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Sample records for therapeutic implications case

  1. Host manipulation by cancer cells: Expectations, facts, and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, Tazzio; Arnal, Audrey; Jacqueline, Camille; Poulin, Robert; Lefèvre, Thierry; Mery, Frédéric; Renaud, François; Roche, Benjamin; Massol, François; Salzet, Michel; Ewald, Paul; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Ujvari, Beata; Thomas, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Similar to parasites, cancer cells depend on their hosts for sustenance, proliferation and reproduction, exploiting the hosts for energy and resources, and thereby impairing their health and fitness. Because of this lifestyle similarity, it is predicted that cancer cells could, like numerous parasitic organisms, evolve the capacity to manipulate the phenotype of their hosts to increase their own fitness. We claim that the extent of this phenomenon and its therapeutic implications are, however, underappreciated. Here, we review and discuss what can be regarded as cases of host manipulation in the context of cancer development and progression. We elaborate on how acknowledging the applicability of these principles can offer novel therapeutic and preventive strategies. The manipulation of host phenotype by cancer cells is one more reason to adopt a Darwinian approach in cancer research. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dermatomyositis and myastenia gravis: An uncommon association with therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Méndez Perles, Clara; Barbadillo, Carmen; Godoy, Hildegarda; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The association of dermatomyositis with myasthenia gravis (MG) is uncommon, having been reported so far in only 26 cases. We report the case of a 69 year-old man diagnosed with MG two years ago and currently treated with piridostigmyne. The patient developed acute proximal weakness, shoulder pain and elevated creatine-kinase (CK). He also developed generalized facial erythema and Gottron's papules. Laboratory tests showed positive antinuclear and anti-Mi2 antibodies. Further analysis confirmed CK levels above 1000 U/l. The clinical management of the patient and the therapeutic implications derived from the coexistence of both entities are discusssed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurosteroids in Schizophrenia: Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HuaLin Cai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurosteroids are a group of important endogenous molecules affecting many neural functions in the brain. Increasing evidence suggests a possible role of these neurosteroids in the pathology and symptomatology of schizophrenia (SZ and other mental disorders. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the neural functions of neurosteroids in the brain, and to evaluate the role of the key neurosteroids as candidate modulators in the etiology and therapeutics of SZ. The present paper provides a brief introduction of neurosteroid metabolism and distribution, followed by a discussion of the mechanisms underlying neurosteroid actions in the brain. The content regarding the modulation of the GABAA receptor is elaborated, given the considerable knowledge of its interactions with other neurotransmitter and neuroprotective systems, as well as its ameliorating effects on stress that may play a role in the SZ pathophysiology. In addition, several preclinical and clinical studies suggested a therapeutic benefit of neurosteroids in SZ patients, even though the presence of altered neurosteroid pathways in the circulating blood and/or brain remains debatable. Following treatment of antipsychotic drugs in SZ, therapeutic benefits have also been linked to the regulation of neurosteroid signaling. Specifically, the neurosteroids such as pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone affect a broad spectrum of behavioral functions through their unique molecular characteristics and may represent innovative therapeutic targets for SZ. Future investigations in larger cohorts with long-term follow-ups will be required to ascertain the neuropsychopharmacological role of this yet unexploited class of neurosteroid agents.

  4. Psychedelics and hypnosis: Commonalities and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemercier, Clément E; Terhune, Devin B

    2018-06-01

    Recent research on psychedelics and hypnosis demonstrates the value of both methods in the treatment of a range of psychopathologies with overlapping applications and neurophenomenological features. The potential of harnessing the power of suggestion to influence the phenomenological response to psychedelics toward more therapeutic action has remained unexplored in recent research and thereby warrants empirical attention. Here we aim to elucidate the phenomenological and neurophysiological similarities and dissimilarities between psychedelic states and hypnosis in order to revisit how contemporary knowledge may inform their conjunct usage in psychotherapy. We review recent advances in phenomenological and neurophysiological research on psychedelics and hypnosis, and we summarize early investigations on the coupling of psychedelics and hypnosis in scientific and therapeutic contexts. Results/outcomes: We highlight commonalities and differences between psychedelics and hypnosis that point to the potential efficacy of combining the two in psychotherapy. We propose multiple research paths for coupling these two phenomena at different stages in the preparation, acute phase and follow-up of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy in order to prepare, guide and integrate the psychedelic experience with the aim of enhancing therapeutic outcomes. Harnessing the power of suggestion to modulate response to psychedelics could enhance their therapeutic efficacy by helping to increase the likelihood of positive responses, including mystical-type experiences.

  5. Pathogenesis of Graves' disease and therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Graves' disease presents itself clinically mainly as hyperthyroidism and infiltrative ophthalmopathy and to a minimal extent also as dermopathy and acropachy. Autoimmune processes are the basic pathogenesis. Stimulating antibodies against the TSH receptor cause hyperthyroidism. Autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes against primarily thyroidal antigens cross-react with similar antigens of the eye muscles and orbital connective tissue, thus spreading the disease from the thyroid to the eyes. The therapeutic goal comprises not only the treatment of hyperthyroidism, but also the induction of a steady immuntolerance in order to minimize the irreversible damage to the eye. The therapeutic armamentarium is formed by antithyroid drugs, glucocorticoids, retrobulbar radition and thyroid ablation, either by nearly total thyroidectomy or by radioiodine. The different indications for both ablative procedures are discussed. (orig.) [de

  6. Tumor dedifferentiation: diagnostic and therapeutic implications

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    Abhimanyu Jha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Some of the neoplasm especially malignant tumors are notorious in masquerading their cell of origin because of additional mutations which drives them to differentiate into unusual phenotype. This is implicated to a phenomenon of tumor dedifferentiation which can mislead into inappropriate categorization and therapy. Dedifferentiation is well recognized in sarcomas such as liposarcoma, chondrosarcoma and MPNST. However, it can also develop in carcinomas, melanomas and lymphomas at initial diagnosis, following therapy or at recurrence.  The phenomenon has been reported in both primary tumors as well as at metastatic foci. A correct and early pathological identification of this phenomenon might profoundly help in guiding appropriate therapy. Clinical and radiological findings, immunohistochemistry and genetic analysis are often required for correct lineage identification of these tumors.

  7. Alexithymia in eating disorders: therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinna F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Federica Pinna, Lucia Sanna, Bernardo Carpiniello Department of Public Health, Clinical and Molecular Medicine - Unit of Psychiatry, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: A high percentage of individuals affected by eating disorders (ED achieve incomplete recovery following treatment. In an attempt to improve treatment outcome, it is crucial that predictors of outcome are identified, and personalized care approaches established in line with new treatment targets, thus facilitating patient access to evidence-based treatments. Among the psychological factors proposed as predictors of outcome in ED, alexithymia is of outstanding interest. The objective of this paper is to undertake a systematic review of the literature relating to alexithymia, specifically in terms of the implications for treatment of ED. In particular, issues concerning the role of alexithymia as a predictor of outcome and as a factor to be taken into account in the choice of treatment will be addressed. The effect of treatments on alexithymia will also be considered. A search of all relevant literature published in English using PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus databases was carried out on the basis of the following keywords: alexithymia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders, and treatment; no time limits were imposed. Despite the clinical relevance of alexithymia, the number of studies published on the above cited aspects is somewhat limited, and these studies are largely heterogeneous and feature significant methodological weaknesses. Overall, data currently available mostly correlate higher levels of alexithymia with a less favorable outcome in ED. Accordingly, alexithymia is seen as a relevant treatment target with the aim of achieving recovery of these patients. Treatments focusing on improving alexithymic traits, and specifically those targeting emotions, seem to show greater efficacy, although alexithymia levels often remain high even after specific

  8. [Diabetic retinopathy: pathogenesis and therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelikánová, Terezie

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) develops in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and is the major cause of vision loss and blindness in the working population. The main risk factor of DR is hyperglycemia accompanied by enhanced mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and hexosamines, increase in polyol metabolism of glucose. The severity of vascular injury depends on the individual genetic background and is modified by other epigenetic, metabolic and haemodynamic factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. In diabetes, damage to the retina occurs in the vasculature (endothelial cells and pericytes), neurons and glia, pigment epithelial cells and infiltrating immunocompetent cells: monocytes, granulocytes, lymfocytes. These activated cells change the production pattern of a number of mediators such as growth factors, proinflammatory cytokines, vasoactive molecules, coagulation factors and adhesion molecules resulting in increased blood flow, increased capillary permeability, proliferation of extracellular matrix and thickening of basal membranes, altered cell turnover (apoptosis, proliferation, hypertrophy), procoagulant and proaggregant pattern, and finally in angiogenesis and tissue remodelling. Brain, liver, adipose tissue, GUT, skeletal muscle and other tissues could be another source of mediators. Therapeutic approaches used for patients with or at risk for diabetic retinopathy include drug therapy to reduce modifiable risk factors, laser photocoagulation, intravitreous administration of anti-VEGF agents/steroids and intraocular surgery. Screening plays an important role in early detection and intervention to prevent the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Described insights into pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for DR, could help in the development of more targeted approach for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy. anti

  9. The therapeutic collaboration in life design counselling: The case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the therapeutic collaboration in a case of Life Design ... In globalised societies, job opportunities and employment conditions are fragile and unstable, requiring ..... balance of therapeutic exchanges involving suppor-.

  10. Understanding music’s therapeutic efficacy: Implications for music education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Thram

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the current era of electronic domination of human experience, be it via cell phone and/or computer addiction, or the ubiquitous television, actual participation in music- making is less and less common for the average person, child or adult. Passive participation through listening is most often cited by people as their major experience with music in their lives. When asked if listening has therapeutic effects, it is rare for anyone to respond in the negative. Likewise, for performers/active participants in music- making, be it solitary or as part of a group, invariably an enhanced sense of well-being from the act of making music is reported. This paper addresses therapeutic aspects of musical participation (singing, clapping, playing an instrument, dancing, listening by providing a historical overview (12th c to present of attitudes toward music’s therapeutic effects. It argues that music exists through the interaction of our biological capacity to make music with our cultural circumstances. How individuals benefit in all aspects their being – physical, mental and emotional – from engaging in the act of making music is illustrated with examples from field research in southern Africa. Finally implications for Music Education are explored which emphasize how more comprehensive integration of music into the curriculum can serve as an antidote to the increasing isolation and alienation of modern life.

  11. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  12. Coronary microvasculopathy in heart transplantation: Consequences and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiati, Alessandra; Tellatin, Sara; Angelini, Annalisa; Iliceto, Sabino; Tona, Francesco

    2014-06-24

    Despite the progress made in the prevention and treatment of rejection of the transplanted heart, cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains the main cause of death in late survival transplanted patients. CAV consists of a progressive diffuse intimal hyperplasia and the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, ending in wall thickening of epicardial vessels, intramyocardial arteries (50-20 μm), arterioles (20-10 μm), and capillaries (system. The non-immunological factors are older donor age, ischemia-reperfusion time, hyperlipidemia and CMV infections. Diagnostic techniques that are able to assess microvascular function are lacking. Intravascular ultrasound and fractional flow reserve, when performed during coronary angiography, are able to detect epicardial coronary artery disease but are not sensitive enough to assess microvascular changes. Some authors have proposed an index of microcirculatory resistance during maximal hyperemia, which is calculated by dividing pressure by flow (distal pressure multiplied by the hyperemic mean transit time). Non-invasive methods to assess coronary physiology are stress echocardiography, coronary flow reserve by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography, single photon emission computed tomography, and perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance. In this review, we intend to analyze the mechanisms, consequences and therapeutic implications of microvascular dysfunction, including an extended citation of relevant literature data.

  13. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Landscape in Lung Cancer: Therapeutical Implications

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    A. Quintanal-Villalonga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease responsible for the most cases of cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients are clinically diagnosed at advanced stages, with a poor survival rate. For this reason, the identification of oncodrivers and novel biomarkers is decisive for the future clinical management of this pathology. The rise of high throughput technologies popularly referred to as “omics” has accelerated the discovery of new biomarkers and drivers for this pathology. Within them, tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs have proven to be of importance as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tools and, due to their molecular nature, as therapeutic targets. Along this review, the role of TKRs in the different lung cancer histologies, research on improvement of anti-TKR therapy, and the current approaches to manage anti-TKR resistance will be discussed.

  14. [Botulism. Therapeutic management. Apropos of 36 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudre, Y; Becq-Giraudon, B; Boutaud, P h

    1975-03-08

    Botulism is relatively common in the Vienne department as we have observed 36 cases over a peroid of 7 years. Other French cases, published over the last 10 years, included 10 to 19 cases in the largest series. In a total of 10 series, there were 105 cases. Botulism is caused, in most cases, by eating ham prepared on the farm. It gives rise to the usual clinical picture including paralysis of accommodation, dysphagia, digestive symptoms with abdominal pain and constipation and finally, bladder paralysis. The mild forms are fairly common. We did not observe any severe cases. Our patients were treated in two homogeneous series of 17 cases each ; two patients were given no treatment. Patients treated by sero-anatoxin therapy according to classical methods, evolved towards a cure within 21 days on average. Patients treated by sulfguanidin were cured within 24 days. This study permitted us to confirm that sero-anatoxin therapy is not essential. The disadvantages are the number of injections, the possibility of sometimes fatal hyper-sensitive reactions which, in the opinion of many authors, justifies routine cover with cortisone. This attitude does not seem to us justified owing to the usually benign nature of the botulism. The treatment with sulfaguanidin is well tolerated and is not of any risk to the patient.

  15. Genital piercings: diagnostic and therapeutic implications for urologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelius, Thomas; Armstrong, Myrna L; Rinard, Katherine; Young, Cathy; Hogan, LaMicha; Angel, Elayne

    2011-11-01

    To provide quantitative and qualitative data that will assist evidence-based decision making for men and women with genital piercings (GP) when they present to urologists in ambulatory clinics or office settings. Currently many persons with GP seek nonmedical advice. A comprehensive 35-year (1975-2010) longitudinal electronic literature search (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, OVID) was conducted for all relevant articles discussing GP. Authors of general body art literature tended to project many GP complications with potential statements of concern, drawing in overall piercings problems; then the information was further replicated. Few studies regarding GP clinical implications were located and more GP assumptions were noted. Only 17 cases, over 17 years, describe specific complications in the peer-reviewed literature, mainly from international sources (75%), and mostly with "Prince Albert" piercings (65%). Three cross-sectional studies provided further self-reported data. Persons with GP still remain a hidden variable so no baseline figures assess the overall GP picture, but this review did gather more evidence about GP wearers and should stimulate further research, rather than collectively projecting general body piercing information onto those with GP. With an increase in GP, urologists need to know the specific differences, medical implications, significant short- and long-term health risks, and patients concerns to treat and counsel patients in a culturally sensitive manner. Targeted educational strategies should be developed. Considering the amount of body modification, including GP, better legislation for public safety is overdue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiple roles and therapeutic implications of Akt signaling in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Calvo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Emiliano Calvo1, Victoria Bolós2, Enrique Grande21Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal (CiOCC, Madrid. Spain; 2Pfizer Oncology, Alcobendas-Madrid, SpainAbstract: The prominence of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in several tumors indicates a relationship with tumor grade and proliferation. Critical cellular processes are driven through this pathway. More detailed knowledge of the pathogenesis of tumors would enable us to design targeted drugs to block both membrane tyrosine kinase receptors and the intracellular kinases involved in the transmission of the signal. The newly approved molecular inhibitors sunitinib (an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and other tyrosine kinase receptors, sorafenib (a serine–threonine kinase inhibitor that acts against B-Raf and temsirolimus (an mTOR inhibitor shown clinical activity in advanced kidney cancer. Chronic myeloid leukemia has changed its natural history thanks to imatinib and dasatinib, both of which inhibit the intracellular bcr/abl protein derived from the alteration in the Philadelphia chromosome. Intracellular pathways are still important in cancer development and their blockade directly affects outcome. Cross-talk has been observed but is not well understood. Vertical and horizontal pathway blockade are promising anticancer strategies. Indeed, preclinical and early clinical data suggest that combining superficial and intracellular blocking agents can synergize and leverage single-agent activity. The implication of the Akt signaling pathway in cancer is well established and has led to the development of new anticancer agents that block its activation.Keywords: Akt, cancer, therapeutic target, Akt inhibitors

  17. Therapeutic Assessment of Complex Trauma: A Single-Case Time-Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarocchi, Anna; Aschieri, Filippo; Fantini, Francesca; Smith, Justin D

    2013-06-01

    The cumulative effect of repeated traumatic experiences in early childhood incrementally increases the risk of adjustment problems later in life. Surviving traumatic environments can lead to the development of an interrelated constellation of emotional and interpersonal symptoms termed complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD). Effective treatment of trauma begins with a multimethod psychological assessment and requires the use of several evidence-based therapeutic processes, including establishing a safe therapeutic environment, reprocessing the trauma, constructing a new narrative, and managing emotional dysregulation. Therapeutic Assessment (TA) is a semistructured, brief intervention that uses psychological testing to promote positive change. The case study of Kelly, a middle-aged woman with a history of repeated interpersonal trauma, illustrates delivery of the TA model for CPTSD. Results of this single-case time-series experiment indicate statistically significant symptom improvement as a result of participating in TA. We discuss the implications of these findings for assessing and treating trauma-related concerns, such as CPTSD.

  18. Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment: Biology and Therapeutic Implications

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    Eunice Yuen-Ting Lau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor consists of heterogeneous cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs that can terminally differentiate into tumor bulk. Normal stem cells in normal organs regulate self-renewal within a stem cell niche. Likewise, accumulating evidence has also suggested that CSCs are maintained extrinsically within the tumor microenvironment, which includes both cellular and physical factors. Here, we review the significance of stromal cells, immune cells, extracellular matrix, tumor stiffness, and hypoxia in regulation of CSC plasticity and therapeutic resistance. With a better understanding of how CSC interacts with its niche, we are able to identify potential therapeutic targets for the development of more effective treatments against cancer.

  19. Understanding Music's Therapeutic Efficacy with Implications for Why Music Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thram, Diane

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I focus on how attention to music's therapeutic efficacy is important to the praxial music education philosophy espoused by Elliott and Silverman. I note, despite the use of the term praxis from Aristotle's philosophy dating back to antiquity, there is no mention in Music Matters 2 of what historical evidence tells us about how…

  20. Internet addiction neuroscientific approaches and therapeutical implications including smartphone addiction

    CERN Document Server

    Reuter, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this successful book provides further and in-depth insight into theoretical models dealing with Internet addiction, as well as includes new therapeutical approaches. The editors also broach the emerging topic of smartphone addiction. This book combines a scholarly introduction with state-of-the-art research in the characterization of Internet addiction. It is intended for a broad audience including scientists, students and practitioners. The first part of the book contains an introduction to Internet addiction and their pathogenesis. The second part of the book is dedicated to an in-depth review of neuroscientific findings which cover studies using a variety of biological techniques including brain imaging and molecular genetics. The third part of the book focuses on therapeutic interventions for Internet addiction. The fourth part of the present book is an extension to the first edition and deals with a new emerging potential disorder related to Internet addiction – smartphone addicti...

  1. Dreams and Psychedelics: Neurophenomenological Comparison and Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenmann, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Background: A resurgence of neurobiological and clinical research is currently underway into the therapeutic potential of serotonergic or ‘classical’ psychedelics such as the prototypical psychedelic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) and ayahuasca – a betacarboline- and dimethyltryptamine (DMT)-containing Amazonian beverage. The aim of this review is to introduce readers to the similarities and dissimilarities between psychedelic states and night dreams and to draw conclusions related to therapeutic applications of psychedelics in psychiatry. Methods: Research literature related to psychedelics and dreaming is reviewed and these two states of consciousness are systematically compared. Relevant conclusions with regard to psychedelic-assisted therapy will be provided. Results: Common features between psychedelic states and night dreams include perception mental imagery emotion activation fear memory extinction and sense of self and body. Differences between these two states are related to differential perceptual input from the environment clarity of consciousness and meta-cognitive abilities. Therefore psychedelic states are closest to lucid dreaming which is characterized by a mixed state of dreaming and waking consciousness Conclusion: The broad overlap between dreaming and psychedelic states supports the notion that psychedelics acutely induce dreamlike subjective experiences which may have long-term beneficial effects on psychosocial functioning and well-being. Future clinical studies should examine how therapeutic outcome is related to the acute dreamlike effects of psychedelics. PMID:28625125

  2. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Bover

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD–MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc., we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions.

  3. Dreams and Psychedelics: Neurophenomenological Comparison and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenmann, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    A resurgence of neurobiological and clinical research is currently underway into the therapeutic potential of serotonergic or 'classical' psychedelics, such as the prototypical psychedelic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,Ndimethyltryptamine), and ayahuasca - a betacarboline- and dimethyltryptamine (DMT)-containing Amazonian beverage. The aim of this review is to introduce readers to the similarities and dissimilarities between psychedelic states and night dreams, and to draw conclusions related to therapeutic applications of psychedelics in psychiatry. Research literature related to psychedelics and dreaming is reviewed, and these two states of consciousness are systematically compared. Relevant conclusions with regard to psychedelicassisted therapy will be provided. Common features between psychedelic states and night dreams include perception, mental imagery, emotion activation, fear memory extinction, and sense of self and body. Differences between these two states are related to differential perceptual input from the environment, clarity of consciousness and meta-cognitive abilities. Therefore, psychedelic states are closest to lucid dreaming which is characterized by a mixed state of dreaming and waking consciousness. The broad overlap between dreaming and psychedelic states supports the notion that psychedelics acutely induce dreamlike subjective experiences which may have long-term beneficial effects on psychosocial functioning and well-being. Future clinical studies should examine how therapeutic outcome is related to the acute dreamlike effects of psychedelics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Implication of fractionated dose exposures in therapeutic gain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy pursues killing tumor cells while sparing normal cells from the radiation exposure. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a cancer treatment modality that delivers a high dose in a single operation. This high-dose single operation shortens the treatment course, but can increase the risk of normal cell damage. Normal cell damage can be reduced by employing multi-directional exposures for an increasing number of isocenters. In this study, we investigated whether therapeutic benefits would be expected by employing new dose fractionation patterns at a high-dose single operation. The conventional single-dose operation in brain tumor radiosurgery is performed by delivering fractionated uniform doses. According to Figs. 2 and 3, the conventional radiosurgery might have obtained some therapeutic benefit by employing the fractionated uniform-dose exposures instead of a single-dose exposure. We suggest that further therapeutic gain be expected by employing the fractionated radiation exposures in an increasing dose pattern. Until ensuring our suggestion, the significance in gain of cell surviving should be verified for all three dose patterns with both normal and tumor cells. The investigation whether normal and tumor cells show the same responses to the fractionated dose exposures at lower and higher than 15 Gy of total dose is also reserved for future work

  5. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Górriz, José Luis; Lloret, María Jesús; da Silva, Iara; Ruiz-García, César; Chang, Pamela; Rodríguez, Mariano; Ballarín, José

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD-MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating) its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc.), we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells—Biology and Therapeutic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürsel, Demirkan B.; Shin, Benjamin J.; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Schlaff, Cody D.; Boockvar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem-cell hypothesis proposes that malignant tumors are likely to encompass a cellular hierarchy that parallels normal tissue and may be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in patients. The purpose of this manuscript is to review methods for optimizing the derivation and culturing of stem-like cells also known as tumor stem cells (TSCs) from patient-derived GBM tissue samples. The hallmarks of TSCs are that they must be able to self-renew and retain tumorigenicity. The isolation, optimization and derivation of TSCs as outlined in this review, will be important in understanding biology and therapeutic applications related to these cells

  7. BRAF V600E mutations are common in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Dias-Santagata

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA is low-grade glial neoplasm principally affecting children and young adults. Approximately 40% of PXA are reported to recur within 10 years of primary resection. Upon recurrence, patients receive radiation therapy and conventional chemotherapeutics designed for high-grade gliomas. Genetic changes that can be targeted by selective therapeutics have not been extensively evaluated in PXA and ancillary diagnostic tests to help discriminate PXA from other pleomorphic and often more aggressive astrocytic malignancies are limited. In this study, we apply the SNaPshot multiplexed targeted sequencing platform in the analysis of brain tumors to interrogate 60 genetic loci that are frequently mutated in 15 cancer genes. In our analysis we detect BRAF V600E mutations in 12 of 20 (60% WHO grade II PXA, in 1 of 6 (17% PXA with anaplasia and in 1 glioblastoma arising in a PXA. Phospho-ERK was detected in all tumors independent of the BRAF mutation status. BRAF duplication was not detected in any of the PXA cases. BRAF V600E mutations were identified in only 2 of 71 (2.8% glioblastoma (GBM analyzed, including 1 of 9 (11.1% giant cell GBM (gcGBM. The finding that BRAF V600E mutations are common in the majority of PXA has important therapeutic implications and may help in differentiating less aggressive PXAs from lethal gcGBMs and GBMs.

  8. Necroptosis: Modules and molecular switches with therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Deepika; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2017-06-01

    Among the various programmed cell death (PCD) pathways, "Necroptosis" has gained much importance as a novel paradigm of cell death. This pathway has emerged as a backup mechanism when physiologically conserved PCD (apoptosis) is non-functional either genetically or pathogenically. The expanding spectrum of necroptosis from physiological development to diverse patho-physiological disorders, including xenobiotics-mediated toxicity has now grabbed the attention worldwide. The efficient role of necroptosis regulators in disease development and management are under constant examination. In fact, few regulators (e.g. MLKL) have already paved their way towards clinical trials and others are in queue. In this review, emphasis has been paid to the various contributing factors and molecular switches that can regulate necroptosis. Here we linked the overview of current knowledge of this enigmatic signaling with magnitude of therapeutics that may underpin the opportunities for novel therapeutic approaches to suppress the pathogenesis of necroptosis-driven disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Exosomes as a tumor immune escape mechanism: possible therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Harold H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in cancer therapy have been substantial in terms of molecular understanding of disease mechanisms, however these advances have not translated into increased survival in the majority of cancer types. One unsolved problem in current cancer therapeutics is the substantial immune suppression seen in patients. Conventionally, investigations in this area have focused on antigen-nonspecific immune suppressive molecules such as cytokines and T cell apoptosis inducing molecules such as Fas ligand. More recently, studies have demonstrated nanovesicle particles termed exosomes are involved not only in stimulation but also inhibition of immunity in physiological conditions. Interestingly, exosomes secreted by cancer cells have been demonstrated to express tumor antigens, as well as immune suppressive molecules such as PD-1L and FasL. Concentrations of exosomes from plasma of cancer patients have been associated with spontaneous T cell apoptosis, which is associated in some situations with shortened survival. In this paper we place the "exosome-immune suppression" concept in perspective of other tumor immune evasion mechanisms. We conclude by discussing a novel therapeutic approach to cancer immune suppression by extracorporeal removal of exosomes using hollow fiber filtration technology

  10. Small molecule modulators of epigenetic modifications: implications in therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruthrotha Selvi, B.; Senapati, Parijat; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex and a dynamic entity that regulates the spatio-temporal expression of genes in response to the intracellular and extracellular signals. This dynamicity is maintained by several factors, including the chromatin modifying Machineries. Chromatin modifying enzymes (for example, lysine (K) acetyl transferases for acetylation, lysine and arginine (R) methyltransferases for methylation, etc.) by virtue of their modifying abilities of both histones and the non histone components, are vital regulatory factors for gene expression both in physiological as well as pathophysiological conditions. Hence the modulators (inhibitors/activators) of these enzymes, which are capable of altering the gene expression globally, could also be useful in understanding the epigenetic mechanism of gene expression as well as for therapeutic purposes. We have found that acetylation of histone chaperone NPM1 and histones is essential for chromatin-mediated transcriptional activation. Remarkably, NPM1 as well as histones get hyperacetylated predominantly in oral cancer patient samples. We identified NPM1 as a positive regulator of the KAT, p300 autoacetylation, the possible causal mechanism of hyperacetylation. Targeting the acetylation by a water-soluble KAT inhibitor, CTK7A in oral tumour xenografted mice, we could demonstrate that the tumour growth could indeed be retarded upon the inhibition of KAT autoacetylation. Presently, we are studying the histone modification language in oral cancer, especially in the context of acetylation and methylation which could be potential targets for combinatorial epigenetic therapeutics. (author)

  11. Characterization of acetate transport in colorectal cancer cells and potential therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Suellen; Azevedo-Silva, João; Casal, Margarida; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Baltazar, Fatima; Preto, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Acetate, together with other short chain fatty acids has been implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention/therapy. Acetate was shown to induce apoptosis in CRC cells. The precise mechanism underlying acetate transport across CRC cells membrane, that may be implicated in its selectivity towards CRC cells, is not fully understood and was addressed here. We also assessed the effect of acetate in CRC glycolytic metabolism and explored its use in combination with the glycolytic inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3BP). We provide evidence that acetate enters CRC cells by the secondary active transporters MCT1 and/or MCT2 and SMCT1 as well as by facilitated diffusion via aquaporins. CRC cell exposure to acetate upregulates the expression of MCT1, MCT4 and CD147, while promoting MCT1 plasma membrane localization. We also observed that acetate increases CRC cell glycolytic phenotype and that acetate-induced apoptosis and anti-proliferative effect was potentiated by 3BP. Our data suggest that acetate selectivity towards CRC cells might be explained by the fact that aquaporins and MCTs are found overexpressed in CRC clinical cases. Our work highlights the importance that acetate transport regulation has in the use of drugs such as 3BP as a new therapeutic strategy for CRC. PMID:28874966

  12. Immunogenomic Classification of Colorectal Cancer and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Roelands

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The immune system has a substantial effect on colorectal cancer (CRC progression. Additionally, the response to immunotherapeutics and conventional treatment options (e.g., chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies is influenced by the immune system. The molecular characterization of colorectal cancer (CRC has led to the identification of favorable and unfavorable immunological attributes linked to clinical outcome. With the definition of consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs based on transcriptomic profiles, multiple characteristics have been proposed to be responsible for the development of the tumor immune microenvironment and corresponding mechanisms of immune escape. In this review, a detailed description of proposed immune phenotypes as well as their interaction with different therapeutic modalities will be provided. Finally, possible strategies to shift the CRC immune phenotype towards a reactive, anti-tumor orientation are proposed per CMS.

  13. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  14. The human gut microbiota and virome: Potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpellini, Emidio; Ianiro, Gianluca; Attili, Fabia; Bassanelli, Chiara; De Santis, Adriano; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Human gut microbiota is a complex ecosystem with several functions integrated in the host organism (metabolic, immune, nutrients absorption, etc.). Human microbiota is composed by bacteria, yeasts, fungi and, last but not least, viruses, whose composition has not been completely described. According to previous evidence on pathogenic viruses, the human gut harbours plant-derived viruses, giant viruses and, only recently, abundant bacteriophages. New metagenomic methods have allowed to reconstitute entire viral genomes from the genetic material spread in the human gut, opening new perspectives on the understanding of the gut virome composition, the importance of gut microbiome, and potential clinical applications. This review reports the latest evidence on human gut "virome" composition and its function, possible future therapeutic applications in human health in the context of the gut microbiota, and attempts to clarify the role of the gut "virome" in the larger microbial ecosystem. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound in gastroenterology: from diagnosis to therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekky, Mohamed A; Abbas, Wael A

    2014-06-28

    Since its advent in 1980, the scope of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has grown to include a wide range of indications, and it is now being incorporated as an integral part of everyday practice in the field of gastroenterology. Its use is extending from an adjuvant imaging aid to utilization as a therapeutic tool for various gastrointestinal disorders. EUS was first used to visualize remote organs, such as the pancreas and abdominal lymph nodes. When fine needle aspiration was introduced, the indications for EUS expanded to include tissue sampling for diagnostic purposes. At the same time, the needle can be used to convey a potential therapy to the internal organs, allowing access to remote sites. In this review, we aim to highlight the expanding spectrum of EUS indications and uses in the field of gastroenterology.

  16. Therapeutic implications of manipulating and mining the microbiota.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-09-01

    The gut microbiota is increasingly recognized as a health asset but occasionally is a contributor to the pathogenesis of both gastrointestinal and certain extra-intestinal disorders. This is driving research interest, the pace of which has been greatly facilitated by new molecular technologies for studying mixed microbial populations, including the non-cultivable sector. In addition, it appears that elements of a modern lifestyle such as diet, domestic hygiene, urbanization, antibiotic usage and family size, may represent proxy markers of environmental influence on the composition of the microbiota colonizing the host in early life. While manipulation of the microbiota has become a therapeutic strategy in certain clinical disorders, the prospect of mining host-microbe-dietary interactions for novel drug discovery may become an even more intriguing reality.

  17. Breast cancer lung metastasis: Molecular biology and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liting; Han, Bingchen; Siegel, Emily; Cui, Yukun; Giuliano, Armando; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2018-03-26

    Distant metastasis accounts for the vast majority of deaths in patients with cancer. Breast cancer exhibits a distinct metastatic pattern commonly involving bone, liver, lung, and brain. Breast cancer can be divided into different subtypes based on gene expression profiles, and different breast cancer subtypes show preference to distinct organ sites of metastasis. Luminal breast tumors tend to metastasize to bone while basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) displays a lung tropism of metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying this organ-specific pattern of metastasis still remain to be elucidated. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances regarding the molecular signaling pathways as well as the therapeutic strategies for treating breast cancer lung metastasis.

  18. Ovarian steroids, stem cells and uterine leiomyoma: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravek, Molly B; Yin, Ping; Ono, Masanori; Coon, John S; Dyson, Matthew T; Navarro, Antonia; Marsh, Erica E; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Kim, J Julie; Wei, Jian-Jun; Bulun, Serdar E

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor in women and is thought to arise from the clonal expansion of a single myometrial smooth muscle cell transformed by a cellular insult. Leiomyomas cause a variety of symptoms, including abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain, bladder or bowel dysfunction, and recurrent pregnancy loss, and are the most common indication for hysterectomy in the USA. A slow rate of cell proliferation, combined with the production of copious amounts of extracellular matrix, accounts for tumor expansion. A common salient feature of leiomyomas is their responsiveness to steroid hormones, thus providing an opportunity for intervention. A comprehensive search of PUBMED was conducted to identify peer-reviewed literature published since 1980 pertinent to the roles of steroid hormones and somatic stem cells in leiomyoma, including literature on therapeutics that target steroid hormone action in leiomyoma. Reviewed articles were restricted to English language only. Studies in both animals and humans were reviewed for the manuscript. Estrogen stimulates the growth of leiomyomas, which are exposed to this hormone not only through ovarian steroidogenesis, but also through local conversion of androgens by aromatase within the tumors themselves. The primary action of estrogen, together with its receptor estrogen receptor α (ERα), is likely mediated via induction of progesterone receptor (PR) expression, thereby allowing leiomyoma responsiveness to progesterone. Progesterone has been shown to stimulate the growth of leiomyoma through a set of key genes that regulate both apoptosis and proliferation. Given these findings, aromatase inhibitors and antiprogestins have been developed for the treatment of leiomyoma, but neither treatment results in complete regression of leiomyoma, and tumors recur after treatment is stopped. Recently, distinct cell populations were discovered in leiomyomas; a small population showed stem-progenitor cell properties, and

  19. Astroglial networks and implications for therapeutic neuromodulation of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Witcher

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common chronic neurologic disorder affecting approximately 1 percent of the world population. More than one-third of all epilepsy patients have incompletely controlled seizures or debilitating medication side effects in spite of optimal medical management. Medically refractory epilepsy is associated with excess injury and mortality, psychosocial dysfunction, and significant cognitive impairment. Effective treatment options for these patients can be limited. The cellular mechanisms underlying seizure activity are incompletely understood, though we here describe multiple lines of evidence supporting the likely contribution of astroglia to epilepsy, with focus on individual astrocytes and their network functions. Of the emerging therapeutic modalities for epilepsy, one of the most intriguing is the field of neuromodulation. Neuromodulatory treatment, which consists of administering electrical pulses to neural tissue to modulate its activity leading to a beneficial effect, may be an option for these patients. Current modalities consist of vagal nerve stimulation, open and closed loop stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Due to their unique properties, we here present astrocytes as likely important targets for the developing field of neuromodulation in the treatment of epilepsy.

  20. Astroglial networks and implications for therapeutic neuromodulation of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Mark R; Ellis, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common chronic neurologic disorder affecting approximately 1% of the world population. More than one-third of all epilepsy patients have incompletely controlled seizures or debilitating medication side effects in spite of optimal medical management. Medically refractory epilepsy is associated with excess injury and mortality, psychosocial dysfunction, and significant cognitive impairment. Effective treatment options for these patients can be limited. The cellular mechanisms underlying seizure activity are incompletely understood, though we here describe multiple lines of evidence supporting the likely contribution of astroglia to epilepsy, with focus on individual astrocytes and their network functions. Of the emerging therapeutic modalities for epilepsy, one of the most intriguing is the field of neuromodulation. Neuromodulatory treatment, which consists of administering electrical pulses to neural tissue to modulate its activity leading to a beneficial effect, may be an option for these patients. Current modalities consist of vagal nerve stimulation, open and closed-loop stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Due to their unique properties, we here present astrocytes as likely important targets for the developing field of neuromodulation in the treatment of epilepsy.

  1. Metabolic actions of FGF21: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Ge

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is an atypical member of the FGF family that functions as an endocrine factor. In obese animals, elevation of plasma FGF21 levels by either pharmacological or genetic approaches reduces body weight, decreases hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, alleviates fatty liver and increases insulin sensitivity. FGF21 exerts its pleiotropic metabolic effects through its actions on multiple targets, including adipose tissue, liver, brain and pancreas. The expression of FGF21 is under the control of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα. A growing body of evidence suggests that the metabolic benefits of these two nuclear receptors are mediated in part by induction of FGF21. In humans, plasma levels of FGF21 are elevated in obese subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes, but are reduced in patients with autoimmune diabetes. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the physiological roles of FGF21 and the molecular pathways underlying its actions, and also discusses the future prospective of developing FGF21 or its agonists as therapeutic agents for obesity-related medical complications.

  2. Angiotensin receptor blockers & endothelial dysfunction: Possible correlation & therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Radenkovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium is one of the most important constituents of vascular homeostasis, which is achieved through continual and balanced production of different relaxing and contractile factors. When there is a pathological disturbance in release of these products, endothelial dysfunction (ED will probably occur. ED is considered to be the initial step in the development of atherosclerosis. This pathological activation and inadequate functioning of endothelial cells was shown to be to some extent a reversible process, which all together resulted in increased interest in investigation of different beneficial treatment options. To this point, the pharmacological approach, including for example, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or statins, was clearly shown to be effective in the improvement of ED. One of many critical issues underlying ED represents instability in the balance between nitric oxide and angiotensin II (Ang II production. Considering that Ang II was confirmed to be important for the development of ED, the aim of this review article was to summarize the findings of up to date clinical studies associated with therapeutic application of angiotensin receptor blockers and improvement in ED. In addition, it was of interest to review the pleiotropic actions of angiotensin receptor blockers linked to the improvement of ED. The prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo or active-controlled clinical trials were identified and selected for the final evaluation.

  3. Innovations in monoclonal antibody tumor targeting; Diagnostic and therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlom, J.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of carcinoma lesions not identified by conventional radiological and physical examinations remains a major problem in the treatment of many carcinomas. This article reviews potential new modalities and areas of research for carcinoma diagnosis and treatment. A case history is presented

  4. Respiratory manifestations of panic disorder: causes, consequences and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Aline; Freire, Rafael Christophe da Rocha; Zin, Walter Araújo; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2009-07-01

    Multiple respiratory abnormalities can be found in anxiety disorders, especially in panic disorder (PD). Individuals with PD experience unexpected panic attacks, characterized by anxiety and fear, resulting in a number of autonomic and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory stimulation is a common event during panic attacks. The respiratory abnormality most often reported in PD patients is increased CO2 sensitivity, which has given rise to the hypothesis of fundamental abnormalities in the physiological mechanisms that control breathing in PD. There is evidence that PD patients with dominant respiratory symptoms are more sensitive to respiratory tests than are those who do not manifest such symptoms, and that the former group constitutes a distinct subtype. Patients with PD tend to hyperventilate and to panic in response to respiratory stimulants such as CO2, triggering the activation of a hypersensitive fear network. Although respiratory physiology seems to remain normal in these subjects, recent evidence supports the idea that they present subclinical abnormalities in respiration and in other functions related to body homeostasis. The fear network, composed of the hippocampus, the medial prefrontal cortex, the amygdala and its brain stem projections, might be oversensitive in PD patients. This theory might explain why medication and cognitive-behavioral therapy are both clearly effective. Our aim was to review the relationship between respiration and PD, addressing the respiratory subtype of PD and the hyperventilation syndrome, with a focus on respiratory challenge tests, as well as on the current mechanistic concepts and the pharmacological implications of this relationship.

  5. Implication of Heat Shock Factors in Tumorigenesis: Therapeutical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thonel, Aurelie de; Mezger, Valerie; Garrido, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Heat Shock Factors (HSF) form a family of transcription factors (four in mammals) which were named according to the discovery of their activation by a heat shock. HSFs trigger the expression of genes encoding Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) that function as molecular chaperones, contributing to establish a cytoprotective state to various proteotoxic stresses and in pathological conditions. Increasing evidence indicates that this ancient transcriptional protective program acts genome-widely and performs unexpected functions in the absence of experimentally defined stress. Indeed, HSFs are able to re-shape cellular pathways controlling longevity, growth, metabolism and development. The most well studied HSF, HSF1, has been found at elevated levels in tumors with high metastatic potential and is associated with poor prognosis. This is partly explained by the above-mentioned cytoprotective (HSP-dependent) function that may enable cancer cells to adapt to the initial oncogenic stress and to support malignant transformation. Nevertheless, HSF1 operates as major multifaceted enhancers of tumorigenesis through, not only the induction of classical heat shock genes, but also of “non-classical” targets. Indeed, in cancer cells, HSF1 regulates genes involved in core cellular functions including proliferation, survival, migration, protein synthesis, signal transduction, and glucose metabolism, making HSF1 a very attractive target in cancer therapy. In this review, we describe the different physiological roles of HSFs as well as the recent discoveries in term of non-cogenic potential of these HSFs, more specifically associated to the activation of “non-classical” HSF target genes. We also present an update on the compounds with potent HSF1-modulating activity of potential interest as anti-cancer therapeutic agents

  6. Implication of Heat Shock Factors in Tumorigenesis: Therapeutical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thonel, Aurelie de [INSERM U866, Dijon (France); Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Burgundy, 21033 Dijon (France); Mezger, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.mezger@univ-paris-diderot.fr [CNRS, UMR7216 Epigenetics and Cell Fate, Paris (France); University Paris Diderot, 75013 Paris (France); Garrido, Carmen, E-mail: valerie.mezger@univ-paris-diderot.fr [INSERM U866, Dijon (France); Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Burgundy, 21033 Dijon (France); CHU, Dijon BP1542, Dijon (France)

    2011-03-07

    Heat Shock Factors (HSF) form a family of transcription factors (four in mammals) which were named according to the discovery of their activation by a heat shock. HSFs trigger the expression of genes encoding Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) that function as molecular chaperones, contributing to establish a cytoprotective state to various proteotoxic stresses and in pathological conditions. Increasing evidence indicates that this ancient transcriptional protective program acts genome-widely and performs unexpected functions in the absence of experimentally defined stress. Indeed, HSFs are able to re-shape cellular pathways controlling longevity, growth, metabolism and development. The most well studied HSF, HSF1, has been found at elevated levels in tumors with high metastatic potential and is associated with poor prognosis. This is partly explained by the above-mentioned cytoprotective (HSP-dependent) function that may enable cancer cells to adapt to the initial oncogenic stress and to support malignant transformation. Nevertheless, HSF1 operates as major multifaceted enhancers of tumorigenesis through, not only the induction of classical heat shock genes, but also of “non-classical” targets. Indeed, in cancer cells, HSF1 regulates genes involved in core cellular functions including proliferation, survival, migration, protein synthesis, signal transduction, and glucose metabolism, making HSF1 a very attractive target in cancer therapy. In this review, we describe the different physiological roles of HSFs as well as the recent discoveries in term of non-cogenic potential of these HSFs, more specifically associated to the activation of “non-classical” HSF target genes. We also present an update on the compounds with potent HSF1-modulating activity of potential interest as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  7. Protein Changes in Sulfur Mustard Exposure: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, P.; Jin, X.; Ray, R.

    2007-01-01

    Laminin-5, a heterotrimer of laminin α3, β3, and γ2 subunits, is a component of the skin basal epithelium. Laminin-5 functions as a ligand of the α3β1 and α6β4 integrins in epidermal keratinocytes to regulate cell adhesion, migration, morphogenesis, and assembly of basement membranes; thus it is essential for a stable attachment of the epidermis to the dermis and recovery of damaged skin. Sulfur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, is a vesicant chemical warfare and terrorism agent. Skin exposure to SM results in fluid-filled blisters; proposed mechanisms are inflammation, protease stimulation, basal cell death, and separation of the epidermis from the dermis apparently due to the degradation of attachment proteins like laminin-5. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SM exposure on the degradation of laminin-5 by exposing normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) to SM (0-300 μM, 1-24 hours). We found that SM degraded laminin-5 and its two subunits β3 and γ2, but not α3. Preincubation of cells with a serine protease inhibitor (PMSF), or a metalloprotease inhibitor (1, 10-phenanthroline) prior to SM exposure partially prevented SM-induced degradation of laminin-5 subunits, β3 and γ2. Regarding specificity, laminin-5 γ2 was degraded due to a bifunctional mustard compound like SM, but not due to the other alkylating agents tested. Our results support that laminin-5 degradation is an important mechanism of SM injury as well as a useful biomarker of SM exposure. This knowledge of the mechanism of laminin-5 degradation due to SM has potential application in developing cutaneous therapeutics against SM.(author)

  8. Nosocomial septicemia and therapeutic angiography. Report of four cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Ph.; Reizine, D.; Merland, J.J.; Guerin, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Therapeutic angiography may be responsible for rare, but serious infectious complications.The authors report 4 cases occurring immediately following angiography. Three modes of contamination are proposed. Contamination by material used during the angiography is due to multiresistant hospital organisms. Penetration of cutaneous organisms into the circulation from the puncture site and bacterial contamination of a focus of tissue necrosis distal to the embolisation explain the other cases. Curative treatment is difficult because of the possibility of contamination of the embolisation material. Prophylactic treatment is essential and consists of respect of the rules of surgical asepsis, bacteriological control of the fluids used and eradication of adjacent septic foci. Routine antibiotic prophylaxis has yet to be evaluated [fr

  9. The therapeutic collaboration in life design counselling: The case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The collaboration coding system enables the assessment of each therapeutic exchange within and outside of the client's therapeutic zone of proximal development, defined as the space between the client's actual therapeutic developmental level and his/her potential developmental level fomented by a collaborative ...

  10. Pancreas divisum: Analysis and therapeutic alternatives with a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokić Radoica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreas divisum is a relatively common pancreatic duct anatomic variant, firstly described in the 17th century. Case report. We reported a 2-year-old child admitted to the Pediatric Clinic with breathing difficulties and abdominal pains. Examination and X-ray image, showed a vast right hydrothorax containing rusty coloured solution with a high degree of amylase. Ultrasound and computed tomography examination revealed pancreatic polycyclic pseudocysts; following magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP, the diagnosis of pancreas divisum was confirmed. The general condition of the patient worsened, requiring an urgent operation. External drainage of the perforated pancreatic pseudocyst was performed. Following external fistula maturation, a change from external to internal drainage was performed using Roux-en-Y fistulojejunostomy. A 3-year postoperative period was uneventful. Conclusion. Pancreas divisum cases are unique requiring clinical experience, rational approach, and complex multimodal management. MRCP is a valuable diagnostic method. Amongst therapeutic options, outer and internal drainage can be seen as reliable methods. Further investigations are absolutely required to determine practical and appropriate conclusions.

  11. Oocyte activation and phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ: diagnostic and therapeutic implications for assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan Walaa M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infertility affects one in seven couples globally and has recently been classified as a disease by the World Health Organisation (WHO. While in-vitro fertilisation (IVF offers effective treatment for many infertile couples, cases exhibiting severe male infertility (19–57% often remain difficult, if not impossible to treat. In such cases, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, a technique in which a single sperm is microinjected into the oocyte, is implemented. However, 1–5% of ICSI cycles still fail to fertilise, affecting over 1000 couples per year in the UK alone. Pregnancy and delivery rates for IVF and ICSI rarely exceed 30% and 23% respectively. It is therefore imperative that Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART protocols are constantly modified by associated research programmes, in order to provide patients with the best chances of conception. Prior to fertilisation, mature oocytes are arrested in the metaphase stage of the second meiotic division (MII, which must be alleviated to allow the cell cycle, and subsequent embryogenesis, to proceed. Alleviation occurs through a series of concurrent events, collectively termed ‘oocyte activation’. In mammals, oocytes are activated by a series of intracellular calcium (Ca2+ oscillations following gamete fusion. Recent evidence implicates a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ, introduced into the oocyte following membrane fusion as the factor responsible. This review summarises our current understanding of oocyte activation failure in human males, and describes recent advances in our knowledge linking certain cases of male infertility with defects in PLCζ expression and activity. Systematic literature searches were performed using PubMed and the ISI-Web of Knowledge. Databases compiled by the United Nations and World Health Organisation databases (UNWHO, and the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA were also scrutinised. It is clear that PLCζ plays a

  12. Oocyte activation and phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ): diagnostic and therapeutic implications for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Walaa M; Kashir, Junaid; Jones, Celine; Coward, Kevin

    2012-07-09

    Infertility affects one in seven couples globally and has recently been classified as a disease by the World Health Organisation (WHO). While in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) offers effective treatment for many infertile couples, cases exhibiting severe male infertility (19-57%) often remain difficult, if not impossible to treat. In such cases, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), a technique in which a single sperm is microinjected into the oocyte, is implemented. However, 1-5% of ICSI cycles still fail to fertilise, affecting over 1000 couples per year in the UK alone. Pregnancy and delivery rates for IVF and ICSI rarely exceed 30% and 23% respectively. It is therefore imperative that Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) protocols are constantly modified by associated research programmes, in order to provide patients with the best chances of conception. Prior to fertilisation, mature oocytes are arrested in the metaphase stage of the second meiotic division (MII), which must be alleviated to allow the cell cycle, and subsequent embryogenesis, to proceed. Alleviation occurs through a series of concurrent events, collectively termed 'oocyte activation'. In mammals, oocytes are activated by a series of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) oscillations following gamete fusion. Recent evidence implicates a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ), introduced into the oocyte following membrane fusion as the factor responsible. This review summarises our current understanding of oocyte activation failure in human males, and describes recent advances in our knowledge linking certain cases of male infertility with defects in PLCζ expression and activity. Systematic literature searches were performed using PubMed and the ISI-Web of Knowledge. Databases compiled by the United Nations and World Health Organisation databases (UNWHO), and the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA) were also scrutinised. It is clear that PLCζ plays a fundamental role in the

  13. Emerging Role and Therapeutic Implication of Wnt Signaling Pathways in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Juan; Chi, Shuhong; Xue, Jing; Yang, Jiali; Li, Feng; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a key role in many biological aspects, such as cellular proliferation, tissue regeneration, embryonic development, and other systemic effects. Under a physiological condition, it is tightly controlled at different layers and arrays, and a dysregulated activation of this signaling has been implicated into the pathogenesis of various human disorders, including autoimmune diseases. Despite the fact that therapeutic interventions are available for ameliorating disease manifestations, there is no curative therapy currently available for autoimmune disorders. Increasing lines of evidence have suggested a crucial role of Wnt signaling during the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases; in addition, some of microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, noncoding RNA molecules capable of transcriptionally regulating gene expression, have also recently been demonstrated to possess both physiological and pathological roles in autoimmune diseases by regulating the Wnt signaling pathway. This review summarizes currently our understanding of the pathogenic roles of Wnt signaling in several major autoimmune disorders and miRNAs, those targeting Wnt signaling in autoimmune diseases, with a focus on the implication of the Wnt signaling as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in immune diseases, as well as miRNA-mediated regulation of Wnt signaling activation in the development of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27110577

  14. Emerging Role and Therapeutic Implication of Wnt Signaling Pathways in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt signaling pathway plays a key role in many biological aspects, such as cellular proliferation, tissue regeneration, embryonic development, and other systemic effects. Under a physiological condition, it is tightly controlled at different layers and arrays, and a dysregulated activation of this signaling has been implicated into the pathogenesis of various human disorders, including autoimmune diseases. Despite the fact that therapeutic interventions are available for ameliorating disease manifestations, there is no curative therapy currently available for autoimmune disorders. Increasing lines of evidence have suggested a crucial role of Wnt signaling during the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases; in addition, some of microRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small, noncoding RNA molecules capable of transcriptionally regulating gene expression, have also recently been demonstrated to possess both physiological and pathological roles in autoimmune diseases by regulating the Wnt signaling pathway. This review summarizes currently our understanding of the pathogenic roles of Wnt signaling in several major autoimmune disorders and miRNAs, those targeting Wnt signaling in autoimmune diseases, with a focus on the implication of the Wnt signaling as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in immune diseases, as well as miRNA-mediated regulation of Wnt signaling activation in the development of autoimmune diseases.

  15. BET inhibitors in metastatic prostate cancer: therapeutic implications and rational drug combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, Mark C; De Marzo, Angelo M; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2017-12-01

    The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of proteins are epigenetic readers of acetylated histones regulating a vast network of protein expression across many different cancers. Therapeutic targeting of BET is an attractive area of clinical development for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), particularly due to its putative effect on c-MYC expression and its interaction with the androgen receptor (AR). Areas covered: We speculate that a combination approach using inhibitors of BET proteins (BETi) with other targeted therapies may be required to improve the therapeutic index of BET inhibition in the management of prostate cancer. Preclinical data has identified several molecular targets that may enhance the effect of BET inhibition in the clinic. This review will summarize the known preclinical data implicating BET as an important therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancer, highlight the ongoing clinical trials targeting this protein family, and speculate on rationale combination strategies using BETi together with other agents in prostate cancer. A literature search using Pubmed was performed for this review. Expert opinion: Use of BETi in the treatment of mCRPC patients may require the addition of a second novel agent.

  16. Mechanisms and consequences of oxidative stress in lung disease: therapeutic implications for an aging populace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Louise

    2018-04-01

    The rapid expansion of the elderly population has led to the recent epidemic of age-related diseases, including increased incidence and mortality of chronic and acute lung diseases. Numerous studies have implicated aging and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases; however, despite recent advances in these fields, the specific contributions of aging and oxidative stress remain elusive. This review will discuss the consequences of aging on lung morphology and physiology, and how redox imbalance with aging contributes to lung disease susceptibility. Here, we focus on three lung diseases for which aging is a significant risk factor: acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Preclinical and clinical development for redox- and senescence-altering therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as scientific advancements that may direct current and future therapeutic development. A deeper understanding of how aging impacts normal lung function, redox balance, and injury-repair processes will inspire the development of new therapies to prevent and/or reverse age-associated pulmonary diseases, and ultimately increase health span and longevity. This review is intended to encourage basic, clinical, and translational research that will bridge knowledge gaps at the intersection of aging, oxidative stress, and lung disease to fuel the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for lung diseases that disproportionately afflict the elderly.

  17. Recent Advances in Developing Inhibitors for Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylases and Their Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs are members of the 2-oxoglutarate dependent non-heme iron dioxygenases. Due to their physiological roles in regulation of HIF-1α stability, many efforts have been focused on searching for selective PHD inhibitors to control HIF-1α levels for therapeutic applications. In this review, we first describe the structure of PHD2 as a molecular basis for structure-based drug design (SBDD and various experimental methods developed for measuring PHD activity. We further discuss the current status of the development of PHD inhibitors enabled by combining SBDD approaches with high-throughput screening. Finally, we highlight the clinical implications of small molecule PHD inhibitors.

  18. Heat Shock Proteins: Pathogenic Role in Atherosclerosis and Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Kilic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are a highly conserved group of proteins that are constitutively expressed and function as molecular chaperones, aiding in protein folding and preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. In the arterial wall, HSPs have a protective role under normal physiologic conditions. In disease states, however, HSPs expressed on the vascular endothelial cell surface can act as targets for detrimental autoimmunity due to their highly conserved sequences. Developing therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis based on HSPs is challenged by the need to balance such physiologic and pathologic roles of these proteins. This paper summarizes the role of HSPs in normal vascular wall processes as well as in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The potential implications of HSPs in clinical therapies for atherosclerosis are also discussed.

  19. Intestinal permeability and its regulation by zonulin: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-10-01

    One of the most important and overlooked functions of the gastrointestinal tract is to provide a dynamic barrier to tightly controlled antigen trafficking through both the transcellular and paracellular pathways. Intercellular tight junctions (TJ) are the key structures regulating paracellular trafficking of macromolecules. Although steady progress has been made in understanding TJ ultrastructure, relatively little is known about their pathophysiological regulation. Our discovery of zonulin, the only known physiological modulator of intercellular TJ described so far, increased understanding of the intricate mechanisms that regulate gut permeability and led us to appreciate that its up-regulation in genetically susceptible individuals may lead to immune-mediated diseases. This information has translational implications, because the zonulin pathway is currently exploited to develop both diagnostic and therapeutic applications pertinent to a variety of immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Current and novel insights into the neurophysiology of migraine and its implications for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Simon; Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Holland, Philip R

    2017-04-01

    Migraine headache and its associated symptoms have plagued humans for two millennia. It is manifest throughout the world, and affects more than 1/6 of the global population. It is the most common brain disorder, and is characterized by moderate to severe unilateral headache that is accompanied by vomiting, nausea, photophobia, phonophobia, and other hypersensitive symptoms of the senses. While there is still a clear lack of understanding of its neurophysiology, it is beginning to be understood, and it seems to suggest migraine is a disorder of brain sensory processing, characterized by a generalized neuronal hyperexcitability. The complex symptomatology of migraine indicates that multiple neuronal systems are involved, including brainstem and diencephalic systems, which function abnormally, resulting in premonitory symptoms, ultimately evolving to affect the dural trigeminovascular system, and the pain phase of migraine. The migraineur also seems to be particularly sensitive to fluctuations in homeostasis, such as sleep, feeding and stress, reflecting the abnormality of functioning in these brainstem and diencephalic systems. Implications for therapeutic development have grown out of our understanding of migraine neurophysiology, leading to major drug classes, such as triptans, calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists, and 5-HT 1F receptor agonists, as well as neuromodulatory approaches, with the promise of more to come. The present review will discuss the current understanding of the neurophysiology of migraine, particularly migraine headache, and novel insights into the complex neural networks responsible for associated neurological symptoms, and how interaction of these networks with migraine pain pathways has implications for the development of novel therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Is Spinal Muscular Atrophy a disease of the motor neurons only: pathogenesis and therapeutic implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Chiara; Ramirez, Agnese; Bucchia, Monica; Rinchetti, Paola; Rideout, Hardy; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Re, Diane B.; Corti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neurological disease that causes infant mortality; no effective therapies are currently available. SMA is due to homozygous mutations and/or deletions in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and subsequent reduction of the SMN protein, leading to the death of motor neurons. However, there is increasing evidence that in addition to motor neurons, other cell types are contributing to SMA pathology. In this review, we will discuss the involvement of non-motor neuronal cells, located both inside and outside the central nervous system, in disease onset and progression. These contribution of non-motor neuronal cells to disease pathogenesis has important therapeutic implications: in fact, even if SMN restoration in motor neurons is needed, it has been shown that optimal phenotypic amelioration in animal models of SMA requires a more widespread SMN correction. It will be crucial to take this evidence into account before clinical translation of the novel therapeutic approaches that are currently under development. PMID:26681261

  2. Vitamin D receptor signaling and its therapeutic implications: Genome-wide and structural view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Carsten; Molnár, Ferdinand

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D3 is one of the few natural compounds that has, via its metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) and the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR), a direct effect on gene regulation. For efficiently applying the therapeutic and disease-preventing potential of 1,25(OH)2D3 and its synthetic analogs, the key steps in vitamin D signaling need to be understood. These are the different types of molecular interactions with the VDR, such as (i) the complex formation of VDR with genomic DNA, (ii) the interaction of VDR with its partner transcription factors, (iii) the binding of 1,25(OH)2D3 or its synthetic analogs within the ligand-binding pocket of the VDR, and (iv) the resulting conformational change on the surface of the VDR leading to a change of the protein-protein interaction profile of the receptor with other proteins. This review will present the latest genome-wide insight into vitamin D signaling, and will discuss its therapeutic implications.

  3. Punica granatum and its therapeutic implications on breast carcinogenesis: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vini, Ravindran; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2015-01-01

    Punica granatum has a recorded history of pharmacological properties which can be attributed to its rich reservoir of phytochemicals. Investigations in recent years have established its tremendous potential as an antitumorogenic agent against various cancers including breast cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. The plausible role of Punica as a therapeutic agent, as an adjuvant in chemotherapy, and its dietary implications as chemopreventive agent in breast cancer have been explored. Mechanistic studies have revealed that Punica extracts and its components, individually or in combination, can modulate and target key proteins and genes involved in breast cancer. Our earlier finding also demonstrated the role of methanolic extract of pomegranate pericarp in reducing proliferation in breast cancer by binding to estrogen receptor at the same time not affecting uterine weight unlike estradiol or tamoxifen. This review analyses other plausible mechanisms of Punica in preventing the progression of breast cancer and how it can possibly be a therapeutic agent by acting at various steps of carcinogenesis including proliferation, invasion, migration, metastasis, angiogenesis, and inflammation via various molecular mechanisms. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. DAF as a therapeutic target for steroid hormones: implications for host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Bogdan; Nowicki, Stella

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a concise historic prospective and a summary of accumulated knowledge on steroid hormones, DAF expression, and therapeutic implication of steroid hormone treatment on multiple pathologies, including infection and the host-pathogen interactions. DAF/CD55 plays multiple physiologic functions including tissue protection from the cytotoxic complement injury, an anti-inflammatory function due to its anti-adherence properties which enhance transmigration of monocytes and macrophages and reduce tissue injury. DAF physiologic functions are essential in many organ systems including pregnancy for protection of the semiallogeneic fetus or for preventing uncontrolled infiltration by white cells in their pro- and/or anti-inflammatory functions. DAF expression appears to have multiple regulatory tissue-specific and/or menstrual cycle-specific mechanisms, which involve complex signaling mechanisms. Regulation of DAF expression may involve a direct or an indirect effect of at least the estrogen, progesterone, and corticosteroid regulatory pathways. DAF is exploited in multiple pathologic conditions by pathogens and viruses in chronic tissue infection processes. The binding of Escherichia coli bearing Dr adhesins to the DAF/CD55 receptor is DAF density dependent and triggers internalization of E. coli via an endocytic pathway involving CD55, lipid rafts, and microtubules. Dr+ E. coli or Dr antigen may persist in vivo in the interstitium for several months. Further understanding of such processes should be instrumental in designing therapeutic strategies for multiple conditions involving DAF's protective or pathologic functions and tailoring host expression of DAF.

  5. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziying Han

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses, are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1 and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms.

  6. Four therapeutic cases of RS3PE syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Naoya; Fukuda, Yukiko; Yang, Kwang-Seok; Aiba, Miyoji; Tsuda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    RS3PE syndrome (Remitting Seronegative Symmetrical Synovitis with Pitting Edema Syndrome) is one of the disorders which present as polyarthritis. It is important to be aware of RS3PE syndrome when encountering elderly patients with polyarthritis who are negative for rheumatoid factor. We report 4 cases of RS3PE syndrome. All cases shared common clinical findings, such as acute onset, symmetrical polyarthritis, pitting edema of the hands and feet, and being negative for rheumatoid factor in serum. Treatment with corticosteroid was very effective in all cases. However, two patients showed a deteriorated clinical condition during the tapering of corticosteroid. Corticosteroid should be tapered off cautiously in patients with RS3PE syndrome. (author)

  7. An unusual case of hypothermia associated with therapeutic doses of olanzapine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnayake Shiroma L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report a case of a 42-year-old man who had symptomatic hypothermia as a result of taking olanzapine for paranoid schizophrenia. According to published data, only a few cases of hypothermia associated with olanzapine have been reported since its introduction into clinical use. Case presentation A 42-year-old Sri Lankan man with schizophrenia who was being treated with a therapeutic dose of olanzapine presented with reduced level of consciousness. He had a core temperature of 32°C and was bradycardic. At the time of admission, the electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia with J waves. He did not have any risk factors for developing hypothermia except the use of olanzapine. There was improvement in his clinical condition with reversal of electrocardiogram changes following gradual rewarming and the omission of olanzapine. Conclusion Hypothermia induced by antipsychotic medications is not uncommon, but olanzapine-induced hypothermia is rare and occurrence has been reported during initiation or increasing the dose. But here the patient developed hypothermia without dose adjustment.

  8. Therapeutic effectiveness of pediatric renal transplantation in 63 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Shu; Wang Mu; Zhu Youhua; Zeng Li; Zhou Meisheng; Zhang Lei; Fu Shangxi; Wang Liming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the characteristic of operation, intra-operation treatment and the application of immunosuppressant in pediatric renal transplantation in order to improve therapeutic effectiveness. Methods: From March 1986 to October 2006, the clinical data of 63 children who underwent renal transplantation in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The 1-, 3-, 5-, 10-year graft survival rates were 98.4%, 90.5%, 88.9% and 68.3%,respectively. And the corresponding patient survival rates were 100%, 95.2%, 92.1%, 71.4%. The body weight increased 4 to 12 kg and the body height grew up 2 to 6 cm during the first year post-transplantation. The main complications in the first year post-transplantation were hypertension (26/63, 41.3%), crinosity (14/63, 22.2%),drug-induced hepatic injury(11/63, 17.5%), gingival hyperplasia (10/63, 15.8%), pulmonary infection(9/63, 14.3%),bone marrow suppression(5/63, 7.9%), herpes (4/63, 6.3%) and diabetes (3/63, 4.8%). Conclusion: Renal transplantation is a preferred method for the treatment of children in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Good tissue matching, proper operative time and pattern, peri-operactive care were essential to success, as well as appropriate immuno-suppressant strategy and good compliance.

  9. [Thoracic wounds. Therapeutic approach. Apropos of 77 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, A; Azorin, J; Destable, M D; Hoang, P; Lapandry, C; de Saint-Florent, G

    1987-05-01

    We have led over a four year period, from 1981 to 1985, a prospective study on all cases of penetrating chest wounds (77 cases) in the intensive Care unit and the Department of Thoracic Surgery at the Avicenne Hospital. These wounds, involving young males, are fortunately mostly benign. Their seriousness is based on the abdominal or mediastinal hemorrhage as well as lesions to the vital organs which need an emergency intervention. The latter, nevertheless, with the help of the mobile reanimation service for transfering the patient, has diminished the mortality rate to 2.6 per cent. Following their experiment and after a review of the literature, the authors expose their method of management of the penetrating chest wounds.

  10. Pharmacological properties of angiotensin II antagonists: Examining all the therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Unger

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II, the effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS, exerts a variety of actions in physiological blood pressure and body fluid regulation, and is implicated as a major pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of the RAS, via treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I, or more recently the Ang II AT1-receptor blockers (ARBs, has been used as a therapeutic approach to the treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular dysfunction. Evidence from animal and clinical studies shows that the antihypertensive and overall organ-protective actions of the ARBs are similar to those of ACE-I. However, as the ARBs selectively block the AT1-receptor, which is responsible for the known cardiovascular actions of Ang II, leave the AT2-receptor unopposed and do not interfere with the breakdown of bradykinin, there is the potential for beneficial effects in hypertensive patients with cardiovascular diseases such as left ventricular hypertrophy. Furthermore, there may be additional benefits when the ARBs are combined with ACE-I in such patients. Animal studies contribute to the elucidation and understanding of the role of AT1- and AT2-receptors in the cardiovascular system, and may help in the design of clinical studies aimed at investigating the effects of ACE-I, ARBs, and their combination, on cardiovascular outcomes in hypertensive patients.

  11. Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications of Cell Death Induction by Indole Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Aamir; Sakr, Wael A.; Rahman, KM Wahidur

    2011-01-01

    Indole compounds, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, are well-known for their anti-cancer properties. In particular, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its dimeric product, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been widely investigated for their effectiveness against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. These compounds are effective inducers of apoptosis and the accumulating evidence documenting their ability to modulate multiple cellular signaling pathways is a testimony to their pleiotropic behavior. Here we attempt to update current understanding on the various mechanisms that are responsible for the apoptosis-inducing effects by these compounds. The significance of apoptosis-induction as a desirable attribute of anti-cancer agents such as indole compounds cannot be overstated. However, an equally intriguing property of these compounds is their ability to sensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Such chemosensitizing effects of indole compounds can potentially have major clinical implications because these non-toxic compounds can reduce the toxicity and drug-resistance associated with available chemotherapies. Combinational therapy is increasingly being realized to be better than single agent therapy and, through this review article, we aim to provide a rationale behind combination of natural compounds such as indoles with conventional therapeutics

  12. Neurovascular cross talk in diabetic retinopathy: Pathophysiological roles and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Elizabeth P.; Wang, Zhongxiao; Chen, Jing; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population in developed countries, and its prevalence will increase as the global incidence of diabetes grows exponentially. DR begins with an early nonproliferative stage in which retinal blood vessels and neurons degenerate as a consequence of chronic hyperglycemia, resulting in vasoregression and persistent retinal ischemia, metabolic disequilibrium, and inflammation. This is conducive to overcompensatory pathological neovascularization associated with advanced proliferative DR. Although DR is considered a microvascular complication, the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia; neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, and dysregulation of neurovascular cross talk are responsible in part for vascular abnormalities in both early nonproliferative DR and advanced proliferative DR. Neuronal activity directly regulates microvascular dilation and blood flow in the process of neurovascular coupling. Retinal neurons also secrete guidance cues in response to injury, ischemia, or metabolic stress that may either promote or suppress vascular outgrowth, either alleviating or exacerbating DR, contingent on the stage of disease and retinal microenvironment. Neurodegeneration, impaired neurovascular coupling, and dysregulation of neuronal guidance cues are key events in the pathogenesis of DR, and correcting these events may prevent or delay development of advanced DR. The review discusses the mechanisms of neurovascular cross talk and its dysregulation in DR, and their potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27473938

  13. Pharmacological properties of angiotensin II antagonists: examining all the therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Unger

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II, the effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS, exerts a variety of actions in physiological blood pressure and body fluid regulation, and is implicated as a major pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of the RAS, via treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I, or more recently the Ang II AT1-receptor blockers (ARBs, has been used as a therapeutic approach to the treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular dysfunction. Evidence from animal and clinical studies shows that the antihypertensive and overall organ-protective actions of the ARBs are similar to those of ACE-I. However, as the ARBs selectively block the AT1-receptor, which is responsible for the known cardiovascular actions of Ang II, leave the AT2-receptor unopposed and do not interfere with the breakdown of bradykinin, there is the potential for beneficial effects in hypertensive patients with cardiovascular diseases such as left ventricular hypertrophy. Furthermore, there may be additional benefits when the ARBs are combined with ACE-I in such patients. Animal studies contribute to the elucidation and understanding of the role of AT1- and AT2-receptors in the cardiovascular system, and may help in the design of clinical studies aimed at investigating the effects of ACE-I, ARBs, and their combination, on cardiovascular outcomes in hypertensive patients.

  14. The therapeutic implications of plasticity of the cancer stem cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Leder

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that tumors contain a small population of cancer cells that have the ability to undergo symmetric self-renewing cell division. In tumors that follow this model, cancer stem cells produce various kinds of specified precursors that divide a limited number of times before terminally differentiating or undergoing apoptosis. As cells within the tumor mature, they become progressively more restricted in the cell types to which they can give rise. However, in some tumor types, the presence of certain extra- or intracellular signals can induce committed cancer progenitors to revert to a multipotential cancer stem cell state. In this paper, we design a novel mathematical model to investigate the dynamics of tumor progression in such situations, and study the implications of a reversible cancer stem cell phenotype for therapeutic interventions. We find that higher levels of dedifferentiation substantially reduce the effectiveness of therapy directed at cancer stem cells by leading to higher rates of resistance. We conclude that plasticity of the cancer stem cell phenotype is an important determinant of the prognosis of tumors. This model represents the first mathematical investigation of this tumor trait and contributes to a quantitative understanding of cancer.

  15. Cellular retinoic acid bioavailability in various pathologies and its therapeutic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A, is a critical signaling molecule in various cell types. We found that RA depletion caused by expression of the RA-metabolizing enzyme CYP26A1 promotes carcinogenesis, implicating CYP26A1 as a candidate oncogene. Several studies of CYP26s have suggested that the biological effect of RA on target cells is primarily determined by "cellular RA bioavailability", which is defined as the RA level in an individual cell, rather than by the serum concentration of RA. Consistently, stellate cells store approximately 80% of vitamin A in the body, and the state of cellular RA bioavailability regulates their function. Based on the similarities between stellate cells and astrocytes, we demonstrated that retinal astrocytes regulate tight junction-based endothelial integrity in a paracrine manner. Since diabetic retinopathy is characterized by increased vascular permeability in its early pathogenesis, RA normalized retinal astrocytes that are compromised in diabetes, resulting in suppression of vascular leakiness. RA also attenuated the loss of the epithelial barrier in murine experimental colitis. The concept of "cellular RA bioavailability" in various diseases will be directed at understanding various pathologies caused by RA insufficiency, implying the potential feasibility of a therapeutic strategy targeting the stellate cell system. © 2017 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Therapeutic approach to Gradenigo's syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspris Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traditional management of Gradenigo's syndrome requires aggressive and radical surgery without any attempt to preserve hearing. Recent reports, however, describe a successful outcome after conservative surgical intervention without labyrinthectomy. A similar outcome has also been reported in patients who were only prescribed with antibiotics and did not undergo myringotomy. Case presentation We report the case of a 24-year-old Caucasian Greek woman with Gradenigo's syndrome who was treated by draining her petrous apex via an infralabyrithine approach between her posterior semicircular canal and the jugular bulb. Her inner ear was not sacrificed during the procedure. She presented pre-operatively with ipsilateral conductive hearing loss, which recovered completely four weeks after the surgery. Conclusions Patients with Gradenigo's syndrome may be successfully treated with a combination of long-term permanent drainage and ventilation of the apical cells with corresponding hearing preservation. This can be achieved via a combination of transmastoid, infralabyrinthine and suprajugular approaches, if such would be allowed by the anatomy of the region or if there is enough space between the posterior semicircular canal and the jugular bulb.

  17. Obstetrical Antiphospholipid Syndrome: From the Pathogenesis to the Clinical and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marchetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an acquired thrombophilia with clinical manifestations associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL in patient plasma. Obstetrical APS is a complex entity that may affect both mother and fetus throughout the entire pregnancy with high morbidity. Clinical complications are as various as recurrent fetal losses, stillbirth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, and preeclampsia. Pathogenesis of aPL targets trophoblastic cells directly, mainly via proapoptotic, proinflammatory mechanisms, and uncontrolled immunomodulatory responses. Actual first-line treatment is limited to low-dose aspirin (LDA and low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH and still failed in 30% of the cases. APS pregnancies should be a major field in obstetrical research, and new therapeutics are still in progress.

  18. Obstetrical Antiphospholipid Syndrome: From the Pathogenesis to the Clinical and Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, T.; Cohen, M.; de Moerloose, P.

    2013-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired thrombophilia with clinical manifestations associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in patient plasma. Obstetrical APS is a complex entity that may affect both mother and fetus throughout the entire pregnancy with high morbidity. Clinical complications are as various as recurrent fetal losses, stillbirth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and preeclampsia. Pathogenesis of aPL targets trophoblastic cells directly, mainly via proapoptotic, proinflammatory mechanisms, and uncontrolled immunomodulatory responses. Actual first-line treatment is limited to low-dose aspirin (LDA) and low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and still failed in 30% of the cases. APS pregnancies should be a major field in obstetrical research, and new therapeutics are still in progress. PMID:23983765

  19. Attachment and object relations in patients with narcissistic personality disorder: implications for therapeutic process and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Diana; Meehan, Kevin B

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a therapeutic approach for patients with severe personality disorders, transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP), a manualized evidence-based treatment, which integrates contemporary object relations theory with attachment theory and research. Case material is presented from a narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) patient in TFP whose primary presenting problems were in the arena of sexuality and love relations, and whose attachment state of mind showed evidence of oscillation between dismissing and preoccupied mechanisms. Clinical process material is presented to illustrate the tactics and techniques of TFP and how they have been refined for treatment of individuals with NPD. The ways in which conflicts around sexuality and love relations were lived out in the transference is delineated with a focus on the interpretation of devalued and idealized representations of self and others, both of which are key components of the compensatory grandiose self that defensively protects the individual from an underlying sense of vulnerability and imperfection. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Therapeutic Relationship and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: A Case Study of an Adolescent Girl With Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Joy Easterbrook

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic relationship in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT has been argued to play an essential role in positive outcomes in therapy. However, it is described as necessary and yet, secondary to technique, often receiving little attention in the training of CBT therapists. This case study explores a trainee psychologist’s experience of finding difficulty in feeling authentic and the application of CBT techniques with her client. This difficulty informed the research question; what is the value of the therapeutic relationship in CBT? A hermeneutic approach with a strong emphasis on phenomenology, is used to explore the therapeutic process and the therapeutic relationship that developed between therapist and client. Qualitative descriptions of 11 sessions are divided into themes, these are discussed in relation to what happened in therapy, and are then discussed further regarding discovery and process into the therapeutic relationship. Conclusions from this case study could possibly reveal the value of the therapeutic relationship when working from a CBT approach, and how it seemed to enable the client to achieve her goal in therapy.

  1. Ebola Virus Altered Innate and Adaptive Immune Response Signalling Pathways: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) arise attention for their impressive lethality by the poor immune response and high inflammatory reaction in the patients. It causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates of up to 90%. The mechanism underlying this lethal outcome is poorly understood. In 2014, a major outbreak of Ebola virus spread amongst several African countries, including Leone, Sierra, and Guinea. Although infections only occur frequently in Central Africa, but the virus has the potential to spread globally. Presently, there is no vaccine or treatment is available to counteract Ebola virus infections due to poor understanding of its interaction with the immune system. Accumulating evidence indicates that the virus actively alters both innate and adaptive immune responses and triggers harmful inflammatory responses. In the literature, some reports have shown that alteration of immune signaling pathways could be due to the ability of EBOV to interfere with dendritic cells (DCs), which link innate and adaptive immune responses. On the other hand, some reports have demonstrated that EBOV, VP35 proteins act as interferon antagonists. So, how the Ebola virus altered the innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways is still an open question for the researcher to be explored. Thus, in this review, I try to summarize the mechanisms of the alteration of innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways by Ebola virus which will be helpful for designing effective drugs or vaccines against this lethal infection. Further, potential targets, current treatment and novel therapeutic approaches have also been discussed.

  2. Paracetamol in therapeutic dosages and acute liver injury: causality assessment in a prospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellote José

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute liver injury (ALI induced by paracetamol overdose is a well known cause of emergency hospital admission and death. However, there is debate regarding the risk of ALI after therapeutic dosages of the drug. The aim is to describe the characteristics of patients admitted to hospital with jaundice who had previous exposure to therapeutic doses of paracetamol. An assessment of the causality role of paracetamol was performed in each case. Methods Based on the evaluation of prospectively gathered cases of ALI with detailed clinical information, thirty-two cases of ALI in non-alcoholic patients exposed to therapeutic doses of paracetamol were identified. Two authors assessed all drug exposures by using the CIOMS/RUCAM scale. Each case was classified into one of five categories based on the causality score for paracetamol. Results In four cases the role of paracetamol was judged to be unrelated, in two unlikely, and these were excluded from evaluation. In seven of the remaining 26 cases, the RUCAM score associated with paracetamol was higher than that associated with other concomitant medications. The estimated incidence of ALI related to the use of paracetamol in therapeutic dosages was 0.4 per million inhabitants older than 15 years of age and per year (99%CI, 0.2-0.8 and of 10 per million paracetamol users-year (95% CI 4.3-19.4. Conclusions Our results indicate that paracetamol in therapeutic dosages may be considered in the causality assessment in non-alcoholic patients with liver injury, even if the estimated incidence of ALI related to paracetamol appears to be low.

  3. Identifying Inconsistencies and Reporting Deficits in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (TMB) Case Reports Authored by TMB Practitioners: a TMB-Adapted CAse REport (CARE) Guidelines Audit Through 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Niki; Shue, Sarah; Freeland, Emilee; Ralston, Rick; Boulanger, Karen T

    2016-09-01

    Case reports are a fundamental tool through which therapeutic massage and bodywork (TMB) practitioners can inform research and impact their field by detailing the presentation, treatment, and follow-up of a single individual encountered in practice. Inconsistencies in case reporting limit their impact as fundamental sources of clinical evidence. Using the TMB-adapted CAse REport (CARE) guidelines, the current study sought to provide a rich description regarding the reporting quality of TMB practitioner authored TMB case reports in the literature. 1) Systematic identification of published, peer-reviewed TMB case reports authored by TMB practitioners following PRISMA recommendations; 2) audit development based on TMB-adapted CARE guidelines; 3) audit implementation; and 4) descriptive analysis of audit scores. Our search identified 977 articles and 35 met study inclusion criteria. On average, TMB case reports included approximately 58% of the total items identified as necessary by the TMB-adapted CARE guidelines. Introduction sections of case reports had the best item reporting (80% on average), while Case Presentation (54%) and Results (52%) sections scored moderately overall, with only 20% of necessary Practitioner Description items included on average. Audit scores revealed inconsistent abstract reporting and few audited case reports including client race (20%), perspective (26%), and occupation/activities (40%); practitioner practice setting (12%), training (12%), scope-of-practice (29%), and credentialing (20%); adverse events or lack thereof (17%); and some aspect of informed consent (34%). Treatment descriptor item reporting varied from high to low. Various implications of concern are discussed. The current audit and descriptive analysis highlight several reporting inconsistencies in TMB case reports prior to 2015. Reporting guidelines for case reports are important if standards for, and impact of, TMB case reports are desired. Adherence to reporting

  4. The therapeutic role of the dacryocystography in patients with epiphora: three cases report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, Fabiano Celli; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Torres Neto, Gilberto; Francisco, Marina Celli

    2006-01-01

    We describe three cases of patients that presented epiphora having been submitted the accomplishment of dacryocystographic study, which ones turned asymptomatic after the accomplishment of the exam, without any other procedure or medicine. The therapeutic potential of the method is stood out, once the literature on this subject is scarce in children and none in adults. (author)

  5. Cancer Stem Cells and Molecular Biology Test in Colorectal Cancer: Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effendi-Ys, Rustam

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in males, the second in females, and is the second leading cause of cancer related death worldwide. Within Indonesia's 250 million population, the incidence rates for CRC per 100,000 population were 15.2 for males and 10.2 for females, and estimated 63,500 cases per year.  More than 50% of colorectal cancer patients will develop metastasis. CRC is still the main cause of tumor-related death, and although most CRC patients are treated with surgery to remove the tumor tissue, some of the CRC patients recurred. Chemotherapy used as adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy also has several problems, in which these treatments are useless in tumor cells with chemo-resistance. Molecular testing of CRC from tumor tissues has important implications for the selection of treatment. Biomarkers can be used as prognostic value, molecular predictive factors, and targeted therapy. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered as the origin of tumorigenesis, development, metastasis and recurrence. At present, it has been shown that CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. This review aims to summarize the issue on CSCs, and the future development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  6. [Post-therapeutic evolution and prognostic factors of intestinal lymphomas, Retrospective analysis of 42 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fayos, M P; Hernández Guío, C; Rivas, M C; Outeiriño, J; González-Campos, C; Lobo, F

    1993-12-01

    To evaluate in retrospect the response to therapy and long-term evolution of a series of primitive intestinal lymphomas. The series was comprised of 42 patients diagnosed in our hospital during 1960-1962. The mean age was 34.5 years (range, 3-73), the M/F ratio was 21/21, and the histopathology distributes as follows: high grade (HG), 24 cases, low grade (LG), 12 cases, and mixed (LG/HG), 6 cases. B/T immunophenotype: 40/2. Staging: IE1,29 cases, IIE2-IV, 11 cases. The treatment applied in the series was classified in various types: ample surgical resection (aSR), 21 cases; partial surgical resection (pSR), 9 cases; abdominal radiation therapy (RT), 7 cases; monochemotherapy (MCT), 7 cases, and polychemotherapy (PCT), 28 cases. The correlation of clinicobiological variables with immediate response to treatment was evaluated by means of the chi square test, and the acturial post-therapeutic survival curves in accordance to the life tables, differences being calculated by the log rank test. Small intestine was the commonest site of involvement, 31 cases; ileocecal region, 7 cases; colon, 2 cases, and colon plus small intestine, 2 cases. Regardless of therapy type, complete remission (CR) was attained in 20 patients (47.5%), partial remission in 5; 11 cases were unresponsive (26.5%) and early death occurred in 6 instances (14.2%). The acturial post-therapeutic survival offered an 8-year expectancy of 47%. The correlation between immediate complete response and 16 clinico-biologic variables showed favourable significance for tumoral proliferation index (i.e., Pc10-positive cells studies. 2) Female sex, type of therapy, multifocal involvement, the need of emergency surgery and high LDH levels have significant value in univariate analyses.

  7. K-12 Implications Seen in Some Cases before High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Arizona's variation on government vouchers for religious schools and California's prohibition on the sale of violent video games to minors present the top two cases with implications for education in the U.S. Supreme Court term that formally begins Oct. 4. New Justice Elena Kagan brings to the court extensive education policy experience as a…

  8. EATING DISORDERS: DENTAL IMPLICATIONSCASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Rode

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity, anorexia and bulimia are typical civilisation diseases or diseases of unhealthy living. They affect mainly white women in their childhood and adolescence. Occurrence of these diseases is getting higher also in Slovenia. Changes inside the oral cavity of a bulimic patient may be detected during a routine clinical examination. This places dental professionals in a position to be among the first to detect bulimia which is usually characterized by episodes of purging behaviors such as self-induced vomiting. Such vomiting brings stomach acids in contact with the mouth and teeth, causing erosion of tooth enamel which often leads to severely decayed teeth.Methods. This study presents a case of successful treatment of oral symptoms and dental rehabilitation in female patient with bulimia.Conclusions. Dental rehabilitation for bulimic patients is more than just a substituting of their bad and lost teeth. It is actually the first step toward their regained self-respect. Therefore it is important for the dentist to be familiar with the clinical symptoms of these diseases that can be revealed in oral cavity to efficiently contribute to a patient rehabilitation.

  9. The diagnostic and therapeutic management of a peculiar case of rectal submucosal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Blajin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction We are presenting the case of a 50 years old female patient with rectal cancer, developed from the submucosal level, who raised difficulties in diagnoses process and therapeutic management. Case report The patient’s symptomatology began four months before the definitive diagnose. Various investigations have been performed, including multiple biopsies which were inconclusive. Surgical intervention was performed to obtain definitive malignancy HP result. The postoperative evolution was peculiar, marked by complications, which required multiple surgical interventions. Conclusions The development of the adenoma, predominantly at the submucosal and muscular level has caused difficulties in both establishing the diagnosis and in the therapeutic management. Sclerosing encapsulated peritonitis (SEP is a rare clinical entity, usually discovered in postoperative intestinal obstruction cases. The etiology and frequency of the SEP depend on its’ type.

  10. Therapeutic radiation and hyperparathyroidism. A case-control study in Rochester, Minn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, C.M.; Heath, H. III; O'Fallon, W.M.; Anderson, J.A.; Earle, J.D.; Melton, L.J. III

    1989-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted among residents of Rochester, Minn, to assess the influence of prior therapeutic radiation on the risk of primary hyperparathyroidism. Fifty-one cases of surgically proven primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed from 1975 through 1983 were each matched by age and gender to two control subjects, with radiation exposure documented through preexisting medical records. The overall odds ratio for any prior therapeutic radiation therapy was 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 0.9 to 4.4) and it was 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 0.9 to 5.7) when limited to those with prior head and neck radiation. Among women, the figures were 2.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 7.5) for any prior therapeutic radiation and 3.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 10.2) for head and neck exposure. This study confirms the association between primary hyperparathyroidism and prior therapeutic radiation exposure, at least for women in this population

  11. Uterine arterial embolization for the treatment of adenomyosis: an analysis of therapeutic results in 80 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Zigang; Yang Yanfen; Guan Jie

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the therapeutic effect of uterine arterial embolization in treating adenomyosis. Methods: Uterine arterial embolization was performed in 80 patients with adenomyosis. The patients were followed up for 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after the operation. After the treatment the degree of dysmenorrhea, the menstrual flow and the uterine volume were observed and were compared with those before the treatment. Results: After uterine arterial embolization the clinical symptoms were relieved in all 80 patients. The menstrual flow was markedly decreased, the anemia was obviously improved and the uterine volume was significantly reduced, while the ovary functioning was not apparently affected. The symptom of dysmenorrhea completely disappeared one month after the therapy in 76 cases and four months after the therapy in the remaining 4 cases. Conclusion: Uterine arterial embolization is a mini-invasive and safe therapy with remarkable therapeutic results and few side-effects. Therefore, this treatment can significantly improve the patient's living quality. (authors)

  12. Climate change and energy: The implications for the Spanish case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Arriaga, J. I.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the mutual implications between the climate change problem and the actual energy-at-a-crossroads situation of the unsustainable world energy model. The implications for the Spanish case are studied as a case example. The paper provides a brief review of the scientific evidence on climate change, analyzes the causes of the present energy dilemma and characterizes the problem to be addressed. The principal challenge for the future climate regime is to identify the nature and level of commitment that will provide sufficient incentives for all countries, with such a diversity of interests. The paper also exposes the most plausible framework for the future climate regime, the basic components of such a regime, the role to be played by the major stake holders and some guidelines for future negotiations. (Author)

  13. Therapeutic decisions in ALS patients: cross-cultural differences and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Peter M; Kuzma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena; Keller, Jürgen; Aho-Oezhan, Helena E A; Ciecwierska, Katarzyna; Szejko, Natalia; Vázquez, Cynthia; Böhm, Sarah; Badura-Lotter, Gisela; Meyer, Thomas; Petri, Susanne; Linse, Katharina; Hermann, Andreas; Semb, Olof; Stenberg, Erica; Nackberg, Simona; Dorst, Johannes; Uttner, Ingo; Häggström, Ann-Cristin; Ludolph, Albert C; Lulé, Dorothée

    2018-05-04

    Quantitative analysis of decision-making on therapeutic options in different sociocultural context in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS patients (n = 244) were consecutively recruited in Germany (n = 83), Poland (n = 83), and Sweden (n = 78) in a prospective cross-cultural study ( www.NEEDSinALS.com ). They were interviewed on preferences for therapeutic techniques including invasive (IV) and non-invasive ventilation (NIV), as well as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and on hypothetical termination of these using quantitative questions. Using standardized questionnaires, religiousness, personal values, quality of life, and depressiveness were assessed. NIV was most frequently used in Germany and PEG in Sweden. Swedish patients were most liberal on initiation and termination of PEG, NIV and IV. Polish patients were mostly undecided and were least likely to consider discontinuing supportive management. Current use was partly associated with age, gender and state of physical function; also, financial support explained some variance. Future preferences on therapeutic options from the patient's perspective were also closely associated with cultural factors. The more oriented towards traditional and conservative values, the less likely patients were to decide for invasive therapeutic devices (IV, PEG), the least likely to have ideations to discontinue any device and the more likely to have an undecided attitude. Current use of therapeutic options is determined by medical condition in analogy to clinical guidelines. For future considerations, other factors such as cultural background are crucial, yielding hurdles to be regarded in the implementation of advanced directives in a multicultural environment.

  14. Acute pancreatitis related to therapeutic dosing with colchicine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Joseph

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colchicine is used in the treatment and prophylaxis of gout. It possesses a narrow therapeutic window, frequently resulting in dose-limiting gastrointestinal side-effects such as diarrhoea and emesis. As colchicine is a cellular anti-mitotic agent, the most serious effects include myelosuppression, myoneuropathy and multiple organ failure. This occurs with intentional overdose or with therapeutic dosing in patients with reduced clearance of colchicine due to pre-existing renal or hepatic impairment. Acute pancreatitis has rarely been reported, and only in association with severe colchicine overdose accompanied by multi-organ failure. Case presentation We report a case of acute pancreatitis without other organ toxicity related to recent commencement of colchicine for acute gout, occurring in an elderly male with pre-existing renal impairment. Conclusion 1 Colchicine should be used with care in elderly patients or patients with impaired renal function. 2 Aside from myelosuppression, myoneuropathy and multiple organ failure, colchicine may now be associated with acute pancreatitis even with therapeutic dosing; this has not previously being reported.

  15. Molecular alterations in acute myeloid leukemia and their clinical and therapeutical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, María Stefania; Piris, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Rivas, José Ángel

    2018-06-09

    Acute myeloid leukaemia is the most common form of acute leukaemia, and its incidence increases with age. The disease derives from a transformed multipotent malignant haematopoietic stem cell that acquires consequent genomic alterations. The identification of recurrent cytogenetic anomalies associated with different patterns of acute myeloid leukaemia clinical presentation has led to the incorporation of genetic markers in clinical decision-making. In addition, the observation that these anomalies may mark therapeutic responses and relapse and survival rates have been incorporated into the World Health Organisation's recent molecular classification and stratification and the European Leukaemia Net, with the aim of creating prognostic categories that help rationalise better diagnosis, prognosis, re-evaluation of the disease and the combination of therapeutic protocols in order to increase the survival rate of these patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative sensory testing of neuropathic pain patients: potential mechanistic and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Doreen B; Geber, Christian; Birklein, Frank; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2012-06-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is a widely accepted tool to investigate somatosensory changes in pain patients. Many different protocols have been developed in clinical pain research within recent years. In this review, we provide an overview of QST and tested neuroanatomical pathways, including peripheral and central structures. Based on research studies using animal and human surrogate models of neuropathic pain, possible underlying mechanisms of chronic pain are discussed. Clinically, QST may be useful for 1) the identification of subgroups of patients with different underlying pain mechanisms; 2) prediction of therapeutic outcomes; and 3) quantification of therapeutic interventions in pain therapy. Combined with sensory mapping, QST may provide useful information on the site of neural damage and on mechanisms of positive and negative somatosensory abnormalities. The use of QST in individual patients for diagnostic purposes leading to individualized therapy is an interesting concept, but needs further validation.

  17. ErbB polymorphisms: Insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay A Alaoui-Jamali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary and to acquired (secondary resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed.

  18. Recent concepts concerning cerebral ischaemia in man and their implications in therapeutic evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depresseux, J C

    1987-06-18

    Recent concepts concerning focal cerebral ischaemia in man and resulting from the data obtained with positron emission tomography are reported. The evolutive steps in the ischaemic process are divided into: perfusion reserve; extraction reserve recruitment; ischaemic penumbra; lesional process and post-lesional developments. Circulatory and metabolic patterns corresponding to these evolutive steps are described and illustrated. The potentials of these data as guide-lines in therapeutic trial methodology are discussed.

  19. Recent concepts concerning cerebral ischaemia in man and their implications in therapeutic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depresseux, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent concepts concerning focal cerebral ischaemia in man and resulting from the data obtained with positron emission tomography are reported. The evolutive steps in the ischaemic process are divided into: perfusion reserve; extraction reserve recruitment; ischaemic penumbra; lesional process and post-lesional developments. Circulatory and metabolic patterns corresponding to these evolutive steps are described and illustrated. The potentials of these data as guide-lines in therapeutic trial methodology are discussed [fr

  20. Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Use of Therapeutic Touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    care units, where reliance on machines and technology have isolated and depersonalized patients. Before the boon of technology in health care, so...adjunctive therapies. Meehan (1990) recommends TT be taught as part of undergraduate or graduate nursing curricula or in a continuing education program of...staff (ANA, 1986). The CNS may serve as a resource person, preceptor and role model to staff Therapeutic Touch 47 nurses and nursing students , or member

  1. Molecular Characterization of Gastric Carcinoma: Therapeutic Implications for Biomarkers and Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Kankeu Fonkoua

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment of advanced gastric carcinoma (GC. Monoclonal antibodies including trastuzumab, ramucirumab, and pembrolizumab have been shown to provide additional benefits. However, the clinical outcomes are often unpredictable and they can vary widely among patients. Currently, no biomarker is available for predicting treatment response in the individual patient except human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 amplification and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 expression for effectiveness of trastuzumab and pembrolizumab, respectively. Multi-platform molecular analysis of cancer, including GC, may help identify predictive biomarkers to guide selection of therapeutic agents. Molecular classification of GC by The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network and the Asian Cancer Research Group is expected to identify therapeutic targets and predictive biomarkers. Complementary to molecular characterization of GC is molecular profiling by expression analysis and genomic sequencing of tumor DNA. Initial analysis of patients with gastroesophageal carcinoma demonstrates that the ratio of progression-free survival (PFS on molecular profile (MP-based treatment to PFS on treatment prior to molecular profiling exceeds 1.3, suggesting the potential value of MP in guiding selection of individualized therapy. Future strategies aiming to integrate molecular classification and profiling of tumors with therapeutic agents for achieving the goal of personalized treatment of GC are indicated.

  2. Cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma: Therapeutic implications based on stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite advances in its diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis of patients with advanced HCC remains unfavorable. Recent advances in stem cell biology and associated technologies have enabled the identification of minor components of tumorigenic cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells, in cancers such as HCC. Furthermore, because CSC play a central role in tumor development, metastasis and recurrence, they are considered to be a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Hepatic CSC have been successfully identified using functional and cell surface markers. The analysis of purified hepatic CSC has revealed the molecular machinery and signaling pathways involved in their maintenance. In addition, epigenetic transcriptional regulation has been shown to be important in the development and maintenance of CSC. Although inhibitors of CSC show promise as CSC-targeting drugs, novel therapeutic approaches for the eradication of CSC are yet to be established. In this review, we describe recent progress in hepatic CSC research and provide a perspective on the available therapeutic approaches based on stem cell biology. © 2015 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  3. Psychomotor Retardation in Depression: A Systematic Review of Diagnostic, Pathophysiologic, and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamila Bennabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychomotor retardation is a central feature of depression which includes motor and cognitive impairments. Effective management may be useful to improve the classification of depressive subtypes and treatment selection, as well as prediction of outcome in patients with depression. The aim of this paper was to review the current status of knowledge regarding psychomotor retardation in depression, in order to clarify its role in the diagnostic management of mood disorders. Retardation modifies all the actions of the individual, including motility, mental activity, and speech. Objective assessments can highlight the diagnostic importance of psychomotor retardation, especially in melancholic and bipolar depression. Psychomotor retardation is also related to depression severity and therapeutic change and could be considered a good criterion for the prediction of therapeutic effect. The neurobiological process underlying the inhibition of activity includes functional deficits in the prefrontal cortex and abnormalities in dopamine neurotransmission. Future investigations of psychomotor retardation should help improve the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying mood disorders and contribute to improving their therapeutic management.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Gastric Carcinoma: Therapeutic Implications for Biomarkers and Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankeu Fonkoua, Lionel; Yee, Nelson S

    2018-03-09

    Palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment of advanced gastric carcinoma (GC). Monoclonal antibodies including trastuzumab, ramucirumab, and pembrolizumab have been shown to provide additional benefits. However, the clinical outcomes are often unpredictable and they can vary widely among patients. Currently, no biomarker is available for predicting treatment response in the individual patient except human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) amplification and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression for effectiveness of trastuzumab and pembrolizumab, respectively. Multi-platform molecular analysis of cancer, including GC, may help identify predictive biomarkers to guide selection of therapeutic agents. Molecular classification of GC by The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network and the Asian Cancer Research Group is expected to identify therapeutic targets and predictive biomarkers. Complementary to molecular characterization of GC is molecular profiling by expression analysis and genomic sequencing of tumor DNA. Initial analysis of patients with gastroesophageal carcinoma demonstrates that the ratio of progression-free survival (PFS) on molecular profile (MP)-based treatment to PFS on treatment prior to molecular profiling exceeds 1.3, suggesting the potential value of MP in guiding selection of individualized therapy. Future strategies aiming to integrate molecular classification and profiling of tumors with therapeutic agents for achieving the goal of personalized treatment of GC are indicated.

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic value of laparoscopy for small bowel blunt injuries: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addeo, Pietro; Calabrese, Daniela Paola

    2011-01-01

    Small bowel injuries after blunt abdominal trauma represent both a diagnostic and a therapeutic challenge. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are necessary in order to avoid a dangerous diagnostic delay. Laparoscopy can represent a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in patients with uncertain clinical symptoms. We report the case of a 25-year-old man, haemodynamically stable, admitted for acute abdominal pain a few hours after a physical assault. Giving the persistence of the abdominal pain and the presence of free fluids at the computed tomography examination, an exploratory laparoscopy was performed. At the laparoscopic exploration, an isolated small bowel perforation was found, 60 cm distal from the ligament of Treitz. The injury was repaired by laparoscopic suturing and the patient was discharged home at postoperative day 3 after an uneventful postoperative course. Laparoscopy represents a valuable tool for patients with small bowel blunt injuries allowing a timely diagnosis and a prompt treatment.

  6. Therapeutic High-Density Barium Enema in a Case of Presumed Diverticular Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonthalee Pausawasdi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding do not have an identifiable source of bleeding at colonoscopy. A significant percentage of these patients will have recurrent bleeding. In many patients, the presence of multiple diverticula leads to a diagnosis of presumed diverticular bleeding. Current treatment options include therapeutic endoscopy, angiography, or surgical resection, all of which depend on the identification of the diverticular source of bleeding. This report describes a case of recurrent bleeding in an elderly patient with diverticula but no identifiable source treated successfully with barium impaction therapy. This therapeutic modality does not depend on the identification of the bleeding diverticular lesion and was well tolerated by our 86-year-old patient.

  7. Examining the therapeutic relationship and confronting resistances in psychodynamic psychotherapy: a certified public accountant case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, Christopher T; Gentile, Julie P; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2011-05-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective for a variety of mental health symptoms. This form of psychotherapy uses patient self reflection and self examination, as well as the therapeutic relationship between the patient and psychiatrist, to explore maladaptive coping strategies and relationship patterns of the patient. A thorough understanding of resistance and the core conflictual relationship theme afford the psychiatrist the ability to facilitate this work. In this article, the composite case illustrates some of the psychodynamic psychotherapy techniques that can be employed in a psychotherapy case. In this example, the case is about a certified public accountant that came to treatment because of an acute stressor that put her career goals at risk. An acute episode or event can bring to light chronic and ongoing symptoms, which have had a remitting and relapsing course, and leave the patient unable to compensate on his or her own.

  8. Therapeutic implications of chemokine-mediated pathways in atherosclerosis: realistic perspectives and utopias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Stavros; Amanatidou, Virginia; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2010-09-01

    Current perspectives on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis strongly support the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the establishment and progression of atherosclerostic lesions. Chemokine-mediated mechanisms are potent regulators of such processes by orchestrating the interactions of inflammatory cellular components of the peripheral blood with cellular components of the arterial wall. The increasing evidence supporting the role of chemokine pathways in atherosclerosis renders chemokine ligands and their receptors potential therapeutic targets. In the following review, we aim to highlight the special structural and functional features of chemokines and their receptors in respect to their roles in atherosclerosis, and examine to what extent available data can be applied in disease management practices.

  9. Therapeutic vaccine for acute and chronic motor neuron diseases: implications for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, D N; Waibel, S; Guntinas-Lichius, O; Lenzen, M; Neiss, W F; Tomov, T L; Yoles, E; Kipnis, J; Schori, H; Reuter, A; Ludolph, A; Schwartz, M

    2003-04-15

    Therapeutic vaccination with Copaxone (glatiramer acetate, Cop-1) protects motor neurons against acute and chronic degenerative conditions. In acute degeneration after facial nerve axotomy, the number of surviving motor neurons was almost two times higher in Cop-1-vaccinated mice than in nonvaccinated mice, or in mice injected with PBS emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant (P amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Cop-1 vaccination prolonged life span compared to untreated matched controls, from 211 +/- 7 days (n = 15) to 263 +/- 8 days (n = 14; P sclerosis. The protocol for non-autoimmune neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, remains to be established by future studies.

  10. Therapeutic outcome of various treatment modalities for the management of 34 cases of mandibular unicystic ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Khadka

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Unicystic ameloblastoma is a challenge, as conservative modalities have high recurrence chances whereas radical modalities have high morbidity for defects and deformity. Enucleation with peripheral ostectomy and Carnoy’s solution is an intermediate treatment with less risk of recurrence and good outcome. The objectives of the study was to determine the therapeutic outcome for various treatment modalities for the management of mandibular unicystic ameloblastoma.Materials & Methods:Retrospective analysis of 34 cases from 2005 to 2014 was done and were analysed in terms of demographic profiles, treatment modalities and its efficacy (recurrence in 6 years’ follow up time.Results: The total number of patients was 34. The age ranged from 12 years to 28 years with a mean age of 18.82 years. Gender distribution was 21 males (61.8% and 13 females (38.2%. The location found was 26 (76.5% cases in posterior mandibular region and 8 (23.5% cases in the anterior mandibular region. Size of the lesions was small in 10 (29.4% cases, medium in 18 (52.9% cases and large in 6 (17.6% cases. Perforation of buccal or lingual cortex was present in 6 (17.6% and no preforation in 28 (82.4%. Treatment modalities done was marsupilisation in 6 (17.6% cases, enucleation with peripheral ostectomy with caroney solution in 22 (64.7% cases and resection with safe margin in 6 (17.6% cases. Recurrence occurred in 8 (23.5% cases and no recurrence in 26 (76.5% cases.Conclusion:Enucleation with peripheral ostectomy and Carnoy’s solution is one of the good treatment modality for unicystic ameloblastoma of the mandible whereas complete resection of the mandible with safe margin has low risk of recurrence in long term follow up.

  11. Nanotechnological strategies for nerve growth factor delivery: Therapeutic implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Célia; Rijo, Patrícia; Reis, Catarina Pinto

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with amyloid-β peptide misfolding and aggregation. Neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), can prevent neuronal damage and rescue the cholinergic neurons that undergo cell death in AD, reverse deposition of extracellular amyloid plaques and improve cognitive deficits. However, NGF administration is hampered by the poor pharmacokinetic profile of the therapeutic protein and its inability to cross the blood-brain barrier, which requires specialised drug delivery systems (DDS) for efficient NGF delivery to the brain. This review covers the main therapeutic approaches that have been developed for NGF delivery targeting the brain, from polymeric implants to gene and cell-based therapies, focusing on the role of nanoparticulate systems for the sustained release of NGF in the brain as a neuroprotective and disease-modifying approach toward AD. Lipid- and polymer-based delivery systems, magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots are specifically addressed as promising nanotechnological strategies to overcome the current limitations of NGF-based therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response

  13. Ion channel expression patterns in glioblastoma stem cells with functional and therapeutic implications for malignancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Pollak

    Full Text Available Ion channels and transporters have increasingly recognized roles in cancer progression through the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and death. Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs are a source of tumor formation and recurrence in glioblastoma multiforme, a highly aggressive brain cancer, suggesting that ion channel expression may be perturbed in this population. However, little is known about the expression and functional relevance of ion channels that may contribute to GSC malignancy. Using RNA sequencing, we assessed the enrichment of ion channels in GSC isolates and non-tumor neural cell types. We identified a unique set of GSC-enriched ion channels using differential expression analysis that is also associated with distinct gene mutation signatures. In support of potential clinical relevance, expression of selected GSC-enriched ion channels evaluated in human glioblastoma databases of The Cancer Genome Atlas and Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas Project correlated with patient survival times. Finally, genetic knockdown as well as pharmacological inhibition of individual or classes of GSC-enriched ion channels constrained growth of GSCs compared to normal neural stem cells. This first-in-kind global examination characterizes ion channels enriched in GSCs and explores their potential clinical relevance to glioblastoma molecular subtypes, gene mutations, survival outcomes, regional tumor expression, and experimental responses to loss-of-function. Together, the data support the potential biological and therapeutic impact of ion channels on GSC malignancy and provide strong rationale for further examination of their mechanistic and therapeutic importance.

  14. Ion channel expression patterns in glioblastoma stem cells with functional and therapeutic implications for malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Julia; Rai, Karan G; Funk, Cory C; Arora, Sonali; Lee, Eunjee; Zhu, Jun; Price, Nathan D; Paddison, Patrick J; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Rostomily, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters have increasingly recognized roles in cancer progression through the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and death. Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) are a source of tumor formation and recurrence in glioblastoma multiforme, a highly aggressive brain cancer, suggesting that ion channel expression may be perturbed in this population. However, little is known about the expression and functional relevance of ion channels that may contribute to GSC malignancy. Using RNA sequencing, we assessed the enrichment of ion channels in GSC isolates and non-tumor neural cell types. We identified a unique set of GSC-enriched ion channels using differential expression analysis that is also associated with distinct gene mutation signatures. In support of potential clinical relevance, expression of selected GSC-enriched ion channels evaluated in human glioblastoma databases of The Cancer Genome Atlas and Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas Project correlated with patient survival times. Finally, genetic knockdown as well as pharmacological inhibition of individual or classes of GSC-enriched ion channels constrained growth of GSCs compared to normal neural stem cells. This first-in-kind global examination characterizes ion channels enriched in GSCs and explores their potential clinical relevance to glioblastoma molecular subtypes, gene mutations, survival outcomes, regional tumor expression, and experimental responses to loss-of-function. Together, the data support the potential biological and therapeutic impact of ion channels on GSC malignancy and provide strong rationale for further examination of their mechanistic and therapeutic importance.

  15. Smoking, nicotine and psychiatric disorders: evidence for therapeutic role, controversies and implications for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, S M; Kutcher, S

    1999-02-01

    Researchers interested in investigating the possible therapeutic effects and the mechanisms of action of nicotine in neuropsychiatric disorders face a social-scientific-ethical dilemma. This dilemma comprises three components: (1) the known addictive potential of nicotine makes careful evaluation of the therapeutic potential of this compound socially unattractive; (2) the potential misuse of scientifically determined data by the tobacco 'lobby' creates ethical concerns; and (3) the possible confusion between the differential effects of nicotine in human smokers versus non-smokers creates difficulties in study designs in voluntary human subjects. Therefore, it is imperative that, at the onset of this review, the authors stress that they do not advocate cigarette-smoking as a route of nicotine intake under any circumstances on the basis that controlled dosing of nicotine may be of potential benefit in some neuropsychiatric disorders. In this article, we review the psychopharmacology of nicotine and its effects in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, depression, anxiety and Tourette's syndrome. Possible mechanisms of action of nicotine directly or indirectly via its interaction with other neurotransmitter systems (i.e. serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline) in relation to its potential role in these disorders are discussed. It is postulated that new drugs may need to be developed that selectively interact with nicotinic receptors without addiction potential.

  16. Specific RSK kinase inhibition by dibenzyl trisulfide and implication for therapeutic treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Henry I C; Facey, Caroline O B; Toyang, Ngeh J; Bryant, Joseph L

    2014-04-01

    The Jamaican "Guinea Hen Weed" (Petiveria alliacea L.) plant has been traditionally used in folklore medicine to treat a variety of diseases including cancer. In the present study we investigated on the therapeutic feasibility of dibenzyl trisulfide (DTS) (isolated from the Jamaican Guinea Hen Weed) as a potent small-molecule kinase inhibitor to treat cancer. We investigated the inhibitory effects of DTS against a large panel of kinases using a well-established competitive binding assay. Cell proliferation data were obtained using the WST-1 colorimetric assay. DTS inhibited the activity of the C-terminal kinase domain of RSK1 (80% compared to control) with a Kd of 1.3 μM. Anti-proliferative effects of DTS were observed in small lung, pancreatic, breast, and prostate cancer cells with IC50 values ranging from 0.34-0.84 μM. We have identified DTS as a highly selective and isoform-specific RSK1 kinase inhibitor with broad cancer therapeutic potential.

  17. Pathogenesis of Graves` disease and therapeutic implications; Pathogenese des Morbus Basedow und therapeutische Implikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seif, F.J. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1997-12-01

    Graves` disease presents itself clinically mainly as hyperthyroidism and infiltrative ophthalmopathy and to a minimal extent also as dermopathy and acropachy. Autoimmune processes are the basic pathogenesis. Stimulating antibodies against the TSH receptor cause hyperthyroidism. Autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes against primarily thyroidal antigens cross-react with similar antigens of the eye muscles and orbital connective tissue, thus spreading the disease from the thyroid to the eyes. The therapeutic goal comprises not only the treatment of hyperthyroidism, but also the induction of a steady immuntolerance in order to minimize the irreversible damage to the eye. The therapeutic armamentarium is formed by antithyroid drugs, glucocorticoids, retrobulbar radition and thyroid ablation, either by nearly total thyroidectomy or by radioiodine. The different indications for both ablative procedures are discussed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Morbus Basedow manifestiert sich klinisch hauptsaechlich als Hyperthyreose und infiltrative Orbitopathie, waehrend Demopathie und Akropathie selten sind. Der Krankheit liegt ein Autoimmunprozess zugrunde, wobei stimuliernde Autoantikoerper gegen den TSH-Rezeptor die Hyperthyreose hervorrufen. Autoantikoerper und T-Lymphozyten gegen primaer thyreoidale Antigene verursachen durch Kreuzreaktion mit aehnlichen Antigenen an den Augenmuskeln und orbitalem Bindegewebe die Orbitopathie. Das therapeutsiche Ziel besteht nicht nur in der Behandlung der Hyperthyreose, sondern vor allem in der Induktion einer immuntoleranten Remission, um die irreversiblen Schaeden am Auge zu minimieren. Die Therapie umfasst Thyreostatika, Glukokortikoide und Orbitaspitzenbestrahlung sowie eine Schilddruesenablation entweder durch fast totale Schilddruesenresektion oder durch Radiojodtherapie. Die Differentialindikationen fuer die beiden ablativen Massnahmen werden eroertert. (orig.)

  18. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  19. Visual and Motor Recovery After "Cognitive Therapeutic Exercises" in Cortical Blindness: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Patre, Daniele; Van de Winckel, Ann; Panté, Franca; Rizzello, Carla; Zernitz, Marina; Mansour, Mariam; Zordan, Lara; Zeffiro, Thomas A; OʼConnor, Erin E; Bisson, Teresa; Lupi, Andrea; Perfetti, Carlo

    2017-07-01

    Spontaneous visual recovery is rare after cortical blindness. While visual rehabilitation may improve performance, no visual therapy has been widely adopted, as clinical outcomes are variable and rarely translate into improvements in activities of daily living (ADLs). We explored the potential value of a novel rehabilitation approach "cognitive therapeutic exercises" for cortical blindness. The subject of this case study was 48-year-old woman with cortical blindness and tetraplegia after cardiac arrest. Prior to the intervention, she was dependent in ADLs and poorly distinguished shapes and colors after 19 months of standard visual and motor rehabilitation. Computed tomographic images soon after symptom onset demonstrated acute infarcts in both occipital cortices. The subject underwent 8 months of intensive rehabilitation with "cognitive therapeutic exercises" consisting of discrimination exercises correlating sensory and visual information. Visual fields increased; object recognition improved; it became possible to watch television; voluntary arm movements improved in accuracy and smoothness; walking improved; and ADL independence and self-reliance increased. Subtraction of neuroimaging acquired before and after rehabilitation showed that focal glucose metabolism increases bilaterally in the occipital poles. This study demonstrates feasibility of "cognitive therapeutic exercises" in an individual with cortical blindness, who experienced impressive visual and sensorimotor recovery, with marked ADL improvement, more than 2 years after ischemic cortical damage.Video Abstract available for additional insights from the authors (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A173).

  20. Personal identity narratives of therapeutic songwriting participants following Spinal Cord Injury: A case series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Chantal; Rickard, Nikki; Tamplin, Jeanette; Baker, Felicity Anne

    2018-07-01

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) patients face unique identity challenges associated with physical limitations, higher comorbid depression, increased suicidality and reduced subjective well-being. Post-injury identity is often unaddressed in subacute rehabilitation environments where critical physical and functional rehabilitation goals are prioritized. Therapeutic songwriting has demonstrated prior efficacy in promoting healthy adjustment and as a means of expression for post-injury narratives. The current study sought to examine the identity narratives of therapeutic songwriting participants. Case-series analysis of the individual identity trajectories of eight individuals. Subacute rehabilitation facility, Victoria, Australia. Eight individuals with an SCI; 7 males and 1 female. Six-week therapeutic songwriting intervention facilitated by a music therapist to promote identity rehabilitation. Identity, subjective well-being and distress, emotional state. Three participants demonstrated positive trajectories and a further three showed negative trajectories; remaining participants were ambiguous in their response. Injury severity differentiated those with positive trajectories from those with negative trajectories, with greater injury severity apparent for those showing negative trends. Self-concept also improved more in those with positive trajectories. Core demographic variables did not however meaningfully predict the direction of change in core identity or wellbeing indices. Identity-focused songwriting holds promise as a means of promoting healthy identity reintegration. Further research on benefits for those with less severe spinal injuries is warranted.

  1. Therapeutic Endoscopy for the Control of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banc-Husu, Anna M; Ahmad, Nuzhat A; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Jaffe, David L; Kochman, Michael L; Rajala, Michael W; Mamula, Petar

    2017-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most common indications for urgent endoscopy in the pediatric setting. The majority of these procedures are performed for control of variceal bleeding, with few performed for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (NVUGI) bleeding. The data on therapeutic endoscopy for NVUGI are sparse. The aims of our study were to review our experience with NVUGI bleeding, describe technical aspects and outcomes of therapeutic endoscopy, and determine gastroenterology fellows' training opportunities according to the national training guidelines. We performed a retrospective review of endoscopy database (Endoworks, Olympus Inc, Center Valley, PA) from January 2009 to December 2014. The search used the following keywords: bleeding, hematemesis, melena, injection, epinephrine, cautery, clip, and argon plasma coagulation. The collected data included demographics, description of bleeding lesion and medical/endoscopic therapy, rate of rebleeding, relevant laboratories, physical examination, and need for transfusion and surgery. The study was approved by the institutional review board. During the study period 12,737 upper endoscopies (esophagogastroduodenoscopies) were performed. A total of 15 patients underwent 17 esophagogastroduodenoscopies that required therapeutic intervention to control bleeding (1:750 procedures). The mean ± standard deviation (median) age of patients who required endoscopic intervention was 11.6 ± 6.0 years (14.0 years). Seven out of 17 patients received dual therapy to control the bleeding lesions. All but 3 patients received medical therapy with intravenous proton pump inhibitor, and 3 received octreotide infusions. Six of the patients experienced rebleeding (40%), with 4 out of 6 initially only receiving single modality therapy. Two of these patients eventually required surgical intervention to control bleeding and both patients presented with bleeding duodenal ulcers. There were no cases of aspiration

  2. Strategies of Echinococcus species responses to immune attacks: implications for therapeutic tool development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yadong

    2013-11-01

    Echinococcus species have been studied as a model to investigate parasite-host interactions. Echinococcus spp. can actively communicate dynamically with a host to facilitate infection, growth and proliferation partially via secretion of molecules, especially in terms of harmonization of host immune attacks. This review systematically outlines our current knowledge of how the Echinococcus species have evolved to adapt to their host's microenvironment. This understanding of parasite-host interplay has implications in profound appreciation of parasite plasticity and is informative in designing novel and effective tools including vaccines and drugs for the treatment of echinococcosis and other diseases. © 2013.

  3. Prognostic and therapeutic implications of vascular disease in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahid, Farhan; Pastori, Daniele; Violi, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    of both disease states leading to a dramatic rise in future cardiovascular events. Indeed, the presence of peripheral artery disease independently predicts stroke in patients with AF. Myocardial infarction (MI) is another well-established risk factor for the development of AF; however, the role of pre...... data from clinical trials with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) provided new insights on the prognostic implications of vascular disease coexistence in AF patients, and randomised trials testing a combination of NOAC with antiplatelet agents are ongoing. This review article provides...

  4. An integrative view of mechanisms underlying generalized spike-and-wave epileptic seizures and its implication on optimal therapeutic treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyuan Yan

    Full Text Available Many types of epileptic seizures are characterized by generalized spike-and-wave discharges. In the past, notable effort has been devoted to understanding seizure dynamics and various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, by taking an integrative view of the underlying mechanisms, we demonstrate that epileptic seizures can be generated by many different combinations of synaptic strengths and intrinsic membrane properties. This integrative view has important medical implications: the specific state of a patient characterized by a set of biophysical characteristics ultimately determines the optimal therapeutic treatment. Through the same view, we further demonstrate the potentiation effect of rational polypharmacy in the treatment of epilepsy and provide a new angle to resolve the debate on polypharmacy. Our results underscore the need for personalized medicine and demonstrate that computer modeling and simulation may play an important role in assisting the clinicians in selecting the optimal treatment on an individual basis.

  5. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Gao, George F.; Tien Po

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC 50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  6. Implications of microRNAs in Colorectal Cancer Development, Diagnosis, Prognosis and Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eZhai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-coding small RNAs with critical regulatory functions as post-transcriptional regulators. Due to the fundamental importance and broad impact of miRNAs on multiple genes and pathways, dysregulated miRNAs have been associated with human diseases, including cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is among the most deadly diseases, and miRNAs offer a new frontier for target discovery and novel biomarkers for both diagnosis and prognosis. In this review, we summarize the recent advancement of miRNA research in CRC, in particular, the roles of miRNAs in colorectal cancer stem cells, EMT, chemoresistance, therapeutics, diagnosis and prognosis.

  7. DNA interstrand cross-link repair: understanding role of Fanconi anemia pathway and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pallavi; Solanki, Avani; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Vundinti, Babu Rao

    2013-11-01

    Interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are extremely toxic DNA lesions that prevent DNA double-helix separation due to the irreversible covalent linkage binding of some agents on DNA strands. Agents that induce these ICLs are thus widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs but may also lead to tumor growth. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder that leads to ICL sensitivity. This review provides update on current understanding of the role of FA proteins in repairing ICLs at various stages of cell cycle. We also discuss link between DNA cross-link genotoxicity caused by aldehydes in FA pathway. Besides this, we summarize various ICL agents that act as drugs to treat different types of tumors and highlight strategies for modulating ICL sensitivity for therapeutic interventions that may be helpful in controlling cancer and life-threatening disease, FA. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Mitochondrial and microcirculatory distress syndrome in the critical patient. Therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, M L; Cerdeño, M C; Serra, M C; Conejero, R

    2013-10-01

    Mitochondrial and microcirculatory distress syndrome (MMDS) can occur during systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and is characterized by cytopathic tissue hypoxia uncorrected by oxygen transport optimization, and associated with an acquired defect in the use of oxygen and energy production in mitochondria, leading to multiple organ dysfunction (MOD). We examine the pathogenesis of MMDS, new diagnostic methods, and recent therapeutic approaches adapted to each of the three phases in the evolution of the syndrome. In the initial phase, the aim is prevention and early reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction. Once the latter is established, the aim is to restore flow of the electron chain, mitochondrial respiration, and to avoid cellular energy collapse. Finally, in the third (resolution) stage, treatment should focus on stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis and the repair or replacement of damaged mitochondria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  9. Synaptic Loss and the Pathophysiology of PTSD: Implications for Ketamine as a Prototype Novel Therapeutic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystal, John H.; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Averill, Lynette A.; Kelmendi, Benjamin; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Sanacora, Gerard; Southwick, Steven M.; Duman, Ronald S.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of Review Studies of the neurobiology and treatment of PTSD have highlighted many aspects of the pathophysiology of this disorder that might be relevant to treatment. The purpose of this review is to highlight the potential clinical importance of an often-neglected consequence of stress models in animals that may be relevant to PTSD: the stress-related loss of synaptic connectivity. Recent Findings Here, we will briefly review evidence that PTSD might be a “synaptic disconnection syndrome” and highlight the importance of this perspective for the emerging therapeutic application of ketamine as a potential rapid-acting treatment for this disorder that may work, in part, by restoring synaptic connectivity. Summary Synaptic disconnection may contribute to the profile of PTSD symptoms that may be targeted by novel pharmacotherapeutics. PMID:28844076

  10. Chaperone-mediated autophagy and neurodegeneration: connections, mechanisms, and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolei; Huang, Sihua; Wang, Xingqin; Tang, Beisha; Li, Wenming; Mao, Zixu

    2015-08-01

    Lysosomes degrade dysfunctional intracellular components via three pathways: macroautophagy, microautophagy, and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Unlike the other two, CMA degrades cytosolic proteins with a recognized KFERQ-like motif in lysosomes and is important for cellular homeostasis. CMA activity declines with age and is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Its impairment leads to the accumulation of aggregated proteins, some of which may be directly tied to the pathogenic processes of neurodegenerative diseases. Its induction may accelerate the clearance of pathogenic proteins and promote cell survival, representing a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarize the current findings on how CMA is involved in neurodegenerative diseases, especially in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Therapeutic Innovations for Targeting Childhood Neuroblastoma: Implications of the Neurokinin-1 Receptor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael; VON Schweinitz, Dietrich

    2017-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid extracranial malignant tumor in children. Despite recent advances in the treatment of this heterogenous tumor with surgery and chemotherapy, the prognosis in advanced stages remains poor. Interestingly, neuroblastoma is one of the few solid tumors, to date, in which an effect for targeted immunotherapy has been proven in controlled clinical trials, giving hope for further advances in the treatment of this and other tumors by targeted therapy. A large array of novel therapeutic options for targeted therapy of neuroblastoma is on the horizon. To this repεrtoirε, the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) system was recently added. The present article explores the most recent developments in targeting neuroblastoma cells via the NK1R and how this new knowledge could be helpful to create new anticancer therapies agains neuroblastoma and other cancers. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Generalised pustular psoriasis – a case report and review of therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Osmola-Mańkowska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Generalised pustular psoriasis (GPP is regarded as a rare clinical subtype of psoriasis. The severity of GPP varies from a benign, chronic course to severe and widespread, life-threatening disease. Due to the uncommon nature of GPP, establishing treatment guidelines for this variant of psoriasis is challenging. Objective. To present the case of a patient with GPP with a short review of therapeutic approaches. Case report. Our patient was treated with standard methods such as acitretin, then cyclosporine and methotrexate as well as with biologic drug – infliximab. During the last and the most severe flare, combination therapy with systemic retinoid and PUVA (Re-PUVA was used. Conclusions. The treatment in GPP should be determined individually according to the severity of the disease, age, gender and comorbidities, as well as according to the physician’s experience with particular methods and their side effects. In addition, the availability of therapeutic options should be taken into consideration.

  13. Case Report: A Case of Severe Cerebral Malaria Managed with Therapeutic Hypothermia and Other Modalities for Brain Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, AbdAllah; Ali, Sajjad; Zahoor, Talal; Azarov, Nick

    2018-04-01

    Malarial infections are uncommon in the United States and almost all reported cases stem from recent travelers coming from endemic countries. Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe form of the disease usually affecting children and individuals with limited immunity. Despite proper management, mortality from CM can reach up to 25%, especially when it is associated with brain edema. Inefficient management of the edema may result in brain herniation and death. Uniform guidelines for management of CM-associated brain edema are lacking. In this report, we present a case of CM with associated severe brain edema that was successfully managed using a unique combination of therapeutic hypothermia, hypertonic saline, mannitol, and hyperventilation along with the antimalarial drugs quinidine and doxycycline. Our use of hypothermia was based on its proven benefit for improving neurological outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients and previous in vitro research, suggesting its potential inhibitory role on malaria growth.

  14. Two cases of acute leukemia developed after therapeutic radiation for malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuo, Kakaru; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tsuno, Sumio; Toyoda, Shigeki

    1978-01-01

    Report was made as to two cases of acute leukemia developed after therapeutic radiation for malignant tumors. Both cases were exposed to atomic-bomb at the places 4 and 3 km far from the center of explosion, and they did not suffer from injuries and acute symptoms due to radiation. Case 1. -A 78 year old man had a mass in a right hypogastric region in April of 1975. In March of 1976, he received laparotomy and was diagnosed as malignant schwannoma. He received radiation therapy with 4,600 R and MFC therapy. In February of 1977, a clinical diagnosis of erythroleukemia was made according to the findings by bone marrow puncture, and he died in March. Postmortem examination revealed that main lesions were malignant schwannoma, its metastases, and leukemia. Case 2. -A 51 year old woman had a finger-tip sized tumor in the left breast in November of 1965, and had a radical operation on the basis of a diagnosis of comedo sarcoma. After that she received 60 Co irradiation with 18,800 R, and she was admitted in December of 1971, because she was suspected of having leukemia. She died in January of 1972. Postmortem examination revealed acute myelocytic leukemia. It is suspected that the onset of erythroleukemia within one year after irradiation would be influenced by MFC therapy in addition to radiotherapy. It was thought that leukemia in Case 2 was influenced by radiotherapy rather than atomic-bomb radioactivity. (Serizawa, K.)

  15. RNA sequencing atopic dermatitis transcriptome profiling provides insights into novel disease mechanisms with potential therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Ungar, Benjamin; Correa da Rosa, Joel

    2015-01-01

    . These limitations might be lessened with next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Objective: We sought to define the lesional AD transcriptome using RNA-seq and compare it using microarrays performed on the same cohort. Methods: RNA-seq and microarrays were performed to identify differentially expressed genes...... RNA-seq showed somewhat better agreement with RT-PCR (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.57 and 0.70 for microarrays and RNA-seq vs RT-PCR, respectively), bias was not eliminated. Among genes uniquely identified by using RNA-seq were triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1......) signaling (eg, CCL2, CCL3, and single immunoglobulin domain IL1R1 related [SIGIRR]) and IL-36 isoform genes. TREM-1 is a surface receptor implicated in innate and adaptive immunity that amplifies infection-related inflammation. Conclusions: This is the first report of a lesional AD phenotype using RNA...

  16. Anaesthesiological implications of Kimura's disease: a case report

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    Sorbello Massimiliano

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Kimura's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition belonging to the angio-lymphatic proliferative group of disorders, usually affecting young men of Asian race, but is rare in Western countries. It is a benign but locally injurious disease, of unknown aetiology, whose classical clinical features are a tumour-like swelling, usually in the head and neck, with or without satellite lymphadenopathy, often accompanied by eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE. Case presentation We report the case of a 33-year-old Caucasian woman with an atypical localization of Kimura's disease, discussing the anaesthesiological implications and reviewing the current literature on Kimura's disease. Conclusions The diagnosis of Kimura's disease can be difficult and misleading, and anaesthesiological precautions could be ignored. Patients with this disease are often evaluated for other disorders: unnecessary diagnostic tests and investigations, or even surgery, may be avoided by just being aware of Kimura's disease.

  17. Differential solubility of curcuminoids in serum and albumin solutions: implications for analytical and therapeutic applications

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    Quitschke Wolfgang W

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercially available curcumin preparations contain a mixture of related polyphenols, collectively referred to as curcuminoids. These encompass the primary component curcumin along with its co-purified derivatives demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin. Curcuminoids have numerous biological activities, including inhibition of cancer related cell proliferation and reduction of amyloid plaque formation associated with Alzheimer disease. Unfortunately, the solubility of curcuminoids in aqueous solutions is exceedingly low. This restricts their systemic availability in orally administered formulations and limits their therapeutic potential. Results Methods are described that achieve high concentrations of soluble curcuminoids in serum. Solid curcuminoids were either mixed directly with serum, or they were predissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and added as aliquots to serum. Both methods resulted in high levels of curcuminoid-solubility in mammalian sera from different species. However, adding aliquots of dimethyl sulfoxide-dissolved curcuminoids to serum proved to be more efficient, producing soluble curcuminoid concentrations of at least 3 mM in human serum. The methods also resulted in the differential solubility of individual curcuminoids in serum. The addition of dimethyl sulfoxide-dissolved curcuminoids to serum preferentially solubilized curcumin, whereas adding solid curcuminoids predominantly solubilized bisdemethoxycurcumin. Either method of solubilization was equally effective in inhibiting dose-dependent HeLa cell proliferation in culture. The maximum concentration of curcuminoids achieved in serum was at least 100-fold higher than that required for inhibiting cell proliferation in culture and 1000-fold higher than the concentration that has been reported to prevent amyloid plaque formation associated with Alzheimer disease. Curcuminoids were also highly soluble in solutions of purified albumin, a major component of

  18. Heteroreceptors Modulating CGRP Release at Neurovascular Junction: Potential Therapeutic Implications on Some Vascular-Related Diseases

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    Abimael González-Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide belonging to the calcitonin gene peptide superfamily. CGRP is a potent vasodilator with potential therapeutic usefulness for treating vascular-related disease. This peptide is primarily located on C- and Aδ-fibers, which have extensive perivascular presence and a dual sensory-efferent function. Although CGRP has two major isoforms (α-CGRP and β-CGRP, the α-CGRP is the isoform related to vascular actions. Release of CGRP from afferent perivascular nerve terminals has been shown to result in vasodilatation, an effect mediated by at least one receptor (the CGRP receptor. This receptor is an atypical G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR composed of three functional proteins: (i the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR; a seven-transmembrane protein, (ii the activity-modifying protein type 1 (RAMP1, and (iii a receptor component protein (RCP. Although under physiological conditions, CGRP seems not to play an important role in vascular tone regulation, this peptide has been strongly related as a key player in migraine and other vascular-related disorders (e.g., hypertension and preeclampsia. The present review aims at providing an overview on the role of sensory fibers and CGRP release on the modulation of vascular tone.

  19. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

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    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  20. Essential oils, their therapeutic properties, and implication in dentistry: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli, Namrata; Dagli, Rushabh; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial treatments currently used for treatment cause several side effects, and bacterial resistance to the antibiotics is also increasing. Therefore, there is need to find better alternatives. Essential oils (EOs) have been used for treatment of various ailments since ancient times and have gained popularity over the years. Safety and efficacy of EOs have been proved by several clinical trials. This review gives an overview on the EOs, their uses, and adverse effects. A literature search was performed in the PubMed for clinical trial studies and review articles on EOs published up to February 2015. The search was performed during March 2015. The following keywords were used: "Lavender essential oil," "cinnamon oil," "clove oil," "eucalyptus oil," "peppermint oil," "lemon EOs," and "tea tree oil." Total 70 relevant articles were found in PubMed database. After screening of abstracts, 52 articles were selected to be included in the present review. On the basis of the available information, it can be concluded that EOs have the potential to be developed as preventive or therapeutic agents for various oral diseases, but further clinical trials are required to establish their safety and efficacy.

  1. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Asthma: Implications for Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Therapeutics

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    P. Hemachandra Reddy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a complex, inflammatory disorder characterized by airflow obstruction of variable degrees, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, and airway inflammation. Asthma is caused by environmental factors and a combination of genetic and environmental stimuli. Genetic studies have revealed that multiple loci are involved in the etiology of asthma. Recent cellular, molecular, and animal-model studies have revealed several cellular events that are involved in the progression of asthma, including: increased Th2 cytokines leading to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the airway, and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction in the activated inflammatory cells, leading to tissue injury in the bronchial epithelium. Further, aging and animal model studies have revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are involved and play a large role in asthma. Recent studies using experimental allergic asthmatic mouse models and peripheral cells and tissues from asthmatic humans have revealed antioxidants as promising treatments for people with asthma. This article summarizes the latest research findings on the involvement of inflammatory changes, and mitochondrial dysfunction/oxidative stress in the development and progression of asthma. This article also addresses the relationship between aging and age-related immunity in triggering asthma, the antioxidant therapeutic strategies in treating people with asthma.

  2. PARP-1 and PARP-2 activity in cancer-induced cachexia: potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Esther; Gea, Joaquim

    2018-01-26

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction and mass loss is a characteristic feature in patients with chronic diseases including cancer and acute conditions such as critical illness. Maintenance of an adequate muscle mass is crucial for the patients' prognosis irrespective of the underlying condition. Moreover, aging-related sarcopenia may further aggravate the muscle wasting process associated with chronic diseases and cancer. Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation has been demonstrated to contribute to the pathophysiology of muscle mass loss and dysfunction in animal models of cancer-induced cachexia. Genetic inhibition of PARP activity attenuated the deleterious effects seen on depleted muscles in mouse models of oncologic cachexia. In the present minireview the mechanisms whereby PARP activity inhibition may improve muscle mass and performance in models of cancer-induced cachexia are discussed. Specifically, the beneficial effects of inhibition of PARP activity on attenuation of increased oxidative stress, protein catabolism, poor muscle anabolism and mitochondrial content and epigenetic modulation of muscle phenotype are reviewed in this article. Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies of pharmacological PARP activity inhibition for the treatment of cancer-induced cachexia are also being described in this review.

  3. Molecular control of HIV-1 postintegration latency: implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies

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    Van Lint Carine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The persistence of HIV-1 latent reservoirs represents a major barrier to virus eradication in infected patients under HAART since interruption of the treatment inevitably leads to a rebound of plasma viremia. Latency establishes early after infection notably (but not only in resting memory CD4+ T cells and involves numerous host and viral trans-acting proteins, as well as processes such as transcriptional interference, RNA silencing, epigenetic modifications and chromatin organization. In order to eliminate latent reservoirs, new strategies are envisaged and consist of reactivating HIV-1 transcription in latently-infected cells, while maintaining HAART in order to prevent de novo infection. The difficulty lies in the fact that a single residual latently-infected cell can in theory rekindle the infection. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment and maintenance of HIV-1 latency and in the transcriptional reactivation from latency. We highlight the potential of new therapeutic strategies based on this understanding of latency. Combinations of various compounds used simultaneously allow for the targeting of transcriptional repression at multiple levels and can facilitate the escape from latency and the clearance of viral reservoirs. We describe the current advantages and limitations of immune T-cell activators, inducers of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and inhibitors of deacetylases and histone- and DNA- methyltransferases, used alone or in combinations. While a solution will not be achieved by tomorrow, the battle against HIV-1 latent reservoirs is well- underway.

  4. Structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of myasthenia gravis and their therapeutic implications

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    Noridomi, Kaori; Watanabe, Go; Hansen, Melissa N.; Han, Gye Won; Chen, Lin (USC)

    2017-04-25

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a major target of autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disease that causes neuromuscular transmission dysfunction. Despite decades of research, the molecular mechanisms underlying MG have not been fully elucidated. Here, we present the crystal structure of the nAChR α1 subunit bound by the Fab fragment of mAb35, a reference monoclonal antibody that causes experimental MG and competes with ~65% of antibodies from MG patients. Our structures reveal for the first time the detailed molecular interactions between MG antibodies and a core region on nAChR α1. These structures suggest a major nAChR-binding mechanism shared by a large number of MG antibodies and the possibility to treat MG by blocking this binding mechanism. Structure-based modeling also provides insights into antibody-mediated nAChR cross-linking known to cause receptor degradation. Our studies establish a structural basis for further mechanistic studies and therapeutic development of MG.

  5. Autophagy and Alzheimer’s Disease: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Implications

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    Md. Sahab Uddin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of progressive dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by a progressive and irreversible loss of cognitive abilities and formation of senile plaques, composed mainly of amyloid β (Aβ, and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, composed of tau protein, in the hippocampus and cortex of afflicted humans. In brains of AD patients the metabolism of Aβ is dysregulated, which leads to the accumulation and aggregation of Aβ. Metabolism of Aβ and tau proteins is crucially influenced by autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent, homeostatic process, in which organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled into energy. Thus, dysfunction of autophagy is suggested to lead to the accretion of noxious proteins in the AD brain. In the present review, we describe the process of autophagy and its importance in AD. Additionally, we discuss mechanisms and genes linking autophagy and AD, i.e., the mTOR pathway, neuroinflammation, endocannabinoid system, ATG7, BCL2, BECN1, CDK5, CLU, CTSD, FOXO1, GFAP, ITPR1, MAPT, PSEN1, SNCA, UBQLN1, and UCHL1. We also present pharmacological agents acting via modulation of autophagy that may show promise in AD therapy. This review updates our knowledge on autophagy mechanisms proposing novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD.

  6. Molecular and clinical pharmacology of intranasal corticosteroids: clinical and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derendorf, H; Meltzer, E O

    2008-10-01

    Intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) are effective treatments for allergic rhinitis, rhinosinusitis, and nasal polyposis. In recent years, increased understanding of corticosteroid and glucocorticoid receptor pharmacology has enabled the development of molecules designed specifically to achieve potent, localized activity with minimal risk of systemic exposure. Pharmacologic potency studies using affinity and other assessments have produced similar rank orders of potency, with the most potent being mometasone furoate, fluticasone propionate, and its modification, fluticasone furoate. The furoate and propionate ester side chains render these agents highly lipophilic, which may facilitate their absorption through nasal mucosa and uptake across phospholipid cell membranes. These compounds demonstrate negligible systemic absorption. Systemic absorption rates are higher among the older corticosteroids (flunisolide, beclomethasone dipropionate, triamcinolone acetonide, and budesonide), which have bioavailabilities in the range of 34-49%. Studies, including 1-year studies with mometasone furoate, fluticasone propionate, and budesonide that evaluated potential systemic effects of INSs in children have generally found no adverse effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function or growth. Clinical data suggest no significant differences in efficacy between the INSs. Theoretically, newer agents with lower systemic availability may be preferable, and may come closer to the pharmacokinetic/pharmacologic criteria for the ideal therapeutic choice.

  7. Phenotype/genotype correlations in Gaucher disease type 1: Clinical and therapeutic implications

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    Sibille, A.; Eng, C.M.; Kim, S.J.; Pastores, G. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G.A. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disease and the most prevalent genetic disease among Ashkenazi Jews. Gaucher disease type 1 is characterized by marked variability of the phenotype and by the absence of neuronopathic involvement. To test the hypothesis that this phenotypic variability was due to genetic compounds of several different mutant alleles, 161 symptomatic patients with Gaucher disease type 1 (> 90% Ashkenazi Jewish) were analyzed for clinical involvement, and their genotypes were determined. Qualitative and quantitative measures of disease involvement included age at onset of the disease manifestations, hepatic and splenic volumes, age at splenectomy, and severity of bony disease. High statistically significant differences (P < .005) were found in each clinical parameter in patients with the N370S/N370S genotype compared with those patients with the N370S/84GG, N370S/L444P, and N370/ genotypes. The symptomatic N370S homozygotes had onset of their disease two to three decades later than patients with the other genotypes. In addition, patients with the latter genotypes have much more severely involved livers, spleens, and bones and had a higher incidence of splenectomy at an earlier age. These predictive genotype analyses provide the basis for genetic care delivery and therapeutic recommendations in patients affected with Gaucher disease type 1. 38 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Rational design of an EGF-IL18 fusion protein: Implication for developing tumor therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jianxin; Peng Ying; Meng Zhefeng; Jin Liqin; Lu Yongsui; Guan Minxin

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a proinflammatory cytokine. This protein has a role in regulating immune responses and exhibits significant anti-tumor activities. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an important growth factor that plays a central role in the regulation of cell cycle and differentiation. It was proposed that a targeted delivery of IL-18 by generation of IL-18-EGF fusion protein might decrease adverse effects and result in enhancing cytotoxic and antitumor activities. In the present study, a fusion protein, consisting of EGFR binding domain fused to human IL-18 mature peptide via a linker peptide of (Gly 4 Ser) 3, was constructed and expressed in the insect cell line Sf9 using Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. We showed that the purified recombinant fusion protein induced similar levels of IFN-γ to that of native IL-18 protein in human PBMC in the presence of ConA. Furthermore, EGF receptor competitive test in human epithelial cancer A431 cell line showed that EGF-IL18 fusion protein can specifically bind with EGFR by competing with native EGF protein. These suggest that this rationally designed protein can be further developed as novel tumor therapeutics

  9. The cephaloceles: A clinical, epidemiological and therapeutic study of 50 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabré, A; Zabsonre, D S; Sanou, A; Bako, Y

    2015-08-01

    Cephaloceles are congenital malformations characterized by externalization of the meninges and/or brain tissue through a congenital skull bone defect. In developed countries, this malformation is rare but in our developing countries, this pathology remains one of our concerns. To describe the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of the cephaloceles. A retrospective study was conducted from 2007 to 2013 on all cases of cephalocele supported in the department of neurosurgery of the Yalgado Ouédraogo University Teaching Hospital of Ouagadougou. The malformations were supplemented by CT scan. All patients were operated. The surgical procedure in cephaloceles of the convexity consisted of a direct approach. Sincipital cephaloceles were operated by transcranial approach or combined approach associating transcranial and transnasal approaches. Fifty patients were gathered during the 7-year period. There were 18 boys and 32 girls. The ages ranged from 1 day to 11 years. The cephaloceles were located on the vault of the skull in 78%; the lesion was sincipital in 22%. The malformation was covered with normal skin in 92%; it was pediculated in 78%. CT scan allowed the classification of cases as meningo-encephaloceles in 31 cases (62%) and meningoceles in 18 cases (36%) and one pure encephalocele. The immediate postoperative course was uneventful in 42 cases (84%); 8 postoperative deaths were recorded. At medium and long term, 4 patients (8%) developed complications of psychomotor deficiency in 3 cases and hydrocephalus in 1 case. The main reasons for the poor prognosis were superinfection, hydrocephalus and/or other brain malformations. Cephaloceles remain relatively frequent in our practice. After surgery, mental failure and hydrocephalus can occur impairing the prognosis. The most suitable solution is a policy of prevention with folic acid treatment before and during pregnancy and following up adequate pregnancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  10. Presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: the findings, the debate, the therapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Angela eCenci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine precursor L-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson´s disease (PD for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes during the progression of PD, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements and motor fluctuations within a few years of L-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal dopamine transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large dopamine swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma L-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in dopamine transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the dopamine transporter, aberrant release of dopamine from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from dopamine play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  11. The kidney and type 2 diabetes mellitus: therapeutic implications of SGLT2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of the kidneys in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has taken on an increased importance in recent years with the arrival of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors - antihyperglycemic agents (AHAs) that specifically target the kidneys. This review includes an update on the physiology of the kidneys, their role in the pathophysiology of T2DM, and the mechanisms implicated in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease, such as glomerular hyperfiltration and inflammation. It also discusses renal issues that could influence the choice of AHA for patients with T2DM, including special populations such as patients with concomitant chronic kidney disease. The most recent data published on the clinical efficacy and safety of the SGLT2 inhibitors canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin and their effects on renal function are presented, showing how the renally mediated mechanisms of action of these agents translate into clinical benefits, including the potential for renoprotection. The observed positive effects of these agents on measures such as glucose control, estimated glomerular filtration rate, albumin-to-creatinine ratio, blood pressure, and body weight in patients both with and without impaired renal function suggest that SGLT2 inhibitors represent an important extension to the diabetes treatment armamentarium.

  12. Regulation of the Nampt-mediated NAD salvage pathway and its therapeutic implications in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huai-Qiang; Zhuang, Zhuo-Nan; Li, Hao; Tian, Tian; Lu, Yun-Xin; Fan, Xiao-Qiang; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Mo, Hai-Yu; Sheng, Hui; Chiao, Paul J; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2016-08-28

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a crucial cofactor for the redox reactions in the metabolic pathways of cancer cells that have elevated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect). Cancer cells are reported to rely on NAD recycling and inhibition of the NAD salvage pathway causes metabolic collapse and cell death. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications for the NAD salvage pathway in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain unclear. This study showed that the expression of Nampt, the rate-limiting enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway, was significantly increased in PDAC cells and PDAC tissues. Additionally, inhibition of Nampt impaired tumor growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, which was accompanied by a decreased cellular NAD level and glycolytic activity. Mechanistically, the Nampt expression was independent of Kras and p16 status, but it was directly regulated by miR-206, which was inversely correlated with the expression of Nampt in PDAC tissues. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Nampt by its inhibitor, FK866, significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of gemcitabine in PDAC cells and in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. In conclusion, the present study revealed a novel regulatory mechanism for Nampt in PDAC and suggested that Nampt inhibition may override gemcitabine resistance by decreasing the NAD level and suppressing glycolytic activity, warranting further clinical investigation for pancreatic cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in autism spectrum disorders: Implications for interventions and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunova, Genoveva; Pallanti, Stefano; Hollander, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Imbalance between excitation and inhibition and increased excitatory-inhibitory (E-I) ratio is a common mechanism in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) that is responsible for the learning and memory, cognitive, sensory, motor deficits, and seizures occurring in these disorders. ASD are very heterogeneous and better understanding of E-I imbalance in brain will lead to better diagnosis and treatments. We perform a critical literature review of the causes and presentations of E-I imbalance in ASD. E-I imbalance in ASD is due primarily to abnormal glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in key brain regions such as neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebellum. Other causes are due to dysfunction of neuropeptides (oxytocin), synaptic proteins (neuroligins), and immune system molecules (cytokines). At the neuropathological level E-I imbalance in ASD is presented as a "minicolumnopathy". E-I imbalance alters the manner by which the brain processes information and regulates behaviour. New developments for investigating E-I imbalance such as optogenetics and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are presented. Non-invasive brain stimulation methods such as TMS for treatment of the core symptoms of ASD are discussed. Understanding E-I imbalance has important implications for developing better pharmacological and behavioural treatments for ASD, including TMS, new drugs, biomarkers and patient stratification.

  14. Presynaptic Mechanisms of l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia: The Findings, the Debate, and the Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) precursor l-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes with disease progression, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements) and motor fluctuations within a few years of l-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal DA transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large DA swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma l-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in DA transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the DA transporter, aberrant release of DA from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from DA) play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  15. The shared neuroanatomy and neurobiology of comorbid chronic pain and PTSD: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scioli-Salter, Erica R; Forman, Daniel E; Otis, John D; Gregor, Kristin; Valovski, Ivan; Rasmusson, Ann M

    2015-04-01

    Chronic pain and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are disabling conditions that affect biological, psychological, and social domains of functioning. Clinical research demonstrates that patients who are affected by chronic pain and PTSD in combination experience greater pain, affective distress, and disability than patients with either condition alone. Additional research is needed to delineate the interrelated pathophysiology of chronic pain and PTSD, with the goal of facilitating more effective therapies to treat both conditions more effectively; current treatment strategies for chronic pain associated with PTSD have limited efficacy and place a heavy burden on patients, who must visit various specialists to manage these conditions separately. This article focuses on neurobiological factors that may contribute to the coprevalence and synergistic interactions of chronic pain and PTSD. First, we outline how circuits that mediate emotional distress and physiological threat, including pain, converge. Secondly, we discuss specific neurobiological mediators and modulators of these circuits that may contribute to chronic pain and PTSD symptoms. For example, neuropeptide Y, and the neuroactive steroids allopregnanolone and pregnanolone (together termed ALLO) have antistress and antinociceptive properties. Reduced levels of neuropeptide Y and ALLO have been implicated in the pathophysiology of both chronic pain and PTSD. The potential contribution of opioid and cannabinoid system factors also will be discussed. Finally, we address potential novel methods to restore the normal function of these systems. Such novel perspectives regarding disease and disease management are vital to the pursuit of relief for the many individuals who struggle with these disabling conditions.

  16. Epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic survey in 505 cases with Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haj Abdolbaghi M

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is an endemic disease in Iran with variety of clinical manifestation. Special characteristics of clinical diagnosis and treatment issues may cause some problems in manegement of patients. In this descriptive study 505 patients with Brucellosis retrospectively were evaluated from clinical point of view, Lab exams and therapeutic issues for 10 years (1990 to 1999. From 505 patients, 321 cases were male and 184 were female. 42.7 percent of cases were in age group of 10 to 30 years. Ingestion of un-pasteurized dairy products was detected in (66.7 percent and 31.86 percent of cases were sheep herders. The most common symptoms and signs were fever (65 percent, sweating (61 percent, arthritis (30.09 percent, sacroilitis (21.5 percent, orchitis (8.2 percent, spondylitis (2-3 percent and endocarditis (1.18. In this survery blood culture for Brucella melitensis became positive in 48.5 percent and bone marrow in 61 percent. Standard tube agglutination was positive in 96 percent (?1.80. Doxycyclin plus Rifampin was the most common regimen we used (37.8 percent. 4 patients died, but just one of those was directly because of Brucella Endocarditis. In this article we have discussed about some interesting cases as well.

  17. Onconase responsive genes in human mesothelioma cells: implications for an RNA damaging therapeutic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altomare, Deborah A; Rybak, Susanna M; Pei, Jianming; Maizel, Jacob V; Cheung, Mitchell; Testa, Joseph R; Shogen, Kuslima

    2010-01-01

    Onconase represents a new class of RNA-damaging drugs. Mechanistically, Onconase is thought to internalize, where it degrades intracellular RNAs such as tRNA and double-stranded RNA, and thereby suppresses protein synthesis. However, there may be additional or alternative mechanism(s) of action. In this study, microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression profiles in untreated human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cell lines and cells exposed to 5 μg/ml Onconase for 24 h. A total of 155 genes were found to be regulated by Onconase that were common to both epithelial and biphasic MM cell lines. Some of these genes are known to significantly affect apoptosis (IL-24, TNFAIP3), transcription (ATF3, DDIT3, MAFF, HDAC9, SNAPC1) or inflammation and the immune response (IL-6, COX-2). RT-PCR analysis of selected up- or down-regulated genes treated with varying doses and times of Onconase generally confirmed the expression array findings in four MM cell lines. Onconase treatment consistently resulted in up-regulation of IL-24, previously shown to have tumor suppressive activity, as well as ATF3 and IL-6. Induction of ATF3 and the pro-apoptotic factor IL-24 by Onconase was highest in the two most responsive MM cell lines, as defined by DNA fragmentation analysis. In addition to apoptosis, gene ontology analysis indicated that pathways impacted by Onconase include MAPK signaling, cytokine-cytokine-receptor interactions, and Jak-STAT signaling. These results provide a broad picture of gene activity after treatment with a drug that targets small non-coding RNAs and contribute to our overall understanding of MM cell response to Onconase as a therapeutic strategy. The findings provide insights regarding mechanisms that may contribute to the efficacy of this novel drug in clinical trials of MM patients who have failed first line chemotherapy or radiation treatment

  18. In Silico Characterization of Hras Pathway for Therapeutic Implications Against Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, S.; Naz, A.; Malik, M. F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Hras (v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) plays a pivotal role in breast tumorigenesis. Expressional aberrations in Hras has significantly been correlated with patient's poor overall survival. In the present study, in silico characterization of Hras to trigger downstream effectors including raf, mek, erk has been explored. Three mutational hotspots for Hras (condons12, 13, 61) have been retrieved from the literature. Promoter modelling using Proscan software revealed a promoter region lacking TATA sequence. To study the epigenetic modifications, methylation analysis of promoter lacking TATA box was done using Methylator software. Methylation is directly correlated with tumor targeting therapies as it represses expression of certain oncogenes. Five candidate sites for hypermethylation of Hras were predicted. Analysis of protein residues involved in interlocking with its downstream effector proteins was also uncovered. In addition to this, a diagnostic and therapeutic relevance of micro RNAs (miRNAs/miRs) specifically acting either as oncogene or tumor suppressors on Hras mediated pathway have been identified. Seven micro RNAs (Let-7, miR-195, miR-497, miR-184, miR-34a, miR-34c, miR-155) found to be responsible for down regulating expression of proteins involved in ressignalling cascade while miR-372 and miR373, miR-212, miR206/21 and miR-17-92 cluster are known to elevate rassignalling pathway. Interestingly, dysregulated expression of Let-7, miR-195, miR-497, miR-184, miR-34, miR-155 co-related with poor prognosis in different cancers has also supported these in silico findings. (author)

  19. Induction of Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Prostate Cancer Cells by Dovitinib (TKI-258 and its Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini S. Yadav

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa remains the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men with an estimated mortality of more than 26,000 in 2016 alone. Aggressive and metastatic tumors are treated with androgen deprivation therapies (ADT; however, the tumors acquire resistance and develop into lethal castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. With the advent of better therapeutics, the incidences of a more aggressive neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC variant continue to emerge. Although de novo occurrences of NEPC are rare, more than 25% of the therapy-resistant patients on highly potent new-generation anti-androgen therapies end up with NEPC. This, along with previous observations of an increase in the number of such NE cells in aggressive tumors, has been suggested as a mechanism of resistance development during prostate cancer progression. Dovitinib (TKI-258/CHIR-258 is a pan receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK inhibitor that targets VEGFR, FGFR, PDGFR, and KIT. It has shown efficacy in mouse-model of PCa bone metastasis, and is presently in clinical trials for several cancers. We observed that both androgen receptor (AR positive and AR-negative PCa cells differentiate into a NE phenotype upon treatment with Dovitinib. The NE differentiation was also observed when mice harboring PC3-xenografted tumors were systemically treated with Dovitinib. The mechanistic underpinnings of this differentiation are unclear, but seem to be supported through MAPK-, PI3K-, and Wnt-signaling pathways. Further elucidation of the differentiation process will enable the identification of alternative salvage or combination therapies to overcome the potential resistance development.

  20. Platelet lysate enhances synovial fluid multipotential stromal cells functions: Implications for therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaie, Ala; Baboolal, Thomas G; Wall, Owen; Jones, Elena; McGonagle, Dennis

    2018-03-01

    Although intra-articular injection of platelet products is increasingly used for joint regenerative approaches, there are few data on their biological effects on joint-resident multipotential stromal cells (MSCs), which are directly exposed to the effects of these therapeutic strategies. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of platelet lysate (PL) on synovial fluid-derived MSCs (SF-MSCs), which in vivo have direct access to sites of cartilage injury. SF-MSCs were obtained during knee arthroscopic procedures (N = 7). Colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F), flow-cytometric phenotyping, carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-based immunomodulation for T-cell and trilineage differentiation assays were performed using PL and compared with standard conditions. PL-enhanced SF-MSC (PL-MSC) proliferation as CFU-F colonies was 1.4-fold larger, and growing cultures had shorter population-doubling times. PL-MSCs and fetal calf serum (FCS)-MSCs had the same immunophenotype and similar immunomodulation activities. In chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation assays, PL-MSCs produced 10% more sulfated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and 45% less Ca ++ compared with FCS-MSCs, respectively. Replacing chondrogenic medium transforming growth factor-β3 with 20% or 50% PL further increased sGAG production of PL-MSCs by 69% and 95%, respectively, compared with complete chondrogenic medium. Also, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium high glucose (HG-DMEM) plus 50% PL induced more chondrogenesis compared with HG-DMEM plus 10% FCS and was comparable to complete chondrogenic medium. This is the first study to assess SF-MSC responses to PL and provides biological support to the hypothesis that PL may be capable of modulating multiple functional aspects of joint resident MSCs with direct access to injured cartilage. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle; Wanscher, Michael; Lippert, Freddy K; Møller, Jacob E; Køber, Lars; Hassager, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopressor support and mortality. In a 6-year period, 310 comatose OHCA patients treated with TH were included. Temperature, hemodynamic parameters and level of vasopressors were registered from admission to 24h after rewarming. Level of vasopressor support was assessed by the cardiovascular sub-score of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). The population was stratified by use of dopamine as first line intervention (D-group) or use of dopamine+norepinephrine/epinephrine (DA-group). Primary endpoint was 30-day mortality and secondary endpoint was in-hospital cause of death. Patients in the DA-group carried a 49% all-cause 30-day mortality rate compared to 23% in the D-group, plog-rank<0.0001, corresponding to an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 2.0 (95% CI: 1.3-3.0), p=0.001). The DA-group had an increased 30-day mortality due to neurological injury (HR=1.7 (95% CI: 1.1-2.7), p=0.02). Cause of death was anoxic brain injury in 78%, cardiovascular failure in 18% and multi-organ failure in 4%. The hemodynamic changes of TH reversed at normothermia, although the requirement for vasopressor support (cardiovascular SOFA≥3) persisted in 80% of patients. In survivors after OHCA treated with TH the induced hemodynamic changes reversed after normothermia, while the need for vasopressor support persisted. Patients requiring addition of norepinephrine/epinephrine on top of dopamine had an increased 30-day all-cause mortality, as well as death from neurological injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Branched-chain amino acids and ammonia metabolism in liver disease: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The rationale for recommendation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) in treatment of liver failure is based on their unique pharmacologic properties, stimulatory effect on ammonia detoxification to glutamine (GLN), and decreased concentrations in liver cirrhosis. Multiple lines of evidence have shown that the main cause of the BCAA deficiency in liver cirrhosis is their consumption in skeletal muscle for synthesis of glutamate, which acts as a substrate for ammonia detoxification to GLN and that the BCAA administration to patients with liver failure may exert a number of positive effects that may be more pronounced in patients with marked depression of BCAA levels. On the other hand, due to the stimulatory effect of BCAA on GLN synthesis, BCAA supplementation may lead to enhanced ammonia production from GLN breakdown in the intestine and the kidneys and thus exert harmful effects on the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, to enhance therapeutic effectiveness of the BCAA in patients with liver injury, their detrimental effect on ammonia production, which is negligible in healthy people and/or patients with other disorders, should be avoided. In treatment of hepatic encephalopathy, simultaneous administration of the BCAA (to correct amino acid imbalance and promote ammonia detoxification to GLN) with α-ketoglutarate (to inhibit GLN breakdown to ammonia in enterocytes) and/or phenylbutyrate (to enhance GLN excretion by the kidneys) is suggested. Attention should be given to the type of liver injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, signs of inflammation, and the dose of BCAA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Distribution of mast cell subtypes in interstitial cystitis: implications for novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shabana T; Birch, Brian R; Voegeli, David; Fader, Mandy; Foria, Vipul; Cooper, Alan J; Walls, Andrew F; Lwaleed, Bashir A

    2018-05-15

    To identify the presence and geographical distribution of mast cell (MC) subtypes: MC T (tryptase positive-chymase negative) and MC TC (tryptase positive-chymase positive) in bladder tissue. Bladder tissue was obtained from patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (n=14) and normal histology from University Hospital Southampton tissue bank. Sequential tissue slices were immunohistochemically stained for MC subtypes using anti-MC tryptase (for MC T and MC TC ) and anti-MC chymase (for MC TC ). Stained sections were photographed, and positively stained MCs were quantified using ImageJ. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and individual paired t-tests. There was a significant difference in the density of MCs between each layer of the disease bladder, with the greatest accumulation within the detrusor (p<0.001). There was a significant increase in MC TC subtype in the lamina (p=0.009) in painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Our results suggest that mastocytosis is present within all layers of disease bladder, especially the muscle layer. The varying increase in MC subtypes in the lamina and mucosa may explain the variability in painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis symptoms. A high influx of MC TC in the mucosa of individuals who also had ulceration noted within their diagnostic notes may be of the Hunner's ulcer subclassification. These findings suggest a relationship between the pathogenesis of MC subtypes and the clinical presentation of painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. A cohort study would further elucidate the diagnostic and/or therapeutic potential of MCs in patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Depth of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3 in Peruvian Women: Implications for Therapeutic Depth of Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxa, Luis; Jeronimo, Jose; Alonzo, Todd A; Gage, Julia; Castle, Philip E; Cremer, Miriam L; Felix, Juan C

    2018-01-01

    To determine the involvement of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) in a population of women in a lower-resource setting. One hundred twelve consecutive cone excision specimens with histological diagnosis of CIN3 were retrieved from the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases in Lima Peru. Two pathologists independently evaluated each specimen microscopically and confirmed 107 cases that could be measured by optical micrometry. Depth and breadth of the lesions were measured microscopically. The mean maximal depth of cervical involvement by CIN3 was 2 ± 0.13 mm; depth was less than 3.5 mm in 89.7% of cases and less than 5 mm in 93.5%. Mean breadth of CIN3 was 7.3 ± 4.4 mm; breadth was less than 15.9 mm in 95% of cases and less than 20.5 mm in 99.7%. The correlation coefficient between breadth and depth of CIN3 was 0.61. No significant correlation was found between age and depth. Depth of CIN3 involvement in a developing country is significantly deeper than that reported in the United States. Treatment selection for women with CIN3 and risk of treatment failure may vary between developing and developed countries because of the difference in the depth of lesions. Countries with underscreened populations need to consider the increased disease severity in devising treatment strategies.

  5. Determination of hemispheric emotional valence in individual subjects: A new approach with research and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polcari Ann

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much has been theorized about the emotional properties of the hemispheres. Our review of the dominant hypotheses put forth by Schore, Joseph, Davidson, and Harmon-Jones on hemispheric emotional valences (HEV shows that none are supported by robust data. Instead, we propose that individual's hemispheres are organized to have differing HEVs that can be lateralized in either direction. Methods Probe auditory evoked potentials (AEP recorded during a neutral and an upsetting memory were used to assess HEV in 28 (20 F right-handed subjects who were either victims of childhood maltreatment (N = 12 or healthy controls. In a sub-population, we determined HEV by emotional response to lateral visual field stimulation (LVFS, in which vision is limited to one, then the other hemifield. We compare a number of morphometric and functional brain measures between individuals who have right-negative versus left-negative HEV. Results Using AEPs to determine HEV, we found 62% of controls and 67% of maltreated subjects had right negative HEV. There was a strong interaction between HEV-laterality and gender, which together accounted for 60% of individual variability in total grey matter volume (GMV. HEV-laterality was associated with differences in hippocampal volume, amygdala/hippocampal ratios, and measures of verbal, visual and global memory. HEV-laterality was associated also with different constellations of symptoms comparing maltreated subjects to controls. Emotional response to LVFS provided a convenient and complementary measure of HEV-laterality that correlated significantly with the HEVs determined by AEPs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that HEV-laterality, like handedness or gender, is an important individual difference with significant implications for brain and behavioral research, and for guiding lateralized treatments such as rTMS.

  6. Determination of hemispheric emotional valence in individual subjects: a new approach with research and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Fredric; Teicher, Martin H; Anderson, Carl; Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Navalta, Carryl P; Andersen, Susan L

    2007-03-06

    Much has been theorized about the emotional properties of the hemispheres. Our review of the dominant hypotheses put forth by Schore, Joseph, Davidson, and Harmon-Jones on hemispheric emotional valences (HEV) shows that none are supported by robust data. Instead, we propose that individual's hemispheres are organized to have differing HEVs that can be lateralized in either direction. Probe auditory evoked potentials (AEP) recorded during a neutral and an upsetting memory were used to assess HEV in 28 (20 F) right-handed subjects who were either victims of childhood maltreatment (N = 12) or healthy controls. In a sub-population, we determined HEV by emotional response to lateral visual field stimulation (LVFS), in which vision is limited to one, then the other hemifield. We compare a number of morphometric and functional brain measures between individuals who have right-negative versus left-negative HEV. Using AEPs to determine HEV, we found 62% of controls and 67% of maltreated subjects had right negative HEV. There was a strong interaction between HEV-laterality and gender, which together accounted for 60% of individual variability in total grey matter volume (GMV). HEV-laterality was associated with differences in hippocampal volume, amygdala/hippocampal ratios, and measures of verbal, visual and global memory. HEV-laterality was associated also with different constellations of symptoms comparing maltreated subjects to controls. Emotional response to LVFS provided a convenient and complementary measure of HEV-laterality that correlated significantly with the HEVs determined by AEPs. Our findings suggest that HEV-laterality, like handedness or gender, is an important individual difference with significant implications for brain and behavioral research, and for guiding lateralized treatments such as rTMS.

  7. Therapeutic fasting as a potential effective treatment for type 2 diabetes: A 4-month case study

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    Michael Ku

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle therapy is an integral part of type 2 diabetes (T2D management, but there remains no consensus on an optimal diet. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic fasting as a treatment for T2D. This case follows a male T2D patient treated at the Intensive Dietary Management Clinic in Scarborough, Ontario, over a 4-month period. The patient’s initial fasting regimen consisted of a 24-h fast, three times a week. Over the course of treatment, the patient gradually extended his fasting period, eventually fasting for 42 h, two to three times a week. By the end of treatment, the patient’s weight was reduced by 17.8% and his waist circumference was reduced by 11.0%. In addition, the patient’s glycated haemoglobin levels decreased from 7.7% to 7.2%, and he was able to completely discontinue his insulin treatment, despite over a decade of insulin usage. The patient did not find it difficult to adhere to the fasting schedule and did not experience any hypoglycaemic episodes or other significant adverse effects. These observations suggest that therapeutic fasting may be a viable treatment option for T2D patients.

  8. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of genetic heterogeneity in myeloid neoplasms uncovered by comprehensive mutational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While growing use of comprehensive mutational analysis has led to the discovery of innumerable genetic alterations associated with various myeloid neoplasms, the under-recognized phenomenon of genetic heterogeneity within such neoplasms creates a potential for diagnostic confusion. Here, we describe two cases where expanded mutational testing led to amendment of an initial diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with subsequent altered treatment of each patient. We demonstrate the power of comprehensive testing in ensuring appropriate classification of genetically heterogeneous neoplasms, and emphasize thoughtful analysis of molecular and genetic data as an essential component of diagnosis and management.

  9. [Food addiction: Definition, measurement and limits of the concept, associated factors, therapeutic and clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathelain, Sarah; Brunault, Paul; Ballon, Nicolas; Réveillère, Christian; Courtois, Robert

    2016-12-01

    and multidimensional concept which requires integrated care with psychotherapy, pharmacological and social lines of approach. This concept has also practical implications in terms of prevention and public health (e.g., prevention, brief interventions, possible law enforcement regarding some kinds of food which could present some addictive properties). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Histopathological study of ocular erythema nodosum leprosum and post-therapeutic scleral perforation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathinam S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae , clinically present either as tuberculoid, borderline or lepromatous type. Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL is an acute humoral response in the chronic course of lepromatous leprosy. Although very severe ENL reactions are known in systemic leprosy, such severity is rare in ocular tissues. A leprosy uveitis patient suffered from a severe form of post-therapeutic ENL reaction which resulted in perforation of the globe at the site of preexisting subconjunctival leproma. Painful blind eye was enucleated. Histopathological study revealed infiltration of numerous polymorphs and macrophages packed with acid-fast bacilli in the conjunctiva, cornea, ciliary body, ora serrata and sclera. A profuse influx of neutrophils on a background of macrophages packed with M. leprae confirmed the ocular ENL reaction. This case is reported to alert the ophthalmologists to a rare ocular complication of ENL.

  11. Evaluation of possible vertical fractures and therapeutic possibilities: A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Espinoza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Restorative treatment of endontic teeth supossed certain complications, especially when the restoration is not adequate. Indications for treatment vary according to the remaining tooth . In cases of which this one is moderated, it is chosen to rehabilitate by a type of indirect obturation, this can be in resin, ceramics or metal. A bad indication of restoration will lead to certain complications due to the fact that the rehabilitation of a treated tooth endodónticamente supposes in the majority of the cases an important challenge for the odontologist since it must solve the loss of structure dentaria, the minor resistance to the fracture before the forces oclusales and the need to provide sufficient retention to the material restorer who will replace the dental lost matter.Dental cracks corresponds to one of the recurring problems, the clinical diagnosis of accounting for it, usually cannot be verified radiographically and clinical examination is necessary.In some cases it opt prematurely for the exodoncy, the implications of this option for the stomatognathic balance should guide the clinician to ensure proper diagnosis and more conservative treatment plan, using the wide variety of new materials and adhesive systems, which allow patient's and clinician's satisfaction.We report the case of a patient presenting a dental crack in the tooth 2.4, which was treated conservatively, obtaining optimal results in terms of aesthetics and functionality.

  12. Identification of HNF1A-MODY and HNF4A-MODY in Irish families: phenotypic characteristics and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyithar, M P; Bacon, S; Pannu, K K; Rizvi, S R; Colclough, K; Ellard, S; Byrne, M M

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1A and HNF4A mutations, and the clinical implications following the genetic diagnosis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) in the Irish population, remain unknown. The aim of this study was to establish the occurrence of HNF1A and HNF4A mutations in subjects classified clinically as MODY to identify novel mutations, and to determine the phenotypic features and response to therapy. A total of 36 unrelated index cases with a clinical diagnosis of MODY were analyzed for HNF1A/HNF4A mutations. OGTT was performed to determine the degree of glucose tolerance and insulin secretory response. Also, 38 relatives underwent OGTT and were tested for the relevant known mutations. HNF1A-/HNF4A-MODY subjects were compared with nine HNF1A mutation-negative relatives and 20 type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients. Seven different HNF1A mutations were identified in 11/36 (30.5%) index cases, two of which were novel (S352fsdelG and F426X), as well as two novel HNF4A mutations (M1? and R290C; 6%). Family screening revealed 20 subjects with HNF1A and seven with HNF4A mutations. Only 51.6% of HNF1A mutation carriers were diagnosed with diabetes by age 25 years; 11 of the mutation carriers were overweight and four were obese. Insulin secretory response to glucose was significantly lower in HNF1A-MODY subjects than in T2DM patients and HNF1A mutation-negative relatives (P=0.01). Therapeutic changes occurred in 48% of mutation carriers following genetic diagnosis. There was an HNF1A-MODY pick-up rate of 30.5% and an HNF4A-MODY pick-up rate of 6% in Irish MODY families. Genetically confirmed MODY has significant therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with breast tuberculosis: Analysis of 46 Cases

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    Murat Ozgur Kilic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tubercular infection. Our aim is to highlight the nonspecific clinical presentations, diagnostic difficulties and therapeutic approaches of mammarian tuberculosis. Forty-six patients diagnosed with breast tuberculosis between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical features, all diagnostic methods, and the outcomes of treatment were analysed. All cases were female with a mean age of 36.4 years. Breast mass and pain were the most common complaints. While 34.8% of the cases had a physical examination with suspicions for malignancy, 43.5% of the patients had Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS 4 or 5 lesions suggested malignancy radiologically. Definitive diagnosis was based on histopathologic examination through core needle biopsy (n = 29, excisional biopsy (n = 12, and open biopsy (n = 5 taken from the abscess wall during drainage. Standard antiTB therapy for 6 months was given to all cases. Thirty-three patients recovered with standard 6-month therapy while extended treatment for 9–12 months was needed in 13 (28.2% cases. Surgery was carried out in 17 cases. Two patients developed recurrence. Breast tuberculosis can be easily confused with breast cancer, suppurative abscess, and other causes of granulomatous mastitis, both clinically and radiologically. A multidisciplinary approach is required to prevent diagnostic delays and unnecessary surgical interventions. Although antiTB therapy is the mainstay treatment of breast TB, surgery is usually indicated in patients refractory to medical treatment.

  14. Genomic portfolio of Merkel cell carcinoma as determined by comprehensive genomic profiling: implications for targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R; Tomson, Brett N; Elkin, Sheryl K; Marchlik, Erica; Carter, Jennifer L; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-04-26

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an ultra-rare cutaneous neuroendocrine cancer for which approved treatment options are lacking. To better understand potential actionability, the genomic landscape of Merkel cell cancers was assessed. The molecular aberrations in 17 patients with Merkel cell carcinoma were, on physician request, tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratory (Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA) using next-generation sequencing (182 or 236 genes) and analyzed by N-of-One, Inc. (Lexington, MA). There were 30 genes harboring aberrations and 60 distinct molecular alterations identified in this patient population. The most common abnormalities involved the TP53 gene (12/17 [71% of patients]) and the cell cycle pathway (CDKN2A/B, CDKN2C or RB1) (12/17 [71%]). Abnormalities also were observed in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway (AKT2, FBXW7, NF1, PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN or RICTOR) (9/17 [53%]) and DNA repair genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, CHEK2, FANCA or MLH1) (5/17 [29%]). Possible cognate targeted therapies, including FDA-approved drugs, could be identified in most of the patients (16/17 [94%]). In summary, Merkel cell carcinomas were characterized by multiple distinct aberrations that were unique in the majority of analyzed cases. Most patients had theoretically actionable alterations. These results provide a framework for investigating tailored combinations of matched therapies in Merkel cell carcinoma patients.

  15. Therapeutic implications in the treatment of aural Pseudomonas infections based on in vitro susceptibility patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohar, J E; Kenna, M A; Wadowsky, R M

    1995-09-01

    To examine the in vitro susceptibility patterns of aural isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to identify changes over a 4-year period. Retrospective case series. The outpatient department at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (Pa), a tertiary referral center. Ambulatory children younger than 18 years from whose ears P aeruginosa was isolated. The in vitro susceptibility of aural isolates of P aeruginosa to ampicillin, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, sulfisoxazole, ticarcillin, mezlocillin, gentamicin, tobramycin, cefazolin, tetracycline, piperacillin, nitrofurantoin, cephalexin hydrochloride, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime axetil, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. No changes were found in the trends of the susceptibility patterns over the 4-year study period, with the exception of the semisynthetic penicillins, ticarcillin and mezlocillin. These two agents were found to be relatively ineffective against the strains of P aeruginosa isolated in 1989 (59% and 18% susceptibility, respectively). This finding is in contrast to their effectiveness over the remainder of the study period (96% and 90% susceptibility, respectively), which was excellent. These observations likely reflect a change in the breakpoints for the minimal inhibitory concentrations between these periods. The intravenous agent with the best susceptibility profile was piperacillin (96%). Of the aminoglycosides tested, 94% of the isolates were sensitive to tobramycin, as opposed to only 79% for gentamicin. This finding may have significance when one is empirically selecting ototopical therapy, since both tobramycin and gentamicin are available as topical preparations. Of the oral agents, the combination of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was most effective (46%).

  16. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

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    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  17. Skull-base invasion of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings and therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Takeshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Kagei, Kenji; Abe, Satoru; Hashimoto, Seiko; Ohmori, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Akira; Fukuda, Satoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of skull-base abnormality on MRI for predicting local recurrence in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Between November 1988 and February 1997, 48 patients with NPC were examined with both MRI (1.5 T) and CT prior to radiation therapy. T classification (1987 UICC) based on physical examination and CT findings were T1 in 3 cases, T2 in 22, T3 in 9, and T4 in 14. On MRI, low-intensity tissue with Gd enhancement in the marrow of the skull was considered to be a suspicious finding of skull-base invasion. CT simulation was performed in all patients. The total dose to the primary tumor was 60-75 Gy (mean, 67 Gy). The mean follow-up period was 42 months. Results: All 14 T4 patients had abnormal tissue in the marrow of the skull base on MRI. Thirty-eight percent (13 of 34) of T1-3 patients were suspected to have skull-base invasion based on MRI (0% for T1, 27% [6 of 22] for T2, and 78% [7 of 9] for T3). The 5-year local control rate was significantly different between T1-3 and T4 tumors (97% vs. 69%, p < 0.025) but was not different by the presence of the MRI abnormality in the skull base. Conclusion: Skull-base invasion suspected solely by MRI does not relate to local recurrence provided that careful treatment planning is performed with the aid of MRI and CT simulator

  18. Written case formulations in the treatment of anorexia nervosa: Evidence for therapeutic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Karina L; O'Hara, Caitlin B; Bartholdy, Savani; Renwick, Beth; Keyes, Alexandra; Lose, Anna; Kenyon, Martha; DeJong, Hannah; Broadbent, Hannah; Loomes, Rachel; McClelland, Jessica; Serpell, Lucy; Richards, Lorna; Johnson-Sabine, Eric; Boughton, Nicky; Whitehead, Linette; Treasure, Janet; Wade, Tracey; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Case formulation is a core component of many psychotherapies and formulation letters may provide an opportunity to enhance the therapeutic alliance and improve treatment outcomes. This study aimed to determine if formulation letters predict treatment satisfaction, session attendance, and symptom reductions in anorexia nervosa (AN). It was hypothesized that higher quality formulation letters would predict greater treatment satisfaction, a greater number of attended sessions, and greater improvement in eating disorder symptoms. Patients were adult outpatients with AN (n = 46) who received Maudsley Anorexia Nervosa Treatment for Adults (MANTRA) in the context of a clinical trial. A Case Formulation Rating Scheme was used to rate letters for adherence to the MANTRA model and use of a collaborative, reflective, affirming stance. Analyses included linear regression and mixed models. Formulation letters that paid attention to the development of the AN predicted greater treatment acceptability ratings (p = 0.002). More reflective and respectful letters predicted greater reductions in Eating Disorder Examination scores (p = 0.003). Results highlight the potential significance of a particular style of written formulation as part of treatment for AN. Future research should examine applicability to other psychiatric disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:874-882). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Therapeutical attitudes in tooth supported overdentures with ball attachements. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Țâncu, A M; Melescanu Imre, M; Preoteasa, C T; Preoteasa, E

    2014-01-01

    Tooth supported overdenture with ball attachments has a number of advantages in prosthetics, but presents some difficulties as well, which sometimes make impossible the use of these anchoring systems; these difficulties should be well known. In this regard we present a suggestive case. It is the case of a patient, aged 57, who came for treatment, suffering from subtotal maxillary and mandibular edentulism (present 11 and 21, respectively 33 and 43), previously having an overdenture prosthesis on natural teeth, with special systems - ball attachment type, dissatisfied with the treatment (due to repeated fractures and functional intolerance to dentures). Clinical examination revealed an increase of the vertical dimension of occlusion and reduced prosthetic space at a correct, functional DVO value, aspects that were explaining the patient's reported complaints. As a therapeutic approach, having into consideration the balance conditions that were favorable for complete dentures and the large ball attachments volume, which did not allow keeping them at a functional DVO at any of the jaws, and the relatively young age of the patient, it was decided to remove the ball attachments and to keep the teeth for a simple overdenture, both to the maxillar and the mandible, over coronary reduced teeth, enough to allow the denture thickness at a functional DVO. Good end result of prosthetics, with stable, functional dentures, which were well tolerated and offered satisfaction to the patient, have led to an increased quality of life.

  20. Therapeutical attitudes in tooth supported overdentures with ball attachements. Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Țâncu, AM; Melescanu Imre, M; Preoteasa, CT; Preoteasa, E

    2014-01-01

    Tooth supported overdenture with ball attachments has a number of advantages in prosthetics, but presents some difficulties as well, which sometimes make impossible the use of these anchoring systems; these difficulties should be well known. In this regard we present a suggestive case. It is the case of a patient, aged 57, who came for treatment, suffering from subtotal maxillary and mandibular edentulism (present 11 and 21, respectively 33 and 43), previously having an overdenture prosthesis on natural teeth, with special systems – ball attachment type, dissatisfied with the treatment (due to repeated fractures and functional intolerance to dentures). Clinical examination revealed an increase of the vertical dimension of occlusion and reduced prosthetic space at a correct, functional DVO value, aspects that were explaining the patient’s reported complaints. As a therapeutic approach, having into consideration the balance conditions that were favorable for complete dentures and the large ball attachments volume, which did not allow keeping them at a functional DVO at any of the jaws, and the relatively young age of the patient, it was decided to remove the ball attachments and to keep the teeth for a simple overdenture, both to the maxillar and the mandible, over coronary reduced teeth, enough to allow the denture thickness at a functional DVO. Good end result of prosthetics, with stable, functional dentures, which were well tolerated and offered satisfaction to the patient, have led to an increased quality of life. PMID:27057258

  1. Therapeutic plasma exchange: an effective treatment in ethylene dibromide poisoning cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Naresh; Bharani, Rajesh; Jain, Manish; Argal, Suarabh; Soni, Harish; Kosta, Susmit; Kumar, Ravindra

    2013-10-01

    Ethylene dibromide (EDB) poisoning is very common in Central India and has fatal outcome. EDB is highly protein bound and, therefore, it is suggested that therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) may be useful in removing drug from body shortly after ingestion before EDB metabolizes and causes severe end organ damage. The aim of our study is to find the effect of time of start of TPE on survival outcome of EDB poisoning cases. Fifty-eight cases of EDB poisoning were reviewed from 2007 to 2012 in Department of critical care medicine in tertiary care hospitals at Indore. Five patients were discharged against medical advice and lost to follow up. TPE was done in 47 patients as early as possible and irrespective of appearance of clinical symptoms. TPE was not performed in six cases as they were hypotensive at admission. The patients with EDB poisoning were 15-45 yrs old with 3:2 male to female ratio. Out of 47 who received TPE, 39 patients survived. TPE had started within 24 h of ingestions of EDB in 36 out of 39 survived patients. Survival outcome was nine times higher in patients who received TPE within 24 h than after 24 h of ingestion. Survival rate was increased to 100% in patients where TPE was done within 12 h of ingestion of EDB. Early TPE help to remove plasma protein bound toxin with significant mortality reduction. However, delay in start of TPE after ingestion of poison has significant poor survival outcome. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Implications for Therapeutic Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Hof

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with an upper motor neurone syndrome (CP suffer from many disabling primary symptoms: spasms, weakness, and loss of dexterity. These primary ‘neurogenic’ symptoms often lead to secondary disabilities, muscle contractures, and tertiary effects, bone deformations. A common symptom of CP is hypertonia, with. the consequence that the involved muscles remain in an excessively shortened length for most of the time. As a normal reaction of the muscle tissue, the number of sarcomeres is reduced and the muscle fibers shorten permanently: a contracture develops. A possible second type of contracture is that normal muscle lengthening along with bone growth is affected. Current treatments for the secondary effects include (1 reduction of muscle force, (2lengthening of the muscle fibers by serial plaster casts, and (3surgical lengthening of tendons or aponeurosis. The choice of treatment depends on the cause of the functional deficit. Bone tissue also adapts itself to abnormal forces, especially in the growth period. The hypertonias or contractures of CP so may give rise to bone malformations that interfere with function (e.g. femur endorotation or may reduce the action of muscles by changing the lever arm (e.g. ankle varus. Although prevention should always be preferred, a timely surgical intervention cannot always be avoided. The differences in treatment for the various groups require and justify an extensive laboratory investigation, including EMG recordings in gait, measurement of passive elastic properties, and long-term observation of the hypertonia.

  3. Immunohistochemical investigations and introduction of new therapeutic strategies in scleromyxoedema: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altmeyer Peter

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scleromyxoedema is a rare chronic skin disease of obscure origin, which may often be associated with severe internal co-morbidity. Even though different casuistic treatment modalities have been described, to date, curing still seems to be impossible. Case presentation We report a 44-year-old Caucasian female presenting with remarkable circumscribed, erythematous to skin-coloured, indurated skin eruptions at the forehead, arms, shoulders, legs and the gluteal region. Routine histology and Alcian blue labelling confirmed a massive deposition of acid mucopolysaccharides. Immunohistochemical investigations revealed proliferating fibroblasts and a discrete lymphocytic infiltration as well as increased dermal expression of MIB-1+ and anti-mastcell-tryptase+ cells. Bone marrow biopsies confirmed a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance without morphological characteristics of plasmocytoma; immunofixation unveiled the presence of IgG-kappa paraproteins. Conclusions Taking all data into account, our patient exhibited a complex form of lichen mxyoedematosus, which could most likely be linked a variant of scleromyxoedema. Experimental treatment with methotrexate resulted in a stabilisation of clinical symptoms but no improvement after five months of therapy. A subsequent therapeutic attempt by the use of medium-dose ultraviolet A1 cold-light photomonotherapy led to a further stabilisation of clinical symptoms, but could not induce a sustained amelioration of skin condition.

  4. Q fever in the Greek Island of Crete: epidemiologic, clinical, and therapeutic data from 98 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselentis, Y; Gikas, A; Kofteridis, D; Kyriakakis, E; Lydataki, N; Bouros, D; Tsaparas, N

    1995-05-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken in Crete, Greece, to investigate the epidemiologic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of Q fever. Over a period of 5 years (1989-1993), 1,298 patients were examined and 98 cases were identified. Individuals who were aged 20-29 years and 30-39 years appeared to have an increased risk of infection. Contact with animals was found to be a major risk factor for acquisition of Q fever. The predominant clinical manifestations of the infection were fever (91.7% of patients) and respiratory disease (88.5%), whereas hepatitis was the dominant feature in only a minority (7.1%) of patients. Chest radiographs frequently revealed pulmonary interstitial changes (36.4% of patients) and alveolar changes (34.4%). Abnormal echocardiographic findings were also observed. There was no difference in the duration of fever whether the patient received therapy with tetracycline or erythromycin, a finding that may be explained by the delay in initiating tetracycline therapy.

  5. Mathematical modeling of tumor-induced immunosuppression by myeloid-derived suppressor cells: Implications for therapeutic targeting strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Pooya; Madjidzadeh, Keivan; Hassan, Moustapha; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr

    2018-04-07

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) belong to immature myeloid cells that are generated and accumulated during the tumor development. MDSCs strongly suppress the anti-tumor immunity and provide conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we present a mathematical model based on ordinary differential equations (ODE) to describe tumor-induced immunosuppression caused by MDSCs. The model consists of four equations and incorporates tumor cells, cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), natural killer (NK) cells and MDSCs. We also provide simulation models that evaluate or predict the effects of anti-MDSC drugs (e.g., l-arginine and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)) on the tumor growth and the restoration of anti-tumor immunity. The simulated results obtained using our model were in good agreement with the corresponding experimental findings on the expansion of splenic MDSCs, immunosuppressive effects of these cells at the tumor site and effectiveness of l-arginine and 5-FU on the re-establishment of antitumor immunity. Regarding this latter issue, our predictive simulation results demonstrated that intermittent therapy with low-dose 5-FU alone could eradicate the tumors irrespective of their origins and types. Furthermore, at the time of tumor eradication, the number of CTLs prevailed over that of cancer cells and the number of splenic MDSCs returned to the normal levels. Finally, our predictive simulation results also showed that the addition of l-arginine supplementation to the intermittent 5-FU therapy reduced the time of the tumor eradication and the number of iterations for 5-FU treatment. Thus, the present mathematical model provides important implications for designing new therapeutic strategies that aim to restore antitumor immunity by targeting MDSCs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Infrapopliteal calcification patterns in critical limb ischemia: diagnostic, pathologic and therapeutic implications in the search for the endovascular holy grail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Jihad A; Diaz-Sandoval, Larry J; Saab, Fadi

    2017-06-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) represents the terminal stage of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and is characterized by multilevel and multivessel disease. Amongst patients with infrainguinal disease, approximately one third have predominantly isolated infrapopliteal disease and the remaining two thirds, a combination of femoropopliteal and infrapopliteal disease. Isolated infrapopliteal disease is mainly seen in the elderly, diabetic, or dialysis-dependent patients. These patients have higher risk of amputation and shorter amputation-free survival. Infrapopliteal disease presents with either complex high-grade calcified tandem lesions in multiple vessels or with long chronic total occlusion (CTO) segments with plaques characterized by higher calcium and lower fibro-fatty content than the inflow vessels, as arterial calcium deposition increases as we progress distally in the arterial tree. Vascular calcification occurs in both intima and media. Intimal calcification leads to development of calcified atheroma and occlusive lesions. Medial calcification leads to stiffening and decrease in arterial wall elasticity and compliance leading to atherosclerosis, reduced perfusion, and PAD, increasing cardiovascular mortality among patients with end-stage renal disease. This article attempts to review the implications of the diverse pathologic patterns of calcium distribution in infrapopliteal vessels of CLI patients, on the diagnostic modalities, technological developments, and the evolution of therapeutic approaches to improve outcomes among these patients. A critical analysis of the currently available data is provided, pointing to the surprising omission on the role of calcium on outcomes, and future directions are discussed. Is infrapopliteal calcium a roadblock or the avenue towards new paths? Necessity remains the mother of invention.

  7. Cancer gene profiling in non-small cell lung cancers reveals activating mutations in JAK2 and JAK3 with therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyu D. Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation sequencing (NGS of cancer gene panels are widely applied to enable personalized cancer therapy and to identify novel oncogenic mutations. Methods We performed targeted NGS on 932 clinical cases of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs using the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot panel v2 assay. Results Actionable mutations were identified in 65% of the cases with available targeted therapeutic options, including 26% of the patients with mutations in National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guideline genes. Most notably, we discovered JAK2 p.V617F somatic mutation, a hallmark of myeloproliferative neoplasms, in 1% (9/932 of the NSCLCs. Analysis of cancer cell line pharmacogenomic data showed that a high level of JAK2 expression in a panel of NSCLC cell lines is correlated with increased sensitivity to a selective JAK2 inhibitor. Further analysis of TCGA genomic data revealed JAK2 gain or loss due to genetic alterations in NSCLC clinical samples are associated with significantly elevated or reduced PD-L1 expression, suggesting that the activating JAK2 p.V617F mutation could confer sensitivity to both JAK inhibitors and anti-PD1 immunotherapy. We also detected JAK3 germline activating mutations in 6.7% (62/932 of the patients who may benefit from anti-PD1 treatment, in light of recent findings that JAK3 mutations upregulate PD-L1 expression. Conclusion Taken together, this study demonstrated the clinical utility of targeted NGS with a focused hotspot cancer gene panel in NSCLCs and identified activating mutations in JAK2 and JAK3 with clinical implications inferred through integrative analysis of cancer genetic, genomic, and pharmacogenomic data. The potential of JAK2 and JAK3 mutations as response markers for the targeted therapy against JAK kinases or anti-PD1 immunotherapy warrants further investigation.

  8. Case formulation and the therapeutic relationship: the role of therapist self-reflection and self-revelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufekcioglu, Sumru; Muran, J Christopher

    2015-05-01

    This article examines the role of the therapist's self-reflection and self-revelation in case formulation. We believe that a collaboratively constructed case formulation must always be considered in the context of an evolving therapeutic relationship. Further, self-reflection and self-revelation on the part of the therapist are critical for a more elaborate and nuanced case formulation and for understanding the patient. This highlights the importance of attunement to the here and now and the evolving therapeutic relationship. From this attunement, the therapist's self-reflection and self-revelation can emerge further, which can lead to the patient's personal growth and increased self-other awareness. To illustrate our point, we present an integrative, relational model in the case of a patient who has been in treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Therapeutic Assessment for Preadolescent Boys with Oppositional Defiant Disorder: A Replicated Single-Case Time-Series Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin D.; Handler, Leonard; Nash, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The Therapeutic Assessment (TA) model is a relatively new treatment approach that fuses assessment and psychotherapy. The study examines the efficacy of this model with preadolescent boys with oppositional defiant disorder and their families. A replicated single-case time-series design with daily measures is used to assess the effects of TA and to…

  10. Supporting Affect Regulation in Children With Multiple Disabilities During Psychotherapy: A Multiple Case Design Study of Therapeutic Attachment. [Miscellaneous Article

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuengel, C; Sterkenburg, P S; Jeczynski, P; Janssen, C G C; Jongbloed, G

    2009-01-01

    : In a controlled multiple case design study, the development of a therapeutic relationship and its role in affect regulation were studied in 6 children with visual disabilities, severe intellectual disabilities, severe challenging behavior, and prolonged social deprivation. In the 1st phase,

  11. Positive results of serological tests for syphilis in pregnancy – diagnostic and therapeutic problems, report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Koper; Agnieszka B. Serwin; Anna Baran; Iwona Flisiak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Undiagnosed and untreated syphilis in pregnancy may result in subsequent complications: early fetal loss, stillbirth, low birth weight of infants and newborns with congenital syphilis. Objective. To analyze diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas of positive results of serological tests for syphilis (STS) in pregnancy. Case reports. We present two cases of pregnant women, hospitalized in our department due to positive results of serological tests for syphilis, pe...

  12. Clinical impact of laboratory error on therapeutic drug monitoring of once-daily tobramycin in cystic fibrosis: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Prescott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Once-daily dosing intravenous tobramycin is commonly used to treat cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations. Clinicians often utilize historical therapeutic drug monitoring data to individualize the dose among patients who have been treated with tobramycin previously. This case series involves three patients with cystic fibrosis who had supra-therapeutic tobramycin levels despite use of a once-daily dosing that produced therapeutic drug levels during a previous hospital admission, raising questions about the validity of these levels. Investigation into several potential sources of error led to the discovery of an analyzer error in the laboratory. Once the laboratory’s tobramycin analyzer was recalibrated, the reported levels were comparable to historical levels. This case series emphasizes the clinical importance of critically analyzing reported levels, and specifically, the importance of utilizing past therapeutic drug monitoring data, if available, for all patients treated with intravenous tobramycin. If a patient was therapeutic on a similar dose of tobramycin during a previous admission, a dose adjustment may not be necessary, and clinicians should consider repeating levels while pursuing alternative explanations for the discrepant serum levels.

  13. How a Fully Automated eHealth Program Simulates Three Therapeutic Processes: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Marianne T S; Johansen, Ayna; Brendryen, Håvar

    2016-06-28

    eHealth programs may be better understood by breaking down the components of one particular program and discussing its potential for interactivity and tailoring in regard to concepts from face-to-face counseling. In the search for the efficacious elements within eHealth programs, it is important to understand how a program using lapse management may simultaneously support working alliance, internalization of motivation, and behavior maintenance. These processes have been applied to fully automated eHealth programs individually. However, given their significance in face-to-face counseling, it may be important to simulate the processes simultaneously in interactive, tailored programs. We propose a theoretical model for how fully automated behavior change eHealth programs may be more effective by simulating a therapist's support of a working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses. We show how the model is derived from theory and its application to Endre, a fully automated smoking cessation program that engages the user in several "counseling sessions" about quitting. A descriptive case study based on tools from the intervention mapping protocol shows how each therapeutic process is simulated. The program supports the user's working alliance through alliance factors, the nonembodied relational agent Endre and computerized motivational interviewing. Computerized motivational interviewing also supports internalized motivation to quit, whereas a lapse management component responds to lapses. The description operationalizes working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses, in terms of eHealth support of smoking cessation. A program may simulate working alliance, internalization of motivation, and lapse management through interactivity and individual tailoring, potentially making fully automated eHealth behavior change programs more effective.

  14. Identifying Inconsistencies and Reporting Deficits in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (TMB) Case Reports Authored by TMB Practitioners: a TMB-Adapted CAse REport (CARE) Guidelines Audit Through 2014†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Niki; Shue, Sarah; Freeland, Emilee; Ralston, Rick; Boulanger, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Case reports are a fundamental tool through which therapeutic massage and bodywork (TMB) practitioners can inform research and impact their field by detailing the presentation, treatment, and follow-up of a single individual encountered in practice. Inconsistencies in case reporting limit their impact as fundamental sources of clinical evidence. Using the TMB-adapted CAse REport (CARE) guidelines, the current study sought to provide a rich description regarding the reporting quality of TMB practitioner authored TMB case reports in the literature. Methods 1) Systematic identification of published, peer-reviewed TMB case reports authored by TMB practitioners following PRISMA recommendations; 2) audit development based on TMB-adapted CARE guidelines; 3) audit implementation; and 4) descriptive analysis of audit scores. Results Our search identified 977 articles and 35 met study inclusion criteria. On average, TMB case reports included approximately 58% of the total items identified as necessary by the TMB-adapted CARE guidelines. Introduction sections of case reports had the best item reporting (80% on average), while Case Presentation (54%) and Results (52%) sections scored moderately overall, with only 20% of necessary Practitioner Description items included on average. Audit scores revealed inconsistent abstract reporting and few audited case reports including client race (20%), perspective (26%), and occupation/activities (40%); practitioner practice setting (12%), training (12%), scope-of-practice (29%), and credentialing (20%); adverse events or lack thereof (17%); and some aspect of informed consent (34%). Treatment descriptor item reporting varied from high to low. Various implications of concern are discussed. Conclusion The current audit and descriptive analysis highlight several reporting inconsistencies in TMB case reports prior to 2015. Reporting guidelines for case reports are important if standards for, and impact of, TMB case reports are

  15. Universal design of workplaces through the use of Poka-Yokes: Case study and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Miralles

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Employment plays an important part in many people’s lives beyond merely providing income, since continued participation in work can have many therapeutic benefits for workers defined as disabled. However, disabled workers face a range of barriers to employment, despite legislation intended to improve workplace accessibility emphasizing adaptations to the workplace, which many employers often find difficult and expensive. The Poka-Yoke approach was developed in the manufacturing industry as a way of improving productivity by reducing errors using often very simple adaptations. This paper argues that, as Poka-Yokes are designed to make life easier and improve the performance of workers without impairments, they are closer to the philosophy of Universal Design than to Accessible Design, and offer an easy and inclusive way of making work more accessible for all kind of workers. Design/methodology/approach: This paper provides a case study demonstrating the use of the Poka-Yoke approach in a sheltered work centre for disabled; highlighting how they served to improve accessibility to work by fulfilling Universal Design principles. Findings: Our research allows us to demonstrate the great potential of Poka-yokes for gaining accessibility to the workplace. The real application of this approach, both in sheltered work centres and ordinary companies, can contribute to improve the high unemployment rates of disabled people. Research limitations/implications: The proposal is innovative and was applied in one specific company. Thus, a range of customized Poka-yokes would be desirable for different industrial sectors. Practical implications: Managers of sheltered work centres, and also of ordinary companies, can realize about the great potential of Poka-Yokes as an easy means of gaining flexibility and accessibility. Originality/value: There are very few papers relating lean manufacturing tools and disability. Our approach analyzes the benefits of

  16. Clinical study of fetal liver transplantation in treatment of four cases of accidental or therapeutic acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report summarized the clinical experience of fetal liver transplantation (FLT) in the medical handling of accidental (case 1) or therapeutic (cases 2-4) acute radiation sickness of severe haemopoietic form. In addition to receiving 80 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide, cases 2, 3 and 4 were exposed to total body single irradiation of 5.5, 5.0 and 5.0 Gy, respectively; while case 1 was exposed to whole body irradiation of 5.2 Gy only. The total number of nucleated fetal liver cells transplanted was 2.26-4.1 x 10 8 /kg. Only 2-5% of peripheral blood cells of cases 2, 3 and 4 were found to have allogeneic marker. The author points out that FLT may be beneficial in those cases of accidental irradiation or patients with acute leukemia when there were no HLA-identical bone marrow donors available

  17. Umbilical melanoma: case report and review of anatomical and therapeutic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Eduardo Miranda; Gomes, Alexandre Santos de Almeida; Ribeiro, Edilana Sa; Vilaca, Thiago Guimaraes; Macedo, Francisco Igor Bulcao de; Santos, Rogerio Luiz dos; Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Background: Malignant melanoma corresponds to 5% of cutaneous neoplasias. However, umbilical melanoma is a rare occurrence, with only 13 cases reported on the literature. The purpose of this article is to present a case of umbilical primary melanoma, discuss the anatomy and lymphatic drainage of this region, and the therapeutic aspects. Clinical description: Three years ago, a 65 years-old white woman from Recife-PE, presented an umbilical pigmented nevus. It grew in size and one year ago the pigmentation increased. Examination showed depressed umbilical scarring completely filled by pigmented lesion with 1.5 cm, irregular borders and a depigmented area; no enlarged inguinal and axillary lymph nodes. Chest X-Ray, CT scan of abdomen and pelvis, and ultrasonography of groin and axillary lymphatic chains were normal. The pathological diagnosis after incisional biopsy was ulcerated malignant melanoma, without defining Breslow classification. Subsequently a complete excision of the lesion was performed; slide showed Breslow 8 mm and 1 mm of margin. Lymphoscintillography showed three left axillary lymph nodes. During surgical widening, the peritoneum seemed disease-free. Lymphatic mapping identified three lymph nodes, one of them not coloured by vital blue. All the lymph nodes were free of metastasis on histopathological and immunohistochemical examination. Discussion: Among the umbilical tumors, 80% are metastatic, the most common branch of which is the gastrointestinal tract. Melanoma is included in the other 20% corresponding to primary neoplasias of the umbilicus, which also include sarcomas, basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. From the embryological point of view, the umbilical scar can contain residues of several types of epithelial tissue of the gastrointestinal duct remaining from the omphalomesenteric duct. Anatomical aspects remain to be studied, such as the cylindrical form and the content within its thickness

  18. The Life Course Implications of Ready to Use Therapeutic Food for Children in Low-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Potts, Kaitlin S; Bazzano, Lydia A; Mason, John B

    2017-04-11

    The development of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) for the treatment of uncomplicated cases of severe acute malnutrition in young children from 6 months to 5 years old has greatly improved survival through the ability to treat large numbers of malnourished children in the community setting rather than at health facilities during emergencies. This success has led to a surge in demand for RUTF in low income countries that are frequently food insecure due to environmental factors such as cyclical drought. Worldwide production capacity for the supply of RUTF has increased dramatically through the expansion and development of new manufacturing facilities in both low and high income countries, and new business ventures dedicated to ready-to-use foods have emerged not only for emergencies, but increasingly, for supplementing caloric intake of pregnant women and young children not experiencing acute undernutrition. Due to the lack of evidence on the long term health impact these products may have, in the midst of global nutrition transitions toward obesity and metabolic dysfunction, the increased use of manufactured, commercial products for treatment and prevention of undernutrition is of great concern. Using a framework built on the life course health development perspective, the current research presents several drawbacks and limitations of RUTF for nutrition of mothers and young children, especially in non-emergency situations. Recommendations follow for potential strategies to limit the use of these products to the treatment of acute undernutrition only, study the longer term health impacts of RUTF, prevent conflict of interests arising for social enterprises, and where possible, ensure that whole foods are supported for life-long health and nutrition, as well as environmental sustainability.

  19. Usefulness of CT-scan in the diagnosis and therapeutic approach of gallstone ileus: report of two surgically treated cases

    OpenAIRE

    Michele, Danzi; Luciano, Grimaldi; Massimiliano, Fabozzi; Stefano, Reggio; Roberta, Danzi; Ernesto, Soscia; Bruno, Amato

    2013-01-01

    Background Gallstone ileus is a rare cause of gastrointestinal obstruction, more frequent in elderly patients, whose treatment is essentially surgical, although some para-surgical and mini-invasive possibilities exist, allowing the solution of such obstructive condition in a completely non-invasive way. Description In our study, after reporting two cases of biliary ileus managed by our surgical division, we will analyze the most suitable diagnostic procedures and the therapeutic approaches to...

  20. Therapeutic Riding for a Student with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairment: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrman, Jennifer; Ross, David B.

    2001-01-01

    A 9-year-old with multiple disabilities and visual impairments was the focus of a 10-week developmental therapeutic riding program incorporating hippotherapy. The program has led to increased mobility, an increase in visual attention span and fixation time, signs of greater verbal communication, and the acquisition of new functional signs.…

  1. Multiple factor analysis of the therapeutic effect of 131I in treating 783 cases of Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Min; Li Xianfeng; Li Sijin; Chen Haibin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the factors influencing therapeutic effect of 131 I in treating 783 cases of Graves disease. Methods: The values of various indexes were quantized on influencing factors such as age, sex, course of disease, mass of thyroid gland, the absorbed dose of 131 I per gram of thryoid gland, the given dose of 131 I, thyroid 24 h 131 I uptaking percentage, thyroid hormone and thyroid autoantibodys. The assessment of the therapeutic effect was made according to complete remission (including hypothyroidism) and partial remission after 131 I therapy. CMH χ 2 , Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Logistic regression were used to analyze the variable parameters before the treatment. Results: The therapeutic effect of 131 I is significant in the follow-up period (CMH χ 2 =69.21, P 131 I therapy for 12 months. The therapeutic effect was related to such factors as age thyroid mass, the absorbed dose of 131 I per gram of thryoid gland, thyroid 24 h 131 I uptaking percentage, etc (all the values of P 131 I uptaking percentage is higher, thyroid mass is bigger, thyroid gland is with noduses, the given dose of 131 I should be increased. Conversely decreased. (authors)

  2. Therapeutic Intervention in a Case of Ataxic Dysarthria Associated with a History of Amateur Boxing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to (a) describe the presenting features of ataxic dysarthria present in a participant with a long history of amateur boxing, (b) describe a novel application of behavioral principles in the treatment of this participant, and (c) discuss implications in the treatment of ataxic dysarthria secondary to boxing. The…

  3. Therapeutic Assessment of Complex Trauma: A Single-Case Time-Series Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tarocchi, Anna; Aschieri, Filippo; Fantini, Francesca; Smith, Justin D.

    2013-01-01

    The cumulative effect of repeated traumatic experiences in early childhood incrementally increases the risk of adjustment problems later in life. Surviving traumatic environments can lead to the development of an interrelated constellation of emotional and interpersonal symptoms termed complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD). Effective treatment of trauma begins with a multimethod psychological assessment and requires the use of several evidence-based therapeutic processes, including es...

  4. Expression and prognostic value of hemopoietic cytokine receptors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML): implications for future therapeutical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Michaela; Hecht, Karin; Reif, Susanne; Pelka-Fleischer, Renate; Pfister, Karin; Schmetzer, Helga

    2004-02-01

    Hemopoietic cytokines regulate hemopoietic cell functions via specific cell surface receptors. There is evidence to suggest, that those receptors (R) could play a role in leukemia with respect to cell differentiations and its regulation, prognosis, and pathobiology. Knowledge of individual cytokine receptor (CKR) profiles could provide new discoveries about CKR-supported therapeutic considerations. We have studied the expression of CKR on mononuclear bone marrow (BM) cells of 89 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at first diagnosis, three patients at relapse or with persisting AML and eight healthy probands by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis using directly fluorescein-conjugated antibodies: CD114 (hG-CSF-R), CD116 (hGM-CSF-R), CD117 (hSCF-R), CD123 (hIL-3-R), CD130 (gp130subunit), CD135 (hFL-R). A case was defined as positive, if more than 20% of the cells expressed the regarding CKR. All investigated CKR were more frequently expressed in AML-samples than in healthy BM-samples, except CD130, which was only expressed on 5-6% of AML-blasts in all and with only one healthy BM-sample being CD130(+). Within the French-American-British (FAB) types we observed a maturation- and lineage (granulocytic/monocytic)-committed expression profile. Monocytic subtypes (FAB-type M4/M5) showed significantly more GM-CSF-R(+) (P = 0.001) and FL-R(+) (P = 0.001) and significantly less stem cell factor-R (SCF-R(+)) (P = 0.02) cases. Highest proportions of G-CSF-R(+) blasts were observed in FAB-type M3. In undifferentiated leukemias (FAB-type M1, M2) high amounts of SCF-R(+), IL-3-R(+), and FL-R(+) blasts could be detected. FL-R was the only CKR, which was positive in FAB-type M0 (n = 2). No differences in CKR-expression were detected between primary (p) and secondary (s). Separating our patient cohorts in cytogenetic risk groups we could detect a significant higher proportion of G-CSF-R(+) blasts in the cytogenetic good risk group than in the bad risk group (P

  5. 8. Therapeutic and Educational Potential of Combining Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Art – Qualitative Analysis of a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Růžička Michal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioural psychotherapy is, just like other psychotherapeutic systems, of an eclectic nature. Should a therapist be successful across a wide range of issues, he/she needs to be adaptable, flexible and eclectic in terms of the techniques applied. Eclectically oriented therapists use a wide range of interventions; however, they adhere to individual theoretical structures. The aim of the paper is to point out the application of a combination of artistic activities within the system of the Cognitive behavioural therapy. For this purpose the paper presents a qualitative analysis of two case studies. We formulated the following research questions. Can the methods of combining the cognitive behavioural therapy and art accelerate the course of therapy? Can the methods of combining the cognitive behavioural therapy and art be perceived by the client as effective? The phenomenon investigated in the case study is a functional analysis of a client’s case and subsequent application of therapeutic and educational techniques of the Cognitive behavioural therapy and art. In both case studies it was demonstrated that the involvement of therapeutic elements accelerated the course of therapy. The clients in the research sample assessed the therapy as beneficial.

  6. Therapeutic implications of curcumin in the prevention of diabetic retinopathy via modulation of anti-oxidant activity and genetic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldebasi, Yousef H; Aly, Salah M; Rahmani, Arshad H

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus that affects the blood vessels of the retina, leading to blindness. The current approach of treatment based on anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenesis drugs and laser photocoagulation are effective but also shows adverse affect in retinal tissues and that can even worsen the visual abilities. Thus, a safe and effective mode of treatment is needed to control or delaying the DR. Based on the earlier evidence of the potentiality of natural products as anti-oxidants, anti-diabetic and antitumor, medicinal plants may constitute a good therapeutic approach in the prevention of DR. Curcumin, constituents of dietary spice turmeric, has been observed to have therapeutic potential in the inhibition or slow down progression of DR. In this review, we summarize the therapeutic potentiality of curcumin in the delaying the DR through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth and nuclear transcription factors. The strength of involvement of curcumin in the modulation of genes action creates a strong optimism towards novel therapeutic strategy of diabetic retinopathy and important mainstay in the management of diabetes and its complications DR. PMID:24379904

  7. The Complex Relationship between Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain and Therapeutic Benefits: A Systematic Review and Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex T. Raben

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG and other adverse metabolic effects represent serious side effects faced by many patients with psychosis that can lead to numerous comorbidities and which reduce the lifespan. While the pathophysiology of AIWG remains poorly understood, numerous studies have reported a positive association between AIWG and the therapeutic benefit of antipsychotic medications.Objectives: To review the literature to (1 determine if AIWG is consistently associated with therapeutic benefit and (2 investigate which variables may mediate such an association.Data Sources: MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Database and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles containing all the following exploded MESH terms: schizophrenia [AND] antipsychotic agents/neuroleptics [AND] (weight gain [OR] lipids [OR] insulin [OR] leptin [AND] treatment outcome. Results were limited to full-text, English journal articles.Results: Our literature search uncovered 31 independent studies which investigated an AIWG-therapeutic benefit association with a total of 6063 enrolled individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or another serious mental illness receiving antipsychotic medications. Twenty-two studies found a positive association while, 10 studies found no association and one study reported a negative association. Study variables including medication compliance, sex, ethnicity, or prior antipsychotic exposure did not appear to consistently affect the AIWG-therapeutic benefit relationship. In contrast, there was some evidence that controlling for baseline BMI/psychopathology, duration of treatment and specific agent studied [i.e., olanzapine (OLZ or clozapine (CLZ] strengthened the relationship between AIWG and therapeutic benefit.Limitations: There were limitations of the reviewed studies in that many had small sample sizes, and/or were retrospective. The heterogeneity of the studies also made comparisons difficult and publication bias

  8. An improved interim therapeutic restoration technique for management of anterior early childhood caries: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood caries presents unique treatment challenges that often require advanced behavior management techniques, such as general anesthesia or procedural sedation. In some cases, use of these pharmacologic adjuncts is undesirable or not possible. The interim therapeutic restoration is a treatment method that, while sometimes employed in such cases, can often produce unsatisfactory results in primary anterior teeth. This is often due to insufficient bulk of material and lack of retention. The purpose of this report was to describe a simple alternative technique (resin modified glass ionomer strip crowns) that may be employed to deliver esthetic anterior restorations to marginally cooperative children in the dental clinic setting and to report on two cases in which it was successfully used. \\\\\\Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., USA. tmnelson@uw.edu

  9. Everolimus Implicated in Case of Severe Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gonzales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer and the third leading cause of cancer related deaths among our population with an estimated number of 246,660 new cases and 40,450 deaths in 2016. With treatment advancements, including targeted agents such as Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, survivability and quality of life continue to improve. However, with the use of these agents come adverse effects, some of which are still being characterized. Our case demonstrates recurrent episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding in a 60-year-old woman being treated with Everolimus for progressive metastatic breast cancer. On endoscopy, bleeding was secondary to erosive gastritis. Previous case reports have described bleeding due to gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE, which was described in two prior reported cases. In our case, bleeding also occurred on a reduced dose of Everolimus compared to what is previously reported (5 mg versus 10 mg. As a result of her gastrointestinal bleeding, she required multiple endoscopic interventions including argon plasma coagulation and multipolar heater probe to achieve hemostasis. This is the first case reported of gastrointestinal bleeding not consistent with GAVE and occurring while being on a reduced dose of Everolimus. It is important to document our case so that the Gastroenterology and Hematology communities can be educated and made aware for their patient populations on Everolimus.

  10. Competitiveness Implications of Environmental Regulations: Case Studies (1992- 1997)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collection of reports is part of a series of case studies designed to examine Michael Porter’s hypothesis that innovative companies responding to environmental regulation can create competitive advantage through lower costs or higher sales.

  11. Pemphigus in North-Western Yemen: A therapeutic study of 75 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Mishri Lal

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pemphigus, though not documented, seems to be quite high in Yemen. There is no universal consensus on the treatment of this disease. The aim was to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of different therapeutic regimens used in patients of pemphigus in North-Western Yemen. Seventy-five Yemeni patients (39 males and 36 females) were included. Diagnosis was based on clinical features, histopathology and the Tzanck test. Results of treatment with these different therapeutic regimens were compared: (1) dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse (DCP), (2) dexamethasone pulse with oral azathioprine, (3) oral prednisolone with azathioprine, (4) oral prednisolone with oral cyclophosphamide, and (5) prednisolone monotherapy. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) was diagnosed in 46 patients, pemphigus foliaceus (PF) in 23, pemphigus vegetans (PVEG) in 5 and pemphigus herpetiformis (PH) in one. Among the 16 patients who received regular DCP therapy, 13 were in remission for 6 months to 11 years without medications (phase 4). Remission without pharmacotherapy could not be achieved with the other regimens and steroid-induced side-effects appeared to be more than with DCP. Immunofluorescence was not available to confirm the diagnosis of pemphigus. Randomization was not done. The DCP regimen seemed to be superior to the other regimens used.

  12. Clinical, Epidemiological and Therapeutic Evaluation in 14 Cases of Inflammatory Breast Cancer in Canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina Gomes da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of evaluating clinical aspects, age, breed, presence of metastasis, chemotherapeutical protocol, use of COX-2 inhibitors and survival rate in female dogs diagnosed with inflammatory carcinoma at the Hospital Veterinario de Uberaba (HVU, a retrospective analysis was performed on the medical records of 14 female dogs seen at HVU between July, 2011 and July, 2012 and diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer. The breeds included were crossbred, poodle, Brazilian terrier, teckel and Belgian shepherd. Average age: 11.1 years. Outbreaks of distant metastasis were detected in 7 animals, out of which 5 patients received COX-2 inhibitors as sole treatment and only 4 received chemotherapeutical treatment. The protocol, constituted by piroxicam, cyclophosphamide, carboplatin and doxorubicin showed the highest survival time (210 days. In conclusion, inflammatory carcinoma is a disease of bad prognosis, short survival time and produces systemic alterations that reduce therapeutic response. Apparently, the most accurate therapeutic form is the association of COX-2 inhibitors and chemotherapeutics; however, controlled clinical studies are needed in order to evaluate these suggestions.

  13. PIM kinases as potential therapeutic targets in a subset of peripheral T cell lymphoma cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Martín-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no efficient therapy for patients with peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL. The Proviral Integration site of Moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM kinases are important mediators of cell survival. We aimed to determine the therapeutic value of PIM kinases because they are overexpressed in PTCL patients, T cell lines and primary tumoral T cells. PIM kinases were inhibited genetically (using small interfering and short hairpin RNAs and pharmacologically (mainly with the pan-PIM inhibitor (PIMi ETP-39010 in a panel of 8 PTCL cell lines. Effects on cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle, key proteins and gene expression were evaluated. Individual inhibition of each of the PIM genes did not affect PTCL cell survival, partially because of a compensatory mechanism among the three PIM genes. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of all PIM kinases strongly induced apoptosis in all PTCL cell lines, without cell cycle arrest, in part through the induction of DNA damage. Therefore, pan-PIMi synergized with Cisplatin. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of PIM reduced primary tumoral T cell viability without affecting normal T cells ex vivo. Since anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL cell lines were the most sensitive to the pan-PIMi, we tested the simultaneous inhibition of ALK and PIM kinases and found a strong synergistic effect in ALK+ ALCL cell lines. Our findings suggest that PIM kinase inhibition could be of therapeutic value in a subset of PTCL, especially when combined with ALK inhibitors, and might be clinically beneficial in ALK+ ALCL.

  14. Implications of the Google’s US 8,996,429 B1 Patent in Cloud Robotics Based Therapeutic Researches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fosch Villaronga, Eduard; Albo-Canals, Jordi; Neves, Antonio J.R.

    2018-01-01

    Intended for being informative to both legal and engineer communities, this chapter raises awareness on the implications of recent patents in the field of human-robot interaction (HRI) studies. Google patented the use of cloud robotics to create robot personality(-ies). The broad claims of the

  15. Etiological and therapeutical observations in a case of belly dancer's dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linazasoro, Girutz; Van Blercom, Nadège; Lasa, Asier; Fernández, José Manuel; Aranzábal, Inés

    2005-02-01

    We report on the case of a woman with belly dancer's syndrome. This case presented two peculiarities: (1) the condition was induced by the chronic use of clebopride, and (2) abdominal dyskinesias showed a dramatic response to the application of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Copyright 2004 Movement Disorder Society.

  16. An analysis of policies for cotrimoxazole, amoxicillin and azithromycin use in Namibia's public sector: Findings and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibuule, Dan; Mubita, Mwangana; Naikaku, Ester; Kalemeera, Francis; Godman, Brian B; Sagwa, Evans

    2017-02-01

    Despite Namibia's robust medicine use systems and policies, antibiotic use indicators remain suboptimal. Recent medicine use surveys rank cotrimoxazole, amoxicillin and azithromycin (CAA) among the most used medicines. However, there is rising resistance to CAA (55.9%-96.7%). Unfortunately, to date, there have been limited studies evaluating policies to improve antibiotic use in Namibia. To evaluate public sector pharmaceutical policies and guidelines influencing the therapeutic use of CAA antibiotics in Namibia. Evaluate Namibia's pharmaceutical policies and guidelines for CAA use through quantitative text analysis. The main outcome variables were the existence of antibiotic policies, therapeutic indications per antibiotic and the type/level of healthcare facility allowed to use the antibiotic. Policies for antibiotic use were limited, with only the draft Namibia Medicines Policy having a statement on antibiotic use. Several essential antibiotics had no therapeutic indications mentioned in the guidelines. Twenty-nine antibiotics were listed for 69 therapeutic indications; CAA (49.3%) antibiotics and ATC J01C/J01D (48%) having the highest indications per antibiotic. For CAA antibiotics, this suggested use was mainly for acute respiratory infections (n=22, 37.2%). Published policies (58.6%-17/29) recommended antibiotics for use at the primary healthcare (PHC) level, with CAA antibiotics recommended mostly for respiratory tract infections and genitourinary infections. Policy and guidelines for antibiotic use in Namibia are not comprehensive and are skewed towards PHCs. Existing policies promote the wide use of CAA antibiotics, which may inadvertently result in their inappropriate use enhancing resistance rates. This calls for the development of more comprehensive antibiotic guidelines and essential medicine lists in tandem with local antimicrobial resistance patterns. In addition, educational initiatives among all key stakeholder groups. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Advance euthanasia directives: a controversial case and its ethical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David Gibbes; Dresser, Rebecca; Kim, Scott Y H

    2018-03-03

    Authorising euthanasia and assisted suicide with advance euthanasia directives (AEDs) is permitted, yet debated, in the Netherlands. We focus on a recent controversial case in which a Dutch woman with Alzheimer's disease was euthanised based on her AED. A Dutch euthanasia review committee found that the physician performing the euthanasia failed to follow due care requirements for euthanasia and assisted suicide. This case is notable because it is the first case to trigger a criminal investigation since the 2002 Dutch euthanasia law was enacted. Thus far, only brief descriptions of the case have been reported in English language journals and media. We provide a detailed description of the case, review the main challenges of preparing and applying AEDs for persons with dementia and briefly assess the adequacy of the current oversight system governing AEDs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma: clinical study and therapeutic results of 95 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanfir, A.; Frikha, M.; Ghorbel, A.; Drira, M.M.; Karray, H.; Daoud, J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. -- The objective of this retrospective study was to discuss the epidemio-clinical criteria and the therapeutic results of metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Patients and methods. - The current study concerned 95 patients with histologically proven nasopharyngeal carcinoma who were metastatic at diagnosis or who had developed late metastasis. We reviewed the epidemio-clinical records of all the patients. Patients were treated with chemotherapy (BEC regimen: bleomycin, epirubicin and cisplatin or PBF regimen: bleomycin, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and radiotherapy of pauci metastatic localizations (single or double) or bone metastasis with high risk of compression or fracture ±associated with locoregional radiotherapy for patients who were metastatic at diagnosis. Response was assessed according to the WHO criteria. Overall survival was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. A long-term disease-free survival was defined from 36 months. Results. - There were 34 patients who were metastatic at diagnosis and 61 patients who had developed late metastasis. The mean age was 41.5 years (sex-ratio: 3.1). Bone metastases were the most frequent (83%). Objective and complete response rates were respectively 75% and 70%, and 32% and 16% for BEC and PBF regimens. Twenty-five patients received radiotherapy for pauci metastatic localizations, among whom 19 patients who were metastatic at diagnosis received locoregional irradiation. The overall survival probability was of 15% for three years. Eleven patients were long survivors (extremes: 36 and 134 months). Conclusion. - Therapeutic results were comparable to those reported in other series using platin combination chemotherapy. Radiotherapy of metastasis yielded to long-term survival. (authors)

  19. Statins as a new therapeutic approach in dedifferentiated thyroid cancer? A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; John, P.; Sinzinger, H.; Staudenherz, A.; Schaffarich, M.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In general differentiated thyroid tumours are removed surgically and afterwards treated with radioiodine. However, still about one third of patients with differentiated tumours, metastasise. Also 30 percent of recurrent thyroid carcinomas do not respond to iodine treatment due to loss of differentiation. Retinoic acid, biological metabolites of vitamin A, are considered to induce re-differentiation of the thyrocyte and thereby induce tumor regression. In follicular carcinoma cells, it also plays an important role in inducing iodine uptake. Retinoids, however, cannot be used in liver disease as they may induce hepatic enzyme increase. In addition 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are reported to induce on the one hand cellular apoptosis and on the other hand, in a lower dosage, differentiation in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells in vitro. We are presenting a 79 years old female patient with an oxyphilic follicular thyroid carcinoma and histologically verified autoimmune hepatitis. The first post therapeutic scan, showed only focal cervical localized iodine uptake. Also 3 months later no pathologic iodine uptake was recognized on the diagnostic scan, whereas the FDG-PET showed solid uptake of FDG cervical, in both lungs, in the mediastinum, the pelvis and the right hip. Due to contraindication for retinoic acid the patient was treated with usual dose statin for about 4 weeks to induce re-differentiation. Following, the patient was administered 9,25 GBq I-131 again and the post therapeutic scan showed iodine uptake cervical and in the right femur. We conclude that the administration of Statins, at low dose (20 mg/day) even over a short period of time, only may induce re-differentiation as well as an antiproliferative effect in vivo. (author)

  20. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Asphyxial Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Due to Drowning: A Systematic Review of Case Series and Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, K-F; Leung, Reynold; Leung, Ling-Pong

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this review was to summarize published evidence of the effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia in patients with drowning-associated asphyxial out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and to explore any preliminary favorable factors in the management of therapeutic hypothermia to improve survival and neurological outcome. Drowning may result in asphyxial OHCA or hypothermic OHCA, but the former does not provide any potential neuroprotective effect as the latter may do. Electronic literature searches of Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Scopus were performed for all years from inception to July 2016. Primary studies in the form of case reports, letters to the editor, and others with higher quality are included, but guidelines, reviews, editorials, textbook chapters, conference abstracts, and nonhuman studies are excluded. Non-English articles are excluded. Relevant studies are then deemed eligible if the drowning OHCA patient's initial temperature was above 28°C, which implies asphyxial cardiac arrest, and intentional therapeutic hypothermia was instituted. Because of the narrow scope of interest and strict definition of the condition, limited studies addressed it, and no randomized controlled trials (RCT) could be selected. Thirteen studies covering 35 patients are included. No quantitative synthesis, assessment of study quality, or assessment of bias was performed. It is conjectured that extended therapeutic hypothermia of 48-72 hours might help prevent reperfusion injury during the intermediate phase of postcardiac arrest care to benefit patients of drowning-associated asphyxial OHCA, but this finding only serves as preliminary observation for future research. No conclusive recommendation could be made regarding the duration of and the time of onset of therapeutic hypothermia. Future research should put effort on RCT, particularly the effect of extended duration of 48-72 hours. Important parameters should be reported in detail. Asphyxial

  1. Therapeutical attitudes in tooth supported overdentures with ball attachements. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    ??ncu, AM; Melescanu Imre, M; Preoteasa, CT; Preoteasa, E

    2014-01-01

    Tooth supported overdenture with ball attachments has a number of advantages in prosthetics, but presents some difficulties as well, which sometimes make impossible the use of these anchoring systems; these difficulties should be well known. In this regard we present a suggestive case. It is the case of a patient, aged 57, who came for treatment, suffering from subtotal maxillary and mandibular edentulism (present 11 and 21, respectively 33 and 43), previously having an overdenture prosthesis...

  2. Alagille syndrome case report: implications for forensic pathology and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petaros, Anja; Miletic, Damir; Stifter, Sanja; Slaus, Mario; Stemberga, Valter

    2015-05-01

    This case report offers a multidisciplinary interpretation of the violent death of a 4-year-old girl suffering from Alagille syndrome who died after a low-height fall that resulted in temporal bone fracture and a large epidural hematoma. The article evidences the macroscopical and microscopical characteristics of the syndrome, focusing especially on the skeletal findings that emerged during autopsy. In the case report, distinction is made between a possible accidental or non-accidental nature of the injuries and the characteristics of the injury have been interpreted in the light of the existing data on Alagille syndrome. In conclusion, the death was documented as accidental since abnormalities in the skeletal system evidenced during autopsy have predisposed the death of the child albeit through a very mild head trauma. The case report evidences the importance of studying features of skull macro- and microstructure in patients with Alagille syndrome, which have been, until now, underreported in literature and which might contribute to fracture vulnerability in these patients. Although rare, Alagille syndrome is a condition that should be known to forensic medicine practitioners and whose features and peculiarities must be taken into consideration in pediatric autopsy and suspected child abuse cases.

  3. Savant Syndrome: Case Studies, Hypotheses, and Implications for Special Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Susan Klug; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The concept of savant syndrome, encompassing those individuals historically known as "idiot savants," is reviewed. Case studies demonstrating special abilities in the areas of calendar calculating, musical ability, artistic talent, memorization, mathematical skills, mechanical achievement, and fine sensory discrimination are discussed,…

  4. Positive results of serological tests for syphilis in pregnancy – diagnostic and therapeutic problems, report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Koper

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Undiagnosed and untreated syphilis in pregnancy may result in subsequent complications: early fetal loss, stillbirth, low birth weight of infants and newborns with congenital syphilis. Objective. To analyze diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas of positive results of serological tests for syphilis (STS in pregnancy. Case reports. We present two cases of pregnant women, hospitalized in our department due to positive results of serological tests for syphilis, performed during the antenatal visit. On the basis of patients' history, physical examination and STS results, early latent syphilis was diagnosed in the first patient; biological false positive reactions were considered in the second one. Both patients received procaine penicillin treatment. Conclusions. Screening for syphilis in pregnancy as a part of antenatal care and appropriate treatment with penicillin are the most effective interventions to prevent complications of syphilis in pregnancy. It is also important to adapt modern European Guidelines for management of syphilis to Polish conditions.

  5. Oesophageal Perforation: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in a resource limited setting. A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahalu William

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oesophageal perforation is a condition associated with a high mortality. Its management is still controversial with operative treatment being favoured but a shift to conservative management is occurring. Very little exists in medical literature about its management in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the paucity of thoracic surgeons is compounded by limited diagnostic and therapeutic facilities. Case Presentation We report three cases of oesophageal perforation which were all treated conservatively with tube thoracostomy, nil by mouth with feeding gastrostomy, intravenous antibiotics and chest physiotherapy. Two patients achieved oesophageal healing but one died due to severe septicaemia. Conclusion In a resource restricted setting, conservative management which includes enteral nutrition by feeding gastrostomy, tube thoracostomy to drain inter pleural contaminants, intravenous antibiotics and chest physiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for oesophageal perforations.

  6. [Therapeutic response to plasmapheresis in four cases with obsessive-compulsive disorder and tic disorder triggered by streptococcal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beşiroğlu, Lütfullah; Ağargün, Mehmet Yücel; Ozbebit, Ozgür; Sözen, Mehmet; Dilek, Imdat; Güleç, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The acronym PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections) has been assigned to a subgroup of patients experiencing pediatric onset obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics as a result of autoimmune response to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection. It has been hypothesized that an immune process initiated by infection affects the basal ganglia and causes neuropsychiatric symptoms. In cases with severe neuropsychiatric symptoms, the use of treatment strategies that interrupt the autoimmune process responsible for the pathogenesis of PANDAS, such as therapeutic plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin, has been proposed. In this paper, we discuss the effect of plasmapheresis treatment in 4 adult cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder and tic disorder triggered by streptococcal infections.

  7. Importance of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis - A Retrospective Study of 4 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa HAMMI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the treatment of active tuberculosis, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is used to optimize dosing that maximizes therapeutic benefit while minimizing toxicity. In Morocco, TDM is not routinely used, yet low levels of anti-TB drugs can be associated with poorer treatment outcomes.Methods: We retrospectively checked our archives for patients with active TB for whom TDM was performed during 2014. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographic, clinical, radiographic and microbiological data including time until smear and culture conversion. Then, we looked for cases with delay of TB conversion.Results: In total, 24 patients were identified, for whom TDM was performed, they all had low serum drug levels. Among them, 4 patients showed delayed bacteriological conversion.Conclusions: Our study cases are showing the benefit of serum dosage in the follow-up of the patients showing a delay of sputum examination conversion, both direct and culture, during their evolutions. TDM is potentially useful for the treatment of active TB, but is currently underused in Morocco.

  8. Modelling hemoglobin and hemoglobin:haptoglobin complex clearance in a non-rodent species– pharmacokinetic and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicitas S Boretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies suggest that haptoglobin (Hp supplementation could be an effective therapeutic modality during acute or chronic hemolytic diseases. Hp prevents Hb extravasation and neutralizes Hb’s oxidative and NO scavenging activity in the vasculature. Small animal models such as mouse, rat and guinea pig appear to be valuable to provide proof-of-concept for Hb neutralization by Hp in diverse pre-clinical conditions. However, these species differ significantly from human in the clearance of Hb:Hp complexes, which leads to long persistence of circulating Hb:Hp complexes after administration of human plasma derived Hp. Alternative animal models must therefore be explored to guide pre-clinical development of these potential therapeutics. In contrast to rodents, dogs have high Hp plasma concentrations comparable to human. In this study we show that like human macrophages, dog peripheral blood monocyte derived macrophages express a glucocorticoid inducible endocytic clearance pathways with a high specificity for the Hb:Hp complex. Evaluating the Beagle dog as a non-rodent model species we provide the first pharmacokinetic parameter estimates of free Hb and Hb:Hp phenotype complexes. The data reflect a drastically reduced volume of distribution (Vc of the complex compared to free Hb, increased exposures (Cmax and AUC and significantly reduced total body clearance (CL with a terminal half-life (t1/2 of approximately 12 hours. Distribution and clearance was identical for dog and human Hb (± glucocorticoid stimulation and for dimeric and multimeric Hp preparations bound to Hb. Collectively, our study supports the dog as a non-rodent animal model to study pharmacological and pharmacokinetic aspects of Hb clearance systems and apply the model to studying Hp therapeutics.

  9. Expeditionary Air Base Defense: Historical Cases and Modern Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    203. 50 As violence in Iraq’s urban areas surged in 2006, IDF attacks against Balad Air Base reached their peak, with approximately 475...defense operations when appropriate, but it is not a singular solution for quickly or completely reducing violence in the area of air bases. The case of...forces “drawing from the units available.”3 This is appropriate for small combat outposts ( COP ) or forward operating bases (FOB) in lower threat

  10. Case mix in paediatric rheumatology: implications for training in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sern Chin; Allen, Roger C; Munro, Jane E; Akikusa, Jonathan D

    2012-05-01

    Despite a move towards the provision of specialist training in Australia in settings that extend beyond the public hospital system, formal comparisons of case mix between public and private specialty clinics have rarely been performed. It is therefore unclear for many specialties how well training in one setting prepares trainees for practice in the other. This study aims to compare the case mix of paediatric rheumatology patients seen in public and private settings and the referral sources of patients in each. An audit of all new patients seen in the public and private paediatric rheumatology clinics on campus at Royal Children's Hospital between June 2009 and January 2011. Data related to demographics, primary diagnosis, referral source and location seen were abstracted and compared. Eight hundred and seventy-six new patients were seen during the period of interest. Of these, 429 patients (48.9%) were seen in private clinics. The commonest diagnostic categories for both type of clinics were non-inflammatory musculoskeletal pain/orthopaedic conditions (public 39.4%, private 33.6%) followed by juvenile idiopathic arthritis (public 16.6%, %, private 18.6%), other skin/soft tissue disorders (public 8.7%, private 9.6%) and pain syndromes (public 4.9%, private 11.4%). Patients with haematological and vasculitic disorders were predominantly seen in public clinics. The commonest source of referrals to both clinics was general practitioners (public 40.6%, private 53.1%). The case mix in private paediatric rheumatology clinics closely mirrors that of public clinics at our centre. Training in either setting would provide sufficient case-mix exposure to prepare trainees for practice in the other. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. A rare case of hidebound disease with dental implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (also called as Scleroderma or hidebound disease is a chronic sclerotic disease of unknown etiology which causes diffuse, increased deposition of extra cellular matrix in connective tissue with vascular abnormalities, resulting in tissue hypoxia. The disease is characterized by diffuse fibrosis; degenerative changes; and vascular abnormalities in the skin (scleroderma, articular structures, and internal organs. Aesthetic and facial dysfunctions are followed by important oral and facial manifestations. Most oral manifestations begin with tongue rigidity and facial skin changes. Bone resorption of mandibular angle and widening of periodontal ligament space on periapical radiographs are important radiological findings. Other systemic changes include the involvement of internal organs, which lead to serious complications as well as disorders in the cardiac muscle and Raynaud΄s phenomenon. This is a case report of 30-year-old female patient with the classical features of this disease. This case is reported for its rarity and variable expressivity. The main aim of this article is to describe thorough presentation of the case report, various forms of scleroderma, pathogenesis, oral, extraoral, periodontal manifestations of scleroderma, and its treatment options. A brief review of the literature, focusing on dental alterations is also presented.

  12. A rare case of hidebound disease with dental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Vikram; Dabra, Sarita; Behl, Ashima Bali; Bali, Rajiv

    2013-07-01

    Systemic sclerosis (also called as Scleroderma or hidebound disease) is a chronic sclerotic disease of unknown etiology which causes diffuse, increased deposition of extra cellular matrix in connective tissue with vascular abnormalities, resulting in tissue hypoxia. The disease is characterized by diffuse fibrosis; degenerative changes; and vascular abnormalities in the skin (scleroderma), articular structures, and internal organs. Aesthetic and facial dysfunctions are followed by important oral and facial manifestations. Most oral manifestations begin with tongue rigidity and facial skin changes. Bone resorption of mandibular angle and widening of periodontal ligament space on periapical radiographs are important radiological findings. Other systemic changes include the involvement of internal organs, which lead to serious complications as well as disorders in the cardiac muscle and Raynaud΄s phenomenon. This is a case report of 30-year-old female patient with the classical features of this disease. This case is reported for its rarity and variable expressivity. The main aim of this article is to describe thorough presentation of the case report, various forms of scleroderma, pathogenesis, oral, extraoral, periodontal manifestations of scleroderma, and its treatment options. A brief review of the literature, focusing on dental alterations is also presented.

  13. Implications of publicly available genomic data resources in searching for therapeutic targets of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sungwon

    2018-04-20

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two major conditions that are related to metabolic disorders and affect a large population. Although there have been significant efforts to identify their therapeutic targets, few benefits have come from comprehensive molecular profiling. This limited availability of comprehensive molecular profiling of obesity and T2D may be due to multiple challenges, as these conditions involve multiple organs and collecting tissue samples from subjects is more difficult in obesity and T2D than in other diseases, where surgical treatments are popular choices. While there is no repository of comprehensive molecular profiling data for obesity and T2D, multiple existing data resources can be utilized to cover various aspects of these conditions. This review presents studies with available genomic data resources for obesity and T2D and discusses genome-wide association studies (GWAS), a knockout (KO)-based phenotyping study, and gene expression profiles. These studies, based on their assessed coverage and characteristics, can provide insights into how such data can be utilized to identify therapeutic targets for obesity and T2D.

  14. Implication of Caspase-3 as a Common Therapeutic Target for Multineurodegenerative Disorders and Its Inhibition Using Nonpeptidyl Natural Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Caspase-3 has been identified as a key mediator of neuronal apoptosis. The present study identifies caspase-3 as a common player involved in the regulation of multineurodegenerative disorders, namely, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Huntington’s disease (HD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. The protein interaction network prepared using STRING database provides a strong evidence of caspase-3 interactions with the metabolic cascade of the said multineurodegenerative disorders, thus characterizing it as a potential therapeutic target for multiple neurodegenerative disorders. In silico molecular docking of selected nonpeptidyl natural compounds against caspase-3 exposed potent leads against this common therapeutic target. Rosmarinic acid and curcumin proved to be the most promising ligands (leads mimicking the inhibitory action of peptidyl inhibitors with the highest Gold fitness scores 57.38 and 53.51, respectively. These results were in close agreement with the fitness score predicted using X-score, a consensus based scoring function to calculate the binding affinity. Nonpeptidyl inhibitors of caspase-3 identified in the present study expeditiously mimic the inhibitory action of the previously identified peptidyl inhibitors. Since, nonpeptidyl inhibitors are preferred drug candidates, hence, discovery of natural compounds as nonpeptidyl inhibitors is a significant transition towards feasible drug development for neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Abnormal function of monoamine oxidase-A in comorbid major depressive disorder and cardiovascular disease: pathophysiological and therapeutic implications (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Mallinger, Alan G

    2012-11-01

    The association between major depressive disorder (MDD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is among the best described medical comorbidities. The presence of MDD increases the risk of cardiac admissions and mortality and increases healthcare costs in patients with CVD, and similarly, CVD affects the course and outcome of MDD. The potential shared biological mechanisms involved in these comorbid conditions are not well known. However, the enzyme monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), which has a key role in the degradation of catecholamines, has been associated with the pathophysiology and therapeutics of both MDD and CVD. Increased MAO-A activity results in the dysregulation of downstream targets of this enzyme and thus affects the pathophysiology of the two diseases. These deleterious effects include altered noradrenaline turnover, with a direct elevation in oxidative stress parameters, as well as increased platelet activity and cytokine levels. These effects were shown to be reversed by MAO inhibitors. Here, a model describing a key role for the MAO-A in comorbid MDD and CVD is proposed, with focus on the shared pathophysiological mechanisms and the potential therapeutic relevance of agents targeting this enzyme.

  16. Therapeutic Targeting of CPT-11 Induced Diarrhea: A Case for Prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Umang; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    CPT-11 (irinotecan), a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor is one of the main treatments for colorectal cancer. The main dose limiting toxicities are neutropenia and late onset diarrhea. Though neutropenia is manageable, CPT-11 induced diarrhea is frequently severe, resulting in hospitalizations, dose reductions or omissions leading to ineffective treatment administration. Many potential agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies to prevent or ameliorate CPT-11 induced late onset diarrhea. It is predicted that prophylaxis of CPT-11 induced diarrhea will reduce sub-therapeutic dosing as well as hospitalizations and will eventually lead to dose escalations resulting in better response rates. This article reviews various experimental agents and strategies employed to prevent this debilitating toxicity. Covered topics include schedule/dose modification, intestinal alkalization, structural/chemical modification, genetic testing, anti-diarrheal therapies, transporter (ABCB1, ABCC2, BCRP2) inhibitors, enzyme (β-glucuronidase, UGT1A1, CYP3A4, carboxylesterase, COX-2) inducers and inhibitors, probiotics, antibiotics, adsorbing agents, cytokine and growth factor activators and inhibitors and other miscellaneous agents. PMID:23597015

  17. Interventional treatment of severe portal hypertension due to hepatolenticular degeneration: therapeutic evaluation of 8 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongwei; Liu Fuquan; Yue Zhendong; Wang Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of sclerotic embolization of esophagogastric varices (SEEV) and partial splenic embolization (PSE) in treating esophagogastric varices and portal hypertension, respectively, in patients with hepatolenticular degeneration. Methods: Eight patients with severe portal hypertension complicated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and hypersplenism were involved in this study. White blood cell (WBC) counts, platelet counts, and portal vein pressure were determined before and after operation, the results were compared with each other. Results: No recurrence or complication occurred after operation in all patients. After the treatment (SEEV and PSE) the hepatic function showed no obvious changes. The WBC counts increased obviously in the first week after operation, and returned to normal range in 2 weeks. The platelet counts gradually returned to normal level from the second week. The portal vein pressure after operation went up a little, from (45.13±8.69) cm H 2 O to (48.63±10.48) cm H 2 O in SEEV group and to (47.88±11.43) cm H 2 O in PSE group, but the difference was of no statistic significance (P>0.05). Conclusion: Interventional therapy can reduce the portal hypertension caused by hepatolenticular degeneration. The technique is safe and effective, and is very helpful for returning to anti-copper treatment. (authors)

  18. Performance Implications of Business Model Change: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Poláková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with changes in performance level introduced by the change of business model. The selected case is a small family business undergoing through substantial changes in reflection of structural changes of its markets. The authors used the concept of business model to describe value creation processes within the selected family business and by contrasting the differences between value creation processes before and after the change introduced they prove the role of business model as the performance differentiator. This is illustrated with the use of business model canvas constructed on the basis interviews, observations and document analysis. The two business model canvases allow for explanation of cause-and-effect relationships within the business leading to change in performance. The change in the performance is assessed by financial analysis of the business conducted over the period of 2006–2012 demonstrates changes in performance (comparing development of ROA, ROE and ROS having their lowest levels before the change of business model was introduced, growing after the introduction of the change, as well as the activity indicators with similar developments of the family business. The described case study contributes to the concept of business modeling with the arguments supporting its value as strategic tool facilitating decisions related to value creation within the business.

  19. Ethical implications of medical crowdfunding: the case of Charlie Gard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Gabrielle; Kelly, Sarah A

    2018-05-04

    Patients are increasingly turning to medical crowdfunding as a way to cover their healthcare costs. In the case of Charlie Gard, an infant born with encephalomyopathic mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, crowdfunding was used to finance experimental nucleoside therapy. Although this treatment was not provided in the end, we will argue that the success of the Gard family's crowdfunding campaign reveals a number of potential ethical concerns. First, this case shows that crowdfunding can change the way in which communal healthcare resources are allocated. Second, within the UK's National Health Service, healthcare is ostensibly not a market resource; thus, permitting crowdfunding introduces market norms that could commodify healthcare. Third, pressures inherent to receiving funds from external parties may threaten the ability of patients-cum-recipients to voluntarily consent to treatment. We conclude that while crowdfunding itself is not unethical, its use can have unforeseen consequences that may influence conceptions of healthcare and how it is delivered. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Position of lung scintigraphy in emergency diagnosis and therapeutic indications in cases of severe pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torquat, Sabine de.

    1975-01-01

    The position of lung scintigraphy in diagnostic strategy is discussed. This technique appears to afford the key examination in severe pulmonary embolism because of its qualities, which are: - speed of execution, - absolute harmlessness, - diagnostic safety. Taking these points in order: - speed of execution is ensured by the very rapid uptake of I 131-labelled albumin macroaggregates (usable immediately) and the existence of the gamma camera; - harmlessness of the examination by the use of non-allergenic radioactive tracers and doses not significantly restricting the vascular bed still perfused; whichever of the two possible techniques is employed (scanner and gamma camera) the examination can always be practised without getting the patient out of bed, which avoids the risk of clot migration due to movement; - certainty of the result by the fact that in the event of a surgical indication the circulation cut-off image is spectacular and obvious in fact a lung amputation image must be equal to or greater than 50% of the pulmonary field before an operation is decided upon all other images remaining within the scope of a hypocoagulant treatment. A study was carried out in a cardio-vascular surgery department on 28 patients hospitalised with a possible view to embolectomy. Lung scintigraphy allows a quick exploration of the minor circulation. In the special clinical situation of the patients, for whom the advisability of an embolectomy is discussed, the scintigraphic examination provides the key: if normal it eliminates the diagnosis absolutely; if not it reveals without extra risk the spectacular obliterations of the vascular bed on which any therapeutic decision, medical or surgical is based [fr

  1. Combination of a Flipped Classroom Format and a Virtual Patient Case to Enhance Active Learning in a Required Therapeutics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichvar, Alicia Beth; Hedges, Ashley; Benedict, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To design and evaluate the integration of a virtual patient activity in a required therapeutics course already using a flipped-classroom teaching format. Design. A narrative-branched, dynamic virtual-patient case was designed to replace the static written cases that students worked through during the class, which was dedicated to teaching the complications of liver disease. Students completed pre- and posttests before and after completing the virtual patient case. Examination scores were compared to those in the previous year. Assessment. Students’ posttest scores were higher compared to pretest scores (33% vs 50%). Overall median examination scores were higher compared to the historical control group (70% vs 80%), as well as scores on questions assessing higher-level learning (67% vs 83%). A majority of students (68%) felt the virtual patient helped them apply knowledge gained in the pre-class video lecture. Students preferred this strategy to usual in-class activities (33%) or indicated it was of equal value (37%). Conclusion. The combination of a pre-class video lecture with an in-class virtual patient case is an effective active-learning strategy. PMID:28179724

  2. Combination of a Flipped Classroom Format and a Virtual Patient Case to Enhance Active Learning in a Required Therapeutics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichvar, Alicia Beth; Hedges, Ashley; Benedict, Neal J; Donihi, Amy C

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To design and evaluate the integration of a virtual patient activity in a required therapeutics course already using a flipped-classroom teaching format. Design. A narrative-branched, dynamic virtual-patient case was designed to replace the static written cases that students worked through during the class, which was dedicated to teaching the complications of liver disease. Students completed pre- and posttests before and after completing the virtual patient case. Examination scores were compared to those in the previous year. Assessment. Students' posttest scores were higher compared to pretest scores (33% vs 50%). Overall median examination scores were higher compared to the historical control group (70% vs 80%), as well as scores on questions assessing higher-level learning (67% vs 83%). A majority of students (68%) felt the virtual patient helped them apply knowledge gained in the pre-class video lecture. Students preferred this strategy to usual in-class activities (33%) or indicated it was of equal value (37%). Conclusion. The combination of a pre-class video lecture with an in-class virtual patient case is an effective active-learning strategy.

  3. Therapeutic implication of L-phenylalanine aggregation mechanism and its modulation by D-phenylalanine in phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virender; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Arora, Ashish; Sinha, Neeraj; Thakur, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of phenylalanine is linked to amyloid formation toxicity in phenylketonuria disease. We are demonstrating that L-phenylalanine self-assembles to amyloid fibrils at varying experimental conditions and transforms to a gel state at saturated concentration. Biophysical methods including nuclear magnetic resonance, resistance by alpha-phenylglycine to fibril formation and preference of protected phenylalanine to self-assemble show that this behaviour of L-phenylalanine is governed mainly by hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, D-phenylalanine arrests the fibre formation by L-phenylalanine and gives rise to flakes. These flakes do not propagate further and prevent fibre formation by L-phenylalanine. This suggests the use of D-phenylalanine as modulator of L-phenylalanine amyloid formation and may qualify as a therapeutic molecule in phenylketonuria. PMID:24464217

  4. Stability and in vitro release profile of enalapril maleate from different commercially available tablets: possible therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Dione Marçal; dos Santos, Leandro Dias; Lima, Eliana Martins

    2008-08-05

    Stability of enalapril maleate formulations can be affected when the product is exposed to higher temperature and humidity, with the formation of two main degradation products: enalaprilat and a diketopiperazine derivative. In this work, stability and drug release profiles of 20 mg enalapril maleate tablets (reference, generic and similar products) were evaluated. After 180 days of the accelerated stability testing, most products did not exhibit the specified amount of drug. Additionally, drug release profiles were markedly different from that of the reference product, mainly due to drug degradation. Changes in drug concentration and drug release profile of enalapril formulations are strong indicators of a compromised bioavailability, with possible interferences on the therapeutic response for this drug.

  5. [A "historical" case of lead poisoning via drinking water: diagnostic and therapeutic issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, F; Girtanner-Brunel, L; Péaud, P Y; Serpollet, G; Duchen, C

    2001-12-01

    It is likely that lead poisoning via drinking water is often overlooked because of its supposed rarity and nonspecific early symptoms, which result in delayed management. One case of severe lead poisoning via drinking water is reported. The diagnosis was long missed and a particularly long chelating treatment was required. The clinical features included lead colic, a Burton's lead line, anemia, polyneuritis and arterial hypertension. Eighteen courses of calcium EDTA were required to obtain 'biological recovery'. The poisoning was linked to a very long water supply lead pipe and potomania secondary to alcohol withdrawal. This case report illustrates how difficult the early recognition of lead poisoning can be, and underlines the need to inquire about a toxic aetiology, particularly via the environment, of otherwise unexplained pathological conditions.

  6. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5-6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5-6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development.

  7. [Common physiological basis for post-traumatic stress disorder and dependence to drugs of abuse: Implications for new therapeutic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisquet-Verrier, Pascale; Tolédano, Daniel; Le Dorze, Claire

    2017-06-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addiction to drugs of abuse are two common diseases, showing high comorbidity rates. This review presents a number of evidence showing similarities between these two pathologies, especially the hyper-responsiveness to environmental cues inducing a reactivation of the target memory leading either to re-experiencing (PTSD), or drug craving. Accordingly, PTSD and addiction to drug of abuse might by considered as memory pathologies, underlined by the same physiological process. We propose that these two pathologies rely on an uncoupling of the monoaminergic systems. According to this hypothesis, exposure to extreme conditions, either negative (trauma) or positive (drugs) induced a loss of the reciprocal control that one system usually exerts on the other monoaminergic system, resulting to an uncoupling between the noradrenergic and the serotonergic systems. Results obtained in our laboratory, using animal models of these pathologies, demonstrate that after a trauma, such as after repeated drug injections, rats developed both a behavioral sensitization (increases of the locomotion in response to a stimulation of the monoaminergic systems) and a pharmacological sensitization (increases of noradrenergic release within the prefrontal cortex). These results support our hypothesis and led us to propose new and innovative therapeutic approaches consisting either to induce a re-coupling of the monoaminergic systems, or to modify the pathological memories by using an emotional memory remodeling. Extremely encouraging results have already been obtained in rats and in humans, opening new and promising therapeutic avenues. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The controversial origin of pericytes during angiogenesis - Implications for cell-based therapeutic angiogenesis and cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocki, Anna; Beyer, Sebastian; Jung, Friedrich; Raghunath, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Pericytes reside within the basement membrane of small vessels and are often in direct cellular contact with endothelial cells, fulfilling important functions during blood vessel formation and homeostasis. Recently, these pericytes have been also identified as mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells, and especially their specialized subpopulation of pericytes, represent promising candidates for therapeutic angiogenesis applications, and have already been widely applied in pre-clinical and clinical trials. However, cell-based therapies of ischemic diseases (especially of myocardial infarction) have not resulted in significant long-term improvement. Interestingly, pericytes from a hematopoietic origin were observed in embryonic skin and a pericyte sub-population expressing leukocyte and monocyte markers was described during adult angiogenesis in vivo. Since mesenchymal stem cells do not express hematopoietic markers, the latter cell type might represent an alternative pericyte population relevant to angiogenesis. Therefore, we sourced blood-derived angiogenic cells (BDACs) from monocytes that closely resembled hematopoietic pericytes, which had only been observed in vivo thus far. BDACs displayed many pericytic features and exhibited enhanced revascularization and functional tissue regeneration in a pre-clinical model of critical limb ischemia. Comparison between BDACs and mesenchymal pericytes indicated that BDACs (while resembling hematopoietic pericytes) enhanced early stages of angiogenesis, such as endothelial cell sprouting. In contrast, mesenchymal pericytes were responsible for blood vessel maturation and homeostasis, while reducing endothelial sprouting.Since the formation of new blood vessels is crucial during therapeutic angiogenesis or during integration of implants into the host tissue, hematopoietic pericytes (and therefore BDACs) might offer an advantageous addition or even an alternative for cell-based therapies.

  9. GABA(B) receptors, schizophrenia and sleep dysfunction: a review of the relationship and its potential clinical and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantrowitz, Joshua; Citrome, Leslie; Javitt, Daniel

    2009-08-01

    Evidence for an intrinsic relationship between sleep, cognition and the symptomatic manifestations of schizophrenia is accumulating. This review presents evidence for the possible utility of GABA(B) receptor agonists for the treatment of subjective and objective sleep abnormalities related to schizophrenia. At the phenotypic level, sleep disturbance occurs in 16-30% of patients with schizophrenia and is related to reduced quality of life and poor coping skills. On the neurophysiological level, studies suggest that sleep deficits reflect a core component of schizophrenia. Specifically, slow-wave sleep deficits, which are inversely correlated with cognition scores, are seen. Moreover, sleep plays an increasingly well documented role in memory consolidation in schizophrenia. Correlations of slow-wave sleep deficits with impaired reaction time and declarative memory have also been reported. Thus, both behavioural insomnia and sleep architecture are critical therapeutic targets in patients with schizophrenia. However, long-term treatment with antipsychotics often results in residual sleep dysfunction and does not improve slow-wave sleep, and adjunctive GABA(A) receptor modulators, such as benzodiazepines and zolpidem, can impair sleep architecture and cognition in schizophrenia. GABA(B) receptor agonists have therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. These agents have minimal effect on rapid eye movement sleep while increasing slow-wave sleep. Preclinical associations with increased expression of genes related to slow-wave sleep production and circadian rhythm function have also been reported. GABA(B) receptor deficits result in a sustained hyperdopaminergic state and can be reversed by a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Genetic, postmortem and electrophysiological studies also associate GABA(B) receptors with schizophrenia. While studies thus far have not shown significant effects, prior focus on the use of GABA(B) receptor agonists has been on the positive symptoms of

  10. THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF SOLASODINE RHAMNOSYL GLYCOSIDES FOR LARGE SKIN CANCERS: TWO CLINICAL CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Bill E. Cham

    2012-01-01

    Solasodine rhamnosyl glycosides (BEC) are a new class of antineoplastics, the efficiency of which administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal, and intratumoral routes is higher than that of many other antitumor agents. Early investigations have established the efficiency of topical BEC applications as a treatment option for non-melanoma skin cancers. There have recently been two clinical cases that count in favor of the fact that the cream formulation Curaderm containing BEC has a very high...

  11. Report of an autopsyzed case of Kaposi sarcoma developed in therapeutically irradiated region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanahashi, Yoshio; Sato, Akihiko

    1975-01-01

    A case of Kaposi sarcoma developed in the right gluteal region of 57 year-old woman was reported in the present paper. The patient received surgical excision of uterine cervical cancer and also gastric cancer in the different time in her past history. Post-operative radiotherapy following uterine excision consisted of 3,350 to 3,650 R of respective 180 kV of X-ray and 60 Co. The mass developed in the region irradiated during the past deep therapy, and showed resistance to Linac irradiation and bleomycin. The masses which seemed to be the same with that in the skin developed in the both lung, and bleomycin administered was not effective. In addition, a mass developed in the right inguinal lymphnode which was considered to be the metastasis from cervical cancer, and was wholly excised. The patient died from pneumonia one year after the manifestation of Kaposi sarcoma. This case was very extraordinary because of the triplicated tumors, i.e., gastric cancer, uterine cervical cancer, and Kaposi sarcoma. The nature of Kaposi sarcoma was discussed from our experience and literature. Kaposi sarcoma in our case, was suggested to be a radiation-induced tumor, and the mechanism of occurrence was considered to be that of multi-centric tumor. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  12. An Unusual Endovascular Therapeutic Approach for a Rare Case of May-Thurner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva-DeAbreu, Adrian; Masha, Luke; Peerbhai, Shareez

    2017-03-06

    BACKGROUND The etiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) may pose a significant diagnostic challenge because truly reversible causes of DVT are rare. In this regard, known pelvic anatomic abnormalities such as aortic and iliac aneurysms should be seriously considered as a complicating factor in patients presenting with acute DVT so as not to miss a potentially curable etiology of May-Thurner syndrome (MTS). CASE REPORT We report the case of a 69-year-old man with a known abdominal aortic aneurysm and bilateral iliac artery aneurysms who presented with an acute DVT. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed increased dilation of his aneurysmal disease with new resultant compression of the left iliac vein representing acquired MTS. The patient underwent endovascular aneurysm repair of the infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm and right common iliac artery aneurysm with a Gore Excluder endoprosthesis in lieu of venous stenting, with resolution of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Infra-renal aortic and iliac aneurysms causing MTS are extremely rare, and patients at risk for MTS through these mechanisms do not fit the classical demographics associated with this syndrome. Furthermore, this is the first case described in which MTS was treated by addressing the aneurysm through an endoprosthetic approach instead of venous stenting, which is the conventional intervention for MTS.

  13. Report of an autopsyed case of Kaposi sarcoma developed in therapeutically irradiated region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanahashi, Y; Sato, A [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-04-01

    A case of Kaposi sarcoma developed in the right gluteal region of 57 year-old woman was reported in the present paper. The patient received surgical excision of uterine cervical cancer and also gastric cancer in the different time in her past history. Post-operative radiotherapy following uterine excision consisted of 3,350 to 3,650 R of respective 180 kV of X-ray and /sup 60/Co. The mass developed in the region irradiated during the past deep therapy, and showed resistance to Linac irradiation and bleomycin. The masses which seemed to be the same with that in the skin developed in the both lung, and bleomycin administered was not effective. In addition, a mass developed in the right inguinal lymphnode which was considered to be the metastasis from cervical cancer, and was wholly excised. The patient died from pneumonia one year after the manifestation of Kaposi sarcoma. This case was very extraordinary because of the triplicated tumors, i.e., gastric cancer, uterine cervical cancer, and Kaposi sarcoma. The nature of Kaposi sarcoma was discussed from our experience and literature. Kaposi sarcoma in our case, was suggested to be a radiation-induced tumor, and the mechanism of occurrence was considered to be that of multi-centric tumor.

  14. Management of hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis and therapeutic plasmapheresis : Report of nine cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyar, S; Harmandar, F; Kök, M; Taș, Z; Dolu, S; Tokuç, A; Köker, G; Görar, S; Çekin, A H

    2017-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is one of the rare causes of the acute pancreatitis. The prevalance of hypertriglyceridemia has increased recently due to the changing eating habits, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption, obesity and concomitant diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the frequency of the acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia may increase in coming years. Diagnosis of the acute pancreatitis by hypertriglyceridemia can be overlooked easily and may be very severe if untreated accurately on time. In addition to the standard management of pancreatitis, specific treatment for hypertriglyceridemia that is insulin, heparin and anti-hypertriglyceridemic drugs are used. Therapeutic plasmapheresis is the last treatment option and seems the most effective one in this subject through developing device and membrane technologies when we review the current literature. Not only triglycerides but also proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules that play an active role in pathogenesis are removed by plasmapheresis. So, the effectiveness of treatment appears promising. However, the exact pathophysiology of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis could not be fully understood and the majority of published experience comes from the case reports and the benefit of randomized clinical trials is not available. Therefore, there are no data about what are the exact indications and when we start therapeutic plasmapheresis in literature. This manuscript describes our hospital experience with treatment options and analyzes reports published recently about plasmapheresis as a treatment modality for hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  15. "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." Supreme Court Case: Implications for School Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Shauna G.; Eusebio, Eleazar C.; Turton, William J.; Wright, Peter W. D.; Hale, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." United States Supreme Court case could have significant implications for school psychology practice. The Court ruled that the parents of a student with a disability were entitled to private school tuition reimbursement even though T.A. had not been identified with a disability or previously…

  16. Clinical features and therapeutic interventions in 17 cases of Bacillus bacteremia in an immunosuppressed patient population.

    OpenAIRE

    Cotton, D J; Gill, V J; Marshall, D J; Gress, J; Thaler, M; Pizzo, P A

    1987-01-01

    We retrospectively examined episodes of Bacillus bacteremia at a hospital with a large proportion of immunosuppressed patients. Seventeen episodes in 9.5 years met our case definition: two of two bottles of one blood culture or one of two bottles of two or more separately obtained blood cultures drawn on the same date. During the same period, there were 59 additional episodes in which a single blood culture had only one of two bottles positive for Bacillus species. Only 2 of 59 such episodes ...

  17. THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF SOLASODINE RHAMNOSYL GLYCOSIDES FOR LARGE SKIN CANCERS: TWO CLINICAL CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill E. Cham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solasodine rhamnosyl glycosides (BEC are a new class of antineoplastics, the efficiency of which administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal, and intratumoral routes is higher than that of many other antitumor agents. Early investigations have established the efficiency of topical BEC applications as a treatment option for non-melanoma skin cancers. There have recently been two clinical cases that count in favor of the fact that the cream formulation Curaderm containing BEC has a very high efficacy in the treatment of large non-melanoma skin cancers that are incurable by other existing methods. Also, Curaderm treatment shows a splendid cosmetic effect. 

  18. Is multiple sclerosis a length-dependent central axonopathy? The case for therapeutic lag and the asynchronous progressive MS hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Gavin; Cutter, Gary; Sormani, Maria Pia; Belachew, Shibeshih; Hyde, Robert; Koendgen, Harold; Knappertz, Volker; Tomic, Davorka; Leppert, David; Herndon, Robert; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Ciccarelli, Olga; Selwood, David; di Cantogno, Elisabetta Verdun; Ben-Amor, Ali-Frederic; Matthews, Paul; Carassiti, Daniele; Baker, David; Schmierer, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    Trials of anti-inflammatory therapies in non-relapsing progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) have been stubbornly negative except recently for an anti-CD20 therapy in primary progressive MS and a S1P modulator siponimod in secondary progressive MS. We argue that this might be because trials have been too short and have focused on assessing neuronal pathways, with insufficient reserve capacity, as the core component of the primary outcome. Delayed neuroaxonal degeneration primed by prior inflammation is not expected to respond to disease-modifying therapies targeting MS-specific mechanisms. However, anti-inflammatory therapies may modify these damaged pathways, but with a therapeutic lag that may take years to manifest. Based on these observations we propose that clinically apparent neurodegenerative components of progressive MS may occur in a length-dependent manner and asynchronously. If this hypothesis is confirmed it may have major implications for the future design of progressive MS trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Blockchain based financial case analysis and its implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonduck Yoo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - In Korea and abroad, this paper investigates the use of blockchains in the financial sector. This study aims to examine how blockchains are applied to the financial sector and how to respond to the Korean conditions. Design/methodology/approach - This paper investigates the movements of the financial sector and related services using the blockchain in the current market. Findings - First, as a result of examining domestic and foreign cases, it can be seen that the areas where blockchains are most actively applied in the financial sector are expanding into settlement, remittance, securities and smart contracts. Also, in Korea, many of the authentication procedures based on the equipment possessed by the consumers are used so that introduction of the blockchain in the authentication part is prominent. Second, the move to introduce a closed (private distributed ledger that does not go through the central bank is accelerating in payments between banks. Third, domestic financial institutions also need joint action by financial institutions through a blockchain consortium to apply blockchain technology to the financial sector. Fourth, consumer needs and technological developments are changing. At the same time, as the opportunity to infringe on the information held by individuals has expanded, the need for blockchain technology is strongly emerging because of the efforts of the organizations to defend it. Originality/value - This paper contributes to understanding the changes in the financial sector using the blockchain.

  20. Epithelial ovarian tumours: 70 cases study: prognostic value factors analysis: therapeutic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola Alles, A.; Barrios Herrera, E.; Sabini Gaye, G.; Muse Sevrini, I.

    1992-01-01

    70 cases of TEO, as well age average it plows analyzed it was 54 years. It staging in E I 23 cases(33%), in E II 17 (24%) in E III 20 (29%) and 10 (14%) in E IV. Predominate over the serous varieties with 29 casos(42%) and mucinosa with 24 (34%), the remaining was 8 endometroids,7 anaplasics and only one tumour to clear cells and of Brenner. The treatment it was surgical predominant complete or not of radiotherapy or Melfalan in those E I-II; and with systemic treatment (CMF or Hexa-CAF) for those E III-IV. The The survive to 5 years was of 77% in E I,55% in E II, 38% in E III, and 0% in E IV. It was not found that the age or other types of histologicos except for the forms anaplasics were prognostic significance factors. In the advanced forms (E III-IV), different predicts of agreement is marked with the volume residual tumoral post surgery, survival of 55% to 5 years with smaller volumes to 2cm of diameter and 0% with higher volume. It conludes in the importance of forming subgroups in which value interrelate predict that orient the processing [es

  1. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Inflammation: Report of a Case with Very Difficult Therapeutic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Crosta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri results from autoimmune response to beta-amyloid deposits in cerebral vessels. Its clinical course and complications have seldom been described in literature. Case Report. In a patient presenting with delirium and left hemiparesis the diagnosis of CAA-ri was supported by the finding of elevated anti-amyloid autoantibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Steroid therapy produced significant improvements in clinical and investigational assessments, but after two months, it caused Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. After steroid therapy discontinuation the patient presented a rapidly progressive dementia, Guillain-Barré syndrome, new cerebral ischemic lesions, and thrombosis of the right cephalic and subclavian veins that were treated with subcutaneous heparin. After a week the patient died because of brain hemorrhage. Conclusion. This case suggests caution in steroid therapy discontinuation and antithrombotic therapy administration in patients with CAA-ri. The CSF search of anti-amyloid autoantibodies could be helpful to support the diagnosis.

  2. Parathyroid carcinoma and persistent hypercalcemia: A case report and review of therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhodip Pramanik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid carcinomas are very uncommon, accounting for 0.1% to 5% of all causes of primary hyperparathyroidism. Parathyroid–jaw tumor syndrome, with a mutation in HRPT2 that encodes parafibromin, is the most common genetic association. Unique features include aggressive clinical course and a lack of preoperative definitive diagnostic criteria. The authors report a case of a 33-year-old male with bilateral nephrocalcinosis, a left-sided neck mass, high calcium, very high parathormone level and a history of parathyroid adenectomy. Computed tomography and 99m-technetium methoxyisobutylisonitrile scan revealed a localized tumor in the left inferior parathyroid region. The patient underwent radical surgery, and histopathology revealed characteristic features of parathyroid carcinoma. Preoperative identification with clinical clues is very important to plan a more radical surgical approach, as both radiotherapy and chemotherapy are ineffective. Recurrence is common and mostly occurs within 2–3 years after surgery. Patient's age, histology and tumor DNA aneuploidy are predictors of survival. Hypercalcemia is controlled with calcimimetics, bisphosphonates and denosumab in inoperable cases. Furthermore, biologic therapy with parafibromin and telomerase inhibitors is under development.

  3. A Case of Kleine-Levin Syndrome: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Marčić

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS is a rare sleep disorder mainly affecting teenage boys in which the main features are intermittent hypersomnolence, behavioral and cognitive disturbances, hyperphagia, and in some cases hyper sexuality. Etiology is unknown, and there is no specific clinical or imaging test for this syndrome even though the illness has well-defined clinical features. Also, there is no effective treatment for KLS. KLS is self-limited, so the prognosis for these patients is not so bad. This study presents our case report and comprehensive workout that led to diagnosis which is primarily clinical. Our patient is a 20-year-old man referred to our clinic because of sleeping problems. At the age of 14, he presented with complaints of the excessive duration of sleep, increased appetite, excessive daytime sleepiness, loss of interest in social activities during attendance of high school and hallucinations. The excessive diagnostic procedure does not find pathological. Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS is a rare sleep disorder of unknown etiology which diagnosis is clinical and diagnostic workup is mainly to exclude other similar conditions. There is no specific therapy, but the disease is self-limited and with good prognosis.

  4. Clinical Implications of 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid in the Kidney, Liver, Lung and Brain: An Emerging Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama H. Elshenawy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA is an important pathway for the formation of eicosanoids. The ω-hydroxylation of AA generates significant levels of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE in various tissues. In the current review, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in the kidney, liver, lung, and brain during physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in tumor formation, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In the kidney, 20-HETE is involved in modulation of preglomerular vascular tone and tubular ion transport. Furthermore, 20-HETE is involved in renal 19 ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and polycystic kidney diseases. The role of 20-HETE in the liver is not clearly understood although it represents 50%–75% of liver CYP-dependent AA metabolism, and it is associated with liver cirrhotic ascites. In the respiratory system, 20-HETE plays a role in pulmonary cell survival, pulmonary vascular tone and tone of the airways. As for the brain, 20-HETE is involved in cerebral I/R injury. Moreover, 20-HETE has angiogenic and mitogenic properties and thus helps in tumor promotion. Several inhibitors and inducers of the synthesis of 20-HETE as well as 20-HETE analogues and antagonists are recently available and could be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of many disease states in the future.

  5. Metabolic Disorder, Inflammation, and Deregulated Molecular Pathways Converging in Pancreatic Cancer Development: Implications for New Therapeutic Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoo, Yoshiharu; Shimasaki, Takeo; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakajima, Hideo; Kawakami, Kazuyuki; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer develops and progresses through complex, cumulative biological processes involving metabolic disorder, local inflammation, and deregulated molecular pathways. The resulting tumor aggressiveness hampers surgical intervention and renders pancreatic cancer resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Based on these pathologic properties, several therapeutic strategies are being developed to reverse refractory pancreatic cancer. Here, we outline molecular targeting therapies, which are primarily directed against growth factor receptor-type tyrosine kinases deregulated in tumors, but have failed to improve the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is a member of a serine/threonine protein kinase family that plays a critical role in various cellular pathways. GSK3β has also emerged as a mediator of pathological states, including glucose intolerance, inflammation, and various cancers (e.g., pancreatic cancer). We review recent studies that demonstrate the anti-tumor effects of GSK3β inhibition alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. GSK3β inhibition may exert indirect anti-tumor actions in pancreatic cancer by modulating metabolic disorder and inflammation

  6. Metabolic Disorder, Inflammation, and Deregulated Molecular Pathways Converging in Pancreatic Cancer Development: Implications for New Therapeutic Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motoo, Yoshiharu, E-mail: motoo@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Medical Oncology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Shimasaki, Takeo [Department of Medical Oncology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Division of Translational & Clinical Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ishigaki, Yasuhito [Medical Research Institute, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Nakajima, Hideo [Department of Medical Oncology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Kawakami, Kazuyuki; Minamoto, Toshinari [Division of Translational & Clinical Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2011-01-24

    Pancreatic cancer develops and progresses through complex, cumulative biological processes involving metabolic disorder, local inflammation, and deregulated molecular pathways. The resulting tumor aggressiveness hampers surgical intervention and renders pancreatic cancer resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Based on these pathologic properties, several therapeutic strategies are being developed to reverse refractory pancreatic cancer. Here, we outline molecular targeting therapies, which are primarily directed against growth factor receptor-type tyrosine kinases deregulated in tumors, but have failed to improve the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is a member of a serine/threonine protein kinase family that plays a critical role in various cellular pathways. GSK3β has also emerged as a mediator of pathological states, including glucose intolerance, inflammation, and various cancers (e.g., pancreatic cancer). We review recent studies that demonstrate the anti-tumor effects of GSK3β inhibition alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. GSK3β inhibition may exert indirect anti-tumor actions in pancreatic cancer by modulating metabolic disorder and inflammation.

  7. MEK/ERK activation plays a decisive role in yellow fever virus replication: implication as an antiviral therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarnaz, Jonas D; De Oliveira, Leonardo C; Torres, Alice A; Palhares, Rafael M; Casteluber, Marisa C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Cardozo, Pablo L; De Souza, Aryádina M R; Pacca, Carolina C; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2014-11-01

    Exploiting the inhibition of host signaling pathways aiming for discovery of potential antiflaviviral compounds is clearly a beneficial strategy for the control of life-threatening diseases caused by flaviviruses. Here we describe the antiviral activity of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 against Yellow fever virus 17D vaccine strain (YFV-17D). Infection of VERO cells with YFV-17D stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation early during infection. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 through U0126 treatment of VERO cells blockades not only the YFV-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but also inhibits YFV replication by ∼99%. U0126 was also effective against dengue virus (DENV-2 and -3) and Saint-Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Levels of NS4AB, as detected by immunofluorescence, are diminished upon treatment with the inhibitor, as well as the characteristic endoplasmic reticulum membrane invagination stimulated during the infection. Though not protective, treatment of YFV-infected, adult BALB/c mice with U0126 resulted in significant reduction of virus titers in brains. Collectively, our data suggest the potential targeting of the MEK1/2 kinase as a therapeutic tool against diseases caused by flaviviruses such as yellow fever, adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination and dengue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A pilot study for robot appearance preferences among high-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorder: Implications for therapeutic use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Kumazaki

    Full Text Available Recent rapid technological advances have enabled robots to fulfill a variety of human-like functions, leading researchers to propose the use of such technology for the development and subsequent validation of interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Although a variety of robots have been proposed as possible therapeutic tools, the physical appearances of humanoid robots currently used in therapy with these patients are highly varied. Very little is known about how these varied designs are experienced by individuals with ASD. In this study, we systematically evaluated preferences regarding robot appearance in a group of 16 individuals with ASD (ages 10-17. Our data suggest that there may be important differences in preference for different types of robots that vary according to interaction type for individuals with ASD. Specifically, within our pilot sample, children with higher-levels of reported ASD symptomatology reported a preference for specific humanoid robots to those perceived as more mechanical or mascot-like. The findings of this pilot study suggest that preferences and reactions to robotic interactions may vary tremendously across individuals with ASD. Future work should evaluate how such differences may be systematically measured and potentially harnessed to facilitate meaningful interactive and intervention paradigms.

  9. The Role of Ovarian Sex Steroids in Metabolic Homeostasis, Obesity, and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Boonyaratanakornkit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obese postmenopausal women have an increased risk of breast cancer and are likely to have a worse prognosis than nonobese postmenopausal women. The cessation of ovarian function after menopause results in withdrawal of ovarian sex steroid hormones, estrogen, and progesterone. Accumulating evidence suggests that the withdrawal of estrogen and progesterone causes homeostasis imbalances, including decreases in insulin sensitivity and leptin secretion and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism, resulting in a total reduction in energy expenditure. Together with a decrease in physical activity and consumption of a high fat diet, these factors significantly contribute to obesity in postmenopausal women. Obesity may contribute to breast cancer development through several mechanisms. Obesity causes localized inflammation, an increase in local estrogen production, and changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, obese women have a higher risk of insulin insensitivity, and an increase in insulin and other growth factor secretion. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the molecular actions of estrogen and progesterone and their contributions to cellular metabolism, obesity, inflammation, and postmenopausal breast cancer. We also discuss how modifications of estrogen and progesterone actions might be used as a therapeutic approach for obesity and postmenopausal breast cancer.

  10. Targeting multiple pathogenic mechanisms with polyphenols for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: Experimental approach and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eWang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease of aging and currently has no cure. Its onset and progression are influenced by multiple factors. There is growing consensus that successful treatment will rely on simultaneously targeting multiple pathological features of AD. Polyphenol compounds have many proven health benefits. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that combining three polyphenolic preparations (grape seed extract, resveratrol and Concord grape juice extract, with different polyphenolic compositions and partially redundant bioactivities, may simultaneously and synergistically mitigate amyloid-β (Aβ mediated neuropathology and cognitive impairments in a mouse model of AD. We found that administration of the polyphenols in combination did not alter the profile of bioactive polyphenol metabolites in the brain. We also found that combination treatment resulted in better protection against cognitive impairments compared to individual treatments, in J20 AD mice. Electrophysiological examination showed that acute treatment with select brain penetrating polyphenol metabolites, derived from these polyphenols, improved oligomeric Aβ (oAβ-induced long term potentiation (LTP deficits in hippocampal slices. Moreover, we found greatly reduced total amyloid content in the brain following combination treatment. Our studies provided experimental evidence that application of polyphenols targeting multiple disease-mechanisms may yield a greater likelihood of therapeutic efficacy.

  11. NABi, a novel β-sheet breaker, inhibits Aβ aggregation and neuronal toxicity: Therapeutic implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ja-Young; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Kang, Seongman

    2018-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregates are an important therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD), a fatal neurodegenerative disease. To date, AD still remains a big challenge due to no effective treatments. Based on the property that Aβ aggregates have the cross-β-structure, a common structural feature in amyloids, we systemically designed the Aβ-aggregation inhibitor that maintains Aβ-interacting ability but removes toxic part from SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1)-G93A. We identified NABi (Natural Aβ Binder and Aβ-aggregation inhibitor) composed of β2-3 strands, a novel breaker of Aβ aggregation, which does not self-aggregate and has no cytotoxicity at all. The NABi blocks Aβ-fibril formation in vitro and in vivo and prevents neuronal cell death, a hallmark of AD pathogenesis. Such anti-amyloidogenic properties can provide novel strategies for treating AD. Furthermore, our study provides molecular insights into the design of amyloidogenic inhibitors to cure various neurodegenerative and amyloid-associated diseases, as NABi would regulate aggregation of other toxic β-sheet proteins other than Aβ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. TREK-1 Channel Expression in Smooth Muscle as a Target for Regulating Murine Intestinal Contractility: Therapeutic Implications for Motility Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruolin Ma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI motility disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS can occur when coordinated smooth muscle contractility is disrupted. Potassium (K+ channels regulate GI smooth muscle tone and are key to GI tract relaxation, but their molecular and functional phenotypes are poorly described. Here we define the expression and functional roles of mechano-gated K2P channels in mouse ileum and colon. Expression and distribution of the K2P channel family were investigated using quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR, immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The contribution of mechano-gated K2P channels to mouse intestinal muscle tension was studied pharmacologically using organ bath. Multiple K2P gene transcripts were detected in mouse ileum and colon whole tissue preparations. Immunohistochemistry confirmed TREK-1 expression was smooth muscle specific in both ileum and colon, whereas TREK-2 and TRAAK channels were detected in enteric neurons but not smooth muscle. In organ bath, mechano-gated K2P channel activators (Riluzole, BL-1249, flufenamic acid, and cinnamyl 1-3,4-dihydroxy-alpha-cyanocinnamate induced relaxation of KCl and CCh pre-contracted ileum and colon tissues and reduced the amplitude of spontaneous contractions. These data reveal the specific expression of mechano-gated K2P channels in mouse ileum and colon tissues and highlight TREK-1, a smooth muscle specific K2P channel in GI tract, as a potential therapeutic target for combating motility pathologies arising from hyper-contractility.

  13. Clomiphene and Its Isomers Block Ebola Virus Particle Entry and Infection with Similar Potency: Potential Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Elizabeth A; Barnes, Alyson B; Wiehle, Ronald D; Fontenot, Gregory K; Hoenen, Thomas; White, Judith M

    2016-08-02

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) in Western Africa highlighted the need for anti-EBOV therapeutics. Clomiphene is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug that blocks EBOV entry and infection in cells and significantly protects EBOV-challenged mice. As provided, clomiphene is, approximately, a 60:40 mixture of two stereoisomers, enclomiphene and zuclomiphene. The pharmacokinetic properties of the two isomers vary, but both accumulate in the eye and male reproductive tract, tissues in which EBOV can persist. Here we compared the ability of clomiphene and its isomers to inhibit EBOV using viral-like particle (VLP) entry and transcription/replication-competent VLP (trVLP) assays. Clomiphene and its isomers inhibited the entry and infection of VLPs and trVLPs with similar potencies. This was demonstrated with VLPs bearing the glycoproteins from three filoviruses (EBOV Mayinga, EBOV Makona, and Marburg virus) and in two cell lines (293T/17 and Vero E6). Visual problems have been noted in EBOV survivors, and viral RNA has been isolated from semen up to nine months post-infection. Since the clomiphene isomers accumulate in these affected tissues, clomiphene or one of its isomers warrants consideration as an anti-EBOV agent, for example, to potentially help ameliorate symptoms in EBOV survivors.

  14. Clomiphene and Its Isomers Block Ebola Virus Particle Entry and Infection with Similar Potency: Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Nelson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV in Western Africa highlighted the need for anti-EBOV therapeutics. Clomiphene is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drug that blocks EBOV entry and infection in cells and significantly protects EBOV-challenged mice. As provided, clomiphene is, approximately, a 60:40 mixture of two stereoisomers, enclomiphene and zuclomiphene. The pharmacokinetic properties of the two isomers vary, but both accumulate in the eye and male reproductive tract, tissues in which EBOV can persist. Here we compared the ability of clomiphene and its isomers to inhibit EBOV using viral-like particle (VLP entry and transcription/replication-competent VLP (trVLP assays. Clomiphene and its isomers inhibited the entry and infection of VLPs and trVLPs with similar potencies. This was demonstrated with VLPs bearing the glycoproteins from three filoviruses (EBOV Mayinga, EBOV Makona, and Marburg virus and in two cell lines (293T/17 and Vero E6. Visual problems have been noted in EBOV survivors, and viral RNA has been isolated from semen up to nine months post-infection. Since the clomiphene isomers accumulate in these affected tissues, clomiphene or one of its isomers warrants consideration as an anti-EBOV agent, for example, to potentially help ameliorate symptoms in EBOV survivors.

  15. Curcumin's Neuroprotective Efficacy in Drosophila Model of Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease Is Phase Specific: Implication of its Therapeutic Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phom, Limamanen; Achumi, Bovito; Alone, Debasmita P.; Muralidhara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra underlies the basic motor impairments of Parkinson's disease (PD). Curcumin has been used for centuries in traditional medicines in India. Our aim is to understand the efficacy of genotropic drug curcumin as a neuroprotective agent in PD. Analysis of different developmental stages in model organisms revealed that they are characterized by different patterns of gene expression which is similar to that of developmental stages of human. Genotropic drugs would be effective only during those life cycle stages for which their target molecules are available. Hence there exists a possibility that targets of genotropic compounds such as curcumin may not be present in all life stages. However, no reports are available in PD models illustrating the efficacy of curcumin in later phases of adult life. This is important because this is the period during which late-onset disorders such as idiopathic PD set in. To understand this paradigm, we tested the protective efficacy of curcumin in different growth stages (early, late health stage, and transition phase) in adult Drosophila flies. Results showed that it can rescue the motor defects during early stages of life but is ineffective at later phases. This observation was substantiated with the finding that curcumin treatment could replenish depleted brain dopamine levels in the PD model only during early stages of life cycle, clearly suggesting its limitation as a therapeutic agent in late-onset neurodegenerative disorders such as PD. PMID:25238331

  16. Metabolic Disorder, Inflammation, and Deregulated Molecular Pathways Converging in Pancreatic Cancer Development: Implications for New Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinari Minamoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer develops and progresses through complex, cumulative biological processes involving metabolic disorder, local inflammation, and deregulated molecular pathways. The resulting tumor aggressiveness hampers surgical intervention and renders pancreatic cancer resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Based on these pathologic properties, several therapeutic strategies are being developed to reverse refractory pancreatic cancer. Here, we outline molecular targeting therapies, which are primarily directed against growth factor receptor-type tyrosine kinases deregulated in tumors, but have failed to improve the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β is a member of a serine/threonine protein kinase family that plays a critical role in various cellular pathways. GSK3β has also emerged as a mediator of pathological states, including glucose intolerance, inflammation, and various cancers (e.g., pancreatic cancer. We review recent studies that demonstrate the anti-tumor effects of GSK3β inhibition alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. GSK3β inhibition may exert indirect anti-tumor actions in pancreatic cancer by modulating metabolic disorder and inflammation.

  17. Functions of the APC tumor suppressor protein dependent and independent of canonical WNT signaling: implications for therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, William; Frankel, Wendy L; Groden, Joanna

    2018-03-01

    The acquisition of biallelic mutations in the APC gene is a rate-limiting step in the development of most colorectal cancers and occurs in the earliest lesions. APC encodes a 312-kDa protein that localizes to multiple subcellular compartments and performs diverse functions. APC participates in a cytoplasmic complex that promotes the destruction of the transcriptional licensing factor β-catenin; APC mutations that abolish this function trigger constitutive activation of the canonical WNT signaling pathway, a characteristic found in almost all colorectal cancers. By negatively regulating canonical WNT signaling, APC counteracts proliferation, promotes differentiation, facilitates apoptosis, and suppresses invasion and tumor progression. APC further antagonizes canonical WNT signaling by interacting with and counteracting β-catenin in the nucleus. APC also suppresses tumor initiation and progression in the colorectal epithelium through functions that are independent of canonical WNT signaling. APC regulates the mitotic spindle to facilitate proper chromosome segregation, localizes to the cell periphery and cell protrusions to establish cell polarity and appropriate directional migration, and inhibits DNA replication by interacting directly with DNA. Mutations in APC are often frameshifts, insertions, or deletions that introduce premature stop codons and lead to the production of truncated APC proteins that lack its normal functions and possess tumorigenic properties. Therapeutic approaches in development for the treatment of APC-deficient tumors are focused on the inhibition of canonical WNT signaling, especially through targets downstream of APC in the pathway, or on the restoration of wild-type APC expression.

  18. PARALLEL MODELS OF ASSESSMENT: INFANT MENTAL HEALTH AND THERAPEUTIC ASSESSMENT MODELS INTERSECT THROUGH EARLY CHILDHOOD CASE STUDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gart, Natalie; Zamora, Irina; Williams, Marian E

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic Assessment (TA; S.E. Finn & M.E. Tonsager, 1997; J.D. Smith, 2010) is a collaborative, semistructured model that encourages self-discovery and meaning-making through the use of assessment as an intervention approach. This model shares core strategies with infant mental health assessment, including close collaboration with parents and caregivers, active participation of the family, a focus on developing new family stories and increasing parents' understanding of their child, and reducing isolation and increasing hope through the assessment process. The intersection of these two theoretical approaches is explored, using case studies of three infants/young children and their families to illustrate the application of TA to infant mental health. The case of an 18-month-old girl whose parents fear that she has bipolar disorder illustrates the core principles of the TA model, highlighting the use of assessment intervention sessions and the clinical approach to preparing assessment feedback. The second case follows an infant with a rare genetic syndrome from ages 2 to 24 months, focusing on the assessor-parent relationship and the importance of a developmental perspective. Finally, assessment of a 3-year-old boy illustrates the development and use of a fable as a tool to provide feedback to a young child about assessment findings and recommendations. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  19. Primary unclassified sarcoma of the parotid gland: a case of diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravakos, Panagiotis; Hartwein, Joerg; Fayyazi, Afshin

    2017-05-01

    Malignant salivary gland sarcomas represent a clinically and histologically diagnostic challenge. Primary unclassified sarcomas of the parotid gland consist a rare salivary gland tumor. We report an unusual case of such a tumor, which occurred in the right parotid gland of a 54-year-old male and presented as an asymptomatic painless mass. The pathologoanatomical examination revealed a rhabdoid large-cell unclassified sarcoma. The patient was treated with superficial parotidectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. No recurrence was noted in a 10-year follow-up period. Due to the rare occurrence of primary unclassified sarcomas, there is no evidence-based treatment of choice. An optimal approach is best planned in a multidisciplinary setting, taking into consideration the resectability of the tumor, individual patient characteristics, presence of local or distant metastatic activity, local infiltrative behavior and tumor stage. A close follow-up of the patient is strongly recommended.

  20. Cribriform carcinoma mimicking breast abscess - case report. Diagnostic and therapeutic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Roszkowska-Purska, Katarzyna; Chrapowicki, Eryk

    2013-06-01

    The authors presents a case of cribriform breast carcinoma in a cyst that clinically imitated an abscess. The case concerns a 71-year-old female patient treated for ankylosing spondylitis, with a positive family history of breast cancer. The patient presented at the surgical clinic for incision of an abscess of the mammary gland localized in the lower inner quadrant that was a consequence of previous trauma to the right breast. The abscess was incised and the serosanguineous contents were evacuated. The wound was drained and antibiotics (Dalacin with Metronidazol) were administered for the period of 10 days. During the treatment, a cutaneous fistula was formed. At the incision site, a hard thickening was palpable (tumor). Core needle biopsy of the clinically palpable tumor was performed and the purulent material from the fistula was collected for a culture test. Complete blood count did not reveal leucocytosis. In accordance with the obtained sensitivity report, the patient was started on antibiotics again. Breast ultrasound performed upon the completion of the antibiotic therapy, in the right breast, revealed two solidcystic oval lesions with thick echogenic walls and blurred margins. Both masses contained dense levels of fluid material and solid polycyclic structures. On sonoelastography, the lesions were heterogeneous with a high Young's modulus. In the right axillary fossa, ultrasound examination revealed three abnormal lymph nodes enlarged to 31 mm length, which were rounded, hypoechoic and without visible sinuses. Histopathology of the core needle biopsy performed at admittance and after the antibiotic therapy indicated a breast abscess (presence of fibrinous and partly fibrinopurulent material). The mass was finally resected to confirm histopathology. The resected material revealed the presence of an invasive, moderately differentiated cribriform carcinoma, which developed within a cyst, with a 40% necrotic component. Eighteen months after the commencement

  1. Manufacturing economics of plant-made biologics: case studies in therapeutic and industrial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusé, Daniel; Tu, Tiffany; McDonald, Karen A

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant biologics in plants has received considerable attention as an alternative platform to traditional microbial and animal cell culture. Industrially relevant features of plant systems include proper eukaryotic protein processing, inherent safety due to lack of adventitious agents, more facile scalability, faster production (transient systems), and potentially lower costs. Lower manufacturing cost has been widely claimed as an intuitive feature of the platform by the plant-made biologics community, even though cost information resides within a few private companies and studies accurately documenting such an advantage have been lacking. We present two technoeconomic case studies representing plant-made enzymes for diverse applications: human butyrylcholinesterase produced indoors for use as a medical countermeasure and cellulases produced in the field for the conversion of cellulosic biomass into ethanol as a fuel extender. Production economics were modeled based on results reported with the latest-generation expression technologies on Nicotiana host plants. We evaluated process unit operations and calculated bulk active and per-dose or per-unit costs using SuperPro Designer modeling software. Our analyses indicate that substantial cost advantages over alternative platforms can be achieved with plant systems, but these advantages are molecule/product-specific and depend on the relative cost-efficiencies of alternative sources of the same product.

  2. Manufacturing Economics of Plant-Made Biologics: Case Studies in Therapeutic and Industrial Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tusé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of recombinant biologics in plants has received considerable attention as an alternative platform to traditional microbial and animal cell culture. Industrially relevant features of plant systems include proper eukaryotic protein processing, inherent safety due to lack of adventitious agents, more facile scalability, faster production (transient systems, and potentially lower costs. Lower manufacturing cost has been widely claimed as an intuitive feature of the platform by the plant-made biologics community, even though cost information resides within a few private companies and studies accurately documenting such an advantage have been lacking. We present two technoeconomic case studies representing plant-made enzymes for diverse applications: human butyrylcholinesterase produced indoors for use as a medical countermeasure and cellulases produced in the field for the conversion of cellulosic biomass into ethanol as a fuel extender. Production economics were modeled based on results reported with the latest-generation expression technologies on Nicotiana host plants. We evaluated process unit operations and calculated bulk active and per-dose or per-unit costs using SuperPro Designer modeling software. Our analyses indicate that substantial cost advantages over alternative platforms can be achieved with plant systems, but these advantages are molecule/product-specific and depend on the relative cost-efficiencies of alternative sources of the same product.

  3. Clinical picture and treatment implication in a child with Capgras syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzone, Luigi; Armando, Marco; De Crescenzo, Franco; Demaria, Francesco; Valeri, Giovanni; Vicari, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome characterized by the patient’s belief that his or her relatives have been replaced by impostors. Case presentation Here we describe the clinical picture and the therapeutic approach to an 11-year-old Caucasian girl with Capgras syndrome. A complete psychopathological assessment was conducted during the acute phase, at one month, two months and six months since diagnosis. Conclusion Subsequent follow-up evaluatio...

  4. Cribriform carcinoma mimicking breast abscess – case report. Diagnostic and therapeutic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Dobruch‑Sobczak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors presents a case of cribriform breast carcinoma in a cyst that clinically imitated an abscess. The case concerns a 71-year-old female patient treated for ankylosing spondylitis, with a positive family history of breast cancer. The patient presented at the surgical clinic for incision of an abscess of the mammary gland localized in the lower inner quadrant that was a consequence of previous trauma to the right breast. The abscess was incised and the serosanguineous contents were evacuated. The wound was drained and antibiotics (Dalacin with Metronidazol were administered for the period of 10 days. During the treatment, a cutaneous fistula was formed. At the incision site, a hard thickening was palpable (tumor. Core needle biopsy of the clinically palpable tumor was performed and the purulent material from the fistula was collected for a culture test. Complete blood count did not reveal leucocytosis. In accordance with the obtained sensitivity report, the patient was started on antibiotics again. Breast ultrasound performed upon the completion of the antibiotic therapy, in the right breast, revealed two solidcystic oval lesions with thick echogenic walls and blurred margins. Both masses contained dense levels of fluid material and solid polycyclic structures. On sonoelastography, the lesions were heterogeneous with a high Young’s modulus. In the right axillary fossa, ultrasound examination revealed three abnormal lymph nodes enlarged to 31 mm length, which were rounded, hypoechoic and without visible sinuses. Histopathology of the core needle biopsy performed at admittance and after the antibiotic therapy indicated a breast abscess (presence of fibrinous and partly fibrinopurulent material. The mass was finally resected to confirm histopathology. The resected material revealed the presence of an invasive, moderately differentiated cribriform carcinoma, which developed within a cyst, with a

  5. [Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome, a real diagnostic and therapeutic challenge: A case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, A; Moumen, A; Massine El Hammoumi, M; Hajhouji, S; El Jadi, H; Anas Guerboub, A; Elmoussaoui, S; Mayaudon, H; Hassane Kabiri, E; Hakkou, K; Belmejdoub, G

    2015-12-01

    Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome is a rare cause of endogenous hypercortisolism attributable to ectopic ACTH secretion by non-pituitary tumors. Imaging and biochemical results are often inconclusive and differential diagnosis with Cushing's disease can then be challenging. Moreover, these tumors may be occult and difficult to find and thus the need of new imaging tools such as (18)FDG-PET scan and (18)DOPA-PET scan. We report a 50-year-old man who presented with very aggressive clinical features related to Cushing's syndrome. Biological work-up confirmed the hypercortisolism and was consistent with an ectopic ACTH secretion. Conventional localization techniques failed to show any tumor and bilateral adrenalectomy was performed because of life-threatening complications. Two years later, thoracic computed tomography reveals an 11 mm mass in the left lower pulmonary lobe, (18)FDG-PET scan found a non-specific mild hypermetabolism of the lung nodule, and the (18)DOPA-PET scan confirmed the high uptake of this nodule suggesting an endocrine carcinoma. Histology confirmed a typical carcinoid tumor. The tumor cells stained positive for ACTH, CD56, chromogranin and synaptophysin. This case illustrates the dilemma between the need for morphological diagnosis of the ectopic ACTH source and control of the life-threatening hypercortisolism. (18)FDG-PET scan and (18)DOPA-PET scan should be considered early as a secondary diagnostic tool when conventional imagery fails to show any tumor. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid Treatment of Leukostasis in Leukemic Mantle Cell Lymphoma Using Therapeutic Leukapheresis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Duc Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of severe leukocytosis caused by leukemic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL, complicated by leukostasis with myocardial infarction in which leukapheresis was used in the initial management. A 73-year-old male presented to the emergency department because of fatigue and thoracic pain. Blood count revealed 630 × 109/L WBC (white blood cells. The electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with an increase of troponin and creatinine kinase. The diagnosis was ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI induced and complicated by leukostasis. Immunophenotyping, morphology, cytogenetic and fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization analysis revealed the diagnosis of a blastoid variant of MCL. To remove leukocytes rapidly, leukapheresis was performed in the intensive care unit. Based on the differential blood count with 95% blasts, which were assigned to the lymphocyte population by the automatic hematology analyzer, leukapheresis procedures were then performed with the mononuclear cell standard program on the Spectra cell separator. The patient was treated with daily leukapheresis for 3 days. The WBC count decreased to 174 × 109/L after the third leukapheresis, with a 72% reduction. After the second apheresis, treatment with vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisolone was started. The patient fully recovered in the further course of the treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on blastoid MCL with leukostasis associated with a STEMI that was successfully treated by leukapheresis. Effective harvest of circulating lymphoma cells by leukapheresis requires adaptation of instrument settings based on the results of the differential blood count prior to apheresis.

  7. Recognition and Distance in Therapeutic Education: A Swedish Case Study on Ethical Qualities within Life Competence Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisdotter Aldenmyr, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Lately, in educational research and debate, there have been discussions on a trend sometimes named as a "therapeutic turn" in education. Mindfulness-oriented activities represent one therapeutic approach in education, aiming for virtues such as patience and trust. A large part of the critical viewpoints on therapeutic education among…

  8. Transcriptomic analysis in a Drosophila model identifies previously implicated and novel pathways in the therapeutic mechanism in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eSingh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We have taken advantage of a newly described Drosophila model to gain insights into the potential mechanism of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, a group of drugs that are widely used in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric conditions besides epilepsy. In the recently described Drosophila model that is inspired by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ induced kindling epileptogenesis in rodents, chronic PTZ treatment for seven days causes a decreased climbing speed and an altered CNS transcriptome, with the latter mimicking gene expression alterations reported in epileptogenesis. In the model, an increased climbing speed is further observed seven days after withdrawal from chronic PTZ. We used this post-PTZ withdrawal regime to identify potential AED mechanism. In this regime, treatment with each of the five AEDs tested, namely, ethosuximide (ETH, gabapentin (GBP, vigabatrin (VGB, sodium valproate (NaVP and levetiracetam (LEV, resulted in rescuing of the altered climbing behavior. The AEDs also normalized PTZ withdrawal induced transcriptomic perturbation in fly heads; whereas AED untreated flies showed a large number of up- and down-regulated genes which were enriched in several processes including gene expression and cell communication, the AED treated flies showed differential expression of only a small number of genes that did not enrich gene expression and cell communication processes. Gene expression and cell communication related upregulated genes in AED untreated flies overrepresented several pathways - spliceosome, RNA degradation, and ribosome in the former category, and inositol phosphate metabolism, phosphatidylinositol signaling, endocytosis and hedgehog signaling in the latter. Transcriptome remodeling effect of AEDs was overall confirmed by microarray clustering that clearly separated the profiles of AED treated and untreated flies. Besides being consistent with previously implicated pathways, our results provide evidence for a role of

  9. Immunophenotyping of Waldenstroms macroglobulinemia cell lines reveals distinct patterns of surface antigen expression: potential biological and therapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneel Paulus

    therapeutic exploit.

  10. A novel method for isolation of histones from serum and its implications in therapeutics and prognosis of solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Divya; Khade, Bharat; Pandya, Riddhi; Gupta, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation in post-translational modifications of histones and their modifiers are now well-recognized as a hallmark of cancer and can be used as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for disease progression and prognosis. In most solid tumours, a biopsy is challenging, costly, painful or potentially risky for the patient. Therefore, non-invasive methods like 'liquid biopsy' for analysis of histone modifications and their modifiers if possible will be helpful in the better clinical management of cancer patients. Here, we have developed a cost-effective and time-efficient protocol for isolation of circulating histones from serum of solid tumor, HCC, called Dual Acid Extraction (DAE) protocol and have confirmed by mass spectrometry. Also, we measured the activity of HDACs and HATs in serum samples. The serum purified histones were profiled for changes in histone PTMs and have shown a comparable pattern of modifications like acetylation (H4K16Ac), methylation (H4K20Me3, H3K27Me3, H3K9Me3) and phosphorylation (γ-H2AX and H3S10P) to paired cancer tissues. Profiling for the histone PTM changes in various other organs of normal and tumor bearing animal suggests that the changes in the histone PTMs observed in the tumor serum is indeed due to changes in the tumor tissue only. Further, we demonstrate that the observed hypo-acetylation of histone H4 in tissue and serum samples of tumor bearing animals corroborated with the elevated HDAC activity in both samples compared to normal. Interestingly, human normal and tumor serum samples also showed elevated HDAC activity with no significant changes in HAT activity. Our study provides the first evidence in the context of histone PTMs and modifiers that liquid biopsy is a valuable predictive tool for monitoring disease progression. Importantly, with the advent of drugs that target specific enzymes involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, liquid biopsy-based 'real time' monitoring will be useful for

  11. Therapeutic bronchoscopy in a child with sand aspiration and respiratory failure from near drowning--case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, N; Slater, A; McEniery, J; Greer, M L; Masters, I B; Chang, A B

    2009-10-01

    Foreign matter aspiration occurs relatively commonly in drowning and near-drowning events. In most cases, stomach contents are aspirated. Sand aspiration rarely occurs and there are no reported cases in children with near drowning. Limited data are available on clinical presentation and management of sand aspiration with accidental burial. We report a 3-year-old boy who nearly drowned while swimming in brackish waters and was found face down in sand. Sand aspiration was suspected when the child continued to have persistent wheezing and high ventilatory requirement despite intensive bronchodilator and corticosteroids therapy with an inability to wean after 4 days post-near-drowning event. Radiology was non-specific in the absence of sand bronchogram. Presence of sand in the airways was confirmed when a bronchoscopy was undertaken and sand seen in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Sequential lung washing followed by exogenous surfactant administration (3 ml/kg) was undertaken and lead to significant improvement such that within 12 hr post-therapeutic lavage, his ventilatory requirements reduced substantially. The child was extubated 4 days post-lavage and on review 2 months post-event, was clinically well with airway resistance within normal predicted values measured on forced oscillatory spirometry (IOS).

  12. Threaded biliary inside stents are a safe and effective therapeutic option in cases of malignant hilar obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inatomi, Osamu; Bamba, Shigeki; Shioya, Makoto; Mochizuki, Yosuke; Ban, Hiromitsu; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Saito, Yasuharu; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2013-02-14

    Although endoscopic biliary stents have been accepted as part of palliative therapy for cases of malignant hilar obstruction, the optimal endoscopic management regime remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of placing a threaded stent above the sphincter of Oddi (threaded inside plastic stents, threaded PS) and compared the results with those of other stent types. Patients with malignant hilar obstruction, including those requiring biliary drainage for stent occlusion, were selected. Patients received either one of the following endoscopic indwelling stents: threaded PS, conventional plastic stents (conventional PS), or metallic stents (MS). Duration of stent patency and the incident of complication were compared in these patients. Forty-two patients underwent placement of endoscopic indwelling stents (threaded PS = 12, conventional PS = 17, MS = 13). The median duration of threaded PS patency was significantly longer than that of conventional PS patency (142 vs. 32 days; P = 0.04, logrank test). The median duration of threaded PS and MS patency was not significantly different (142 vs. 150 days, P = 0.83). Stent migration did not occur in any group. Among patients who underwent threaded PS placement as a salvage therapy after MS obstruction due to tumor ingrowth, the median duration of MS patency was significantly shorter than that of threaded PS patency (123 vs. 240 days). Threaded PS are safe and effective in cases of malignant hilar obstruction; moreover, it is a suitable therapeutic option not only for initial drainage but also for salvage therapy.

  13. Severe Hyperthyroidism Complicated by Agranulocytosis Treated with Therapeutic Plasma Exchange: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Garla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To present a case of Graves’ disease complicated by methimazole induced agranulocytosis treated with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE and review of the literature. Case Presentation. A 21-year-old patient with a history of Graves’ disease presented to the endocrine clinic. His history was significant for heat intolerance, weight loss, and tremors. Upon examination he had tachycardia, smooth goiter, thyroid bruit, and hyperactive reflexes. He was started on methimazole and metoprolol and thyroidectomy was to be done once his thyroid function tests normalized. On follow-up, the patient symptoms persisted. Complete blood count done showed a white blood cell count of 2100 (4000–11,000 cells/cu mm with a neutrophil count of 400 cells/cu mm, consistent with neutropenia. He was admitted to the hospital and underwent 3 cycles of TPE and was also given filgrastim. He improved clinically and his thyroxine (T4 levels also came down. Thyroidectomy was done. He was discharged on levothyroxine for postsurgical hypothyroidism. Conclusion. Plasmapheresis may be useful in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. It works by removing protein bound hormones and also possibly inflammatory cytokines. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of various modalities of TPE in the treatment of hyperthyroidism.

  14. Esophageal involvement is frequent in lichen planus: study in 32 patients with suggestion of clinicopathologic diagnostic criteria and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Johannes S; Technau-Hafsi, Kristin; Schwacha, Henning; Kuhlmann, Jan; Hirsch, Gunther; Brass, Volker; Deibert, Peter; Schmitt-Graeff, Anette; Kreisel, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a classic skin disease that can involve the skin, hair, and nails, as well as the oral and genital mucosa. Histopathology is characterized by a T-lymphocytic, lichenoid, and interface dermatitis. Multiple case reports and small case series have shown that LP can involve the esophagus. However, the diagnostic criteria, incidence, and best treatment options remain uncertain. This study aimed to refine the diagnostic criteria, estimate prevalence, and present an outlook on treatment options to prevent long-term sequelae. Thirty-two consecutive patients with LP of the skin, hair, nails, oral mucosa, and/or genital mucosa underwent a comprehensive clinicopathologic assessment. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, and biopsies were evaluated histologically, immunohistochemically, and by direct immunofluorescence. Patients diagnosed with esophageal lichen planus (ELP) were followed up prospectively where possible. In total, 20 of 32 patients had ELP. Ten of these 20 patients were classified as having proven ELP, with clear-cut endoscopically visible lesions; the other 10 were classified as having probable ELP. Eight of 10 patients with proven ELP were started on new or additional therapy because of esophageal findings. Treatment with a topical budesonide formulation or systemic corticosteroids was successful in most patients with proven ELP and reversed functional esophageal stenosis. ELP can be found in more than 50% of patients with proven mucocutaneous LP when clinical and pathologic findings are correlated carefully. Topical or systemic corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for ELP. Timely medical therapy seems to prevent scarring stenosis of the esophagus.

  15. Trauma y trastornos de la alimentación: Implicaciones teóricas y terapéuticas Trauma and eating disorders: Theoretical and therapeutical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Castaldi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Los trastornos de alimentación representan un fenómeno complejo, cuya aproximación implica miradas que integren múltiples niveles de análisis. El presente documento pretende analizar el concepto de trauma relacional aplicado a contextos relacionales en los cuales un miembro presenta tal sintomatología. Se presentan y articulan las implicancias ligadas a la hipótesis planteada, con el objetivo de evidenciar como el tomar en consideración la existencia de un trauma relacional puede ser útil para profundizar aspectos de la dinámica familiar y del posicionamiento individual del miembro sintomático, integrando los aportes psicoanalíticos y sistémicos. Se articulará dicho concepto con la visión trigeneracional clásica y se explicitarán las implicancias posibles en relación al trabajo terapéutico. Eating disorders represent a complex phenomenon that requires a multiple-level analysis approach. The present document analyzes the concept of relational trauma applied to relational contexts where a member presents the symptomatology. The implications linked to the hypothesis proposed are presented and articulated, with the purpose of providing evidence of how considering the existence of a relational trauma can be useful for analyzing elements of family dynamics and of the individual positioning of the symptomatic member, integrating both psychoanalytic and systemic contributions. The concept of relational trauma is articulated with the traditional third-generation view, and the possible implications concerning therapeutic work are stated.

  16. Aerosol exposure to Rift Valley fever virus causes earlier and more severe neuropathology in the murine model, which has important implications for therapeutic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Reed

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an important mosquito-borne veterinary and human pathogen that can cause severe disease including acute-onset hepatitis, delayed-onset encephalitis, retinitis and blindness, or a hemorrhagic syndrome. Currently, no licensed vaccine or therapeutics exist to treat this potentially deadly disease. Detailed studies describing the pathogenesis of RVFV following aerosol exposure have not been completed and candidate therapeutics have not been evaluated following an aerosol exposure. These studies are important because while mosquito transmission is the primary means for human infection, it can also be transmitted by aerosol or through mucosal contact. Therefore, we directly compared the pathogenesis of RVFV following aerosol exposure to a subcutaneous (SC exposure in the murine model by analyzing survival, clinical observations, blood chemistry, hematology, immunohistochemistry, and virus titration of tissues. Additionally, we evaluated the effectiveness of the nucleoside analog ribavirin administered prophylactically to treat mice exposed by aerosol and SC. The route of exposure did not significantly affect the survival, chemistry or hematology results of the mice. Acute hepatitis occurred despite the route of exposure. However, the development of neuropathology occurred much earlier and was more severe in mice exposed by aerosol compared to SC exposed mice. Mice treated with ribavirin and exposed SC were partially protected, whereas treated mice exposed by aerosol were not protected. Early and aggressive viral invasion of brain tissues following aerosol exposure likely played an important role in ribavirin's failure to prevent mortality among these animals. Our results highlight the need for more candidate antivirals to treat RVFV infection, especially in the case of a potential aerosol exposure. Additionally, our study provides an account of the key pathogenetic differences in RVF disease following two potential

  17. Cancer testis antigens and NY-BR-1 expression in primary breast cancer: prognostic and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balafoutas, Dimitrios; zur Hausen, Axel; Mayer, Sebastian; Hirschfeld, Marc; Jaeger, Markus; Denschlag, Dominik; Gitsch, Gerald; Jungbluth, Achim; Stickeler, Elmar

    2013-06-03

    Cancer-testis antigens (CTA) comprise a family of proteins, which are physiologically expressed in adult human tissues solely in testicular germ cells and occasionally placenta. However, CTA expression has been reported in various malignancies. CTAs have been identified by their ability to elicit autologous cellular and or serological immune responses, and are considered potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. The breast differentiation antigen NY-BR-1, expressed specifically in normal and malignant breast tissue, has also immunogenic properties. Here we evaluated the expression patterns of CTAs and NY-BR-1 in breast cancer in correlation to clinico-pathological parameters in order to determine their possible impact as prognostic factors. The reactivity pattern of various mAbs (6C1, MA454, M3H67, 57B, E978, GAGE #26 and NY-BR-1 #5) were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a tissue micro array series of 210 randomly selected primary invasive breast cancers in order to study the diversity of different CTAs (e.g. MAGE-A, NY-ESO-1, GAGE) and NY-BR-1. These expression data were correlated to clinico-pathological parameters and outcome data including disease-free and overall survival. Expression of at least one CTA was detectable in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in 37.2% of the cases. NY-BR-1 expression was found in 46.6% of tumors, respectively. Overall, CTA expression seemed to be linked to adverse prognosis and M3H67 immunoreactivity specifically was significantly correlated to shorter overall and disease-free survival (p=0.000 and 0.024, respectively). Our findings suggest that M3H67 immunoreactivity could serve as potential prognostic marker in primary breast cancer patients. The exclusive expression of CTAs in tumor tissues as well as the frequent expression of NY-BR-1 could define new targets for specific breast cancer therapies.

  18. Therapeutic indications and other use-case-driven updates in the drug ontology: anti-malarials, anti-hypertensives, opioid analgesics, and a large term request.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, William R; Hanna, Josh; Hicks, Amanda; Amirova, Samira; Bramblett, Baxter; Diller, Matthew; Enderez, Rodel; Modzelewski, Timothy; Vasconcelos, Mirela; Delcher, Chris

    2017-03-03

    The Drug Ontology (DrOn) is an OWL2-based representation of drug products and their ingredients, mechanisms of action, strengths, and dose forms. We originally created DrOn for use cases in comparative effectiveness research, primarily to identify historically complete sets of United States National Drug Codes (NDCs) that represent packaged drug products, by the ingredient(s), mechanism(s) of action, and so on contained in those products. Although we had designed DrOn from the outset to carefully distinguish those entities that have a therapeutic indication from those entities that have a molecular mechanism of action, we had not previously represented in DrOn any particular therapeutic indication. In this work, we add therapeutic indications for three research use cases: resistant hypertension, malaria, and opioid abuse research. We also added mechanisms of action for opioid analgesics and added 108 classes representing drug products in response to a large term request from the Program for Resistance, Immunology, Surveillance and Modeling of Malaria in Uganda (PRISM) project. The net result is a new version of DrOn, current to May 2016, that represents three major therapeutic classes of drugs and six new mechanisms of action. A therapeutic indication of a drug product is represented as a therapeutic function in DrOn. Adverse effects of drug products, as well as other therapeutic uses for which the drug product was not designed are dispositions. Our work provides a framework for representing additional therapeutic indications, adverse effects, and uses of drug products beyond their design. Our work also validated our past modeling decisions for specific types of mechanisms of action, namely effects mediated via receptor and/or enzyme binding. DrOn is available at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dron.owl . A smaller version without NDCs is available at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dron/dron-lite.owl.

  19. Clinical neurofeedback: case studies, proposed mechanism, and implications for pediatric neurology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda, Stella B; McMahon, Doreen; Othmer, Siegfried; Othmer, Sue

    2011-08-01

    Trends in alternative medicine use by American health care consumers are rising substantially. Extensive literature exists reporting on the effectiveness of neurofeedback in the treatment of autism, closed head injury, insomnia, migraine, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and posttraumatic stress disorder. We speculated that neurofeedback might serve as a therapeutic modality for patients with medically refractory neurological disorders and have begun referring patients to train with clinical neurofeedback practitioners. The modality is not always covered by insurance. Confident their child's medical and neurological needs would continue to be met, the parents of 3 children with epilepsy spectrum disorder decided to have their child train in the modality. The children's individual progress following neurofeedback are each presented here. A proposed mechanism and practice implications are discussed.

  20. Implications of central immune signaling caused by drugs of abuse: mechanisms, mediators and new therapeutic approaches for prediction and treatment of drug dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coller, Janet K; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2012-05-01

    In the past two decades a trickle of manuscripts examining the non-neuronal central nervous system immune consequences of the drugs of abuse has now swollen to a significant body of work. Initially, these studies reported associative evidence of central nervous system proinflammation resulting from exposure to the drugs of abuse demonstrating key implications for neurotoxicity and disease progression associated with, for example, HIV infection. However, more recently this drug-induced activation of central immune signaling is now understood to contribute substantially to the pharmacodynamic actions of the drugs of abuse, by enhancing the engagement of classical mesolimbic dopamine reward pathways and withdrawal centers. This review will highlight the key in vivo animal, human, biological and molecular evidence of these central immune signaling actions of opioids, alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Excitingly, this new appreciation of central immune signaling activity of drugs of abuse provides novel therapeutic interventions and opportunities to identify 'at risk' individuals through the use of immunogenetics. Discussion will also cover the evidence of modulation of this signaling by existing clinical and pre-clinical drug candidates, and novel pharmacological targets. Finally, following examination of the breadth of central immune signaling actions of the drugs of abuse highlighted here, the current known common immune signaling components will be outlined and their impact on established addiction neurocircuitry discussed, thereby synthesizing a common neuroimmune hypothesis of addiction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Evidence for the Spread and Seeding Capacities of the Mutant Huntingtin Protein in in Vitro Systems and Their Therapeutic Implications

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    Maria Masnata

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders are not only characterized by specific patterns of cell loss but the presence and accumulation of various pathological proteins—both of which correlate with disease evolution. There is now mounting evidence to suggest that these pathological proteins present with toxic, at times prion-like, properties and can therefore seed pathology in neighboring as well remotely connected healthy neurons as they spread across the brain. What is less clear, at this stage, is how much this actually contributes to, and drives, the core pathogenic events. In this review, we present a comprehensive, up-to-date summary of the reported in vitro studies that support the spreading and seeding capacities of pathological proteins, with an emphasis on mutant huntingtin protein in the context of Huntington's disease, although in vivo work remains to be performed to validate this theory in this particular disease. We have further reviewed these findings in light of their potential implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  2. Transcriptional Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ: Therapeutic Implications for Cardiovascular Diseases

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    Florence Gizard

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs is a critical process for the development of atherosclerosis and complications of procedures used to treat atherosclerotic diseases, including postangioplasty restenosis, vein graft failure, and transplant vasculopathy. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and the molecular target for the thiazolidinediones (TZD, used clinically to treat insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition to their efficacy to improve insulin sensitivity, TZD exert a broad spectrum of pleiotropic beneficial effects on vascular gene expression programs. In SMCs, PPARγ is prominently upregulated during neointima formation and suppresses the proliferative response to injury of the arterial wall. Among the molecular target genes regulated by PPARγ in SMCs are genes encoding proteins involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cellular senescence, and apoptosis. This inhibition of SMC proliferation is likely to contribute to the prevention of atherosclerosis and postangioplasty restenosis observed in animal models and proof-of-concept clinical studies. This review will summarize the transcriptional target genes regulated by PPARγ in SMCs and outline the therapeutic implications of PPARγ activation for the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis and its complications.

  3. Severe Hyperthyroidism Complicated by Agranulocytosis Treated with Therapeutic Plasma Exchange: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garla, Vishnu; Kovvuru, Karthik; Ahuja, Shradha; Palabindala, Venkatataman; Malhotra, Bharat; Abdul Salim, Sohail

    2018-01-01

    To present a case of Graves' disease complicated by methimazole induced agranulocytosis treated with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) and review of the literature. A 21-year-old patient with a history of Graves' disease presented to the endocrine clinic. His history was significant for heat intolerance, weight loss, and tremors. Upon examination he had tachycardia, smooth goiter, thyroid bruit, and hyperactive reflexes. He was started on methimazole and metoprolol and thyroidectomy was to be done once his thyroid function tests normalized. On follow-up, the patient symptoms persisted. Complete blood count done showed a white blood cell count of 2100 (4000-11,000 cells/cu mm) with a neutrophil count of 400 cells/cu mm, consistent with neutropenia. He was admitted to the hospital and underwent 3 cycles of TPE and was also given filgrastim. He improved clinically and his thyroxine (T4) levels also came down. Thyroidectomy was done. He was discharged on levothyroxine for postsurgical hypothyroidism. Plasmapheresis may be useful in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. It works by removing protein bound hormones and also possibly inflammatory cytokines. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of various modalities of TPE in the treatment of hyperthyroidism.

  4. The therapeutic role of the dacryocystography in patients with epiphora: three cases report; O papel terapeutico da dacriocistografia em pacientes com epifora: relato de tres casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, Fabiano Celli [Hospital de Caridade Sao Braz, Porto Uniao, SC (Brazil); Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Francisco, Vivian Frida Murta; Mendonca Junior, Adhemar [Clinica Radiologica Emilio Amorim, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Torres Neto, Gilberto [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Disciplina de Radiologia; Francisco, Marina Celli [Universidade Evangelica do Parana (Brazil). Curso de Medicina

    2006-10-15

    We describe three cases of patients that presented epiphora having been submitted the accomplishment of dacryocystographic study, which ones turned asymptomatic after the accomplishment of the exam, without any other procedure or medicine. The therapeutic potential of the method is stood out, once the literature on this subject is scarce in children and none in adults. (author)

  5. Evaluation of approved and non-approved requests for therapeutic abortion in cases referred to legal medicine organization of Lorestan province in 2013

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    peyman Astaraki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Authorizing abortion in some cases of fetal and maternal diseases which was implemented by passing its law in 2005, a major change in therapeutic abortion was performed in Iran,s health system. Although there may be cases of illegal abortion, but our study examined legal abortion of Lorestan province in 2013, which led to increase in awareness of health professionals about indications of therapeutic abortion, the time to do it and answer to related questions. Materials and Methods: In this epidemiological and cross-sectional study, all applications for abortion permission, received by Lorestan legal organization in 2013, were studied. The data were recorded in a questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software. Results: From 205 cases during a year, 144 of them obtained permission for abortion of which 88% issued for fetal abnormalities and 12% due to illness of the mother. The most common diseases in the fetus were, the brain and skull abnormalities, and in the mothers, cardiovascular diseases and hematologic abnormalities were the highest. In these cases, the most frequency belonged to the age group of 25-34 years. For 61 requests, permission for abortion had not been issued. High gestational age (26 cases and diseases of the brain and skull, were the most common reasons of request for abortion. Conclusion: Abortion means therapeutic abortion and with the increase in the authorized therapeutic abortion, the illegal abortion will be reduced and leads to increase in the health of pregnant women. By increasing awareness of the medical staff about permitted therapeutic abortion and related laws, a correct and better guidance of pregnant women, we can help them to have a healthy community. As well as the problems of obstetricians and gynecologists, in this field, will be decreased.

  6. Biofuel's energetic paradigm and its implications: A global overview and the Colombian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiblanco Rozo, Carmenza; Hortua Romero, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade biofuels have become a feasible answer given the global need for alternative energy sources. Its increasing demand has been reflected in the expansion of raw materials' crops, with implications in several topics: land use change, ecosystem services relating hydric resources, Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG), food security and land property. The objective of this article is a critical analysis of these issues based on a revision of international literature, but also approaching the Colombian case, particularly African oil palm expansion and its social implications. The main results point out that crop expansion will occur in tropical countries. This generates negative impacts that contribute to conflicts around water and land accessibility in regions characterized by their high social and ecosystem vulnerability. Additionally, it is necessary to improve information systems and to refine methodologies and models that allow an adequate evaluation of biofuel production impacts on human well being.

  7. Worsening cholestasis and possible cefuroxime-induced liver injury following "successful" therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for a distal common bile duct stone: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niriella, Madunil Anuk; Kumarasena, Ravindu Sujeewa; Dassanayake, Anuradha Supun; Pathirana, Aloka; de Silva Hewavisenthi, Janaki; de Silva, Hithanadura Janaka

    2016-12-21

    Cefuroxime very rarely causes drug-induced liver injury. We present a case of a patient with paradoxical worsening of jaundice caused by cefuroxime-induced cholestasis following therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for a distal common bile duct stone. A 51-year-old, previously healthy Sri Lankan man presented to our hospital with obstructive jaundice caused by a distal common bile duct stone. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with stone extraction, common bile duct clearance, and stenting failed to improve the cholestasis, with paradoxical worsening of his jaundice. A liver biopsy revealed features of drug-induced intrahepatic cholestasis. Although his case was complicated by an episode of cholangitis, the patient made a complete recovery in 4 months with supportive treatment and withdrawal of the offending drug. This case highlights a very rare drug-induced liver injury caused by cefuroxime as well as our approach to treating a patient with paradoxical worsening of jaundice after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

  8. True recurrence vs. new primary ipsilateral breast tumor relapse: An analysis of clinical and pathologic differences and their implications in natural history, prognoses, and therapeutic management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Tanya E.; Lee, Daesung; Turner, Bruce C.; Carter, Darryl; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to classify all ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) in patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (CS+RT) as either new primary tumors (NP) or true local recurrences (TR) and to assess the prognostic and therapeutic implications of this classification. Methods and Materials: Of the 1152 patients who have been treated at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1990, 136 patients have experienced IBTR as their primary site of failure. These relapses were classified as either NP or TR. Specifically, patients were classified as NP if the recurrence was distinctly different from the primary tumor with respect to the histologic subtype, the recurrence location was in a different location, or if the flow cytometry changed from aneuploid to diploid. This information was determined by a detailed review of each patient's hospital and/or radiotherapy record, mammograms, and pathologic reports. Results: As of 2/99, with a mean follow-up of 14.2 years, the overall ipsilateral breast relapse-free rate for all 1152 patients was 86% at 10 years. Using the classification scheme outlined above, 60 patient relapses were classified as TR, 70 were classified as NP and 6 were unable to be classified. NP patients had a longer mean time to breast relapse than TR patients (7.3 years vs. 3.7 years, p < 0.0001) and were significantly younger than TR patients (48.9 years vs. 54.5 years, p < 0.01). Patients developed both TR and NP at similar rates until approximately 8 years, when TR rates stabilized but NP rates continued to rise. By 15 years following original diagnosis, the TR rate was 6.8% compared to 13.1% for NP. Of the patients who had been previously tested for BRCA1/2 mutations, 17% (8/52) had deleterious mutations. It is noteworthy that all patients with deleterious mutations had new primary IBTR, while patients without deleterious mutations had both TR and NP (p = 0.06). Ploidy was evenly distributed between TR and NP but NP

  9. Comprehensive Review of Medicinal Marijuana, Cannabinoids, and Therapeutic Implications in Medicine and Headache: What a Long Strange Trip It's Been ….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P

    2015-06-01

    The use of cannabis, or marijuana, for medicinal purposes is deeply rooted though history, dating back to ancient times. It once held a prominent position in the history of medicine, recommended by many eminent physicians for numerous diseases, particularly headache and migraine. Through the decades, this plant has taken a fascinating journey from a legal and frequently prescribed status to illegal, driven by political and social factors rather than by science. However, with an abundance of growing support for its multitude of medicinal uses, the misguided stigma of cannabis is fading, and there has been a dramatic push for legalizing medicinal cannabis and research. Almost half of the United States has now legalized medicinal cannabis, several states have legalized recreational use, and others have legalized cannabidiol-only use, which is one of many therapeutic cannabinoids extracted from cannabis. Physicians need to be educated on the history, pharmacology, clinical indications, and proper clinical use of cannabis, as patients will inevitably inquire about it for many diseases, including chronic pain and headache disorders for which there is some intriguing supportive evidence. To review the history of medicinal cannabis use, discuss the pharmacology and physiology of the endocannabinoid system and cannabis-derived cannabinoids, perform a comprehensive literature review of the clinical uses of medicinal cannabis and cannabinoids with a focus on migraine and other headache disorders, and outline general clinical practice guidelines. The literature suggests that the medicinal use of cannabis may have a therapeutic role for a multitude of diseases, particularly chronic pain disorders including headache. Supporting literature suggests a role for medicinal cannabis and cannabinoids in several types of headache disorders including migraine and cluster headache, although it is primarily limited to case based, anecdotal, or laboratory-based scientific research. Cannabis

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DinG is a structure-specific helicase that unwinds G4 DNA: implications for targeting G4 DNA as a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Roshan Singh; Desingu, Ambika; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Rao, Desirazu N; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2014-09-05

    The significance of G-quadruplexes and the helicases that resolve G4 structures in prokaryotes is poorly understood. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is GC-rich and contains >10,000 sequences that have the potential to form G4 structures. In Escherichia coli, RecQ helicase unwinds G4 structures. However, RecQ is absent in M. tuberculosis, and the helicase that participates in G4 resolution in M. tuberculosis is obscure. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis DinG (MtDinG) exhibits high affinity for ssDNA and ssDNA translocation with a 5' → 3' polarity. Interestingly, MtDinG unwinds overhangs, flap structures, and forked duplexes but fails to unwind linear duplex DNA. Our data with DNase I footprinting provide mechanistic insights and suggest that MtDinG is a 5' → 3' polarity helicase. Notably, in contrast to E. coli DinG, MtDinG catalyzes unwinding of replication fork and Holliday junction structures. Strikingly, we find that MtDinG resolves intermolecular G4 structures. These data suggest that MtDinG is a multifunctional structure-specific helicase that unwinds model structures of DNA replication, repair, and recombination as well as G4 structures. We finally demonstrate that promoter sequences of M. tuberculosis PE_PGRS2, mce1R, and moeB1 genes contain G4 structures, implying that G4 structures may regulate gene expression in M. tuberculosis. We discuss these data and implicate targeting G4 structures and DinG helicase in M. tuberculosis could be a novel therapeutic strategy for culminating the infection with this pathogen. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Influence of perfusion and ventilation scans on therapeutic decision making and outcome in cases of possible embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercandetti, A.J.; Kipper, M.S.; Moser, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of perfusion (Q) and ventilation (V) scans on therapeutic decision making and outcome among 229 patients referred for lung scans because embolism was suggested and found that specific V/Q scan patterns strongly influenced postscan decisions regarding initiation, maintenance or cessation of heparin therapy. These therapeutic decisions bore a relationship to outcome (recurrences and death) and disclosed decision-making deficits that need remedy by future investigational and educational efforts. 25 references, 5 tables

  12. Ethical Implications of Case-Based Payment in China: A Systematic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Pingyue; Biller-Andorno, Nikola; Wild, Verina

    2015-12-01

    How health care providers are paid affects how medicine is practiced. It is thus important to assess provider payment models not only from the economic perspective but also from the ethical perspective. China recently started to reform the provider payment model in the health care system from fee-for-service to case-based payment. This paper aims to examine this transition from an ethical perspective. We collected empirical studies on the impact of case-based payment in the Chinese health care system and applied a systematic ethical matrix that integrates clinical ethics and public health ethics to analyze the empirical findings. We identified eleven prominent ethical issues related to case-based payment. Some ethical problems of case-based payment in China are comparable to ethical problems of managed care and diagnosis related groups in high-income countries. However, in this paper we discuss in greater detail four specific ethical issues in the Chinese context: professionalism, the patient-physician relationship, access to care and patient autonomy. Based on the analysis, we cautiously infer that case-based payment is currently more ethically acceptable than fee-for-service in the context of China, mainly because it seems to lower financial barriers to access care. Nonetheless, it will be difficult to justify the implementation of case-based payment if no additional measures are taken to monitor and minimize its existing negative ethical implications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [The Euro-orphans phenomenon and the courses in therapeutic work and psychiatric treatment--a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Marta; Gaweda, Agnieszka; Janas-Kozik, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Today, the phenomenon of Euro-orphan is more and more frequently reported in the literature. This term refers to children with one or both parents emigrated from the country for work purposes. In connection with the social transformations of orphan-hood types described in the literature (nature, spiritual, social), the definition has been broadened by the definition ofeuro-orphan. The Ministry of Education describes the euro-orphan as the destruction of the family structure, the disorder of the socialisation process of children and reduction of the emotional exchanges among family members, as a result of migration of their parents. It provides further that not every child whose parents are not present in the country is covered as an euro-orphan. However, this group has become an increasingly larger populations. Lack of physical proximity and accessibility of important persons may have some psychological and pedagogical implications. These in turn can be shaped over time, into pathological symptoms, which are diagnostic entities in developmental psychiatry. It is not know precisely how many children in Poland are Euro-orphans. The aim of this paper is an attempt to understand the social phenomenon of Euro-orphanhood in the light of the observed psychopathologies of children and adolescents. The case study of the psychotherapy of a patient suffering from the Euro-orphanhood syndrome. Euro-orphanhood is a social phenomenon that generates Euro-orphans with a wide range of psychopathological symptoms classified in different diagnostic categories. The type and intensification of the psychopathological symptoms depend on the quality of relationships with meaningful persons prior to the Euro-orphanhood period. The course of the psychotherapeutic work with Euro-orphans should cover an individual aspect taking into consideration the maturity of defensive mechanisms as well as the work-through of negative feelings cumulated due to becoming a Euro-orphan.

  14. Doll therapy: a therapeutic means to meet past attachment needs and diminish behaviours of concern in a person living with dementia--a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisiani, Leah; Angus, Jocelyn

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this research study was to examine the impact of the provision of a lifelike baby doll as a therapeutic tool on the behaviour of a person living with dementia. Specifically, this single case study assessed the potential benefits, if any, of the use of doll therapy in reducing behaviours of concern such as anxiety and agitation that may be associated with observed attachment needs of a person living with dementia. A single case study of a female participant, with moderately advanced Alzheimer's disease, was the subject of this research. The case study used both qualitative and quantitative research design and methodology in data collection and analysis. Demonstrated that doll therapy was a positive intervention for the person living with dementia who was the participant in this research. The findings indicate a reduction in behaviours of concern related to the need for attachment and a considerable decline in levels of anxiety and agitation. There was extensive ongoing improvement in social interaction and communication. This research supports doll therapy as a therapeutic intervention that may be utilized within the ongoing care of some persons with dementia to meet needs for attachment and to reduce behaviours of concern. Despite some controversy on this topic, doll therapy should be considered as a therapeutic approach to further dementia care in light of this positive outcome.

  15. Therapeutic implications of selecting the SCORE (European versus the D'AGOSTINO (American risk charts for cardiovascular risk assessment in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giné-Garriga Maria

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No comparisons have been made of scales estimating cardiovascular mortality and overall cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The study objectives were to assess the agreement between the Framingham-D'Agostino cardiovascular risk (CVR scale and the chart currently recommended in Europe (SCORE with regard to identification of patients with high CVR, and to describe the discrepancies between them and the attendant implications for the treatment of hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. Methods A total of 474 hypertensive patients aged 40–65 years monitored in primary care were enrolled into the study. CVR was assessed using the Framingham-D'Agostino scale, which estimates the overall cardiovascular morbidity and mortality risk, and the SCORE chart, which estimates the cardiovascular mortality risk. Cardiovascular risk was considered to be high for values ≥ 20% and ≥ 5% according to the Framingham-D'Agostino and SCORE charts respectively. Kappa statistics was estimated for agreement in classification of patients with high CVR. The therapeutic recommendations in the 2007 European Guidelines on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention were followed. Results Mean patient age was 54.1 (SD 7.3, and 58.4% were males. A high CVR was found in 17.5% using the SCORE chart (25.3% males, 6.6% females and in 32.7% using the D'Agostino method (56.9% males, 12,7% females. Kappa coefficient was 0.52, and increased to 0.68 when the high CVR threshold was established at 29% according to D'Agostino. Hypertensive patients with high SCORE and non-high D'Agostino (1.7% were characterized by an older age, diabetes, and a lower atherogenic index, while the opposite situation (16.9% was associated to males, hyperlipidaemia, and a higher atherogenic index. Variables with a greater weight in discrepancies were sex and smoking. A 32.0% according to SCORE and 33.5% according to D'Agostino would be candidates to receive antihypertensive treatment, and 15.8% and

  16. Immunohistochemical determination of HER-2/neu overexpression in malignant melanoma reveals no prognostic value, while c-Kit (CD117 overexpression exhibits potential therapeutic implications

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    Potti Anil

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER-2/neu and c-kit (CD117 onco-protein are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapy in solid tumors, but data on their role in malignant melanoma is currently limited. We studied the prevalence of overexpression of HER-2/neu and c-Kit in 202 patients with malignant melanoma to evaluate a possible prognostic value of these molecular targets in malignant melanoma. Methods Overexpression of HER-2/neu and c-Kit was evaluated using immunohistochemical assays in 202 archival tissue specimens. Results Between 1991 and 2001, 202 subjects (109 males; 54% and 93 females; 46% with malignant melanoma were studied with a mean age of 57 years (age range: 15–101 years. The most common histologic type was amelanotic melanoma (n = 62; 30.7% followed by superficial spreading melanoma (n = 54; 26.7%. The depth of penetration of melanoma (Breslow thickness, pT Stage ranged from 0.4 mm (stage pT1 to 8.0 mm (stage pT4A. Mean thickness was 2.6 mm (stage pT3A. The ECOG performance scores ranged from 0 to 3. Only 2 patients (0.9% revealed HER-2/neu overexpression, whereas 46 (22.8% revealed c-Kit overexpression. Multivariate analysis performed did not show a significant difference in survival between c-Kit positive and negative groups (p = 0.36. Interestingly, not only was c-Kit more likely to be overexpressed in the superficial spreading type, a preliminary association between the presence or absence of c-Kit overexpression and the existence of another second primary tumor was also observed. Conclusions The results of our large study indicate that the HER-2/neu onco-protein neither has a role in melanogenesis nor is a potential target for clinical trials with monoclonal antibody therapy. This indicates there is no role for its testing in patients with malignant melanoma. Although c-Kit, expressed preferentially in the superficial spreading type, may not have prognostic value, it does have significant therapeutic implications as a

  17. Energy and environmental implications of carbon emission reduction targets: Case of Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Ram M.; Rajbhandari, Salony

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the sectoral energy consumption pattern and emissions of CO 2 and local air pollutants in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. It also discusses the evolution of energy service demands, structure of energy supply system and emissions from various sectors under the base case scenario during 2005-2050. A long term energy system planning model of the Kathmandu Valley based on the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) framework is used for the analyses. Furthermore, the paper analyzes the least cost options to achieve CO 2 emission reduction targets of 10%, 20% and 30% below the cumulative emission level in the base case and also discusses their implications for total cost, technology-mix, energy-mix and local pollutant emissions. The paper shows that a major switch in energy use pattern from oil and gas to electricity would be needed in the Valley to achieve the cumulative CO 2 emission reduction target of 30% (ER30). Further, the share of electricity in the cumulative energy consumption of the transport sector would increase from 12% in the base case to 24% in the ER30 case.

  18. Implications of case managers' perceptions and attitude on safety of home-delivered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarahjane

    2015-12-01

    Perceptions on safety in community care have been relatively unexplored. A project that sought to understand the multiple perspectives on safety in the NHS case-management programme was carried out in relation to the structure, process, and outcome of care. This article presents a component of the nursing perspective that highlights an important element in the structure of nursing care that could potentially impede the nurses' ability to be fully effective and safe. A single case study of the case-management programme was undertaken. Three primary care organisations from three strategic health authorities participated, and three focus groups were conducted (one within each organisation). In total, 17 case management nurses participated. Data were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and subjected to framework analysis. Nursing staff attitudes were identified as a structure of care that influence safety outcomes, particularly their perceptions of the care setting and the implications it has on their role and patient behaviour. Greater understanding of the expected role of the community nurse is necessary, and relevant training is required for nurses to be successful in empowering patients to perform more safely. In addition, efforts need to be made to improve patients' trust in the health-care system to prevent harm and promote more effective utilisation of resources.

  19. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of a primary bilateral leiomyoma of the ovaries: a case report and a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esch, E.M. van; Wijngaarden, S.E. van; Schaafsma, H.E.; Smeets, M.J.; Rhemrev, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A primary fibroid (leiomyoma) arising from both ovaries is rare and can be difficult to diagnose as a result of the low incidence and its indistinctive presentation. A literature review on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of this rare benign tumour is presented. We describe a

  20. Public health implications of lead poisoning in backyard chickens and cattle: four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roegner A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amber Roegner,1 Federico Giannitti,2 Leslie W Woods,2 Asli Mete,2 Birgit Puschner1,2 1Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA; 2California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA Abstract: Lead intoxication in livestock has historically been associated with cattle turned out to pasture and accidental ingestion of lead from drinking crankcase oil, licking grease from machinery, chewing on plumbing or batteries, or drinking water contaminated from leaching materials. Even with the decrease in manufactured items produced with lead, contaminants persist in the landscape and may enter the food supply through animal products. Changing patterns of open range herds moving to new pasture and the increased popularity of urban/suburban backyard chickens or other livestock necessitates public awareness about the clinical signs of lead intoxication, the potential for subclinical animals, public health concerns, particularly for exposure in children, and testing options available. Cases of lead intoxication in livestock demand a thorough case work-up to identify all sources of lead, address subclinical cases, evaluate risk to consumers, and make management suggestions for future prevention. We discuss four recent cases of confirmed lead poisoning in backyard chickens and open range cattle and assess the public health implications therein. Taken as a whole and considering the potential of the remaining herd or flock to be affected without necessarily showing signs, public health officials and veterinarians should be prepared to advise clients on case work-up and management and prevention considerations. Backyard chickens and cattle may not present for suspected lead poisoning as in several of the cases discussed herein yet may still contain concerning tissue or blood levels. The authors believe increased

  1. OBSERVATION ON THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF TREATMENT OF 150CASES OF INSOMNIA BY PUNCTURING BODY ACUPOINTS AND OTOPOINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宗莲

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper,the therapeutic effect of needling Baihui(GV20)and Sishen-chong(EX-HN1)combined with otopoint Xin(MA-IC),Shenmen,Naodian and pizhixia(MA-AT1)for treatment of insomnia was observed in 150patients.Results showed that the cure rate,effective rate and ineffective rate were84%,13.33%and2.67%respectively.Comparison between Western medicine group and acupuncture group showed a significant difference in the therapeutic effect(P<0.01).It displays that acupuncture can correct the imbalance between excitement and suppression of the cerebral cortex and had effects of tranquilizing and allaying excitement.

  2. Clinical implications of antiretroviral drug interactions with warfarin: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterly, John S; Darin, Kristin M; Gerzenshtein, Lana; Othman, Fidah; Postelnick, Michael J; Scarsi, Kimberly K

    2013-06-01

    Warfarin, a frequently prescribed anticoagulant with a narrow therapeutic index, is susceptible to drug-drug interactions with antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study compared the warfarin maintenance dose (WMD) between patients receiving and not receiving ART and evaluated predictors of warfarin dosage among those on ART. This was a case-control (1:2) study. Cases were HIV-infected patients receiving warfarin and protease inhibitor (PI)- and/or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based ART. Controls were randomly selected HIV-uninfected patients receiving warfarin. The WMD was compared between cases and controls and between cases on varying ART regimens. Bivariate comparisons were performed and a linear regression model was developed to identify predictors of WMD. We identified 18 case and 36 control patients eligible for inclusion. Cases were younger than controls (mean age: 45.8 versus 63.1 years, P African American (50.0% versus 22.2%, P=0.04). ART was classified as PI-based (n=9), NNRTI-based (n=7) and PI + NNRTI-based (n=2). The WMD (mean ± SD) differed between cases and controls (8.6  ±  3.4 mg versus 5.1 ± 1.5 mg, P ART regimens (PI: 8.8  ±  4.5 mg; NNRTI: 8.6   ± 1.8 mg; PI + NNRTI: 7.3  ±  3.3 mg; P = 0.86). Race and ritonavir dose were independent predictors of WMD, predicting an increase of 3.9 mg (95% CI: 0.88-6.98, P = 0.02) if a patient was African American or 3.7 mg (95% CI: 0.53-6.89, P = 0.03) if the total daily ritonavir dose was 200 mg. The required WMD was significantly higher in patients receiving ART. Prompt dose titration to achieve a higher WMD with vigilant monitoring may be required due to these drug-drug interactions.

  3. Therapeutic Efficacy of Bipolar Radiofrequency Thermotherapy for Patients with Chronic Prostatitis: A Retrospective Analysis of 26 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Ju Young; Shim, Seung Bum; Yoo, Dong Hoon; Park, Young Woong; Kim, Jong Yeon; Noh, Joon Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Chronic prostatitis (CP) does not yet have a universally successful therapy. Alternative treatments including thermotherapy have been adopted in the multimodal management of pain and voiding dysfunction. We retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of bipolar radiofrequency thermotherapy for patients who were unsatisfied with conventional medication for CP. Materials and Methods A retrospective study between October 2009 and September 2010 of 26 patients who were under 50 year...

  4. Environmental implications of electricity purchase from independent power producers: a case study from Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin Shrestha; Ram M Shrestha

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyses the effect on the environment of electricity purchase from independent power producers (IPPs) in the case of Thailand. The environmental implication is evaluated in terms of the net change in emission of air pollutants with electricity purchase from IPPs by a utility. The main finding of the study is that electricity purchase from a non-dispatchable IPP plant based on coal-fired generation would increase the net emissions compared with that without the purchase from IPPs. The study also shows that the lower plant factor of the IPP plant would also increase the emission of air pollutants. Furthermore, with non-dispatchable IPP plants, the total emission of air pollutants would increase, whereas with dispatchable IPP plants the total emission would decrease with the level of electricity purchases. (author)

  5. Restructuring patient flow logistics around patient care needs: implications and practicalities from three critical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Stefano; Barbieri, Marta; Lega, Federico

    2009-06-01

    To make hospitals more patient-centered it is necessary to intervene on patient flow logistics. The study analyzes three innovative redesign projects implemented at three Italian hospitals. The three hospitals have reorganized patient flow logistics around patient care needs using, as proxies, the expected length of stay and the level of nursing assistance. In order to do this, they have extensively revised their logistical configuration changing: (1) the organization of wards, (2) the hospital's physical lay-out, (3) the capacity planning system, and (4) the organizational roles supporting the patient flow management. The study describes the changes implemented as well as the results achieved and draws some general lessons that provide useful hints for those other hospitals involved in such type of redesign projects. The paper ends by discussing some policy implications. In fact, the results achieved in the three cases investigated provide interesting material for further discussion on clinical, operational, and economic issues.

  6. Isolated persistent left superior vena cava: A case report and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarjit Bisoyi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The venous anomaly of a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC affects 0.3%-0.5% of the general population. PLSVC with absent right superior vena cava, also termed as "isolated PLSVC," is an extremely rare venous anomaly. Almost half of the patients with isolated PLSVC have cardiac anomalies in the form of atrial septal defect, endocardial cushion defects, or tetralogy of Fallot. Isolated PLSVC is usually innocuous. Its discovery, however, has important clinical implications. It can pose clinical difficulties with central venous access, cardiothoracic surgeries, and pacemaker implantation. When it drains to the left atrium, it may create a right to left shunt. In this case report, we present the incidental finding of isolated PLSVC in a patient who underwent aortic valve replacement. Awareness about this condition and its variations is important to avoid complications.

  7. Interviewing children in custody cases: implications of research and policy for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saywitz, Karen; Camparo, Lorinda B; Romanoff, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Research on child interviewing has burgeoned over the past 25 years as expectations about children's agency, competence, and participation in society have changed. This article identifies recent trends in research, policy, and theory with implications for the practice of interviewing children in cases of contested divorce and for the weight to be given the information children provide. A number of fields of relevant research are identified, including studies of families who have participated in the family law system, studies of child witnesses in the field, experimental studies of the effects of interview techniques on children's memory and suggestibility, and ethnographic methods that elicit children's views of their own experiences. Finally, a set of 10 principles for practice are delineated based on the best available science. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Therapeutic Jurisprudence in Health Research: Enlisting Legal Theory as a Methodological Guide in an Interdisciplinary Case Study of Mental Health and Criminal Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzi, Priscilla; Krupa, Terry

    2015-09-01

    Studies that seek to understand and improve health care systems benefit from qualitative methods that employ theory to add depth, complexity, and context to analysis. Theories used in health research typically emerge from social science, but these can be inadequate for studying complex health systems. Mental health rehabilitation programs for criminal courts are complicated by their integration within the criminal justice system and by their dual health-and-justice objectives. In a qualitative multiple case study exploring the potential for these mental health court programs in Arctic communities, we assess whether a legal theory, known as therapeutic jurisprudence, functions as a useful methodological theory. Therapeutic jurisprudence, recruited across discipline boundaries, succeeds in guiding our qualitative inquiry at the complex intersection of mental health care and criminal law by providing a framework foundation for directing the study's research questions and the related propositions that focus our analysis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Rescue therapeutic strategy combining ultra-protective mechanical ventilation with extracorporeal CO2 removal membrane in near-fatal asthma with severe pulmonary barotraumas: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavot, Arthur; Mallat, Jihad; Vangrunderbeeck, Nicolas; Thevenin, Didier; Lemyze, Malcolm

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical ventilation of severe acute asthma is still considered a challenging issue, mainly because of the gas trapping phenomenon with the potential for life-threatening barotraumatic pulmonary complications. Herein, we describe 2 consecutive cases of near-fatal asthma for whom the recommended protective mechanical ventilation approach using low tidal volume of 6 mL/kg and small levels of PEEP was rapidly compromised by giant pneumomediastinum with extensive subcutaneousemphysema. Near fatal asthma. A rescue therapeutic strategy combining extracorporeal CO2 removal membrane with ultra-protective extremely low tidal volume (3 mL/kg) ventilation was applied. Both patients survived hospital discharge. These 2 cases indicate that ECCO2R associated with ultra-protective ventilation could be an alternative to surgery in case of life-threatening barotrauma occurring under mechanical ventilation.

  10. Poisons Implicated in Homicidal, Suicidal and Accidental Cases in North-West Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, A.; Khan, M. T. H.; Khan, M. J.; Fatima, S.; Khan, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pakistan has one of the highest prevalence of poisoning in the world. However, limited data exist on the frequency of poisons implicated in homicidal, suicidal, and accidental cases in North-West Pakistan (Khyber Pakhtunkhwa). Methods: This retrospective study of 353 cases and biological specimens of poisoning received at the department of Forensic medicine and toxicology, Khyber Medical College Peshawar from 13 districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Frequency of poisoning was assessed by testing each specimen for 17 different poisons. Results: Of all the specimens, 250 (70.8 percent) specimens tested positive and the rest did not show any indication of poisoning (n=103, 29.2 percent). The most frequent poisons detected were benzodiazepines (total n=75), organophosphates (total n=58), phencyclidine (total n=30) and morphine (total n=23). Gender had a significant association with benzodiazepines (p=0.011), tricyclic antidepressants (p=0.001), and organophosphates (p<0.001). Organophosphates were the most common cause of poisoning in females while benzodiazepines were the most common cause of poisoning in males. Conclusion: Poisoning by benzodiazepines, organophosphates and phencyclidine are the most common causes of intoxication in population of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Source of poisoning varies with gender for organophosphates, benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants. (author)

  11. Poisons Implicated In Homicidal, Suicidal And Accidental Cases In North-West Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Adil; Khan, Muhammad Jaffar; Humayun Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Masood Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Fatima, Sadia

    2016-01-01

    Pakistan has one of the highest prevalence of poisoning in the world. However, limited data exist on the frequency of poisons implicated in homicidal, suicidal, and accidental cases in North-West Pakistan (Khyber Pakhtunkhwa). This retrospective study of 353 cases and biological specimens of poisoning received at the department of Forensic medicine and toxicology, Khyber Medical College Peshawar from 13 districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Frequency of poisoning was assessed by testing each specimen for 17 different poisons. Of all the specimens, 250 (70.8%) specimens tested positive and the rest didn't show any indication of poisoning (n=103, 29.2%). The most frequent poisons detected were benzodiazepines (total n=75), organophosphates (total n=58), phencyclidine (total n=30) and morphine (total n=23). Gender had a significant association with benzodiazepines (p=0.011), tricyclic antidepressants (p=0.001), and organophosphates (ppoisoning in females while benzodiazepines were the most common cause of poisoning in males. Poisoning by benzodiazepines, organophosphates and phencyclidine are the most common causes of intoxication in population of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Source of poisoning varies with gender for organophosphates, benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants.

  12. A Case Study with an Identified Bully: Policy and Practice Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huddleston, Lillie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bullying is a serious public health problem that may include verbal or physical injury as well as social isolation or exclusion. As a result, research is needed to establish a database for policies and interventions designed to prevent bullying and its negative effects. This paper presented a case study that contributed to the literature by describing an intervention for bullies that has implications for research, practice and related policies regarding bullying.Methods: An individualized intervention for an identified bully was implemented using the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model (PCSIM; Nastasi, Moore, & Varjas, 2004 with a seventh-grade middle school student. Ecological and culture-specific perspectives were used to develop and implement the intervention that included psychoeducational sessions with the student and consultation with the parent and school personnel. A mixed methods intervention design was used with the following informants: the target student, the mother of the student, a teacher and the school counselor. Qualitative data included semi-structured interviews with the parent, teacher and student, narrative classroom observations and evaluation/feedback forms filled out by the student and interventionist. Quantitative data included the following quantitative surveys (i.e., Child Posttraumatic Stress Reaction Index [CPTS-RI] and the Behavior Assessment Scale for Children, 2nd Edition. Both qualitative and quantitative data were used to evaluate the acceptability, integrity and efficacy of this intervention.Results: The process of intervention design, implementation and evaluation are described through an illustrative case study. Qualitative and quantitative findings indicated a decrease in internalizing, externalizing and bullying behaviors as reported by the teacher and the mother, and a high degree of acceptability and treatment integrity as reported by multiple stakeholders.Conclusion: This case

  13. Role of therapeutic fasting along with other Naturopathy and Yoga Modalities in addressing acne vulgaris – A single case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushparaj Ameya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 23 year old female diagnosed as acne vulgaris underwent Therapeutic fasting (TF and other naturopathy and yoga modalities for 30 days. She presented with eruptions all over her face and the face was edematous. She was given a modified diet for initial 3 days which included fresh fruits and juices along with cooked vegetables and sorghum roti. Additionally Naturopathy treatments like Swedish massage, steam bath, warm water enema and hip bath were given along with some yogic postures, pranayam and kriyas (Cleansing procedures. The patient responded well to the therapeutic fasting. By the end of 30 days there were no eruptions in her face and her skin also was clear. All the treatments were based on the principle of naturopathic medicine that the body has its own power to heal itself. TF has shown to attenuate inflammatory status of the body by suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and decreasing body fat and circulating levels of leukocytes. This is the first study to report the non pharmacological approach towards treating acne. To conclude fasting along with other naturopathy and yoga modalities has shown noteworthy changes in reducing the inflammatory response in acne vulgaris. However large scale studies are warranted.

  14. Using therapeutic jurisprudence and preventive law to examine disputants' best interests in mediating cases about physicians' practices: a guide for medical regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Lorraine E

    2004-01-01

    Therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) and preventive law (PL) are used as two theoretical perspectives from which to examine the best interests of parties in mediation because of a dispute about a physician's practice. The focus is mediation provided by and/or for the medical regulator. The paper reviews the literature on TJ and PL, and their relationship to mediation, and demonstrates how medical regulators could benefit by working within a framework reflecting both these perspectives providing it does not involve an egregious matter. A TJ and PL framework would be of particular value in identifying cases for mediation and in evaluating resolutions to mediated disputes.

  15. The implications of trade liberalization for diet and health: a case study from Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Anne Marie; Hawkes, Corinna

    2009-07-28

    Central America has undergone extensive trade liberalization over the past two decades, and has recently signed a Free Trade Agreement with the United States. The region is also experiencing a dual burden of malnutrition with the growth of dietary patterns associated with the global 'nutrition transition'. This study describes the relationship between trade liberalization policies and food imports and availability, and draws implications for diet and health, using Central America as a case study region. Changes in tariff and non-tariff barriers for each country were documented, and compared with time-series graphs of import, production and availability data to show the outcome of changes in trade policy in relation to food imports and food availability. Changes in trade policy in Central America have directly affected food imports and availability via three avenues. First, the lowering of trade barriers has promoted availability by facilitating higher imports of a wide range of foods. Second, trade liberalization has affected food availability through promoting domestic meat production. Third, reductions in barriers to investment appear to be critical in expansion of processed food markets. This suggests that changes in trade policies have facilitated rising availability and consumption of meat, dairy products, processed foods and temperate (imported fruits) in Central America. This study indicates that the policies of trade liberalization in Central American countries over the past two decades, particularly in relation to the United States, have implications for health in the region. Specifically, they have been a factor in facilitating the "nutrition transition", which is associated with rising rates of obesity and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Given the significant cost of chronic disease for the health care system, individuals and the wider community, it is critical that preventive health measures address such upstream determinants

  16. The implications of trade liberalization for diet and health: a case study from Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkes Corinna

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central America has undergone extensive trade liberalization over the past two decades, and has recently signed a Free Trade Agreement with the United States. The region is also experiencing a dual burden of malnutrition with the growth of dietary patterns associated with the global 'nutrition transition'. This study describes the relationship between trade liberalization policies and food imports and availability, and draws implications for diet and health, using Central America as a case study region. Methods Changes in tariff and non-tariff barriers for each country were documented, and compared with time-series graphs of import, production and availability data to show the outcome of changes in trade policy in relation to food imports and food availability. Results Changes in trade policy in Central America have directly affected food imports and availability via three avenues. First, the lowering of trade barriers has promoted availability by facilitating higher imports of a wide range of foods. Second, trade liberalization has affected food availability through promoting domestic meat production. Third, reductions in barriers to investment appear to be critical in expansion of processed food markets. This suggests that changes in trade policies have facilitated rising availability and consumption of meat, dairy products, processed foods and temperate (imported fruits in Central America. Conclusion This study indicates that the policies of trade liberalization in Central American countries over the past two decades, particularly in relation to the United States, have implications for health in the region. Specifically, they have been a factor in facilitating the "nutrition transition", which is associated with rising rates of obesity and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Given the significant cost of chronic disease for the health care system, individuals and the wider community, it is critical

  17. A successful antimicrobial therapeutic strategy for the discitis caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans under unknown drug susceptibility: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Shunsuke; Horiuchi, Yosuke; Uchida, Takae; Yonaha, Akiko; Miyata, Takanori; Nagano, Eiko; Kodama, Takao; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2018-04-20

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is well-known as the pathogen of gingivitis or periodontitis, and discitis or vertebral osteomyelitis cases caused by this organism have rarely been reported. Ampicillin or amoxicillin has been used in the previously reported discitis cases; however, no cases have been reported that is treated with levofloxacin. We report the first published case we chose levofloxacin to treat. We failed to perform the susceptibility testing because of the poor growth and fastidious nature of the organism, and the result of susceptibility of amoxicillin was unclear. Levofloxacin, which A. actinomycetemcomitans is usually susceptible to, can be an effective alternative oral antimicrobial agent in such cases. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mentoring Postsecondary Tenure-Track Faculty: A Theory-Building Case Study and Implications for Institutional Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dannielle Joy; Boyer, Patricia; Russell, Isela

    2011-01-01

    The featured research uses theory-building case study to understand the experiences of junior faculty in a mentoring program. Findings suggest the importance of professional interaction for faculty members' integration into their campus communities. An explanatory model illustrates the findings and supplements discussion of the implications for…

  19. Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Student Counselling: What Therapeutic Goals Are Identifed and What Are the Implications for Educational Providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Terry; Ersahin, Zehra; Sefi, Aaron; Hebron, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Online counselling is increasingly being used as an alternative to face-to-face student counselling. Using an exploratory mixed methods design, this project investigated the practice by examining the types of therapeutic goals that 11- to 25-year-olds identify online in routine practice. These goals were then compared to goals identified in…

  20. Ethical dilemmas among nurses as they transition to hospital case management: implications for organizational ethics, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lolita T

    2007-01-01

    To describe the experiences of ethical concerns by clinical nurses as they transitioned into their new role in hospital case management. Through this study, an attempt was made to explore experiences of ethical concerns and identify the implications for organizational ethics. In this study, nurse case managers practicing in the acute hospital setting, military, not-for-profit community, and teaching hospitals were interviewed. The majority of the nurse case manager participants were engaged in hospital discharge planning and utilization review activities. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used to identify the themes inherent in ethical concerns and articulate them within the context of hospital nurse case management. Fifteen participants were interviewed to obtain a qualitative description of the nurse case managers' lived experiences of ethical dilemmas and how they were resolved. Nurse case managers' perceptions of solutions/options to resolve such ethical dilemmas were explored. As nurses transition into the expanded role of case management in the present healthcare delivery system, they frequently face situations demanding ethical choices and judgments to accommodate diverse patient interests and needs. These ethical decisions required in daily practice in case management represent ethical dilemmas to nurses. The insights derived from the analysis of the interviews have implications for nursing practice, education, policy, ethics, and research; recommendations for organizations employing nurse case managers in terms of recruitment, orientation, training, and continued need for educational support are identified. 1. The clinical decisions required in daily practice of case management represented challenges to the nurses. This highlights the critical role of adequate educational orientation to case management for beginning case managers. 2. Nurse case managers should be cognizant of the "disconnect" that could occur between their obligations to the

  1. Ethical dilemmas among nurses as they transition to hospital case management: implications for organizational ethics, part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lolita T

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of ethical concerns by clinical nurses as they transitioned into their new role in hospital case management. Through this study, an attempt was made to explore experiences of ethical concerns and identify the implications for organizational ethics. In this study, nurse case managers practicing in the acute care setting, military, not-for-profit community, and teaching hospitals were interviewed. The majority of the nurse case manager participants were engaged in hospital discharge planning and utilization review activities. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used to identify the themes inherent in ethical concerns and articulate them within the context of hospital nurse case management. Fifteen participants were interviewed to obtain a qualitative description of the nurse case managers' lived experiences of ethical dilemmas and how they were resolved. Nurse case managers' perceptions of solutions/options to resolve such ethical dilemmas were explored. As nurses transition into the expanded role of case management in the present healthcare delivery system, they frequently face situations demanding ethical choices and judgments to accommodate diverse patient interests and needs. These ethical decisions required in daily practice of case management represent ethical dilemmas to nurses. The insights derived from the analysis of the interviews have implications for nursing practice, education, policy, ethics, and research; recommendations for organizations employing nurse case managers in terms of recruitment, orientation, training, and continued need for educational support are identified. 1. The clinical decisions required in daily practice of case management represented challenges to the nurses. This highlights the critical role of adequate educational orientation to case management for beginning case managers. 2. Nurse case managers should be cognizant of the "disconnect" that could occur between

  2. Implications of Reverse Innovation for Socio-Economic Sustainability: A Case Study of Philips China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Shan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The idea of reverse innovation, local innovation happening in emerging markets for the global market, has gained much academic and managerial attention in recent years. The purpose of this study is to understand how reverse innovation has successfully diffused into the product and market development strategies at Philips Inc., a prominent multinational company (MNC of the modern era. Furthermore, the study presents the success achieved by these innovations at both the domestic and global levels, along with their implications regarding socio-economic sustainability in emerging markets. In order to investigate the research questions, a case study of Philips China was conducted involving three product innovations that were found to be suitable examples of reverse innovation. After the study of extant literature on the topic, drawing from research databases, newspaper articles, and company press releases, five semi-structuredinterviews were conducted with key managers and a market practitioner to gain sufficient understanding for this exploratory study. Subsequent case analysis concludes that these innovations are examples of reverse innovation representing a new paradigm change in innovation flow. This flow of innovation from emerging markets to developed markets as confirmed by Corsi’s framework could potentially disrupt developed markets as well as contribute to ensure healthy living conditions for the population living in developing countries. If so, this represents a sustainable socio-economic change in-line with the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goal (SDG of “ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages.” This is relevant as Philips aspires to be a prominent private sector player in achieving the above-stated goal by defeating non-communicable disease and strengthening local healthcare systems.

  3. The benchmarks of carbon emissions and policy implications for China's cities: Case of Nanjing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Jun; Zhang Rongrong; Wang Haikun; Liu Miaomiao; Wu Yi

    2011-01-01

    The development of urbanization is accelerating in China, and there are great pressures and opportunities in cities to reduce carbon emissions. An emissions inventory is a basic requirement for analyzing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), their potential reduction and to realize low-carbon development of cities. This study describes a method to establish a GHGs emissions inventory in Chinese cities for 6 emission sources including industrial energy consumption, transportation, household energy consumption, commercial energy consumption, industrial processes and waste. Nanjing city was selected as a representative case to analyze the characteristics of carbon emissions in Chinese cities. The results show that carbon emissions in Nanjing have increased nearly 50% during the last decade. The three largest GHGs contributors were industrial energy consumption, industrial processes and transportation, which contributed 37-44%, 35-40% and 6-10%, respectively, to the total GHGs emissions. Per GDP carbon emissions decreased by 55% from 2002 to 2009, and the per capita and per GDP carbon emissions were comparable or even lower than the world average levels. These results have important policy implications for Chinese cities to control their carbon emissions. - Highlights: → Carbon emissions inventory using bottom-up methodology was firstly reported for a Chinese city. → Emission characteristics of Nanjing city were compared with other international cities. → Low carbon policies for Chinese cities were recommended based on the results of this research.

  4. A case study of chiropractic management of pregnancy-related heartburn with postulated fetal epigenome implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    This case study reports on chiropractic care for pregnancy-related heartburn. The purpose of this article is to relate the benefit of chiropractic treatment for one individual, to contrast chiropractic management with the biomedical standard of care for pregnancy-related heartburn, and to point to potential epigenetic implications of the standard of care. A 32-year-old woman who was 24 weeks pregnant presented with persistent heartburn that she was treating with ranitidine (Zantac®) and calcium carbonate (Tums®) daily at the initiation of chiropractic care. Findings of the initial examination were thoracic intersegmental dysfunction and pain upon palpation of the diaphragm, with hypertonicity noted. Therapy localization was positive for reflexes associated with the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter, suggesting spasms. Emotional components also were identified in association with the symptoms by the use of a mind-body therapy called NeuroEmotional Technique. The patient was treated by adjusting the thoracic spine, manually releasing the diaphragm spasms, and releasing the esophageal spasm with an activator (a small hand-held instrument that creates a percussive force). The patient was symptom-free and did not use medication after the fifth treatment. She was followed throughout the remainder of her pregnancy and was asymptomatic and required no further treatment. A larger study should investigate the effectiveness of chiropractic care for the treatment of pregnancy-related heartburn. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A rare variant of the ulnar artery with important clinical implications: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casal Diogo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the major arteries of the upper limb are estimated to be present in up to one fifth of people, and may have significant clinical implications. Case presentation During routine cadaveric dissection of a 69-year-old fresh female cadaver, a superficial brachioulnar artery with an aberrant path was found bilaterally. The superficial brachioulnar artery originated at midarm level from the brachial artery, pierced the brachial fascia immediately proximal to the elbow, crossed superficial to the muscles that originated from the medial epicondyle, and ran over the pronator teres muscle in a doubling of the antebrachial fascia. It then dipped into the forearm fascia, in the gap between the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus. Subsequently, it ran deep to the palmaris longus muscle belly, and superficially to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, reaching the gap between the latter and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, where it assumed is usual position lateral to the ulnar nerve. Conclusion As far as the authors could determine, this variant of the superficial brachioulnar artery has only been described twice before in the literature. The existence of such a variant is of particular clinical significance, as these arteries are more susceptible to trauma, and can be easily confused with superficial veins during medical and surgical procedures, potentially leading to iatrogenic distal limb ischemia.

  6. Economic and occupational implications of upstream activity. The Eni-Agip case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report evaluates the national and regional economic implications, for Italy, of the exploration and development activity in the petroleum sector (at the domestic and international level), with reference being made to the specific case of Eni's Agip Division. The business considered here is basically of an investment nature; as a result, the supply of goods and services Agip Division requires of the Italian production sectors represents an autonomous component of the domestic demand, to which induced effects are attributable. The study has revealed that Eni-Agip's demand plays a central role in promoting domestic production and in the extent of the induced effects in terms of creation of added value and employment. From this point of view, the specific nature of its demand places Eni-Agip at the top of the system of the large domestic enterprises, whose role as the dynamo of the national economy has gradually decreased. Viceversa, Eni-Agip's ability to promote domestic production and employment proves to be lower than that of the sectors where the presence of medium- and small- sized firms is prevalent, a fact that confirms their increasing role in the Italian economy. As far the territorial aspect is concerned, the promotion of production and jobs brought about by Eni-Agip's demand obviously affects the country's most productive regions, especially where industrial supplies are involved, but its specific regional distribution entails also a significant local interest in different central-southern regions of the country [it

  7. [The pharyngeal anxiety syndrome: globus perception and pharyngeal sensations as an oligosymptomatic abortive form of an anxiety disorder? Nosologic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects, illustrated with a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, F

    1998-09-01

    Since the introduction of the modern psychiatric diagnosis systems anxiety disorders have been intensively discussed. As clinical subtypes in panic disorder the cardial type and the vestibular type are widely accepted. We describe in a case report another of these subtypes, the pharyngeal type; it is characterised by symptoms that are related to the pharynx such as feeling a lump in the throat, swallow disturbance or pain in the pharynx region. It may therefore be called "throat-anxiety syndrome" or "phagophobia". Nosological implications are also discussed.

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of bipolar radiofrequency thermotherapy for patients with chronic prostatitis: a retrospective analysis of 26 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ju Young; Shim, Seung Bum; Yoo, Dong Hoon; Park, Young Woong; Kim, Jong Yeon; Noh, Joon Hwa

    2012-07-01

    Chronic prostatitis (CP) does not yet have a universally successful therapy. Alternative treatments including thermotherapy have been adopted in the multimodal management of pain and voiding dysfunction. We retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of bipolar radiofrequency thermotherapy for patients who were unsatisfied with conventional medication for CP. A retrospective study between October 2009 and September 2010 of 26 patients who were under 50 years old and diagnosed with CP (National Institutes of Health [NIH]-category III) was performed. Twenty patients were diagnosed with inflammatory CP (NIH-category IIIa) and the rest with noninflammatory CP (NIH-category IIIb). We used the Tempro system at an intraprostatic temperature of 55℃ for 50 minutes with a medium heating rate. All patients also completed the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI) before and after treatment. In the patients diagnosed with CP, the mean serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 0.9±0.3 ng/ml, the prostate volume was 27.1±5.5 g, and the average score for all 3 domains on the NIH-CPSI significantly decreased. The total scores decreased from 19.8±7.1 to 11.1±7.0, the pain domain decreased from 8.6±3.1 to 4.8±3.1, the voiding symptom domain decreased from 5.1±1.8 to 2.9±1.8, and the effect on the quality of life decreased from 6.1±2.2 to 3.4±2.2 (pthermotherapy for patients with CP intractable to conventional medication can provide significant improvement in the NIH-CPSI. Large, randomized controlled trials will also be required to confirm the efficacy of this therapy.

  9. Therapeutic benefits of ACTH and levetiracetam in STXBP1 encephalopathy with a de novo mutation: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shunli; Wang, Liyuan; Cai, Xiao Tang; Zhou, Hui; Yu, Dan; Wang, Zhiling

    2018-05-01

    The case report aims to discuss the clinical symptoms and treatment of encephalopathy caused by a novel syntaxin- binding protein 1 (STXBP1) genetic mutation. The patient, a girl, was born at 38+4 weeks of gestation. She had frequent spasm attacks accompanied by obvious psychomotor development retardation since the neonatal period. Genetic screening identified a novel STXBP1 genetic mutation. Early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with STXBP1 mutation. We adjusted the antiepileptic strategy to oral levetiracetam and topiramate, and intravenous administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone(ACTH) for 2 weeks. Subsequently, prednisone was continued, and gradually reduced and withdrawn over 3 months. The treatment was effective with complete control of the epileptic seizures and improvements in the electroencephalogram readings. However, the effects on psychomotor ability were slow and limited. A literature review of STXBP1 mutation cases in which ACTH was administered showed that complete seizure control is observed in 60% of cases, 20% are partially affected, and the remaining 20% show no effect. ACTH and levetiracetam had good therapeutic effects in epilepsy control in this case of de novo STXBP1 mutation. ACTH is an effective drug for early-onset epileptic encephalopathy caused by STXBP1 mutation. However, controlling epilepsy using this therapy does not alter the psychomotor development retardation caused by the STXBP1 mutation.

  10. Macromolecular therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-09-28

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines - (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Severe iron overload and hyporegenerative anemia in a case with rhesus hemolytic disease: therapeutic approach to rare complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Demircioğlu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 33 weeks’ gestation, a baby with rhesus hemolytic disease (RHD, who had received intrauterine transfusions twice, developed cholestatic hepatic disease and late hyporegenerative anemia. Her serum ferritin and bilirubin levels increased to 8842 ng/ml and 17.9 mg/dl, respectively. Liver biopsy showed cholestasis and severe iron overload. Treatment with recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO decreased the transfusion need, and intravenous deferoxamine resulted in a marked decreased in serum ferritin levels and normalization of liver function. In patients who have undergone intrauterine transfusions due to RHD, hyperferritinemia and late hyporegenerative anemia should be kept in mind. Chelation therapy in cases with symptomatic hyperferritinemia and rHuEPO treatment in cases with severe hyporegenerative anemia should be considered.

  12. Type V hypertriglyceridemia in children, a therapeutic challenge in pediatrics: A case report and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Meliţ, Lorena Elena; Dobreanu, Minodora; Mărginean, Maria Oana

    2017-12-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is defined as a level of triglycerides above 150 mg/dL. The complex causes and classification of hypertriglyceridemia lead to difficulties in the diagnosis and management of this condition. We present the case of a 15 years and 6 months old female teenager, admitted in our clinic for the following complaints: severe abdominal pain predominantly in the lateral left quadrant, nausea, vomiting, and the lack of stools for 2 days. The clinical exam showed: impaired general status, painful abdomen at superficial and deep palpation in the left and upper abdominal quadrants, the absence of stools for 2 days. The laboratory parameters revealed leukocytosis with neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, high level of serum amylase and triglycerides, and increased inflammatory biomarkers. The imagistic investigations showed ascites and paralytic ileus. The management was burdened by the side-effects of hypolipidemic drugs impairing the liver function and leading to rhabdomyolysis, but eventually the patient's outcome was good. Type V hyperlipoproteinemia is a rare condition accounting for approximately 5% of the cases. The risk for acute pancreatitis is well-known to be associated with hypertriglyceridemia, even though in rare cases. The prognosis of hypertriglyceridemia is pediatrics is burdened not only by the long-term risk factors associated to the diseases itself, but also by the negative effects of long-term hypolipidemic treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular docking studies of 3-bromopyruvate and its derivatives to metabolic regulatory enzymes: Implication in designing of novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saveg; Pandey, Shrish Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Goel, Yugal; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2017-01-01

    Altered metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, as malignant cells display a mammoth up-regulation of enzymes responsible for steering their bioenergetic and biosynthetic machinery. Thus, the recent anticancer therapeutic strategies focus on the targeting of metabolic enzymes, which has led to the identification of specific metabolic inhibitors. One of such inhibitors is 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), with broad spectrum of anticancer activity due to its ability to inhibit multiple metabolic enzymes. However, the molecular characterization of its binding to the wide spectrum of target enzymes remains largely elusive. Therefore, in the present study we undertook in silico investigations to decipher the molecular nature of the docking of 3-BP with key target enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle by PatchDock and YASARA docking tools. Additionally, derivatives of 3-BP, dibromopyruvate (DBPA) and propionic acid (PA), with reported biological activity, were also investigated for docking to important target metabolic enzymes of 3-BP, in order to predict their therapeutic efficacy versus that of 3-BP. A comparison of the docking scores with respect to 3-BP indicated that both of these derivatives display a better binding strength to metabolic enzymes. Further, analysis of the drug likeness of 3-BP, DBPA and PA by Lipinski filter, admetSAR and FAF Drug3 indicated that all of these agents showed desirable drug-like criteria. The outcome of this investigation sheds light on the molecular characteristics of the binding of 3-BP and its derivatives with metabolic enzymes and thus may significantly contribute in designing and optimizing therapeutic strategies against cancer by using these agents.

  14. Molecular docking studies of 3-bromopyruvate and its derivatives to metabolic regulatory enzymes: Implication in designing of novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveg Yadav

    Full Text Available Altered metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, as malignant cells display a mammoth up-regulation of enzymes responsible for steering their bioenergetic and biosynthetic machinery. Thus, the recent anticancer therapeutic strategies focus on the targeting of metabolic enzymes, which has led to the identification of specific metabolic inhibitors. One of such inhibitors is 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP, with broad spectrum of anticancer activity due to its ability to inhibit multiple metabolic enzymes. However, the molecular characterization of its binding to the wide spectrum of target enzymes remains largely elusive. Therefore, in the present study we undertook in silico investigations to decipher the molecular nature of the docking of 3-BP with key target enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle by PatchDock and YASARA docking tools. Additionally, derivatives of 3-BP, dibromopyruvate (DBPA and propionic acid (PA, with reported biological activity, were also investigated for docking to important target metabolic enzymes of 3-BP, in order to predict their therapeutic efficacy versus that of 3-BP. A comparison of the docking scores with respect to 3-BP indicated that both of these derivatives display a better binding strength to metabolic enzymes. Further, analysis of the drug likeness of 3-BP, DBPA and PA by Lipinski filter, admetSAR and FAF Drug3 indicated that all of these agents showed desirable drug-like criteria. The outcome of this investigation sheds light on the molecular characteristics of the binding of 3-BP and its derivatives with metabolic enzymes and thus may significantly contribute in designing and optimizing therapeutic strategies against cancer by using these agents.

  15. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  16. Clinicopathological characteristics and therapeutic outcomes in thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas: a single-center study of 90 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shozo; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Horiguchi, Kentaro; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Akira; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Junko; Inoshita, Naoko

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze clinicopathological characteristics and treatment outcomes in a large single-center clinical series of cases of thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas. The authors retrospectively reviewed clinical, pathological, and treatment characteristics of 90 consecutive cases of TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas treated with transsphenoidal surgery between December 1991 and May 2013. The patient group included 47 females and 43 males (median age 42 years, range 11-74 years). Sixteen tumors (18%) were microadenomas and 74 (82%) were macroadenomas. Microadenomas were significantly more frequent in the more recent half of our case series (12 of 45 cases) (p = 0.0274). Cavernous sinus invasion was confirmed in 21 patients (23%). In 67 cases (74%), the tumors were firm elastic or hard in consistency. Acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia were observed, respectively, in 14 (16%) and 11 (12%) of the 90 cases. Euthyroidism was achieved in 40 (83%) of 48 patients and tumor shrinkage was found in 24 (55%) of 44 patients following preoperative somatostatin analog treatment. Conventional transsphenoidal surgery, extended transsphenoidal surgery, and a simultaneous combined supra- and infrasellar approach were performed in 85, 2, and 3 patients, respectively. Total removal with endocrinological remission was achieved in 76 (84%) of 90 patients, including all 16 (100%) patients with microadenomas, 60 (81%) of the 74 with macroadenomas, and 8 (38%) of the 21 with cavernous sinus invasion. None of these 76 patients experienced tumor recurrence during a median follow-up period of 2.8 years. Stratifying by Knosp grade, total removal with endocrinological remission was achieved in 34 of 36 patients with Knosp Grade 0 tumors, all 24 of those with Grade 1 tumors, 12 of the 14 with Grade 2 tumors, 6 of the 8 with Grade 3 tumors, and none of the 8 with Grade 4 tumors. Cavernous sinus invasion and tumor size were significant independent predictors of surgical

  17. Malaria case in Madagascar, probable implication of a new vector, Anopheles coustani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomichene, Thiery N J J; Tata, Etienne; Boyer, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Indoor spraying of insecticides and the use of insecticide-treated bed nets are key strategies for national malaria vector control in the central highlands of Madagascar. During the year 2013, malaria outbreaks were reported by the National Malaria Control Programme in the highlands, including the district of Ankazobe. Entomological trapping was carried out in April and May 2013 and in March 2014, using human landing catches, collection of mosquitoes resting in stables and in houses by oral aspirators, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps. Detection of Plasmodium in mosquitoes was carried out on head and thorax of anopheline females by ELISA, CSP and PCR (Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium malariae, Plasmodium vivax, or Plasmodium ovale). Human biting rate (HBR), sporozoite index and entomological infection rate (EIR) were calculated for Anopheles funestus, Anopheles arabiensis, Anopheles mascarensis, and Anopheles coustani. In Ankazobe district, the presence of malaria vectors such as An. funestus, An. arabiensis and An. mascarensis was confirmed, and a new and abundant potential vector, An. coustani was detected. Indeed, one individual of An. funestus and two An. coustani were detected positive with P. falciparum while one An. mascarensis and four An. coustani were positive with P. vivax. For An. coustani, in March 2014, the EIR varied from 0.01 infectious bites/person/month (ipm) outdoors to 0.11 ipm indoors. For An. funestus, in April 2013, the EIR was 0.13 ipm. The highest HBR value was observed for An. coustani, 86.13 ipm outdoors. The highest sporozoite rate was also for An. coustani, 9.5 % of An. coustani caught in stable was sporozoite positive. The implication of An. coustani in malaria transmission was not previously mentioned in Madagascar. Its very high abundance and the detection of Plasmodium coupled with an opportunistic feeding behaviour in villages with malaria cases supports its role in malaria transmission in Madagascar.

  18. Implications of private sector participation in power generation-a case study from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandra, P.

    2006-01-01

    India suffers from widespread shortages of electricity supply. These shortages, among others, are detrimental to the economic growth. The prospects for the next decade do not seem to be much brighter. Efforts in expanding generation capacity by the state-owned electric utilities are hampered by severe resource constraints. Against this backdrop, to mobilize additional resources to help bridge the gap in demand and supply, the Government of India formulated a policy in 1991 with the objective to encourage greater investment by private enterprises in the electricity sector. To study the implications of such an initiative on various stakeholders, viz., public utilities, consumers and private sector, the present paper tries to analyse issues like planned rationing, guarantees to private sector, backing down of existing capacity. Using the state of Karnataka (in Southern India) as a case study, the paper develops multiple scenarios using an integrated mixed integer-programming model. The results show the advantage of marginal non-supply (rationing) of electricity in terms of achieving overall effective supply demand matching as well as providing economic benefits to the state that could be generated through cost savings. The results also show the negative impacts of high guarantees offered to the private sector in terms of the opportunity costs of reduced utilization of both the existing and the new public capacity. The estimated generation losses and the associated economic impacts of backing down of existing and new public capacity on account of guarantees are found to be significantly high. For 2011-12, depending on the type of scenarios, the estimated generation and economic losses are likely to be in the range of 3200-10,000 GWh and Rs. 4200-13,600 million respectively. The impact of these losses on the consumers could be in terms of significant increase in energy bills (in the range of 19-40% for different scenarios) due to rise in tariffs

  19. Implications of private sector participation in power generation - a case study from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandra, P.

    2006-01-01

    India suffers from widespread shortages of electricity supply. These shortages, among others, are detrimental to the economic growth. The prospects for the next decade do not seem to be much brighter. Efforts in expanding generation capacity by the state-owned electric utilities are hampered by severe resource constraints. Against this backdrop, to mobilize additional resources to help bridge the gap in demand and supply, the Government of India formulated a policy in 1991 with the objective to encourage greater investment by private enterprises in the electricity sector. To study the implications of such an initiative on various stakeholders, viz., public utilities, consumers and private sector, the present paper tries to analyse issues like planned rationing, guarantees to private sector, backing down of existing capacity. Using the state of Karnataka (in Southern India) as a case study, the paper develops multiple scenarios using an integrated mixed integer-programming model. The results show the advantage of marginal non-supply (rationing) of electricity in terms of achieving overall effective supply demand matching as well as providing economic benefits to the state that could be generated through cost savings. The results also show the negative impacts of high guarantees offered to the private sector in terms of the opportunity costs of reduced utilization of both the existing and the new public capacity. The estimated generation losses and the associated economic impacts of backing down of existing and new public capacity on account of guarantees are found to be significantly high. For 2011-12, depending on the type of scenarios, the estimated generation and economic losses are likely to be in the range of 3200-10,000 GWh and Rs. 4200-13,600 million respectively. The impact of these losses on the consumers could be in terms of significant increase in energy bills (in the range of 19-40% for different scenarios) due to rise in tariffs. (author)

  20. Climate change and energy: The implications for the Spanish case; Cambio Climatico y Energia: Impliacaciones reciprocas en el caso Espanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Arriaga, J. I.

    2007-07-01

    This paper examines the mutual implications between the climate change problem and the actual energy-at-a-crossroads situation of the unsustainable world energy model. The implications for the Spanish case are studied as a case example. The paper provides a brief review of the scientific evidence on climate change, analyzes the causes of the present energy dilemma and characterizes the problem to be addressed. The principal challenge for the future climate regime is to identify the nature and level of commitment that will provide sufficient incentives for all countries, with such a diversity of interests. The paper also exposes the most plausible framework for the future climate regime, the basic components of such a regime, the role to be played by the major stake holders and some guidelines for future negotiations. (Author)

  1. Massive Lumbar Disk Herniation Following "Therapeutic" Water Boiling of the Lower Extremities: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallone, Aldo; Çelniku, Megi

    2017-01-01

    Legs burning for treating lumbar radicular pain are still in use nowadays in low socioeconomical environments. They are dangerous as the case we report shows clearly. A 49-year-old man came to our attention with severe flaccid paraparesis occurred 10 days before, almost immediately after he had immersed his legs in boiling water to treat his severe left lumbocrural pain. This was known to be due to a right L3/4 herniated disk diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. At the examination he showed severe motor paresis and absent reflexes of his lower limbs, while crural pain was mild and sensation and urinary function were unaffected. The results of his neurologic examination led us to suspect an acute motor axon degeneration related to thermal shock. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging, performed before the planned electromyogram as an exception to the established routine, showed instead a giant 5- × 5.5-cm, herniated disk compressing the dural sac at L3. Prompt surgical decompression led to rapid improvement. We discuss here the pathophysiology of this unusual case and point out how medieval practices for treating sciatica-like pain are not only unjustified from a medical viewpoint but also potentially dangerous. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gigantic retroperitoneal hematoma as a complication of anticoagulation therapy with heparin in therapeutic doses: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daliakopoulos Stavros I

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a distinct clinical entity that can present as a rare life-threatening event characterized by sudden onset of bleeding into the retroperitoneal space, occurring in association with bleeding disorders, intratumoral bleeding, or ruptures of any retroperitoneal organ or aneurysm. The spontaneous form is the most infrequent retroperitoneal hemorrhage, causing significant morbidity and representing a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation We report the case of a patient with coronary artery disease who presented with transient ischemic attack, in whom anticoagulant therapy with heparin precipitated a massive spontaneous atraumatic retroperitoneal hemorrhage (with international normalized ratio 2.4, which was treated conservatively. Conclusion Delay in diagnosis is potentially fatal and high clinical suspicion remains crucial. Finally, it is a matter of controversy whether retroperitoneal hematomas should be surgically evacuated or conservatively treated and the final decision should be made after taking into consideration patient's general condition and the possibility of permanent femoral or sciatic neuropathy due to compression syndrome.

  3. Fissures in rock under water pressure, implications on stability : 3 unusual cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helwig, P.C. [Helwig Hydrotechnique Ltd., St. John' s, NL (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The presence of water in rock joints has important implications on the stability of rock foundations. Appropriate analyses are needed to assess the stability of dam foundations, abutments and rock walls. This paper presented 3 case studies in which the freezing of seepage flows in rock joints and transient pressure in rock walls were investigated: (1) an assessment of the effects of freezing water in rock joints at the Paradise River arch dam in Newfoundland; (2) stability of rock walls in the unlined power tunnel of the Cat Arm hydroelectric development in Newfoundland due to transient pressures; and (3) assessing the influence of fluctuating water pressures in a stilling basin excavated in rock. After an investigation of the Paradise River canyon walls, a drainage system comprised of peripheral drain holes was drilled into the foundation and walls at regular intervals to intercept seepage flows and to relieve uplift water pressures. However, no special treatment was found for the potential freezing of water in the joints of the dam walls and foundation. The Cat Arm tunnel was used to study the depth at which significant transient pressures can be used to assess rock stability. Rock properties, typical fracture apertures and spacing were assumed and joint deformability was taken into account. An axisymmetric solution was obtained by considering the continuity and flow through an annular element of the rock wall. A finite difference method was used to solve the resulting nonlinear differential equation. In the final case study, blast-damaged rock was undermining the toe of a spillway. A cut-off wall was constructed as a series of drilled, cast-in-place concrete caisson piles. Criteria for the design included extending the cut-off wall to a depth beyond the effects of fluctuating surface pressures. Depth was assessed by considering the transient behaviour of water penetrating a sub-vertical joint subject exposed to fluctuating pressures. Results of the calculations

  4. Evaluation of 201Tl stress-redistribution imaging for the detection of myocardial ischemia and assessment of its therapeutic effect (40 cases attached)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jinghui

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of 201 Tl stress-redistribution imagings of 21 normal controls and 19 myocardial ischemia were reported. Normal variability of myocardial images and its influencing factors were discussed as well. All of 40 cases were also undergoing coronary arteriography (CAG), and exercise ECG. Taken the stenosis of coronary artery > 50% by CAG as the criterion of diagnosis of CHD, the sensitivity and specificity of 201 Tl image were 94.7% and 100%, while as exercise ECG were 66.6% and 80.9% respectively. 2 patients with bypass surgery and 6 patients with PTCA were examined pre- and postoperatively by 201 Tl images. The results indicated that this technique was noninvasive and reliable also for the assessment of their therapeutic effect and follow up studies

  5. "They Treat Us Like Human Beings"--Experiencing a Therapeutic Sex Offenders Prison: Impact on Prisoners and Staff and Implications for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagden, Nicholas; Winder, Belinda; Hames, Charlie

    2016-03-01

    Research evidence demonstrates that sex offender treatment programmes (SOTPs) can reduce the number of sex offenders who are reconvicted. However, there has been much less empirical research exploring the experiences and perspectives of the prison environment within which treatment takes place. This is important, particularly for sexual offenders, as they often face multiple stigmas in prison. This study used a mixed-methods approach to explore the experiences of prisoners and staff at a therapeutically orientated sexual offenders' prison to understand whether the prison environment was conducive to rehabilitation. The quantitative strand of the research sampled prisoners (n = 112) and staff (n = 48) from a therapeutically orientated sex offenders prison. This strand highlighted that both prisoners and staff had positive attitudes toward offenders and high beliefs that offenders could change. Importantly, the climate was rated positively and, in particular, participants had very high ratings of "experienced safety." The qualitative strand of the research consisted of semistructured interviews with prisoners (n = 15) and a range of prison staff (n = 16). The qualitative analysis revealed positive prisoner views toward staff relationships, with most participants articulating that the prison and its staff had contributed to positive change in prisoners. Crucially, the environment was perceived as safe and allowed prisoners "headspace" to work through problems and contemplate change. This research offers some support to the notion that context is important for sex offender rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Identification of genes highly downregulated in pancreatic cancer through a meta-analysis of microarray datasets: implications for discovery of novel tumor-suppressor genes and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonesekere, Nalin C W; Andersen, Wyatt; Smith, Alex; Wang, Xiaosheng

    2018-02-01

    The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC), which has a 5-year survival rate of about 7%. Recent failures of targeted therapies inhibiting kinase activity in clinical trials have highlighted the need for new approaches towards combating this deadly disease. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly downregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We have used qRT-PCR to confirm the downregulation of selected genes in a panel of PC cell lines. This study has yielded several novel candidate tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) including GNMT, CEL, PLA2G1B and SERPINI2. We highlight the role of GNMT, a methyl transferase associated with the methylation potential of the cell, and CEL, a lipase, as potential therapeutic targets. We have uncovered genetic links to risk factors associated with PC such as smoking and obesity. Genes important for patient survival and prognosis are also discussed, and we confirm the dysregulation of metabolic pathways previously observed in PC. While many of the genes downregulated in our dataset are associated with protein products normally produced by the pancreas for excretion, we have uncovered some genes whose downregulation appear to play a more causal role in PC. These genes will assist in providing a better understanding of the disease etiology of PC, and in the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  7. Therapeutic Implications of Black Seed and Its Constituent Thymoquinone in the Prevention of Cancer through Inactivation and Activation of Molecular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad H. Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer is probably the most dreaded disease in both men and women and also major health problem worldwide. Despite its high prevalence, the exact molecular mechanisms of the development and progression are not fully understood. The current chemotherapy/radiotherapy regime used to treat cancer shows adverse side effect and may alter gene functions. Natural products are generally safe, effective, and less expensive substitutes of anticancer chemotherapeutics. Based on previous studies of their potential therapeutic uses, Nigella sativa and its constituents may be proved as good therapeutic options in the prevention of cancer. Black seeds are used as staple food in the Middle Eastern Countries for thousands of years and also in the treatment of diseases. Earlier studies have shown that N. sativa and its constituent thymoquinone (TQ have important roles in the prevention and treatment of cancer by modulating cell signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the role of N. sativa and its constituents TQ in the prevention of cancer through the activation or inactivation of molecular cell signaling pathways.

  8. Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy: A case report and review of anesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eduardo Anillo Lombana

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the anesthetic implications of this rare disease, particularly the use of a regional technique that removes the restrictive effect of the hip pain, and therefore increases the risk of a fracture.

  9. "Too stubborn to ever be governed by enforced insanity": Some therapeutic jurisprudence dilemmas in the representation of criminal defendants in incompetency and insanity cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the importance of the relationship between therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) and the role of criminal defense lawyers in insanity and incompetency-to-stand-trial (IST) cases. That inattention is especially noteworthy in light of the dismal track record of counsel providing services to defendants who are part of this cohort of incompetency-status-raisers and insanity-defense-pleaders. On one hand, this lack of attention is a surprise as TJ scholars have, in recent years, turned their attention to virtually every other aspect of the legal system. On the other hand, it is not a surprise, given the omnipresence of sanism, an irrational prejudice of the same quality and character of other irrational prejudices that cause (and are reflected in) prevailing social attitudes of racism, sexism, homophobia, and ethnic bigotry, that infects both our jurisprudence and our lawyering practices. Sanism is largely invisible and largely socially acceptable, and is based predominantly upon stereotype, myth, superstition, and deindividualization. It is sustained and perpetuated by our use of alleged "ordinary common sense" (OCS) and heuristic reasoning in an unconscious response to events both in everyday life and in the legal process. This paper examines the literature that seeks to apply TJ principles to the criminal law process in general, drawing mostly on the work of Professor David Wexler. It considers why the lack of attention that I have referred to already is surprising (given TJ's mandate and the fact that many TJ issues are inevitably raised in any insanity or IST case). The paper then considers why this lack of attention is not surprising, given the omnipresence of sanism. It will consider some of the actual counseling issues that might arise in these contexts, and offer some suggestions to lawyers representing clients in cases in which mental status issues may be raised. The paper concludes that we must rigorously apply therapeutic

  10. Therapeutic and Ethical Dilemma of Puberty and Menstruation Problems in an Intellectually Disabled (Autistic) Female: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarian, Azadeh; Mehrpisheh, Shahrokh

    2015-10-01

    Intellectual disability is a term used when a person has certain limitations in mental functioning and skills. Autism is a group of developmental brain disorders, collectively called autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Teenagers with learning and physical disabilities are more likely to have menstrual problems compared to the general populations. The parents of a 12-year-old girl with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability referred to the coroner due to her numerous problems of puberty (menstruation) including: poor hygiene and polluting herself and the environment, not allowing to put or change the pads and changes in mood and physical health prior period, requested for the surgery (hysterectomy). In legal medicine organization after reviewing the medical records, physical exams and medical consultations with a gynecologist and psychiatric, surgery was not accepted. Hysterectomy (surgery) due to the age of the child, either physically or morally is not recommended. The use of hormone replacement therapy has side effects such as osteoporosis. In these cases, it seems noninvasive methods (behavioral therapy and learning care skills) under the welfare experts is also more effective and morally.

  11. Severe form of streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis of the upper limb - diagnostic and therapeutic challenge: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since delay in recognition and effective treatment of necrotizing fasciitis (NF caused by invasive group A streptococcus increases the mortality and disability, the early diagnosis and management of this disease are essential for a better outcome. We presented a patient with a severe form of streptococcal NF of the left upper limb in whom amputation was performed as a life saving procedure. Case report. A 65-year-old man, previously healthy, suffered an injury to his left hand by sting on a fish bone. Two days after that the patient got fever, redness, swelling and pain in his left hand. Clinical examination of the patient after admission indicated NF that spread quickly to the entire left upper limb, left armpit, and the left side of the chest and abdomen. Despite the use of aggressive antibiotic and surgical therapy severe destruction of the skin and subcutaneous tissues developed with the development of gangrene of the left upper limb. In this situation, the team of specialists decided that the patient must be operated on submited to amputation of the left arm, at the shoulder. After amputation and aggressive debridement of soft tissue on the left side of the trunk, the patient completely recovered. β-hemolytic streptococcus group A was isolated from the skin and tissue obtained during the surgery. Conclusion. In the most severe forms of streptococcal NF of the extremities, adequate multidisciplinary treatment, including limb amputation, can save the life of a patient.

  12. Insights into the Molecular Pathogenesis of Activated B-Cell-like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Its Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Lenz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the last couple of years, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL has significantly improved. Large-scale gene expression profiling studies have led to the discovery of several molecularly defined subtypes that are characterized by specific oncogene addictions and significant differences in their outcome. Next generation sequencing efforts combined with RNA interference screens frequently identify crucial oncogenes that lead to constitutive activation of various signaling pathways that drive lymphomagenesis. This review summarizes our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the activated B-cell-like (ABC DLBCL subtype that is characterized by poor prognosis. A special emphasis is put on findings that might impact therapeutic strategies of affected patients.

  13. Insights into the Molecular Pathogenesis of Activated B-Cell-like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Its Therapeutic Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Georg [Translational Oncology, Department of Medicine A, Albert-Schweitzer Campus 1, University Hospital Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Cluster of Excellence EXC 1003, Cells in Motion, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    Within the last couple of years, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has significantly improved. Large-scale gene expression profiling studies have led to the discovery of several molecularly defined subtypes that are characterized by specific oncogene addictions and significant differences in their outcome. Next generation sequencing efforts combined with RNA interference screens frequently identify crucial oncogenes that lead to constitutive activation of various signaling pathways that drive lymphomagenesis. This review summarizes our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL subtype that is characterized by poor prognosis. A special emphasis is put on findings that might impact therapeutic strategies of affected patients.

  14. Molecular profiling of tumour budding implicates TGFβ-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a therapeutic target in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, D H; Dabelsteen, E; Specht, L; Fiehn, A M K; Therkildsen, M H; Jønson, L; Vikesaa, J; Nielsen, F C; von Buchwald, C

    2015-08-01

    Although tumour budding is an adverse prognostic factor for many cancer types, the molecular mechanisms governing this phenomenon are incompletely understood. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of tumour budding may provide new therapeutic and diagnostic options. We employ digital image analysis to demonstrate that the number of tumour buds in cytokeratin-stained sections correlates with patients having lymph node metastases at diagnosis. The tumour bud count was also a predictor of overall survival, independent of TNM stage. Tumour buds and paired central tumour areas were subsequently collected from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) specimens, using laser capture microdissection, and examined with RNA sequencing and miRNA-qPCR arrays. Compared with cells from the central parts of the tumours, budding cells exhibited a particular gene expression signature, comprising factors involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and activated TGFβ signalling. Transcription factors ZEB1 and PRRX1 were up-regulated concomitantly with the decreased expression of mesenchymal-epithelial (MET) transcription factors (eg OVOL1) in addition to Krüppel-like factors and Grainyhead-like factors. Moreover, miR-200 family members were down-regulated in budding tumour cells. We used immunohistochemistry to validate five markers of the EMT/MET process in 199 OSCC tumours, as well as in situ hybridization in 20 OSCC samples. Given the strong relationship between tumour budding and the development of lymph node metastases and an adverse prognosis, therapeutics based on inhibiting the activation of TGFβ signalling may prove useful in the treatment of OSCC. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Implications for advanced safeguards derived from PR and PP case study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    The proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) working group produced a case study on the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). The ESFR is a hypothetical nuclear energy system consisting of four sodium-cooled fast reactors of medium size collocated with an on-site dry fuel storage facility and a spent fuel reprocessing facility using pyroprocessing technology. This study revealed how safeguards would be applied at such site consisting of integrated multiple fuel cycle facilities and the implications of what safeguards technology and safeguards concepts would need to be adapted and developed to safeguard successfully this Generation IV nuclear energy system concept. The major safeguards concepts driving our safeguards analysis are timeliness goals and material quantity goals. Because the fresh transuranic (TRU) fuel to be produced in the ESFR fuel fabrication facility contains plutonium, the ESFR will be reprocessing, using in the reactor, and storing material on site that will have IAEA defined 'direct-use material' in it with stringent timeliness goals and material quantity goals that drive the safeguards implementation. Specifically, the TRU fresh fuel, pyroprocessing in process material, LWR spent fuel sent to the ESFR, and TRU spent fuel will contain plutonium. This material will need to be verified at interim intervals four times per year because the irradiated direct-use material, as defined previously, has three-month timeliness goals and 8 kg material quantity goals for plutonium. The TRU in-process material is, of course, irradiated direct-use material as defined by the IAEA. Keeping the plutonium and uranium together with TRu products should provide a radiation barrier. this radiation barrier slows down the ability to reprocess the fuel. Furthermore, the reprocessing technique, if it has some intrinsic proliferation resistance, will need major modifications to be able to separate plutonium from the uranium and TRU mixture. The ESFR design

  16. Implications for Advanced Safeguards Derived from PR and PP Case Study Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear Nonproliferation Division, N-4, Safeguards and Security Group, P. O. Box 1663, N-4, Mail Stop E541, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) working group produced a case study on the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). The ESFR is a hypothetical nuclear energy system consisting of four sodium-cooled fast reactors of medium size collocated with an on-site dry fuel storage facility and a spent fuel reprocessing facility using pyro-processing technology. This study revealed how safeguards would be applied at such site consisting of integrated multiple fuel cycle facilities and the implications of what safeguards technology and safeguards concepts would need to be adapted and developed to safeguard successfully this Generation IV nuclear energy system concept. The major safeguards concepts driving our safeguards analysis are timeliness goals and material quantity goals. Because the fresh transuranic (TRU) fuel to be produced in the ESFR fuel fabrication facility contains plutonium, the ESFR will be reprocessing, using in the reactor, and storing material on site that will have IAEA defined 'direct use material' in it with stringent timeliness goals and material quantity goals that drive the safeguards implementation. Specifically, the TRU fresh fuel, pyro-processing in process material, LWR spent fuel sent to the ESFR, and TRU spent fuel will contain plutonium. This material will need to be verified at interim intervals four times per year because the irradiated direct use material, as defined previously, has three-month timeliness goals and 8 kg material quantity goals for plutonium. The TRU in-process material is, of course, irradiated direct-use material because of keeping the plutonium and uranium together with TRU products that should provide a radiation barrier that slows down the ability to reprocess the fuel and by the process if it intrinsically will take major modification to be able to separate plutonium from the uranium and TRU mixture. This is an issue that the ESFR design must answer to state it has valuable

  17. Evaluation of therapeutic response with 18-FDG PET-CT for non-small cell lung cancer: case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitencourt, Almir G.V.; Lima, Eduardo N.P.; Chojniak, Rubens; Haddad, Fabio J.; Dettino, Aldo L.A.; Cavicchioli, Marcelo; Torres, Ivone C.G.

    2010-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography / Computed Tomography (PET-CT) is increasingly being used as to complement conventional imaging methods and improve the management of patients with non-small cells lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of this work is to report on a case in which PET-CT was used as a complementary method to evaluate the therapeutic response in a patient with NSCLC, and to carry out a literature review of the theme. Female patient, 65 years-old, with NSCLC, stage IIIA (T2N2M0), was submitted to exclusive neoadjuvant chemotherapy and presented good response to the treatment, classified by the morphological criteria of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) as a partial response (reduction equal to or greater than 30% in the sum of the widest diameter of all the target lesions in the computed tomography). The metabolic evaluation by PET-CT showed a complete response (reduction equal to or higher than 80% at maximum SUV of the lesions), which was confirmed in the histopathological analysis of the surgical samples. In the case presented, and through the literature review, we show that the evaluation of response with metabolic criteria, associated with morphological criteria, may be more accurate than the use of morphological criteria alone. (author)

  18. Understanding the environmental implications of energy transitions. A case study for wind power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvesen, Anders

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental change in the ways in which we provide energy to run our economies, an energy transition, is needed to mitigate climate change. Wind power is an important part of future global energy supply in most energy scenarios. This thesis aims to contribute to a better understanding of the environmental implications of energy transitions, primarily by examining the case of wind power. This involves new investigations of both potential negative impacts of wind power and the positive role of the technology in emission reduction, as well as a critical review of past research. Three papers on wind power are presented: a comprehensive literature review of life cycle assessments (LCA) of wind power, a scenario-based LCA of large-scale adoption of wind power, and an LCA of an offshore wind farm. A hybrid LCA methodology is employed in the scenario-based LCA and LCA of an offshore wind farm. Another paper is presented which is not concerned with wind power in particular, but takes the form of an evaluation of limitations of climate change mitigation literature. It helps to achieve the aim stated above by bringing together knowledge of indirect effects of mitigation measures, and by elucidating how these effects may influence the viability of proposed mitigation strategies. The literature review aims to take stock of insights from past research, with a particular view to identifying remaining challenges. A survey of results indicates 0.063 ({+-}0.061) and 0.055 ({+-}0.037) kWh energy used and 20 ({+-}14) and 16 ({+-}10) Co2 emitted per kWh electricity for onshore and offshore cases. Evidence suggests strong positive effects of scale in the lower end of the turbine size spectrum, but is inconclusive for the megawatt range. LCAs tend to assume higher capacity factors than current real-world averages. Limitations of existing research are discussed; this includes poorly understood toxicity and resource depletion impacts, cut-off errors and seemingly inconsistent modelling

  19. Structures of native and affinity-enhanced WT1 epitopes bound to HLA-A*0201: Implications for WT1-based cancer therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2010-09-07

    Presentation of peptides by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules is required for the initiation and propagation of a T cell-mediated immune response. Peptides from the Wilms Tumor 1 transcription factor (WT1), upregulated in many hematopoetic and solid tumors, can be recognized by T cells and numerous efforts are underway to engineer WT1-based cancer vaccines. Here we determined the structures of the class I MHC molecule HLA-A*0201 bound to the native 126-134 epitope of the WT1 peptide and a recently described variant (R1Y) with improved MHC binding. The R1Y variant, a potential vaccine candidate, alters the positions of MHC charged side chains near the peptide N-terminus and significantly reduces the peptide/MHC electrostatic surface potential. These alterations indicate that the R1Y variant is an imperfect mimic of the native WT1 peptide, and suggest caution in its use as a therapeutic vaccine. Stability measurements revealed how the R1Y substitution enhances MHC binding affinity, and together with the structures suggest a strategy for engineering WT1 variants with improved MHC binding that retain the structural features of the native peptide/MHC complex.

  20. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  1. Dispepsia funcional: Nuevos conocimientos en la fisiopatogenia con implicaciones terapéuticas Functional dyspepsia: New pathophysiologic knowledge with therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Hernando-Harder

    2007-08-01

    the gastroduodenal region, in the absence of any organic, systemic, or metabolic disease that is likely to explain the symptoms. Pathogenetic features include disturbed gastric accommodation and emptying, duodenal dysmotility, heightened sensitivity, notably psychosocial disturbances and an association with a postinfective state. Increasing efforts are made to determine the etiopathogenesis of the disease, including new molecular and genetic aspects. However, the exact etiopathologic mechanism that causes the symptoms in an individual patient remains to be identified. The new Rome III criteria redefine and sub-characterize FD patients according to their main symptoms and this can be of value for standardized research, development and control of new therapeutic strategies and calculated therapeutic recommendations in the clinical practice. Various treatment modalities have been employed including dietary modifications, pharmacological agents directed at different targets within the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system and psychological therapies including hypnotherapy. Unfortunately, to date, all of these therapies have yielded only marginal results. After excluding organic diseases, it is essential that the patient be assured about the benign nature and prognosis of the disease, and this can be sometimes the most helpful inversion for the patient and his/her physician.

  2. Therapeutic potential of Mucuna pruriens (Linn.) on ageing induced damage in dorsal nerve of the penis and its implication on erectile function: an experimental study using albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppan, Prakash; Muhammed, Ibrahim; Mohanraj, Karthik Ganesh; Lakshmanan, Ganesh; Premavathy, Dinesh; Muthu, Sakthi Jothi; Wungmarong Shimray, Khayinmi; Sathyanathan, Sathya Bharathy

    2018-02-15

    To study the effect of ethanolic seed extract of Mucuna pruriens on damaged dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) in aged rat in relation to penile erection. The rats were divided into four groups Young (3 months), Aged (24 - 28 months), Aged + M. pruriens, and Young + M. pruriens (200 mg/kg b.w/60 days) and were subjected to the hypophysial - gonadal axis, nerve conduction velocity (NCV), and penile reflex. DNP sections were stained with nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NaDPH) diaphorase, androgen receptor (AR), and osmium tetroxide. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining, electron microscopy(EM) and histometric analyses were done. Significant disturbance in hypophysial - gonadal axis was noted in aged rat. With reduced number of myelinated fibers, diameter, vacuolization, indentation of the myelin sheath, and degeneration. nNOS and its cofactor (NaDPH diaphorase) were reduced in aged rat DNP. NCV was slow in aged rats and concomitant poor penile reflex was also noted. AR showed reduced expression in aged rat DNP when compared to young and control groups. TUNEL positive cells were increased in aged rat DNP. These pathological changes were remarkably reduced or recovered in M. pruriens treated aged rats. The results indicate a multi-factorial therapeutic activity in penile innervations towards sustaining the penile erection in the presence of the extract in aged rats and justifying the claim of traditional usage.

  3. Role of protein kinase C β and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor in malignant pleural mesothelioma: Therapeutic implications and the usefulness of Caenorhabditis elegans model organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Loganathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To examine the role of both protein kinase C (PKC-β and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-2 in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM using respective inhibitors, enzastaurin and KRN633. Materials and Methods: MPM cell lines, control cells, and a variety of archived MPM tumor samples were used to determine the protein expression levels of PKC-β, VEGFR-2, VEGF, and p-AKT. Effects of enzastaurin and KRN633 on phosphorylation status of key signaling molecules and viability of the mesothelioma cells were determined. The common soil nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, was treated with enzastaurin to determine its suitability to screen for highly potent kinase inhibitors. Results: PKC-β1, PKC-β2 and VEGFR-2/KDR were overexpressed in MPM cell lines and MPM tumor tissues. Enzastaurin treatment resulted in significant loss in viability of VEGF induced cell proliferation; however, the effect of KRN633 was much less. Enzastaurin also dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of PKC-β, its downstream target p-AKT, and surprisingly, the upstream VEGFR-2. The combination of the two drugs at best was additive and similar results were obtained with respect to cell viability. Treatment of C. elegans with enzastaurin resulted in clear phenotypic changes and the worms were hypermotile with abnormal pattern and shape of eggs, suggesting altered fecundity. Conclusions: PKC-β1 and VEGFR-2 are both excellent therapeutic targets in MPM. Enzastaurin was better at killing MPM cells than KRN633 and the combination lacked synergy. In addition, we show here that C. elegans can be used to screen for the next generation inhibitors as treatment with enzastaurin resulted in clear phenotypic changes that could be assayed.

  4. Optical microscopy of targeted drug delivery and local distribution in skin of a topical minocycline: implications in translational research and guidance for therapeutic dose selection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsmeier, Maiko; Sawant, Tanvee; Lac, Diana; Yamamoto, Akira; Chen, Xin; Huang, Susan Y.; Nagavarapu, Usha; Evans, Conor L.; Chan, Kin Foong; Daniels, AnnaMarie

    2017-02-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin condition commonly resulting in negative aesthetic and social impacts on those affected. Minocycline, currently available as an oral antibiotic for moderate to severe acne, has a known minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the acne-causing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in vitro, with its anti-inflammatory properties also eliciting inhibitory effects on pro-inflammatory molecules. A novel topical gel composition containing solubilized minocycline (BPX-01) has been developed to directly deliver the drug to the skin. Because minocycline is a known fluorophore, fluorescence microscopy and concurrent quantitative measurements were performed on excised human facial skin dosed with different concentrations, in order to determine the spatial distribution of the drug and quantification of its local concentration in the epidermis and the pilosebaceous unit where P. acnes generally reside. Local minocycline delivery confirmed achievement of an adequate therapeutic dose to support clinical studies. Subsequently, a 4-week double-blind, randomized, vehicle controlled clinical study was performed to assess the safety and efficacy of 1% minocycline BPX-01 applied daily. No instances of cutaneous toxicity were reported, and a greater than 1 log reduction of P. acnes count was observed at week 4 with statistical significance from baseline and vehicle control. In addition, no detectable amounts of minocycline in the plasma were reported, suggesting the potential of this new formulation to diminish the known systemic adverse effects associated with oral minocycline. Follow-on clinical plans are underway to further establish the safety of BPX-01 and to evaluate its efficacy against inflammatory acne lesions in a 225 patient multi-center dose-finding study.

  5. Implications of Financing Higher Education for Access and Equity: The Case of Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbani, Nader; Salloum, Siba

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the implications for access and equity of the Syrian government's efforts to reform higher education in the country over the past decade. In the context of social and economic reforms that are moving the county from a state-controlled to a social market economy, it focuses on adequacy in financing higher education, as well as…

  6. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and duodeno-jejunal adenocarcinoma: therapeutic implications Síndrome de Peutz-Jeghers y adenocarcinoma duodenal-yeyunal: implicaciones terapéuticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Cienfuegos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS is an autosomal dominant hamartomatous poliposis describred in 1921. Hemminki in 1997 described the presence of LKB-1 mutation tumor-suppressor gen. The patients with PJS develop a higher cumulative incidence of gastrointestinal, pancreas and extraintestinal tumors, being occasion of a renew interest on hamartomatous polyposis syndromes regarding the clinical care, cancer surveillance treatment and long term follow-up. We report the case of a 38 years old male, diagnosed of PJS who developed a multiple adenocarcinoma in duodenum and yeyunum. Surgically treated and with a long-term free disease survival of 11 years represents the sixth case reported in the spanish literature of PJS associated with a gastrointestinal tumor. A critical review, molecular alterations and the established criteria of tumor screening and surveillance are reviewed.

  7. Universal design of workplaces through the use of Poka-Yokes: case study and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Miralles Insa, Cristóbal; Holt, Raimond; Marin-Garcia, Juan A.; Canos-Daros, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Employment plays an important part in many people’s lives beyond merely providing income, since continued participation in work can have many therapeutic benefits for workers defined as disabled. However, disabled workers face a range of barriers to employment, despite legislation intended to improve workplace accessibility emphasizing adaptations to the workplace, which many employers often find difficult and expensive. The Poka-Yoke approach was developed in the manufacturin...

  8. Geoethical implications in the L'Aquila case: scientific knowledge and communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    effective evaluation of the errors of the prediction models. Furthermore, it has to include a commitment increasingly qualified in scientific communication, through the use of a simplified language but still scientifically correct and suitable for different users. Finally, it consists of taking care of the redefinition of relationships with policy makers and media, so that it is possible, also through the sharing of operational protocols, to establish areas of expertise helpful to clarify roles and responsibilities. Certainly a reflection arises from this sad affair: the unpredictability of natural hazards cannot be an excuse to acquit the science, as well as the legitimate need of citizens for reassurance has not to be used to exert pressure on those who have to make decisions in circumstances where the margins of error are still very high. This work aims to summarize some essential passages of the L'Aquila case, since the geoethical implications of this affair are important and paradigmatic.

  9. Thioredoxin-1 overexpression in transgenic mice attenuates streptozotocin-induced diabetic osteopenia: a novel role of oxidative stress and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yasuhiro; Fujii, Hideki; Kitazawa, Riko; Yodoi, Junji; Kitazawa, Sohei; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2009-05-01

    . Suppression of increased oxidative stress by TRX induction could be a potential therapeutic approach for diabetic osteopenia.

  10. Progression of urothelial carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder: a switch from luminal to basal phenotype and related therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Isabella; Schneider, Ursula; Grimm, Tobias; Karl, Alexander; Horst, David; Gaisa, Nadine T; Knüchel, Ruth; Garczyk, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    The stratification of bladder cancer into luminal and basal tumors has recently been introduced as a novel prognostic system in patient cohorts of muscle-invasive bladder cancer or high-grade papillary carcinomas. Using a representative immunohistochemistry panel, we analyzed luminal and basal marker expression in a large case series (n = 156) of urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS), a precancerous lesion that frequently progresses to muscle-invasive disease. The majority of CIS cases was characterized by a positivity for luminal markers (aberrant cytokeratin (CK) 20 85% (132/156), GATA3 median Remmele score (score of staining intensity (0-3) multiplied with percentage of positive cells (0-4)): 12, estrogen receptor (ER) β Remmele score > 2: 88% (138/156), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) Dako score 3+ 32% (50/156), Her2 Dako score 2+ 33% (51/156)), and marginal expression of basal markers (CK5/6+ 2% (3/156), CK14+ 1% (2/156)). To further investigate phenotypic stability during disease progression, we compared 48 pairs of CIS and invasive tumors from the same biopsy. A highly significant loss of luminal marker expression (p < 0.001) was observed in the course of progression whereas an increase of basal marker expression (p < 0.01) was noted in the invasive compartment. Importantly, 91% of CIS cases demonstrated a positivity for at least one of the two predictive markers Her2 and ERβ, indicating that the analysis of Her2 and ERβ may help to identify CIS-patient subgroups prone to more efficient targeted treatment strategies. Larger prospective and biomarker-embedded clinical trials are needed to confirm and validate our preliminary findings.

  11. Human urine-based therapeutics in Spain from the early 20th century to the present: a historical literature overview and a present-day case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, José Ramón; Aparicio Mena, Alfonso J; González, José Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Human urine is currently the subject of biomedical investigations as a potential therapeutic resource and it continues to be used in remedies in different cultures and societies, including the Spanish culture. In this study we gather etnomedical knowledge about urotherapy and determine their associated symbolisms in Spain. A literature overview and a case study were carried out to compile urine-based remedies and as a direct analysis of symbolic systems. Urotherapy is widespread in Spanish folk medicine. Among the 204 collected remedies, those related to treatment of diseases or skin conditions predominate (63%). Remedies have been reported for the treatment of skin diseases such as eczema, chloasma, alopecia, etc. to treat or alleviate burns, chilblains, wounds or skin chapping, and as a treatment of venomous bites. Most of the collected remedies have an associated naturalist symbolism, based on local traditions and the transmission of empirical initial knowledge. The use of urine in Spain is a result of the interaction of two types of practice: a local and traditional urotherapy, rural and with a utilitarian purpose, and a technical urotherapy, limited to an urban environment and a naturopathic medicine.

  12. Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer: Analysis of therapeutic results in 112 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Koizumi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Masaki; Iwai, Toshinori; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Oguri, Senri; Kioi, Mitomu; Hirota, Makoto; Koike, Izumi; Hata, Masaharu; Tohnai, Iwai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and rate of organ preservation in patients with stage III or IV oral cancer treated with retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy. Materials and methods: One hundred and twelve patients with stage III and IV oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy. Catheterization from the superficial temporal and occipital arteries was performed. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m 2 , cisplatin, total 150 mg/m 2 ) and daily concurrent radiotherapy (total of 60 Gy) for 6 weeks. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 46.2 months (range, 10–76 months). After intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy, primary site complete response was achieved in 98 (87.5%) of 112 cases. Five-year survival and local control rates were 71.3% and 79.3%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities included mucositis in 92.0%, neutropenia in 30.4%, dermatitis in 28.6%, anemia in 26.8%, and thrombocytopenia in 7.1% of patients. Grade 3 toxicities included dysphagia in 72.3%, nausea/vomiting in 21.4%, fever in 8.0%, and renal failure in 0.9% of patients. Conclusion: Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer provided good overall survival and local control

  13. Considering photodynamic therapy as a therapeutic modality in selected cases of dome-shaped macula complicated by foveal serous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapi, Ilir; Neri, Piergiorgio; Mariotti, Cesare; Gesuita, Rosaria; Pirani, Vittorio; Freddo, Francesco; Lutaj, Pajtim; Giovannini, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    To study the role of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a therapeutic modality in myopic patients with dome-shaped macula (DSM) associated with foveal serous retinal detachment (SRD). Retrospective interventional case series. The medical records of 10 consecutive myopic patients (10 eyes) with DSM associated with subfoveal SRD and treated with PDT were reviewed. Visual gain and loss were considered as increasing or decreasing of two or more lines of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), respectively, and eyes with fluid resolution were deemed responsive to PDT. All eyes underwent several PDT treatments, with a median of three and a median follow-up time of 15.5 months. At final follow-up, six eyes (60%) showed complete resolution of the foveal SRD. The baseline hypocyanescent macular area observed during late indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) frames was significantly lower in the group of patients who responded to PDT and had an increase of at least two Snellen lines in BCVA (P = .01). Data suggest that myopic eyes associated with DSM and foveal SRD may be responsive to PDT, showing total resolution of fluid accumulation and positive BCVA changes if baseline ICGA findings show evidence of a limited hypocyanescent macular area. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Correlation between total vitamin D levels and psychotic psychopathology in patients with schizophrenia: therapeutic implications for add-on vitamin D augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Rabia Nazik; Altunsoy, Neslihan; Tikir, Baise; Cingi Külük, Merve; Unal, Kubranur; Goka, Sema; Aydemir, Cigdem; Goka, Erol

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is one of the implicated factors in ethio-pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Low serum vitamin D levels have been reported in many schizophrenia studies. However, the question is still not answered: Is there a correlation between disease activity and serum vitamin D levels? This is the first study evaluating the relationship between serum total vitamin D levels and disease activity, by comparing total vitamin D levels in two schizophrenia groups abruptly different in terms of disease activity. 41 patients with schizophrenia in remission, 40 patients with schizophrenia those in an acute episode and 40 age- and sex -matched controls with no major psychopatology were recruited in this study. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Clinical Global Impression - Severety scale (CGI-S) were used to evaluate disease activity. A demographic data form that included entries on age, gender, ethnicity, weight, skin color, daily duration of sun exposure and nutritional assessment were used. Blood samples were taken from all patients and controls. Total vitamin D (D2+D3), calcium, phosphor, parathyroid hormone values were measured. Patients in an acute episode had significantly lower vitamin D levels compared to patients in remission and to healthy controls (in terms of median values respectively, 7.18, 15.03, 15.02, p vitamin D levels and CGI scores (r = -0.624, p vitamin D levels and PANNS scores (r = -0.508, p vitamin D levels. Even though important factors for vitamin D synthesis were similar, there was severe vitamin D deficiency in patients presenting with an acute episode, significantly different from those in remission. Is vitamin D deficiency the result or the cause of an acute episode? Our results contribute to the idea that vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia may have interactions with an unknown pathway. Present data points out a possible influence at a genomic level. Future trials may investigate this association with longer follow up

  15. Poultry Waste Management Techniques in Urban Agriculture and its Implications: A Case of Metropolitan Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Vide Adedayo

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the existing poultry waste management and utilization technique in urban vegetable farms. It analyses the implications of the management pattern on yield and revenue and further determines the socio-economic differentials of farmers on management pattern. Socio-economic survey was carried out to determine relationship between socio economic characteristics of farmers and poultry waste management while field experiments and estimations were done to determine poultry waste p...

  16. Prostate Brachytherapy Case Volumes by Academic and Nonacademic Practices: Implications for Future Residency Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orio, Peter F.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Cail, Daniel W.; Chen, Yu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prostate brachytherapy has continued to decline in the United States. We examined the national practice patterns of both academic and nonacademic practices performing prostate brachytherapy by case volume per year to further characterize the decline and postulate the effect this trend might have on training the next generation of residents. Methods and Materials: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone radiation therapy in 2004 to 2012 were identified. The annual brachytherapy case volume at each facility was determined and further categorized into ≤12 cases per year (ie, an average of ≤1 cases per month), 13 to 52 cases per year, and ≥53 cases per year (ie, an average of ≥1 cases per week) in academic practices versus nonacademic practices. Results: In 2004 to 2012, academic practices performing an average of ≤1 brachytherapy cases per month increased from 56.4% to 73.7%. In nonacademic practices, this percentage increased from 60.2% to 77.4% (P<.0001 for both). Practices performing an average of ≥1 cases per week decreased among both academic practices (from 6.7% to 1.5%) and nonacademic practices (from 4.5% to 2.7%). Conclusions: Both academic and nonacademic radiation oncology practices have demonstrated a significant reduction in the use of prostate brachytherapy from 2004 to 2012. With the case volume continuing to decline, it is unclear whether we are prepared to train the next generation of residents in this critical modality.

  17. Miomas e infertilidade: bases fisiopatológicas e implicações terapêuticas Uterine leiomyomas and infertility: physiopathological basis and therapeutical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Berwanger da Silva

    2005-03-01

    : although there are contradictory results, the majority of authors determined a possible cause-consequence relation between some types of leiomyomas and reproductive impairement. Concerning therapeutics, we were able to clearly place myomectomy as being the surgical technique with the best results. Surgical approaches used for this procedure did not show significant differences from each other, except for submucosal myomas, where histeroscopy is more effective. Other existent treatment options do not seem to be indicated for infertile patients with uterine leiomyomas. CONCLUSIONS: the possible association between myomas and reproductive impairment needs to be further investigated. Success indicated by gestational rates following surgical resection, mainly in patients with submucosal myomas, are an indication that they do have a role in infertility etiology. Concerning the treatment, it became clear that myomectomy is the procedure of choice for all patients desiring to become pregnant.

  18. Clinical picture and treatment implication in a child with Capgras syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Luigi; Armando, Marco; De Crescenzo, Franco; Demaria, Francesco; Valeri, Giovanni; Vicari, Stefano

    2012-11-27

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome characterized by the patient's belief that his or her relatives have been replaced by impostors. Here we describe the clinical picture and the therapeutic approach to an 11-year-old Caucasian girl with Capgras syndrome. A complete psychopathological assessment was conducted during the acute phase, at one month, two months and six months since diagnosis. Subsequent follow-up evaluations in this patient allowed us to detect improvements in the psychotic symptoms following treatment with risperidone and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, suggesting that this combined therapy may significantly improve the clinical outcome in patients who have Capgras syndrome.

  19. A rare case of persistent metopic suture in an elderly individual: Incidental autopsy finding with clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vikram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metopic suture is a dense fibrous joint extending from the nasion to the bregma. Normally, closure of this suture takes place between 1-8 years of age. Failure of this closure beyond 8 years leads to persistent metopic suture. A rare case of persistent metopic suture in a 60-year-old male is documented, who committed suicide by alleged consumption of organophosphorous compound at District Govt. Wenlock Hospital, Mangalore, Karnataka, India. Metopic suture may mimic skull fracture and may mislead an inexperienced forensic expert. Neurosurgeon should also be aware of this anatomical variation while performing frontal craniotomy, as the persistent metopic suture may mimic vertical fracture of the skull. Hence, in this case report, the clinical and medico-legal implications of the persistent metopic sutures have been discussed.

  20. Opioid Addiction: Social Problems Associated and Implications of Both Current and Possible Future Treatments, including Polymeric Therapeutics for Giving Up the Habit of Opioid Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benéitez, M Cristina; Gil-Alegre, M Esther

    2017-01-01

    Detoxification programmes seek to implement the most secure and compassionate ways of withdrawing from opiates so that the inevitable withdrawal symptoms and other complications are minimized. Once detoxification has been achieved, the next stage is to enable the patient to overcome his or her drug addiction by ensuring consumption is permanently and completely abandoned, only after which can the subject be regarded as fully recovered. A systematic search on the common databases of relevant papers published until 2016 inclusive. Our study of the available oral treatments for opioid dependence has revealed that no current treatment can actually claim to be fully effective. These treatments require daily oral administration and, consequently, regular visits to dispensaries, which in most cases results in a lack of patient compliance, which causes fluctuations in drug plasma levels. We then reviewed alternative treatments in the available scientific literature on polymeric sustained release formulations. Research has been done not only on release systems for detoxification but also on release systems for giving up the habit of taking opioids. These efforts have obtained the recent authorization of polymeric systems for use in patients that could help them to reduce their craving for drugs.

  1. Opioid Addiction: Social Problems Associated and Implications of Both Current and Possible Future Treatments, including Polymeric Therapeutics for Giving Up the Habit of Opioid Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Benéitez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Detoxification programmes seek to implement the most secure and compassionate ways of withdrawing from opiates so that the inevitable withdrawal symptoms and other complications are minimized. Once detoxification has been achieved, the next stage is to enable the patient to overcome his or her drug addiction by ensuring consumption is permanently and completely abandoned, only after which can the subject be regarded as fully recovered. Methods. A systematic search on the common databases of relevant papers published until 2016 inclusive. Results and Conclusion. Our study of the available oral treatments for opioid dependence has revealed that no current treatment can actually claim to be fully effective. These treatments require daily oral administration and, consequently, regular visits to dispensaries, which in most cases results in a lack of patient compliance, which causes fluctuations in drug plasma levels. We then reviewed alternative treatments in the available scientific literature on polymeric sustained release formulations. Research has been done not only on release systems for detoxification but also on release systems for giving up the habit of taking opioids. These efforts have obtained the recent authorization of polymeric systems for use in patients that could help them to reduce their craving for drugs.

  2. Cholera cases cluster in time and space in Matlab, Bangladesh: implications for targeted preventive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debes, Amanda K; Ali, Mohammad; Azman, Andrew S; Yunus, Mohammad; Sack, David A

    2016-12-01

    : Cholera remains a serious public health threat in Asia, Africa and in parts of the Americas. Three World health Organization (WHO) pre-qualified oral cholera vaccines are now available but their supply is limited, so current supplies must be administered strategically. This requires an improved understanding of disease transmission and control strategies. : We used demographics and disease surveillance data collected from 1991 to 2000 in Matlab, Bangladesh, to estimate the spatial and temporal extent of the zone of increased risk around cholera cases. Specifically, we compare the cholera incidence among individuals living close to cholera cases with that among individuals living close to those without medically-attended cholera in this rural endemic setting. : Those living within 50 m of a confirmed cholera case had 36 times (95% confidence interval: 23-56) the risk of becoming a cholera case in the first 3 days (after case presentation) compared with risk elsewhere in the community. The relative risk gradually declined in space and time, but remained significantly high up to 450 me away within 3 days of case presentation, and up to 150 m away within 23 days from the date of presentation of the case. : These findings suggest that, if conducted rapidly, vaccinating individuals living close to a case (ring vaccination) could be an efficient and effective strategy to target vaccine to a high-risk population in an endemic setting. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  3. Self-neglect: a case study and implications for clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Day, Mary Rose

    2015-03-02

    Self-neglect is a worldwide and serious public health issue that can have serious adverse outcomes and is more common in older people. Cases can vary in presentation, but typically present as poor self-care, poor care of the environment and service refusal. Community nurses frequently encounter self-neglect cases and health and social care professionals play a key role in the identification, management and prevention of self-neglect. Self-neglect cases can give rise to ethical, personal and professional challenges. The aim of this article is to create a greater understanding of the concept of self-neglect among community nurses.

  4. Social equity and livelihood implications of REDD+ in rural communities – a case study from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Poudel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite growing international consensus that the use of the policy instrument REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation in developing countries could be an effective way to reduce carbon emissions from the forestry sector and support bio-diversity with livelihood benefits, there are a range of unresolved issues, including potential implications for rural livelihoods. This paper presents results from recent research that examines social equity and livelihood implications of the piloting of REDD+ through Nepal’s community forestry system, within selected villages in the Gorkha district of Nepal. The research reveals the varying experiences of households, closely correlated to the socio-economic attributes of the households. Despite the ‘no harm and equitable’ policy, this research indicates that not everyone is experiencing the anticipated benefits of REDD+. Although poorer, women-headed and marginalized households are targeted in some ways (e.g. seed grants, the support is limited, and inadequately compensates the loss they have experienced in other ways (e.g. limited access to forests. Households bundling by caste may not necessarily address equity, but is likely to increase intra-caste marginalization.

  5. An Empirical Investigation of Architectural Heritage Management Implications for Tourism: The Case of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Gholitabar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are manifold. First, to investigate the potentials of architectural heritage in the context of tourism destination development, as well as examine public sector policies and make plans toward the preservation of these resources. Secondly, to appraise the outcome of preservation and its implications for tourism. The study is an effort to explore and understand the interrelationships between tourism and architectural heritage sites through tourist image and perception. For the purposes of this research, numerous heritage sites were sampled in Portugal. A mixed research method was utilized to gauge tourists’ image/perception of heritage resources, and impact (quantitative approach. A qualitative approach was utilized to assess the priority of tourists in their visits and public-sector policies toward heritage resource management and planning. The fuzzy logic method was used to assess the architectural value and the tourist and preservation potential of historical buildings in Porto/Aveiro. The contribution and implications of the study are also explained. The results revealed that architectural heritage resources have the most appeal to tourists. The study to date demonstrates the architectural value and tourist and preservation potential of the buildings observed via evaluation by fuzzy logic methods.

  6. Primary Bladder Neurofibroma: A Rare Case with Clinical Implications and Diagnostic Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakanthan, Srikanth; Naik, Ramadas; Bukelo, Maryann Margaret; Rai, Sharada; Prabhu, Laxman

    2015-09-01

    Neurofibroma of the genito-urinary tract is rare. Urinary bladder is the commonest organ involved in cases of urinary tract involvement. Patients present early in life and there is male preponderance. We discuss here a case of primary neurofibroma of the urinary bladder in a 52-year-male presenting with haematuria, irritative bladder symptoms and pelvic mass. Cystoscopy showed a swelling in the left lateral wall. A transurethral biopsy revealed neurofibroma of the urinary bladder. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis.

  7. Cumulative emission budgets and their implications: the case for SAFE carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Myles; Bowerman, Niel; Frame, David; Mason, Charles

    2010-05-01

    The risk of dangerous long-term climate change due to anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions is predominantly determined by cumulative emissions over all time, not the rate of emission in any given year or commitment period. This has profound implications for climate mitigation policy: emission targets for specific years such as 2020 or 2050 provide no guarantee of meeting any overall cumulative emission budget. By focusing attention on short-term measures to reduce the flow of emissions, they may even exacerbate the overall long-term stock. Here we consider how climate policies might be designed explicitly to limit cumulative emissions to, for example, one trillion tonnes of carbon, a figure that has been estimated to give a most likely warming of two degrees above pre-industrial, with a likely range of 1.6-2.6 degrees. Three approaches are considered: tradable emission permits with the possibility of indefinite emission banking, carbon taxes explicitly linked to cumulative emissions and mandatory carbon sequestration. Framing mitigation policy around cumulative targets alleviates the apparent tension between climate protection and short-term consumption that bedevils any attempt to forge global agreement. We argue that the simplest and hence potentially the most effective approach might be a mandatory requirement on the fossil fuel industry to ensure that a steadily increasing fraction of fossil carbon extracted from the ground is artificially removed from the active carbon cycle through some form of sequestration. We define Sequestered Adequate Fraction of Extracted (SAFE) carbon as a source in which this sequestered fraction is anchored to cumulative emissions, increasing smoothly to reach 100% before we release the trillionth tonne. While adopting the use of SAFE carbon would increase the cost of fossil energy much as a system of emission permits or carbon taxes would, it could do so with much less explicit government intervention. We contrast this proposal

  8. Human papillomavirus genotype distribution in cervical cancer cases in Spain. Implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, Laia; Pérez, Cristina; Tous, Sara; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio; Lloveras, Belen; Lerma, Enrique; Guarch, Rosa; Andújar, Miguel; Pelayo, Adela; Alejo, Maria; Ordi, Jaume; Klaustermeier, Joellen; Velasco, Julio; Guimerà, Nuria; Clavero, Omar; Castellsagué, Xavier; Quint, Wim; Muñoz, Nubia; Bosch, F Xavier; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2012-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is critical to guide the introduction and to assess the impact of HPV prophylactic vaccines. This study aims to provide specific information for Spain. 1043 histological confirmed ICC cases diagnosed from 1940 to 2007 from six Spanish regions were assembled. HPV DNA detection was performed by SPF(10) broad-spectrum PCR followed by deoxyribonucleic acid enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by reverse hybridization line probe assay (LiPA(25)) (version 1). Of 1043 ICC cases, 904 were HPV DNA positive (adjusted prevalence: 89.1%). The eight most common types, in decreasing order, were HPV 16, 18, 33, 31, 45, 35, 52 and 56, accounting for more than 90% of cases. HPV 16 and 18 contributed to 72.4% of all HPV positive ICC cases. In cervical adenocarcinomas, this contribution increased up to 94%. HPV 16 and 18 relative contributions showed a stable pattern over the 60 year study period. HPV 45, 18 and 16-positive ICC cases presented at younger ages than cases with other HPV types (adjusted mean age: 43.8, 45.2, 52.6 and 57.7 years, respectively). HPV 16 and 18 accounted together for a 72.4% of positive cases, with no statistically significant changes in their relative contributions over the last decades. In 94% of cervical adenocarcinomas we identified at least one of the two HPV types included in the current vaccines (HPV 16/18). Results suggest a major impact of HPV vaccines on reduction of ICC burden in Spain in the HPV vaccinated cohorts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Implications for new physics from fine-tuning arguments 1. Application to SUSY and seesaw cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberto Casas, J.; Hidalgo, Irene; Espinosa, Jose R.

    2004-01-01

    We revisit the standard argument to estimate the scale of new physics (NP) beyond the SM, based on the sensitivity of the Higgs mass to quadratic divergences. Although this argument is arguably naive, the corresponding estimate, Λ SM SM . One can obtain more precise implications from fine-tuning arguments in specific examples of NP. Here we consider SUSY and right-handed (seesaw) neutrinos. SUSY is a typical example for which the previous general estimate is indeed conservative: the MSSM is fine-tuned a few %, even for soft masses of a few hundred GeV. In contrast, other SUSY scenarios, in particular those with low-scale SUSY breaking, can easily saturate the general bound on Λ SM . The seesaw mechanism requires large fine-tuning if M R > or approx.10 7 GeV, unless there is additional NP (SUSY being a favourite option). (author)

  10. The Evolution of End-of-Life Care: Ethical Implications for Case Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink-Samnick, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This article: : Applicable to all health care sectors where case management is practiced. Few topics are more intimate and multifaceted for case managers than engaging with today's culturally diverse patient populations around end-of-life processes. The already prominent focus of this issue has been further elevated by a series of events to receive public attention. These include the Institute of Medicine's 2014 report-Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life, rising numbers of patients around the globe requesting to end life on their own terms, and corresponding death with dignity initiatives and legislation.Another vital factor in the end-of-life equation involves how the latest generation of shared decision making influences the management of treatment dialogues among practitioners, patients, as well as insurance companies. Case managers are at the intersection of these complex interactions, working to achieve ethical, as well as legal accountability to the patient, employer, and profession while balancing personal perspectives. Professionals strive to effectively intervene with patients and their support systems facing end-of-life care decisions. It is essential case managers actively consider the intricacies of ethical practice and current contexts including death with dignity legislation, shared decision making, and shifts in regulations and reimbursement for end-of-life care.Case management's ethical envelope will continue to be pushed. To that end amid shifting societal constructs, professionals must have mastery of applicable codes, standards, principles, and rules essential for adherence to ethical practice.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics in ecosystem response to climatic change: Case studies and policy implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Virginia R.; Wilcox, Douglas A.; Stottlemyer, Robert; Barrow, Wylie; Fagre, Dan; Baron, Jill S.; Price, Jeff; Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Allen, Craig D.; Peterson, David L.; Ruggerone, Greg; Doyle, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many biological, hydrological, and geological processes are interactively linked in ecosystems. These ecological phenomena normally vary within bounded ranges, but rapid, nonlinear changes to markedly different conditions can be triggered by even small differences if threshold values are exceeded. Intrinsic and extrinsic ecological thresholds can lead to effects that cascade among systems, precluding accurate modeling and prediction of system response to climate change. Ten case studies from North America illustrate how changes in climate can lead to rapid, threshold-type responses within ecological communities; the case studies also highlight the role of human activities that alter the rate or direction of system response to climate change. Understanding and anticipating nonlinear dynamics are important aspects of adaptation planning since responses of biological resources to changes in the physical climate system are not necessarily proportional and sometimes, as in the case of complex ecological systems, inherently nonlinear.

  12. Recent US Case of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease-Global Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Atul; Fischer, Michael; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Parker, Alicia; Ram, Aarthi; Soto, Claudio; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Cohen, Yvonne; Belay, Ermias D; Maddox, Ryan A; Mead, Simon; Goodman, Clay; Kass, Joseph S; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Hussein, Haitham M

    2015-05-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a rare, fatal prion disease resulting from transmission to humans of the infectious agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We describe the clinical presentation of a recent case of vCJD in the United States and provide an update on diagnostic testing. The location of this patient's exposure is less clear than those in the 3 previously reported US cases, but strong evidence indicates that exposure to contaminated beef occurred outside the United States more than a decade before illness onset. This case exemplifies the persistent risk for vCJD acquired in unsuspected geographic locations and highlights the need for continued global surveillance and awareness to prevent further dissemination of vCJD.

  13. Specific antigen serologic tests in leprosy: implications for epidemiological surveillance of leprosy cases and household contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana Paula Mendes; Coelho, Angélica da Conceição Oliveira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Lana, Francisco Carlos Félix

    2017-09-01

    There is a lack of straightforward tests for field application and known biomarkers for predicting leprosy progression in infected individuals. The aim was to analyse the response to infection by Mycobacterium leprae based on the reactivity of specific antigens: natural disaccharide linked to human serum albumin via an octyl (NDOHSA), a semisynthetic phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I); Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (LID-1) and natural disaccharide octyl - Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (NDOLID). The study population consisted of 130 leprosy cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 and 277 household contacts. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyse the reactivity of antibodies against NDOHSA, LID-1 and NDOLID. The samples and controls were tested in duplicate, and the antibody titer was expressed as an ELISA index. Data collection was made by home visits with application of questionnaire and dermatological evaluation of all household contacts to identify signs and symptoms of leprosy. Significant differences in the median ELISA results were observed among leprosy cases in treatment, leprosy cases that had completed treatment and household contacts. Higher proportions of seropositivity were observed in leprosy cases in treatment. Seropositivity was also higher in multibacillary in relation to paucibacillary, with the difference reaching statistical significance. Lower titers were observed among cases with a longer treatment time or discharge. For household contacts, the differences according to the clinical characteristics of the leprosy index case were less pronounced than expected. Other factors, such as the endemicity of leprosy, exposure outside the residence and genetic characteristics, appeared to have a greater influence on the seropositivity. Serologic tests could be used as auxiliary tools for determining the operational classification, in addition to identifying infected individuals

  14. Pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seok Hwee; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2006-01-01

    1. Pharmacogenetics refers to the study of genetically controlled variations in drug response. Functional variants caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding drug-metabolising enzymes, transporters, ion channels and drug receptors have been known to be associated with interindividual and interethnic variation in drug response. Genetic variations in these genes play a role in influencing the efficacy and toxicity of medications. 2. Rapid, precise and cost-effective high-throughput technological platforms are essential for performing large-scale mutational analysis of genetic markers involved in the aetiology of variable responses to drug therapy. 3. The application of a pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics in general clinical practice is still far from being achieved today owing to various constraints, such as limited accessibility of technology, inadequate knowledge, ambiguity of the role of variants and ethical concerns. 4. Drug actions are determined by the interplay of several genes encoding different proteins involved in various biochemical pathways. With rapidly emerging SNP discovery technological platforms and widespread knowledge on the role of SNPs in disease susceptibility and variability in drug response, the pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics is anticipated to take off in the not-too-distant future. This will present profound clinical, economic and social implications for health care.

  15. Implications of the 750 GeV γγ Resonance as a Case Study for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keisuke [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Grojean, Christophe [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Inst. Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA) and Inst. de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE); Peskin, Michael E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barklow, Tim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gao, Yuanning [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Center for High Energy Physics; Kanemura, Shinya [Univ. of Toyama (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kim, Hyungdo [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Nojiri, Mihoko [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe; Perelstein, Maxim [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. for Elementary Particle Physics; Poschl, Roman [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL). Centre Scientifique d' Orsay; Reuter, Jurgen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Simon, Frank [Max Planck Inst. for Physics (MPP), Munich (Germany); Tanabe, Tomohiko [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). International Center for Elementary Particle Physics (ICEPP); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wells, James D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics; Falkowski, Adam [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Lab. of Theoretical Physics (LPT); Matsumoto, Shigeki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe; Moroi, Takeo [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Richard, Francois [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL). Centre Scientifique d' Orsay; Tian, Junping [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). International Center for Elementary Particle Physics (ICEPP); Vos, Marcel [Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Valencia (Spain) and Univ. of Valencia (Spain). Inst. for Corpuscular Physics (IFIC); Yokoya, Hiroshi [Korean Inst. for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of ). Quantum Universe Center; Murayama, Hitoshi [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-14

    If the γγ resonance at 750 GeV suggested by 2015 LHC data turns out to be a real effect, what are the implications for the physics case and upgrade path of the International Linear Collider? Whether or not the resonance is confirmed, this question provides an interesting case study testing the robustness of the ILC physics case. In this note, we address this question with two points: (1) Almost all models proposed for the new 750 GeV particle require additional new particles with electroweak couplings. The key elements of the 500 GeV ILC physics program - precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark, and 4-fermion interactions - will powerfully discriminate among these models. This information will be important in conjunction with new LHC data, or alone, if the new particles accompanying the 750 GeV resonance are beyond the mass reach of the LHC. (2) Over a longer term, the energy upgrade of the ILC to 1 TeV already discussed in the ILC TDR will enable experiments in γγ and e+e- collisions to directly produce and study the 750 GeV particle from these unique initial states.

  16. Implications of the 750 GeV γγ resonance as a case study for the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Grojean, Christophe; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelon; Peskin, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    If the γγ resonance at 750 GeV suggested by 2015 LHC data turns out to be a real effect, what are the implications for the physics case and upgrade path of the International Linear Collider? Whether or not the resonance is confirmed, this question provides an interesting case study testing the robustness of the ILC physics case. In this note, we address this question with two points: (1) Almost all models proposed for the new 750 GeV particle require additional new particles with electroweak couplings. The key elements of the 500 GeV ILC physics program - precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark, and 4-fermion interactions - will powerfully discriminate among these models. This information will be important in conjunction with new LHC data, or alone, if the new particles accompanying the 750 GeV resonance are beyond the mass reach of the LHC. (2) Over a longer term, the energy upgrade of the ILC to 1 TeV already discussed in the ILC TDR will enable experiments in γγ and e"+e"- collisions to directly produce and study the 750 GeV particle from these unique initial states.

  17. Case Designs for Ill-Structured Problems: Analysis and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, Nada; Blijd, Cecily Williams

    2009-01-01

    This study is a third in a series of studies that examined students' information seeking and problem solving behaviors while interacting with one of two types of web-based representations of an ill-structured instructional design case: hierarchical (tree-like) and heterarchical (network-like). A Java program was used to track students' hypermedia…

  18. The Implications of Teachers' Implicit Theories for Moral Education: A Case Study from Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Inkeri; Kuusisto, Elina; Hanhimäki, Eija; Tirri, Kirsi

    2018-01-01

    Implicit theories concerning the malleability of human qualities are known to have a powerful impact on motivation and learning, but their role in moral education is an under-researched topic. In this qualitative case study, we examined the impact of implicit theories on four Finnish teachers' practices of teaching morally and in teaching…

  19. Presumed Cases of Mumps in Pregnancy: Clinical and Infection Control Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svjetlana Lozo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a mumps outbreak in New York and New Jersey was reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Subsequently, the dissemination of the disease was rapid, and, from June 28th 2009 through January 29th 2010, a total of 1,521 cases of mumps were reported in New York and New Jersey. Seven presumed cases occurred in pregnant women cared for at our institution. Mumps diagnosis as per the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene was based on clinical manifestations, particularly parotitis. Prior immunizations with mumps vaccine and negative IgM were not adequate to rule out mumps infections. All of our seven patients had exposure to mumps in either their household or their community, and some of the them had symptoms of mumps. Due to the difficulties in interpreting serologies of these patients, their cases led to a presumed diagnosis of mumps. The diagnosis of mumps lead to the isolation of patients and health care personnel that were in contact with them. In this paper, we detail the presenting findings, diagnostic dilemmas and infection control challenges associated with presumed cases of mumps in pregnancy.

  20. Methamphetamine Exposure, Iron Deficiency, and Implications for Cognitive-Communicative Function: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lynette R.; Heiss, Cynthia J.; White, Letitia; Kaf, Wafaa A.; Becker, Alan; Schindler, Jessica B.; Dion, Nancy; Oswalt, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) exposure during fetal development has the potential to adversely affect the development of multiple organ systems. An interdisciplinary case study of a 4-year 11-month-old child born to a mother addicted to meth revealed significant cognitive and communicative delays. Possible meth-related consequences for these delays…

  1. Public health implications of using various case definitions in The Netherlands during the worldwide SARS outbreak.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timen, A.; Doornum, G.J.J. van; Schutten, M.; Conyn-van Spaendonck, M.A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Osterhaus, A.D.; Steenbergen, J.E. van

    2006-01-01

    This study analysed the consequences of deviation from the WHO case definition for the assessment of patients with suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in The Netherlands during 2003. Between 17 March and 7 July 2003, as a result of dilemmas in balancing sensitivity and specificity,

  2. (Re)Reading National Identities in School Historiographies: Pedagogical Implications from the Case of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerides, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    The article, using Cyprus as a case study, seeks to reframe disputes over the nature of national identities constituted in school historiographies and it does so by introducing a novel approach to the study of the making of identity in school history. This approach, grounded on post-foundational thinking and an inter-discursive mode of textual…

  3. Counseling a Student Presenting Borderline Personality Disorder in the Small College Context: Case Study and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Matthew R.; Faulkner, Ginger E.

    2009-01-01

    This case study examines the dynamics and challenges associated with counseling a client experiencing borderline personality disorder in the small college institutional context. The work of counseling centers at small private institutions has been relatively unexplored in the extant college counseling literature. To help fill this gap, the current…

  4. Educational Implications of the Subtle Late Effects of Childhood Leukemia Medical Treatment: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavach, John F.; Hart, Juliet E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a four-year longitudinal case study of a nine-year-old student when he was diagnosed with leukemia. Cognitive, neuropsychological, and affective functioning both pre and post chemotherapy treatment were assessed. Full neuropsychological evaluation revealed difficulties with processing speed, concentration, and organization…

  5. Yessotoxin, a Promising Therapeutic Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yessotoxin (YTX is a polyether compound produced by dinoflagellates and accumulated in filter feeding shellfish. No records about human intoxications induced by this compound have been published, however it is considered a toxin. Modifications in second messenger levels, protein levels, immune cells, cytoskeleton or activation of different cellular death types have been published as consequence of YTX exposure. This review summarizes the main intracellular pathways modulated by YTX and their pharmacological and therapeutic implications.

  6. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-04-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to produce the "Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases" to promote the exceptional competence and diligence required when the consequence is life or death. This article summarizes the "Supplementary Guidelines," with implications for social work practice--that is, professional responsibility, competence, interviewing skill, knowledge of behavioral and mental impairment, records review, life history compilation, data interpretation, witness support, law-related knowledge, and testimony. The social work, which is scrutinized in a court of law, requires cultural competence, diverse oral and written communication skills, diligence, and the highest ethical standards.

  7. The Short-term Therapeutic Effect of the Three-part Massotherapy for Insomnia Due to Deficiency of Both the Heart and the Spleen- A Report of 100 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the short-term therapeutic effect of the three-part massotherapy on insomnia due to deficiency of both the heart and spleen. Methods: Two hundred cases were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group, each consisting of 100 cases. Patients in the treatment group were treated with the three-part massotherapy, while those in the control group with oral administration of Guipi Wan (归脾丸Pill for Invigorating the Spleen and Nourishing the Heart). The total clinical therapeutic effects, the total scores of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) of the treatment group were compared with those of the control group. Results: After the treatment, the total therapeutic effects, PSQI, SAS, and SDS of the two groups all showed significant improvement (P<0.01), and the scores of the treatment group were superior to those of the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: The three-part massotherapy has definite therapeutic effects on insomnia due to deficiency of both the heart and the spleen, which is safe and easy to operate, and worthy of popularization.

  8. Therapeutic implications of recombinant human erythropoietin in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-12-29

    Dec 29, 2006 ... quence of both, RHUEPO has achieved the highest annual sales ... analysis of the US Medicare database (Ma et al., 1999) ... blood transfusions and improves quality of life (Eschbach, ... Large doses of EPO results increase in blood pressure .... human erythropoietin was obtained from human genomic.

  9. Imaging of hamstring injuries: therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koulouris, George [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and General Diagnostic Imaging, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Connell, David [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Though recent research into the diagnosis and management of hamstring disorders has resulted in early and accurate recognition of injury, hamstring strain remains the most common form of muscle injury in the active population. With prompt recognition of hamstring strain, an appropriate rest and rehabilitation routine may be devised by the sports clinician in the hope of avoiding future and possibly more debilitating injury. As such, imaging has played a pivotal role in assisting athletes, both elite and recreational, in returning to activity expeditiously. (orig.)

  10. Imaging of hamstring injuries: therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koulouris, George; Connell, David

    2006-01-01

    Though recent research into the diagnosis and management of hamstring disorders has resulted in early and accurate recognition of injury, hamstring strain remains the most common form of muscle injury in the active population. With prompt recognition of hamstring strain, an appropriate rest and rehabilitation routine may be devised by the sports clinician in the hope of avoiding future and possibly more debilitating injury. As such, imaging has played a pivotal role in assisting athletes, both elite and recreational, in returning to activity expeditiously. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of penile traumas - therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolotto, Michele; Calderan, Loretta; Cova, Maria Assunta [Universita di Trieste, UCO di Radiologia, Trieste (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    Injury to the penis may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating trauma. Nonpenetrating injury to the erect penis can produce albugineal tear, intracavernous hematoma or extraalbugineal hematoma from rupture of the dorsal vessels. Nonpenetrating injury to the flaccid penis usually follows blunt perineal traumas producing extratunical or cavernosal haematomas, or cavernosal artery tear followed by high flow priapism. Differential diagnosis between albugineal tear and other penile injuries must be obtained as soon as possible, since early surgical repair of albugineal tear reduces significantly the rate of postraumatic curvature and fibrosis. Ultrasonography (US) is able to detect the exact site of the tear in most patients as an interruption of the thin echogenic line of the tunica albuginea. Other imaging techniques are rarely required in the clinical practice. Color Doppler US is the imaging modality of choice to evaluate patients with high flow priapism. Focal or diffuse cavernosal fibrosis can be identified with US as echogenic areas in the cavernosal bodies. Postraumatic erectile dysfunction can result from fibrotic changes, nerve and vascular impairment or both. Doppler evaluation of penile vasculature is required in young patients with postraumatic impotence before surgical revascularization procedures. (orig.)

  12. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  13. Categorisation of Colour Terms Using New Validation Tools: A Case Study and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Shabnam; Brindle, Jonathan A.; Matusiak, Barbara S.; Klöckner, Christian A.

    2018-01-01

    This article elaborates on the results of a field experiment conducted among speakers of the Chakali language, spoken in northern Ghana. In the original study, the Color-aid Corporation Chart was used to perform the focal task in which consultants were asked to point at a single colour tile on the chart. However, data from the focal task could not be analysed since the Color-aid tiles had not yet been converted into numerical values set forth by the Commission internationale de l’éclairage (CIE). In this study, the full set of 314 Color-aid tiles were measured for chromaticity and converted into the CIE values at the Daylight Laboratory of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. This article presents the conversion methodology and makes the results of the measurements, which are available in the Online Appendix. We argue that some visual-perception terms cannot be reliably ascribed to colour categories established by the Color-aid Corporation. This suggests that the ideophonic expressions in the dataset do not denote ‘colours’, as categorised in the Color-aid system, as it was impossible to average the consultants’ data into a CIE chromaticity diagram, illustrate the phenomena on the Natural Colour System (NCS) Circle and Triangle diagrams, and conduct a statistical analysis. One of the implications of this study is that a line between a visual-perception term and a colour term could be systematically established using a method with predefined categorical thresholds. PMID:29755718

  14. Policy implications of achievement testing using multilevel models: The case of Brazilian elementary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Gomes Menezes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale educational assessment has been established as source of descriptive, evaluative and interpretative information that influence educational policies worldwide throughout the last third of the 20th century. In the 1990s the Brazilian Ministry of Education developed the National Basic Education Assessment System (SAEB that regularly measures management, resource and contextual school features and academic achievement in public and private institutions. In 2005, after significant piloting and review of the SAEB, a new sampling strategy was taken and Prova Brasil became the new instrument used by the Ministry to assess skills in Portuguese (reading comprehension and Mathematics (problem solving, as well as collecting contextual information concerning the school, principal, teacher, and the students. This study aims to identify which variables are predictors of academic achievement of fifth grade students on Prova Brasil. Across a large sample of students, multilevel models tested a large number of variables relevant to student achievement. This approach uncovered critical variables not commonly seen as significant in light of other achievement determinants, including student habits, teacher ethnicity, and school technological resources. As such, this approach demonstrates the value of MLM to appropriately nuanced educational policies that reflect critical influences on student achievement. Its implications for wider application for psychology studies that may have relevant impacts for policy are also discussed.

  15. The Extent and Implications of the Microclimatic Conditions in the Urban Environment: A Vienna Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Vuckovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent challenges in the realm of urban studies concern better understanding of microclimatic conditions. Changes in urban climate affect cities at local and global scales, with consequences for human health, thermal comfort, building energy use, and anthropogenic emissions. The extent of these impacts may vary due to different morphologies and materials of the built environment. The present contribution summarizes the results of a multi-year effort concerned with the extent and implications of urban heat in Vienna, Austria. For this purpose, high-resolution weather data across six locations are obtained and analyzed. This allowed for an objective assessment of urban-level climatic circumstances across distinct low-density and high-density typologies. Subsequently, a systematic framework was developed for identification of essential properties of the built environment (geometric and material-related that are hypothesized to influence microclimate variation. Results point to a number of related (positive and negative correlations with microclimatic tendencies. Additionally, the impact of this location-specific weather data on building performance simulation results is evaluated. The results suggest that buildings' thermal performance is significantly influenced by location-specific microclimatic conditions with variation of mean annual heating load across locations of up to 16.1 kWhm−2·a−1. The use of location-independent weather data sources (e.g., standardized weather files for building performance estimations can, thus, result in considerable errors.

  16. Categorisation of Colour Terms Using New Validation Tools: A Case Study and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Shabnam; Brindle, Jonathan A; Matusiak, Barbara S; Klöckner, Christian A

    2018-01-01

    This article elaborates on the results of a field experiment conducted among speakers of the Chakali language, spoken in northern Ghana. In the original study, the Color-aid Corporation Chart was used to perform the focal task in which consultants were asked to point at a single colour tile on the chart. However, data from the focal task could not be analysed since the Color-aid tiles had not yet been converted into numerical values set forth by the Commission internationale de l'éclairage (CIE). In this study, the full set of 314 Color-aid tiles were measured for chromaticity and converted into the CIE values at the Daylight Laboratory of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. This article presents the conversion methodology and makes the results of the measurements, which are available in the Online Appendix. We argue that some visual-perception terms cannot be reliably ascribed to colour categories established by the Color-aid Corporation. This suggests that the ideophonic expressions in the dataset do not denote 'colours', as categorised in the Color-aid system, as it was impossible to average the consultants' data into a CIE chromaticity diagram, illustrate the phenomena on the Natural Colour System (NCS) Circle and Triangle diagrams, and conduct a statistical analysis. One of the implications of this study is that a line between a visual-perception term and a colour term could be systematically established using a method with predefined categorical thresholds.

  17. Implications of Switching Fossil Fuel Subsidies to Solar: A Case Study for the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Sampedro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fuel subsidies (FFS constitute one of the most obvious barriers to tackling climate change, as they encourage inefficient energy consumption and divert investment away from clean energy sources. According to the International Monetary Fund, FFS amounted globally to $233 billion in 2014, over four times the value of subsidies awarded to promote renewable energy. In this study an integrated assessment model is used to analyse the CO2 implications in the European Union of eliminating FFS and recycling the revenues to promote rooftop PV. It is found that eliminating FFS would give rise to a small reduction in CO2 due to fuel-switching from coal to gas. If the revenues were recycled to promote solar, then the CO2 reduction would increase from 1.8% to 2.2% by 2030. Eliminating FFS is not a panacea from the mitigation point of view, even if the revenues are recycled, but other important objectives, such as those related to renewable energy promotion and the reduction of air pollution, are advanced at zero cost for the government.

  18. Pharmacogenomics and migraine: possible implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Brosen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the science about how inherited factors influence the effects of drugs. Drug response is always a result of mutually interacting genes with important modifications from environmental and constitutional factors. Based on the genetic variability of pharmacokinetic and in some...... cases pharmacodynamic variability we mention possible implications for the acute and preventive treatment of migraine. Pharmacogenomics will most likely in the future be one part of our therapeutic armamentarium and will provide a stronger scientific basis for optimizing drug therapy on the basis...

  19. Genetic Relatedness among Nontypeable Pneumococci Implicated in Sporadic Cases of Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Jason H.; Musher, Daniel M.; Silberman, Ronald; Phan, Hoang M.; Watson, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of epidemic conjunctivitis. A previous molecular fingerprinting study identified a clone of nontypeable pneumococcus that was responsible for a recent outbreak of conjunctivitis. In the present study, we examined the extent to which pneumococci that cause sporadic cases of conjunctivitis are related to this epidemic strain. Using arbitrarily primed BOX-PCR, we have determined that, of 10 nontypeable pneumococci causing sporadic conjunctiv...

  20. Cost-effectiveness implications based on a comparison of nursing home and home health case mix.

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, A M; Shaughnessy, P W; Pettigrew, M L

    1985-01-01

    Case-mix differences between 653 home health care patients and 650 nursing home patients, and between 455 Medicare home health patients and 447 Medicare nursing home patients were assessed using random samples selected from 20 home health agencies and 46 nursing homes in 12 states in 1982 and 1983. Home health patients were younger, had shorter lengths of stay, and were less functionally disabled than nursing home patients. Traditional long-term care problems requiring personal care were more...

  1. Cytomegalovirus implicated in a case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfeir, Maroun

    2015-08-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis, also known as PORN, has been described as a variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy, occurring particularly in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Although the etiologic organism has been reported to be Varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV) can be an etiologic agent. Our case illustrates the occurrence of two opportunistic infections: PORN associated with CMV and Mycobacterium avium intracellulare duodenitis in a patient with uncontrolled HIV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Financial Regulation: Case Studies and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Coates, John

    2015-01-01

    Some members of Congress, the D.C. Circuit, and legal academia are promoting a particular, abstract form of cost-benefit analysis for financial regulation: judicially enforced quantification. How would CBA work in practice, if applied to specific, important, representative rules, and what is the alternative? Detailed case studies of six rules – (1) disclosure rules under Sarbanes-Oxley Section 404, (2) the SEC’s mutual fund governance reforms, (3) Basel III’s heightened capital requirements f...

  3. A case study of polypharmacy management in nine European countries: Implications for change management and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Jennifer; Alonso, Albert; MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek; Kempen, Thomas; Mair, Alpana; Castel-Branco, Margarida; Codina, Carles; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Fleming, Glenda; Gennimata, Dimitra; Gillespie, Ulrika; Harrison, Cathy; Illario, Maddalena; Junius-Walker, Ulrike; Kampolis, Christos F; Kardas, Przemyslaw; Lewek, Pawel; Malva, João; Menditto, Enrica; Scullin, Claire; Wiese, Birgitt

    2018-01-01

    Multimorbidity and its associated polypharmacy contribute to an increase in adverse drug events, hospitalizations, and healthcare spending. This study aimed to address: what exists regarding polypharmacy management in the European Union (EU); why programs were, or were not, developed; and, how identified initiatives were developed, implemented, and sustained. Change management principles (Kotter) and normalization process theory (NPT) informed data collection and analysis. Nine case studies were conducted in eight EU countries: Germany (Lower Saxony), Greece, Italy (Campania), Poland, Portugal, Spain (Catalonia), Sweden (Uppsala), and the United Kingdom (Northern Ireland and Scotland). The workflow included a review of country/region specific polypharmacy policies, key informant interviews with stakeholders involved in policy development and implementation and, focus groups of clinicians and managers. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis of individual cases and framework analysis across cases. Polypharmacy initiatives were identified in five regions (Catalonia, Lower Saxony, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Uppsala) and included all care settings. There was agreement, even in cases without initiatives, that polypharmacy is a significant issue to address. Common themes regarding the development and implementation of polypharmacy management initiatives were: locally adapted solutions, organizational culture supporting innovation and teamwork, adequate workforce training, multidisciplinary teams, changes in workflow, redefinition of roles and responsibilities of professionals, policies and legislation supporting the initiative, and data management and information and communication systems to assist development and implementation. Depending on the setting, these were considered either facilitators or barriers to implementation. Within the studied EU countries, polypharmacy management was not widely addressed. These results highlight the importance of change

  4. Environmental implications of decarbonising electricity supply in large economies: The case of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoyo-Castelazo, Edgar; Stamford, Laurence; Azapagic, Adisa

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Life cycle impacts of decarbonising electricity supply in Mexico estimated. • Eleven scenarios considered to 2050 with different technologies and GHG targets. • Continuing with business as usual would double current life cycle GHG emissions. • Life cycle impacts can be reduced by 80% with increased renewables, nuclear and CCS. • Demand reduction important but on its own cannot help achieve Mexican GHG targets. - Abstract: Driven by the security of supply and climate change concerns, decarbonisation of energy supply has become a priority for many countries. This study focuses on Mexico, the world’s 14th largest economy, and considers the environmental implications of decarbonising its electricity supply. Eleven scenarios are considered for the year 2050 with different technology mixes and GHG reduction targets, ranging from stabilisation at the year 2000 level to a reduction of 60–85%. Unlike most energy scenario analyses which focus mainly on direct CO 2 or GHG emissions, this paper presents the full life cycle impacts of electricity generation in 2050 considering ten environmental impacts which, in addition to global warming, include resource and ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, summer smog, human and eco-toxicity. The results indicate that continuing with business as usual (BAU) would double the current life cycle GHG emissions, even if annual electricity demand growth was reduced to 2.25% from the current 2.8%. Switching from the current fossil fuel mix to a higher contribution of renewables (55–86%) and nuclear power (up to 30%) would lead to a significant reduction of all ten life cycle impacts compared to the current situation and up to an 80% reduction compared to BAU

  5. The Use of Case Based Multiple Choice Questions for Assessing Large Group Teaching: Implications on Student's Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Donnelly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The practice of assessments in third level education is extremely important and a rarely disputed part of the university curriculum as a method to demonstrate a student’s learning. However, assessments to test a student’s knowledge and level of understanding are challenging to apply given recent trends which are showing that student numbers are increasing, student demographics are wide ranging and resources are being stretched. As a result of these emerging challenges, lecturers are required to develop a comprehensive assessment to effectively demonstrate student learning, whilst efficiently managing large class sizes. One form of assessment which has been used for efficient assessment is multiple choice questions (MCQs; however this method has been criticised for encouraging surface learning, in comparison to other methods such as essays or case studies. This research explores the impact of blended assessment methods on student learning. This study adopts a rigorous three-staged qualitative methodology to capture third level lecturers’ and students’ perception to (1 the level of learning when using MCQs; (2 the level of learning when blended assessment in the form of case based MCQs are used. The findings illuminate the positive impact of cased based MCQs as students and lecturers suggest that it leads to a higher level of learning and deeper information processing over that of MCQs without case studies. 2 The implications of this research is that this type of assessment contributes to the current thinking within literature on the use of assessments methods, as well as the blending of assessment methods to reach a higher level of learning. It further serves to reinforce the belief that assessments are the greatest influence on students’ learning, and the requirement for both universities and lecturers to reflect on the best form of assessment to test students’ level of understanding, whilst also balancing the real challenges of

  6. NRASQ61K mutated primary leptomeningeal melanoma in a child: case presentation and discussion on clinical and diagnostic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelino, Giulia; De Pasquale, Maria Debora; De Sio, Luigi; Serra, Annalisa; Massimi, Luca; De Vito, Rita; Marrazzo, Antonio; Lancella, Laura; Carai, Andrea; Antonelli, Manila; Giangaspero, Felice; Gessi, Marco; Menchini, Laura; Scarciolla, Laura; Longo, Daniela; Mastronuzzi, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Primary melanocytic neoplasms are rare in the pediatric age. Among them, the pattern of neoplastic meningitis represents a peculiar diagnostic challenge since neuroradiological features may be subtle and cerebrospinal fluid analysis may not be informative. Clinical misdiagnosis of neoplastic meningitis with tuberculous meningitis has been described in few pediatric cases, leading to a significant delay in appropriate management of patients. We describe the case of a child with primary leptomeningeal melanoma (LMM) that was initially misdiagnosed with tuberculous meningitis. We review the clinical and molecular aspects of LMM and discuss on clinical and diagnostic implications. A 27-month-old girl with a 1-week history of vomiting with mild intermittent strabismus underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging, showing diffuse brainstem and spinal leptomeningeal enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was unremarkable. Antitubercular treatment was started without any improvement. A spinal intradural biopsy was suggestive for primary leptomeningeal melanomatosis. Chemotherapy was started, but general clinical conditions progressively worsened and patient died 11 months after diagnosis. Molecular investigations were performed post-mortem on tumor tissue and revealed absence of BRAF V600E , GNAQ Q209 and GNA11 Q209 mutations but the presence of a NRAS Q61K mutation. Our case adds some information to the limited experience of the literature, confirming the presence of the NRAS Q61K mutation in children with melanomatosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of leptomeningeal melanocytic neoplasms (LMN) without associated skin lesions to harbor this mutation. Isolated LMN presentation might be insidious, mimicking tuberculous meningitis, and should be suspected if no definite diagnosis is possible or if antitubercular treatment does not result in dramatic clinical improvement. Leptomeningeal biopsy should be considered, not only to confirm diagnosis of LMN but also to study

  7. Genetic Relatedness among Nontypeable Pneumococci Implicated in Sporadic Cases of Conjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jason H.; Musher, Daniel M.; Silberman, Ronald; Phan, Hoang M.; Watson, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of epidemic conjunctivitis. A previous molecular fingerprinting study identified a clone of nontypeable pneumococcus that was responsible for a recent outbreak of conjunctivitis. In the present study, we examined the extent to which pneumococci that cause sporadic cases of conjunctivitis are related to this epidemic strain. Using arbitrarily primed BOX-PCR, we have determined that, of 10 nontypeable pneumococci causing sporadic conjunctivitis, 5 were clonal and closely related to a previous outbreak strain, whereas 5 others were genetically diverse. PMID:10565927

  8. Anaesthetic Implications in Primary Hyperparathyroidism with Severe Hypercalcaemia; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Bansal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare endocrinal disorder of excess production of parathormone. A wide array of presenting symptoms may occur from parathormone induced hypercalcaemia leading to nephrolithiasis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness and cardiac arrhythmias. We present a case of young female who presented with non union of an operated fracture femur and generalized bony pains and frequent complaints of vomiting, polyuria and polydipsia. She was diagnosed to have primary hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcaemia and underwent parathyroidectomy. The potential perioperative problems and anaesthetic concerns require a focused management and are discussed.

  9. Geoethical implications for geoarchaeology. The Laacher See and AD 536 case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Felix; Price, Neil; Andersen, Per

    2017-04-01

    Environmental catastrophes represent profound challenges faced by societies today. Numerous scholars in the climate sciences as well as the Humanities have argued for a greater ethical engagement with these pressing issues. At the same time, several disciplines concerned with hazards are moving towards formalized ethical codes or promises that guide not only the dissemination of data but oblige scientists to relate to fundamentally political issues. With its starting point in the recently proposed geoethical promise, this paper reports on two case studies of how past natural hazards have affected vulnerable societies in Europe's past. We ask whether cases of past calamities and their societal effects should not play a greater role in public debates and whether geo-archaeologists working with past environmental hazards should be more outspoken in their ethical considerations. We offer no firm answers, but suggest that geo-archaeologists engage with debates of human-environment relations at this interface between politics, public affairs and science. We argue for greater communication between the human and natural sciences and further suggest that outreach institutions such as museums - both natural and cultural - could and perhaps should play a key role in staging such engagements.

  10. The Implications of Victimhood Identity: The Case of ‘Persecution’ of Swedish Hunters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica von Essen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This ethnographically based study examines Swedish hunters’ claims to victimhood through appeal to the term ‘persecution’. Perceiving disenfranchisement, injustice and discrimination on the basis of wolf conservation policy, we present hunters’ self-styled predicament as victimhood-claimants of persecution at the hands of a state that has been co-opted by a conservationist, pro-wolf agenda that systematically disenfranchises rural and hunting interests and lifestyles. Through the phenomenological accounts of hunter respondents, our paper takes seriously the hunters’ perception of persecution and, likewise, considers the opposite case made by conservationists: that wolves have been, and continue to be, the real victims of persecution in the conflict. Nonetheless, we show that the persecution language as it is applied from opposing parties in the conflict is problematic inasmuch as it is focused around creating a moral panic and confusion among the Swedish public who are ultimately responsible, as a democratic body-politic, for assessing the legitimacy of claims to moral wrong-doing and legal redress for the wronged. Our case study joins scholarship that explores the pathologies of claims to victimization

  11. Cybersecurity Implications for Industry, Academia, and Parents: A Qualitative Case Study in NSF STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Gregory V.

    Rationale: Former President Barack Obama's 3.9 trillion for the 2015 fiscal year budget request included a 2.9 billion investment in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education. Research then showed that the national spending for cybersecurity has exceeded $10.7 billion in the 2015 fiscal year. Nonetheless, the number of cyberattacks has risen year after year since 2012, potentially due to the lack of education and training in cybersecurity. Methodology: A qualitative case study research was conducted to explore and investigate the lived professional experiences of experts from San Antonio Texas whose efforts were aligned to increase the number of qualified cybersecurity professionals. To qualify the organizational needs for cybersecurity professionals, the study gathered expert opinions by surveying human resource managers pertaining to the needs of cybersecurity education. To refine and further validate data collection efforts, the study involved researcher observations and a survey of a narrow cohort to perform analytic induction to eliminate bias and exhaust the exploratory research (Maxwell, 2005). Result: The findings of the case study will: 1) help augment the importance of cybersecurity education in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade, 2) be utilized as a single guide for school leaders in the process of developing cybersecurity education strategies, and 3) in the longer term, be used by the National Sciences Foundation (NSF) as an effective model to institute cybersecurity education practices nationwide and thereby reduce the existing trouble of the nation by criminal cyber actors.

  12. Policy and programmatic implications of task shifting in Uganda: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambisya Yoswa M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uganda has a severe health worker shortage and a high demand for health care services. This study aimed to assess the policy and programmatic implications of task shifting in Uganda. Methods This was a qualitative, descriptive study through 34 key informant interviews and eight (8 focus group discussions, with participants from various levels of the health system. Results Policy makers understood task shifting, but front-line health workers had misconceptions on the meaning and intention(s of task shifting. Examples were cited of task shifting within the Ugandan health system, some formalized (e.g. psychiatric clinical officers, and some informal ones (e.g. nurses inserting IV lines and initiating treatment. There was apparently high acceptance of task shifting in HIV/AIDS service delivery, with involvement of community health workers (CHW and PLWHA in care and support of AIDS patients. There was no written policy or guidelines on task shifting, but the policy environment was reportedly conducive with plans to develop a policy and guidelines on task shifting. Factors favouring task shifting included successful examples of task shifting, proper referral channels, the need for services, scarcity of skills and focused initiatives such as home based management of fever. Barriers to task shifting included reluctance to change, protection of professional turf, professional boundaries and regulations, heavy workload and high disease burden, poor planning, lack of a task shifting champion, lack of guidelines, the name task shifting itself, and unemployed health professionals. There were both positive and negative views on task shifting: the positive ones cast task shifting as one of the solutions to the dual problem of lack of skills and high demand for service, and as something that is already happening; while negative ones saw it as a quick fix intended for the poor, a threat to quality care and likely to compromise the health

  13. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Tomar

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma (RB is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59 while only 42.4% (25/59 of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9% of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1% in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41 of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59 of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and

  14. Hydrotherapy for the long-term ventilated patient: A case study and implications for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Sally; Thomas, Peter; James, Christine

    2017-11-01

    Hydrotherapy of mechanically ventilated patients has been shown to be safe and feasible in both the acute stages of critical illness and in those requiring long term mechanical ventilation. This case study describes the hydrotherapy sessions of a 36 year old female, who after suffering complications of pneumococcal meningitis, became an incomplete quadriplegic and required long term mechanical ventilation. When implementing hydrotherapy with patients on mechanical ventilation a number of factors should be considered. These include staff resources and training, airway and ventilation management, patient preparation and safety procedures. Hydrotherapy can be safely utilised with mechanically ventilated patients, and may facilitate a patient's ability to participate in active exercise and rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Implications of post-gadolinium MRI results in 13 cases with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Hayakawa, Minako

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a relative lack of definitive information about the contrast-enhancement characteristics of lesions in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Objective: Evaluation of contrast-enhanced MRI findings in PRES with a special emphasis on pathophysiology of post-gadolinium behavior of these lesions. Materials and methods: Contrast-enhanced 1.5 T MRI findings and relevant clinical data of the patients were retrospectively reviewed on 13 cases (six males, seven females; age range: 22-78; mean age 47). Although fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion-weighted MR images were considered for identification of the entity, primarily post-contrast T1-weighted MR images were searched for traces of enhancement in the lesions. Results: No definitely enhancing lesion was identified in the MR images obtained in 6-48 h after onset of symptoms (mostly headaches, seizures and cortical visual field deficits) in this series. Severity of disease indicated by small hemorrhages, confluence of lesions or progression to cytotoxic edema did not seem to alter this result. Typical lesion characteristics were consistent with vasogenic edema on FLAIR and diffusion MR images. Acute elevation of blood pressure on chronic hypertensive background was responsible in four, eclampsia in three, uremia with blood pressure fluctuations in three, and cyclosporine-toxicity in three cases. Conclusion: Although occasional enhancing brain lesions have been reported in the literature on PRES, contrast-enhancement of lesions may be a factor of scan timing and underlying etiology. Prospective studies with larger series on PRES are required for better evaluation of contrast-enhancement in MRI with respect to scan timing, which in turn may help understand its pathophysiology better

  16. A case of ultrasound-guided prenatal diagnosis of prune belly syndrome in Papua New Guinea – implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital malformation of unknown aetiology and is characterised by abnormalities of the urinary tract, a deficiency of abdominal musculature and bilateral cryptorchidism in males. We report a case of prune belly syndrome from Papua New Guinea, which was suspected on pregnancy ultrasound scan and confirmed upon delivery. Case presentation A 26-year-old married woman, Gravida 3 Para 2, presented to antenatal clinic in Madang, Papua New Guinea, at 21+5 weeks’ gestation by dates. She was well with no past medical or family history of note. She gave consent to participate in a clinical trial on prevention of malaria in pregnancy and underwent repeated ultrasound examinations which revealed a live fetus with persistent megacystis and anhydramnios. Both mother and clinicians agreed on conservative management of the congenital abnormality. The mother spontaneously delivered a male fetus weighing 2010 grams at 34 weeks’ gestation with grossly abnormal genitalia including cryptorchidism, penile aplasia and an absent urethral meatus, absent abdominal muscles and hypoplastic lungs. The infant passed away two hours after delivery. This report discusses the implications of prenatal detection of severe congenital abnormalities in PNG. Conclusion This first, formally reported, case of prune belly syndrome from a resource-limited setting in the Oceania region highlights the importance of identifying and documenting congenital abnormalities. Women undergoing antenatal ultrasound examinations must be carefully counseled on the purpose and the limitations of the scan. The increasing use of obstetric ultrasound in PNG will inevitably result in a rise in prenatal detection of congenital abnormalities. This will need to be met with adequate training, referral mechanisms and better knowledge of women’s attitudes and beliefs on birth defects and ultrasound. National medicolegal guidance regarding induced abortion and resuscitation of a

  17. Use of anteromedial thigh perforator flap and immunological implications of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, A; Calamita, R; Tartaglione, C; Bolletta, E; Di Benedetto, G; Pierangeli, M

    2016-12-02

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is mainly characterised by the development of numerous multicentric and relapsing cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). A major problem for patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is the large amount of BCCs that can invade the deep underlying structures, especially the face. Here, we describe the case of a 23-year-old male affected by Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. He had recurrent BCCs on a hairless scalp and dorsum since he was 17 years old and underwent four surgical procedures to excise BCCs, including a reconstruction with anteromedial thigh perforator flap. For each of the surgical procedures, a phenotypic study on peripheral blood mononuclear cells using flow cytometry was performed on the same day of surgery, and on days 7, 14 and 21 after surgery. The role of the tumour-specific cytolytic immune response as a potential future treatment of syndromic BCCs and its trend in relation to surgical ablation of large portions of tumour tissue was examined, and the cosmetic and therapeutic results are shown.

  18. Trifid nasopalatine canal: case report of a rare anatomical variation and its surgical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guanaes Gomes Torres, Marianna; Crusoé-Rebello, Margarida Iêda; Faro Valverde, Ludmila de; Torres Andion Vidal, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The nasopalatine canal is a long slender structure present in the midline of the anterior maxilla that connects the palate to the floor of the nasal cavity. The nasopalatine canal contains the nasopalatine nerve, the terminal branch of the nasopalatine artery, fibrous connective tissue, adipose tissue, and minor salivary glands. The purpose of this article was to report a case of a trifid nasopalatine canal detected by cone beam computed tomography prior to dental implant placement. A 47-year-old female patient was submitted to cone beam computed tomography. Axial and sagittal sections revealed a trifurcation of the nasopalatine canal. Each canal was separated from the other by bony septa and extended independently from the floor of the nasal cavity to the incisive foramen in the remnant of the alveolar process in the anterior region of the maxilla. Cone beam computed tomography has permitted better visualization of the details and anatomical variations of the nasopalatine canal. Detailed knowledge of variations in the shape, number and size of the nasopalatine canal is fundamental for surgical procedures, such as local anesthesia in the anterior maxillary region and placement of dental implants, in order to prevent damage to important arteries and nerves. (author)

  19. Significance of Perceived Social Expectation and Implications to Conservation Education: Turtle Conservation as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Alex Y.; Chow, Alex T.; Cheung, Sze Man

    2012-11-01

    The likelihood of participating in wildlife conservation programs is dependent on social influences and circumstances. This view is validated by a case study of behavioral intention to support conservation of Asian turtles. A total of 776 college students in China completed a questionnaire survey designed to identify factors associated with their intention to support conservation. A regression model explained 48 % of variance in the level of intention. Perceived social expectation was the strongest predictor, followed by attitudes toward turtle protection and perceived behavioral control, altogether explaining 44 %. Strong ethics and socio-economic variables had some statistical significant impacts and accounted for 3 % of the variance. The effects of general environmental awareness, trust and responsibility ascription were modest. Knowledge about turtles was a weak predictor. We conclude that perceived social expectation is a limiting factor of conservation behavior. Sustained interest and commitment to conservation can be created by enhancing positive social influences. Conservation educators should explore the potential of professionally supported, group-based actions that can nurture a sense of collective achievement as part of an educational campaign.

  20. Sovereign Adaptive Risk Modeling and Implications for the Eurozone GREXIT Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Escalera

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the Financial Stability Board (FSB and the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS created a list of systemically important financial institutions (SIFIs with the intention of determining which financial institutions were important enough to the global market that their failure would result in systemic collapse. In this work, we create a model that modifies the BCBS’s five indicators of size, interconnectedness, cross-jurisdictional activities, complexity, and substitutability and apply these measures of systemic stress to governments. Although the cross-jurisdictional activities and size were almost identical to the SIFI calculations, the others had to be adapted to mirror the intent of the BCBS. Interconnectedness is calculated by simulation of what would happen to nearby countries if a country defaulted. Substitutability is estimated by the number of services that would no longer be provided if the government ceased to exist. Complexity is market-based and is derived from credit default swap (CDS spreads. The original application of the model was to track the systemic interdependence of the Eurozone, with particular emphasis on the case of Greece. We anticipate that this model can be used in regional fiscal situations beyond the Eurozone.

  1. Case Study of R-1234yf Refrigerant: Implications for the Framework for Responsible Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzisz, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    Safety and care for the natural environment are two of the most important values that drive scientific enterprise in twentieth century. Researchers and innovators often develop new technologies aimed at pollution reduction, and therefore satisfy the strive for fulfilment of these values. This work is often incentivized by policy makers. According to EU directive 2006/40/EC on mobile air conditioning since 2013 all newly approved vehicles have to be filled with refrigerant with low global warming potential (GWP). Extensive and expensive research financed by leading car manufacturers led to invention of R-1234yf refrigerant with GWP marketing. Secondly, I examine framework for responsible innovation. In greater detail I discuss the notions of care for future generations and collective responsibility. Thirdly, I apply the offered framework to the case study at hand. Finally, I draw some conclusions which go in two directions: one is to make some suggestions for improving the framework of RI, and the second is to identify missed opportunities for developing truly responsible refrigerant.

  2. Adaptive transgenerational plasticity in plants: case studies, mechanisms, and implications for natural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob J. Herman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to environmental conditions not only by plastic changes to their own development and physiology, but also by altering the phenotypes expressed by their offspring. This transgenerational plasticity was initially considered to entail only negative effects of stressful parental environments, such as production of smaller seeds by resource- or temperature-stressed parent plants, and was therefore viewed as environmental noise. Recent evolutionary ecology studies have shown that in some cases, these inherited environmental effects can include specific growth adjustments that are functionally adaptive to the parental conditions that induced them, which can range from contrasting states of controlled laboratory environments to the complex habitat variation encountered by natural plant populations. Preliminary findings suggest that adaptive transgenerational effects can be transmitted by means of diverse mechanisms including changes to seed provisioning and biochemistry, and epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation that can persist across multiple generations. These non-genetically inherited adaptations can influence the ecological breadth and evolutionary dynamics of plant taxa and promote the spread of invasive plants. Interdisciplinary studies that join mechanistic and evolutionary ecology approaches will be an important source of future insights.

  3. Adaptive transgenerational plasticity in plants: case studies, mechanisms, and implications for natural populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jacob J; Sultan, Sonia E

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond to environmental conditions not only by plastic changes to their own development and physiology, but also by altering the phenotypes expressed by their offspring. This transgenerational plasticity was initially considered to entail only negative effects of stressful parental environments, such as production of smaller seeds by resource- or temperature-stressed parent plants, and was therefore viewed as environmental noise. Recent evolutionary ecology studies have shown that in some cases, these inherited environmental effects can include specific growth adjustments that are functionally adaptive to the parental conditions that induced them, which can range from contrasting states of controlled laboratory environments to the complex habitat variation encountered by natural plant populations. Preliminary findings suggest that adaptive transgenerational effects can be transmitted by means of diverse mechanisms including changes to seed provisioning and biochemistry, and epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation that can persist across multiple generations. These non-genetically inherited adaptations can influence the ecological breadth and evolutionary dynamics of plant taxa and promote the spread of invasive plants. Interdisciplinary studies that join mechanistic and evolutionary ecology approaches will be an important source of future insights.

  4. Analysis of dental injuries with clinical implications: A forensic case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Si-Lei; Peng, Shu-Ya; Wan, Lei; Chen, Jie-Min; Xia, Wen-Tao

    2018-01-01

    Dental injuries, especially of the incisors, caused by punches in violent criminal attacks could be seen in daily forensic casework involving the identification of injuries to a living body. Sometimes, when there is neither circumstantial evidence nor information about the surrounding circumstances, it is difficult to discern the cause of these injuries and the manner in which they were inflicted. As an example of clinical forensic medicine, we present the case of a 58-year-old woman whose teeth were injured when fighting with her son-in-law over household affairs with no witnesses present. The two parties had conflicting stories about the cause of the woman's injury. The woman claimed that her teeth were lost while she was being beaten by her son-in-law, and the man argued that the damage to his mother-in-law's teeth was self-inflicted when she bit his fingers. The police attending the crime called for a forensic examination. Forensic practitioners analysed the mechanism of the tooth loss using multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) and imaging reconstruction technology. Local alveolar bone (medial alveolar) fracture and a small area of alveolar bone loss were found on MSCT. Thus, forensic medical experts speculated that the woman's lower central and lateral incisors were lost as a result of a violent attack and were not self-inflicted. Finally, forensic practitioners helped police in avoiding a miscarriage of justice and wrongful conviction.

  5. A case study of global health at the university: implications for research and action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Pinto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Global health is increasingly a major focus of institutions in high-income countries. However, little work has been done to date to study the inner workings of global health at the university level. Academics may have competing objectives, with few mechanisms to coordinate efforts and pool resources. Objective: To conduct a case study of global health at Canada's largest health sciences university and to examine how its internal organization influences research and action. Design: We drew on existing inventories, annual reports, and websites to create an institutional map, identifying centers and departments using the terms ‘global health’ or ‘international health’ to describe their activities. We compiled a list of academics who self-identified as working in global or international health. We purposively sampled persons in leadership positions as key informants. One investigator carried out confidential, semi-structured interviews with 20 key informants. Interview notes were returned to participants for verification and then analyzed thematically by pairs of coders. Synthesis was conducted jointly. Results: More than 100 academics were identified as working in global health, situated in numerous institutions, centers, and departments. Global health academics interviewed shared a common sense of what global health means and the values that underpin such work. Most academics interviewed expressed frustration at the existing fragmentation and the lack of strategic direction, financial support, and recognition from the university. This hampered collaborative work and projects to tackle global health problems. Conclusions: The University of Toronto is not exceptional in facing such challenges, and our findings align with existing literature that describes factors that inhibit collaboration in global health work at universities. Global health academics based at universities may work in institutional siloes and this limits both

  6. A case study of global health at the university: implications for research and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Andrew D; Cole, Donald C; ter Kuile, Aleida; Forman, Lisa; Rouleau, Katherine; Philpott, Jane; Pakes, Barry; Jackson, Suzanne; Muntaner, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Global health is increasingly a major focus of institutions in high-income countries. However, little work has been done to date to study the inner workings of global health at the university level. Academics may have competing objectives, with few mechanisms to coordinate efforts and pool resources. To conduct a case study of global health at Canada's largest health sciences university and to examine how its internal organization influences research and action. We drew on existing inventories, annual reports, and websites to create an institutional map, identifying centers and departments using the terms 'global health' or 'international health' to describe their activities. We compiled a list of academics who self-identified as working in global or international health. We purposively sampled persons in leadership positions as key informants. One investigator carried out confidential, semi-structured interviews with 20 key informants. Interview notes were returned to participants for verification and then analyzed thematically by pairs of coders. Synthesis was conducted jointly. More than 100 academics were identified as working in global health, situated in numerous institutions, centers, and departments. Global health academics interviewed shared a common sense of what global health means and the values that underpin such work. Most academics interviewed expressed frustration at the existing fragmentation and the lack of strategic direction, financial support, and recognition from the university. This hampered collaborative work and projects to tackle global health problems. The University of Toronto is not exceptional in facing such challenges, and our findings align with existing literature that describes factors that inhibit collaboration in global health work at universities. Global health academics based at universities may work in institutional siloes and this limits both internal and external collaboration. A number of solutions to address these

  7. Medical therapeutic effect of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    In order to compare the therapeutic effect as well as side effects between antithyroid therapy and radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism, the author evaluated 111 cases of hyperthyroidism which were composed of 57 patients with antithyroid treatment, 23 patients with combined treatment comprising of antithyroid and radioactive iodine ( 131 I) and 31 patients with treatment of 131 I alone. (author)

  8. A case of ultrasound-guided prenatal diagnosis of prune belly syndrome in Papua New Guinea--implications for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ome, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina; Hamura, Nancy; Umbers, Alexandra J; Siba, Peter; Laman, Moses; Bolnga, John; Rogerson, Sheryle; Unger, Holger W

    2013-05-07

    Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital malformation of unknown aetiology and is characterised by abnormalities of the urinary tract, a deficiency of abdominal musculature and bilateral cryptorchidism in males. We report a case of prune belly syndrome from Papua New Guinea, which was suspected on pregnancy ultrasound scan and confirmed upon delivery. A 26-year-old married woman, Gravida 3 Para 2, presented to antenatal clinic in Madang, Papua New Guinea, at 21(+5) weeks' gestation by dates. She was well with no past medical or family history of note. She gave consent to participate in a clinical trial on prevention of malaria in pregnancy and underwent repeated ultrasound examinations which revealed a live fetus with persistent megacystis and anhydramnios. Both mother and clinicians agreed on conservative management of the congenital abnormality. The mother spontaneously delivered a male fetus weighing 2010 grams at 34 weeks' gestation with grossly abnormal genitalia including cryptorchidism, penile aplasia and an absent urethral meatus, absent abdominal muscles and hypoplastic lungs. The infant passed away two hours after delivery. This report discusses the implications of prenatal detection of severe congenital abnormalities in PNG. This first, formally reported, case of prune belly syndrome from a resource-limited setting in the Oceania region highlights the importance of identifying and documenting congenital abnormalities. Women undergoing antenatal ultrasound examinations must be carefully counseled on the purpose and the limitations of the scan. The increasing use of obstetric ultrasound in PNG will inevitably result in a rise in prenatal detection of congenital abnormalities. This will need to be met with adequate training, referral mechanisms and better knowledge of women's attitudes and beliefs on birth defects and ultrasound. National medicolegal guidance regarding induced abortion and resuscitation of a fetus with severe congenital abnormalities may

  9. Interpreting potential markers of storage and rehearsal: Implications for studies of verbal short-term memory and neuropsychological cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Logie, Robert H; Jarrold, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Neuropsychological studies of verbal short-term memory have often focused on two signature effects - phonological similarity and word length - the absence of which has been taken to indicate problems in phonological storage and rehearsal respectively. In the present study we present a possible alternative reading of such data, namely that the absence of these effects can follow as a consequence of an individual's poor level of recall. Data from a large normative sample of 251 adult participants were re-analyzed under the assumption that the size of phonological similarity and word length effects are proportional to an individual's overall level of recall. For both manipulations, when proportionalized effects were plotted against memory span, the same function fit the data in both auditory and visual presentation conditions. Furthermore, two additional sets of single-case data were broadly comparable to those that would be expected for an individual's level of verbal short-term memory performance albeit with some variation across tasks. These findings indicate that the absolute magnitude of phonological similarity and word length effects depends on overall levels of recall, and that these effects are necessarily eliminated at low levels of verbal short-term memory performance. This has implications for how one interprets any variation in the size of these effects, and raises serious questions about the causal direction of any relationship between impaired verbal short-term memory and the absence of phonological similarity or word length effects.

  10. Costs of implementing integrated community case management (iCCM) in six African countries: implications for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviaud, Emmanuelle; Besada, Donnela; Leon, Natalie; Rohde, Sarah; Sanders, David; Oliphant, Nicholas; Doherty, Tanya

    2017-06-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa still reports the highest rates of under-five mortality. Low cost, high impact interventions exist, however poor access remains a challenge. Integrated community case management (iCCM) was introduced to improve access to essential services for children 2-59 months through diagnosis, treatment and referral services by community health workers for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhea. This paper presents the results of an economic analysis of iCCM implementation in regions supported by UNICEF in six countries and assesses country-level scale-up implications. The paper focuses on costs to provider (health system and donors) to inform planning and budgeting, and does not cover cost-effectiveness. The analysis combines annualised set-up costs and 1 year implementation costs to calculate incremental economic and financial costs per treatment from a provider perspective. Affordability is assessed by calculating the per capita financial cost of the program as a percentage of the public health expenditure per capita. Time and financial implications of a 30% increase in utilization were modeled. Country scale-up is modeled for all children under 5 in rural areas. Utilization of iCCM services varied from 0.05 treatment/y/under-five in Ethiopia to over 1 in Niger. There were between 10 and 603 treatments/community health worker (CHW)/y. Consultation cost represented between 93% and 22% of economic costs per treatment influenced by the level of utilization. Weighted economic cost per treatment ranged from US$ 13 (2015 USD) in Ghana to US$ 2 in Malawi. CHWs spent from 1 to 9 hours a week on iCCM. A 30% increase in utilization would add up to 2 hours a week, but reduce cost per treatment (by 20% in countries with low utilization). Country scale up would amount to under US$ 0.8 per capita total population (US$ 0.06-US$0.74), between 0.5% and 2% of public health expenditure per capita but 8% in Niger. iCCM addresses unmet needs and impacts on under 5 mortality. An

  11. Conversational evidence in therapeutic dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Tom; Busch, Robbie; Couture, Shari

    2008-07-01

    Family therapists' participation in therapeutic dialogue with clients is typically informed by evidence of how such dialogue is developing. In this article, we propose that conversational evidence, the kind that can be empirically analyzed using discourse analyses, be considered a contribution to widening psychotherapy's evidence base. After some preliminaries about what we mean by conversational evidence, we provide a genealogy of evaluative practice in psychotherapy, and examine qualitative evaluation methods for their theoretical compatibilities with social constructionist approaches to family therapy. We then move on to examine the notion of accomplishment in therapeutic dialogue given how such accomplishments can be evaluated using conversation analysis. We conclude by considering a number of research and pedagogical implications we associate with conversational evidence.

  12. [Therapeutic education didactic techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Maite; Vidal, Mercè; Jansa, Margarida

    2012-10-01

    This article includes an introduction to the role of Therapeutic Education for Diabetes treatment according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the Diabetes Education Study Group (DESG) of the "European Association for Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) of the Spanish Ministry of Health. We analyze theoretical models and the differences between teaching vs. learning as well as current trends (including Internet), that can facilitate meaningful learning of people with diabetes and their families and relatives. We analyze the differences, similarities, advantages and disadvantages of individual and group education. Finally, we describe different educational techniques (metaplan, case method, brainstorming, role playing, games, seminars, autobiography, forums, chats,..) applicable to individual, group or virtual education and its application depending on the learning objective.

  13. The special effects of hypnosis and hypnotherapy: A contribution to an ecological model of therapeutic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Matthias

    2006-04-01

    There is ample evidence that hypnosis enhances the effectiveness of psychotherapy and produces some astounding effects of its own. In this paper, the effective components and principles of hypnosis and hypnotherapy are analyzed. The "special" hypnotic and hypnotherapeutic effects are linked to the fact that the ecological requirements of therapeutic change are taken into account implicitly and/or explicitly when working with hypnotic trances in a therapeutic setting. The hypnotic situation is described--theoretically and in case examples--as a therapeutic modality that gratifies and aligns the basic emotional needs to feel autonomous, related, competent, and oriented. It is shown how the hypnotic relationship can help promote a sound ecological balance between these needs--a balance that is deemed to be a necessary prerequisite for salutogenesis. Practical implications for planning hypnotherapeutic interventions are discussed.

  14. Implication of heavy metals distribution for a municipal solid waste management system - a case study in Shanghai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hua; He Pinjing; Shao Liming

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination in municipal solid waste (MSW) is of increasing concern. The occurrence and distribution of heavy metals in MSW and their implications for the integrated MSW management system in mega-cities have been investigated by means of material flow analysis based on a case study of Shanghai in China. A good statistical basis was provided through a one-year monitoring program on the mass and metals composition of the waste from three MSW treatment facilities. The results showed that the main heavy metals in the MSW were Zn, Cr, Cu, and Pb (on average > 100 mg kg -1 ), followed by Ni, Cd, and Hg. The MSW contained higher levels of Cu and Ni in metals, Cr and Pb in plastics, and Pb and Zn in the inorganic fractions. Regardless of the sources, the statistically similar heavy metal contents in the organic fractions indicated that effective blending and diffusion of heavy metals had taken place throughout the MSW collection, transfer, transportation, and storage, leading to cross-contamination of the waste fractions. PU (composed of putrescible waste and miscellaneous indistinguishable particles) contributed the majority of the heavy metals to the MSW, followed by plastics, as a result of the predominance in the overall composition of PU and plastics rather than from differences in their heavy metal contents. Therefore, manual or mechanical separation of some significantly heavy metal-rich fractions alone is not sufficient to reduce the heavy metal contents in the MSW. Source separation of organic waste and the diversion of tailored inorganic waste such as hazardous components, construction and demolition waste, etc., are proposed to control the heavy metal contamination in MSW. For the mixed MSW management system, physicochemical fractionation to exclude particles containing high levels of heavy metals can be conducted

  15. Midlatitude Cirrus Clouds Derived from Hurricane Nora: A Case Study with Implications for Ice Crystal Nucleation and Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Arnott, W. Patrick; O'C. Starr, David; Mace, Gerald G.; Wang, Zhien; Poellot, Michael R.

    2003-04-01

    Hurricane Nora traveled up the Baja Peninsula coast in the unusually warm El Niño waters of September 1997 until rapidly decaying as it approached southern California on 24 September. The anvil cirrus blowoff from the final surge of tropical convection became embedded in subtropical flow that advected the cirrus across the western United States, where it was studied from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) in Salt Lake City, Utah, on 25 September. A day later, the cirrus shield remnants were redirected southward by midlatitude circulations into the southern Great Plains, providing a case study opportunity for the research aircraft and ground-based remote sensors assembled at the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. Using these comprehensive resources and new remote sensing cloud retrieval algorithms, the microphysical and radiative cloud properties of this unusual cirrus event are uniquely characterized.Importantly, at both the FARS and CART sites the cirrus generated spectacular halos and arcs, which acted as a tracer for the hurricane cirrus, despite the limited lifetimes of individual ice crystals. Lidar depolarization data indicate widespread regions of uniform ice plate orientations, and in situ particle replicator data show a preponderance of pristine, solid hexagonal plates and columns. It is suggested that these unusual aspects are the result of the mode of cirrus particle nucleation, presumably involving the lofting of sea salt nuclei in strong thunderstorm updrafts into the upper troposphere. This created a reservoir of haze particles that continued to produce halide-salt-contaminated ice crystals during the extended period of cirrus cloud maintenance. The inference that marine microbiota are embedded in the replicas of some ice crystals collected over the CART site points to the longevity of marine effects. Various nucleation scenarios proposed for cirrus clouds based on this and other studies, and the

  16. Implication of heavy metals distribution for a municipal solid waste management system - a case study in Shanghai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hua [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: solidwaste@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2008-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination in municipal solid waste (MSW) is of increasing concern. The occurrence and distribution of heavy metals in MSW and their implications for the integrated MSW management system in mega-cities have been investigated by means of material flow analysis based on a case study of Shanghai in China. A good statistical basis was provided through a one-year monitoring program on the mass and metals composition of the waste from three MSW treatment facilities. The results showed that the main heavy metals in the MSW were Zn, Cr, Cu, and Pb (on average > 100 mg kg{sup -1}), followed by Ni, Cd, and Hg. The MSW contained higher levels of Cu and Ni in metals, Cr and Pb in plastics, and Pb and Zn in the inorganic fractions. Regardless of the sources, the statistically similar heavy metal contents in the organic fractions indicated that effective blending and diffusion of heavy metals had taken place throughout the MSW collection, transfer, transportation, and storage, leading to cross-contamination of the waste fractions. PU (composed of putrescible waste and miscellaneous indistinguishable particles) contributed the majority of the heavy metals to the MSW, followed by plastics, as a result of the predominance in the overall composition of PU and plastics rather than from differences in their heavy metal contents. Therefore, manual or mechanical separation of some significantly heavy metal-rich fractions alone is not sufficient to reduce the heavy metal contents in the MSW. Source separation of organic waste and the diversion of tailored inorganic waste such as hazardous components, construction and demolition waste, etc., are proposed to control the heavy metal contamination in MSW. For the mixed MSW management system, physicochemical fractionation to exclude particles containing high levels of heavy metals can be conducted.

  17. Implications of climate change scenarios for agriculture in alpine regions--a case study in the Swiss Rhone catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, J; Smith, P; Gobiet, A

    2014-09-15

    Coping with climate change in agriculture requires knowledge of trends in agro-climatic conditions with a focus at the smaller scales where decisions are taken. As part of the EU FP7 ACQWA project, the situation was analyzed for agriculture in the case of the Swiss Rhone catchment (Valais) where cultivation of permanent crops (orchards and vineyards) and livestock production are the most important agro-economic activities. The aim of this study was to use daily data from four downscaled and bias corrected transient climate change scenarios to analyze changes in water and temperature related indices over the period 1951-2050 for three locations (Aigle, Sion, Montana) that are representative of different production zones in the catchment. The results indicate that most relevant implications are caused by projected changes in temperature and not in precipitation. They indicate an extension of the thermal growing season with potentially positive effects on pasture and livestock production, most pronounced at the mountain site (Montana), but a trend towards increasing risks of frost in permanent crops and in heat stress for livestock at the valley bottom (Aigle, Sion). The increase in water requirement for irrigation in 2021-2050 relative to 1981-2009 is moderate (4-16%, depending on location). However, in years with low amounts of snow and rain, in small catchments with a nival regime, reduced water supply by rivers could restrict the surface area of grassland that can be irrigated, particularly during springtime. It is concluded that coping with heat-related risks may be most needed at the lower cropland and pasture sites while water-related issues would become more relevant in more elevated locations where pasture-based livestock production is the dominant type of agricultural land use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. IMPLICATIONS OF GLOBAL PRICING POLICIES ON ACCESS TO INNOVATIVE DRUGS: THE CASE OF TRASTUZUMAB IN SEVEN LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon-Riviere, Andres; Garay, Osvaldo Ulises; Augustovski, Federico; Vallejos, Carlos; Huayanay, Leandro; Bueno, Maria del Pilar Navia; Rodriguez, Alarico; de Andrade, Carlos José Coelho; Buendía, Jefferson Antonio; Drummond, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Differential pricing, based on countries' purchasing power, is recommended by the World Health Organization to secure affordable medicines. However, in developing countries innovative drugs often have similar or even higher prices than in high-income countries. We evaluated the potential implications of trastuzumab global pricing policies in terms of cost-effectiveness (CE), coverage, and accessibility for patients with breast cancer in Latin America (LA). A Markov model was designed to estimate life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and costs from a healthcare perspective. To better fit local cancer prognosis, a base case scenario using transition probabilities from clinical trials was complemented with two alternative scenarios with transition probabilities adjusted to reflect breast cancer epidemiology in each country. Incremental discounted benefits ranged from 0.87 to 1.00 LY and 0.51 to 0.60 QALY and incremental CE ratios from USD 42,104 to USD 110,283 per QALY (2012 U.S. dollars), equivalent to 3.6 gross domestic product per capita (GDPPC) per QALY in Uruguay and to 35.5 GDPPC in Bolivia. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed 0 percent probability that trastuzumab is CE if the willingness-to-pay threshold is one GDPPC per QALY, and remained so at three GDPPC threshold except for Chile and Uruguay (4.3 percent and 26.6 percent, respectively). Trastuzumab price would need to decrease between 69.6 percent to 94.9 percent to became CE in LA. Although CE in other settings, trastuzumab was not CE in LA. The use of health technology assessment to prioritize resource allocation and support price negotiations is critical to making innovative drugs available and affordable in developing countries.

  19. Case Study: The Myanmar and Bangladesh Maritime Boundary Dispute in the Bay of Bengal and Its Implications for South China Sea Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi A. Balaram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to review the pertinent Myanmar and Bangladesh history in overlapping maritime territorial claims leading up to the September 2011 International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS case: Dispute Concerning Delimitation of the Maritime Boundary Between Bangladesh and Myanmar in the Bay of Bengal. It will dissect the legal proceedings as primary source documents and apply the relevant judgement findings to analyse the implications for the respective countries and for South China Sea maritime boundary disputes. While the judgements of this case set certain legal precedents that may be more easily applied to bilateral disputes, the implications, nevertheless, impinge on multilateral claims as well. To the extent that the Bangladesh-Myanmar ITLOS judgement provides a pathway to third-party, independent, and peaceful resolution to the potentially explosive and escalating tensions in the South China Sea, this paper argues that findings are relevant, but limited.

  20. Therapeutic Dimensions of the Black Aesthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors of this article see the black aesthetic largely in terms of the affective component. Emotional oneness which is foreign to the white world view is the means by which the black man can achieve optimal mental health and development. The therapeutic implications of the black aesthetic are outlined. (NG)

  1. Intra-firm knowledge transfer-a qualitative case study of knowledge transfer and its implications in a soft service firm

    OpenAIRE

    Zheleva, Denitsa; Viklund, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    The following case study aims to explore the knowledge transfer and its implications in the context of a soft service firm. The complexity of knowledge itself and the knowledge transfer process in service firms brings new challenges. The phenomenon was investigated by the application of grounded theory. Interviews were conducted with employees at a company present in the Quick Service Restaurant segment. It resulted in several findings that were not reported by previous literature. Firstly, w...

  2. Endovascular repair of mycotic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta: diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas-two case reports with 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Ivan; Sarac, Momir; Tomic, Aleksandar; Bezmarevic, Mihailo

    2013-10-01

    A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is a rare diagnosis with high mortality. We present two cases