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Sample records for therapeutic glucocorticoid mimetics

  1. Temporal control of glucocorticoid neurodynamics and its relevance for brain homeostasis, neuropathology and glucocorticoid-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafatakis, Konstantinos; Russell, Georgina M; Zarros, Apostolos; Lightman, Stafford L

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids mediate plethora of actions throughout the human body. Within the brain, they modulate aspects of immune system and neuroinflammatory processes, interfere with cellular metabolism and viability, interact with systems of neurotransmission and regulate neural rhythms. The influence of glucocorticoids on memory and emotional behaviour is well known and there is increasing evidence for their involvement in many neuropsychiatric pathologies. These effects, which at times can be in opposing directions, depend not only on the concentration of glucocorticoids but also the duration of their presence, the temporal relationship between their fluctuations, the co-influence of other stimuli, and the overall state of brain activity. Moreover, they are region- and cell type-specific. The molecular basis of such diversity of effects lies on the orchestration of the spatiotemporal interplay between glucocorticoid- and mineralocorticoid receptors, and is achieved through complex dynamics, mainly mediated via the circadian and ultradian pattern of glucocorticoid secretion. More sophisticated methodologies are therefore required to better approach the study of these hormones and improve the effectiveness of glucocorticoid-based therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glucocorticoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias: a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Margraf, Jürgen

    2008-04-07

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and phobias belong to the most common anxiety disorders and to the most common psychiatric illnesses in general. In both disorders, aversive memories are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology. Previously, we have reported that elevated glucocorticoid levels inhibit memory retrieval in animals and healthy humans. We therefore hypothesized that the administration of glucocorticoids might also inhibit the retrieval of aversive memory, thereby reducing symptoms in patients with PTSD and phobias. In recent clinical studies, we found first evidence to support this hypothesis. In patients with PTSD, low-dose cortisol treatment for one month reduced symptoms of traumatic memories without causing adverse side effects. Furthermore, we found evidence for a prolonged effect of the cortisol treatment. Persistent retrieval and reconsolidation of traumatic memories is a process that keeps these memories vivid and thereby the disorder alive. By inhibiting memory retrieval, cortisol may weaken the traumatic memory trace, and thus reduce symptoms even beyond the treatment period. In patients with social phobia, we found that a single oral administration of cortisone 1 h before a socio-evaluative stressor significantly reduced self-reported fear during the anticipation-, exposure-, and recovery phase of the stressor. In subjects with spider phobia, repeated oral administration of cortisol 1 h before exposure to a spider photograph induced a progressive reduction of stimulus-induced fear. This effect was maintained when subjects were exposed to the stimulus again two days after the last cortisol administration, indicating that cortisol facilitated the extinction of phobic fear. In conclusion, by a common mechanism of reducing the retrieval of aversive memories, glucocorticoids may be suited for the treatment of PTSD as well as phobias. More studies are needed to further evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of

  3. Incretin mimetics: a novel therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Katrine Bilberg; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2010-01-01

    antidiabetes agents have failed to obtain these goals. Incretin mimetics are a new class of antidiabetes drugs which involve modulation of the incretin system. They bind to and activate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors on pancreatic beta-cells following which insulin secretion and synthesis...... are initiated. Since the compounds have no insulinotropic activity at lower glucose concentrations the risk of hypoglycemia - a well-known shortcoming of existing antidiabetes treatments - is low. Additionally, incretin mimetics have been shown to be associated with beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk...... factors such as weight loss, decrease in blood pressure and changes in lipid profile. Current clinical data on the two available incretin mimetics, exenatide and liraglutide, are evaluated in this review, focusing on pharmacology, efficacy, safety and tolerability. The review is built on a systematic Pub...

  4. Cyclic Peptides as Novel Therapeutic Microbicides: Engineering of Human Defensin Mimetics

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    Annarita Falanga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic peptides are receiving significant attention thanks to their antimicrobial activity and high serum stability, which is useful to develop and design novel antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides appear to be key components of innate defences against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Among the others, defensins possess a strong microbicidial activity. Defensins are cationic and amphipathic peptides with six cysteine residues connected by three disulfide bonds found in plants, insects, and mammals; they are divided in three families: α-, β-, and θ-defensins. α-Defensins are contained in the primary granules of human neutrophils; β-defensins are expressed in human epithelia; and θ-defensins are pseudo-cyclic defensins not found in humans, but in rhesus macaques. The structural diversities among the three families are reflected in a different antimicrobial action as well as in serum stability. The engineering of these peptides is an exciting opportunity to obtain more functional antimicrobial molecules highlighting their potential as therapeutic agents. The present review reports the most recent advances in the field of cyclic peptides with a specific regard to defensin analogs.

  5. A pilot study evaluating therapeutic response of different dosage of oral glucocorticoid in two children with familial glucocorticoid deficiency presenting with diffuse mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation

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    Uttam Kumar Sarkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD is a rare autosomal recessive potentially life-threatening condition, characterized by glucocorticoid deficiency, preserved aldosterone/renin secretion, and secondary rise in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone level. This occurs due to either mutation in adrenocorticotropic receptor (25%, FGD Type-1 or in the MC2 receptor accessory protein (15%–20%. However, in about 50% patients, no identifiable mutations have been identified. Clinically, it manifests with weakness, fatigue, weight loss, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypoglycemia, and hypothermia. Progressive mucocutaneous pigmentation is a conspicuous presentation. Repeated hypoglycemia may result in seizure, persistent neurological, severe mental disability, and even sudden death. Standard therapy is oral glucocorticoids (10–15 mg/m2. Patients and Results: Two familial cases of FGD were put on progressively increasing doses of oral glucocorticoids (10 mg, 15 mg, and 20 mg/m2/day, each for 6 weeks to achieve the best response without any adverse effects. One patient had excellent improvement with 15 mg/m2/day, and another required 20 mg/m2/day. The latter patient had excellent overall improvement with only moderate improvement in pigmentation. Conclusion: Glucocorticoids replacement with optimum dose is necessary in FGD to promote physical and neurological growth and to prevent adrenal crises, hypotension, hypoglycemia, and sudden death. Higher dose than mentioned in literature (15 mg/m2/day may be required in selected cases. Mucocutaneous pigmentation may require even higher dose than we used. More studies are required.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of small doses of colchicine combined with glucocorticoid for acute gouty arthritis

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    Ying LIU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the clinical effect of small dose of colchicine combined with glucocorticoid for acute gouty arthritis. Methods Ninety-two patients with acute gouty arthritis were equally and randomly divided into small doses of colchicine combined with dexamethasone treatment group (treatment group and conventional large dose colchicine treatment group (control group between January 2009 and December 2013. The articular lesion scoring and clinical efficacy evaluation were performed at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72h after treatment. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, white blood cells, hepatorenal function and glomerular filtration rate (GFR were determined before and 72h after treatment respectively. The gastrointestinal adverse events and recurrence rate were observed within one month after treatment. Results The articular lesion scores were significantly decreased at 6, 12, 48, and 72h after treatment in treatment group compared with control group (P0.05. Serum uric acid, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase in serum (SGPT, and GFR did not show any change before and 72h after the treatment, and there was also no significant difference between groups (P>0.05. The incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events were obviously higher in control group (76.1% compared with that of the treatment group (P<0.05, and the differences was statistically significant. There was no statistical difference in recurrence rate between the control group and treatment group after a follow-up of one month. Conclusions Compared with conventional large dose colchicine, small dose of colchicine combined with dexamethasone can more rapidly and effectively control acute gouty arthritis, with good tolerability and safety, thus being worthy of popularization clinically. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.10

  7. Therapeutic Effects of the Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic Compound Me2DO2A on Experimental Articular Pain in Rats

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    Lorenzo Di Cesare Mannelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide anion ( is overproduced in joint inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Increased production leads to tissue damage, articular degeneration, and pain. In these conditions, the physiological defense against , superoxide dismutases (SOD are decreased. The complex MnL4 is a potent SOD mimetic, and in this study it was tested in inflammatory and osteoarticular rat pain models. In vivo protocols were approved by the animal Ethical Committee of the University of Florence. Pain was measured by paw pressure and hind limb weight bearing alterations tests. MnL4 (15 mg kg−1 acutely administered, significantly reduced pain induced by carrageenan, complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA, and sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA. In CFA and MIA protocols, it ameliorated the alteration of postural equilibrium. When administered by osmotic pump in the MIA osteoarthritis, MnL4 reduced pain, articular derangement, plasma TNF alpha levels, and protein carbonylation. The scaffold ring was ineffective. MnL4 (10−7 M prevented the lipid peroxidation of isolated human chondrocytes when was produced by RAW 264.7. MnL4 behaves as a potent pain reliever in acute inflammatory and chronic articular pain, being its efficacy related to antioxidant property. Therefore MnL4 appears as a novel protective compound potentially suitable for the treatment of joint diseases.

  8. How do glucocorticoids compare to oligo decoys as inhibitors of collagen synthesis and potential toxicity of these therapeutics?

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    Cutroneo, Kenneth R; Sterling, Kenneth M

    2004-05-01

    This article demonstrates how glucocorticoids decrease collagen synthesis. The parameters used to assess procollagen synthesis in our laboratory will be compared to those used by others. This article will note all the pertinent literature on the molecular mechanisms of this down regulation of procollagen synthesis. For example, what are the effects of glucocorticoids at the levels of transcription and translation of collagen mRNAs? Finally, we will define a molecular mechanism to inhibit Type I collagen synthesis by decreasing the binding of the TGF-beta activator protein complex to the TGF-beta element in the distal promoter of the proalpha1 Type I collagen gene, preventing the 2:1 ratio of alpha1 to alpha2 chains in the processed Type I collagen molecule. We will next ask "How do sense oligo decoys decrease Type I collagen synthesis at the in vivo and at the cell levels?" In primary fibrotic cell culture, the double-stranded phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide decoys were more effective than their sense single-stranded counterparts. The molecular mechanism for the decrease in Type I collagen synthesis is the same as glucocorticoids, that is by decreasing the binding of the TGF-beta activator protein complex to the TGF-beta element in the distal promoter of the proalpha1 Type I collagen gene for the transcription of the proalpha1 mRNAs. The reason for using sense oligo decoys as anti-fibrotic agents as compared to the anti-fibrotic glucocorticoids, is that presently marketed and FDA approved glucocorticoids have many untoward side effects which the sense oligo decoys do not have. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Novel Manganese-Porphyrin Superoxide Dismutase-Mimetic Widens the Therapeutic Margin in a Preclinical Head and Neck Cancer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashcraft, Kathleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Boss, Mary-Keara [Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, North Carolina State College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Tovmasyan, Artak [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Fontanella, Andrew N. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Young, Kenneth H.; Palmer, Gregory M.; Birer, Samuel R.; Landon, Chelsea D.; Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva K. [Physics and Computing Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Weitner, Tin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Sheng, Huaxin; Warner, David S. [Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Spasojevic, Ivan [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Batinic-Haberle, Ines [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Dewhirst, Mark W., E-mail: mark.dewhirst@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To test the effects of a novel Mn porphyrin oxidative stress modifier, Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-n-butoxyethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnBuOE), for its radioprotective and radiosensitizing properties in normal tissue versus tumor, respectively. Methods and Materials: Murine oral mucosa and salivary glands were treated with a range of radiation doses with or without MnBuOE to establish the dose–effect curves for mucositis and xerostomia. Radiation injury was quantified by intravital near-infrared imaging of cathepsin activity, assessment of salivation, and histologic analysis. To evaluate effects of MnBuOE on the tumor radiation response, we administered the drug as an adjuvant to fractionated radiation of FaDu xenografts. Again, a range of radiation therapy (RT) doses was administered to establish the radiation dose–effect curve. The 50% tumor control dose values with or without MnBuOE and dose-modifying factor were determined. Results: MnBuOE protected normal tissue by reducing RT-mediated mucositis, xerostomia, and fibrosis. The dose-modifying factor for protection against xerostomia was 0.77. In contrast, MnBuOE increased tumor local control rates compared with controls. The dose-modifying factor, based on the ratio of 50% tumor control dose values, was 1.3. Immunohistochemistry showed that MnBuOE-treated tumors exhibited a significant influx of M1 tumor-associated macrophages, which provides mechanistic insight into its radiosensitizing effects in tumors. Conclusions: MnBuOE widens the therapeutic margin by decreasing the dose of radiation required to control tumor, while increasing normal tissue resistance to RT-mediated injury. This is the first study to quantitatively demonstrate the magnitude of a single drug's ability to radioprotect normal tissue while radiosensitizing tumor.

  10. CD28 homodimer interface mimetic peptide acts as a preventive and therapeutic agent in models of severe bacterial sepsis and gram-negative bacterial peritonitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramachandran, Girish; Kaempfer, Raymond; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Shirvan, Anat; Chahin, Abdullah B; Palardy, John E; Parejo, Nicolas A; Chen, Yaping; Whitford, Melissa; Arad, Gila; Hillman, Dalia; Shemesh, Ronen; Blackwelder, William; Ayala, Alfred; Cross, Alan S; Opal, Steven M

    .... A CD28 mimetic peptide (AB103; previously known as p2TA) that attenuates CD28 signaling and T-helper type 1 cytokine responses was tested for its ability to increase survival in models of polymicrobial infection and gram-negative sepsis...

  11. Higher derivative mimetic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic gravity in the presence of classified higher derivative terms which can make the mimetic perturbations stable. We show that the quadratic higher derivative terms which are independent of curvature and the cubic higher derivative terms which come from curvature corrections are sufficient to remove instabilities in mimetic perturbations. The classified higher derivative terms have the same dimensions but they contribute differently in the background and perturbed equations. Therefore, we can control both the background and the perturbation equations allowing us to construct the higher derivative extension of mimetic dark matter and the mimetic nonsingular bouncing scenarios. The latter can be thought as a new higher derivative effective action for the loop quantum cosmology scenario in which the equations of motion coincide with those suggested by loop quantum cosmology. We investigate a possible connection between the mimetic cosmology and the Randall-Sundrum cosmology.

  12. Mimetic discretization methods

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Jose E

    2013-01-01

    To help solve physical and engineering problems, mimetic or compatible algebraic discretization methods employ discrete constructs to mimic the continuous identities and theorems found in vector calculus. Mimetic Discretization Methods focuses on the recent mimetic discretization method co-developed by the first author. Based on the Castillo-Grone operators, this simple mimetic discretization method is invariably valid for spatial dimensions no greater than three. The book also presents a numerical method for obtaining corresponding discrete operators that mimic the continuum differential and

  13. Therapeutic effects of the superoxide dismutase mimetic compound MnIIMe2DO2A on experimental articular pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Bani, Daniele; Bencini, Andrea; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Calosi, Laura; Cantore, Miriam; Carossino, Anna Maria; Ghelardini, Carla; Valtancoli, Barbara; Failli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide anion (O(2) (•-)) is overproduced in joint inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Increased O(2) (•-) production leads to tissue damage, articular degeneration, and pain. In these conditions, the physiological defense against O(2) (•-), superoxide dismutases (SOD) are decreased. The Mn(II) complex MnL4 is a potent SOD mimetic, and in this study it was tested in inflammatory and osteoarticular rat pain models. In vivo protocols were approved by the animal Ethical Committee of the University of Florence. Pain was measured by paw pressure and hind limb weight bearing alterations tests. MnL4 (15 mg kg(-1)) acutely administered, significantly reduced pain induced by carrageenan, complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA). In CFA and MIA protocols, it ameliorated the alteration of postural equilibrium. When administered by osmotic pump in the MIA osteoarthritis, MnL4 reduced pain, articular derangement, plasma TNF alpha levels, and protein carbonylation. The scaffold ring was ineffective. MnL4 (10(-7) M) prevented the lipid peroxidation of isolated human chondrocytes when O(2) (•-) was produced by RAW 264.7. MnL4 behaves as a potent pain reliever in acute inflammatory and chronic articular pain, being its efficacy related to antioxidant property. Therefore MnL4 appears as a novel protective compound potentially suitable for the treatment of joint diseases.

  14. Regulation of triglyceride metabolism by glucocorticoid receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jen-Chywan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that play critical and complex roles in the regulation of triglyceride (TG homeostasis. Depending on physiological states, glucocorticoids can modulate both TG synthesis and hydrolysis. More intriguingly, glucocorticoids can concurrently affect these two processes in adipocytes. The metabolic effects of glucocorticoids are conferred by intracellular glucocorticoid receptors (GR. GR is a transcription factor that, upon binding to glucocorticoids, regulates the transcriptional rate of specific genes. These GR primary target genes further initiate the physiological and pathological responses of glucocorticoids. In this article, we overview glucocorticoid-regulated genes, especially those potential GR primary target genes, involved in glucocorticoid-regulated TG metabolism. We also discuss transcriptional regulators that could act with GR to participate in these processes. This knowledge is not only important for the fundamental understanding of steroid hormone actions, but also are essential for future therapeutic interventions against metabolic diseases associated with aberrant glucocorticoid signaling, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, central obesity and hepatic steatosis.

  15. Helix mimetics: Recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    The development of protein-protein interaction (PPIs) inhibitors represents a challenging goal in chemical biology and drug discovery. PPIs are problematic targets because they involve large surfaces with less well defined features and recognition motifs that are less amenable to conventional experimental and computational ligand discovery methodologies. α-Helix mediated PPIs represent a sub group with a clearly defined interface and thus may be more amenable to the development of generic ligand discovery methods. Indeed, this is borne out in numerous studies using peptides covalently constrained into a helical conformation resulting in improvement of myriad biophysical and cellular properties. It is however desirable to have small molecule alternatives: a helix mimetic (proteomimetic) is a generic small molecule scaffold that projects functional groups in a similar spatial orientation so as to mimic the presentation of key amino acid side chains from the helix that mediates the PPI. The first true example of a helix mimetic was described over a decade ago however this approach has not yet been elaborated to the extent that it receives similar levels of attention to constrained peptides. This review explores recent significant developments in the area of small molecule α-helix mimetics and provides a critical overview of success stories, potential limitations of the approach, and areas for future development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David J; Spencer, Karen A

    2018-01-15

    Throughout life physiological systems strive to maintain homeostasis and these systems are susceptible to exposure to maternal or environmental perturbations, particularly during embryonic development. In some cases, these perturbations may influence genetic and physiological processes that permanently alter the functioning of these physiological systems; a process known as developmental programming. In recent years, the neuroimmune system has garnered attention for its fundamental interactions with key hormonal systems, such as the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The ultimate product of this axis, the glucocorticoid hormones, play a key role in modulating immune responses within the periphery and the CNS as part of the physiological stress response. It is well-established that elevated glucocorticoids induced by developmental stress exert profound short and long-term physiological effects, yet there is relatively little information of how these effects are manifested within the neuroimmune system. Pre and post-natal periods are prime candidates for manipulation in order to uncover the physiological mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune responses. Understanding the potential programming role of glucocorticoids may be key in uncovering vulnerable windows of CNS susceptibility to stressful experiences during embryonic development and improve our use of glucocorticoids as therapeutics in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. (Pseudoamide-linked oligosaccharide mimetics: molecular recognition and supramolecular properties

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    José L. Jiménez Blanco

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Oligosaccharides are currently recognised as having functions that influence the entire spectrum of cell activities. However, a distinct disadvantage of naturally occurring oligosaccharides is their metabolic instability in biological systems. Therefore, much effort has been spent in the past two decades on the development of feasible routes to carbohydrate mimetics which can compete with their O-glycosidic counterparts in cell surface adhesion, inhibit carbohydrate processing enzymes, and interfere in the biosynthesis of specific cell surface carbohydrates. Such oligosaccharide mimetics are potential therapeutic agents against HIV and other infections, against cancer, diabetes and other metabolic diseases. An efficient strategy to access this type of compounds is the replacement of the glycosidic linkage by amide or pseudoamide functions such as thiourea, urea and guanidine. In this review we summarise the advances over the last decade in the synthesis of oligosaccharide mimetics that possess amide and pseudoamide linkages, as well as studies focussing on their supramolecular and recognition properties.

  18. Cardioprotective potential of annexin-A1 mimetics in myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chengxue; Yang, Yuan H; May, Lauren; Gao, Xiaoming; Stewart, Alastair G; Tu, Yan; Woodman, Owen L; Ritchie, Rebecca H

    2015-04-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) and its resultant heart failure remains a major cause of death in the world. The current treatments for patients with MI are revascularization with thrombolytic agents or interventional procedures. These treatments have focused on restoring blood flow to the ischemic tissue to prevent tissue necrosis and preserve organ function. The restoration of blood flow after a period of ischemia, however, may elicit further myocardial damage, called reperfusion injury. Pharmacological interventions, such as antioxidant and Ca(2+) channel blockers, have shown premises in experimental settings; however, clinical studies have shown limited success. Thus, there is a need for the development of novel therapies to treat reperfusion injury. The therapeutic potential of glucocorticoid-regulated anti-inflammatory mediator annexin-A1 (ANX-A1) has recently been recognized in a range of systemic inflammatory disorders. ANX-A1 binds to and activates the family of formyl peptide receptors (G protein-coupled receptor family) to inhibit neutrophil activation, migration and infiltration. Until recently, studies on the cardioprotective actions of ANX-A1 and its peptide mimetics (Ac2-26, CGEN-855A) have largely focused on its anti-inflammatory effects as a mechanism of preserving myocardial viability following I-R injury. Our laboratory provided the first evidence of the direct protective action of ANX-A1 on myocardium, independent of inflammatory cells in vitro. We now review the potential for ANX-A1 based therapeutics to be seen as a "triple shield" therapy against myocardial I-R injury, limiting neutrophil infiltration and preserving both cardiomyocyte viability and contractile function. This novel therapy may thus represent a valuable clinical approach to improve outcome after MI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    of combinatorial peptide libraries. The C3 and NBP10 peptides target the first Ig module whereas the ENFIN2 and ENFIN11 peptides target fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of NCAM. A number of NCAM mimetics can induce neurite outgrowth and exhibit neuroprotective and synaptic plasticity modulating properties...

  20. Beta-2 mimetics and magnesium: true or false friends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlach, Jean; Pagès, Nicole; Bac, Pierre; Bara, Michel; Guiet-Bara, Andrée

    2003-09-01

    Physiological beta stimulation may be involved in the regulation of magnesium status namely by homeostatic increase of magnesemia during magnesium deficiency. But conversely excessive beta stimulation namely by use of pharmacological high doses of beta mimetics may induce a decrease of magnesemia. Two different types of magnesium therapy ought to be distinguished. Nutritional magnesium therapy which may physiologically palliate a magnesium deficiency due to an insufficient magnesium intake. It is devoid of any toxicity. Pharmacological magnesium therapy, whatever the magnesium status, causes a iatrogenic magnesium load. It may induce magnesium toxicity. Tocolysis is the one common obstetrical indication for beta mimetics and magnesium. Beta-2 mimetics are the reference tocolytic drugs in most countries. But high doses of beta-2 mimetics for suppression of premature labor are associated to a high incidence of maternal, fetal and neonatal side effects. Tocolysis must then be discontinued or limited to shorter treatments with the lowest possible doses. Nutritional magnesium therapy which palliates gestational magnesium deficiency is efficient and atoxic. Conversely, high doses of intravenous MgSO4 for tocolysis are less efficient and unsafe. Because of its maternal and above all pediatric side effects, this maternal pharmacological magnesium therapy should be abandoned for tocolysis. Investigation of the therapeutic ratio of various magnesium salts before their clinical use could help to determine if other anions different from sulfate could decrease the toxicity. Beta-2 agonists are first line asthma therapy, but their safety is debated. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) per se may induce magnesium depletion related to a dysregulation of the control mechanisms of magnesium status. It requires a correction of its causal regulation, but nutritional magnesium supplementation is ineffective. When chronic primary magnesium deficiency coexists with

  1. Caloric restriction and exercise "mimetics'': Ready for prime time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschin, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Exercise and diet are powerful interventions to prevent and ameliorate various pathologies. The development of pharmacological agents that confer exercise- or caloric restriction-like phenotypic effects is thus an appealing therapeutic strategy in diseases or even when used as life-style and longevity drugs. Such so-called exercise or caloric restriction "mimetics" have so far mostly been described in pre-clinical, experimental settings with limited translation into humans. Interestingly, many of these compounds activate related signaling pathways, most often postulated to act on the common downstream effector peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in skeletal muscle. In this review, resveratrol and other exercise- and caloric restriction "mimetics" are discussed with a special focus on feasibility, chances and limitations of using such compounds in patients as well as in healthy individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Julie E; Geller, David S

    2012-07-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced hypertension is a common clinical problem that is poorly understood, thus rendering treatment strategies sub-optimal. This form of hypertension has been commonly thought to be mediated by excess sodium and water reabsorption by the renal mineralocorticoid receptor. However, experimental and clinical data in both humans and animal models suggest important roles for the glucocorticoid receptor as well, in both the pathogenesis and maintenance of this hypertension. The glucocorticoid receptor is widely expressed in a number of organ systems relevant to blood pressure regulation, including the kidney, the brain and the vasculature. In vitro studies in isolated kidney tissues as well as in vascular smooth muscle and vascular endothelial cells have attempted to elucidate the molecular physiology of glucocorticoid-induced hypertension, but have generally been limited by the inability to study signaling pathways in an intact organism. More recently, the power of mouse genetics has been employed to examine the tissue-specific contributions of vascular and extra-vascular tissues to this form of hypertension. Here we review recent developments in our understanding of the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

  3. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis – a disorder of mesenchymal stromal cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Stuart Cooper

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are a class of steroid hormones that are essential to life but cause serious harm in excess. The main clinical features of glucocorticoid excess are due to adverse effects on cells and tissues that arise from a common developmental precursor – the mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC; sometimes referred to as the mesenchymal stem cell. Interestingly glucocorticoids appear essential for the differentiation of cells and tissues that arise from MSCs. High levels of glucocorticoids are used in tissue engineering strategies to enhance the formation of tissues such as bone, cartilage and muscle. This article discusses the paradox that glucocorticoids both enhance and impair MSC development and function. It will describe how endogenous glucocorticoids are likely to be important in these processes in vivo and will discuss the implications for therapies aimed at reducing the damage associated with the use of therapeutic glucocorticoids.

  4. [Glucocorticoids and metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourniaire, J; Daumont, M

    1976-01-01

    After a brief historical account, the physiological effect of glucocorticoid hormones are analysed. Their main point of impact is neoglucogenesis from proteins. To this is added their direct action on carbohydrates, their intervention in the use of lipids, and in the movement of water and salts. Cortisone penetrates into the cell, is fixed by a cortisone receptor in order to be transferred into the nucleus and to act on the transformation of ADN-ARN. Its relationships with cyclic AMP are discussed. The hormonal correlations of glucocorticoids are numerous. (insulin, catecholamine, glucagon, growth hormone, androgen). Synthetic cordicoids have biological actions which are close to those of glucocorticoids, but vary depending on their structure. These physiological and pharmacological notions imply certain precautions in the use of this type of hormone derivative.

  5. Osteoporosis inducida por glucocorticoides Glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    R. Gutiérrez-Polo

    2003-01-01

    Los glucocorticoides son un grupo de fármacos que se emplean muy frecuentemente en la práctica médica por su indiscutible utilidad. La osteoporosis inducida por éstos supone el principal efecto adverso derivado de su administración sistémica y prolongada, constituyendo la causa más frecuente de osteoporosis secundaria. Comporta además una importante repercusión sanitaria y socioeconómica como consecuencia de las complicaciones que ocasiona, como son las diferentes fracturas óseas por fragilid...

  6. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Anna C; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that stress, measured by increased glucocorticoid secretion, leads to profound reproductive dysfunction. In times of stress, glucocorticoids activate many parts of the fight or flight response, mobilizing energy and enhancing survival, while inhibiting metabolic processes that are not necessary for survival in the moment. This includes reproduction, an energetically costly procedure that is very finely regulated. In the short term, this is meant to be beneficial, so that the organism does not waste precious energy needed for survival. However, long-term inhibition can lead to persistent reproductive dysfunction, even if no longer stressed. This response is mediated by the increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids, which orchestrate complex inhibition of the entire reproductive axis. Stress and glucocorticoids exhibits both central and peripheral inhibition of the reproductive hormonal axis. While this has long been recognized as an issue, understanding the complex signaling mechanism behind this inhibition remains somewhat of a mystery. What makes this especially difficult is attempting to differentiate the many parts of both of these hormonal axes, and new neuropeptide discoveries in the last decade in the reproductive field have added even more complexity to an already complicated system. Glucocorticoids (GCs) and other hormones within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (as well as contributors in the sympathetic system) can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at all levels-GCs can inhibit release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release in the pituitary, and inhibit testosterone synthesis and release from the gonads, while also influencing gametogenesis and sexual behavior. This chapter is not an exhaustive review of all the known literature, however is aimed at giving a brief look at both the central and peripheral effects of glucocorticoids on the reproductive function.

  7. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bosscher, Karolien

    2010-05-31

    The ancient two-faced Roman god Janus is often used as a metaphor to describe the characteristics of the Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1), which exhibits both a beneficial side, that serves to halt inflammation, and a detrimental side responsible for undesirable effects. However, recent developments suggest that the Glucocorticoid Receptor has many more faces with the potential to express a range of different functionalities, depending on factors that include the tissue type, ligand type, receptor variants, cofactor surroundings and target gene promoters. This behavior of the receptor has made the development of safer ligands, that trigger the expression program of only a desirable subset of genes, a real challenge. Thus more knowledge-based fundamental research is needed to ensure the design and development of selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators capable of reaching the clinic. Recent advances in the characterization of novel selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators, specifically in the context of anti-inflammatory strategies, will be described in this review. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Research progress of nanoparticles as enzyme mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, XiaoNa; Liu, JianBo; Hou, Shuai; Wen, Tao; Liu, WenQi; Zhang, Ke; He, WeiWei; Ji, YingLu; Ren, HongXuan; Wang, Qi; Wu, XiaoChun

    2011-10-01

    Natural enzymes as biological catalysts possess remarkable advantages, especially their highly efficient and selective catalysis under mild conditions. However, most natural enzymes are proteins, thus exhibiting an inherent low durability to harsh reaction conditions. Artificial enzyme mimetics have been pursued extensively to avoid this drawback. Quite recently, some inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) have been found to exhibit unique enzyme mimetics. In addition, their much higher stability overcomes the inherent disadvantage of natural enzymes. Furthermore, easy mass-production and low cost endow them more benefits. As a new member of artificial enzyme mimetics, they have received intense attention. In this review article, major progress in this field is summarized and future perspectives are highlighted.

  9. Instructions for producing a mouse model of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, S.; Baschant, U.; Rauch, A.

    2014-01-01

    with a compromised bone quality and an increased fracture risk. At the cellular level, glucocorticoids suppress bone formation and stimulate bone resorption, which leads to loss of bone mass. To investigate the underlying mechanisms and new therapeutic strategies, the in vivo model for glucocorticoid-induced bone...

  10. Clinical aspects of glucocorticoid sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lamberts, Steven; Huizenga, Nannette; Lange, Pieter; Jong, Frank; Koper, Jan

    1996-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies demonstrate that primary (hereditary) abnormalities in the glucocorticoid receptor gene make 6.6% of the normal population relatively 'hypersensitive' to glucocorticoids, while 2.3% are relatively 'resistant.' These abnormalities might explain why some individuals develop severe adverse effects during low dose glucocorticoid therapy, while others do not develop side effects even during long-term therapy with a much higher dose. Awareness of this heterogeneity in glu...

  11. Risk of catecholaminergic crisis following glucocorticoid administration in patients with an adrenal mass: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, C.; Uum, S.H. van; Lenders, J.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoids as diagnostic or therapeutic agents have been reported to carry an increased risk of catecholaminergic crisis (CC) in patients with pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma (PPGL). METHODS: We searched literature databases using the following terms: pheochromocytoma,

  12. Molecular Integration of Incretin and Glucocorticoid Action Reverses Immunometabolic Dysfunction and Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarta, Carmelo; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Zhu, Zhimeng

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of diet-induced obesity. However, scarce therapeutic options are available to treat obesity and the associated immunometabolic complications. Glucocorticoids are routinely employed for the management of inflammatory diseases...

  13. Clinical aspects of glucocorticoid sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); N.A.T.M. Huizenga (Nannette); P. de Lange (Pieter); F.H. de Jong (Frank); J.W. Koper (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies demonstrate that primary (hereditary) abnormalities in the glucocorticoid receptor gene make 6.6% of the normal population relatively 'hypersensitive' to glucocorticoids, while 2.3% are relatively 'resistant.' These abnormalities might explain why some individuals develop

  14. Glucocorticoids, chronic stress, and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallman, Mary F.; Pecoraro, Norman C.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Warne, James P.; Ginsberg, Abigail B.; Akana, Susan F.; Laugero, Kevin C.; Houshyar, Hani; Strack, Alison M.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Bell, Mary E.

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids either inhibit or sensitize stress-induced activity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, depending on time after their administration, the concentration of the steroids, and whether there is a concurrent stressor input. When there are high glucocorticoids together with a

  15. Glucocorticoids suppress inflammation via the upregulation of negative regulator IRAK-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masanori; Lee, Ji-Yun; Susuki-Miyata, Seiko; Wang, Wenzhuo Y.; Xu, Haidong; Kai, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Koichi S.; Flavell, Richard A.; Li, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are among the most commonly used anti-inflammatory agents. Despite the enormous efforts in elucidating the glucocorticoid-mediated anti-inflammatory actions, how glucocorticoids tightly control overactive inflammatory response is not fully understood. Here we show that glucocorticoids suppress bacteria-induced inflammation by enhancing IRAK-M, a central negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signalling. The ability of glucocorticoids to suppress pulmonary inflammation induced by non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae is significantly attenuated in IRAK-M-deficient mice. Glucocorticoids improve the survival rate after a lethal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae infection in wild-type mice, but not in IRAK-M-deficient mice. Moreover, we show that glucocorticoids and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae synergistically upregulate IRAK-M expression via mutually and synergistically enhancing p65 and glucocorticoid receptor binding to the IRAK-M promoter. Together, our studies unveil a mechanism by which glucocorticoids tightly control the inflammatory response and host defense via the induction of IRAK-M and may lead to further development of anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies. PMID:25585690

  16. Is There a Renaissance of Glucocorticoids in Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, J R; Gunasekera, Wma

    2017-10-01

    The first therapeutic use of glucocorticoids was in a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis and the symptomatic benefit was astounding. Adverse effects from increasingly large doses led to them being overshadowed, dismissed as inappropriate treatment, and ignored for 20 years - but in the last 2 decades, the accumulating evidence and clinical practice suggest there is a justified renaissance in their use as a first-line treatment. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  17. Modular protein switches derived from antibody mimetic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholes, N; Date, A; Beaujean, P; Hauk, P; Kanwar, M; Ostermeier, M

    2016-02-01

    Protein switches have potential applications as biosensors and selective protein therapeutics. Protein switches built by fusion of proteins with the prerequisite input and output functions are currently developed using an ad hoc process. A modular switch platform in which existing switches could be readily adapted to respond to any ligand would be advantageous. We investigated the feasibility of a modular protein switch platform based on fusions of the enzyme TEM-1 β-lactamase (BLA) with two different antibody mimetic proteins: designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) and monobodies. We created libraries of random insertions of the gene encoding BLA into genes encoding a DARPin or a monobody designed to bind maltose-binding protein (MBP). From these libraries, we used a genetic selection system for β-lactamase activity to identify genes that conferred MBP-dependent ampicillin resistance to Escherichia coli. Some of these selected genes encoded switch proteins whose enzymatic activity increased up to 14-fold in the presence of MBP. We next introduced mutations into the antibody mimetic domain of these switches that were known to cause binding to different ligands. To different degrees, introduction of the mutations resulted in switches with the desired specificity, illustrating the potential modularity of these platforms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides for Pan Anti-Tumor Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKieber-Emmons

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mimicry is fundamental to biology which transcends to many disciplines ranging from immune pathology to drug design. Structural characterization of molecular partners has provided insight into the origins and relative importance of complementarity in mimicry. Chemical complementarity is easy to understand; amino acid sequence similarity between peptides, for example, can lead to cross-reactivity triggering similar reactivity from their cognate receptors. However, conformational complementarity is difficult to decipher. Molecular mimicry of carbohydrates by peptides is often considered one of those. Extensive studies of innate and adaptive immune responses suggests the existence of carbohydrate mimicry, but the structural basis for this mimicry yields confounding details; peptides mimicking carbohydrates in some cases fail to exhibit both chemical and conformational mimicry. Deconvolution of these two types of complementarity in mimicry and its relationship to biological function can nevertheless lead to new therapeutics. Here, we discuss our experience in bringing a tumor-associated carbohydrate mimetic peptide to the clinic. Emphasis is placed on the rationale, the lessons learned from the methodologies to identify mimics, a perspective on the limitations of structural analysis, the biological consequences of mimicking tumor associated carbohydrate antigens and the notion of reverse engineering to develop carbohydrate mimetic peptides in vaccine design strategies to induce responses to pan-glycan antigens expressed on cancer cells.

  19. Mimetic desire and scapegoat mechanism in sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Pisk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most fundamental question about sport is what is sport, what is its origin and its essence? Because sport is connected with the human being (there is no sport without human beings different anthropological visions of human being result in different understandings of sport. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is to present and explain an anthropological vision of the human being and society as was developed by René Girard. In his view mimetic desire and the scapegoat mechanism have a central role in any culture, religion or other secular institutions. The explanatory power of his theory is presented when it is applied to the world of sport. METHODS: Our methodology is philosophical, involving conceptual analysis and the application of the outcomes to sport. RESULTS: In the paper we show that mimetic desire can be recognized as one of the important origins of recreational and competitive sports. When people recognize what other people are able to do or accomplish in sport this invokes the mimetic desire as a result of which motivation for sport and competiveness can arise. But mimetic rivalry leads to an unstable situation. Therefore a second element is needed: Scapegoating in sport is presented as a mean to preserve the good reputation of sport, to keep peace in sport as well as in society as a whole. Finally, the attempt to overcome mimetic desire and scapegoating in sport is presented and the question if this is worth trying at all is opened. CONCLUSIONS: The theories of mimetic desire and scapegoat mechanism have great explanatory power when they are applied to the field of sport. They could reveal us some hidden motives and forces which drive athletes and sport as a whole. Moreover, they exceed the world of sport and reveal the influence of sport on the whole of society.

  20. [Glucocorticoids in rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziurla, R; Buttgereit, F

    2008-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are effective drugs which are often used in rheumatology. However, they have a considerable potential for frequent and sometimes serious side effects that restrict their use. Their mechanisms of action are either receptor dependent (specific) or independent (unspecific) on the genomic as well as the non-genomic level. Many adverse effects are predominantly caused by transactivation while the desired effects are mostly mediated by transrepression. Treatment strategies are sub-classified into low, medium, high, very high dose and pulse therapy based on criteria such as dose, indication, duration of treatment and potential risk of adverse events. The musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, neuro-endocrino-immunological, opthalmological and neuropsychiatric systems are examples where adverse effects may occur.

  1. Novel Superoxide Dismutase Mimetics for Protection against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While proven to be of benefit in animal models of organ injury involving O2○-, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and superoxide dismutase mimetics (SODm) can suffer problems regarding their bioavailability and toxicity. Since ROS has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of several disease conditions including acute kidney ...

  2. Apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovingh, G. K.; Bochem, Andrea E.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To review published data related to the potential applicability of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides. Recent findings Despite a wealth of information on HDL-C levels and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), little evidence is present to suggest that raising HDL-C levels per se

  3. The CNTF-derived peptide mimetic Cintrofin attenuates spatial-learning deficits in a rat post-status epilepticus model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russmann, Vera; Seeger, Natalie; Zellinger, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic growth factor is considered a potential therapeutic agent for central nervous system diseases. We report first in vivo data of the ciliary neurotrophic growth factor peptide mimetic Cintrofin in a rat post-status epilepticus model. Cintrofin prevented long-term alterations in...

  4. Self-assembly of fibronectin mimetic peptide-amphiphile nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexeisen, Emilie Lynn

    Many therapeutic strategies incorporate peptides into their designs to mimic the natural protein ligands found in vivo. A few examples are the short peptide sequences RGD and PHSRN that mimic the primary and synergy-binding domains of the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, which is recognized by the cell surface receptor, alpha5beta 1 integrin. Even though scaffold modification with biomimetic peptides remains one of the most promising approaches for tissue engineering, the use of these peptides in therapeutic tissue-engineered products and drug delivery systems available on the commercial market is limited because the peptides are not easily able to mimic the natural protein. The design of a peptide that can effectively target the alpha5beta1 integrin would greatly increase biomimetic scaffold therapeutic potential. A novel peptide containing both the RGD primary binding domain and PHSRN synergy-binding domain for fibronectin joined with the appropriate linker should bind alpha 5beta1 integrin more efficiently and lead to greater cell adhesion over RGD alone. Several fibronectin mimetic peptides were designed and coupled to dialkyl hydrocarbon tails to make peptide-amphiphiles. The peptides contained different linkers connecting the two binding domains and different spacers separating the hydrophobic tails from the hydrophilic headgroups. The peptide-amphiphiles were deposited on mica substrates using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Langmuir isotherms indicated that the peptide-amphiphiles that contained higher numbers of serine residues formed a more tightly packed monolayer, but the increased number of serines also made transferring the amphiphiles to the mica substrate more difficult. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the bilayers showed that the headgroups might be bent, forming small divots in the surface. These divots may help expose the PHSRN synergy-binding domain. Parallel studies undertaken by fellow group members showed that human

  5. Oestrogene mimetic isoflavones’ pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Dragomirescu,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genisteine is the most abundant and the most studied estrogen-mimetic izoflavone. It's chemical formula is 4',5,7 – trihidroxyisoflavone. It has also estrogen-modulated properties by its binding ability to the beta type estrogen receptor. Genisteine presents the following farmacodinamic effects: antiaterogen effect, prevention of estrogen-dependent cancers, especially breast cancer, prevention of skin aging body, osteoprogen effect, prevention of osteoporosis at the menopauses women. Despite all these real benefits, there are also many adverse effects, registered both in humans and animals. Thus, the sheep feeding with some Fabaceae species, containing estrogen-mimetic isoflavones were stopped their reproductive function(isoflavones acted as an oral contraceptive. In humans, phytoestroges influence is still under evaluation, being suspected effects such as cerebral involution - via abusive apoptosis - or disturbance in hormonal status, in male children. All these are added to already known allergies, caused by soy proteins.

  6. Novel aspects of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation and glucocorticoid actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Aguilera, Greti; Herman, James P.; Fiedler, Jenny L.; Deak, Terrence; Cordeiro de Sousa, Maria Bernardete

    2014-01-01

    conserved, being present in the earliest vertebrates. Understanding these basic mechanisms may lead to novel approaches for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for disorders related to stress and alterations of glucocorticoid secretion. PMID:24724595

  7. NEC violation in mimetic cosmology revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ijjas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the context of Einstein gravity, if the null energy condition (NEC is satisfied, the energy density in expanding space–times always decreases while in contracting space–times the energy density grows and the universe eventually collapses into a singularity. In particular, no non-singular bounce is possible. It is, though, an open question if this energy condition can be violated in a controlled way, i.e., without introducing pathologies, such as unstable negative-energy states or an imaginary speed of sound. In this letter, we will re-examine the claim that the recently proposed mimetic scenario can violate the NEC without pathologies. We show that mimetic cosmology is prone to gradient instabilities even in cases when the NEC is satisfied (except for trivial examples. Most interestingly, the source of the instability is always the Einstein–Hilbert term in the action. The matter stress-energy component does not contribute spatial gradient terms but instead makes the problematic curvature modes dynamical. We also show that mimetic cosmology can be understood as a singular limit of known, well-behaved theories involving higher-derivative kinetic terms and discuss ways of removing the instability.

  8. Direct couplings of mimetic dark matter and their cosmological effects

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Liuyuan; Mou, Yicen; Zheng, Yunlong; Li, Mingzhe

    2017-01-01

    The original mimetic model was proposed to take the role of dark matter. In this paper we consider possible direct interactions of the mimetic dark matter with other matter in the universe, especially the standard model particles such as baryons and photons. By imposing shift symmetry, the mimetic dark matter field can only have derivative couplings. We discuss the possibilities of generating baryon number asymmetry and cosmic birefringence in the universe based on the derivative couplings of...

  9. [Glucocorticoids in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmanović, S Z

    1995-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are among the most commonly used drugs. They have been employed to treat almost every known disease, from urticaria to leukemia. GCs are so termed because of their action to increase plasma glucose as a result of enhanced hepatic gluconeogenesis, but they play, also, key regulatory roles in a wide variety of physiologic processes. They are essential for survival under stress. GC effect is mediated through receptors localised in cytosol. Receptor-GC complexes bind to hormone response elements in nuclear DNA, affect transcription of genes, either stimulating or inhibiting mRNAs. Proteins so produced (enzymes, hormones) are responsible for the steroid response. There is one type of GC receptor and all GCs will affect all tissues in the same way. At present rational use of GCs falls into two categories: replacement therapy (in Addison's diseasse and in congenital adrenal hyperplasia) and pharmacotherapy, mostly for their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, but also to lyse leukemic lymphocytes or to reduce brain edema. GC therapy does not cure the primary disease--it only ameliorates its manifestations and provides time for the body natural defenses to work. After the withdrawal of steroid therapy manifestations of primary process usually return. So, as a result, there is no positive effect on long-term prognosis. Most common indications for prologned high-dose GC therapy are in organ transplantation, tumour chemotherapy, collagen vascular syndromes, ulcerative colitis, nephrotic syndrome and regional enteritis. Asthma, allergic diseases, inflammatory eye diseases and blood dyscrasias are also often treated with GCs. Used in pharmacological doses GCs have a number of adverse side effects. The use of alternate 0 day therapy can decrease most GC side effects (less suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, growth inhibition, cushingoid features, infections and myopathy). Discontinuation of long-term therapy is potentially

  10. Periodontitis destructions are restored by synthetic glycosaminoglycan mimetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallam-Laroye, C; Escartin, Q; Zlowodzki, A-S; Barritault, D; Caruelle, J-P; Baroukh, B; Saffar, J-L; Colombier, M-L

    2006-12-01

    Periodontitis are bacterium-driven inflammatory diseases that destroy tooth-supporting tissues whose complete restoration is not currently possible. RGTA, a new class of agents, have this capacity in an animal model. Periodontitis was induced in hamsters and, starting 8 weeks later, injected RG1503, a glycosaminoglycan synthesized from a 40 kDa dextran behaving like a heparan sulfate mimetic (1.5 mg kg(-1) w(-1)) or saline for 8 weeks. The three periodontium compartments were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and morphometry. The gingival extracellular matrix disorganized by inflammation was restoring under treatment. The collagen network was repaired and resumed its previous organization. Fibrillin-1 expression was restored so that the elastic network rebuilt at a distance from the pocket and began to reconstruct near the pocket. Apoptotic cell numbers were decreased in the pocket epithelium, and more so in the infiltrated connective tissue. The continuity and the thickness of the basement membrane were restored and testified normalization of epithelium connective tissue interaction. The amount of alveolar bone increased around the first molar, and the interradicular bone was rebuilt. The root cementum was thickened and the number of proliferating cells in the periodontal ligament was increased close to the cementum. RG1503 treatment induces potent anabolic reactions in the extracellular matrices of the different tissues of the periodontium and recruitment of progenitors. In particular, the cell proliferation close to the root surface suggests the reformation of a functional attachment apparatus. These results demonstrate that RG1503 reverses the degenerative changes induced by inflammation and favors the conditions of a regenerative process. Thus, RGTA, a known matrix component mimetic and protector, may be considered as a new therapeutic tool to regenerate the tissues destroyed by periodontitis.

  11. Direct couplings of mimetic dark matter and their cosmological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liuyuan; Mou, Yicen; Zheng, Yunlong; Li, Mingzhe

    2018-01-01

    The original mimetic model was proposed to take the role of dark matter. In this paper we consider possible direct interactions of mimetic dark matter with other matter in the universe, especially standard model particles such as baryons and photons. By imposing shift symmetry, the mimetic dark matter field can only have derivative couplings. We discuss the possibilities of generating baryon number asymmetry and cosmic birefringence in the universe based on the derivative couplings of mimetic dark matter to baryons and photons. Supported by NSFC (11422543, 11653002)

  12. Glucocorticoid management in rheumatoid arthritis: morning or night low dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Sabrina; Cutolo, Maurizio; Pizzorni, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Morning symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are linked to circadian increase of night inflammation, supported by inadequate cortisol secretion in active disease. Therefore, exogenous glucocorticoid administration in RA is recommended by EULAR and ACR from the beginning of the diagnosis, since may partially act like a "replacement therapy". In addition, the prevention/treatment of the night up-regulation of the immune/inflammatory reaction has been shown more effective when exogenous glucocorticoid administration is managed with a night-time-release formulation. Despite a considerably higher cost than conventional prednisone (immediate release), chronotherapy with night-time-release prednisone has been recognized a cost-effective option for RA patients not on glucocorticoids who are eligible for therapy with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Interestingly, since different cell populations involved in the inflammatory process are particularly activated during the night (i.e. monocytes, macrophages), other therapeutical approaches used in RA, such as conventional DMARDs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should follow the same concepts of glucocorticoid chronotherapy. Therefore, bedtime methotrexate chronotherapy was found to better manage RA symptoms, and several available NSAIDs (i.e. indomethacin, aceclofenac, ketoprofen, flurbiprofen, lornoxicam) have been recently modified in their formulation, in order to obtain more focused night action.

  13. Enhanced sensitivity to glucocorticoids in cytarabine-resistant AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malani, D; Murumägi, A; Yadav, B; Kontro, M; Eldfors, S; Kumar, A; Karjalainen, R; Majumder, M M; Ojamies, P; Pemovska, T; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C; Porkka, K; Wolf, M; Aittokallio, T; Kallioniemi, O

    2017-05-01

    We sought to identify drugs that could counteract cytarabine resistance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by generating eight resistant variants from MOLM-13 and SHI-1 AML cell lines by long-term drug treatment. These cells were compared with 66 ex vivo chemorefractory samples from cytarabine-treated AML patients. The models and patient cells were subjected to genomic and transcriptomic profiling and high-throughput testing with 250 emerging and clinical oncology compounds. Genomic profiling uncovered deletion of the deoxycytidine kinase (DCK) gene in both MOLM-13- and SHI-1-derived cytarabine-resistant variants and in an AML patient sample. Cytarabine-resistant SHI-1 variants and a subset of chemorefractory AML patient samples showed increased sensitivity to glucocorticoids that are often used in treatment of lymphoid leukemia but not AML. Paired samples taken from AML patients before treatment and at relapse also showed acquisition of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Enhanced glucocorticoid sensitivity was only seen in AML patient samples that were negative for the FLT3 mutation (P=0.0006). Our study shows that development of cytarabine resistance is associated with increased sensitivity to glucocorticoids in a subset of AML, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy that should be explored in a clinical trial of chemorefractory AML patients carrying wild-type FLT3.

  14. Apolipoprotein Mimetic Peptides: A New Approach for the Treatment of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglan eYao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available New treatments are needed for severe asthmatics to improve disease control and avoid severe toxicities associated with oral corticosteroids. We have used a murine model of house dust mite (HDM-induced asthma to identify steroid-unresponsive genes that might represent targets for new therapeutic approaches for severe asthma. This strategy identified apolipoprotein E as a steroid-unresponsive gene with increased mRNA expression in the lungs of HDM-challenged mice. Furthermore, apolipoprotein E functioned as an endogenous negative regulator of airway hyperreactivity and goblet cell hyperplasia in experimental HDM-induced asthma. The ability of apolipoprotein E, which is expressed by lung macrophages, to attenuate AHR and goblet cell hyperplasia is mediated by low density lipoprotein (LDL receptors expressed by airway epithelial cells. Consistent with this, administration of an apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide, corresponding to amino acids 130 to 149 of the LDL receptor-binding domain of the holo-apoE protein, significantly reduced AHR and goblet cell hyperplasia in HDM-challenged apoE-/- mice. These findings identified the apolipoprotein E - LDL receptor pathway as a new druggable target for asthma that can be activated by administration of apoE mimetic peptides. Similarly, apolipoprotein A-I may have therapeutic potential in asthma based upon its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-fibrotic properties. Furthermore, administration of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides has attenuated airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperreactivity in murine models of experimental asthma. Thus, site-directed delivery of inhaled apolipoprotein E or apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides may represent novel treatment approaches that can be developed for asthma, including severe disease.

  15. Exercise Mimetics: Impact on Health and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weiwei; Evans, Ronald M

    2017-02-07

    The global epidemic of obesity and its associated chronic diseases is largely attributed to an imbalance between caloric intake and energy expenditure. While physical exercise remains the best solution, the development of muscle-targeted "exercise mimetics" may soon provide a pharmaceutical alternative to battle an increasingly sedentary lifestyle. At the same time, these advances are fueling a raging debate on their escalating use as performance-enhancing drugs in high-profile competitions such as the Olympics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Black hole solutions in mimetic Born-Infeld gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Pisin

    2018-01-01

    The vacuum, static, and spherically symmetric solutions in the mimetic Born-Infeld gravity are studied. The mimetic Born-Infeld gravity is a reformulation of the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) model under the mimetic approach. Due to the mimetic field, the theory contains non-trivial vacuum solutions different from those in Einstein gravity. We find that with the existence of the mimetic field, the spacelike singularity inside a Schwarzschild black hole could be altered to a lightlike singularity, even though the curvature invariants still diverge at the singularity. Furthermore, in this case, the maximal proper time for a timelike radially-infalling observer to reach the singularity is found to be infinite.

  17. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used in treatment of paediatric diseases, but evidence of associated adverse cerebral effects is accumulating. The various pharmacokinetic profiles of the exogenous glucocorticoids and the changes in pharmacodynamics during childhood, result in different exposure...... of nervous tissue to exogenous glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids activate two types of intracellular receptors, the mineralocorticoid receptor and the glucocorticoid receptor. The two receptors differ in cerebral distribution, affinity and effects. Exogenous glucocorticoids favor activation...... of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...

  18. [Glucocorticoid therapy: what is the information sought by patients? Traffic analysis of the website cortisone-info.fr].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, J; Six, M; Morin, C; Fardet, L

    2013-05-01

    About 1% of the general population are receiving systemic glucocorticoids. The information about this treatment sought by patients is unknown. The website www.cortisone-info.fr aims to provide therapeutic information about glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid therapy. It was posted on January 16, 2012. The information available on the website is documented and based on the recent medical literature. The website is made of 43 pages divided into five main sections (generalities about glucocorticoids, adverse events, measures associated with glucocorticoid therapy, discontinuation of glucocorticoids and, situations requiring attention). The website traffic between February 1st, 2012 and January 4, 2013 was analyzed using Google Analytics. During the study period, the website was visited by 67,496 people (average number of visitors per day: 33 in February 2012, 326 in December 2012). The number of page views was 230,496 or an average of 3.5 pages per visitor. Of these 230,496 page views, 145,431 (63.1%) were related to adverse events and 37,722 (16.4%) were related to generalities about glucocorticoids (e.g., what is cortisone? For which disease? How does it work?). Information particularly sought by visitors was related to the diet to follow during glucocorticoid therapy (page accessed 11,946 times), data about what cortisone is (page accessed 11,829 times) and the effects of glucocorticoids on weight (page accessed 10,442 times). Knowledge of glucocorticoid-treated patients' expectations may help physicians to optimize information they give, thereby helping to reduce patients' concerns about glucocorticoids and to improve adherence to the treatment. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Standardised nomenclature for glucocorticoid dosages and glucocorticoid treatment regimens : current questions and tentative answers in rheumatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttgereit, F; da Silva, JAP; Burmester, GR; Cutolo, M; Jacobs, J; Kirwan, J; Kohler, L; van Riel, P; Vischer, T; Bijlsma, JWJ

    In rheumatology and other medical specialties there is a discrepancy between the widespread use and the imprecise designation of glucocorticoid treatment regimens. Verbal descriptions of glucocorticoid treatment regimens used in various phases of diseases vary between countries and institutions.

  20. NEC violation in mimetic cosmology revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    In the context of Einstein gravity, if the null energy condition (NEC) is satisfied, the energy density in expanding space-times always decreases while in contracting space-times the energy density grows and the universe eventually collapses into a singularity. In particular, no non-singular bounce is possible. It is, though, an open question if this energy condition can be violated in a controlled way, i.e., without introducing pathologies, such as unstable negative-energy states or an imaginary speed of sound. In this paper, we will re-examine the claim that the recently proposed mimetic scenario can violate the NEC without pathologies. We show that mimetic cosmology is prone to gradient instabilities even in cases when the NEC is satisfied (except for trivial examples). Most interestingly, the source of the instability is always the Einstein-Hilbert term in the action. The matter stress-energy component does not contribute spatial gradient terms but instead makes the problematic curvature modes dynamical. ...

  1. Exercise, fasting, and mimetics: toward beneficial combinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Richard T; Zillikens, M Carola; Friesema, Edith C H; delli Paoli, Giuseppe; Bloch, Wilhelm; Uitterlinden, André G; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia; de Lange, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated disorders that involve a multiplicity of tissues. Both fasting and physical exercise are known to counteract dyslipidemia/hyperglycemia. Skeletal muscle plays a key role in the control of blood glucose levels, and the metabolic changes and related signaling pathways in skeletal muscle induced by fasting overlap with those induced by exercise. The reduction of fat disposal has been shown to extend to the liver and to white and brown adipose tissue and to involve an increase in their metabolic activities. In recent years signal transduction pathways related to exercise and fasting/food withdrawal in muscle have been intensively studied, both in animals and in humans. Combining fasting/food withdrawal with exercise in animals as well as in humans causes changes unlike those seen during fasting/food withdrawal or exercise alone, which favor repair of muscle over autophagy. In addition, compounds that mimic exercise have been studied in combination with exercise or fasting/food withdrawal. This review addresses our current knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie the individual and combined effects of fasting/food withdrawal, endurance or resistance exercise, and their mimetics, in muscle vs other organs in rodents and humans, and highlights which combinations may improve metabolic disorders.-Jaspers, R. T., Zillikens, M. C., Friesema, E. C. H., delli Paoli, G., Bloch, W., Uitterlinden, A. G., Goglia, F., Lanni, A., de Lange, P. Exercise, fasting, and mimetics: toward beneficial combinations. © FASEB.

  2. Pathway interactions between MAPKs, mTOR, PKA, and the glucocorticoid receptor in lymphoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson E Brad

    2007-03-01

    to a resistant clone of CEM cells. Forskolin, which activates the cAMP pathway, and rapamycin, which inhibits mTOR, also inhibit JNK. Further, the sensitizing treatments result in a largely dexamethasone-dependent increase in the total pool of glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylated at serine 211. The phospho-serine 211 receptor is known to be more potent in activating gene transcription and apoptosis. The interactive effects demonstrated here in reverting resistant cells to corticoid sensitivity could provide therapeutic clinical potential in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies.

  3. Hormetic Influence of Glucocorticoids on Human Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Lupien, Sonia J.; Buss, Claudia; Schramek, Tania E.; Maheu, Francoise; Pruessner, Jens

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the effects of glucocorticoids on human learning and memory using the recent model of hormesis proposed by Calabrese and collaborators. Although acute increases in glucocorticoids have been shown to impair memory function in humans, other studies report no such impairments or, in contrast, beneficial effects of acute glucocorticoid increases on human memory function. We summarize these studies and assess whether the wealth of data obtained in humans with regard to th...

  4. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene

  5. HIF1alpha synergizes with glucocorticoids to promote BFU-E progenitor self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Johan; Rayon Estrada, Violeta; Shin, Chanseok; Gupta, Sumeet; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-03-24

    With the aim of finding small molecules that stimulate erythropoiesis earlier than erythropoietin and that enhance erythroid colony-forming unit (CFU-E) production, we studied the mechanism by which glucocorticoids increase CFU-E formation. Using erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E) and CFU-E progenitors purified by a new technique, we demonstrate that glucocorticoids stimulate the earliest (BFU-E) progenitors to undergo limited self-renewal, which increases formation of CFU-E cells > 20-fold. Interestingly, glucocorticoids induce expression of genes in BFU-E cells that contain promoter regions highly enriched for hypoxia-induced factor 1α (HIF1α) binding sites. This suggests activation of HIF1α may enhance or replace the effect of glucocorticoids on BFU-E self-renewal. Indeed, HIF1α activation by a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor (PHI) synergizes with glucocorticoids and enhances production of CFU-Es 170-fold. Because PHIs are able to increase erythroblast production at very low concentrations of glucocorticoids, PHI-induced stimulation of BFU-E progenitors thus represents a conceptually new therapeutic window for treating erythropoietin-resistant anemia.

  6. Glucocorticoid Cell Priming Enhances Transfection Outcomes in Adult Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Abby M; Plautz, Sarah A; Zempleni, Janos; Pannier, Angela K

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the most widely researched stem cell types with broad applications from basic research to therapeutics, the majority of which require introduction of exogenous DNA. However, safety and scalability issues hinder viral delivery, while poor efficiency hinders nonviral gene delivery, particularly to hMSCs. Here, we present the use of a pharmacologic agent (glucocorticoid) to overcome barriers to hMSC DNA transfer to enhance transfection using three common nonviral vectors. Glucocorticoid priming significantly enhances transfection in hMSCs, demonstrated by a 3-fold increase in efficiency, 4–15-fold increase in transgene expression, and prolonged transgene expression when compared to transfection without glucocorticoids. These effects are dependent on glucocorticoid receptor binding and caused in part by maintenance of normal metabolic function and increased cellular (5-fold) and nuclear (6–10-fold) DNA uptake over hMSCs transfected without glucocorticoids. Results were consistent across five human donors and in cells up to passage five. Glucocorticoid cell priming is a simple and effective technique to significantly enhance nonviral transfection of hMSCs that should enhance their clinical use, accelerate new research, and decrease reliance on early passage cells. PMID:26478250

  7. The Mimetic Principle in the Underground Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Voicu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been in the recent years an increased preoccupation at international level for the research of the mechanism of development of the underground economy. The numerous vain attempts to measure the dimension of the underground economy persuaded us to embark on a qualitative research of this economic phenomenon. In our investigation on the roots of the underground economy we drew very close to the psychological and sociological aspects of the phenomenon itself. The process of humanizing that has at its origin components of the mimetic principle, like acquisitive mimesis, prompt us to ponder over J.M. Keynes’ words: „The avoidance of taxes is the only intellectual ambition that one feels rewarded for.”

  8. Advances in Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Uyl, D.; Bultink, I.E.M.; Lems, W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is one of the most important side effects of glucocorticoid use, as it leads to an increased risk of fractures. Recently, many published studies have focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone metabolism, the pathophysiology of GIOP, and the

  9. The mimetic finite difference method for elliptic problems

    CERN Document Server

    Veiga, Lourenço Beirão; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the theoretical and computational aspects of the mimetic finite difference method for a wide class of multidimensional elliptic problems, which includes diffusion, advection-diffusion, Stokes, elasticity, magnetostatics and plate bending problems. The modern mimetic discretization technology developed in part by the Authors allows one to solve these equations on unstructured polygonal, polyhedral and generalized polyhedral meshes. The book provides a practical guide for those scientists and engineers that are interested in the computational properties of the mimetic finite difference method such as the accuracy, stability, robustness, and efficiency. Many examples are provided to help the reader to understand and implement this method. This monograph also provides the essential background material and describes basic mathematical tools required to develop further the mimetic discretization technology and to extend it to various applications.

  10. Insulin-mimetic activity of stevioside on diabetic rats: biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin-mimetic activity of stevioside on diabetic rats: biochemical, molecular and histopathological study. Osama M. Saleh, Nabil S. Awad, Mohamed M. Soliman, Ahmed A. Mansour, Mohammed A. Nassan ...

  11. Nuclear receptors and AMPK: can exercise mimetics cure diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Christopher E; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Anne R; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2016-07-01

    Endurance exercise can lead to systemic improvements in insulin sensitivity and metabolic homeostasis, and is an effective approach to combat metabolic diseases. Pharmacological compounds that recapitulate the beneficial effects of exercise, also known as 'exercise mimetics', have the potential to improve disease symptoms of metabolic syndrome. These drugs, which can increase energy expenditure, suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis, and induce insulin sensitization, have accordingly been highly scrutinized for their utility in treating metabolic diseases including diabetes. Nevertheless, the identity of an efficacious exercise mimetic still remains elusive. In this review, we highlight several nuclear receptors and cofactors that are putative molecular targets for exercise mimetics, and review recent studies that provide advancements in our mechanistic understanding of how exercise mimetics exert their beneficial effects. We also discuss evidence from clinical trials using these compounds in human subjects to evaluate their efficacy in treating diabetes. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Hormetic Influence of Glucocorticoids on Human Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupien, Sonia J.; Buss, Claudia; Schramek, Tania E.; Maheu, Francoise; Pruessner, Jens

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the effects of glucocorticoids on human learning and memory using the recent model of hormesis proposed by Calabrese and collaborators. Although acute increases in glucocorticoids have been shown to impair memory function in humans, other studies report no such impairments or, in contrast, beneficial effects of acute glucocorticoid increases on human memory function. We summarize these studies and assess whether the wealth of data obtained in humans with regard to the effects of acute increase of glucocorticoids on human cognition are in line with a hormetic function. We then discuss several factors that will have to be taken into account in order to confirm the presence of a hormetic function between glucocorticoids and human cognitive performance. PMID:19330155

  13. Glucocorticoids as mediators of developmental programming effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khulan, Batbayar; Drake, Amanda J

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to an adverse environment in early life is associated with an increased risk of cardio-metabolic and behavioral disorders in adulthood, a phenomenon termed 'early life programming'. One major hypothesis for early life programming is fetal glucocorticoid overexposure. In animal studies, prenatal glucocorticoid excess as a consequence of maternal stress or through exogenous administration to the mother or fetus is associated with programming effects on cardiovascular and metabolic systems and on the brain. These effects can be transmitted to subsequent generations. Studies in humans provide some evidence that prenatal glucocorticoid exposure may exert similar programming effects on glucose/insulin homeostasis, blood pressure and neurodevelopment. The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids mediate these effects are unclear but may include a role for epigenetic modifications. This review discusses the evidence for glucocorticoid programming in animal models and in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exogenous Cushing's syndrome and glucocorticoid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Rachel L; Leinung, Matthew C

    2005-06-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy in various forms is extremely common for a wide range of inflammatory, autoimmune, and neoplastic disorders. It is therefore important for the physician to be aware of the possibility of both iatrogenic and factitious Cushing's syndrome. Although most common with oral therapy, it is also important to be alert to the fact that all forms of glucocorticoid delivery have the potential to cause Cushing's syndrome. Withdrawal from chronic glucocorticoid therapy presents significant challenges. These include the possibility of adrenal insufficiency after discontinuation of steroid therapy, recurrence of underlying disease as the glucocorticoid is being withdrawn, and the possibility of steroid withdrawal symptoms. Nonetheless, with patience and persistence, a reasonable approach to withdrawal of glucocorticoid therapy can be achieved.

  15. Preclinical analysis of the gamma-secretase inhibitor PF-03084014 in combination with glucocorticoids in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samon, Jeremy B.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Hadler, Michael; Ambesi-Impiobato, Alberto; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Jakubczak, John; Randolph, Sophia; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias and lymphomas (T-ALL) are aggressive hematologic cancers frequently associated with activating mutations in NOTCH1. Early studies identified NOTCH1 as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of T-ALL through the use of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs). Here, we characterized the interaction between PF-03084014, a clinically-relevant GSI, and dexamethasone in preclinical models of glucocorticoid-resistant T-ALL. Combination treatment of the GSI PF-03084014 with glucocorticoids induced a synergistic antileukemic effect in human T-ALL cell lines and primary human T-ALL patient samples. Mechanistically PF-03084014 plus glucocorticoid treatment induced increased transcriptional upregulation of the glucocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid target genes. Treatment with PF-03084014 and glucocorticoids in combination was highly efficacious in vivo, with enhanced reduction of tumor burden in a xenograft model of T-ALL. Finally, glucocorticoid treatment effectively reversed PF-03084014-induced gastrointestinal toxicity via inhibition of goblet cell metaplasia. These results warrant the analysis of PF-03084014 and glucocorticoids in combination for the treatment of glucocorticoid-resistant T-ALL. PMID:22504949

  16. Preclinical analysis of the γ-secretase inhibitor PF-03084014 in combination with glucocorticoids in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samon, Jeremy B; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Hadler, Michael; Ambesi-Impiobato, Alberto; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H; Rowe, Jacob M; Jakubczak, John; Randolph, Sophia; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2012-07-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL) and lymphomas are aggressive hematologic cancers frequently associated with activating mutations in NOTCH1. Early studies identified NOTCH1 as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of T-ALL through the use of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI). Here, we characterized the interaction between PF-03084014, a clinically relevant GSI, and dexamethasone in preclinical models of glucocorticoid-resistant T-ALL. Combination treatment of the GSI PF-03084014 with glucocorticoids induced a synergistic antileukemic effect in human T-ALL cell lines and primary human T-ALL patient samples. Mechanistically PF-03084014 plus glucocorticoid treatment induced increased transcriptional upregulation of the glucocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid target genes. Treatment with PF-03084014 and glucocorticoids in combination was highly efficacious in vivo, with enhanced reduction of tumor burden in a xenograft model of T-ALL. Finally, glucocorticoid treatment effectively reversed PF-03084014-induced gastrointestinal toxicity via inhibition of goblet cell metaplasia. These results warrant the analysis of PF-03084014 and glucocorticoids in combination for the treatment of glucocorticoid-resistant T-ALL. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors are associated with IQ and behavior in young adults born very preterm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, B. van der; Pal, S.M. van der; Rotteveel, J.; Finken, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Preterm survivors exhibit neurodevelopmental impairments. Whether this association is influenced by antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and glucocorticoid sensitivity is unknown. Objectives: To study the effects of antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and

  18. Timing of glucocorticoid therapy for liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENG Qinghua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There are still controversies over the use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of liver failure, and current guidelines for liver failure recommend that glucocorticoids should be used with great caution. However, some latest studies have shown that the use of glucocorticoid therapy in the early stage of liver failure can bring more benefits to patients. Age, disease progression rate and severity, and complications of liver failure may affect the treatment outcome. Further studies are still needed for the selection of right patients, drugs and dose, and treatment timing.

  19. Exenatide improves glucocorticoid-induced glucose intolerance in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiying Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruiying Zhao1,2*, Enrique Fuentes-Mattei1,2*, Guermarie Velazquez-Torres1,3, Chun-Hui Su1,2, Jian Chen1, Mong-Hong Lee1,2, Sai-Ching Jim Yeung4,51Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 2Program in Genes and Development, 3Program in Cancer Biology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, 5Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA *Both authors contributed equally.Abstract: Exenatide is an incretin mimetic that is recently available in the US for the treatment of diabetes. There is a paucity of information on the effects of exenatide in glucocorticoid (GC-induced diabetes. Although the effect of continuous intravenous infusion of exenatide on GC-induced glucose intolerance has been investigated before in healthy human males receiving oral prednisolone, we investigated the efficacy of a single subcutaneous dose of exenatide (3 µg/kg in lowering blood glucose in GC-induced glucose intolerance in C57BL/6 mice. In a longitudinal experiment, the area under the curve (AUC of oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT significantly increased after dexamethasone (P = 0.004, which was subsequently decreased by exenatide (P < 0.001. A cross-sectional experiment showed that exenatide improved glucose tolerance compared with placebo in a mouse model of dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance. AUC of OGTT in the exenatide group were significantly (P < 0.001 lower than in the placebo group. Insulin tolerance tests (ITT demonstrated that exenatide decreased the ability of the mice to tolerate insulin compared with placebo. The AUC of ITT in the exenatide group were also significantly (P = 0.006 lower than in the placebo group. In conclusion, a single dose of exenatide was able to decrease glucose intolerance and

  20. Glucocorticoids, vitamin D and bone : a pathophysiologic and therapeutic study of glucocorticoid-induced bone disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Braun (Jacob Johannes)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractMooser's report ( 1921) of a patient with osteoporosis and obesity is one of the first descriptions of endogenous hypercortisolism. Later Cushing (1932) described the syndrome as a clinical entity and Albright et al. (1941) reported 9 patients who at autopsy all appeared to have

  1. Towards natural mimetics of metformin and rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliper, Alexander; Jellen, Leslie; Cortese, Franco; Artemov, Artem; Karpinsky-Semper, Darla; Moskalev, Alexey; Swick, Andrew G; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2017-11-15

    Aging is now at the forefront of major challenges faced globally, creating an immediate need for safe, widescale interventions to reduce the burden of chronic disease and extend human healthspan. Metformin and rapamycin are two FDA-approved mTOR inhibitors proposed for this purpose, exhibiting significant anti-cancer and anti-aging properties beyond their current clinical applications. However, each faces issues with approval for off-label, prophylactic use due to adverse effects. Here, we initiate an effort to identify nutraceuticals-safer, naturally-occurring compounds-that mimic the anti-aging effects of metformin and rapamycin without adverse effects. We applied several bioinformatic approaches and deep learning methods to the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) dataset to map the gene- and pathway-level signatures of metformin and rapamycin and screen for matches among over 800 natural compounds. We then predicted the safety of each compound with an ensemble of deep neural network classifiers. The analysis revealed many novel candidate metformin and rapamycin mimetics, including allantoin and ginsenoside (metformin), epigallocatechin gallate and isoliquiritigenin (rapamycin), and withaferin A (both). Four relatively unexplored compounds also scored well with rapamycin. This work revealed promising candidates for future experimental validation while demonstrating the applications of powerful screening methods for this and similar endeavors.

  2. Energy restriction and potential energy restriction mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolai, Sibylle; Pallauf, Kathrin; Huebbe, Patricia; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Energy restriction (ER; also known as caloric restriction) is the only nutritional intervention that has repeatedly been shown to increase lifespan in model organisms and may delay ageing in humans. In the present review we discuss current scientific literature on ER and its molecular, metabolic and hormonal effects. Moreover, criteria for the classification of substances that might induce positive ER-like changes without having to reduce energy intake are summarised. Additionally, the putative ER mimetics (ERM) 2-deoxy-d-glucose, metformin, rapamycin, resveratrol, spermidine and lipoic acid and their suggested molecular targets are discussed. While there are reports on these ERM candidates that describe lifespan extension in model organisms, data on longevity-inducing effects in higher organisms such as mice remain controversial or are missing. Furthermore, some of these candidates produce detrimental side effects such as immunosuppression or lactic acidosis, or have not been tested for safety in long-term studies. Up to now, there are no known ERM that could be recommended without limitations for use in humans.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  4. Mimetic Divergence and the Speciation Continuum in the Mimic Poison Frog Ranitomeya imitator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twomey, Evan; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Venegas, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    mimetic radiation to establish four morphs in Peru. We find that mimetic morphs are strongly phenotypically differentiated, producing geographic clines with varying widths. However, distinct morphs show little neutral genetic divergence, and landscape genetic analyses implicate isolation by distance...

  5. Smac mimetic SM-164 potentiates APO2L/TRAIL- and doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuijun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The members of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs family are key negative regulators of apoptosis. Overexpression of IAPs are found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and can contribute to chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of HCC. Small-molecule Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac mimetics have recently emerged as novel anticancer drugs through targeting IAPs. The specific aims of this study were to 1 examine the anticancer activity of Smac mimetics as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy in HCC cells, and 2 investigate the mechanism of anticancer action of Smac mimetics. METHODS: Four HCC cell lines, including SMMC-7721, BEL-7402, HepG2 and Hep3B, and 12 primary HCC cells were used in this study. Smac mimetic SM-164 was used to treat HCC cells. Cell viability, cell death induction and clonal formation assays were used to evaluate the anticancer activity. Western blotting analysis and a pancaspase inhibitor were used to investigate the mechanisms. RESULTS: Although SM-164 induced complete cIAP-1 degradation, it displayed weak inhibitory effects on the viability of HCC cells. Nevertheless, SM-164 considerably potentiated Apo2 ligand or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (APO2L/TRAIL- and Doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in HCC cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that SM-164 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents resulted in enhanced activation of caspases-9, -3 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, and also led to decreased AKT activation. CONCLUSIONS: Smac mimetics can enhance chemotherapeutic-mediated anticancer activity by enhancing apoptosis signaling and suppressing survival signaling in HCC cells. This study suggests Smac mimetics are potential therapeutic agents for HCC.

  6. Glucocorticoids are ineffective in alcoholic hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, E; Gluud, C

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials of glucocorticoid treatment in clinical alcoholic hepatitis, adjusting for prognostic variables and their possible interaction with therapy, because these trials have given appreciably different results. Weighted...... may be different (beneficial or harmful) in special patient subgroups. These results do not support the routine use of glucocorticoids in patients with alcoholic hepatitis, including those with encephalopathy. Whether other subgroups may benefit needs further investigation using the individual patient...

  7. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 2: Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    The lifelong health of an individual is shaped during critical periods of development. The fetus is particularly susceptible to internal and external stimuli, many of which can alter developmental trajectories and subsequent susceptibility to disease. Glucocorticoids are critical in normal development of the fetus, as they are involved in the growth and maturation of many organ systems. The surge in fetal glucocorticoid levels that occurs in most mammalian species over the last few days of pregnancy is an important developmental switch leading to fundamental changes in gene regulation in many organs, including the brain. These changes are important for the transition to postnatal life. Exposure of the fetus to increased levels of glucocorticoids, resulting from maternal stress or treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids, can lead to long-term 'programming' of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and behaviours. Glucocorticoids act at multiple levels within the fetal brain. Growing evidence indicates that they can exert powerful effects on the epigenome, including on DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA, to influence gene expression. Such influences probably represent a critical component of the 'programming' process, and might be partly responsible for the transgenerational effects of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure on neurologic, cardiovascular and metabolic function.

  8. Inhibition of Rotavirus Infectivity by a Neoglycolipid Receptor Mimetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Daniel W.; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Hanafin, William P.; Firkins, Lawrence D.; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    -scale production capabilities make SLPE a promising candidate for further exploration as a possible prophylactic or therapeutic nutriceutical for combating rotavirus disease in animals. Most importantly, the results presented here provide proof of concept that the nutriceutical approach of providing natural or synthetic dietary receptor mimetics for protection against gastrointestinal virus infectious disease in all species is plausible. PMID:22254094

  9. Copper Complexes of Nicotinic-Aromatic Carboxylic Acids as Superoxide Dismutase Mimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acid (also known as vitamin B3 is a dietary element essential for physiological and antihyperlipidemic functions. This study reports the synthesis of novel mixed ligand complexes of copper with nicotinic and other select carboxylic acids (phthalic, salicylic and anthranilic acids. The tested copper complexes exhibited superoxide dismutase (SOD mimetic activity and antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, with a minimum inhibition concentration of 256 μg/mL. Copper complex of nicotinic-phthalic acids (CuNA/Ph was the most potent with a SOD mimetic activity of IC50 34.42 μM. The SOD activities were observed to correlate well with the theoretical parameters as calculated using density functional theory (DFT at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory. Interestingly, the SOD activity of the copper complex CuNA/Ph was positively correlated with the electron affinity (EA value. The two quantum chemical parameters, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO, were shown to be appropriate for understanding the mechanism of the metal complexes as their calculated energies show good correlation with the SOD activity. Moreover, copper complex with the highest SOD activity were shown to possess the lowest HOMO energy. These findings demonstrate a great potential for the development of value-added metallovitamin-based therapeutics.

  10. Primordial cosmology in mimetic born-infeld gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Che-Yu; Chen, Pisin

    2017-11-01

    The Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) model is reformulated within the mimetic approach. In the presence of a mimetic field, the model contains non-trivial vacuum solutions which could be free of spacetime singularity because of the Born-Infeld nature of the theory. We study a realistic primordial vacuum universe and prove the existence of regular solutions, such as primordial inflationary solutions of de Sitter type or bouncing solutions. Besides, the linear instabilities present in the EiBI model are found to be avoidable for some interesting bouncing solutions in which the physical metric as well as the auxiliary metric are regular at the background level.

  11. Glucocorticoids induce CCN5/WISP-2 expression and attenuate invasion in oestrogen receptor-negative human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrand, Nathalie; Stragier, Emilien; Redeuilh, Gérard; Sabbah, Michèle

    2012-10-01

    CCN5 (cysteine-rich 61/connective tissue growth factor/nephroblastoma overexpressed 5)/WISP-2 [WNT1 (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 1)-inducible signalling pathway protein 2] is an oestrogen-regulated member of the CCN family. CCN5 is a transcriptional repressor of genes associated with the EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) and plays an important role in maintenance of the differentiated phenotype in ER (oestrogen receptor)-positive breast cancer cells. In contrast, CCN5 is undetectable in more aggressive ER-negative breast cancer cells. We now report that CCN5 is induced in ER-negative breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-231 following glucocorticoid exposure, due to interaction of the endogenous glucocorticoid receptor with a functional glucocorticoid-response element in the CCN5 gene promoter. Glucocorticoid treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells is accompanied by morphological alterations, decreased invasiveness and attenuated expression of mesenchymal markers, including vimentin, cadherin 11 and ZEB1 (zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1). Interestingly, glucocorticoid exposure did not increase CCN5 expression in ER-positive breast cancer cells, but rather down-regulated ER expression, thereby attenuating oestrogen pathway signalling. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid treatment of ER-negative breast cancer cells induces high levels of CCN5 expression and is accompanied by the appearance of a more differentiated and less invasive epithelial phenotype. These findings propose a novel therapeutic strategy for high-risk breast cancer patients.

  12. 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases: Intracellular Gate-Keepers of Tissue Glucocorticoid Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Karen; Holmes, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid action on target tissues is determined by the density of “nuclear” receptors and intracellular metabolism by the two isozymes of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) which catalyze interconversion of active cortisol and corticosterone with inert cortisone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone. 11β-HSD type 1, a predominant reductase in most intact cells, catalyzes the regeneration of active glucocorticoids, thus amplifying cellular action. 11β-HSD1 is widely expressed in liver, adipose tissue, muscle, pancreatic islets, adult brain, inflammatory cells, and gonads. 11β-HSD1 is selectively elevated in adipose tissue in obesity where it contributes to metabolic complications. Similarly, 11β-HSD1 is elevated in the ageing brain where it exacerbates glucocorticoid-associated cognitive decline. Deficiency or selective inhibition of 11β-HSD1 improves multiple metabolic syndrome parameters in rodent models and human clinical trials and similarly improves cognitive function with ageing. The efficacy of inhibitors in human therapy remains unclear. 11β-HSD2 is a high-affinity dehydrogenase that inactivates glucocorticoids. In the distal nephron, 11β-HSD2 ensures that only aldosterone is an agonist at mineralocorticoid receptors (MR). 11β-HSD2 inhibition or genetic deficiency causes apparent mineralocorticoid excess and hypertension due to inappropriate glucocorticoid activation of renal MR. The placenta and fetus also highly express 11β-HSD2 which, by inactivating glucocorticoids, prevents premature maturation of fetal tissues and consequent developmental “programming.” The role of 11β-HSD2 as a marker of programming is being explored. The 11β-HSDs thus illuminate the emerging biology of intracrine control, afford important insights into human pathogenesis, and offer new tissue-restricted therapeutic avenues. PMID:23899562

  13. Glucocorticoid augmentation of prolonged exposure therapy: rationale and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Bierer, Linda M; Pratchett, Laura; Malowney, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged exposure (PE) therapy has been found to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, it is difficult for many patients to engage fully in the obligatory retelling of their traumatic experiences. This problem is compounded by the fact that habituation and cognitive restructuring - the main mechanisms through which PE is hypothesized to work - are not instantaneous processes, and often require several weeks before the distress associated with imaginal exposure abates. Two cases are described that respectively illustrate the use of hydrocortisone and placebo, in combination with PE, for the treatment of combat-related PTSD. Based on known effects of glucocorticoids on learning and memory performance, we hypothesized that augmentation with hydrocortisone would improve the therapeutic effects of PE by hastening "new" learning and facilitating decreases in the emotional impact of fear memories during the course of treatment. The veteran receiving hydrocortisone augmentation of PE displayed an accelerated and ultimately greater decline in PTSD symptoms than the veteran receiving placebo. While no general conclusion can be derived from comparison of two patients, the findings are consistent with the rationale for augmentation. These case reports support the potential for an appropriately designed and powered clinical trial to examine the efficacy of glucocorticoids in augmenting the effects of psychotherapy for PTSD.

  14. Glucocorticoid augmentation of prolonged exposure therapy: rationale and case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pratchett

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Prolonged exposure (PE therapy has been found to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; however, it is difficult for many patients to engage fully in the obligatory retelling of their traumatic experiences. This problem is compounded by the fact that habituation and cognitive restructuring – the main mechanisms through which PE is hypothesized to work – are not instantaneous processes, and often require several weeks before the distress associated with imaginal exposure abates. Case reports: Two cases are described that respectively illustrate the use of hydrocortisone and placebo, in combination with PE, for the treatment of combat-related PTSD. Based on known effects of glucocorticoids on learning and memory performance, we hypothesized that augmentation with hydrocortisone would improve the therapeutic effects of PE by hastening “new” learning and facilitating decreases in the emotional impact of fear memories during the course of treatment. The veteran receiving hydrocortisone augmentation of PE displayed an accelerated and ultimately greater decline in PTSD symptoms than the veteran receiving placebo. Conclusions: While no general conclusion can be derived from comparison of two patients, the findings are consistent with the rationale for augmentation. These case reports support the potential for an appropriately designed and powered clinical trial to examine the efficacy of glucocorticoids in augmenting the effects of psychotherapy for PTSD.

  15. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A. [Cell Systems Division, Invitrogen, Madison, WI (United States); Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Mais, Dale E. [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); MPI Research, Mattawan, MI (United States); Wang, Ming-Wei, E-mail: wangmw@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  16. Smac mimetic enables the anticancer action of BCG-stimulated neutrophils through TNF-α but not through TRAIL and FasL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinesh G, Goodwin; Chunduru, Srinivas; Kamat, Ashish M

    2012-07-01

    BCG, the current gold standard immunotherapy for bladder cancer, exerts its activity via recruitment of neutrophils to the tumor microenvironment. Many patients do not respond to BCG therapy, indicating the need to understand the mechanism of action of BCG-stimulated neutrophils and to identify ways to overcome resistance to BCG therapy. Using isolated human neutrophils stimulated with BCG, we found that TNF-α is the key mediator secreted by BCG-stimulated neutrophils. RT4v6 human bladder cancer cells, which express TNFR1, CD95/Fas, CD95 ligand/FasL, DR4, and DR5, were resistant to BCG-stimulated neutrophil conditioned medium but effectively killed by the combination of conditioned medium and Smac mimetic. rhTNF-α and rhFasL, but not rhTRAIL, in combination with Smac mimetic, generated signature molecular events similar to those produced by BCG-stimulated neutrophils in combination with Smac mimetic. However, experiments using neutralizing antibodies to these death ligands showed that TNF-α secreted from BCG-stimulated neutrophils was the key mediator of anticancer action. These findings explain the mechanism of action of BCG and identified Smac mimetics as potential combination therapeutic agents for bladder cancer.

  17. Designing a small molecule erythropoietin mimetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a protein made by the kidneys in response to low red blood cell count that is secreted into the bloodstream and binds to a receptor on hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow inducing them to become new red blood cells. EPO made with recombinant DNA technology was brought to market in the 1980s to treat anemia caused by kidney disease and cancer chemotherapy. Because EPO infusion was able to replace blood transfusions in many cases, it rapidly became a multibillion dollar per year drug and as the first biologic created with recombinant technology it launched the biotech industry. For many years intense research was focused on creating a small molecule orally available EPO mimetic. The Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) group seemed to definitively establish that only large peptides with a minimum of 60 residues could replace EPO, as anything less was not a full agonist. An intense study of the published work led me to hypothesize that the size of the mimetic is not the real issue, but the symmetry making and breaking of the EPO receptor induced by the ligand is the key to activating the stem cells. This analysis meant that residues in the binding site of the receptor deemed absolutely essential for ligand binding and activation from mutagenesis experiments, were probably not really that important. My fundamental hypotheses were: (a) the symmetric state of the homodimeric receptor is the most stable state and thus must be the off-state, (b) a highly localized binding site exists at a pivot point where the two halves of the receptor meet, (c) small molecules can be created that have high potency for this site that will be competitive with EPO and thus can displace the protein-protein interaction, (d) small symmetric molecules will stabilize the symmetric off-state of the receptor, and (e) a key asymmetry in the small molecule will stabilize a mirror image asymmetry in the receptor resulting in the stabilization of the on-state and proliferation of

  18. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Algieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  19. Cell outer membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liang, Fei; Kong, Lingheng; Zheng, Lina; Fan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    A negatively charged copolymer poly (MPC-co-AMPS) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and 2-acrylamide-2-methyl propane sulfonic acid (AMPS) was designed and synthesized. Chitosan nanoparticles with cell outer membrane mimetic structure were prepared by electrostatic interaction between the sulfonic acid groups of poly (MPC-co-AMPS) and the protonated amino groups of chitosan. Effects of factors on influencing the particle size, distribution, and stability were investigated. The experimental results showed that cell membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles with controllable and homogeneous size ranged from 100 to 300 nm were prepared at the concentration of 0.1-2.0 mg/mL and the charge ratio of 0.5-1.1. Chitosan nanoparticles prepared can exist stably for more than 45 days when placed at 4 °C and pH nanoparticles reduced significantly after surface modification with cell membrane mimetic structure, meeting the basic requirements of biomedical materials. The results suggest cell membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles prepared with polyanion and polycation obtain good biological compatibility and immune stealth ability, which has important academic significance and great application prospects.

  20. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  1. Glucocorticoids and the regulation of memory in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Quervain, Dominique J. -F; Aerni, Amanda; Schelling, Gustav; Roozendaal, Benno

    Over the last decades considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that glucocorticoids - stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex - are crucially involved in the regulation of memory. Specifically, glucocorticoids have been shown to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing

  2. Adverse consequences of glucocorticoid medication: psychological, cognitive, and behavioral effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judd, L.L.; Schettler, P.J.; Brown, E.S.; Wolkowitz, O.M.; Sternberg, E.M.; Bender, B.G.; Bulloch, K.; Cidlowski, J.A.; Kloet, E.R. de; Fardet, L.; Joels, M.; Leung, D.Y.; McEwen, B.S.; Roozendaal, B.; Rossum, E.F. van; Ahn, J.; Brown, D.W.; Plitt, A.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as

  3. Glucocorticoid Receptors and the Pattern of Steroid Response in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CD3+) expression of glucocorticoid receptors (GCR) and the response to glucocorticoid treatment in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (NS). The aim of the current study is to determine whether steroid responsiveness is dependent on ...

  4. Adverse Consequences of Glucocorticoid Medication : Psychological, Cognitive, and Behavioral Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judd, Lewis L.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Brown, E. Sherwood; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Sternberg, Esther M.; Bender, Bruce G.; Bulloch, Karen; Cidlowski, John A.; de Kloet, E. Ronald; Fardet, Laurence; Joëls, Marian; Leung, Donald Y. M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Roozendaal, Benno; Van Rossum, Elisabeth F. C.; Ahn, Junyoung; Brown, David W.; Plitt, Aaron; Singh, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as

  5. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 1: Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Fetal development is a critical period for shaping the lifelong health of an individual. However, the fetus is susceptible to internal and external stimuli that can lead to adverse long-term health consequences. Glucocorticoids are an important developmental switch, driving changes in gene regulation that are necessary for normal growth and maturation. The fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is particularly susceptible to long-term programming by glucocorticoids; these effects can persist throughout the life of an organism. Dysfunction of the HPA axis as a result of fetal programming has been associated with impaired brain growth, altered behaviour and increased susceptibility to chronic disease (such as metabolic and cardiovascular disease). Moreover, the effects of glucocorticoid-mediated programming are evident in subsequent generations, and transmission of these changes can occur through both maternal and paternal lineages.

  6. Islet-cell dysfunction induced by glucocorticoid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Kwa, Kelly A A; van Genugten, Renate E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system.......Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system....

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor haplotype and metabolic syndrome : the Lifelines cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wester, Vincent L.; Koper, Jan W.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Franco, Oscar H.; Stolk, Ronald P.; van Rossum, Elisabeth F. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An excess of glucocorticoids (Cushing's syndrome) is associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) features. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene influence sensitivity to glucocorticoids and have been associated with aspects of MetS. However,

  8. Perinatal glucocorticoid treatment and perspectives for antioxidat therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsseling, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338666885

    2014-01-01

    Pre- and postnatal glucocorticoids are a life-saving therapy for prematurely born infants. However, glucocorticoids also trigger unwanted side effects. In part I we investigated the effects of antenatal glucocorticoids on hippocampal development. First in a mice model using a clinically relevant

  9. Management of glucocorticoids-induced osteoporosis: role of teriparatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Migliaccio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Migliaccio1, Marina Brama1, Nazzarena Malavolta21Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medica, Policlinico Umberto I, Università degli Studi Sapienza di Roma, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Policlinico S Orsola Malpighi, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Glucocorticoids (GC-induced osteoporosis (GIOP is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis, which leads to an increased fracture risk in patients. The normal bone turnover depends on a balance between osteoblasts and osteoclasts activity and GC can cause a rapid bone loss, decreasing bone formation and increasing bone resorption. The decreased bone formation is mainly due to the GC-induced apoptosis of both osteoblasts and osteocytes, while the increased bone resorption is due to the increased life-span of pre-existing osteoclasts. Bisphosphonates are clearly effective in preventing and treating GIOP but anabolic therapeutic strategies are the new promising therapeutic alternative. Experimental and clinical studies indicate that teriparatide, the active (1–34 parathyroid hormone (PTH molecule, is efficacious for the treatment of GIOP, being able to induce an increase in bone mass in these patients. Intermittent administration of human PTH (1–34 stimulates bone formation by increasing osteoblast number. Additionally, human PTH (1–34 modulates the level and/or activity of locally produced growth factors and cytokines. Teriparatide has been demonstrated in several clinical studies to significantly decrease the incidence of fractures in patients affected by GIOP. It has recently received an indication for GIOP and its label indication has also been expanded.Keywords: glucocorticoids, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteoporosis, teriparatide

  10. Glucocorticoid Regulation of the Vitamin D Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter. PMID:20398752

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown and adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijdonk, Leonarda Wilhelmina Antonia van

    2010-01-01

    The research in this thesis is aimed at the elucidation of the role of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in hippocampal neuroplasticity and functioning. To achieve this, we have developed a novel method to specifically knockdown GR in a discrete cell population of the mouse brain. In this thesis I

  12. From receptor balance to rational glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, E Ron

    2014-08-01

    Corticosteroids secreted as end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis act like a double-edged sword in the brain. The hormones coordinate appraisal processes and decision making during the initial phase of a stressful experience and promote subsequently cognitive performance underlying the management of stress adaptation. This action exerted by the steroids on the initiation and termination of the stress response is mediated by 2 related receptor systems: mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). The receptor types are unevenly distributed but colocalized in abundance in neurons of the limbic brain to enable these complementary hormone actions. This contribution starts from a historical perspective with the observation that phasic occupancy of GR during ultradian rhythmicity is needed to maintain responsiveness to corticosteroids. Then, during stress, initially MR activation enhances excitability of limbic networks that are engaged in appraisal and emotion regulation. Next, the rising hormone concentration occupies GR, resulting in reallocation of energy to limbic-cortical circuits with a role in behavioral adaptation and memory storage. Upon MR:GR imbalance, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs, which can enhance an individual's vulnerability. Imbalance is characteristic for chronic stress experience and depression but also occurs during exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Hence, glucocorticoid psychopathology may develop in susceptible individuals because of suppression of ultradian/circadian rhythmicity and depletion of endogenous corticosterone from brain MR. This knowledge generated from testing the balance hypothesis can be translated to a rational glucocorticoid therapy.

  13. Bisphosphonates and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: cons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lems, W.F.; Saag, K.

    2015-01-01

    During the use of glucocorticoids (GCs), both vertebral and nonvertebral fracture risk are increased, due to the direct and indirect negative effects of GCs on bone, muscles, and the activity of the underlying inflammatory diseases. Inhibition of bone formation and increased apoptosis of osteocytes

  14. On the retinal toxicity of intraocular glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriglia, Alicia; Valamanesh, Fatemeh; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2010-12-15

    Corticosteroids are hormones involved in many physiological responses such as stress, immune modulation, protein catabolism and water homeostasis. The subfamily of glucocorticoids is used systemically in the treatment of inflammatory diseases or allergic reactions. In the eye, glucocorticoides are used to treat macular edema, inflammation and neovascularization. The most commonly used glucocorticoid is triamcinolone acetonide (TA). The pharmaceutical formulation of TA is not adapted for intravitreal administration but has been selected by ophthalmologists because its very low intraocular solubility provides sustained effect. Visual benefits of intraocular TA do not clearly correlate with morpho-anatomical improvements, suggesting potential toxicity. We therefore studied, non-common, but deleterious effects of glucocorticoids on the retina. We found that the intravitreal administration of TA is beneficial in the treatment of neovascularization because it triggers cell death of endothelial cells of neovessels by a caspase-independent mechanism. However, this treatment is toxic for the retina because it induces a non-apoptotic, caspase-independent cell death related to paraptosis, mostly in the retinal pigmented epithelium cells and the Müller cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinoids enhance glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T cells by facilitating glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, K; Sarang, Z; Scholtz, B; Brázda, P; Ghyselinck, N; Chambon, P; Fésüs, L; Szondy, Z

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of thymocytes is one of the first recognized forms of programmed cell death. It was shown to require gene activation induced by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translocated into the nucleus following ligand binding. In addition, the necessity of the glucocorticoid-induced, but transcription-independent phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) has also been shown. Here we report that retinoic acids, physiological ligands for the nuclear retinoid receptors, enhance glucocorticoid-induced death of mouse thymocytes both in vitro and in vivo. The effect is mediated by retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha/retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimers, and occurs when both RARα and RXR are ligated by retinoic acids. We show that the ligated RARα/RXR interacts with the ligated GR, resulting in an enhanced transcriptional activity of the GR. The mechanism through which this interaction promotes GR-mediated transcription does not require DNA binding of the retinoid receptors and does not alter the phosphorylation status of Ser232, known to regulate the transcriptional activity of GR. Phosphorylation of PI-PLC was not affected. Besides thymocytes, retinoids also promoted glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of various T-cell lines, suggesting that they could be used in the therapy of glucocorticoid-sensitive T-cell malignancies. PMID:21072052

  16. Fabrication of hierarchical feather-mimetic polymer nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Shenshen; Wang, Tao; Zhong, Longgang; Peng, Meiling; Yao, Juming; Wang, Sheng

    2018-01-01

    In this study, hierarchically feather-mimetic structures formed of poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) (PMIA) nanofibres were prepared by electrospinning and subsequent crystallisation for superwettability applications. X-ray diffraction measurementsand scanning electron microscopy show that a feather-mimetic structure of crystallised nanoflakes was formed following a hydrothermal treatment process. The nanoflakes formed a nanosized fine texture on top of a coarser-textured membrane, which greatly improved the membrane roughness and yielded a hierarchical topography. After fluorination, the membrane exhibited superamphiphobicity, with surface contact angles of 151° and 136° for water and hexadecane, respectively. The method provides new insight for the design and development of functional bionic membranes based on PMIA.

  17. Combinatorial solid-phase synthesis of hapalosin mimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jacob A.; Jensen, Knud J.; Nielsen, John

    2000-01-01

    The solid-phase synthesis of a small library of mimetics of the cyclic depsipeptide hapalosin is described. 3-Amino-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzoic acid was anchored through the anilino moiety to a backbone amide linker (BAL) handle support. Using chemoselective reactions and without the need for protec...... for protecting group manipulations, the benzoic acid group was first amidated, then the aniline nitrogen was acylated, and finally the nitro group was reduced to an amine and acylated or reductively alkylated, to generate a 12-member library.......The solid-phase synthesis of a small library of mimetics of the cyclic depsipeptide hapalosin is described. 3-Amino-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzoic acid was anchored through the anilino moiety to a backbone amide linker (BAL) handle support. Using chemoselective reactions and without the need...

  18. Cell death induction by the BH3 mimetic GX15-070 in thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Viehof, Jan; Jastrow, Holger; Becher-Boveleth, Nina; Fuhrer, Dagmar; Mann, Klaus

    2015-07-22

    The evasion of cell death is one of the hallmarks of cancer, contributing to both tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Dedifferentiated and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas that do not take up radioiodine are resistant to conventional anticancer treatments and patients with these tumors are difficult to treat. BH3 mimetics are a new class of drugs that target anti-apoptotic proteins of the BCL-2 family and promote cell death. The purpose of this study was to analyze the molecular effects of the BH3 mimetic GX15-070 on thyroid carcinoma cell lines and to characterize cell death induced by GX15-070. A total of 17 cell lines derived from follicular, papillary, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas were treated with GX15-070. Cell viability was measured with MTT assay while cell cycle phase distribution and subG1 peaks were determined after propidium iodide staining. We assessed cell death via the caspase 3/7 activity, caspase cleavage products, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) liberation assays, and a LC3 analysis by western blot. Ultrastructural changes were analysed by electron microscopy of GX15-070-treated cells. After GX15-070 treatment, the number of viable cells was decreased in all cell lines examined, with IC50 values ranging from 48nM to 3.25 μM. We observed biochemical markers of autophagic cell death and necrosis like LC3 conversion and LDH release after the GX15-070 treatment. Electron microscopy revealed several common characteristic ultrastructural changes like swelling of mitochondria, dilatation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, membrane blebbing and formation of vacuoles. GX15-070 treatment induced DNA fragmentation detected by subG1-peak induction and an arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle. Caspase activation after GX15-070 incubation was detected but had no effect on viability of cells. With these experiments we demonstrated the efficacy of the BH3 mimetic drug GX15-070 acting against dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma cells of various histological

  19. Iron Oxide Nanozyme: A Multifunctional Enzyme Mimetic for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Lizeng; Fan, Kelong; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in many important fields due to their excellent nanoscale physical properties, such as magnetism/superparamagnetism. They are usually assumed to be biologically inert in biomedical applications. However, iron oxide nanoparticles were recently found to also possess intrinsic enzyme-like activities, and are now regarded as novel enzyme mimetics. A special term, ?Nanozyme?, has thus been coined to highlight the intrinsic enzymatic properties of such...

  20. Insulin mimetic peptide S371 folds into a helical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2017-06-05

    Insulin plays a crucial physiological role in glucose control by initiating a number of signaling events on binding and activating its cell surface receptor. Insulin mimics have, therefore, become promising agents for treating diabetes and to probe the mechanism of interaction of insulin with its receptor. Specifically, many insulin-mimetic peptide sequences have been discovered and found to selectively function as agonists and antagonists, but their structures and the mechanistic details of their interactions with the receptor remain challenging to characterize. In this work, we have studied the folding properties and structure of a Site 1 insulin mimetic peptide S371 that has sequence similarities with the insulin B-chain as well as with a critical hormone-binding element of the receptor known as the C-terminal (CT) peptide. We first validated our simulation approaches by predicting the known solution structure of the insulin B-chain helix and then applied them to study the folding of the mimetic peptide S371. Our data predict a helical fold for the first 16 residues of S371 that has a resemblance to the helical motifs in the insulin B-chain and CT. We also propose receptor-bound models of S371 that provide mechanistic explanations for competing binding properties of S371 and CT to the Site 1 of IR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. From Dalek half balls to Daft Punk helmets: Mimetic fandom and the crafting of replicas

    OpenAIRE

    Matt Hills

    2014-01-01

    Mimetic fandom is a surprisingly understudied mode of (culturally masculinized) fan activity in which fans research and craft replica props. Mimetic fandom can be considered as (in)authentic and (im)material, combining noncommercial status with grassroots marketing or brand reinforcement as well as fusing an emphasis on material artifacts with Web 2.0 collective intelligence. Simply analyzing mimetic fandom as part of fannish material culture fails to adequately assess the nonmaterial aspects...

  2. Differential action of glucocorticoids on apolipoprotein E gene expression in macrophages and hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Georgeta Trusca

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (apoE has anti-atherosclerotic properties, being involved in the transport and clearance of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins as well as in cholesterol efflux from cells. We hypothesized that glucocorticoids may exert anti-inflammatory properties by increasing the level of macrophage-derived apoE. Our data showed that glucocorticoids increased apoE expression in macrophages in vitro as well as in vivo. Dexamethasone increased ~6 fold apoE mRNA levels in cultured peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 cells. Administered to C57BL/6J mice, dexamethasone induced a two-fold increase in apoE expression in peritoneal macrophages. By contrast, glucocorticoids did not influence apoE expression in hepatocytes, in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, dexamethasone enhanced apoE promoter transcriptional activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages, but not in HepG2 cells, as tested by transient transfections. Analysis of apoE proximal promoter deletion mutants, complemented by protein-DNA interaction assays demonstrated the functionality of a putative glucocorticoid receptors (GR binding site predicted by in silico analysis in the -111/-104 region of the human apoE promoter. In hepatocytes, GR can bind to their specific site within apoE promoter but are not able to modulate the gene expression. The modulatory blockade in hepatocytes is a consequence of partial involvement of transcription factors and other signaling molecules activated through MEK1/2 and PLA2/PLC pathways. In conclusion, our study indicates that glucocorticoids (1 differentially target apoE gene expression; (2 induce a significant increase in apoE level specifically in macrophages. The local increase of apoE gene expression in macrophages at the level of the atheromatous plaque may have therapeutic implications in atherosclerosis.

  3. Glucocorticoid-resistant Th17 cells are selectively attenuated by cyclosporine A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewitz-Bowers, Lauren P.; Lait, Philippa J. P.; Copland, David A.; Chen, Ping; Wu, Wenting; Dhanda, Ashwin D.; Vistica, Barbara P.; Williams, Emily L.; Liu, Baoying; Jawad, Shayma; Li, Zhiyu; Tucker, William; Hirani, Sima; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Zhu, Jun; Sen, Nida; Conway-Campbell, Becky L.; Gery, Igal; Dick, Andrew D.; Wei, Lai; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Lee, Richard W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids remain the cornerstone of treatment for inflammatory conditions, but their utility is limited by a plethora of side effects. One of the key goals of immunotherapy across medical disciplines is to minimize patients’ glucocorticoid use. Increasing evidence suggests that variations in the adaptive immune response play a critical role in defining the dose of glucocorticoids required to control an individual’s disease, and Th17 cells are strong candidate drivers for nonresponsiveness [also called steroid resistance (SR)]. Here we use gene-expression profiling to further characterize the SR phenotype in T cells and show that Th17 cells generated from both SR and steroid-sensitive individuals exhibit restricted genome-wide responses to glucocorticoids in vitro, and that this is independent of glucocorticoid receptor translocation or isoform expression. In addition, we demonstrate, both in transgenic murine T cells in vitro and in an in vivo murine model of autoimmunity, that Th17 cells are reciprocally sensitive to suppression with the calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine A. This result was replicated in human Th17 cells in vitro, which were found to have a conversely large genome-wide shift in response to cyclosporine A. These observations suggest that the clinical efficacy of cyclosporine A in the treatment of SR diseases may be because of its selective attenuation of Th17 cells, and also that novel therapeutics, which target either Th17 cells themselves or the effector memory T-helper cell population from which they are derived, would be strong candidates for drug development in the context of SR inflammation. PMID:25775512

  4. Metabolic effects of the incretin mimetic exenatide in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Schnabel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Catherine A Schnabel, Matthew Wintle, Orville KoltermanAmylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc, 9360 Towne Centre Drive, Suite 110, San Diego, CA 92121, USAAbstract: Interventional studies have demonstrated the impact of hyperglycemia on the development of vascular complications associated with type 2 diabetes, which underscores the importance of safely lowering glucose to as near-normal as possible. Among the current challenges to reducing the risk of vascular disease associated with diabetes is the management of body weight in a predominantly overweight patient population, and in which weight gain is likely with many current therapies. Exenatide is the first in a new class of agents termed incretin mimetics, which replicate several glucoregulatory effects of the endogenous incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1. Currently approved in the US as an injectable adjunct to metformin and/or sulfonylurea therapy, exenatide improves glycemic control through multiple mechanisms of action including: glucose-dependent enhancement of insulin secretion that potentially reduces the risk of hypoglycemia compared with insulin secretagogues; restoration of first-phase insulin secretion typically deficient in patients with type 2 diabetes; suppression of inappropriately elevated glucagon secretion to reduce postprandial hepatic output; and slowing the rate of gastric emptying to regulate glucose appearance into the circulation. Clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with subcutaneous exenatide twice daily demonstrated sustained improvements in glycemic control, evidenced by reductions in postprandial and fasting glycemia and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels. Notably, improvements in glycemic control with exenatide were coupled with progressive reductions in body weight, which represents a distinct therapeutic benefit for patients with type 2 diabetes. Acute effects of exenatide on beta-cell responsiveness along with significant reductions

  5. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica biofilm formation using small-molecule adenosine mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jacob A; Marshall, Joanna M; Bhatiya, Aditi; Eguale, Tadesse; Kwiek, Jesse J; Gunn, John S

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms have been widely implicated in chronic infections and environmental persistence of Salmonella enterica, facilitating enhanced colonization of surfaces and increasing the ability of the bacteria to be transmitted to new hosts. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi biofilm formation on gallstones from humans and mice enhances gallbladder colonization and bacterial shedding, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilms facilitate long-term persistence in a number of environments important to food, medical, and farming industries. Salmonella regulates expression of many virulence- and biofilm-related processes using kinase-driven pathways. Kinases play pivotal roles in phosphorylation and energy transfer in cellular processes and possess an ATP-binding pocket required for their functions. Many other cellular proteins also require ATP for their activity. Here we test the hypothesis that pharmacological interference with ATP-requiring enzymes utilizing adenosine mimetic compounds would decrease or inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. Through the screening of a 3,000-member ATP mimetic library, we identified a single compound (compound 7955004) capable of significantly reducing biofilm formation by S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi. The compound was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic toward S. Typhimurium or cytotoxic to mammalian cells. An ATP-Sepharose affinity matrix technique was used to discover potential protein-binding targets of the compound and identified GroEL and DeoD. Compound 7955004 was screened against other known biofilm-forming bacterial species and was found to potently inhibit biofilms of Acinetobacter baumannii as well. The identification of a lead compound with biofilm-inhibiting capabilities toward Salmonella provides a potential new avenue of therapeutic intervention against Salmonella biofilm formation, with applicability to biofilms of other bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. [Therapeutic strategies in idiopatic inflammatory myopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakour, Reza; Leimgruber, Annette; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Spertini, François

    2009-04-15

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, such as polymyositis and dermatomyositis, share common clinical features such as progressive, symmetrical muscle weakness prevailing in the lower limbs, associated sometimes with muscle pains. High CK and typical biopsy insure the diagnosis. Possible causes for secondary myopathies and associated diseases should be actively investigated. The search for autoantibodies helps to better classify inflammatory myopathies and to better define the prognosis of the myopathy. Glucocorticoids are the cornerstone of the early phase therapy. Glucocorticoid-sparing agents, such as azathioprine and methotrexate, are second line agents but can be readily prescribed. In case of therapeutic resistance, a rescue treatment (ciclosporine, immunoglobulins, rituximab, cyclophosphamide) could be considered.

  7. Preparation of Proteoglycan Mimetic Graft Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipper, Matt J; Place, Laura W

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are proteins with pendant glycosaminoglycan polysaccharide side chains. The method described here enables the preparation of graft copolymers with glycosaminoglycan side chains, which mimic the structure and composition of proteoglycans. By controlling the stoichiometry, graft copolymers can be obtained with a wide range of glycosaminoglycan side-chain densities. The method presented here uses a three-step reaction mechanism to first functionalize a hyaluronic acid backbone, followed by reductive amination to couple the glycosaminoglycan side chain to the backbone, by the reducing end. Proteoglycan mimics like the ones proposed here could be used to study the structure-property relationships of proteoglycans and to introduce the biochemical and biomechanical properties of proteoglycans into biomaterials and therapeutic formulations.

  8. Extensive Regulation of Diurnal Transcription and Metabolism by Glucocorticoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Weger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Altered daily patterns of hormone action are suspected to contribute to metabolic disease. It is poorly understood how the adrenal glucocorticoid hormones contribute to the coordination of daily global patterns of transcription and metabolism. Here, we examined diurnal metabolite and transcriptome patterns in a zebrafish glucocorticoid deficiency model by RNA-Seq, NMR spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-based methods. We observed dysregulation of metabolic pathways including glutaminolysis, the citrate and urea cycles and glyoxylate detoxification. Constant, non-rhythmic glucocorticoid treatment rescued many of these changes, with some notable exceptions among the amino acid related pathways. Surprisingly, the non-rhythmic glucocorticoid treatment rescued almost half of the entire dysregulated diurnal transcriptome patterns. A combination of E-box and glucocorticoid response elements is enriched in the rescued genes. This simple enhancer element combination is sufficient to drive rhythmic circadian reporter gene expression under non-rhythmic glucocorticoid exposure, revealing a permissive function for the hormones in glucocorticoid-dependent circadian transcription. Our work highlights metabolic pathways potentially contributing to morbidity in patients with glucocorticoid deficiency, even under glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Moreover, we provide mechanistic insight into the interaction between the circadian clock and glucocorticoids in the transcriptional regulation of metabolism.

  9. Testicular Receptor-4: Novel Regulator of Glucocorticoid Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyun; Du, Li; Heaney, Anthony P

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids are powerful steroid hormones that regulate development, metabolism, and immune response. However, glucocorticoid unresponsiveness or resistance is observed in the treatment of inflammatory, autoimmune, and lymphoproliferative diseases and significantly limits their efficacy. In Cushing's disease, although some glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of pituitary-derived ACTH is seen, corticotroph tumors exhibit relative resistance to glucocorticoid action. We previously demonstrated that testicular orphan receptor 4 (TR4) binds to the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) promoter to induce corticotroph tumor POMC expression and ACTH secretion, and we hypothesized that TR4 may interact with glucocorticoid signaling to modulate POMC expression and action. Here we demonstrate that TR4 abrogates glucocorticoid receptor (GR)- or dexamethasone-mediated POMC and activator protein-1 transrepression in both murine and human pituitary corticotroph tumor cells. Co-immunoprecipitation studies indicate that TR4 and GR interact directly with each other, resulting in TR4-mediated disruption of GR binding to the POMC promoter. These results demonstrate that TR4 binds GR to play an important role in glucocorticoid-directed corticotroph tumor POMC regulation in addition to modulating glucocorticoid actions on other GR targets. Characterization of this pathway may offer important insights into glucocorticoid resistance and may identify a novel approach for the treatment of Cushing's disease and the glucocorticoid-resistant states.

  10. Lung epithelial tip progenitors integrate glucocorticoid- and STAT3-mediated signals to control progeny fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laresgoiti, Usua; Rao, Chandrika; Brady, Jane L.; Richardson, Rachel V.; Batchen, Emma J.; Chapman, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient alveolar gas exchange capacity is a major contributor to lung disease. During lung development, a population of distal epithelial progenitors first produce bronchiolar-fated and subsequently alveolar-fated progeny. The mechanisms controlling this bronchiolar-to-alveolar developmental transition remain largely unknown. We developed a novel grafting assay to test if lung epithelial progenitors are intrinsically programmed or if alveolar cell identity is determined by environmental factors. These experiments revealed that embryonic lung epithelial identity is extrinsically determined. We show that both glucocorticoid and STAT3 signalling can control the timing of alveolar initiation, but that neither pathway is absolutely required for alveolar fate specification; rather, glucocorticoid receptor and STAT3 work in parallel to promote alveolar differentiation. Thus, developmental acquisition of lung alveolar fate is a robust process controlled by at least two independent extrinsic signalling inputs. Further elucidation of these pathways might provide therapeutic opportunities for restoring alveolar capacity. PMID:27578791

  11. Mifepristone as a therapeutic agent in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is the body's main stress-response system, and cortisol is the major adrenal glucocorticoid hormone secreted in human beings. HPA axis activity and cortisol secretion is regulated by a negative feedback system involving glucocorticoid receptors. Dysregulation of the HPA axis and increased cortisol levels have been implicated in mood, psychotic, and other psychiatric disorders. Mifepristone, as a potent antagonist of glucocorticoid receptors, has been studied or is currently being investigated as a potential therapeutic agent for psychotic depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and alcohol and cocaine dependence, as well as for mitigating the weight gain associated with the use of antipsychotic drugs and for improving cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This article will review some of the work in these areas.

  12. Epidural glucocorticoid use for vertebrogenic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Churyukanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review deals with the use of glucocorticoids (GC for nonspecific vertebrogenic pain and radiculopathy. The pathophysiology of radiculopathy and the role of mechanical and chemical components in the development of pain syndrome are discussed. The data of clinical trials analyzing the efficiency of epidural GC use, as well as possible indications for this therapy and its adverse reactions are under consideration. The available concepts of the analgesic effect of epidural CG are discussed.

  13. Biochemical endpoints of glucocorticoid hormone action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.A.; Nicholson, M.L.; Guyette, W.A.; Giddings, S.J.; Mendelsohn, S.L.; Nordeen, S.K.; Lyons, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    Both the rapidly evolving metabolic effects of glucocorticoids and the more slowly developing lethal actions appear to be initiated via the synthesis of new mRNAs and proteins. The chronic suppression of cell growth may be the consequence of suppression of overall rates of protein synthesis (and probably RNA and DNA synthesis as well) that in turn may represent the cellular response to the small changes in ratios of adenine nucleotides that result from the suppression of oxidative ATP production. The inhibition of glucose transport may also play a role here to prevent a compensatory increase in glycolytic ATP production. Some other hormone actions, the decrease in the ability of cells to concentrate AIB and the increase in nuclear fragility are unrelated to, and evolve separately from, the hormonal inhibitions on energy production. Cell killing is not the result of suppression of protein synthesis, nor of hormone-induced increases in calcium uptake. While the mechanisms are unknown, the increase in nuclear fragility appears to be the earliest measure of their operation. In tumor cells resistance to lethal actions of glucocorticoids may emerge via the selection of cells with hardier membranes, that are better able to withstand the intracellular destructive events set in motion by high levels of glucocorticoids.

  14. The glucocorticoid receptor: a revisited target for toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketon, Jeanette I Webster; Sternberg, Esther M

    2010-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation and glucocorticoid responses are critical for survival from a number of bacterial, viral and toxic insults, demonstrated by the fact that removal of the HPA axis or GR blockade enhances mortality rates. Replacement with synthetic glucocorticoids reverses these effects by providing protection against lethal effects. Glucocorticoid resistance/insensitivity is a common problem in the treatment of many diseases. Much research has focused on the molecular mechanism behind this resistance, but an area that has been neglected is the role of infectious agents and toxins. We have recently shown that the anthrax lethal toxin is able to repress glucocorticoid receptor function. Data suggesting that the glucocorticoid receptor may be a target for a variety of toxins is reviewed here. These studies have important implications for glucocorticoid therapy.

  15. The Glucocorticoid Receptor: A Revisited Target for Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette I. Webster Marketon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activation and glucocorticoid responses are critical for survival from a number of bacterial, viral and toxic insults, demonstrated by the fact that removal of the HPA axis or GR blockade enhances mortality rates. Replacement with synthetic glucocorticoids reverses these effects by providing protection against lethal effects. Glucocorticoid resistance/insensitivity is a common problem in the treatment of many diseases. Much research has focused on the molecular mechanism behind this resistance, but an area that has been neglected is the role of infectious agents and toxins. We have recently shown that the anthrax lethal toxin is able to repress glucocorticoid receptor function. Data suggesting that the glucocorticoid receptor may be a target for a variety of toxins is reviewed here. These studies have important implications for glucocorticoid therapy.

  16. Genetic engineering of the glucocorticoid receptor by fusion with the herpes viral protein VP22 causes selective loss of transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, J; Stevens, A; Ray, D W

    2002-03-01

    The development of methods for engineering proteins with novel properties opens the way to manipulating intracellular processes in a therapeutically useful way. Glucocorticoids, acting via glucocorticoid receptors (GR), are potent anti-inflammatory agents, acting to oppose nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B) function. The herpes viral protein, VP22, has been reported to confer intercellular trafficking activity on 'cargo' proteins, potentially facilitating gene therapy with intracellular proteins. VP22GR, resulting from the addition of VP22 to the N terminal of GR, was equipotent with the wild-type GR in opposing NF kappa B p65-driven expression of an NF kappa B reporter gene. Surprisingly, VP22GR was incapable of inducing transactivation of positive glucocorticoid reporter genes (MMTV-luc and TAT3-luc). Furthermore, the VP22GR had powerful dominant negative activity on both endogenous and exogenous GR transactivation. VP22GR was cytoplasmic in quiescent cells, and after hormone addition underwent nuclear translocation to share the same distribution as the GR. The ability of the VP22GR to selectively confer and enhance glucocorticoid-dependent transrepression of NF kappa B may be of use therapeutically in e.g. transplant rejection, inflammatory arthritis or asthma.

  17. Dibutyltin disrupts glucocorticoid receptor function and impairs glucocorticoid-induced suppression of cytokine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Gumy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotins are highly toxic and widely distributed environmental chemicals. Dibutyltin (DBT is used as stabilizer in the production of polyvinyl chloride plastics, and it is also the major metabolite formed from tributyltin (TBT in vivo. DBT is immunotoxic, however, the responsible targets remain to be defined. Due to the importance of glucocorticoids in immune-modulation, we investigated whether DBT could interfere with glucocorticoid receptor (GR function. METHODOLOGY: We used HEK-293 cells transiently transfected with human GR as well as rat H4IIE hepatoma cells and native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages expressing endogenous receptor to study organotin effects on GR function. Docking of organotins was used to investigate the binding mechanism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that nanomolar concentrations of DBT, but not other organotins tested, inhibit ligand binding to GR and its transcriptional activity. Docking analysis indicated that DBT inhibits GR activation allosterically by inserting into a site close to the steroid-binding pocket, which disrupts a key interaction between the A-ring of the glucocorticoid and the GR. DBT inhibited glucocorticoid-induced expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and tyrosine-aminotransferase (TAT and abolished the glucocorticoid-mediated transrepression of TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activity. Moreover, DBT abrogated the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: DBT inhibits ligand binding to GR and subsequent activation of the receptor. By blocking GR activation, DBT may disturb metabolic functions and modulation of the immune system, providing an explanation for some of the toxic effects of this organotin.

  18. Perioperative glucocorticoids in hip and knee surgery - benefit vs. harm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, T H; Kehlet, H

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are frequently used to prevent post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and may be part of multimodal analgesic regimes. The objective of this review was to evaluate the overall benefit vs. harm of perioperative glucocorticoids in patients undergoing hip or knee surgery. A wide......-analysis was performed. In conclusion, in addition to PONV reduction with low-dose systemic glucocorticoid, this review supports high-dose systemic glucocorticoid to ameliorate post-operative pain after hip and knee surgery. However, large-scale safety and dose-finding studies are warranted before final recommendations....

  19. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD\\'s ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  20. Iron Oxide Nanozyme: A Multifunctional Enzyme Mimetic for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lizeng; Fan, Kelong; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in many important fields due to their excellent nanoscale physical properties, such as magnetism/superparamagnetism. They are usually assumed to be biologically inert in biomedical applications. However, iron oxide nanoparticles were recently found to also possess intrinsic enzyme-like activities, and are now regarded as novel enzyme mimetics. A special term, "Nanozyme", has thus been coined to highlight the intrinsic enzymatic properties of such nanomaterials. Since then, iron oxide nanoparticles have been used as nanozymes to facilitate biomedical applications. In this review, we will introduce the enzymatic features of iron oxide nanozyme (IONzyme), and summarize its novel applications in biomedicine.

  1. Nonconventional amide bond formation catalysis: programming enzyme specificity with substrate mimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordusa F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the design and characteristics of substrate mimetics in protease-catalyzed reactions. Firstly, the basis of protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis and the general advantages of substrate mimetics over common acyl donor components are described. The binding behavior of these artificial substrates and the mechanism of catalysis are further discussed on the basis of hydrolysis, acyl transfer, protein-ligand docking, and molecular dynamics studies on the trypsin model. The general validity of the substrate mimetic concept is illustrated by the expansion of this strategy to trypsin-like, glutamic acid-specific, and hydrophobic amino acid-specific proteases. Finally, opportunities for the combination of the substrate mimetic strategy with the chemical solid-phase peptide synthesis and the use of substrate mimetics for non-peptide organic amide synthesis are presented.

  2. Why glucocorticoid withdrawal may sometimes be as dangerous as the treatment itself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinsen, Stina; Baslund, Bo; Klose, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy is widely used, but withdrawal from glucocorticoids comes with a potential life-threatening risk of adrenal insufficiency. Recent case reports document that adrenal crisis after glucocorticoid withdrawal remains a serious problem in clinical practice. Partly due to difficul......Glucocorticoid therapy is widely used, but withdrawal from glucocorticoids comes with a potential life-threatening risk of adrenal insufficiency. Recent case reports document that adrenal crisis after glucocorticoid withdrawal remains a serious problem in clinical practice. Partly due...

  3. EPOR-Based Purification and Analysis of Erythropoietin Mimetic Peptides from Human Urine by Cys-Specific Cleavage and LC/MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Matthias; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-09-01

    The development of a new class of erythropoietin mimetic agents (EMA) for treating anemic conditions has been initiated with the discovery of oligopeptides capable of dimerizing the erythropoietin (EPO) receptor and thus stimulating erythropoiesis. The most promising amino acid sequences have been mounted on various different polymeric structures or carrier molecules to obtain highly active EPO-like drugs exhibiting beneficial and desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. Concomitant with creating new therapeutic options, erythropoietin mimetic peptide (EMP)-based drug candidates represent means to artificially enhance endurance performance and necessitate coverage by sports drug testing methods. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a strategy for the comprehensive detection of EMPs in doping controls, which can be used complementary to existing protocols. Three model EMPs were used to provide proof-of-concept data. Following EPO receptor-facilitated purification of target analytes from human urine, the common presence of the cysteine-flanked core structure of EMPs was exploited to generate diagnostic peptides with the aid of a nonenzymatic cleavage procedure. Sensitive detection was accomplished by targeted-SIM/data-dependent MS2 analysis. Method characterization was conducted for the EMP-based drug peginesatide concerning specificity, linearity, precision, recovery, stability, ion suppression/enhancement, and limit of detection (LOD, 0.25 ng/mL). Additionally, first data for the identification of the erythropoietin mimetic peptides EMP1 and BB68 were generated, demonstrating the multi-analyte testing capability of the presented approach.

  4. Context Modulates Outcome of Perinatal Glucocorticoid Action in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo Ronald ede Kloet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prematurely born infants may be at risk, because of inadequate maturation of tissues. If there are signs of preterm birth, it has become common practice therefore to treat either antenatally the mother or postnatally the infant with glucocorticoids to accelerate tissue development, particularly of the lung. However, this life-saving early glucocorticoid treatment was found to increase the risk of adverse outcome in later life. In one animal study the authors reported a 25% shorter lifespan of rats treated as newborns with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, but sofar this finding has not been replicated. After a brief clinical introduction, we discuss studies in rodents designed to examine how perinatal glucocorticoid action affects the developing brain. It appears that the perinatal action of the glucocorticoid depends on the context and the timing as well as the type of administered steroid. The type of steroid is important because the endogenous glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone bind to two distinct receptor populations, i.e. mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid receptors (GR, while synthetic glucocorticoids predominantly bind to the GR. In addition, if given antenatally hydrocortisone is inactivated in the placenta by 11β-HSD type 2, and dexamethasone is not. With respect to timing, the outcome of glucocorticoid effects is different in early vs late phases of brain development. The context refers to the environmental input that can affect the susceptibility to glucocorticoid action in the newborn rodent brain; early handling of pups and maternal care obliterate effects of postnatal dexamethasone treatment. Context also refers to coping with environmental conditions in later life, for which the individual may have been programmed epigenetically by early life experience. This knowledge of determinants affecting the outcome of perinatal glucocorticoid exposure may have clinical implications for the treatment of

  5. Context modulates outcome of perinatal glucocorticoid action in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, E Ronald; Claessens, Sanne E F; Kentrop, Jiska

    2014-01-01

    Prematurely born infants may be at risk, because of inadequate maturation of tissues. If there are signs of preterm birth, it has become common practice therefore to treat either antenatally the mother or postnatally the infant with glucocorticoids to accelerate tissue development, particularly of the lung. However, this life-saving early glucocorticoid treatment was found to increase the risk of adverse outcome in later life. In one animal study, the authors reported a 25% shorter lifespan of rats treated as newborns with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, but so far this finding has not been replicated. After a brief clinical introduction, we discuss studies in rodents designed to examine how perinatal glucocorticoid action affects the developing brain. It appears that the perinatal action of the glucocorticoid depends on the context and the timing as well as the type of administered steroid. The type of steroid is important because the endogenous glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone bind to two distinct receptor populations, i.e., mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors (GR), while synthetic glucocorticoids predominantly bind to the GR. In addition, if given antenatally hydrocortisone is inactivated in the placenta by 11β-HSD type 2, and dexamethasone is not. With respect to timing, the outcome of glucocorticoid effects is different in early vs. late phases of brain development. The context refers to the environmental input that can affect the susceptibility to glucocorticoid action in the newborn rodent brain; early handling of pups and maternal care obliterate effects of post-natal dexamethasone treatment. Context also refers to coping with environmental conditions in later life, for which the individual may have been programed epigenetically by early-life experience. This knowledge of determinants affecting the outcome of perinatal glucocorticoid exposure may have clinical implications for the treatment of prematurely born infants.

  6. The Regulation of Muscle Mass by Endogenous Glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Marks

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are highly conserved fundamental regulators of energy homeostasis. In response to stress in the form of perceived danger or acute inflammation, glucocorticoids are released from the adrenal gland, rapidly mobilizing energy from carbohydrate, fat and protein stores. In the case of inflammation, mobilized protein is critical for the rapid synthesis of acute phase reactants and an efficient immune response to infection. While adaptive in response to infection, chronic mobilization can lead to a p rofound depletion of energy stores. Skeletal muscle represents the major body store of protein, and can become substantially atrophied under conditions of chronic inflammation. Glucocorticoids elicit the atrophy of muscle by increasing the rate of protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy lysosome system. Protein synthesis is also suppressed at the level of translational initiation, preventing the production of new myofibrillar protein. Glucocorticoids also antagonize the action of anabolic regulators such as insulin further exacerbating the loss of protein and muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass in the context of chronic disease is a key feature of cachexia and contributes substantially to morbidity and mortality. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that glucocorticoid signaling is a common mediator of wasting, irrespective of the underlying initiator or disease state. This review will highlight fundamental mechanisms of glucocorticoid signaling and detail the mechanisms of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. Additionally, the evidence for glucocorticoids as a driver of muscle wasting in numerous disease states will be discussed. Given the burden of wasting diseases and the nodal nature of glucocorticoid signaling, effective anti-glucocorticoid therapy would be a valuable clinical tool. Therefore, the progress and potential pitfalls in the development of glucocorticoid antagonists for muscle wasting will

  7. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M Presman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation within the GR DNA-binding domain (GRdim mutant has been reported as crucial for receptor dimerization and DNA binding, this assumption has recently been challenged. Here we have analyzed the GR oligomerization state in vivo using the number and brightness assay. Our results suggest a complete, reversible, and DNA-independent ligand-induced model for GR dimerization. We demonstrate that the GRdim forms dimers in vivo whereas adding another mutation in the ligand-binding domain (I634A severely compromises homodimer formation. Contrary to dogma, no correlation between the GR monomeric/dimeric state and transcriptional activity was observed. Finally, the state of dimerization affected DNA binding only to a subset of GR binding sites. These results have major implications on future searches for therapeutic glucocorticoids with reduced side effects.

  8. The mimetic repertoire of the spotted bowerbird Ptilonorhynchus maculatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Laura A.; Healy, Susan D.

    2011-06-01

    Although vocal mimicry in songbirds is well documented, little is known about the function of such mimicry. One possibility is that the mimic produces the vocalisations of predatory or aggressive species to deter potential predators or competitors. Alternatively, these sounds may be learned in error as a result of their acoustic properties such as structural simplicity. We determined the mimetic repertoires of a population of male spotted bowerbirds Ptilonorhynchus maculatus, a species that mimics predatory and aggressive species. Although male mimetic repertoires contained an overabundance of vocalisations produced by species that were generally aggressive, there was also a marked prevalence of mimicry of sounds that are associated with alarm such as predator calls, alarm calls and mobbing calls, irrespective of whether the species being mimicked was aggressive or not. We propose that it may be the alarming context in which these sounds are first heard that may lead both to their acquisition and to their later reproduction. We suggest that enhanced learning capability during acute stress may explain vocal mimicry in many species that mimic sounds associated with alarm.

  9. Effects of canola and corn oil mimetic on Jurkat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinsete Juliana A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Western diet is high in omega-6 fatty acids and low in omega-3 fatty acids. Canola oil contains a healthier omega 3 to omega 6 ratio than corn oil. Jurkat T leukemia cells were treated with free fatty acids mixtures in ratios mimicking that found in commercially available canola oil (7% α-linolenic, 30% linoleic, 54% oleic or corn oil (59% linoleic, 24% oleic to determine the cell survival or cell death and changes in expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and receptors following oil treatment. Methods Fatty acid uptake was assessed by gas chromatography. Cell survival and cell death were evaluated by cell cycle analyses, propidium-iodide staining, trypan blue exclusion and phosphatidylserine externalization. mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines and receptors were assessed by RT-PCR. Results There was a significant difference in the lipid profiles of the cells after treatment. Differential action of the oils on inflammatory molecules, following treatment at non-cytotoxic levels, indicated that canola oil mimetic was anti-inflammatory whereas corn oil mimetic was pro-inflammatory. Significance These results indicate that use of canola oil in the diet instead of corn oil might be beneficial for diseases promoted by inflammation.

  10. Chromatin Architecture Defines the Glucocorticoid Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Craig J.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2013-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) functions to regulate a wide group of physiological processes through hormone inducible interaction with genomic loci and subsequent manipulation of the transcriptional output of target genes. Despite expression in a wide variety of tissues, the GR has diverse roles that are regulated tightly in a cell type specific manner. With the advent of whole genome approaches, the details of that diversity and the mechanisms regulating them are beginning to be elucidated. This review aims describe the recent advances detailing the role chromatin structure plays in dictating GR specificity. PMID:23545159

  11. Glucocorticoid therapy-induced memory deficits: acute versus chronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, Daniel; Wolf, Oliver T; Kollias, Spyros; Roozendaal, Benno; Forster, Adrian; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2008-03-26

    Conditions with chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels are usually associated with declarative memory deficits. Considerable evidence suggests that long-term glucocorticoid exposure may cause cognitive impairment via cumulative and long-lasting influences on hippocampal function and morphology. However, because elevated glucocorticoid levels at the time of retention testing are also known to have direct impairing effects on memory retrieval, it is possible that such acute hormonal influences on retrieval processes contribute to the memory deficits found with chronic glucocorticoid exposure. To investigate this issue, we examined memory functions and hippocampal volume in 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated either chronically (5.3 +/- 1.0 years, mean +/- SE) with low to moderate doses of prednisone (7.5 +/- 0.8 mg, mean +/- SE) or without glucocorticoids. In both groups, delayed recall of words learned 24 h earlier was assessed under conditions of either elevated or basal glucocorticoid levels in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Although the findings in this patient population did not provide evidence for harmful effects of a history of chronic prednisone treatment on memory performance or hippocampal volume per se, acute prednisone administration 1 h before retention testing to either the steroid or nonsteroid group impaired word recall. Thus, these findings indicate that memory deficits observed under chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels result, at least in part, from acute and reversible glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval.

  12. Glucocorticoid receptors in monocytes in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Binder, C

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics were investigated in 8 males with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes mellitus and 14 healthy males. The cell type studied was monocytes, and a method for correction for heterogeneity in glucocorticoid binding in a mononuclear leucocyte population was...

  13. Glucocorticoids facilitate the retention of acquired immobility during forced swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H D; De Korte, C C; De Kloet, E R

    1985-01-01

    The adrenalectomy-induced decrease in the level of immobility during a 5 min retest period in the Porsolt swimming test could be reversed by glucocorticoids administered s.c. 15 min after the initial forced swimming exposure. The synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and RU 28362 were active in

  14. The impact of insulin resistance, gender, genes, glucocorticoids and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-15

    Nov 15, 2010 ... Review: The impact of insulin resistance, gender, genes, glucocorticoids and ethnicity on body fat distribution. 2010 Volume 15 No 3 ... Understanding the factors that regulate body fat distribution should not only give insight ... glucocorticoids may sculpture body fat and change the pathogenicity of obesity.

  15. Profound postanesthetic hypoglycemia attributable to glucocorticoid deficiency in 2 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, I F; Matwichuk, C L; Carpenter, L G; Behrend, E N

    1999-01-01

    Glucocorticoid deficiency was diagnosed as the cause of severe postanesthetic hypoglycemia in 2 dogs. Prior signs of systemic illness were not described in either dog; however, preoperative hematologic findings were consistent with glucocorticoid deficiency. Fasting hypoglycemia is a possible complication of chronic adrenal insufficiency primarily because of impaired gluconeogenesis. PMID:10416071

  16. Withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids and exacerbations of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Helgo; Disse, Bernd; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids in combination with long-acting bronchodilators is recommended in patients with frequent exacerbations of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the benefit of inhaled glucocorticoids in addition to two long......-acting bronchodilators has not been fully explored. METHODS: In this 12-month, double-blind, parallel-group study, 2485 patients with a history of exacerbation of COPD received triple therapy consisting of tiotropium (at a dose of 18 μg once daily), salmeterol (50 μg twice daily), and the inhaled glucocorticoid...... findings, health status, and dyspnea were also monitored. RESULTS: As compared with continued glucocorticoid use, glucocorticoid withdrawal met the prespecified noninferiority criterion of 1.20 for the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) with respect to the first moderate or severe COPD...

  17. Mimetic Gravity: A Review of Recent Developments and Applications to Cosmology and Astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Sebastiani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mimetic gravity is a Weyl-symmetric extension of General Relativity, related to the latter by a singular disformal transformation, wherein the appearance of a dust-like perfect fluid can mimic cold dark matter at a cosmological level. Within this framework, it is possible to provide a unified geometrical explanation for dark matter, the late-time acceleration, and inflation, making it a very attractive theory. In this review, we summarize the main aspects of mimetic gravity, as well as extensions of the minimal formulation of the model. We devote particular focus to the reconstruction technique, which allows the realization of any desired expansionary history of the universe by an accurate choice of potential or other functions defined within the theory (as in the case of mimetic f(R gravity. We briefly discuss cosmological perturbation theory within mimetic gravity. As a case study within which we apply the concepts previously discussed, we study a mimetic Hořava-like theory, of which we explore solutions and cosmological perturbations in detail. Finally, we conclude the review by discussing static spherically symmetric solutions within mimetic gravity and apply our findings to the problem of galactic rotation curves. Our review provides an introduction to mimetic gravity, as well as a concise but self-contained summary of recent findings, progress, open questions, and outlooks on future research directions.

  18. Tall stature in familial glucocorticoid deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, L L; Huebner, A; Metherell, L A; Canas, A; Warne, G L; Bitti, M L; Cianfarani, S; Clayton, P E; Savage, M O; Clark, A J

    2000-10-01

    Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) has frequently been associated with tall stature in affected individuals. The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of five such patients were studied with the aim of clarifying the underlying mechanisms of excessive growth in these patients. Five patients with a clinical diagnosis of FGD are described in whom the disorder resulted from a variety of novel or previously described missense or nonsense mutations of the ACTH receptor (MC2-R). All patients demonstrated excessive linear growth over that predicted from parental indices and increased head circumference. Growth hormone and IGF-I-values were normal. Growth charts suggest that the excessive growth is reduced to normal following the introduction of glucocorticoid replacement. A characteristic facial appearance including hypertelorism, marked epicanthic folds and prominent frontal bossing was noted. These findings indicate that ACTH resistance resulting from a defective ACTH receptor may be associated with abnormalities of cartilage and/or bone growth independently of the GH-IGF-I axis, but probably dependent on ACTH actions through other melanocortin receptors.

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: 2013 update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazzantini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis leading to the so-called glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIO. A treatment with 10 mg/d of prednisone or equivalent for more than 3 months leads to a 7-fold increase in hip fractures and a 17-fold increase in vertebral fractures. The difference between bone quantity and quality in GIO makes bone mineral density measurements inadequate to detect patients at risk of fracture. The adverse effects of glucocorticoids on the skeleton derive from a direct impact on bone cells with a severe impairment of mechanical competence. Crucial to prevention of GIO is early timing of intervention. The World Health Organization has adopted a fracture prevention algorithm (FRAX intended to estimate fracture risk in GIO. The American College of Rhematology modified its prevention and treatment guidelines taking into account the individual risk of fracture calculated in GIO on the basis of the FRAX algorithm. Recently, also a joint Guideline Working Group of the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF and the European Calcified Tissue Society (ECTS published a framework for the development of national guidelines for the management of GIO. Bisphosphonates are the first-line drugs to treat GIO; teriparatide counteracts several fundamental pathophysiologic aspects of GIO; denosumab is useful in patients with renal failure and in potentially pregnant young women. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty may be less beneficial in GIO than in primary involutional osteoporosis.

  20. The CNTF-derived peptide mimetic Cintrofin attenuates spatial-learning deficits in a rat post-status epilepticus model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russmann, Vera; Seeger, Natalie; Zellinger, Christina; Hadamitzky, Martin; Pankratova, Stanislava; Wendt, Hannes; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir; Potschka, Heidrun

    2013-11-27

    Ciliary neurotrophic growth factor is considered a potential therapeutic agent for central nervous system diseases. We report first in vivo data of the ciliary neurotrophic growth factor peptide mimetic Cintrofin in a rat post-status epilepticus model. Cintrofin prevented long-term alterations in the number of doublecortin-positive neuronal progenitor cells and attenuated the persistence of basal dendrites. In contrast, Cintrofin did neither affect acute status epilepticus-associated alterations in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis nor reveal any relevant effect on seizure activity. Whereas status epilepticus caused a significant disturbance in spatial learning in reversed peptide-treated rats, the performance of Cintrofin-treated rats did not differ from controls. The study confirms that Cintrofin comprises an active sequence mimicking effects of its parent molecule. While the data argue against an antiepileptogenic effect, they indicate a putative disease-modifying impact of Cintrofin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. TREATMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN A GOLDEN LION TAMARIN (LEONTOPITHECUS ROSALIA) WITH THE GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1 MIMETIC EXENATIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James G; Langan, Jennifer N; Gilor, Chen

    2016-09-01

    An 8-yr-old male golden lion tamarin ( Leontopithecus rosalia ) was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus based on hyperglycemia and persistent glycosuria. Initial treatment consisted of the oral antihyperglycemic medications glipizide and metformin that resulted in decreased blood glucose concentrations; however, marked glycosuria persisted. Insufficient improvement on oral antihyperglycemic therapy and poor feasibility of daily subcutaneous insulin therapy led to an investigation into an alternative therapy with extended-release exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic, at a dosage of 0.13 mg/kg subcutaneously once per month. Following treatment with exenatide, the persistent glycosuria resolved, the animal maintained normal blood glucose concentrations, and had lower serum fructosamine concentrations compared to pretreatment levels. Based on these findings, extended-release exenatide could be considered as a therapeutic option in nonhuman primates with diabetes mellitus that do not respond to oral antihyperglycemics and in which daily subcutaneous insulin is not feasible.

  2. [Detection of glucocorticoids by pressurized capillary electrochromatography with ultra-violet detection and its application in hair analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boxiang; Zheng, Minmin; Lu, Lanxiang; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-08-01

    An effective and convenient method for glucocorticoid analysis in hair by reversed-phase pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) with ultra-violet (UV) detection was developed. Eight glucocorticoids (betamethasone, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, prednisolone acetate, hydrocortisone acetate, cortisone acetate and corticosterone) were separated within 20 min in an isocratic mode pCEC. The separations were performed on a reversed-phase C18 column, and with 245 nm as the UV detection wavelength. The mobile phase was composed of 1.5 mmol/L Tris buffer (pH 8.0) and acetonitrile (65: 35, v/v), at a pump flow rate of 0.105 mL/min. All of the compounds showed good linearity in the range of 0.036 - 4.0 mmol/L. The limits of detection (LODs) for all glucocorticoids were of microg/g levels. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of hair samples. The interference of hair matrices was effectively eliminated by protein enzymatic digestion, followed by a methanol extraction and a solid phase extraction (SPE) clean up step. The average recoveries of 71% - 85% at different fortified levels of glucocorticoids were achieved. This non-invasive method is useful for rapidly estimating the level of drug exposure in drug chronic abuse and monitoring the compliance of therapeutic drugs.

  3. Primary and secondary prophylaxis to the use of inhaled glucocorticoid in primary health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Barbara Rubek; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Schwarz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the extent of inhaled glucocorticoid (IGC) treatment in general and to what extent general practitioners (GPs) manage the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.......To investigate the extent of inhaled glucocorticoid (IGC) treatment in general and to what extent general practitioners (GPs) manage the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis....

  4. The Effect of Glucocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptor Interactions on Brain, Spinal Cord, and Glial Cell Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Madalena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress, injury, and disease trigger glucocorticoid (GC elevation. Elevated GCs bind to the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor (GR. While GRs are in every cell in the nervous system, the expression level varies, suggesting that diverse cell types react differently to GR activation. Stress/GCs induce structural plasticity in neurons, Schwann cells, microglia, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes as well as affect neurotransmission by changing the release and reuptake of glutamate. While general nervous system plasticity is essential for adaptation and learning and memory, stress-induced plasticity is often maladaptive and contributes to neuropsychiatric disorders and neuropathic pain. In this brief review, we describe the evidence that stress/GCs activate GR to promote cell type-specific changes in cellular plasticity throughout the nervous system.

  5. Mimetic Discretization of Vector-valued Diffusion Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kennet

    relations are based on universal physical laws and if these are not represented correctly by the numerical scheme, the wrong physics are being solved for. General schemes like the Finite Difference Method (FDM) and the Finite Element Method (FEM) approximate the solution of all the involved Partial......In this thesis a mimetic discretization method on quadrilaterals is presented with an emphasis on diffusion dominated problems containing second order tensors. Such problems are among others found in structural and fluid dynamical problems. The expansion of the variables is done through orthogonal...... this is the balance of the change of mass in a finite volume with mass fluxes across the surfaces bounding this volume? In the FDM and FEM the derivatives in the gradient-, curl- and divergence operator are approximated by formulating expressions with respect to a finite number of selected points. The continuous...

  6. Ancient homology underlies adaptive mimetic diversity across butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Jason R.; Imhoff, Vance E.; Martin, Arnaud; Savage, Wesley K.; Chamberlain, Nicola L.; Pote, Ben L.; Peterson, Chelsea; Smith, Gabriella E.; Evans, Benjamin; Reed, Robert D.; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Mullen, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Convergent evolution provides a rare, natural experiment with which to test the predictability of adaptation at the molecular level. Little is known about the molecular basis of convergence over macro-evolutionary timescales. Here we use a combination of positional cloning, population genomic resequencing, association mapping and developmental data to demonstrate that positionally orthologous nucleotide variants in the upstream region of the same gene, WntA, are responsible for parallel mimetic variation in two butterfly lineages that diverged >65 million years ago. Furthermore, characterization of spatial patterns of WntA expression during development suggests that alternative regulatory mechanisms underlie wing pattern variation in each system. Taken together, our results reveal a strikingly predictable molecular basis for phenotypic convergence over deep evolutionary time. PMID:25198507

  7. Improved Oxidase Mimetic Activity by Praseodymium Incorporation into Ceria Nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Fernandez-Garcia, Susana; Tinoco, Miguel; Yan, Zhaoxia; Xue, Qi; Blanco, Ginesa; Calvino, Jose J; Hungria, Ana B; Chen, Xiaowei

    2017-06-07

    Ceria nanocubes (NC) modified with increasing concentrations of praseodymium (5, 10, 15, and 20 mol %) have been successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized Pr-modified ceria nanocubes exhibit an enhanced oxidase-like activity on the organic dye TMB within a wide range of concentrations and durations. The oxidase activity increases with increasing Pr amounts in Pr-modified ceria nanocubes within the investigated concentration range. Meanwhile, these Pr-modified ceria nanocubes also show higher reducibility than pure ceria nanocubes. The kinetics of their oxidase mimetic activity is fitted with the Michaelis-Menten equation. A mechanism has been proposed on how the Pr incorporation could affect the energy level of the bands in ceria and hence facilitate the TMB oxidation reaction. The presence of Pr(3+) species on the surface also contributes to the increasing activity of the Pr-modified ceria nanocubes present higher oxidase activity than pure ceria nanocubes.

  8. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Fetal glucocorticoid exposure is associated with preadolescent brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Sandman, Curt A; Buss, Claudia; Wing, Deborah A; Head, Kevin

    2013-11-01

    Glucocorticoids play a critical role in normative regulation of fetal brain development. Exposure to excessive levels may have detrimental consequences and disrupt maturational processes. This may especially be true when synthetic glucocorticoids are administered during the fetal period, as they are to women in preterm labor. This study investigated the consequences for brain development and affective problems of fetal exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Brain development and affective problems were evaluated in 54 children (56% female), aged 6 to 10, who were full term at birth. Children were recruited into two groups: those with and without fetal exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired and cortical thickness was determined. Child affective problems were assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist. Children in the fetal glucocorticoid exposure group showed significant and bilateral cortical thinning. The largest group differences were in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC). More than 30% of the rACC was thinner among children with fetal glucocorticoid exposure. Furthermore, children with more affective problems had a thinner left rACC. Fetal exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids has neurologic consequences that persist for at least 6 to 10 years. Children with fetal glucocorticoid exposure had a thinner cortex primarily in the rACC. Our data indicating that the rACC is associated with affective problems in conjunction with evidence that this region is involved in affective disorders raise the possibility that glucocorticoid-associated neurologic changes increase vulnerability to mental health problems. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metal based SOD mimetic therapeutic agents: Synthesis, characterization and biochemical studies of metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Coordination compounds of Fe(III, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II with the Schiff base obtained through the condensation of L1 and L2 (L1 – obtained through the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfuraldehyde and L2 – derived from 2-aminobenzothiazole and 3-nitrobenzaldehyde were synthesized under reflux conditions. The newly formed complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance, 1H NMR, UV–Vis., IR and ESR techniques. Cyclic voltammogram of the complexes in DMSO solution at 300 K was recorded and their salient features were summarized. The X-band ESR spectrum of the copper complex in DMSO solution at 300 and 77 K was recorded. The in vitro biological screening of the investigated compounds was tested against the bacterial species, and fungal species by disc diffusion method. The antimicrobial activity of metal complexes was dependent on the microbial species tested, ligand and the metal salts used. A comparative study of inhibition values of Schiff bases and their complexes indicates that the complexes exhibit higher antimicrobial activity than the free ligands. The DNA binding studies were performed for the complexes using cyclic voltammetry and electronic absorption spectra. Superoxide dismutase activity of these complexes has also been examined.

  11. Incretin mimetics: a novel therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Katrine Bilberg; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease associated with low quality of life and early death. The goal in diabetes treatment is to prevent these outcomes by tight glycemic control and minimizing vascular risk factors. So far, even intensified combination regimen with the traditional......Med and Medline search for publications with the key words GLP-1 receptor agonist, exenatide, liraglutide and type 2 diabetes mellitus up to January 2009....

  12. Neuropsychiatric findings in Cushing syndrome and exogenous glucocorticoid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkman, Monica N

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the neuropsychiatric presentations elicited by spontaneous hypercortisolism and exogenous supraphysiologic glucocorticoids. Patients with Cushing disease and syndrome develop a depressive syndrome: irritable and depressed mood, decreased libido, disrupted sleep and cognitive decrements. Exogenous short-term glucocorticoid administration may elicit a hypomanic syndrome with mood, sleep and cognitive disruptions. Treatment options are discussed. Brain imaging and neuropsychological studies indicate elevated cortisol and other glucocorticoids are especially deleterious to hippocampus and frontal lobe. The research findings also shed light on neuropsychiatric abnormalities in conditions that have substantial subgroups exhibiting elevated and dysregulated cortisol: aging, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells ...... that in response to glucocorticoid administration, induced autophagy aids to maintain proliferation and prevent apoptosis of BMSCs. Thus, it is hypothesized that autophagy may be a novel target in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis.......Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...

  14. Addison disease in patients treated with glucocorticoid therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Acute adrenal crisis in patients with unrecognized chronic adrenocortical failure is difficult to diagnose and potentially fatal. We describe 2 patients with acute adrenal crisis whose diagnoses were hindered because of concomitant glucocorticoid treatment. Acute adrenal insufficiency is primarily a state of mineralocorticoid deficiency. Prednisolone and prednisone, the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory corticosteroid agents, have minimal mineralocorticoid activity. Several conditions that may be treated with pharmacological glucocorticoids are associated with an increased risk of Addison disease. An acute adrenal crisis, against which concurrent glucocorticoid therapy does not confer adequate protection, may develop in such patients.

  15. Glucocorticoid use and abuse in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Danza, Alvaro; Khamashta, Munther

    2012-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents. They act by two different mechanisms: the genomic and the non-genomic pathways. The genomic pathway is considered responsible for many adverse effects of GCs, most of them are time and dose dependent. Observational studies support a relationship between GCs and damage in SLE. GCs have been associated with the development of osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, cataracts, hyperglycaemia, coronary heart disease and cognitive impairment, among others. Although no clinical trial has compared high vs low doses of GCs, some studies have shown the efficacy of medium doses in severe forms of SLE. The dose below which treatment can be considered safe has not been defined, but daily doses <7.5 mg of prednisone seem to minimize adverse effects. Combination therapy with HCQ and the judicious use of immunosuppressive drugs help to keep prednisone therapy within those limits.

  16. Nacre-mimetics with synthetic nanoclays up to ultrahigh aspect ratios

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Das, Paramita; Malho, Jani-Markus; Rahimi, Khosrow; Schacher, Felix H; Wang, Baochun; Demco, Dan Eugen; Walther, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we demonstrate large progress of mechanical and functional properties of self-assembled polymer/nanoclay nacre-mimetics by using synthetic nanoclays with aspect ratios covering three orders in magnitude (25-3,500...

  17. Identification of novel small-molecule Ulex europaeus I mimetics for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashin, Christa; Spindler, Lisa; Russell, Shannon; Schink, Amy; Lambkin, Imelda; O'Mahony, Daniel; Houghten, Richard; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2003-11-17

    Lectin mimetics have been identified that may have potential application towards targeted drug delivery. Synthetic multivalent polygalloyl constructs effectively competed with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA1) for binding to intestinal Caco-2 cell membranes.

  18. A non-linear constrained optimization technique for the mimetic finite difference method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svyatskiy, Daniil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bertolazzi, Enrico [Univ. of Trento (Italy); Frego, Marco [Univ. of Trento (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    This is a strategy for the construction of monotone schemes in the framework of the mimetic finite difference method for the approximation of diffusion problems on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes.

  19. Glucocorticoid programming of the mesopontine cholinergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia eBorges

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress perception, response, adaptation and coping strategies are individually distinct, and the sequel of stress and/or glucocorticoids is also distinct between subjects. In the last years, it has become clear that early life stress is a powerful modulator of neuroendocrine stress-responsive circuits, programming intrinsic susceptibility to stress, and potentiating the appearance of stress-related disorders such as depression, anxiety and addiction. Herein we were interested in understanding how early life experiences reset the normal processing of negative stimuli, leading to emotional dysfunction. Animals prenatally exposed to glucocorticoids (iuGC present hyperanxiety, increased fear behaviour and hyper-reactivity to negative stimuli. In parallel, we found a remarkable increase in the number of aversive 22kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in response to an aversive cue. Considering the suggested role of the mesopontine tegmentum cholinergic pathway, arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT, in the initiation of 22kHz vocalizations and hypothetically in the control of emotional arousal and tone, we decided to evaluate the condition of this circuit in iuGC animals. Notably, in a basal situation, iuGC animals present increased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression in the LDT and PPT, but not in other cholinergic nuclei, namely in the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, and in accordance with the amplified response to an adverse stimulus of iuGC animals, we found marked changes in the cholinergic activation pattern of LDT and PPT regions. Altogether, our results suggest a specific cholinergic pathway programing by prenatal GC, and hint that this may be of relevance in setting individuals stress vulnerability threshold.

  20. Physiology and molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Nagalski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs are secreted into the systemic circulation from the adrenal cortex. This release is under the control of the circadian clock and can be enhanced at any time in response to a stressor. The levels of circulating GC are regulated systemically by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and locally by access to target cells and pre-receptor metabolism by 11β-hydroxysteroids dehydrogenase enzymes. GCs mediate their genomic action by binding to two different ligand-inducible transcription factors: high-affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR and 10-fold lower affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GRs. Responses to GCs vary among individuals, cells, and tissues. The diversity and specificity in the steroid hormone’s response in the cell is controlled at different levels, including receptor translocation, interaction with specific transcription factors and coregulators, and the regulation of receptor protein levels by microRNA. Moreover, multiple GR isoforms are generated from one single GR gene by alternative splicing and alternative translation initiation. These isoforms all have unique tissue distribution patterns and transcriptional regulatory profiles. Furthermore, each is subjected to various post-translational modifications that affect receptor function. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of GC action is further complicated by the realization that GCs can induce rapid, non-genomic effects within the cytoplasm. A tight regulation of GC secretion and their cell-specific activity is essential for proper organism function. This is particularly seen under conditions of GC deficiency or excess, as in Addison’s disease and Cushing’s syndrome, respectively.

  1. Folate Receptor-Targeting Gold Nanoclusters as Fluorescence Enzyme Mimetic Nanoprobes for Tumor Molecular Colocalization Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Fang, Shengtao; Wang, Yanan; Gao, Duyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2014-01-01

    Nanoprobes with enzyme-like properties attracted a growing interest in early screening and diagnosis of cancer. To achieve high accuracy and specificity of tumor detection, the design and preparation of enzyme mimetic nanoprobes with high enzyme activity, tumor targeting and excellent luminescence property is highly desirable. Herein, we described a novel kind of fluorescence enzyme mimetic nanoprobe based on folate receptor-targeting Au nanoclusters. The nanoprobes exhibited excellent stabil...

  2. Superoxide radical induces sclerotial differentiation in filamentous phytopathogenic fungi: a superoxide dismutase mimetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapostolou, Ioannis; Georgiou, Christos D

    2010-03-01

    This study shows that the superoxide radical (O(2) *( -)), a direct indicator of oxidative stress, is involved in the differentiation of the phytopathogenic filamentous fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Sclerotium rolfsii and Sclerotinia minor, shown by using superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics to decrease their sclerotial differentiation. The production rate of O(2) *(-) and SOD levels in these fungi, as expected, were significantly lowered by the SOD mimetics, with concomitant decrease of the indirect indicator of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation.

  3. [Histologic expressions of IL-4/STAT6 in nasal mucosa of guinea pig allergic rhinitis models and effect of glucocorticoid on them].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Geng, Manying; Yan, Baoxing; Lu, Xing

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the relation between IL-4/STAT6 and allergic rhinitis by comparing expressions of IL-4 and STAT6 in normal nasal mucosa and allergic rhinitis models, to explore the influence of glucocorticoid on IL-4, and STAT6 expression, and then to elucidate further the pathogenesis of AR and the mechanism of glucocorticoid. Forty-five guinea pigs were divided into three groups: normal control (NC) group, allergic rhinitis group (AR) and glucocorticoid (Glu) group (15 each). Animals in AR and Glu groups were sensitized with egg albumin, and in NC group were treated with normal saline as control. After sensitization and reproduction of AR model, rats in AR group received no treatment, while those in Glu group were treated with glucocorticoid (50 microl/one side/time, once a day) for 5 days. The changes in behavior was examined, and pathology of nasal mucosa were observed with HE staining, and the protein expressions of IL-4 and STAT6 in the nasal mucosa were detected by immunohistochemical technique. Compared with NC group, the frequency of sneezing and nose-scratching, and the expressions of IL-4 and STAT6 were increased obviously, but the opposite findings were observed in Glu group. IL-4 and STAT6 are related to the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis and may be the main factors for eosinophil infiltration in allergic rhinitis. Glucocorticoid may produce a therapeutic effect by intervening the expression of IL-4 and STAT6.

  4. Smac mimetics and oncolytic viruses synergize in driving anticancer T-cell responses through complementary mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Sun; Dastidar, Himika; Zhang, Chunfen; Zemp, Franz J; Lau, Keith; Ernst, Matthias; Rakic, Andrea; Sikdar, Saif; Rajwani, Jahanara; Naumenko, Victor; Balce, Dale R; Ewanchuk, Ben W; Taylor, Pankaj; Yates, Robin M; Jenne, Craig; Gafuik, Chris; Mahoney, Douglas J

    2017-08-24

    Second mitochondrial activator of caspase (Smac)-mimetic compounds and oncolytic viruses were developed to kill cancer cells directly. However, Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies also modulate host immune responses in ways we hypothesized would complement one another in promoting anticancer T-cell immunity. We show that Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies synergize in driving CD8 + T-cell responses toward tumors through distinct activities. Smac-mimetic compound treatment with LCL161 reinvigorates exhausted CD8 + T cells within immunosuppressed tumors by targeting tumor-associated macrophages for M1-like polarization. Oncolytic virus treatment with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV ΔM51 ) promotes CD8 + T-cell accumulation within tumors and CD8 + T-cell activation within the tumor-draining lymph node. When combined, LCL161 and VSV ΔM51 therapy engenders CD8 + T-cell-mediated tumor control in several aggressive mouse models of cancer. Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies are both in clinical development and their combination therapy represents a promising approach for promoting anticancer T-cell immunity.Oncolytic viruses (OV) and second mitochondrial activator of caspase (Smac)-mimetic compounds (SMC) synergistically kill cancer cells directly. Here, the authors show that SMC and OV therapies combination also synergize in vivo by promoting anticancer immunity through an increase in CD8 + T-cell response.

  5. Effects of Chronic Psychosocial Stress on Reduction of Basal Glucocorticoid Levels and Suppression of Glucocorticoid Levels Following Dexamethasone Administration in Animal Model of PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Starcevic

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Significant changes in HPA activity, reductions in basal glucocorticoid levels and enhanced dexamethasone induced inhibition of glucocorticoid levels have been manifested. All of this is manifested in PTSD patients also as many other stress induces changes.

  6. Glucocorticoids in nephrology I: pharmacology and side effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Pajek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids have been used in clinical medicine since 1940s. Despite the time-long use they are still a subject of active ongoing research. We describe the mode of action, pharmacology and side effects to enable proper prescription of these drugs. Glucocorticoids exert genomic and non-genomic effects, the latter become important at higher doses. The nomenclature of dosage ranges and the principles of dosage adjustments are given. Glucocortioid use is associated with frequent and important side effects in numerous organ systems. Prophylactic treatments for osteoporosis and infections are described. The suppression of hypothalamic-hypophyseal hormonal axis determines the need for gradual glucocorticoid withdrawal and supplementation after discontinuation. Finally, glucocorticoid withdrawal syndrome is described.

  7. Hypersensitivity Reactions from Excipients in Systemic Glucocorticoid Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calogiuri, Gianfranco; Garvey, Lene H; Romita, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most widely used drugs for the treatment of hypersensitivity, however these drugs themselves and the excipients contained in commercial corticosteroid formulations are able to induce severe immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions. Reactions involving excipients have been...

  8. Glucocorticoids and the regulation of memory in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Aerni, Amanda; Schelling, Gustav; Roozendaal, Benno

    2009-08-01

    Over the last decades considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that glucocorticoids - stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex - are crucially involved in the regulation of memory. Specifically, glucocorticoids have been shown to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing experiences, but impair memory retrieval and working memory during emotionally arousing test situations. Furthermore, growing evidence indicates that these different glucocorticoid effects all depend on emotional arousal-induced activation of noradrenergic transmission within the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) and on interactions of the BLA with other brain regions, such as the hippocampus and neocortical regions. Here we review findings from both animal and human experiments and present an integrated perspective of how these opposite glucocorticoid effects might act together to serve adaptive processing of emotionally significant information. Furthermore, as intense emotional memories also play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology of anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or phobias, we discuss to what extent the basic findings on glucocorticoid effects on emotional memory might have implications for the understanding and treatment of these clinical conditions. In this context, we review data suggesting that the administration of glucocorticoids might ameliorate chronic anxiety by reducing retrieval of aversive memories and enhancing fear extinction.

  9. The influence of glucocorticoid signaling on tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volden, Paul A; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2013-03-01

    The diagnosis of cancer elicits a broad range of well-characterized stress-related biobehavioral responses. Recent studies also suggest that an individual's neuroendocrine stress response can influence tumor biology. One of the major physiological pathways altered by the response to unrelenting social stressors is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal or HPA axis. Initially following acute stress exposure, an increased glucocorticoid response is observed; eventually, chronic stress exposure can lead to a blunting of the normal diurnal cortisol pattern. Interestingly, recent evidence also links high primary tumor glucocorticoid receptor expression (and associated increased glucocorticoid-mediated gene expression) to more rapid estrogen-independent breast cancer progression. Furthermore, animal models of human breast cancer suggest that glucocorticoids inhibit tumor cell apoptosis. These findings provide a conceptual basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence of the individual's stress response, and specifically glucocorticoid action, on breast cancer and other solid tumor biology. How this increased glucocorticoid signaling might contribute to cancer progression is the subject of this review. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Properties of GSK866 Analogs with Cysteine Reactive Warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra S. Chirumamilla

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic glucocorticoids (GC are the mainstay therapy for treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. Due to the high adverse effects associated with long-term use, GC pharmacology has focused since the nineties on more selective GC ligand-binding strategies, classified as selective glucocorticoid receptor (GR agonists (SEGRAs or selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators (SEGRMs. In the current study, GSK866 analogs with electrophilic covalent-binding warheads were developed with potential SEGRA properties to improve their clinical safety profile for long-lasting topical skin disease applications. Since the off-rate of a covalently binding drug is negligible compared to that of a non-covalent drug, its therapeutic effects can be prolonged and typically, smaller doses of the drug are necessary to reach the same level of therapeutic efficacy, thereby potentially reducing systemic side effects. Different analogs of SEGRA GSK866 coupled to cysteine reactive warheads were characterized for GR potency and selectivity in various biochemical and cellular assays. GR- and NFκB-dependent reporter gene studies show favorable anti-inflammatory properties with reduced GR transactivation of two non-steroidal GSK866 analogs UAMC-1217 and UAMC-1218, whereas UAMC-1158 and UAMC-1159 compounds failed to modulate cellular GR activity. These results were further supported by GR immuno-localization and S211 phospho-GR western analysis, illustrating significant GR phosphoactivation and nuclear translocation upon treatment of GSK866, UAMC-1217, or UAMC-1218, but not in case of UAMC-1158 or UAMC-1159. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analysis of tryptic peptides of recombinant GR ligand-binding domain (LBD bound to UAMC-1217 or UAMC-1218 confirmed covalent cysteine-dependent GR binding. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations, as well as glucocorticoid receptor ligand-binding domain (GR-LBD coregulator interaction profiling of the GR-LBD bound to GSK866 or

  11. [Glucocorticoid and Bone. The effect of glucocorticoid and PTH in osteoblast apoptosis and differentiation via interleukin 11 expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Itsuro

    2014-09-01

    Intermittent PTH administration stimulates bone formation and counteracts the inhibition of bone formation by glucocorticoid excess. We have previously demonstrated that PTH enhances interleukin (IL) -11 gene transcription by a rapid induction of delta-fosB expression and Smad1/5 phosphorylation. On the other hand, glucocorticoid can suppress osteoblast differentiation and enhance apoptosis of osteoblast cells via down-regulation of IL-11 expression. PTH could reverse glucocorticoid-induced these damage of osteoblast via stimulation of IL-11 expression. Our data also suggested that IL-11 mediates stimulatory and inhibitory signals of osteoblast differentiation by affecting Wnt signaling. These data demonstrates that PTH and glucocorticoid may regulate osteoblast differentiation and apoptosis via their effect on IL-11 expression.

  12. The effect of a diiodothyronine mimetic on insulin sensitivity in male cardiometabolic patients: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur van der Valk

    Full Text Available Obesity and its associated cardiometabolic co-morbidities are increasing worldwide. Since thyroid hormone mimetics are capable of uncoupling the beneficial metabolic effects of thyroid hormones from their deleterious effects on heart, bone and muscle, this class of drug is considered as adjacent therapeutics to weight-lowering strategies. This study investigated the safety and efficacy of TRC150094, a thyroid hormone mimetic.This 4-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial was conducted in India and The Netherlands. Forty subjects were randomized at a 1:1 ratio to receive either TRC150094 dosed at 50 mg or placebo once daily for 4 weeks. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and (1H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS were performed before and after treatment.At baseline, subjects were characterized by markedly impaired hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. TRC150094 dosed 50 mg once daily was safe and well tolerated. Hepatic nor peripheral insulin sensitivity improved after TRC150094 treatment, expressed as the suppression of Endogenous Glucose Production from 59.5 to 62.1%; p = 0.477, and the rate of glucose disappearance from 28.8 to 26.4 µmol kg(-1min(-1, p = 0.185. TRC150094 administration did not result in differences in fasting plasma free fatty acids from 0.51 to 0.51 mmol/L, p = 0.887 or in insulin-mediated suppression of lipolysis from 57 to 54%, p = 0.102. Also, intrahepatic triglyceride content was unaltered.Collectively, these data show that, in contrast to the potent metabolic effects in experimental models, TRC150094 at a dose of 50 mg daily does not improve the metabolic homeostasis in subjects at an increased cardiometabolic risk. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether TRC150094 has beneficial effects in patients with more severe metabolic derangement, such as overt diabetes mellitus and hypertriglyceridemia.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01408667.

  13. Reissner–Nordström Anti-de Sitter Black Holes in Mimetic F(R Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Oikonomou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study under which conditions the Reissner–Nordström anti-de Sitter black hole can be a solution of the vacuum mimetic F ( R gravity with Lagrange multiplier and mimetic scalar potential. As the author demonstrates, the resulting picture in the mimetic F ( R gravity case is a trivial extension of the standard F ( R approach, and in effect, the metric perturbations in the mimetic F ( R gravity case, for the Reissner–Nordström anti-de Sitter black hole metric, at the first order of the perturbed variables are the same at the leading order.

  14. Low-dose glucocorticoids in hyperandrogenism Efecto de bajas dosis de glucocorticoides en el hiperandrogenismo

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Rizzo; Viviana Dobrovsky; Karina Danilowicz; Martha Kral; Graciela Cross; Héctor A. Serra; Oscar D. Bruno

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of low-doses of glucocorticoids on androgen and cortisol secretion during the course of the day, we evaluated clinical signs of hyperandrogenism and total, free and bioavailable testosterone, SHBG, and cortisol following two different protocols: A) fourteen patients received betamethasone 0.6 mg/day (n=8) or methylprednisolone 4 mg/day (n=6), as single daily oral dose at 11.00 PM, during 30 days, B) fourteen patients were evaluated under betamethasone 0.3 mg in a sin...

  15. Systematic review of the clinical effect of glucocorticoids on nonhematologic malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Bruce D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids are often used in the treatment of nonhematologic malignancy. This review summarizes the clinical evidence of the effect of glucocorticoid therapy on nonhematologic malignancy. Methods A systematic review of clinical studies of glucocorticoid therapy in patients with nonhematologic malignancy was undertaken. Only studies having endpoints of tumor response or tumor control or survival were included. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Register/Databases, conference proceedings (ASCO, AACR, ASTRO/ASTR, ESMO, ECCO and other resources were used. Data was extracted using a standard form. There was quality assessment of each study. There was a narrative synthesis of information, with presentation of results in tables. Where appropriate, meta-analyses were performed using data from published reports and a fixed effect model. Results Fifty four randomized controlled trials (RCTs, one meta-analysis, four phase l/ll trials and four case series met the eligibility criteria. Clinical trials of glucocorticoid monotherapy in breast and prostate cancer showed modest response rates. In advanced breast cancer meta-analyses, the addition of glucocorticoids to either chemotherapy or other endocrine therapy resulted in increased response rate, but not increased survival. In GI cancer, there was one RCT each of glucocorticoids vs. supportive care and chemotherapy +/- glucocorticoids; glucocorticoid effect was neutral. The only RCT found of chemotherapy +/- glucocorticoids, in which the glucocorticoid arm did worse, was in lung cancer. In glucocorticoid monotherapy, meta-analysis found that continuous high dose glucocorticoids had a detrimental effect on survival. The only other evidence, for a detrimental effect of glucocorticoid monotherapy, was in one of the two trials in lung cancer. Conclusion Glucocorticoid monotherapy has some benefit in breast and prostate cancer. In advanced breast cancer, the addition of glucocorticoids to other

  16. Glucocorticoids enhance extinction-based psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Bentz, Dorothée; Michael, Tanja; Bolt, Olivia C; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Margraf, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2011-04-19

    Behavioral exposure therapy of anxiety disorders is believed to rely on fear extinction. Because preclinical studies have shown that glucocorticoids can promote extinction processes, we aimed at investigating whether the administration of these hormones might be useful in enhancing exposure therapy. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 40 patients with specific phobia for heights were treated with three sessions of exposure therapy using virtual reality exposure to heights. Cortisol (20 mg) or placebo was administered orally 1 h before each of the treatment sessions. Subjects returned for a posttreatment assessment 3-5 d after the last treatment session and for a follow-up assessment after 1 mo. Adding cortisol to exposure therapy resulted in a significantly greater reduction in fear of heights as measured with the acrophobia questionnaire (AQ) both at posttreatment and at follow-up, compared with placebo. Furthermore, subjects receiving cortisol showed a significantly greater reduction in acute anxiety during virtual exposure to a phobic situation at posttreatment and a significantly smaller exposure-induced increase in skin conductance level at follow-up. The present findings indicate that the administration of cortisol can enhance extinction-based psychotherapy.

  17. Metal stabilization of collagen and de novo designed mimetic peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish S.; Xu, Fei; Pike, Douglas H.; Belure, Sandeep V.; Hasan, Nida F.; Drzewiecki, Kathryn E.; Shreiber, David I.; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    We explore the design of metal binding sites to modulate triple-helix stability of collagen and collagen-mimetic peptides. Globular proteins commonly utilize metals to connect tertiary structural elements that are well separated in sequence, constraining structure and enhancing stability. It is more challenging to engineer structural metals into fibrous protein scaffolds, which lack the extensive tertiary contacts seen in globular proteins. In the collagen triple helix, the structural adjacency of the carboxy-termini of the three chains makes this region an attractive target for introducing metal binding sites. We engineered His3 sites based on structural modeling constraints into a series of designed homotrimeric and heterotrimeric peptides, assessing the capacity of metal binding to improve stability and in the case of heterotrimers, affect specificity of assembly. Notable enhancements in stability for both homo and heteromeric systems were observed upon addition of zinc(II) and several other metal ions only when all three histidine ligands were present. Metal binding affinities were consistent with the expected Irving-Williams series for imidazole. Unlike other metals tested, copper(II) also bound to peptides lacking histidine ligands. Acetylation of the peptide N-termini prevented copper binding, indicating proline backbone amide metal-coordination at this site. Copper similarly stabilized animal extracted Type I collagen in a metal specific fashion, highlighting the potential importance of metal homeostasis within the extracellular matrix. PMID:26225466

  18. Superoxide dismutase mimetic activity of cytokinin-copper(II) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Hirobe, M.

    1986-05-29

    Dissociation constants of cytokinins, derivatives of purine which form complexes which cupric ion, were determined by spectrophotometry and the stability constants of their copper complexes by pH titration. The values found for kinetic were 3.76, 9.96, 7.8, and 15.3 for pK/sub 1/ for pK/sub 2/, logk/sub 1/, and log..beta../sub 2/, respectively, and those for 6-benzylaminopurine were, in the same order, 3.90, 9.84, 8.3, and 15.9. The copper(II) complexes with kinetin and 6-benzylaminopurine had superoxide dismutase mimetic activity, and the reaction rate constants with superoxide, which were determined by polarography. were 2.3 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ for kinetin and 1.5 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ for 6-benzylaminopurine at pH 9.8 and 25/sup 0/C.

  19. Basal Lamina Mimetic Nanofibrous Peptide Networks for Skeletal Myogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasa, I. Ceren; Gunduz, Nuray; Kilinc, Murat; Guler, Mustafa O.; Tekinay, Ayse B.

    2015-11-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for the coordination and regulation of cell adhesion, recruitment, differentiation and death. Therefore, equilibrium between cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and matrix-associated signals are important for the normal functioning of cells, as well as for regeneration. In this work, we describe importance of adhesive signals for myoblast cells’ growth and differentiation by generating a novel ECM mimetic peptide nanofiber scaffold system. We show that not only structure but also composition of bioactive signals are important for cell adhesion, growth and differentiation by mimicking the compositional and structural properties of native skeletal muscle basal lamina. We conjugated laminin-derived integrin binding peptide sequence, “IKVAV”, and fibronectin-derived well known adhesive sequence, “RGD”, into peptide nanostructures to provide adhesive and myogenic cues on a nanofibrous morphology. The myogenic and adhesive signals exhibited a synergistic effect on model myoblasts, C2C12 cells. Our results showed that self-assembled peptide nanofibers presenting laminin derived epitopes support adhesion, growth and proliferation of the cells and significantly promote the expression of skeletal muscle-specific marker genes. The functional peptide nanofibers used in this study present a biocompatible and biodegradable microenvironment, which is capable of supporting the growth and differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes.

  20. Light-Adaptive Supramolecular Nacre-Mimetic Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Baolei; Noack, Manuel; Merindol, Remi; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Walther, Andreas

    2016-08-10

    Nature provides design paradigms for adaptive, self-healing, and synergistic high-performance structural materials. Nacre's brick-and-mortar architecture is renowned for combining stiffness, toughness, strength, and lightweightness. Although elaborate approaches exist to mimic its static structure and performance, and to incorporate functionalities for the engineering world, there is a profound gap in addressing adaptable mechanical properties, particularly using remote, quick, and spatiotemporal triggers. Here, we demonstrate a generic approach to control the mechanical properties of nacre-inspired nanocomposites by designing a photothermal energy cascade using colloidal graphene as light-harvesting unit and coupling it to molecularly designed, thermoreversible, supramolecular bonds in the nanoconfined soft phase of polymer/nanoclay nacre-mimetics. The light intensity leads to adaptive steady-states balancing energy uptake and dissipation. It programs the mechanical properties and switches the materials from high stiffness/strength to higher toughness within seconds under spatiotemporal control. We envisage possibilities beyond mechanical materials, for example, light-controlled (re)shaping or actuation in highly reinforced nanocomposites.

  1. Determination of superoxide dismutase mimetic activity in common culinary herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Magali; Naughton, Declan P; Opara, Elizabeth I

    2014-01-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the removal of superoxide, a free radical associated with chronic inflammation, is catalysed by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Thus in addition to acting as an antioxidant, SOD may also be utilized as an anti-inflammatory agent. Some plant derived foods have been shown to have SOD mimetic (SODm) activity however it is not known if this activity is possessed by culinary herbs which have previously been shown to possess both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the study was to ascertain if the culinary herbs rosemary, sage and thyme possess SODm activity, and to investigate the influence of cooking and digestion on this activity. Transition metal ion content was also determined to establish if it could likely contribute to any SODm activity detected. All extracts of uncooked (U), cooked (C) and cooked and digested (C&D) herbs were shown to possess SODm activity, which was significantly correlated with previously determined antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of these herbs. SODm activity was significantly increased following (C) and (C&D) for rosemary and sage only. The impact of (C) and (C&D) on the SODm for thyme may have been influenced by its transition metal ion content. SODm activity may contribute to the herbs' antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities however the source and significance of this activity need to be established.

  2. Membrane mimetic surface functionalization of nanoparticles: Methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Jacob; Vabbilisetty, Pratima; Sun, Xue-Long

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs), due to their size-dependent physical and chemical properties, have shown remarkable potential for a wide range of applications over the past decades. Particularly, the biological compatibilities and functions of NPs have been extensively studied for expanding their potential in areas of biomedical application such as bioimaging, biosensing, and drug delivery. In doing so, surface functionalization of NPs by introducing synthetic ligands and/or natural biomolecules has become a critical component in regards to the overall performance of the NP system for its intended use. Among known examples of surface functionalization, the construction of an artificial cell membrane structure, based on phospholipids, has proven effective in enhancing biocompatibility and has become a viable alternative to more traditional modifications, such as direct polymer conjugation. Furthermore, certain bioactive molecules can be immobilized onto the surface of phospholipid platforms to generate displays more reminiscent of cellular surface components. Thus, NPs with membrane-mimetic displays have found use in a range of bioimaging, biosensing, and drug delivery applications. This review herein describes recent advances in the preparations and characterization of integrated functional NPs covered by artificial cell membrane structures and their use in various biomedical applications. PMID:23688632

  3. Therapeutic benefits of enhancing permeability barrier for atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory role of epidermal permeability barrier function in cutaneous inflammation has been well appreciated. While barrier disruption induces cutaneous inflammation, improvement of permeability barrier function alleviates inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function not only prevents the development of atopic eczema, but also delays the relapse of these diseases. Moreover, enhancing the epidermal permeability barrier also alleviates atopic eczema. Furthermore, co-applications of barrier enhancing products with glucocorticoids can increase the therapeutic efficacy and reduce the adverse effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of atopic eczema. Therefore, utilization of permeability barrier enhancing products alone or in combination with glucocorticoids could be a valuable approach in the treatment of atopic eczema. In this review, we discuss the benefits of improving the epidermal permeability barrier in the management of atopic eczema.

  4. A polysialic acid mimetic peptide promotes functional recovery in a mouse model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Philippe; Norreel, Jean-Chrétien; Schachner, Melitta; Rougon, Geneviève; Amoureux, Marie-Claude

    2009-09-01

    Contrary to lower species that recapitulate some of the developmental programs, in mammals, functional recovery after spinal cord injury is impaired by a non-permissive environment and the lack of plasticity of adult neurons. The developmental plasticity associated linear homopolymer of alpha 2,8-linked sialic acid (PolySialic Acid, PSA), represents a permissive determinant that could contribute to recovery. We previously showed that a PSA cyclic mimetic peptide (PR-21) displayed PSA-like biological functions (Torregrossa, P., Buhl, L., Bancila, M., Durbec, P., Schafer, C., Schachner, M., Rougon, G., 2004. Selection of poly-alpha 2,8-sialic acid mimotopes from a random phage peptide library and analysis of their bioactivity. J. Biol. Chem. 279, 30707-30714.). In the present study we investigated the therapeutic potential of PR-21 in young adult mice after dorsal hemisection at the T9 level. We show that PR-21 fulfills several criteria for an in vivo use as it is not toxic, not immunogenic and displays good stability in biological fluids or tissue. Delivery of PR-21 to the lesion site decreased the time of the animals' return to continence, and enhanced motor functions, sensorimotor control and coordination of hindlimbs with forelimbs when compared to a control peptide. At the cellular level, PR-21 increased serotonergic axon density at and caudal to the lesion site, and decreased reactive gliosis in vivo. In an in vitro model of reactive astrocytes, PR-21 increased NCAM expression in strongly GFAP positive cells. Our data point to the unique features of a carbohydrate mimicking peptide, and support the notion that PSA can be considered as an important factor in recovery from spinal cord injury.

  5. Niacin Alternatives for Dyslipidemia: Fool's Gold or Gold Mine? Part II: Novel Niacin Mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Harsh; Dunbar, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    Two cardiovascular outcome trials established niacin 3 g daily prevents hard cardiac events. However, as detailed in part I of this series, an extended-release (ER) alternative at only 2 g nightly demonstrated no comparable benefits in two outcome trials, implying the alternative is not equivalent to the established cardioprotective regimen. Since statins leave a significant treatment gap, this presents a major opportunity for developers. Importantly, the established regimen is cardioprotective, so the pathway is likely beneficial. Moreover, though effective, the established cardioprotective regimen is cumbersome, limiting clinical use. At the same time, the ER alternative has been thoroughly discredited as a viable substitute for the established cardioprotective regimen. Therefore, by exploiting the pathway and skillfully avoiding the problems with the established cardioprotective regimen and the ER alternative, developers could validate cardioprotective variations facing little meaningful competition from their predecessors. Thus, shrewd developers could effectively tap into a gold mine at the grave of the ER alternative. The GPR109A receptor was discovered a decade ago, leading to a large body of evidence commending the niacin pathway to a lower cardiovascular risk beyond statins. While mediating niacin's most prominent adverse effects, GPR109A also seems to mediate anti-lipolytic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherogenic effects of niacin. Several developers are investing heavily in novel strategies to exploit niacin's therapeutic pathways. These include selective GPR109A receptor agonists, niacin prodrugs, and a niacin metabolite, with encouraging early phase human data. In part II of this review, we summarize the accumulated results of these early phase studies of emerging niacin mimetics.

  6. Size Control and Fluorescence Labeling of Polydopamine Melanin-Mimetic Nanoparticles for Intracellular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang R. Amin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As synthetic analogs of the natural pigment melanin, polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs are under active investigation as non-toxic anticancer photothermal agents and as free radical scavenging therapeutics. By analogy to the widely adopted polydopamine coatings, polydopamine NPs offer the potential for facile aqueous synthesis and incorporation of (biofunctional groups under mild temperature and pH conditions. However, clear procedures for the convenient and reproducible control of critical NP properties such as particle diameter, surface charge, and loading with functional molecules have yet to be established. In this work, we have synthesized polydopamine-based melanin-mimetic nanoparticles (MMNPs with finely controlled diameters spanning ≈25 to 120 nm and report on the pH-dependence of zeta potential, methodologies for PEGylation, and the incorporation of fluorescent organic molecules. A comprehensive suite of complementary techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, zeta-potential, ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy, was used to characterize the MMNPs and their properties. Our PEGylated MMNPs are highly stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS and in cell culture media and exhibit no cytotoxicity up to at least 100 µg mL−1 concentrations. We also show that a post-functionalization methodology for fluorophore loading is especially suitable for producing MMNPs with stable fluorescence and significantly narrower emission profiles than previous reports, suggesting they will be useful for multimodal cell imaging. Our results pave the way towards biomedical imaging and possibly drug delivery applications, as well as fundamental studies of MMNP size and surface chemistry dependent cellular interactions.

  7. Size Control and Fluorescence Labeling of Polydopamine Melanin-Mimetic Nanoparticles for Intracellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Devang R; Sugnaux, Caroline; Lau, King Hang Aaron; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2017-09-01

    As synthetic analogs of the natural pigment melanin, polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs) are under active investigation as non-toxic anticancer photothermal agents and as free radical scavenging therapeutics. By analogy to the widely adopted polydopamine coatings, polydopamine NPs offer the potential for facile aqueous synthesis and incorporation of (bio)functional groups under mild temperature and pH conditions. However, clear procedures for the convenient and reproducible control of critical NP properties such as particle diameter, surface charge, and loading with functional molecules have yet to be established. In this work, we have synthesized polydopamine-based melanin-mimetic nanoparticles (MMNPs) with finely controlled diameters spanning ≈25 to 120 nm and report on the pH-dependence of zeta potential, methodologies for PEGylation, and the incorporation of fluorescent organic molecules. A comprehensive suite of complementary techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), zeta-potential, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy, was used to characterize the MMNPs and their properties. Our PEGylated MMNPs are highly stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and in cell culture media and exhibit no cytotoxicity up to at least 100 μg mL -1 concentrations. We also show that a post-functionalization methodology for fluorophore loading is especially suitable for producing MMNPs with stable fluorescence and significantly narrower emission profiles than previous reports, suggesting they will be useful for multimodal cell imaging. Our results pave the way towards biomedical imaging and possibly drug delivery applications, as well as fundamental studies of MMNP size and surface chemistry dependent cellular interactions.

  8. The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 18 female skeletally mature sheep were randomly allocated into three groups of six each. Group 1 (glucocorticoid-1) received prednisolone treatment (0.60 mg/kg/day, five times weekly) for 7 months. Group 2 (glucocorticoid-2) received the same treatment regime followed by observation...... months after glucocorticoid cessation, suggesting a delayed effect of glucocorticoid on cortical bone. Thus, changes in cortical bone beyond cancellous bone might further increase fracture risk in patients treated with glucocorticoids. This model might be used as a glucocorticoid-induced osteoporotic...

  9. Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic GC4419 Enhances the Oxidation of Pharmacological Ascorbate and Its Anticancer Effects in an H2O2-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin D. Heer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer, together with head and neck cancer, accounts for more than one-fourth of cancer deaths worldwide. New, non-toxic therapeutic approaches are needed. High-dose IV vitamin C (aka, pharmacological ascorbate; P-AscH− represents a promising adjuvant to radiochemotherapy that exerts its anti-cancer effects via metal-catalyzed oxidation to form H2O2. Mn(III-porphyrins possessing superoxide dismutase (SOD mimetic activity have been shown to increase the rate of oxidation of AscH−, enhancing the anti-tumor effects of AscH− in several cancer types. The current study demonstrates that the Mn(II-containing pentaazamacrocyclic selective SOD mimetic GC4419 may serve as an AscH−/O2•− oxidoreductase as evidenced by the increased rate of oxygen consumption, steady-state concentrations of ascorbate radical, and H2O2 production in complete cell culture media. GC4419, but not CuZnSOD, was shown to significantly enhance the toxicity of AscH− in H1299, SCC25, SQ20B, and Cal27 cancer cell lines. This enhanced cancer cell killing was dependent upon the catalytic activity of the SOD mimetic and the generation of H2O2, as determined using conditional overexpression of catalase in H1299T cells. GC4419 combined with AscH− was also capable of enhancing radiation-induced cancer cell killing. Currently, AscH− and GC4419 are each being tested separately in clinical trials in combination with radiation therapy. Data presented here support the hypothesis that the combination of GC4419 and AscH− may provide an effective means by which to further enhance radiation therapy responses.

  10. Beyond Antibodies as Binding Partners: The Role of Antibody Mimetics in Bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaowen; Yang, Yu-Ping; Dikici, Emre; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2017-06-12

    The emergence of novel binding proteins or antibody mimetics capable of binding to ligand analytes in a manner analogous to that of the antigen-antibody interaction has spurred increased interest in the biotechnology and bioanalytical communities. The goal is to produce antibody mimetics designed to outperform antibodies with regard to binding affinities, cellular and tumor penetration, large-scale production, and temperature and pH stability. The generation of antibody mimetics with tailored characteristics involves the identification of a naturally occurring protein scaffold as a template that binds to a desired ligand. This scaffold is then engineered to create a superior binder by first creating a library that is then subjected to a series of selection steps. Antibody mimetics have been successfully used in the development of binding assays for the detection of analytes in biological samples, as well as in separation methods, cancer therapy, targeted drug delivery, and in vivo imaging. This review describes recent advances in the field of antibody mimetics and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, specifically in diagnostics and other analytical methods.

  11. From Dalek half balls to Daft Punk helmets: Mimetic fandom and the crafting of replicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Hills

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mimetic fandom is a surprisingly understudied mode of (culturally masculinized fan activity in which fans research and craft replica props. Mimetic fandom can be considered as (inauthentic and (immaterial, combining noncommercial status with grassroots marketing or brand reinforcement as well as fusing an emphasis on material artifacts with Web 2.0 collective intelligence. Simply analyzing mimetic fandom as part of fannish material culture fails to adequately assess the nonmaterial aspects of this collaborative creativity. Two fan cultures are taken as case studies: Dalek building groups and Daft Punk helmet constructors. These diverse cases indicate that mimetic fandom has a presence and significance that moves across media fandoms and is not restricted to the science fiction, fantasy, and horror followings with which it is most often associated. Mimetic fandom may be theorized as an oscillatory activity that confuses binaries and constructions of (academic/fan authenticity. This fan practice desires and pursues a kind of ontological bridging or unity—from text to reality—that is either absent or less dominant in many other fan activities such as cosplay, screen-used prop collecting, and geographical pilgrimage. Fan studies may benefit from reassessing the place of mimesis, especially in order to theorize fan practices that are less clearly transformative in character.

  12. Nacre-mimetics with synthetic nanoclays up to ultrahigh aspect ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Paramita; Malho, Jani-Markus; Rahimi, Khosrow; Schacher, Felix H.; Wang, Baochun; Demco, Dan Eugen; Walther, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Nacre-mimetics hold great promise as mechanical high-performance and functional materials. Here we demonstrate large progress of mechanical and functional properties of self-assembled polymer/nanoclay nacre-mimetics by using synthetic nanoclays with aspect ratios covering three orders in magnitude (25-3,500). We establish comprehensive relationships among structure formation, nanostructuration, deformation mechanisms and mechanical properties as a function of nanoclay aspect ratio, and by tuning the viscoelastic properties of the soft phase via hydration. Highly ordered, large-scale nacre-mimetics are obtained even for low aspect ratio nanoplatelets and show pronounced inelastic deformation with very high toughness, while those formed by ultralarge nanoplatelets exhibit superb stiffness and strength, previously only reachable for highly crosslinked materials. Regarding functionalities, we report formerly impossible glass-like transparency, and excellent gas barrier considerably exceeding earlier nacre-mimetics based on natural nanoclay. Our study enables rational design of future high-performance nacre-mimetic materials and opens avenues for ecofriendly, transparent, self-standing and strong advanced barrier materials.

  13. Elementary dispersion analysis of some mimetic discretizations on triangular C-grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korn, P., E-mail: peter.korn@mpimet.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Danilov, S. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-01

    Spurious modes supported by triangular C-grids limit their application for modeling large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Their behavior can be modified within a mimetic approach that generalizes the scalar product underlying the triangular C-grid discretization. The mimetic approach provides a discrete continuity equation which operates on an averaged combination of normal edge velocities instead of normal edge velocities proper. An elementary analysis of the wave dispersion of the new discretization for Poincaré, Rossby and Kelvin waves shows that, although spurious Poincaré modes are preserved, their frequency tends to zero in the limit of small wavenumbers, which removes the divergence noise in this limit. However, the frequencies of spurious and physical modes become close on shorter scales indicating that spurious modes can be excited unless high-frequency short-scale motions are effectively filtered in numerical codes. We argue that filtering by viscous dissipation is more efficient in the mimetic approach than in the standard C-grid discretization. Lumping of mass matrices appearing with the velocity time derivative in the mimetic discretization only slightly reduces the accuracy of the wave dispersion and can be used in practice. Thus, the mimetic approach cures some difficulties of the traditional triangular C-grid discretization but may still need appropriately tuned viscosity to filter small scales and high frequencies in solutions of full primitive equations when these are excited by nonlinear dynamics.

  14. General inverse solid-phase synthesis method for C-terminally modified peptide mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasubilli, Ramakrishna; Gutheil, William G

    2004-01-01

    Peptide mimetics are of considerable interest as bioactive agents and drugs. C-terminally modified peptide mimetics are of particular interest given the synthetic versatility of the carboxyl group and its derivatives. A general approach to C-terminally modified peptide mimetics, based on a urethane attachment strategy and amino acid t-butyl ester-based N-to-C peptide synthesis, is described. This approach is compatible with the reaction conditions generally employed for solution-phase peptide mimetic synthesis. To develop and demonstrate this approach, it was employed for the solid-phase synthesis of peptide trifluoromethyl ketones, peptide boronic acids, and peptide hydroxamic acids. The development of a versatile general approach to C-terminally modified peptides using readily available starting materials provides a basis for the combinatorial and parallel solid-phase synthesis of these peptide mimetic classes for bioactive agent screening and also provides a basis for the further development of solid-phase C-terminal functional group elaboration strategies.

  15. Hypoxia-mimetic agents inhibit proliferation and alter the morphology of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Hui-Lan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The therapeutic efficacy of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic diseases is closely related to level of hypoxia in the damaged tissues. To elucidate the potential therapeutic applications and limitations of hMSCs derived from human umbilical cords, the effects of hypoxia on the morphology and proliferation of hMSCs were analyzed. Results After treatment with DFO and CoCl2, hMSCs were elongated, and adjacent cells were no longer in close contact. In addition, vacuole-like structures were observed within the cytoplasm; the rough endoplasmic reticulum expanded, and expanded ridges were observed in mitochondria. In addition, DFO and CoCl2 treatments for 48 h significantly inhibited hMSCs proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (P Conclusions The hypoxia-mimetic agents, DFO and CoCl2, alter umbilical cord-derived hMSCs morphology and inhibit their proliferation through influencing the cell cycle.

  16. Glucocorticoid Receptor Polymorphisms and Outcomes in Pediatric Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvijanovich, Natalie Z; Anas, Nick; Allen, Geoffrey L; Thomas, Neal J; Bigham, Michael T; Weiss, Scott L; Fitzgerald, Julie; Checchia, Paul A; Meyer, Keith; Quasney, Michael; Gedeit, Rainer; Freishtat, Robert J; Nowak, Jeffrey; Raj, Shekhar S; Gertz, Shira; Grunwell, Jocelyn R; Opoka, Amy; Wong, Hector R

    2017-04-01

    Polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid receptor gene are associated with outcome and corticosteroid responsiveness among patients with inflammatory disorders. We conducted a candidate gene association study to test the hypothesis that these polymorphisms are associated with outcome and corticosteroid responsiveness among children with septic shock. We genotyped 482 children with septic shock for the presence of two glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms (rs56149945 and rs41423247) associated with increased sensitivity and one glucocorticoid receptor polymorphism (rs6198) associated with decreased sensitivity to corticosteroids. The primary outcome variable was complicated course, defined as 28-day mortality or the persistence of two or more organ failures 7 days after a septic shock diagnosis. We used logistic regression to test for an association between corticosteroid exposure and outcome, within genotype group, and adjusted for illness severity. Multiple PICUs in the United States. Standard care. There were no differences in outcome when comparing the various genotype groups. Among patients homozygous for the wild-type glucocorticoid receptor allele, corticosteroids were independently associated with increased odds of complicated course (odds ratio, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.01-5.21; p = 0.047). Based on these glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms, we could not detect a beneficial effect of corticosteroids among any genotype group. Among children homozygous for the wild-type allele, corticosteroids were independently associated with increased odds of poor outcome.

  17. Adverse consequences of glucocorticoid medication: psychological, cognitive, and behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Lewis L; Schettler, Pamela J; Brown, E Sherwood; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Sternberg, Esther M; Bender, Bruce G; Bulloch, Karen; Cidlowski, John A; de Kloet, E Ronald; Fardet, Laurence; Joëls, Marian; Leung, Donald Y M; McEwen, Bruce S; Roozendaal, Benno; Van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; Ahn, Junyoung; Brown, David W; Plitt, Aaron; Singh, Gagandeep

    2014-10-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as ways to prevent and treat these disturbances. An illustrative case vignette is presented describing a patient's experience of cycles of manic-like behavior and depression while on high-dosage prednisone, with long-term cognitive disorganization, vulnerability to stress, and personality changes. Severe neuropsychiatric consequences (including suicide, suicide attempt, psychosis, mania, depression, panic disorder, and delirium, confusion, or disorientation) have been reported to occur in 15.7 per 100 person-years at risk for all glucocorticoid courses, and 22.2 per 100 person-years at risk for first courses. The majority of patients experience less severe but distressing and possibly persistent changes in mood, cognition, memory, or behavior during glucocorticoid treatment or withdrawal. Although prediction of such effects is difficult, risks vary with age, gender, dosage, prior psychiatric history, and several biological markers. Key mechanisms thought to underlie these risk factors are briefly described. Recommendations are given for identifying individual risk factors and for monitoring and managing adverse neuropsychiatric effects of glucocorticoids.

  18. [Treatment of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome: questions of glucocorticoid withdrawal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igaz, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tóth, Miklós; Gláz, Edit; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2007-02-04

    Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is the most common form of hypercortisolism. Glucocorticoids are widely used for the treatment of various diseases, often in high doses that may lead to the development of severe hypercortisolism. Iatrogenic hypercortisolism is unique, as the application of exogenous glucocorticoids leads to the simultaneous presence of symptoms specific for hypercortisolism and the suppression of the endogenous hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The principal question of its therapy is related to the problem of glucocorticoid withdrawal. There is considerable interindividual variability in the suppression and recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, therefore, glucocorticoid withdrawal and substitution can only be conducted in a stepwise manner with careful clinical follow-up and regular laboratory examinations regarding endogenous hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Three major complications which can be associated with glucocorticoid withdrawal are: i. reactivation of the underlying disease, ii. secondary adrenal insufficiency, iii. steroid withdrawal syndrome. Here, the authors summarize the most important aspects of this area based on their clinical experience and the available literature data.

  19. Synergistic Effect of Caffeine and Glucocorticoids on Expression of Surfactant Protein B (SP-B) mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrholz, Markus; Bersani, Iliana; Kramer, Boris W.; Speer, Christian P.; Kunzmann, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Administration of glucocorticoids and caffeine is a common therapeutic intervention in the neonatal period, but possible interactions between these substances are still unclear. The present study investigated the effect of caffeine and different glucocorticoids on expression of surfactant protein (SP)-B, crucial for the physiological function of pulmonary surfactant. We measured expression levels of SP-B, various SP-B transcription factors including erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 4 (ErbB4) and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), as well as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) after administering different doses of glucocorticoids, caffeine, cAMP, or the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor rolipram in the human airway epithelial cell line NCI-H441. Administration of dexamethasone (1 µM) or caffeine (5 mM) stimulated SP-B mRNA expression with a maximal of 38.8±11.1-fold and 5.2±1.4-fold increase, respectively. Synergistic induction was achieved after co-administration of dexamethasone (1 mM) in combination with caffeine (10 mM) (206±59.7-fold increase, pcaffeine with hydrocortisone (87.9±39.0), prednisolone (154±66.8), and betamethasone (123±6.4). Rolipram also induced SP-B mRNA (64.9±21.0-fold increase). We detected a higher expression of ErbB4 and GR mRNA (7.0- and 1.7-fold increase, respectively), whereas TTF-1, Jun B, c-Jun, SP1, SP3, and HNF-3α mRNA expression was predominantly unchanged. In accordance with mRNA data, mature SP-B was induced significantly by dexamethasone with caffeine (13.8±9.0-fold increase, p = 0.0134). We found a synergistic upregulation of SP-B mRNA expression induced by co-administration of various glucocorticoids and caffeine, achieved by accumulation of intracellular cAMP. This effect was mediated by a caffeine-dependent phosphodiesterase inhibition and by upregulation of both ErbB4 and the GR. These results suggested that caffeine is able to induce the expression of SP-transcription factors and affects the

  20. Prey from the eyes of predators: Color discriminability of aposematic and mimetic butterflies from an avian visual perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shiyu; Lim, Matthew; Kunte, Krushnamegh

    2015-11-01

    Predation exerts strong selection on mimetic butterfly wing color patterns, which also serve other functions such as sexual selection. Therefore, specific selection pressures may affect the sexes and signal components differentially. We tested three predictions about the evolution of mimetic resemblance by comparing wing coloration of aposematic butterflies and their Batesian mimics: (a) females gain greater mimetic advantage than males and therefore are better mimics, (b) due to intersexual genetic correlations, sexually monomorphic mimics are better mimics than female-limited mimics, and (c) mimetic resemblance is better on the dorsal wing surface that is visible to predators in flight. Using a physiological model of avian color vision, we quantified mimetic resemblance from predators' perspective, which showed that female butterflies were better mimics than males. Mimetic resemblance in female-limited mimics was comparable to that in sexually monomorphic mimics, suggesting that intersexual genetic correlations did not constrain adaptive response to selection for female-limited mimicry. Mimetic resemblance on the ventral wing surface was better than that on the dorsal wing surface, implying stronger natural and sexual selection on ventral and dorsal surfaces, respectively. These results suggest that mimetic resemblance in butterfly mimicry rings has evolved under various selective pressures acting in a sex- and wing surface-specific manner. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. The effectiveness of synthetic glucocorticoids on the disease course, treatment, and outcome of severe sepsis and septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Dumančić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the high morbidity and mortality rates, severe sepsis and septic shock, present a major global public health problem. The treatment and management of severe sepsis and septic shock is based on a set of international guidelines called the Surviving sepsis campaign (SSC. SSC guidelines suggest the use of hydrocortisone at a dose of 200 mg IV in adult patients with septic shock refractory to fluid resuscitation and vasopressors. During the last century, the importance of cortisol as an essential hormone at times of stress, such as septic shock, has been recognized. Therefore, the therapeutic use of synthetic glucocorticoids has been the subject of many studies during the last few decades but their results are not consistent. Two of the largest studies (CORTICUS and French study showed different effects of synthetic glucocorticoids on mortality rates, but they both showed a significantly shorter duration of septic shock. There is an ongoing large, multicenter, double-blind, randomized study (ADRENAL study and its primary goal is to assess the impact of hydrocortisone therapy on 90-day survival rate. It is expected that the results of this study might provide answers to the questions raised by previously conducted studies. This review will summarize the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock and the role of cortisol in its development, and will highlight the most important clinical studies pertaining to synthetic glucocorticoid administration in sepsis and septic shock.

  2. Mussel-mimetic, bioadhesive polymers from plant-derived materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraishi, Noriko; Kaneko, Daisaku; Taira, Shu; Wang, Siqian; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2015-02-01

    Mussel-mimetic, bioadhesive polymers are synthesized from plant-derived sources. The strong adhesive action is caused by interactions between the catechol groups at the end of the polymer terminal chains and the substrate surface. Here, we present a preliminary study of the adhesion properties and a discussion of the adhesion mechanism. Two bioadhesive polymers were synthesized from natural plant-derived monomers by the transesterification of: (a) caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid; DHCA) and p-coumaric acid (4-hydroxycinnamic acid; 4HCA) to produce poly(DHCA-co-4HCA); and (b) 4-dihydroxyhydrocinnamic acid (DHHCA) and 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid (3HPPA) to produce poly(DHHCA-co-3HPPA). Thermoplastic poly(DHCA-co-4HCA) or poly(DHHCA-co-3HPPA) was placed between glass, carbon, steel, or bovine dentin substrates, and a lap shear adhesion test was conducted to compare them using conventional cyanoacrylate glue and epoxy resin. The greatest adhesion for all tested substrates was exhibited by poly(DHHCA-co-3HPPA), followed by epoxy resin adhesive, poly(DHCA-co-4HCA), and cyanoacrylate adhesive. The adhesive strength of poly(DHHCA-co-3HPPA) was greater than 25.6 MPa for glass, 29.6 MPa for carbon, 15.7 MPa for steel, and 16.3 MPA for bovine dentin. The adhesion of poly(DHHCA-co-3HPPA) might be the strongest reported for a mussel-mimic adhesive system, and could be a feasible alternative to petroleum adhesives. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smans, L.; Lentjes, E.G.W.M.; Hermus, A.R.; Zelissen, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects.

  4. ROLE OF THE ENDOCANNABINOID SYSTEM IN REGULATING GLUCOCORTICOID EFFECTS ON MEMORY FOR EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsak, P.; Roozendaal, B.; Campolongo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex, have potent modulatory effects on emotional memory. Whereas early studies focused mostly on the detrimental effects of chronic stress and glucocorticoid exposure on cognitive performance and the classic genomic pathways that mediate

  5. Lymphocyte glucocorticoid receptor resistance and depressive symptoms severity : A preliminary report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanke, M. A. C.; Bosker, F. J.; Gladkevich, An.; Medema, H. M.; den Boer, J. A.; Korf, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of the temporal interrelationship of neuropsychiatric parameters requires technologies allowing frequent biological measurements. We propose glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function of lymphocytes to assess the temporal relationship between glucocorticoid resistance and the course

  6. Adrenal Insufficiency Caused by Locally Applied Glucocorticoids-Myth or Fact?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinsen, Stina; Klose, Marianne; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Case-reports have made it evident that both inhaled, percutaneous, intranasal, intraarticular and ophthalmic administered glucocorticoids have the potential to cause life threatening adrenal insufficiency. With few and sometimes conflicting data and study methodology the prevalence of adrenal...... insufficiency secondary to locally applied glucocorticoids is not clear. Adrenal insufficiency can only be correctly evaluated by a stimulation test, and has by this procedure been reported in up to 40-50% of patients treated with high-dose inhaled glucocorticoids. Medium- to low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids...... have been shown to cause adrenal suppression in 0-16% of patients. Glucocorticoid creams and nasal glucocorticoids can cause adrenal insufficiency, also when used within prescribed doses, but the frequency seems to be less than with inhaled glucocorticoids. Intraarticularly administered glucocorticoids...

  7. Connexin mimetic peptides fail to inhibit vascular conducted calcium responses in renal arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Salomonsson, Max; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig

    2008-01-01

    in transmission of conducted vasoconstrictor signals in the preglomerular arterioles is unknown. Connexin mimetic peptides were previously reported to target and inhibit specific connexins. We, therefore, investigated whether conducted vasoconstriction in isolated renal arterioles could be blocked by the use...... of mimetic peptides directed against one or more connexins. Preglomerular resistance vessels were microdissected from kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats and loaded with fura 2. The vessels were stimulated locally by applying electrical current through a micropipette, and the conducted calcium response...... was measured 500 mum from the site of stimulation. Application of connexin mimetic peptides directed against Cx40, 37/43, 45, or a cocktail with equimolar amounts of each, did not inhibit the propagated response, whereas the nonselective gap junction uncoupler carbenoxolone completely abolished the propagated...

  8. Targeting apoptotic machinery as approach for anticancer therapy: Smac mimetics as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevine M.Y. Elsayed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a chief regulator of cellular homeostasis. Impairment of apoptotic machinery is a main characteristic of several diseases such as cancer, where the evasion of apoptosis is a cardinal hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis is regulated by contribution of pro- and anti- apoptotic proteins, where caspases are the main executioners of the apoptotic machinery. IAP (inhibitors of apoptosis proteins is a family of endogenous inhibitors of apoptosis, which perform their function through interference with the function of caspases. Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases is endogenous inhibitor of IAPs, thus it is one of the major proapoptotic endogenous proteins. Thus, the development of Smac mimetics has evolved as an approach for anticancer therapy. Several Smac mimetic agents have been introduced to clinical trial such as birinapanet 12. Herein, the history of development of Smac mimetics along with the recent development in this field is briefly discussed.

  9. A review of underwater bio-mimetic propulsion: cruise and fast-start

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Ming; Cao, Yong-Hui; Pan, Guang

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in the understanding of underwater bio-mimetic propulsion. Two impressive models of underwater propulsion are considered: cruise and fast-start. First, we introduce the progression of bio-mimetic propulsion, especially underwater propulsion, where some primary conceptions are touched upon. Second, the understanding of flapping foils, considered as one of the most efficient cruise styles of aquatic animals, is introduced, where the effect of kinematics and the shape and flexibility of foils on generating thrust are elucidated respectively. Fast-start propulsion is always exhibited when predator behaviour occurs, and we provide an explicit introduction of corresponding zoological experiments and numerical simulations. We also provide some predictions about underwater bio-mimetic propulsion.

  10. Chronic restraint stress upregulates erythropoiesis through glucocorticoid stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L Voorhees

    Full Text Available In response to elevated glucocorticoid levels, erythroid progenitors rapidly expand to produce large numbers of young erythrocytes. Previous work demonstrates hematopoietic changes in rodents exposed to various physical and psychological stressors, however, the effects of chronic psychological stress on erythropoiesis has not be delineated. We employed laboratory, clinical and genomic analyses of a murine model of chronic restraint stress (RST to examine the influence of psychological stress on erythropoiesis. Mice exposed to RST demonstrated markers of early erythroid expansion involving the glucocorticoid receptor. In addition, these RST-exposed mice had increased numbers of circulating reticulocytes and increased erythropoiesis in primary and secondary erythroid tissues. Mice also showed increases in erythroid progenitor populations and elevated expression of the erythroid transcription factor KLF1 in these cells. Together this work reports some of the first evidence of psychological stress affecting erythroid homeostasis through glucocorticoid stimulation.

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor polymorphism in obesity and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer-Łobodzińska, Agnieszka; Adamiec-Mroczek, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity plays a significant role in the etiology of obesity and is essential for glucose homeostasis, the development of hyperinsulinaemia and subsequent increased fat deposition. Several polymorphisms in the GR gene have been described, and at least three of them seem to be associated with altered glucocorticoid sensitivity and changes in glucose homeostasis, and other metabolic parameters. The N363S polymorphism has been associated with increased sensitivity to glucocorticoides, increased insulin response to dexamethasone and increased plasma glucose level. BclI polymorphism is associated with increased abdominal obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and increased insulin resistance. Another polymorphism, ER22/23EK, in contrast to the others, is associated with relative resistance to glucocoricides actions and more beneficial metabolic profile-lower insulin resistance level, decreased lower cardiovascular risk and subseuent prolongation of life time. More research is still needed to understand the mechanisms behind these associations at the molecular level.

  12. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:26870823

  13. Molecular engineering of RANTES peptide mimetics with potent anti-HIV-1 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusso, Paolo; Vangelista, Luca; Cimbro, Raffaello; Secchi, Massimiliano; Sironi, Francesca; Longhi, Renato; Faiella, Marina; Maglio, Ornella; Pavone, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is utilized as a critical coreceptor by most primary HIV-1 strains. While the lack of structural information on CCR5 has hampered the rational design of specific inhibitors, mimetics of the chemokines that naturally bind CCR5 can be molecularly engineered. We used a structure-guided approach to design peptide mimetics of the N-loop and β1-strand regions of regulated on activation normal T-cell-expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5, which contain the primary molecular determinants of HIV-1 blockade. Rational modifications were sequentially introduced into the N-loop/β1-strand sequence, leading to the generation of mimetics with potent activity against a broad spectrum of CCR5-specific HIV-1 isolates (IC50 range: 104–640 nM) but lacking activity against CXCR4-specific HIV-1 isolates. Functional enhancement was initially achieved with the stabilization of the N loop in the β-extended conformation adopted in full-length RANTES, as confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. However, the most dramatic increase in antiviral potency resulted from the engraftment of an in silico-optimized linker segment designed using de novo structure-prediction algorithms to stabilize the C-terminal α-helix and experimentally validated by NMR. Our mimetics exerted CCR5-antagonistic effects, demonstrating that the antiviral and proinflammatory functions of RANTES can be uncoupled. RANTES peptide mimetics provide new leads for the development of safe and effective HIV-1 entry inhibitors.—Lusso, P., Vangelista, L., Cimbro, R., Secchi, M., Sironi, F., Longhi, R., Faiella, M., Maglio, O., Pavone, V. Molecular engineering of RANTES peptide mimetics with potent anti-HIV-1 activity. PMID:21199933

  14. Potential significance of physiological and pharmacological glucocorticoids in early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Anthony E; Papageorghiou, Aris T

    2008-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of the developmental consequences of increased glucocorticoid exposure in mid- to late pregnancy, relatively little is known regarding the significance of glucocorticoids in early pregnancy. The objective of this review was to consider potential roles for this family of corticosteroids that might relate to early pregnancy. Although this is a narrative review, 249 source articles addressing potential effects of glucocorticoids on aspects of early pregnancy and development (published between 1997 and 2007) were identified using a systematic literature search. Additional articles (115) were identified if cited by the primary reference articles identified in the systematic phase of the review. Much of the evidence to implicate glucocorticoids in early pregnancy comes from studies of steroid receptors and the 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, which modulate cortisol action in the endometrium/decidua, trophoblast, placenta and embryo/fetus. The evidence reviewed suggests that in early pregnancy the actions of glucocorticoids are balanced between positive effects that would promote pregnancy (e.g. stimulation of hCG secretion, suppression of uterine natural killer cells, and promotion of trophoblast growth/invasion) versus adverse effects that would be expected to compromise the pregnancy (e.g. inhibition of cytokine-prostaglandin signalling, restriction of trophoblast invasion following up-regulation of plasminogen activation inhibitor-1, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of embryonic and placental growth). Glucocorticoids exert many actions that could impact both negatively and positively on key aspects of early pregnancy. These steroids may also be implicated in obstetric complications, including intra-uterine growth restriction, pre-term labour, pre-eclampsia and chorio-aminionitis.

  15. Ulcerative colitis impairs the acylethanolamide-based anti-inflammatory system reversal by 5-aminosalicylic acid and glucocorticoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Suárez

    Full Text Available Studies in animal models and humans suggest anti-inflammatory roles on the N-acylethanolamide (NAE-peroxisome proliferators activated receptor alpha (PPARα system in inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the presence and function of NAE-PPARα signaling system in the ulcerative colitis (UC of humans remain unknown as well as its response to active anti-inflammatory therapies such as 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA and glucocorticoids. Expression of PPARα receptor and PPARα ligands-biosynthetic (NAPE-PLD and -degrading (FAAH and NAAA enzymes were analyzed in untreated active and 5-ASA/glucocorticoids/immunomodulators-treated quiescent UC patients compared to healthy human colonic tissue by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses. PPARα, NAAA, NAPE-PLD and FAAH showed differential distributions in the colonic epithelium, lamina propria, smooth muscle and enteric plexus. Gene expression analysis indicated a decrease of PPARα, PPARγ and NAAA, and an increase of FAAH and iNOS in the active colitis mucosa. Immunohistochemical expression in active colitis epithelium confirmed a PPARα decrease, but showed a sharp NAAA increase and a NAPE-PLD decrease, which were partially restored to control levels after treatment. We also characterized the immune cells of the UC mucosa infiltrate. We detected a decreased number of NAAA-positive and an increased number of FAAH-positive immune cells in active UC, which were partially restored to control levels after treatment. NAE-PPARα signaling system is impaired during active UC and 5-ASA/glucocorticoids treatment restored its normal expression. Since 5-ASA actions may work through PPARα and glucocorticoids through NAE-producing/degrading enzymes, the use of PPARα agonists or FAAH/NAAA blockers that increases endogenous PPARα ligands may yield similar therapeutics advantages.

  16. Chemogenomic Landscape of RUNX1-mutated AML Reveals Importance of RUNX1 Allele Dosage in Genetics and Glucocorticoid Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laura; Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Bordeleau, Marie-Eve; Krosl, Jana; Baccelli, Irène; Boucher, Geneviève; Lehnertz, Bernhard; Chagraoui, Jalila; MacRae, Tara; Ruel, Réjean; Chantigny, Yves; Lemieux, Sébastien; Marinier, Anne; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2017-11-15

    Purpose:RUNX1-mutated (RUNX1mut) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with adverse outcome, highlighting the urgent need for a better genetic characterization of this AML subgroup and for the design of efficient therapeutic strategies for this disease. Toward this goal, we further dissected the mutational spectrum and gene expression profile of RUNX1mut AML and correlated these results to drug sensitivity to identify novel compounds targeting this AML subgroup.Experimental Design: RNA-sequencing of 47 RUNX1mut primary AML specimens was performed and sequencing results were compared to those of RUNX1 wild-type samples. Chemical screens were also conducted using RUNX1mut specimens to identify compounds selectively affecting the viability of RUNX1mut AML.Results: We show that samples with no remaining RUNX1 wild-type allele are clinically and genetically distinct and display a more homogeneous gene expression profile. Chemical screening revealed that most RUNX1mut specimens are sensitive to glucocorticoids (GCs) and we confirmed that GCs inhibit AML cell proliferation through their interaction with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We observed that specimens harboring RUNX1 mutations expected to result in low residual RUNX1 activity are most sensitive to GCs, and that coassociating mutations as well as GR levels contribute to GC sensitivity. Accordingly, acquired glucocorticoid sensitivity was achieved by negatively regulating RUNX1 expression in human AML cells.Conclusions: Our findings show the profound impact of RUNX1 allele dosage on gene expression profile and glucocorticoid sensitivity in AML, thereby opening opportunities for preclinical testing which may lead to drug repurposing and improved disease characterization. Clin Cancer Res; 23(22); 6969-81. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Low-dose glucocorticoids in hyperandrogenism Efecto de bajas dosis de glucocorticoides en el hiperandrogenismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rizzo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of low-doses of glucocorticoids on androgen and cortisol secretion during the course of the day, we evaluated clinical signs of hyperandrogenism and total, free and bioavailable testosterone, SHBG, and cortisol following two different protocols: A fourteen patients received betamethasone 0.6 mg/day (n=8 or methylprednisolone 4 mg/day (n=6, as single daily oral dose at 11.00 PM, during 30 days, B fourteen patients were evaluated under betamethasone 0.3 mg in a single daily dose at 11.00 PM during six months, 11 out of whom were re-evaluated six months later. Twenty eight women with hyperandrogenism were included and seven normal females were used as control. Blood samples were taken in follicular phase at 8 AM and 7 PM to determine SHBG, cortisol, total, free and bioavailable testosterone. In both protocols, a significant morning and evening decrease in cortisol and testosterone (pCon el objetivo de investigar el efecto de bajas dosis de glucocorticoides sobre la secreción de andrógenos y cortisol en el curso del día, evaluamos signos de hiperandrogenismo, testosterona total, libre y biodisponible y cortisol según dos protocolos diferentes: A catorce pacientes recibieron betametasona 0.6 mg/día (n= 8 o metilprednisolona 4 mg/día (n= 6 en dosis única cotidiana, a las 23 h, durante 30 días, B catorce pacientes fueron evaluadas bajo betametasona 0.3 mg en dosis única cotidiana a la 23 h, administrada durante 6 meses; de ellas, 11 pacientes fueron re-evaluadas 6 meses más tarde. Se incluyeron 28 mujeres con hiperandrogenismo y 7 controles normales. Se obtuvieron muestras de sangre en fase folicular a las 08:00 y 9:00 h para determinar SHBG, cortisol, testosterona total, libre y biodisponible. En ambos protocolos se observó una disminución significativa de cortisol y testosterona (p<0.05 a <0.01, más importante con betametasona (p<0.05. En el protocolo B, los niveles matutinos de SHBG aumentaron

  18. The Mimetic Born-Infeld Gravity: The Primordial Cosmos and Spherically Symmetric Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Yu Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI model is reformulated within the mimetic approach. In the presence of a mimetic field, the model contains non-trivial vacuum solutions. We study a realistic primordial vacuum universe and we prove the existence of regular solutions. Besides, the linear instabilities in the EiBI model are found to be avoidable for some bouncing solutions. For a vacuum, static and spherically symmetric geometry, a new branch of solutions in which the black hole singularity that is replaced with a lightlike singularity is found.

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eddelien, Heidi Shil; Hoffmeyer, Henrik Westy; Lund, Eva Charlotte Løbner

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are used for intensive care unit (ICU) patients on several indications. We present a patient who was admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory failure caused by bronchospasm requiring mechanical ventilation and treated with methylprednisolone 240 mg/day in addition...... to antibiotics and bronchiolytics. When the sedation was lifted on day 10, the patient was awake but quadriplegic. Blood samples revealed elevated muscle enzymes, electromyography showed myopathy, and a muscle biopsy was performed. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy was suspected, GC treatment was tapered...

  20. Stress and memory: opposing effects of glucocorticoids on memory consolidation and memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno

    2002-11-01

    It is well established that glucocorticoid hormones, secreted by the adrenal cortex after a stressful event, influence cognitive performance. Some studies have found glucocorticoid-induced memory enhancement. However, many studies have reported impairing effects of glucocorticoids on memory function. This paper reviews recent findings from this laboratory on the acute effects of glucocorticoids in rats on specific memory phases, i.e., memory consolidation and memory retrieval. The evidence suggests that the consequences of glucocorticoid activation on cognition depend largely on the different memory phases investigated. Posttraining activation of glucocorticoid-sensitive pathways involving glucocorticoid receptors enhances memory consolidation in a pattern highly similar to that previously described for adrenal catecholamines. Also, similar to catecholamine effects on memory consolidation, glucocorticoid influences on memory consolidation depend on noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala and interactions with other brain regions. By contrast, memory retrieval processes are usually impaired with high circulating levels of glucocorticoids or following infusions of glucocorticoid receptor agonists into the hippocampus. The hypothesis is proposed that these apparently dual effects of glucocorticoids on memory consolidation and memory retrieval might be related and that the basolateral complex of the amygdala is a key structure in a memory-modulatory system that regulates, in concert with other brain regions, stress and glucocorticoid effects on both memory consolidation and memory retrieval. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  1. Preclinical analysis of the gamma-secretase inhibitor PF-03084014 in combination with glucocorticoids in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Samon, Jeremy B.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Hadler, Michael; Ambesi-Impiobato, Alberto; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Jakubczak, John; Randolph, Sophia; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2012-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias and lymphomas (T-ALL) are aggressive hematologic cancers frequently associated with activating mutations in NOTCH1. Early studies identified NOTCH1 as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of T-ALL through the use of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs). Here, we characterized the interaction between PF-03084014, a clinically-relevant GSI, and dexamethasone in preclinical models of glucocorticoid-resistant T-ALL. Combination treatment of the GSI PF-0...

  2. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling Mecanismos moleculares de señalización del receptor de glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.Esta revisión destaca los más recientes hallazgos sobre los mecanismos moleculares del receptor de glucocorticoides (GR. La mayoría de los efectos de los glucocorticoides son mediados por los GR intracelulares presentes en casi todos los tejidos y controlan la activación transcripcional por mecanismos directos e indirectos. Las respuestas a los glucocorticoides son específicas para cada gen y tejido. Los GR se asocian en forma selectiva con ligandos producidos en la glándula adrenal, corticosteroides, en respuesta a cambios neuroendocrinos. La interacción del ligando con el GR promueve: a la unión del GR a elementos genómicos de respuesta a glucocorticoides, modulando la transcripción; b la interacción de monómeros del GR con otros factores de transcripción activados por otras vías, llevando a la transrepresión. El GR regula un amplio espectro de funciones fisiológicas, incluyendo la

  3. Structural variants of glucocorticoid receptor binding sites and different versions of positive glucocorticoid responsive elements: Analysis of GR-TRRD database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkulov, Vasily M; Merkulova, Tatyana I

    2009-05-01

    The GR-TRRD section of the TRRD database contains the presently largest sample of published nucleotide sequences with experimentally confirmed binding to the glucocorticoid hormone receptor (GR). This sample comprises 160 glucocorticoid receptor binding sites (GRbs) from 77 vertebrate glucocorticoid-regulated genes. Analysis of this sample has demonstrated that the structure of only half GRbs (54%) corresponds to the generally accepted organization of glucocorticoid response element (GRE) as an inverted repeat of the TGTTCT hexanucleotide. As many as 40% of GRbs contain only the hexanucleotide, and the majority of such "half-sites" belong to the glucocorticoid-inducible genes. An expansion of the sample allowed the consensus of GRbs organized as an inverted repeat to be determined more precisely. Several possible mechanisms underlying the role of the noncanonical receptor binding sites (hexanucleotide half-sites) in the glucocorticoid induction are proposed based on analysis of the literature data.

  4. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L. (GSKNC); (GSK)

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  5. Concentration Dependent Actions of Glucocorticoids on Neuronal Viability and Survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ábrahám, István M.; Meerlo, Peter; Luiten, Paul G.M.

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of evidence based on experimental data demonstrates that glucocorticoids (GCs) can play a potent role in the survival and death of neurons. However, these observations reflect paradoxical features of GCs, since these adrenal stress hormones are heavily involved in both

  6. Uso de glucocorticoides en enfermedades alérgicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rodríguez-González

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Los glucocorticoides son análogos sintéticos de las hormonas adrenocorticales, de uso común, de gran utilidad en la práctica clínica del pediatra y se consideran la piedra angular del tratamiento farmacológico de enfermedades alérgicas.

  7. Chronic Glucocorticoid Hypersecretion in Cushing's Syndrome Exacerbates Cognitive Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Kathy; Forget, Helene; Cohen, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Cumulative exposure to glucocorticoid hormones (GC) over the lifespan has been associated with cognitive impairment and may contribute to physical and cognitive degeneration in aging. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the pattern of cognitive deficits in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS), a disorder characterized by…

  8. Stress, glucocorticoids and absences in a genetic epilepsy model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolmacheva, E.A.; Oitzl, M.S.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Although stress can alter the susceptibility of patients and animal models to convulsive epilepsy, little is known about the role of stress and glucocorticoid hormones in absence epilepsy. We measured the basal and acute stress-induced (foot-shocks: FS) concentrations of corticosterone in WAG/Rij

  9. Sensitivity to glucocorticoids is decreased in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winsen, Lisa M. L.; Muris, Daan F. R.; Polman, Chris H.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van den Berg, Timo K.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids (GC), which are under control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, play an important role in controlling chronic inflammatory demyelinating diseases, like multiple sclerosis (MS). Increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity has been found in MS patients

  10. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported...

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor effects on the immune system and infl ammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThomas Addison’s discovery in the mid-1800s that the adrenal cortex was essential for survival preceded by nearly a century the demonstration that this gland produced at least two distinct hormones, each essential for normal life. How glucocorticoids sustained life remained a mystery for

  12. Impact of Preterm Birth on Glucocorticoid Variability in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, Shikha; Mitchell, Cameron J; Thorstensen, Eric B; Wall, Clare R; Perrella, Sharon L; Geddes, Donna T; Cameron-Smith, David

    2017-09-01

    Preterm birth is a stressful event for both the mother and infant. Whereas the initiation of breastfeeding is important for preterm infant health, little is known of the glucocorticoid hormones (cortisol and cortisone) in human milk following preterm birth. Research aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between human milk glucocorticoid concentrations and preterm birth. Human milk was sampled weekly for up to 6 weeks from 22 women who delivered a preterm infant at 28 to 32 weeks' gestation. Human milk was analyzed for total and free cortisol and cortisone concentrations using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Milk sampled from mothers of preterm infants had more cortisone than cortisol ( p milk of mothers who delivered infants after 30 weeks compared with those who delivered before 30 weeks of gestation ( p = .02). Glucocorticoid concentrations did not change over the sampling time (weeks 1 to 6 postpartum) and did not differ by infant gender. Glucocorticoids were present in all milk samples following preterm birth. Cortisone concentration tended to be higher in those who delivered after 30 weeks' gestation but did not increase further over the weeks following birth.

  13. Glucocorticoid-Induced Diabetes Mellitus: An Important but Overlooked Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghwan Suh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are widely used as potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs to treat a wide range of diseases. However, they are also associated with a number of side effects, including new-onset hyperglycemia in patients without a history of diabetes mellitus (DM or severely uncontrolled hyperglycemia in patients with known DM. Glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus (GIDM is a common and potentially harmful problem in clinical practice, affecting almost all medical specialties, but is often difficult to detect in clinical settings. However, scientific evidence is lacking regarding the effects of GIDM, as well as strategies for prevention and treatment. Similarly to nonsteroid-related DM, the principles of early detection and risk factor modification apply. Screening for GIDM should be considered in all patients treated with medium to high doses of glucocorticoids. Challenges in the management of GIDM stem from wide fluctuations in postprandial hyperglycemia and the lack of clearly defined treatment protocols. Together with lifestyle measures, hypoglycemic drugs with insulin-sensitizing effects are indicated. However, insulin therapy is often unavoidable, to the point that insulin can be considered the drug of choice. The treatment of GIDM should take into account the degree and pattern of hyperglycemia, as well as the type, dose, and schedule of glucocorticoid used. Moreover, it is essential to instruct the patient and/or the patient's family about how to perform the necessary adjustments. Prospective studies are needed to answer the remaining questions regarding GIDM.

  14. The effect of early administration of glucocorticoids on learning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been observed that steroids administered postnatally may have transient retarding effect on learning and memory functions, and that animal age and sex may modify such effects. This study aims to illustrate the effect of early administration of glucocorticoids on learning and spatial memory. Wistar rat pups were ...

  15. Glucocorticoids suppress vasopressin gene expression in human suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, R.-Y.; Unmehopa, U.A.; Zhou, J.-N.; Swaab, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Sleep impairment is one of the major side effects of glucocorticoid therapy. The mechanism responsible for this circadian disorder is unknown, but alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock of the human brain, are presumed to play a major role. In the present study, the

  16. Glucocorticoids suppress vasopressin gene expression in human suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Rong-Yu; Unmehopa, Unga A.; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Swaab, Dick F.

    2006-01-01

    Sleep impairment is one of the major side effects of glucocorticoid therapy. The mechanism responsible for this circadian disorder is unknown, but alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock of the human brain, are presumed to play a major role. In the present study, the

  17. Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ricardo M; Bialy, Liza M; Vandermeer, Ben; Tjosvold, Lisa; Plint, Amy C; Patel, Hema; Johnson, David W; Klassen, Terry P; Hartling, Lisa

    2013-06-04

    Previous systematic reviews have not shown clear benefit of glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis, but their use remains considerable. Recent large trials add substantially to current evidence and suggest novel glucocorticoid-including treatment approaches. To review the efficacy and safety of systemic and inhaled glucocorticoids in children with acute viral bronchiolitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1950 to January week 2, 2013), EMBASE (1980 to January 2013), LILACS (1982 to January 2013), Scopus® (1823 to January 2013) and IRAN MedEx (1998 to November 2009). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing short-term systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids versus placebo or another intervention in children under 24 months with acute bronchiolitis (first episode with wheezing). Our primary outcomes were: admissions by days 1 and 7 for outpatient studies; and length of stay (LOS) for inpatient studies. Secondary outcomes included clinical severity parameters, healthcare use, pulmonary function, symptoms, quality of life and harms. Two authors independently extracted data on study and participant characteristics, interventions and outcomes. We assessed risk of bias and graded strength of evidence. We meta-analysed inpatient and outpatient results separately using random-effects models. We pre-specified subgroup analyses, including the combined use of bronchodilators used in a protocol. We included 17 trials (2596 participants); three had low overall risk of bias. Baseline severity, glucocorticoid schemes, comparators and outcomes were heterogeneous. Glucocorticoids did not significantly reduce outpatient admissions by days 1 and 7 when compared to placebo (pooled risk ratios (RRs) 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78 to 1.08 and 0.86; 95% CI 0.7 to 1.06, respectively). There was no benefit in LOS for inpatients (mean difference -0.18 days; 95% CI -0.39 to 0.04). Unadjusted results from a

  18. Gramicidin S derivatives containing cis- and trans-morpholine amino acids (MAAS) as turn mimetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapoerchan, V.V.; Spalburg, E.; Neeling, A.J. de; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Noort, D.; Otero, J.M. de; Ferraces-Casais, P.; Llamas-Saiz, A.L.; Raaij, M.J. van; Doorn, J. van; Marel, G.A. van der; Overkleeft, H.S.; Overhand, M.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclic decapeptide gramicidin S (GS) was used as a model for the evaluation of four turn mimetics. For this purpose, one of the D-Phe-Pro two-residue turn motifs in the rigid cyclic β-hairp0in structure of GS was replaced with morpholine amino acids (MAA 2-5), differing in stereochemistry and

  19. Gramicidin S derivatives containing cis- and trans-morpholine amino acids (MAAs) as turn mimetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapoerchan, V.V.; Spalburg, E.; Neeling, de A.J.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Noort, D.; Otero, J.M.; Ferraces-Casais, P.; Llamas-Saiz, A.L.; Raaij, van M.J.; Doorn, van J.; Marel, van der G.A.; Overkleeft, H.S.; Overhand, M.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclic decapeptide gramicidin S (GS) was used as a model for the evaluation of four turn mimetics. For this purpose, one of the D-Phe-Pro two-residue turn motifs in the rigid cyclic -hairpin structure of GS was replaced with morpholine amino acids (MAA 2-5), differing in stereochemistry and

  20. The conversion in the René Girard’s mimetic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Moreno Fernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the specific peculiarities of René Girard’s mimetic theory is the recovery of the concept of conversion. In this article we expose, in a detailed way, the three senses of the conversion according to his thinking: novelistic, religious and epistemological. There is an interaction between the three senses and also different significations for each other.

  1. New mimetic peptides inhibitors of Aβ aggregation : Molecular guidance for rational drug design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera Guisasola, E.E.; Andujar, S.; Hubin, E.; Broersen, Kerensa; Kraan, Yvonne M.; Mendez, L.; Delpiccolo, C.M.L.; Masman, M.F.; Rodriguez, A.M.; Enriz, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    A new series of mimetic peptides possessing a significant Aβ aggregation modulating effect was reported here. These compounds were obtained based on a molecular modelling study which allowed us to perform a structural-based virtual selection. Monitoring Aβ aggregation by thioflavin T fluorescence

  2. New mimetic peptides inhibitors of A beta aggregation. Molecular guidance for rational drug design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera Guisasola, Exequiel E.; Andujar, Sebastian A.; Hubin, Ellen; Broersen, Kerensa; Kraan, Ivonne M.; Mendez, Luciana; Delpiccolo, Carina M. L.; Masman, Marcelo F.; Rodriguez, Ana M.; Enriz, Ricardo D.

    2015-01-01

    A new series of mimetic peptides possessing a significant A beta aggregation modulating effect was reported here. These compounds were obtained based on a molecular modelling study which allowed us to perform a structural-based virtual selection. Monitoring A beta aggregation by thioflavin T

  3. New mimetic peptides inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. Molecular guidance for rational drug design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera Guisasola, E.E.; Andujar, S.; Hubin, E.; Broersen, Kerensa; Kraan, Yvonne M.; Mendez, L.; Delpiccolo, C.M.L.; Masman, M.F.; Rodriguez, A.M.; Enriz, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    A new series of mimetic peptides possessing a significant Aβ aggregation modulating effect was reported here. These compounds were obtained based on a molecular modelling study which allowed us to perform a structural-based virtual selection. Monitoring Aβ aggregation by thioflavin T fluorescence

  4. A Case of Mimetic Isomorphism: A Short-Cut to Increasing Loyalty to Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkodashvili, Mariam

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the process of shortening career path to leadership positions in academia that could serve as an example of mimetic isomorphism, where university tries to apply business-like quick result-oriented strategies. This strategy incentivizes young faculty to stay in universities and keep loyalty to academia. This process could also…

  5. Student-Driven Design of Peptide Mimetics: Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Peptoid Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Nicola L. B.; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Yoo, Barney; Schulz, Nathan; Zea, Corbin J.; Streff, Jennifer M.; Schwarz, Kimberly L.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment for the undergraduate organic laboratory is described in which peptide mimetic oligomers called "peptoids" are built stepwise on a solid-phase resin. Students employ two modern strategies to facilitate rapid multistep syntheses: solid-phase techniques to obviate the need for intermediate purifications and microwave irradiation to…

  6. BH3 mimetics inhibit growth of chondrosarcoma--a novel targeted-therapy for candidate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morii, Takeshi; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Kazuo; Yoshiyama, Akira; Aoyagi, Takayuki; Hornicek, Francis J; Ichimura, Shoichi

    2014-11-01

    Chondrosarcoma is refractory to conventional chemotherapy. BH-3 mimetics ABT-737 and ABT-263 are synthetic small-molecule inhibitors of anti-apoptotic proteins B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl2) and Bcl-xL, which play a critical role in survival of chondrosarcoma cells. Chondrosarcoma cell lines SW-1353 and CS-1 were used as the disease model. We used immunoblotting to assess the expression of target molecules Bcl2 and Bcl-xL, and the apoptotic inducers Bcl2-associated X (Bax) and Bcl2-antagonist/killer (Bak). In vitro growth inhibition by BH-3 mimetics was confirmed by photomicroscopic cell counting and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) assay. Apoptotic induction was confirmed by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). In vivo growth inhibition was assessed in a non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse model. Expression of the target and effector molecules was confirmed in chondrosarcoma cell lines. BH3 mimetics significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in vitro. Administration of ABT-263 inhibited chondrosarcoma growth and improved survival in a mouse model. BH3 mimetics represent a novel treatment modality for chondrosarcoma. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Novel thrombopoietin mimetic peptides bind c-Mpl receptor: Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaquan; Tian, Fang; Zhi, Dejuan; Wang, Haiqing; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Hongyu

    2017-02-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) acts in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells and by initiating specific maturation events in megakaryocytes. Now, TPO-mimetic peptides with amino acid sequences unrelated to TPO are of considerable pharmaceutical interest. In the present paper, four new TPO mimetic peptides that bind and activate c-Mpl receptor have been identified, synthesized and tested by Dual-Luciferase reporter gene assay for biological activities. The molecular modeling research was also approached to understand key molecular mechanisms and structural features responsible for peptide binding with c-Mpl receptor. The results presented that three of four mimetic peptides showed significant activities. In addition, the molecular modeling approaches proved hydrophobic interactions were the driven positive forces for binding behavior between peptides and c-Mpl receptor. TPO peptide residues in P7, P13 and P7' positions were identified by the analysis of hydrogen bonds and energy decompositions as the key ones for benefiting better biological activities. Our data suggested the synthesized peptides have considerable potential for the future development of stable and highly active TPO mimetic peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of tempol on redox homeostasis and stress tolerance in mimetically aged Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksu, Ugur; Yanar, Karolin; Terzioglu, Duygu; Erkol, Tugçe; Ece, Evrim; Aydin, Seval; Uslu, Ezel; Çakatay, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test our hypothesis that scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) with tempol, a membrane permeable antioxidant, affects the type and magnitude of oxidative damage and stress tolerance through mimetic aging process in Drosophila. Drosophila colonies were randomly divided into three

  9. Comparative Allometric Growth of the Mimetic Ephippid Reef Fishes Chaetodipterus faber and Platax orbicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Breno; Sakai, Yoichi; Pereira, Pedro H C; Gasset, Eric; Buchet, Vincent; Maamaatuaiahutapu, Moana; Ready, Jonathan S; Oliveira, Yrlan; Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Vallinoto, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Mimesis is a relatively widespread phenomenon among reef fish, but the ontogenetic processes relevant for mimetic associations in fish are still poorly understood. In the present study, the allometric growth of two allopatric leaf-mimetic species of ephippid fishes, Chaetodipterus faber from the Atlantic and Platax orbicularis from the Indo-Pacific, was analyzed using ten morphological variables. The development of fins was considered owing to the importance of these structures for mimetic behaviors during early life stages. Despite the anatomical and behavioral similarities in both juvenile and adult stages, C. faber and P. orbicularis showed distinct patterns of growth. The overall shape of C. faber transforms from a rounded-shape in mimetic juveniles to a lengthened profile in adults, while in P. orbicularis, juveniles present an oblong profile including dorsal and anal fins, with relative fin size diminishing while the overall profile grows rounder in adults. Although the two species are closely-related, the present results suggest that growth patterns in C. faber and P. orbicularis are different, and are probably independent events in ephippids that have resulted from similar selective processes.

  10. Reproductive isolation related to mimetic divergence in the poison frog Ranitomeya imitator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twomey, Evan; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Summers, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    phenotypic transition zone, neutral genetic divergence and assortative mating, suggesting that divergent selection to resemble different model species has led to a breakdown in gene flow between these two populations. These results extend the effects of mimicry on speciation into a vertebrate system...... and characterize an early stage of speciation where reproductive isolation between mimetic morphs is incomplete but evident....

  11. Evaluating Glucocorticoid Administration on Biomechanical Properties of Rats’ Tibial Diaphysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidouni, Mohammadjavad; Nejati, Hossein; Salimi, Maryam; Bayat, Mohammad; Amini, Abdollah; Noruzian, Mohsen; Asgharie, Mohammad Ali; Rezaian, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a disease, which causes bone loss and fractures. Although glucocorticoids effectively suppress inflammation, their chronic use is accompanied by bone loss with a tendency toward secondary osteoporosis. Objectives: This study took into consideration the importance of cortical bone in the entire bone's mechanical competence. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of different protocols of glucocorticoid administration on the biomechanical properties of tibial bone diaphysis in rats compared to control and low-level laser-treated rats. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. We used systematic random sampling to divide 40 adult male rats into 8 groups with 5 rats in each group. Groups were as follows: 1) control, 2) dexamethasone (7 mg/week), 3) dexamethasone (0.7 mg/week), 4) methylprednisolone (7 mg/kg/week), 5) methylprednisolone (5 mg/kg twice weekly), 6) dexamethasone (7 mg/kg three times per week), 7) dexamethasone (0.7 mg/kg thrice per week), and 8) low-level laser-treated rats. The study periods were 4-7 weeks. At the end of the treatment periods, we examined the mechanical properties of tibial bone diaphysis. Data were analyzed by statistical analyses. Results: Glucocorticoid-treated rats showed weight loss and considerable mortality (21%). The biomechanical properties (maximum force) of glucocorticoid-treated rats in groups 4 (62 ± 2.9), 6 (63 ± 5.1), and 7 (60 ± 5.3) were comparable with the control (46 ± 1.5) and low-level laser-treated (57 ± 3.2) rats. Conclusions: In contrast to the findings in humans and certain other species, glucocorticoid administration caused anabolic effect on the cortical bone of tibia diaphysis bone in rats. PMID:26019900

  12. Glucocorticoid receptor haplotype and metabolic syndrome: the Lifelines cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Vincent L; Koper, Jan W; van den Akker, Erica L T; Franco, Oscar H; Stolk, Ronald P; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C

    2016-12-01

    An excess of glucocorticoids (Cushing's syndrome) is associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) features. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene influence sensitivity to glucocorticoids and have been associated with aspects of MetS. However, results are inconsistent, perhaps due to the heterogeneity of the studied populations and limited samples. Furthermore, the possible association between functional GR SNPs and prevalence of MetS remains unexplored. Cross-sectional population-based cohort study. MetS presence and carriage of functional GR SNPs (BclI, N363S, ER22/23EK, GR-9beta) were determined in 12 552 adult participants from Lifelines, a population-based cohort study in the Netherlands. GR SNPs were used to construct GR haplotypes. Five haplotypes accounted for 99.9% of all GR haplotypes found. No main effects of functional GR haplotypes on MetS were found, but the association of GR haplotype 4 (containing N363S) with MetS was influenced by interaction with age, sex and education status (P haplotype 4 increased MetS presence in younger men (at or below the median age of 47; odds ratio 1.77, P = 0.005) and in people of low education status (odds ratio 1.48, P = 0.039). A glucocorticoid receptor haplotype that confers increased sensitivity to glucocorticoids appears to increase the risk of metabolic syndrome, but only among younger men and less educated individuals, suggesting gene-environment interactions. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  13. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Faraz Kazim

    Full Text Available Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6, which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  14. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazim, Syed Faraz; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria Del Carmen; Arif, Mohammad; Blanchard, Julie; Fayyaz, Fatima; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6), which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  15. Furoxans (1,2,5-Oxadiazole-N-Oxides) as Novel NO Mimetic Neuroprotective and Procognitive Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefer, Isaac T.; VandeVrede, Lawren; Fa; , Mauro; Arancio, Ottavio; Thatcher, Gregory R.J. (Columbia); (UIC)

    2012-08-31

    Furoxans (1,2,5-oxadiazole-N-oxides) are thiol-bioactivated NO-mimetics that have not hitherto been studied in the CNS. Incorporation of varied substituents adjacent to the furoxan ring system led to modulation of reactivity toward bioactivation, studied by HPLC-MS/MS analysis of reaction products. Attenuated reactivity unmasked the cytoprotective actions of NO in contrast to the cytotoxic actions of higher NO fluxes reported previously for furoxans. Neuroprotection was observed in primary neuronal cell cultures following oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). Neuroprotective activity was observed to correlate with thiol-dependent bioactivation to produce NO{sub 2}{sup -}, but not with depletion of free thiol itself. Neuroprotection was abrogated upon cotreatment with a sGC inhibitor, ODQ, thus supporting activation of the NO/sGC/CREB signaling cascade by furoxans. Long-term potentiation (LTP), essential for learning and memory, has been shown to be potentiated by NO signaling, therefore, a peptidomimetic furoxan was tested in hippocampal slices treated with oligomeric amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) and was shown to restore synaptic function. The novel observation of furoxan activity of potential therapeutic use in the CNS warrants further studies.

  16. Selective replication of oncolytic virus M1 results in a bystander killing effect that is potentiated by Smac mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Haipeng; Liang, Jiankai; Tan, Yaqian; Cavenee, Webster K; Yan, Guangmei

    2017-06-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment modality that uses native or genetically modified viruses that selectively replicate in and kill tumor cells. Viruses represent a type of pathogen-associated molecular pattern and thereby induce the up-regulation of dozens of cytokines via activating the host innate immune system. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic compounds (SMCs), which antagonize the function of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and induce apoptosis, sensitize tumor cells to multiple cytokines. Therefore, we sought to determine whether SMCs sensitize tumor cells to cytokines induced by the oncolytic M1 virus, thus enhancing a bystander killing effect. Here, we report that SMCs potentiate the oncolytic effect of M1 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. This strengthened oncolytic efficacy resulted from the enhanced bystander killing effect caused by the M1 virus via cytokine induction. Through a microarray analysis and subsequent validation using recombinant cytokines, we identified IL-8, IL-1A, and TRAIL as the key cytokines in the bystander killing effect. Furthermore, SMCs increased the replication of M1, and the accumulation of virus protein induced irreversible endoplasmic reticulum stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated apoptosis. Nevertheless, the combined treatment with M1 and SMCs had little effect on normal and human primary cells. Because SMCs selectively and significantly enhance the bystander killing effect and the replication of oncolytic virus M1 specifically in cancer cells, this combined treatment may represent a promising therapeutic strategy.

  17. Development of electrospun bone-mimetic matrices for bone regenerative applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Matthew Christopher

    Although bone has a dramatic capacity for regeneration, certain injuries and procedures present defects that are unable to heal properly, requiring surgical intervention to induce and support osteoregeneration. Our research group has hypothesized that the development of a biodegradable material that mimics the natural composition and architecture of bone extracellular matrix has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit to these patients. Utilizing a process known as electrospinning, our lab has developed a bone-mimetic matrix (BMM) consisting of composite nanofibers of the mechanically sta-ble polymer polycaprolactone (PCL), and the natural bone matrix molecules type-I colla-gen and hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (HA). We herein show that BMMs supported great-er adhesion, proliferation, and integrin activation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the multipotent bone-progenitor cells within bone marrow and the periosteum, in comparison to electrospun PCL alone. These cellular responses, which are essential early steps in the process of bone regeneration, highlight the benefits of presenting cells with natural bone molecules. Subsequently, evaluation of new bone formation in a rat cortical tibia defect showed that BMMs are highly osteoconductive. However, these studies also revealed the inability of endogenous cells to migrate within electrospun matrices due to the inherently small pore sizes. To address this limitation, which will negatively impact the rate of scaf-fold-to-bone turnover and inhibit vascularization, sacrificial fibers were added to the ma-trix. The removal of these fibers after fabrication resulted in BMMs with larger pores, leading to increased infiltration of MSCs and endogenous bone cells. Lastly, we evaluat-ed the potential of our matrices to stimulate the recruitment of MSCs, a vital step in bone healing, through the sustained delivery of platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). BMMs were found to adsorb and subsequently release greater

  18. Mechanisms of neuroblastoma cell growth inhibition by CARP-1 functional mimetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magesh Muthu

    Full Text Available Neuroblastomas (NBs are a clinically heterogeneous group of extra cranial pediatric tumors. Patients with high-risk, metastatic NBs have a long-term survival rate of below 40%, and are often resistant to current therapeutic modalities. Due to toxic side effects associated with radiation and chemotherapies, development of new agents is warranted to overcome resistance and effectively treat this disease in clinic. CARP-1 functional mimetics (CFMs are an emerging class of small molecule compounds that inhibit growth of diverse cancer cell types. Here we investigated NB inhibitory potential of CFMs and the molecular mechanisms involved. CFM-1, -4, and -5 inhibited NB cell growth, in vitro, independent of their p53 and MYCN status. CFM-4 and -5 induced apoptosis in NB cells in part by activating pro-apoptotic stress-activated kinases (SAPKs p38 and JNK, stimulating CARP-1 expression and cleavage of PARP1, while promoting loss of the oncogenes C and N-myc as well as mitotic cyclin B1. Treatments of NB cells with CFM-4 or -5 also resulted in loss of Inhibitory κB (IκB α and β proteins. Micro-RNA profiling revealed upregulation of XIAP-targeting miR513a-3p in CFM-4-treated NB, mesothelioma, and breast cancer cells. Moreover, exposure of NB and breast cancer cells to CFM-4 or -5 resulted in diminished expression of anti-apoptotic XIAP1, cIAP1, and Survivin proteins. Expression of anti-miR513a-5p or miR513a-5p mimic, however, interfered with or enhanced, respectively, the breast cancer cell growth inhibition by CFM-4. CFMs also impacted biological properties of the NB cells by blocking their abilities to migrate, form colonies in suspension, and invade through the matrix-coated membranes. Our studies indicate anti-NB properties of CFM-4 and 5, and suggest that these CFMs and/or their future analogs have potential as anti-NB agents.

  19. Five patients with biochemical and/or clinical generalized glucocorticoid resistance without alterations in the glucocorticoid receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.T.M. Huizenga (Nannette); P. de Lange (Pieter); J.W. Koper (Jan); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); R. Abs; J.H. Kasteren; F.H. de Jong (Frank); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractCortisol resistance (CR) is a rare disease characterized by a generalized reduced sensitivity of end-organs to the actions of glucocorticoids (GCs). GC effects are mediated by the GC receptor (GR). The molecular alterations in CR described thus far were

  20. Tunable elastin-mimetic multiblock hybrid copolymers for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber, Sarah Elizabeth

    Elastin-mimetic hybrid polymers (EMHPs) have been developed to capture the multiblock molecular architecture of tropoelastin, allowing tunability in chemical, structural, biological, and mechanical properties. Multiblock EMHPs containing flexible synthetic segments were first synthesized via step growth polymerization of diazido-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and alkyne-terminated AKA3KA (K = lysine, A = alanine) (AK2) peptide employing copper (I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC, or orthogonal click chemistry). Covalent crosslinking of the EMHPs with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) through the lysine residues in the peptide domain afforded an elastomeric hydrogel (xEMHP) with a compressive modulus of 0.12 +/- 0.018 MPa when hydrated. xEMHPs exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to primary porcine vocal fold fibroblasts. The modular nature of the synthesis allowed facile adjustment of the peptide sequence to modulate the structural and the biological properties of EMHPs. Thus, EMHPs containing integrin-binding peptides were constructed using di-azido-PEG and an alkyne-terminated AK2 peptide with a terminal, integrin-binding GRGDSP domain via the step growth click coupling reaction. Hydrogels formed by covalent crosslinking of the RGD-containing EMHPs had a compressive modulus of 1.06 +/- 0.1MPa when hydrated. Neonatal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) were able to adhere to the hydrogels within 1 h, and to spread and develop F-actin filaments 24 h post seeding. NHDF proliferation was only observed on hydrogels containing RGD domains, demonstrating the importance of integrin engagement for cell growth and the potential use of these EMHPs as tissue engineering scaffolds. The tunability of the EMHP system was further investigated by development of self-assembling, pH-responsive multiblock polymers composed of alternating domains of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and a peptide derived from the hydrophobic domains of elastin with the sequence (VPGVG)2 (VG2). The

  1. HDL-mimetic PLGA nanoparticle to target atherosclerosis plaque macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E.; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, Yongtae; van der Staay, Susanne E. M.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and

  2. Glucocorticoid Induced Cerebellar Toxicity in the Developing Neonate: Implications for Glucocorticoid Therapy during Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K. Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prematurely born infants commonly suffer respiratory dysfunction due to the immature state of their lungs. As a result, clinicians often administer glucocorticoid (GC therapy to accelerate lung maturation and reduce inflammation. Unfortunately, several studies have found GC therapy can also produce neuromotor/cognitive deficits and selectively stunt the cerebellum. However, despite its continued use, relatively little is known about how exposure to this hormone might produce neurodevelopmental deficits. In this review, we use rodent and human research to provide evidence that GC therapy may disrupt cerebellar development through the rapid induction of apoptosis in the cerebellar external granule layer (EGL. The EGL is a transient proliferative region responsible for the production of over 90% of the neurons in the cerebellum. During normal development, endogenous GC stimulation is thought to selectively signal the elimination of the EGL once production of new neurons is complete. As a result, GC therapy may precociously eliminate the EGL before it can produce enough neurons for normal cerebellar function. It is hoped that this review may provide information for future clinical research in addition to translational guidance for the safer use of GC therapy.

  3. Cancer cell-selective promoter recognition accompanies antitumor effect by glucocorticoid receptor-targeted gold nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Samaresh; Agarwalla, Pritha; Mukherjee, Sudip; Bag, Indira; Sreedhar, Bojja; Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied on the delivery of `exogenous' genes invoking gene knockdown or replacement. Practically, there are no instances for the nanoparticle-mediated promoter regulation of `endogenous' genes, more so, as a cancer selective phenomenon. In this regard, we report the development of a simple, easily modifiable GNP-formulation, which promoted/up-regulated the expression of a specific category of `endogenous' genes, the glucocorticoid responsive genes. This genetic up-regulation was induced in only cancer cells by modified GNP-mediated transcriptional activation of its cytoplasmic receptor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Normal cells and their GR remained primarily unperturbed by this GNP-formulation. The most potent gene up-regulating GNP-formulation down-regulated a cancer-specific proliferative signal, phospho-Akt in cancer cells, which accompanied retardation of tumor growth in the murine melanoma model. We show that GR-targeted GNPs may find potential use in the targeting and modulation of genetic information in cancer towards developing novel anticancer therapeutics.Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied

  4. HDL-Mimetic PLGA Nanoparticle To Target Atherosclerosis Plaque Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E.; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E. M.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A.; Moore, Kathryn J; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein co...

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides for Therapeutic Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsogbadrakh Mishig-Ochir

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been considered as potential therapeutic sources of future antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum activities and different mechanisms of action compared to conventional antibiotics. Although AMPs possess considerable benefits as new generation antibiotics, their clinical and commercial development still have some limitations, such as potential toxicity, susceptibility to proteases, and high cost of peptide production. In order to overcome those obstacles, extensive efforts have been carried out. For instance, unusual amino acids or peptido-mimetics are introduced to avoid the proteolytic degradation and the design of short peptides retaining antimicrobial activities is proposed as a solution for the cost issue. In this review, we focus on small peptides, especially those with less than twelve amino acids, and provide an overview of the relationships between their three-dimensional structures and antimicrobial activities. The efforts to develop highly active AMPs with shorter sequences are also described.

  6. miR-128b is a potent glucocorticoid sensitizer in MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia cells and exerts cooperative effects with miR-221.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Ai; Ha, Daon; Hsieh, James; Rao, Prakash K; Schotte, Diana; den Boer, Monique L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-11-05

    MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) has a poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate expression of target mRNAs. Our analysis of previously published data showed that expression of miR-128b and miR-221 is down-regulated in MLL-rearranged ALL relative to other types of ALL. Reexpression of these miRNAs cooperatively sensitizes 2 cultured lines of MLL-AF4 ALL cells to glucocorticoids. Target genes down-regulated by miR-128b include MLL, AF4, and both MLL-AF4 and AF4-MLL fusion genes; miR-221 down-regulates CDKN1B. These results demonstrate that down-regulation of miR-128b and miR-221 is implicated in glucocorticoid resistance and that restoration of their levels is a potentially promising therapeutic in MLL-AF4 ALL.

  7. The transcriptomics of glucocorticoid receptor signaling in developing zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinushan Nesan

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the primary corticosteroid in teleosts that is released in response to stressor activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis. The target tissue action of this hormone is primarily mediated by the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR, a ligand-bound transcription factor. In developing zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos, GR transcripts and cortisol are maternally deposited into the oocyte prior to fertilization and influence early embryogenesis. To better understand of the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated changes in the developmental transcriptome prior to hatch, in response to morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of GR using the Agilent zebrafish microarray platform. A total of 1313 and 836 mRNA transcripts were significantly changed at 24 and 36 hours post fertilization (hpf, respectively. Functional analysis revealed numerous developmental processes under GR regulation, including neurogenesis, eye development, skeletal and cardiac muscle formation. Together, this study underscores a critical role for glucocorticoid signaling in programming molecular events essential for zebrafish development.

  8. Pharmaceutical topical dosage forms as carriers for glucocorticoids

    OpenAIRE

    Raposo, Sara Sofia Caliço, 1984-

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Farmácia (Tecnologia Farmacêutica), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Farmácia, 2013 With rapid developments in materials science, pharmaceutics and biotechnology, new systems have emerged for topical glucocorticoids delivery. Despite being a mature class of drugs, they are still the most frequently prescribed drugs by dermatologists, explaining the interest on this field. Over the years, research has focused on strategies to optimize the potency of steroids while ...

  9. Glucocorticoids entrain molecular clock components in human peripheral cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Marc; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2015-04-01

    In humans, shift work induces a desynchronization between the circadian system and the outside world, which contributes to shift work-associated medical disorders. Using a simulated night shift experiment, we previously showed that 3 d of bright light at night fully synchronize the central clock to the inverted sleep schedule, whereas the peripheral clocks located in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) took longer to reset. This underlines the need for testing the effects of synchronizers on both the central and peripheral clocks. Glucocorticoids display circadian rhythms controlled by the central clock and are thought to act as synchronizers of rodent peripheral clocks. In the present study, we tested whether the human central and peripheral clocks were sensitive to exogenous glucocorticoids (Cortef) administered in the late afternoon. We showed that 20 mg Cortef taken orally acutely increased PER1 expression in PBMC peripheral clocks. After 6 d of Cortef administration, the phases of central markers were not affected, whereas those of PER2-3 and BMAL1 expression in PBMCs were shifted by ∼ 9.5-11.5 h. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that human peripheral clocks are entrained by glucocorticoids. Importantly, they suggest innovative interventions for shift workers and jet-lag travelers, combining synchronizing agents for the central and peripheral clocks. © FASEB.

  10. Adipocyte glucocorticoid receptors mediate fat-to-brain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G; Solomon, Matia B; Flak, Jonathan N; Scott, Karen A; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Myers, Brent; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J; Herman, James P

    2015-06-01

    Stress-related (e.g., depression) and metabolic pathologies (e.g., obesity) are important and often co-morbid public health concerns. Here we identify a connection between peripheral glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling originating in fat with the brain control of both stress and metabolism. Mice with reduced adipocyte GR hypersecrete glucocorticoids following acute psychogenic stress and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. This hypersecretion gives rise to deficits in responsiveness to exogenous glucocorticoids, consistent with reduced negative feedback via adipocytes. Increased stress reactivity occurs in the context of elevated hypothalamic expression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-excitatory neuropeptides and in the absence of altered adrenal sensitivity, consistent with a central cite of action. Our results identify a novel mechanism whereby activation of the adipocyte GR promotes peripheral energy storage while inhibiting the HPA axis, and provide functional evidence for a fat-to-brain regulatory feedback network that serves to regulate not just homeostatic energy balance but also responses to psychogenic stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucocorticoids play a key role in circadian cell cycle rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dickmeis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Clock output pathways play a pivotal role by relaying timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems. Both cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms have been implicated as clock outputs; however, the relative importance and interplay between these mechanisms are poorly understood. The cell cycle represents a highly conserved regulatory target of the circadian timing system. Previously, we have demonstrated that in zebrafish, the circadian clock has the capacity to generate daily rhythms of S phase by a cell-autonomous mechanism in vitro. Here, by studying a panel of zebrafish mutants, we reveal that the pituitary-adrenal axis also plays an essential role in establishing these rhythms in the whole animal. Mutants with a reduction or a complete absence of corticotrope pituitary cells show attenuated cell-proliferation rhythms, whereas expression of circadian clock genes is not affected. We show that the corticotrope deficiency is associated with reduced cortisol levels, implicating glucocorticoids as a component of a systemic signaling pathway required for circadian cell cycle rhythmicity. Strikingly, high-amplitude rhythms can be rescued by exposing mutant larvae to a tonic concentration of a glucocorticoid agonist. Our work suggests that cell-autonomous clock mechanisms are not sufficient to establish circadian cell cycle rhythms at the whole-animal level. Instead, they act in concert with a systemic signaling environment of which glucocorticoids are an essential part.

  12. Environmental disturbance confounds prenatal glucocorticoid programming experiments in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, D; Kenyon, C J; Seckl, J R; Holmes, M C

    2010-07-01

    Low birth weight in humans is predictive of hypertension in adult life, and while the mechanisms underlying this link remain unknown, fetal overexposure to glucocorticoids has been implicated. We have previously shown that prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) exposure in the rat lowers birth weight and programmes adult hypertension. This current study aimed to unravel the molecular nature of this hypertension. However, unknowingly, post hoc investigations revealed that our animals had been subjected to environmental noise stresses from an adjacent construction site, which were sufficient to confound our prenatal DEX-programming experiments. This perinatal stress successfully established low birth weight, hypercorticosteronaemia, insulin resistance, hypertension and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction in vehicle (VEH)-treated offspring, such that the typical distinctions between both treatment groups were ameliorated. The lack of an additional effect on DEX-treated offspring is suggestive of a maximal effect of perinatal stress and glucocorticoids, serving to prevent against the potentially detrimental effects of sustained glucocorticoid hyper-exposure. Finally, this paper serves to inform researchers of the potential detrimental effects of neighbouring construction sites to their experiments.

  13. Serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 regulates neutrophil clearance during inflammation resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgon, Joseph; Robertson, Anne L; Sadiku, Pranvera; Wang, Xingang; Hooper-Greenhill, Edward; Prince, Lynne R; Walker, Paul; Hoggett, Emily E; Ward, Jonathan R; Farrow, Stuart N; Zuercher, William J; Jeffrey, Philip; Savage, Caroline O; Ingham, Philip W; Hurlstone, Adam F; Whyte, Moira K B; Renshaw, Stephen A

    2014-02-15

    The inflammatory response is integral to maintaining health by functioning to resist microbial infection and repair tissue damage. Large numbers of neutrophils are recruited to inflammatory sites to neutralize invading bacteria through phagocytosis and the release of proteases and reactive oxygen species into the extracellular environment. Removal of the original inflammatory stimulus must be accompanied by resolution of the inflammatory response, including neutrophil clearance, to prevent inadvertent tissue damage. Neutrophil apoptosis and its temporary inhibition by survival signals provides a target for anti-inflammatory therapeutics, making it essential to better understand this process. GM-CSF, a neutrophil survival factor, causes a significant increase in mRNA levels for the known anti-apoptotic protein serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1). We have characterized the expression patterns and regulation of SGK family members in human neutrophils and shown that inhibition of SGK activity completely abrogates the antiapoptotic effect of GM-CSF. Using a transgenic zebrafish model, we have disrupted sgk1 gene function and shown this specifically delays inflammation resolution, without altering neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites in vivo. These data suggest SGK1 plays a key role in regulating neutrophil survival signaling and thus may prove a valuable therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  14. Serum and Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase 1 (SGK1) Regulates Neutrophil Clearance During Inflammation Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgon, Joseph; Robertson, Anne L.; Sadiku, Pranvera; Wang, Xingang; Hooper-Greenhill, Edward; Prince, Lynne R.; Walker, Paul; Hoggett, Emily E.; Ward, Jonathan R.; Farrow, Stuart N.; Zuercher, William J.; Jeffrey, Philip; Savage, Caroline O.; Ingham, Philip W.; Hurlstone, Adam F.; Whyte, Moira K. B.; Renshaw, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The inflammatory response is integral to maintaining health, by functioning to resist microbial infection and repair tissue damage. Large numbers of neutrophils are recruited to inflammatory sites to neutralise invading bacteria through phagocytosis and the release of proteases and reactive oxygen species into the extracellular environment. Removal of the original inflammatory stimulus must be accompanied by resolution of the inflammatory response, including neutrophil clearance, to prevent inadvertent tissue damage. Neutrophil apoptosis and its temporary inhibition by survival signals provides a target for anti-inflammatory therapeutics, making it essential to better understand this process. GM-CSF, a neutrophil survival factor, causes a significant increase in mRNA levels for the known anti-apoptotic protein Serum and Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase 1 (SGK1). We have characterised the expression patterns and regulation of SGK family members in human neutrophils, and shown that inhibition of SGK activity completely abrogates the anti-apoptotic effect of GM-CSF. Using a transgenic zebrafish model, we have disrupted sgk1 gene function and shown this specifically delays inflammation resolution, without altering neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites in vivo. These data suggest SGK1 plays a key role in regulating neutrophil survival signalling, and thus may prove a valuable therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:24431232

  15. Superoxide dismutase mimetics: synthesis and structure-activity relationship study of MnTBAP analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauuan, Polivina Jolicia F; Trova, Michael P; Gregor-Boros, Livia; Bocckino, Stephen B; Crapo, James D; Day, Brian J

    2002-09-01

    Carboxylic ester and amide-substituted analogues of [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrinato]manganese(III) chloride (MnTBAP) were synthesized and assayed as potential superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics. The tetraester analogues 4a and 4b were found to have comparable SOD activity to the known SOD mimetic MnTBAP, while amides 4c-4e exhibited reduced SOD activity. In the substituted methyl benzoate/acid and disubstituted porphyrin series, analogues 12c, 12f, and 12m were found to have comparable to improved SOD activity relative to MnTBAP and analogues 12j, 13a, and 13d exhibited improved activity in both the SOD and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) assays relative to MnTBAP.

  16. Forms of action for perfect fluid in general relativity and mimetic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paston, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We consider various forms of action allowing us to describe a perfect fluid in the framework of general relativity. First, we consider a potential motion without pressure. Starting from an action in terms of the current density vector built similarly to the action of a single particle, we build a series of equivalent actions through various changes of variables. The results are then generalized to the cases of motion with vorticity and the presence of pressure. The obtained forms of action are compared to the previously known variants. We discuss the possibilities to use the obtained results to formulate the theories containing a description of a perfect fluid. A new form of action is proposed for mimetic gravity, which allows a motion with vorticity for mimetic matter as a perfect fluid.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new sialyl Lewis X mimetic derived from lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervin, Stephanie M; Lowe, John B; Koreeda, Masato

    2002-08-09

    A sialyl Lewis X (sLe(x)) mimetic compound, 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl 3-O-carboxymethyl-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->4)-[alpha-L-fucosyl-(1-->6)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2a), has been synthesized in 14 steps from D-lactose. This synthesis features the use of the activated glycosylating donor, lactosyl iodide, in a Koenigs-Knorr sequence, the regioselective derivatization at the C-3 position of the galactose moiety, and the stereoselective construction of a fucose-alpha(1-->6)-lactose linkage. The mimetic was tested for its ability to inhibit human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (hPMNL) adhesion to immobilized recombinant human E-selectin under shear stress conditions.

  18. Mimetic Theory for Cell-Centered Lagrangian Finite Volume Formulation on General Unstructured Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burton, Donald E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christon, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-19

    A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving large deformation problems is constructed based on the hypo-elastic model and using the mimetic theory. Rigorous analysis in the context of gas and solid dynamics, and arbitrary polygonal meshes, is presented to demonstrate the ability of cell-centered schemes in mimicking the continuum properties and principles at the discrete level. A new mimetic formulation based gradient evaluation technique and physics-based, frame independent and symmetry preserving slope limiters are proposed. Furthermore, a physically consistent dissipation model is employed which is both robust and inexpensive to implement. The cell-centered scheme along with these additional new features are applied to solve solids undergoing elasto-plastic deformation.

  19. Bioactive Mimetics of Conotoxins and other Venom Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Peter J.; Tuck, Kellie L.

    2015-01-01

    Ziconotide (Prialt®), a synthetic version of the peptide ω-conotoxin MVIIA found in the venom of a fish-hunting marine cone snail Conus magnus, is one of very few drugs effective in the treatment of intractable chronic pain. However, its intrathecal mode of delivery and narrow therapeutic window cause complications for patients. This review will summarize progress in the development of small molecule, non-peptidic mimics of Conotoxins and a small number of other venom peptides. This will include a description of how some of the initially designed mimics have been modified to improve their drug-like properties. PMID:26501323

  20. Bioactive Mimetics of Conotoxins and other Venom Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Duggan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ziconotide (Prialt®, a synthetic version of the peptide ω-conotoxin MVIIA found in the venom of a fish-hunting marine cone snail Conus magnus, is one of very few drugs effective in the treatment of intractable chronic pain. However, its intrathecal mode of delivery and narrow therapeutic window cause complications for patients. This review will summarize progress in the development of small molecule, non-peptidic mimics of Conotoxins and a small number of other venom peptides. This will include a description of how some of the initially designed mimics have been modified to improve their drug-like properties.

  1. Safety of low dose glucocorticoid treatment in rheumatoid arthritis: published evidence and prospective trial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, J A P; Jacobs, J W G; Kirwan, J R; Boers, M; Saag, K G; Inês, L B S; de Koning, E J P; Buttgereit, F; Cutolo, M; Capell, H; Rau, R; Bijlsma, J W J

    2006-01-01

    Adverse effects of glucocorticoids have been abundantly reported. Published reports on low dose glucocorticoid treatment show that few of the commonly held beliefs about their incidence, prevalence, and impact are supported by clear scientific evidence. Safety data from recent randomised controlled clinical trials of low dose glucocorticoid treatment in RA suggest that adverse effects associated with this drug are modest, and often not statistically different from those of placebo. PMID:16107513

  2. Risk of cardiovascular events in people prescribed glucocorticoids with iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome: cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Fardet, Laurence; Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is an increased risk of cardiovascular events in people who exhibit iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome during treatment with glucocorticoids. Design Cohort study. Setting 424 UK general practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database. Participants People prescribed systemic glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (n=547) and two comparison groups: those prescribed glucocorticoids and with no diagnosis of iatroge...

  3. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) is involved in glucocorticoid-induced and mineralocorticoid-induced leptin production by osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaise, Olivier; Relic, Biserka; Charlier, Edith; Zeddou, Mustapha; Neuville, Sophie; Deroyer, Céline; Gillet, Philippe; Louis, Edouard; Malaise, Michel G; de Seny, Dominique

    2016-10-04

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) is a mediator of the anti-inflammatory activities of glucocorticoids. However, GILZ deletion does not impair the anti-inflammatory activities of exogenous glucocorticoids in mice arthritis models and GILZ could also mediate some glucocorticoid-related adverse events. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a metabolic disorder that is partly attributed to adipokines such as leptin, and we previously observed that glucocorticoids induced leptin secretion in OA synovial fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to position GILZ in OA through its involvement in the anti-inflammatory activities of glucocorticoids and/or in the metabolic pathway of leptin induction. The influences of mineralocorticoids on GILZ and leptin expression were also investigated. Human synovial fibroblasts were isolated from OA patients during knee replacement surgery. Then, the cells were treated with a glucocorticoid (prednisolone), a mineralocorticoid (aldosterone), a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist (mifepristone), a selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist (Compound A), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists (eplerenone and spironolactone), TNF-α or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Cells were transfected with shRNA lentiviruses for the silencing of GILZ and GR. The leptin, IL-6, IL-8 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 levels were measured by ELISA. Leptin, the leptin receptor (Ob-R), GR and GILZ expression levels were analyzed by western blotting and/or RT-qPCR. (1) The glucocorticoid prednisolone and the mineralocorticoid aldosterone induced GILZ expression dose-dependently in OA synovial fibroblasts, through GR but not MR. Similar effects on leptin and Ob-R were observed: leptin secretion and Ob-R expression were also induced by prednisolone and aldosterone through GR; (2) GILZ silencing experiments demonstrated that GILZ was involved in the glucocorticoid-induced and mineralocorticoid-induced leptin secretion and Ob-R expression in OA

  4. Synthesis of Estradiol mimetics and potential anti-Alzheimer´s agents

    OpenAIRE

    Flöistrup, Erik

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is composed of two projects, both involving synthesis aimed at drug discovery. The first project covers method development for the synthesis of substances that can be used in estrogen replacement therapy. It presents the successful use of CuO as co-reagent in various palladium catalyzed Stille cross-couplings of sterically hindered bi- and heterobiaryls, meant to function as mimetics of the estradiol backbone. The results clearly point to the advantages of the method, compared ...

  5. Genistein inhibits glucocorticoid amplification in adipose tissue by suppression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Noriko; Kubota, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Kato, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Excess glucocorticoids promote visceral obesity, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. The main regulator of intracellular glucocorticoid levels is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which converts inactive glucocorticoids into bioactive forms such as cortisol in humans and corticosterone in rodents. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PD), which is colocalized with 11β-HSD1 in the intralumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, supplies a crucial coenzyme, NADPH, for full reductase activity of 11β-HSD1. Therefore, it is possible that inhibition of 11β-HSD1 will become a considerable medical treatment for metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes. Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has received attention for its therapeutic potential for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, and has been proposed as a promising compound for the treatment of metabolic disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic anti-obesity effects of genistein have not been fully clarified. Here, we demonstrate that genistein was able to inhibit 11β-HSD1 and H6PD activities within 10 or 20min, in dose- and time-dependent manners. Inhibition of 11β-HSD2 activity was not observed in rat kidney microsomes. The inhibition was not reversed by two estrogen receptor antagonists, tamoxifen and ICI182,780. A kinetic study revealed that genistein acted as a non-competitive inhibitor of 11β-HSD1, and its apparent Km value for 11-dehydrocorticosterone was 0.5μM. Genistein also acted as a non-competitive inhibitor of H6PD, and its apparent Km values for G6P and NADP were 0.9 and 3.3μM, respectively. These results suggest that genistein may exert its inhibitory effect by interacting with these enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alkaloid defenses of co-mimics in a putative Müllerian mimetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Polytypism in aposematic species is unlikely according to theory, but commonly seen in nature. Ranitomeya imitator is a poison frog species exhibiting polytypic mimicry of three congeneric model species (R. fantastica, R. summersi, and two morphs of R. variabilis) across four allopatric populations (a "mimetic radiation"). In order to investigate chemical defenses in this system, a key prediction of Müllerian mimicry, we analyzed the alkaloids of both models and mimics from four allopatric populations. Results In this study we demonstrate distinct differences in alkaloid profiles between co-mimetic species within allopatric populations. We further demonstrate that R. imitator has a greater number of distinct alkaloid types than the model species and more total alkaloids in all but one population. Conclusions Given that R. imitator is the more abundant species in these populations, R. imitator is likely driving the majority of predator-learned avoidance in these complexes. The success of Ranitomeya imitator as a putative advergent mimic may be a direct result of differences in alkaloid sequestration. Furthermore, we propose that automimicry within co-mimetic species is an important avenue of research. PMID:24707851

  7. Late-time cosmological approach in mimetic f(R, T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffou, E.H. [Institut de Mathematiques et de Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin); Houndjo, M.J.S. [Institut de Mathematiques et de Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin); Faculte des Sciences et Techniques de Natitingou, Natitingou (Benin); Hamani-Daouda, M. [Universite de Niamey, Departement de Physique, Niamey (Niger); Alvarenga, F.G. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Engenharia e Ciencias Naturais, CEUNES, Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the late-time cosmic acceleration in mimetic f(R, T) gravity with the Lagrange multiplier and potential in a Universe containing, besides radiation and dark energy, a self-interacting (collisional) matter. We obtain through the modified Friedmann equations the main equation that can describe the cosmological evolution. Then, with several models from Q(z) and the well-known particular model f(R, T), we perform an analysis of the late-time evolution. We examine the behavior of the Hubble parameter, the dark energy equation of state and the total effective equation of state and in each case we compare the resulting picture with the non-collisional matter (assumed as dust) and also with the collisional matter in mimetic f(R, T) gravity. The results obtained are in good agreement with the observational data and show that in the presence of the collisional matter the dark energy oscillations in mimetic f(R, T) gravity can be damped. (orig.)

  8. Folate receptor-targeting gold nanoclusters as fluorescence enzyme mimetic nanoprobes for tumor molecular colocalization diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Fang, Shengtao; Wang, Yanan; Gao, Duyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2014-01-01

    Nanoprobes with enzyme-like properties attracted a growing interest in early screening and diagnosis of cancer. To achieve high accuracy and specificity of tumor detection, the design and preparation of enzyme mimetic nanoprobes with high enzyme activity, tumor targeting and excellent luminescence property is highly desirable. Herein, we described a novel kind of fluorescence enzyme mimetic nanoprobe based on folate receptor-targeting Au nanoclusters. The nanoprobes exhibited excellent stability, low cytotoxicity, high fluorescence and enzyme activity. We demonstrated that the nanoprobes could be used for tumor tissues fluorescence/visualizing detection. For the same tumor tissue slice, the nanoprobes peroxidase staining and fluorescent staining were obtained simultaneously, and the results were mutually complementary. Therefore, the fluorescence enzyme mimetic nanoprobes could provide a molecular colocalization diagnosis strategy, efficiently avoid false-positive and false-negative results, and further improve the accuracy and specificity of cancer diagnoses. By examining different clinical samples, we demonstrated that the nanoprobes could distinguish efficiently cancerous cells from normal cells, and exhibit a clinical potential for cancer diagnosis.

  9. Bio-mimetic mineralization potential of collagen hydrolysate obtained from chromium tanned leather waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Madhu, S; Chandra Babu, N K; Shanthi, C

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics serve as an alternative to autogenous-free bone grafting by virtue of their excellent biocompatibility. However, chemically synthesized HA lacks the strong load-bearing capacity as required by bone. The bio-mimetic growth of HA crystals on collagen surface provides a feasible solution for synthesizing bone substitutes with the desired properties. This study deals with the utilization of the collagen hydrolysate recovered from leather waste as a substrate for promoting HA crystal growth. Bio-mimetic growth of HA was induced by subjecting the hydrolysate to various mineralization conditions. Parameters that would have a direct effect on crystal growth were varied to determine the optimal conditions necessary. Maximum mineralization was achieved with a combination of 10mM of CaCl2, 5mM of Na2HPO4, 100mM of NaCl and 0.575% glutaraldehyde at a pH of 7.4. The metal-protein interactions leading to formation of HA were identified through Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The crystal dimensions were determined to be in the nanoscale range by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The size and crystallinity of bio-mimetically grown HA indicate that hydrolysate from leather waste can be used as an ideal alternative substrate for bone growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Geographic variation in mimetic precision among different species of coral snake mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcali, C K; Pfennig, D W

    2017-07-01

    Batesian mimicry is widespread, but whether and why different species of mimics vary geographically in resemblance to their model is unclear. We characterized geographic variation in mimetic precision among four Batesian mimics of coral snakes. Each mimic occurs where its model is abundant (i.e. in 'deep sympatry'), rare (i.e. at the sympatry/allopatry boundary or 'edge sympatry') and absent (i.e. in allopatry). Geographic variation in mimetic precision was qualitatively different among these mimics. In one mimic, the most precise individuals occurred in edge sympatry; in another, they occurred in deep sympatry; in the third, they occurred in allopatry; and in the fourth, precise mimics were not concentrated anywhere throughout their range. Mimicry was less precise in allopatry than in sympatry in only two mimics. We present several nonmutually exclusive hypotheses for these patterns. Generally, examining geographic variation in mimetic precision - within and among different mimics - offers novel insights into the causes and consequences of mimicry. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Interactions of Bio-Inspired Membranes with Peptides and Peptide-Mimetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sebastiano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD and implicit solvent coarse-grained (CG Molecular Dynamics (MD we examine the interaction of an amphiphilic cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE and its synthetic counterpart with a bio-inspired membrane. We use the DPD technique to investigate the interaction of peptide-mimetic nanoparticles, or nanopins, with a three-component membrane. The CG MD approach is used to investigate the interaction of a cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE with single-component membrane. We observe the spontaneous binding and subsequent insertion of peptide and nanopin in the membrane by using CG MD and DPD approaches, respectively. In addition, we find that the insertion of peptide and nanopins is mainly driven by the favorable enthalpic interactions between the hydrophobic components of the peptide, or nanopin, and the membrane. Our study provides insights into the mechanism underlying the interactions of amphiphilic peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a membrane. The result of this study can be used to guide the functional integration of peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a cell membrane.

  12. Identification of novel insulin mimetic drugs by quantitative total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerstorfer, Peter; Stadlbauer, Verena; Chtcheglova, Lilia A; Haselgrübler, Renate; Borgmann, Daniela; Wruss, Jürgen; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Schröder, Klaus; Winkler, Stephan M; Höglinger, Otmar; Weghuber, Julian

    2014-12-01

    Insulin stimulates the transport of glucose in target tissues by triggering the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane. Resistance to insulin, the major abnormality in type 2 diabetes, results in a decreased GLUT4 translocation efficiency. Thus, special attention is being paid to search for compounds that are able to enhance this translocation process in the absence of insulin. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy was applied to quantify GLUT4 translocation in highly insulin-sensitive CHO-K1 cells expressing a GLUT4-myc-GFP fusion protein. Using our approach, we demonstrated GLUT4 translocation modulatory properties of selected substances and identified novel potential insulin mimetics. An increase in the TIRF signal was found to correlate with an elevated glucose uptake. Variations in the expression level of the human insulin receptor (hInsR) showed that the insulin mimetics identified stimulate GLUT4 translocation by a mechanism that is independent of the presence of the hInsR. Taken together, the results indicate that TIRF microscopy is an excellent tool for the quantification of GLUT4 translocation and for identifying insulin mimetic drugs. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Adolescent stress-induced epigenetic control of dopaminergic neurons via glucocorticoids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niwa, Minae; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Tankou, Stephanie; Seshadri, Saurav; Hikida, Takatoshi; Matsumoto, Yurie; Cascella, Nicola G; Kano, Shin-ichi; Ozaki, Norio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Sawa, Akira

    2013-01-01

    .... Accordingly, excess stressors result in adult-onset neuropsychiatric disorders. We describe an underlying mechanism in which glucocorticoids link adolescent stressors to epigenetic controls in neurons...

  14. Treatment of frozen shoulder with subcutaneous TNF-alpha blockade compared with local glucocorticoid injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schydlowsky, Pierre; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of subcutaneous adalimumab injections with intraarticular glucocorticoid injections on frozen shoulder of 18 patients with unilateral joint involvement. Ten patients were randomised to subcutaneous injections with adalimumab and eight to intraarticular glucocorticoid inject...... injections administered every other week for a total of three administrations. The evaluation included validated scores. No effect of subcutaneous injections of adalimumab on frozen shoulder symptoms was demonstrated.......We compared the effect of subcutaneous adalimumab injections with intraarticular glucocorticoid injections on frozen shoulder of 18 patients with unilateral joint involvement. Ten patients were randomised to subcutaneous injections with adalimumab and eight to intraarticular glucocorticoid...

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  16. Systematic review on the effect of glucocorticoid use on procoagulant, anti-coagulant and fibrinolytic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zaane, B; Nur, E; Squizzato, A; Gerdes, V E A; Büller, H R; Dekkers, O M; Brandjes, D P M

    2010-11-01

    Whether glucocorticoid use contributes to a hypercoagulable state, and thereby enhances the thrombotic risk, is controversial. We aimed to examine the effects of glucocorticoid use on coagulation and fibrinolysis. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched to identify published studies comparing glucocorticoid treatment with a glucocorticoid-free control situation. Subjects could be either patients or healthy volunteers. Two investigators independently performed study selection and data extraction. Results were expressed as standardized mean difference, if possible; data were pooled with a random-effects model. Of the 1967 identified publications, 36 papers were included. In healthy volunteers, a clear rise in factor (F)VII, VIII and XI activity was observed after glucocorticoid treatment, but these data alone provided insufficient evidence to support hypercoagulability. However, during active inflammation, glucocorticoids significantly increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), whereas levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and fibrinogen decreased. Peri-operative use of glucocorticoids inhibited the increase in tissue-type plasminogen activator induced by surgery. The present study showed differential effects of glucocorticoids depending on the clinical situation in which it is given, most likely as a result of their disease modifying properties. Clinical outcome studies are needed to adequately assess the risk-benefit of glucocorticoid use per population when thrombotic complication is the focus. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor mediated suppression of natural killer cell activity: identification of associated deacetylase and corepressor molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Kristin A; Krukowski, Karen; Eddy, Justin L; Janusek, Linda Witek; Mathews, Herbert L

    2012-01-01

    Physical and psychological stressors reduce natural killer cell function. This reduction in cellular function results from stress-induced release of glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids act upon natural killer cells to deacetylate and transrepress immune response genes through epigenetic processes. However, other than the glucocorticoid receptor, the proteins that participate in this process are not well described in natural killer cells. The purpose of this study was to identify the proteins associated with the glucocorticoid receptor that are likely epigenetic participants in this process. Treatment of natural killer cells with the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, produced a significant time dependent reduction in natural killer cell activity as early as 8h post treatment. This reduction in natural killer cell activity was preceded by nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor with histone deacetylase 1 and the corepressor, SMRT. Other class I histone deacetylases were not associated with the glucocorticoid receptor nor was the corepressor NCoR. These results demonstrate histone deacetylase 1 and SMRT to associate with the ligand activated glucocorticoid receptor within the nuclei of natural killer cells and to be the likely participants in the histone deacetylation and transrepression that accompanies glucocorticoid mediated reductions in natural killer cell function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. INVITED REVIEW: The usefulness of measuring glucocorticoids for assessing animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, C R; Tilbrook, A J

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (corticosterone in birds and rodents and cortisol in all other mammals) are glucoregulatory hormones that are synthesized in response to a range of stimuli including stress and are regularly measured in the assessment of animal welfare. Glucocorticoids have many normal or non-stress-related functions, and glucocorticoid synthesis can increase in response to pleasure, excitement, and arousal as well as fear, anxiety, and pain. Often, when assessing animal welfare, little consideration is given to normal non-stress-related glucocorticoid functions or the complex mechanisms that regulate the effects of glucocorticoids on physiology. In addition, it is rarely acknowledged that increased glucocorticoid synthesis can indicate positive welfare states or that a stress response can increase fitness and improve the welfare of an animal. In this paper, we review how and when glucocorticoid synthesis increases, the actions mediated through type I and type II glucocorticoid receptors, the importance of corticosteroid-binding globulin, the role of 11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and the key aspects of neurophysiology relevant to activating the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. This is discussed in the context of animal welfare assessment, particularly under the biological functioning and affective states frameworks. We contend that extending the assessment of animal welfare to key brain regions afferent to the hypothalamus and incorporating the aspects of glucocorticoid physiology that affect change in target tissue will advance animal welfare science and inspire more comprehensive assessment of the welfare of animals.

  19. Targeting the tight junction protein, zonula occludens-1, with the connexin43 mimetic peptide, αCT1, reduces VEGF-dependent RPE pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Elisabeth; Strauss, Randy; Brandon, Carlene; Grek, Christina; Ghatnekar, Gautam; Gourdie, Robert; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2017-05-01

    A critical target tissue in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which forms the outer blood-retina barrier (BRB). RPE-barrier dysfunction might result from attenuation/disruption of intercellular tight junctions. Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) is a major structural protein of intercellular junctions. A connexin43-based peptide mimetic, αCT1, was developed to competitively block interactions at the PDZ2 domain of ZO-1, thereby inhibiting ligands that selectively bind to this domain. We hypothesized that targeting ZO-1 signaling using αCT1 would maintain BRB integrity and reduce RPE pathophysiology by stabilizing gap- and/or tight-junctions. RPE-cell barrier dysfunction was generated in mice using laser photocoagulation triggering choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or bright light exposure leading to morphological damage. αCT1 was delivered via eye drops. αCT1 treatment reduced CNV development and fluid leakage as determined by optical coherence tomography, and damage was correlated with disruption in cellular integrity of surrounding RPE cells. Light damage significantly disrupted RPE cell morphology as determined by ZO-1 and occludin staining and tiling pattern analysis, which was prevented by αCT1 pre-treatment. In vitro experiments using RPE and MDCK monolayers indicated that αCT1 stabilizes tight junctions, independent of its effects on Cx43. Taken together, stabilization of intercellular junctions by αCT1 was effective in ameliorating RPE dysfunction in models of AMD-like pathology. The connexin43 mimetic αCT1 accumulates in the mouse retinal pigment epithelium following topical delivery via eye drops. αCT1 eye drops prevented RPE-cell barrier dysfunction in two mouse models. αCT1 stabilizes intercellular tight junctions. Stabilization of cellular junctions via αCT1 may serve as a novel therapeutic approach for both wet and dry age-related macular degeneration.

  20. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  1. Synergistic stimulation of myogenesis by glucocorticoid and IGF-I signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansters, N A; Langen, R C; Wouters, E F; Schols, A M

    2013-05-01

    Muscle wasting is associated with poor prognosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Exercise stimulates muscle recovery, but its efficacy is variable, depending on the clinical condition and medical treatment. Systemic glucocorticoids, commonly administered in high doses during acute disease exacerbations or as maintenance treatment in end-stage disease, are known to contribute to muscle wasting. As muscle mass recovery involves insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I signaling, which can be stimulated by anabolic steroids, the impact of glucocorticoids and the effect of simultaneous IGF-I stimulation by anabolic steroids on muscle recovery and growth were investigated. The effects of, and interactions between, glucocorticoid and IGF-I signaling on skeletal muscle growth were assessed in differentiating C2C12 myocytes. As proof of principle, we performed a post hoc analysis stratifying patients by glucocorticoid use of a clinical trial investigating the efficacy of anabolic steroid supplementation on muscle recovery in muscle-wasted patients with COPD. Glucocorticoids strongly impaired protein synthesis signaling, myotube formation, and muscle-specific protein expression. In contrast, in the presence of glucocorticoids, IGF-I synergistically stimulated myotube fusion and myofibrillar protein expression, which corresponded with restored protein synthesis signaling by IGF-I and increased transcriptional activation of muscle-specific genes by glucocorticoids. In COPD patients on maintenance glucocorticoid treatment, the clinical trial also revealed an enhanced effect of anabolic steroids on muscle mass and respiratory muscle strength. In conclusion, synergistic effects of anabolic steroids and glucocorticoids on muscle recovery may be caused by relief of the glucocorticoid-imposed blockade on protein synthesis signaling, allowing effective translation of glucocorticoid-induced accumulation of muscle-specific gene transcripts.

  2. Very high frequency of fragility fractures associated with high-dose glucocorticoids in postmenopausal women: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goichi Kageyama

    2017-06-01

    Fragility fractures associated with high-dose glucocorticoid therapy are common among postmenopausal women. Extreme care should be taken especially for postmenopausal women when high-dose glucocorticoid therapy is required.

  3. Glucocorticoid administration for Graves' hyperthyroidism treated by radioiodine. A questionnaire survey among members of the European Thyroid Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazarus, J. H.; Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Kahaly, G. J.; Krassas, G.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Baldeschi, L.; Boboridis, K.; Boschi, A.; Currò, N.; Daumerie, C.; Dickinson, A. J.; Eckstein, A.; Kendall-Taylor, P.; Lane, C. M.; Ludgate, M. E.; Mann, K.; Marinò, M.; Mourits, M. P.; Nardi, M.; Neoh, C.; Orgiazzi, J.; Pearce, S.; Perros, P.; Pinchera, A.; Pitz, S.; Salvi, M.; Sivelli, P.; Stahl, M.; von Arx, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glucocorticoid prophylaxis is required in some instances after radioiodine (RAI) treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism to prevent progression of Graves' orbitopathy (GO). However, no randomized clinical trial has been performed to ascertain the optimum glucocorticoid therapy. Aim and

  4. Impact of Stress and Glucocorticoids on Schema-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluen, Lisa Marieke; Nixon, Patricia; Agorastos, Agorastos; Wiedemann, Klaus; Schwabe, Lars

    2017-05-01

    Pre-existing knowledge, a 'schema', facilitates the encoding, consolidation, and retrieval of schema-relevant information. Such schema-based memory is key to every form of education and provides intriguing insights into the integration of new information and prior knowledge. Stress is known to have a critical impact on memory processes, mainly through the action of glucocorticoids and catecholamines. However, whether stress and these major stress mediators affect schema-based learning is completely unknown. To address this question, we performed two experiments, in which participants acquired a schema on day 1 and learned schema-related as well as schema-unrelated information on day 2. In the first experiment, participants underwent a stress or control manipulation either immediately or about 25 min before schema-based memory testing. The second experiment tested whether glucocorticoid and/or noradrenergic activation is sufficient to modulate schema-based memory. To this end, participants received orally a placebo, hydrocortisone, the α2-adrenoceptor-antagonist yohimbine, leading to increased noradrenergic stimulation, or both drugs, before completing the schema-based memory test. Our data indicate that stress, irrespective of the exact timing of the stress exposure, impaired schema-based learning, while leaving learning of schema-unrelated information intact. A very similar effect was obtained after hydrocortisone, but not yohimbine, administration. These data show that stress disrupts participants' ability to benefit from prior knowledge during learning and that glucocorticoid activation is sufficient to produce this effect. Our findings provide novel insights into the impact of stress and stress hormones on the dynamics of human memory and have important practical implications, specifically for educational contexts.

  5. Dexamethasone and sex regulate placental glucocorticoid receptor isoforms in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffe, James S M; Saif, Zarqa; Perkins, Anthony V; Moritz, Karen M; Clifton, Vicki L

    2017-08-01

    Maternal dexamethasone exposure in the mouse impairs placental development and programs adult disease in a sexually dimorphic manner. Glucocorticoids bind to different glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoforms to regulate gene transcription and cellular signaling. We hypothesized that sexually dimorphic placental responses to glucocorticoids are due to differences in GR isoforms present in the placenta. Pregnant C57Bl6 mice were exposed to saline or dexamethasone from E12.5 until E14.5 (1 µg/kg/h) before the collection of placentae. Cytoplasmic and nuclear protein fractions were extracted from placentae of male and female fetuses for Western blot analysis of GR isoforms. Eight known isoforms of the GR were detected in the mouse placenta including the translational isoforms GRα-A, B, C and D1-3 and the splice variants GRA and GRP. The expression of GRA, GRP and each of the GRα isoforms were altered by dexamethasone in relation to fetal sex and cellular location. Placentae of female fetuses had higher GRα-A and GRP expression in the cytoplasm than males, and GRα-C was more highly expressed in the nucleus of females than that in males. Dexamethasone significantly increased the cytoplasmic expression of GRα-A, but reduced the expression of GRα-C in placentae of males. Dexamethasone increased the expression of the GRα-C-regulated genes Sgk1 and Bcl2l11, particularly in females. The cleaved caspase-3 staining in placental sections indicated GRα-C may mediate sex differences in dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. These findings may underlie the sex-specific placental adaptations that regulate different growth profiles in males and females and different risks for programmed disease outcomes in offspring. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. HDL-mimetic PLGA nanoparticle to target atherosclerosis plaque macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E M; van Rijs, Sarian M; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-03-18

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA-HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA-HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers.

  7. Behavioral neuroadaptation to alcohol : from glucocorticoids to histone acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Beracochea

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A prime mechanism that contributes to the development and maintenance of alcoholism is the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity and the release of glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans and primates, corticosterone in rodents from the adrenal glands. In the brain, sustained, local elevation of glucocorticoid concentration even long after cessation of chronic alcohol consumption compromises functional integrity of a circuit including the prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus and the amygdala. These structures are implicated in learning and memory processes as well as in orchestrating neuroadaptive responses to stress and anxiety responses. Thus, potentiation of anxiety-related neuroadaptation by alcohol is characterized by an abnormally amygdala hyperactivity coupled with a hypofunction of the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. This review describes research on molecular and epigenetic mechanisms by which alcohol causes distinct region-specific adaptive changes in gene expression patterns and ultimately, leads to a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments on prefrontal- and hippocampal-based tasks. Alcohol-induced neuroadaptations involve the dysregulation of numerous signaling cascades, leading to long-term changes in transcriptional profiles of genes, through the actions of transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP response element binding protein and chromatin remodeling due to post-translational modifications of histone proteins. We describe the role of prefrontal-hippocampus-amygdala circuit in mediating the effects of acute and chronic alcohol on learning and memory, and region-specific molecular and epigenetic mechanisms involved in this process. This review first discusses the importance of brain region-specific dysregulation of glucocorticoid concentration in the development of alcohol dependence and describes on how persistently increased glucocorticoid levels in prefrontal cortex may be involved in

  8. OSTEOPENIA in cancellous bone of sheep induced by Glucocorticoid alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Cheng, L.; Bollen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    ) treatment for a long period of time after ovariectomy (OVX) to induce osteoporosis (1). However, no information in literature is available whether osteoporosis (OP) in sheep can be induced by application of GC alone. This study aimed to investigate effects of GC alone without OVX on three-dimensional (3-D......Introduction: There is a great need for suitable large animal models that closely resemble osteoporosis in humans, and that they have adequate bone size for bone prosthesis and biomaterial research. Previous investigations have shown that osteoporotic sheep model requires glucocorticoid (GC...

  9. Glucocorticoid supplementation during ovarian stimulation for IVF or ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalampokas, Theodoros; Pandian, Zabeena; Keay, Stephen D; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2017-03-27

    Ovarian response to stimulation during in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) plays an important role in determining live birth rates. Adjuvant treatments during ovarian stimulation that have different modes of action have been used to improve ovarian response to stimulation and outcome of IVF. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are a class of steroid hormones that have been used either alone or in combination with other stimulatory regimens in order to improve folliculogenesis and pregnancy rates. However, considerable uncertainty remains over whether administration of glucocorticoid during ovarian stimulation until oocyte recovery is superior to no glucocorticoid in improving live birth rates in women undergoing IVF/ICSI. To determine the safety and effectiveness of systemic glucocorticoids during ovarian stimulation for IVF and ICSI cycles. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Studies Online (CRSO), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO from inception to 10 October 2016. We handsearched reference lists of articles, trial registers and relevant conference proceedings and contacted researchers in the field. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant treatment with systemic glucocorticoids during ovarian stimulation for IVF or ICSI cycles versus no adjuvant treatment. Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted the data. Our primary outcome was live birth. Secondary outcomes included clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, miscarriage, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and side-effects. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and pooled the data using a fixed-effect model. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE methods. Four RCTs were included in the review (416 women). The trials compared glucocorticoid supplementation during IVF stimulation versus placebo

  10. Glucocorticoid hypersensitivity syndrome resulting from inhaled corticosteroid: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejiofor T Ugwu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘glucocorticoid hypersensitivity syndrome’ is very sparse in the literature. It describes a very rare entity characterized by the appearance of typical Cushingoid features in the presence of normal or low serum cortisol levels. It is also known as cortisol hyper-reactive syndrome or normocortisolemic Cushing’s syndrome. This report illustrates this unusual phenomenon accompanied by metabolic syndrome-like manifestations in a young Nigerian man who was receiving inhaled corticosteroid for bronchial asthma and who experienced a significant improvement following withdrawal of the steroid treatment.

  11. A Mixed Glucocorticoid/Mineralocorticoid Selective Modulator With Dominant Antagonism in the Male Rat Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atucha, E.; Zalachoras, I.; Heuvel, J.K. van den; Weert, L.T.C.M. van; Melchers, D.; Mol, I.M.; Belanoff, J.K.; Houtman, R.; Hunt, H.; Roozendaal, B.; Meijer, O.C.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal glucocorticoid hormones are potent modulators of brain function in the context of acute and chronic stress. Both mineralocorticoid (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) can mediate these effects. We studied the brain effects of a novel ligand, C118335, with high affinity for GRs and

  12. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Diego M; Ogara, M Florencia; Stortz, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation wi...

  13. Brief treatment with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone normalizes the reduction in neurogenesis after chronic stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, C.A.; Mayer, J.L.; de Kloet, E.R.; Joëls, M.; Lucassen, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    In rodents, stress suppresses adult neurogenesis. This is thought to involve activation of glucocorticoid receptors in the brain. In the present study, we therefore questioned whether glucocorticoid receptor blockade by mifepristone can normalize the effects of chronic stress on adult neurogenesis.

  14. A chemical screening procedure for glucocorticoid signaling with a zebrafish larva luciferase reporter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Benjamin D; Weger, Meltem; Jung, Nicole; Lederer, Christin; Bräse, Stefan; Dickmeis, Thomas

    2013-09-10

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones and their artificial derivatives are widely used drugs to treat inflammation, but long-term treatment with glucocorticoids can lead to severe side effects. Test systems are needed to search for novel compounds influencing glucocorticoid signaling in vivo or to determine unwanted effects of compounds on the glucocorticoid signaling pathway. We have established a transgenic zebrafish assay which allows the measurement of glucocorticoid signaling activity in vivo and in real-time, the GRIZLY assay (Glucocorticoid Responsive In vivo Zebrafish Luciferase activitY). The luciferase-based assay detects effects on glucocorticoid signaling with high sensitivity and specificity, including effects by compounds that require metabolization or affect endogenous glucocorticoid production. We present here a detailed protocol for conducting chemical screens with this assay. We describe data acquisition, normalization, and analysis, placing a focus on quality control and data visualization. The assay provides a simple, time-resolved, and quantitative readout. It can be operated as a stand-alone platform, but is also easily integrated into high-throughput screening workflows. It furthermore allows for many applications beyond chemical screening, such as environmental monitoring of endocrine disruptors or stress research.

  15. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: an update on current pharmacotherapy and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bultink, I.E.M.; Baden, M.; Lems, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is one of the most devastating side-effects of glucocorticoid (GC) use, as it is associated with an increased fracture risk. The importance of GIOP as a health problem is underlined by the frequent use of GC treatment in patients with various

  16. FXR agonist GW4064 increases plasma glucocorticoid levels in C57BL/6 mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Menno; van der Sluis, Ronald J.; Li, Zhaosha; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Groen, Albert K.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Since high expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has been detected in glucocorticoid-producing adrenocortical cells, we evaluated the potential role of FXR in adrenal glucocorticoid production. FXR agonist GW4064 increased fasting plasma corticosterone levels (+45%; P <0.01) in C57BL/6 mice,

  17. Polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor gene and their associations with metabolic parameters and body composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractMost actions of glucocorticoids (GCs) are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The interindividual response to GCs varies considerably, as demonstrated by a variable suppressive response to 0.25-mg dexamethasone (DEX). Several polymorphisms in the gene coding

  18. Fatal and non-fatal adverse events of glucocorticoid therapy for Graves' orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcocci, Claudio; Watt, Torquil; Altea, Maria Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the side effects of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy observed by European thyroidologists during the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy (GO).......The objective of this study was to investigate the side effects of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy observed by European thyroidologists during the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy (GO)....

  19. Maternal PTSD associates with greater glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring of Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrner, Amy; Bierer, Linda M; Passarelli, Vincent; Pratchett, Laura C; Flory, Janine D; Bader, Heather N; Harris, Iris R; Bedi, Aarti; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; Makotkine, Iouri; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Intergenerational effects of trauma have been observed clinically in a wide range of populations, and parental PTSD has been associated with an increased risk for psychopathology in offspring. In studies of Holocaust survivor offspring, parental PTSD, and particularly maternal PTSD, has been associated with increased risk for PTSD, low basal urinary cortisol excretion and enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone. Such findings implicate maternally derived glucocorticoid programming in the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related consequences, potentially resulting from in utero influences or early life experiences. This study investigated the relative influence of Holocaust exposure and PTSD in mothers and fathers on glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring. Eighty Holocaust offspring and 15 offspring of non-exposed Jewish parents completed evaluations and provided blood and urine samples. Glucocorticoid sensitivity was evaluated using the lysozyme suppression test (LST), an in vitro measure of glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity in a peripheral tissue, the dexamethasone suppression test (DST), and 24-h urinary cortisol excretion. Maternal PTSD was associated with greater glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring across all three measures of glucocorticoid function. An interaction of maternal and paternal PTSD on the DST and 24-h urinary cortisol showed an effect of decreased glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring with paternal, but not maternal, PTSD. Although indirect, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that epigenetic programming may be involved in the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related effects on glucocorticoid regulation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Regulation of structural plasticity and neurogenesis during stress and diabetes; protective effects of glucocorticoid receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Fitzsimons, C.P.; Vreugdenhil, E.; Hu, P.; Oomen, C.; Revsin, Y.; Joëls, M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Gravanis, A.G.; Mellon, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we will review changes in structural plasticity of the adult hippocampus during stress and exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs). We further discuss the protective and normalizing role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist treatment under these conditions and its implications for

  1. Glucocorticoids exert context-dependent effects on cells of the joint in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Suzi H; Andreassen, Kim V; Christensen, Søren T

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to attenuate bone formation in vivo leading to decreased bone volume and increased risk of fractures, whereas effects on the joint tissue are less characterized. However, glucocorticoids appear to have a reducing effect on inflammation and pain in osteoarthritis. This st...

  2. Regulation of the CCL2 gene in pancreatic β-cells by IL-1β and glucocorticoids: role of MKP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J Burke

    Full Text Available Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from both resident and invading leukocytes within the pancreatic islets impacts the development of Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Synthesis and secretion of the chemokine CCL2 from pancreatic β-cells in response to pro-inflammatory signaling pathways influences immune cell recruitment into the pancreatic islets. Therefore, we investigated the positive and negative regulatory components controlling expression of the CCL2 gene using isolated rat islets and INS-1-derived β-cell lines. We discovered that activation of the CCL2 gene by IL-1β required the p65 subunit of NF-κB and was dependent on genomic response elements located in the -3.6 kb region of the proximal gene promoter. CCL2 gene transcription in response to IL-1β was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the IKKβ and p38 MAPK pathways. The IL-1β-mediated increase in CCL2 secretion was also impaired by p38 MAPK inhibition and by glucocorticoids. Moreover, multiple synthetic glucocorticoids inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated induction of the CCL2 gene. Induction of the MAP Kinase Phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 gene by glucocorticoids or by adenoviral-mediated overexpression decreased p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which diminished CCL2 gene expression, promoter activity, and release of CCL2 protein. We conclude that glucocorticoid-mediated repression of IL-1β-induced CCL2 gene transcription and protein secretion occurs in part through the upregulation of the MKP-1 gene and subsequent deactivation of the p38 MAPK. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory actions observed with MKP-1 overexpression were obtained without suppressing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Thus, MKP-1 is a possible target for anti-inflammatory therapeutic intervention with preservation of β-cell function.

  3. Regulation of the CCL2 gene in pancreatic β-cells by IL-1β and glucocorticoids: role of MKP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Susan J; Goff, Matthew R; Updegraff, Barrett L; Lu, Danhong; Brown, Patricia L; Minkin, Steven C; Biggerstaff, John P; Zhao, Ling; Karlstad, Michael D; Collier, J Jason

    2012-01-01

    Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from both resident and invading leukocytes within the pancreatic islets impacts the development of Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Synthesis and secretion of the chemokine CCL2 from pancreatic β-cells in response to pro-inflammatory signaling pathways influences immune cell recruitment into the pancreatic islets. Therefore, we investigated the positive and negative regulatory components controlling expression of the CCL2 gene using isolated rat islets and INS-1-derived β-cell lines. We discovered that activation of the CCL2 gene by IL-1β required the p65 subunit of NF-κB and was dependent on genomic response elements located in the -3.6 kb region of the proximal gene promoter. CCL2 gene transcription in response to IL-1β was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the IKKβ and p38 MAPK pathways. The IL-1β-mediated increase in CCL2 secretion was also impaired by p38 MAPK inhibition and by glucocorticoids. Moreover, multiple synthetic glucocorticoids inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated induction of the CCL2 gene. Induction of the MAP Kinase Phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) gene by glucocorticoids or by adenoviral-mediated overexpression decreased p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which diminished CCL2 gene expression, promoter activity, and release of CCL2 protein. We conclude that glucocorticoid-mediated repression of IL-1β-induced CCL2 gene transcription and protein secretion occurs in part through the upregulation of the MKP-1 gene and subsequent deactivation of the p38 MAPK. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory actions observed with MKP-1 overexpression were obtained without suppressing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Thus, MKP-1 is a possible target for anti-inflammatory therapeutic intervention with preservation of β-cell function.

  4. The selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist mapracorat displays a favourable safety-efficacy ratio for the topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumer, Wolfgang; Rossbach, Kristine; Schmidt, Bernard H

    2017-02-01

    Mapracorat is a nonsteroidal Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Agonist (SEGRA) that is presumed to have a better therapeutic index compared to classical glucocorticoids. To compare the efficacy and safety of mapracorat with classical glucocorticoids used for the treatment of allergic skin diseases in dogs. Six laboratory beagles. The effect of mapracorat on lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα secretion from canine peripheral blood derived mononuclear cells (PBMC) was tested. In vivo, mapracorat was compared to triamcinolone acetonide using a skin inflammation model. Skin fold thickness was determined after daily administration of mapracorat and triamcinolone acetonide over 14 days. Mapracorat concentration dependently inhibited TNFα secretion from activated canine PBMC with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) value of approximately 0.2 nmol/L. Intradermal injection of compound 48/80 (50 μg in 50 μL saline) resulted in a clear wheal and flare reaction over the 60 min observation period. Topical pre-treatment with mapracorat (0.1%) and triamcinolone acetonide (0.015%) led to significant reduction in the wheal and flare responses compared to vehicle (acetone) treated areas. However, once daily topical administration of triamcinolone acetonide significantly reduced skin fold thickness from day 8 to 14, whereas no such reduction was observed for mapracorat. These results demonstrate that mapracorat has comparable anti-inflammatory efficacy to classical steroidal glucocorticoids under these experimental settings and maintenance of skin fold thickness indicates a better safety profile compared to triamcinolone acetonide at equipotent concentrations. This profile further suggests that SEGRAs show promise in the management of inflammatory and pruritic skin diseases in dogs. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  5. Mutations of glucocorticoid receptor differentially affect AF2 domain activity in a steroid-selective manner to alter the potency and efficacy of gene induction and repression†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yong-guang; Xu, Yong; Xu, H. Eric; Simons, S. Stoney

    2009-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of steroid hormones is intimately associated with their structure. Deacylcortivazol (DAC) contains several features that were predicted to make it an inactive glucocorticoid. Nevertheless, gene induction and repression by complexes of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with DAC occurs with greater potency (lower EC50) than, and equal efficacy (maximal activity, or Amax) to, the very active and smaller synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex). Guided by a recent x-ray structure of DAC bound to the GR ligand binding domain (LBD), we now report that several point mutants in the LBD have little effect on the binding of either agonist steroid. However, these same mutations dramatically alter the Amax and/or EC50 of exogenous and endogenous genes in a manner that depends on steroid structure. In some cases, Dex is no longer a full agonist. These properties appear to result from a preferential inactivation of the AF2 activation domain in the GR LBD of Dex-, but not DAC-, bound receptors. The Dex-bound receptors display normal binding to, but greatly reduced response to, the coactivator TIF2, thus indicating a defect in the transmission efficiency of GR-steroid complex information to the coactivator TIF2. In addition, all GR mutants that are active in gene induction with either Dex or DAC have greatly reduced activity in gene repression. This contrasts with the reports of GR mutations preferentially suppressing GR-mediated induction. The properties of these GR mutants in gene induction support the hypothesis that the Amax and EC50 of GR-controlled gene expression can be independently modified, indicate that the receptor can be modified to favor activity with a specific agonist steroid, and suggest that new ligands with suitable substituents may be able to affect the same LBD conformational changes and thereby broaden the therapeutic applications of glucocorticoid steroids PMID:18578507

  6. Mutations of glucocorticoid receptor differentially affect AF2 domain activity in a steroid-selective manner to alter the potency and efficacy of gene induction and repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yong-guang; Xu, Yong; Xu, H Eric; Simons, S Stoney

    2008-07-22

    The transcriptional activity of steroid hormones is intimately associated with their structure. Deacylcortivazol (DAC) contains several features that were predicted to make it an inactive glucocorticoid. Nevertheless, gene induction and repression by complexes of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with DAC occur with potency (lower EC 50) greater than and efficacy (maximal activity, or A max) equal to those of the very active and smaller synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex). Guided by a recent X-ray structure of DAC bound to the GR ligand binding domain (LBD), we now report that several point mutants in the LBD have little effect on the binding of either agonist steroid. However, these same mutations dramatically alter the A max and/or EC 50 of exogenous and endogenous genes in a manner that depends on steroid structure. In some cases, Dex is no longer a full agonist. These properties appear to result from a preferential inactivation of the AF2 activation domain in the GR LBD of Dex-bound, but not DAC-bound, receptors. The Dex-bound receptors display normal binding to, but a greatly reduced response to, the coactivator TIF2, thus indicating a defect in the transmission efficiency of GR-steroid complex information to the coactivator TIF2. In addition, all GR mutants that are active in gene induction with either Dex or DAC have greatly reduced activity in gene repression. This contrasts with the reports of GR mutations preferentially suppressing GR-mediated induction. The properties of these GR mutants in gene induction support the hypothesis that the A max and EC 50 of GR-controlled gene expression can be independently modified, indicate that the receptor can be modified to favor activity with a specific agonist steroid, and suggest that new ligands with suitable substituents may be able to affect the same LBD conformational changes and thereby broaden the therapeutic applications of glucocorticoid steroids.

  7. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors are associated with IQ and behavior in young adults born very preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voorn, Bibian; Wit, Jan M; van der Pal, Sylvia M; Rotteveel, Joost; Finken, Martijn J J

    2015-02-01

    Preterm survivors exhibit neurodevelopmental impairments. Whether this association is influenced by antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and glucocorticoid sensitivity is unknown. This study aimed to study the effects of antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) polymorphisms on behavior and intelligence quotient (IQ). This study was part of the 19-year follow-up of the Project On Preterm and Small-for-gestational-age birth cohort. Multicenter study. Three hundred forty-four 19-year-olds born very preterm (gestational age Behavior (Young Adult Self Report and Young Adult Behavior Checklist for parents) and IQ (digital Multicultural Capacity Test-intermediate level). Data were analyzed by linear regression and presented as regression coefficient (95% confidence interval [CI]). Sex ratio, GR (R23K; N363S) and MR (-2G/C; I180V) genotypes were equally distributed between treated and nontreated subjects. Independent of treatment, R23K carriers had improved IQ scores (β 9.3; 95% CI, 3.4 to 15.1) and a tendency toward more favorable total problem behavior scores (β -8.5; 95% CI, -17.3 to 0.2) ; -2G/C CC carriers had poorer IQ scores (β -6.2; 95% CI, -10.5 to -1.9); I180V carriers had more favorable internalizing behavior scores (β -2.0; 95% CI, -3.9 to -0.1). Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment was associated with more unfavorable behavior scores, especially internalizing behavior (β 2.4; 95% CI, 0.3 to 4.5). Interaction between GR and MR polymorphisms and antenatal glucocorticoid treatment was observed, with poorer IQ scores for exposed N363S carriers; poorer intellectual subdomain scores for exposed I180V-carriers; more favorable total problem behavior scores for exposed R23K carriers. Genetic variations in glucocorticoid sensitivity and antenatal glucocorticoid treatment are associated with IQ and behavior in young adult preterm survivors.

  8. Silencing Mediator of Retinoid and Thyroid Hormone Receptors (SMRT) regulates glucocorticoid action in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emont, Margo P; Mantis, Stelios; Kahn, Jonathan H; Landeche, Michael; Han, Xuan; Sargis, Robert M; Cohen, Ronald N

    2015-05-15

    Local modulation of glucocorticoid action in adipocytes regulates adiposity and systemic insulin sensitivity. However, the specific cofactors that mediate glucocorticoid receptor (GR) action in adipocytes remain unclear. Here we show that the silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) is recruited to GR in adipocytes and regulates ligand-dependent GR function. Decreased SMRT expression in adipocytes in vivo increases expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. Moreover, adipocytes with decreased SMRT expression exhibit altered glucocorticoid regulation of lipolysis. We conclude that SMRT regulates the metabolic functions of GR in adipocytes in vivo. Modulation of GR-SMRT interactions in adipocytes represents a novel approach to control the local degree of glucocorticoid action and thus influence adipocyte metabolic function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucocorticoid treatment earlier in childhood and adolescence show dose-response associations with diurnal cortisol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Holm, Sara K; Uldall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Heightened levels of glucocorticoids in children and adolescents have previously been linked to prolonged changes in the diurnal regulation of the stress-hormone cortisol, a glucocorticoid regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis (HPA-axis). To address this question, we examined...... the salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR) and daily cortisol output in 36 children and adolescents (25 girls/11 boys) aged 7-16 years previously treated with glucocorticoids for nephrotic syndrome or rheumatic disorder and 36 healthy controls. Patients and controls did not significantly differ in the CAR...... patients showed a positive linear relationship with the mean daily glucocorticoid doses administered during treatment. The observed dose-response associations suggest that glucocorticoid therapy during childhood and adolescence might trigger long-term changes in HPA-axis regulation, which may differ...

  10. Insulin inhibition of glucocorticoid-stimulated gene transcription: requirement for an insulin response element?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierreux, C E; Rousseau, G G; Lemaigre, F P

    1999-01-25

    The glucocorticoid hormone receptor binds to regulatory elements of target genes and activates transcription through interactions with coactivators. For a subset of genes, glucocorticoid receptor activity is inhibited by insulin. The present paper analyzes recent data on the molecular mechanisms whereby insulin exerts this antiglucocorticoid effect. Two models are proposed. In the first model insulin controls the activity of an insulin-responsive factor bound to an insulin-responsive DNA element. In a second model, insulin targets a non-DNA bound coactivator of the glucocorticoid receptor. Here, the gene-specificity of the effect of insulin is conferred by the combined action of the glucocorticoid receptor, of DNA-bound transcription factors and of coactivators, which form a higher order structure that binds to a DNA sequence called glucocorticoid/insulin responsive unit.

  11. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W.; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain. PMID:27739425

  12. High faecal glucocorticoid levels predict mortality in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethan Pride, R

    2005-03-22

    Glucocorticoid levels are commonly used as measures of stress in wild animal populations, but their relevance to individual fitness in a wild population has not been demonstrated. In this study I followed 93 ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at Berenty Reserve in Madagascar, collecting 1089 faecal samples from individually recognized animals, and recording their survival over a 2 year period. I evaluated faecal glucocorticoid levels as predictors of individual survival to the end of the study. Animals with high glucocorticoid levels had a significantly higher mortality rate. This result suggests that glucocorticoid measures can be useful predictors of individual survival probabilities in wild populations. The 'stress landscape' indicated by glucocorticoid patterns may approximate the fitness landscape to which animals adapt.

  13. Glucocorticoids maintain human osteoclasts in the active mode of their resorption cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    that glucocorticoids deeply modify this resorptive behavior. First, glucocorticoids gradually induce excavations with a trenchlike morphology while reducing the time-dependent increase in excavation numbers. This indicates that glucocorticoids make osteoclasts elongate the excavations they initiated rather than...... migrating to a new resorption site, as in control conditions. Second, the round excavations in control conditions contain undegraded demineralized collagen as repeatedly reported earlier, whereas the excavations with a trenchlike morphology generated under glucocorticoid exposure appear devoid of leftovers...... of demineralized collagen. This indicates that collagenolysis proceeds generally at a lower rate than demineralization under control conditions, whereas collagenolysis rates are increased up to the level of demineralization rates in the presence of glucocorticoids. Taking these observations together leads...

  14. Total brain, cortical and white matter volumes in children previously treated with glucocorticoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara K; Madsen, Kathrine S; Vestergaard, Martin

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal exposure to glucocorticoids and elevated endogenous glucocorticoid-levels during childhood can have detrimental effects on the developing brain. Here, we examined the impact of glucocorticoid-treatment during childhood on brain volumes. METHODS: Thirty children and adolescents...... with rheumatic or nephrotic disease previously treated with glucocorticoids and 30 controls matched on age, sex, and parent education underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Total cortical grey and white matter, brain, and intracranial volume, and total cortical thickness and surface area were...... were mainly driven by the children with rheumatic disease. Total cortical thickness and cortical surface area did not significantly differ between groups. We found no significant associations between glucocorticoid-treatment variables and volumetric measures. CONCLUSION: Observed smaller total brain...

  15. Expression and function of nuclear receptor coregulators in brain : understanding the cell-specific effects of glucocorticoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Siem van der

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the raising awareness of the role of glucocorticoids in the onset of numerous (neuro)-pathologies constitutes the increasing necessity of understanding the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in bodily processes and brain functioning. Glucocorticoids mediate their effects by binding

  16. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...way it adapts is by upregulating another hormone receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which may compensate for diminished AR activity. The

  17. Comparative analysis of ginsenosides in human glucocorticoid receptor binding, transactivation, and transrepression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Catherine; Lau, Aik Jiang; Wang, RuiQi; Chang, Thomas K H

    2017-11-15

    Conflicting data exist on the effect of ginsenosides on transactivation of human glucocorticoid receptor α (herein referred to as glucocorticoid receptor), and relatively little is known regarding the effect of these chemicals on transrepression of this receptor. We investigated the effect of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD), PPD-type ginsenosides (Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Rd, Rh2, and Compound K), 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT), and PPT-type ginsenosides (Re, Rf, Rg1, and Rh1) on glucocorticoid receptor binding, transactivation, and transrepression. Each ginsenoside was less efficacious than dexamethasone (positive control) in binding to the ligand-binding domain of glucocorticoid receptor. Among the ginsenosides investigated, Rh2 had the smallest IC50 value (15 ± 1µM), whereas it was 0.02 ± 0.01µM for dexamethasone. In contrast to dexamethasone, none of the ginsenosides influenced glucocorticoid receptor transactivation or transrepression in LS180 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, as assessed in a dual-luciferase reporter gene assay. Rh2 did not affect the endogenous mRNA level of tyrosine aminotransferase (marker for glucocorticoid receptor transactivation) or corticosteroid-binding globulin (marker for glucocorticoid receptor transrepression) in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. This chemical also did not alter the response by a glucocorticoid receptor agonist (dexamethasone or Compound A) in the dual-luciferase reporter gene assay or target gene expression assay. In conclusion, ginsenosides were less efficacious and less potent than dexamethasone in binding to the ligand-binding domain of glucocorticoid receptor. The number of glycosylated groups was associated with a decrease in receptor binding potency. PPD-type and PPT-type ginsenosides are not modulators of glucocorticoid receptor transactivation or transrepression in LS180 and HepG2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of glucocorticoid hormones on adipokine secretion and human adipose tissue metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, John N

    2013-08-01

    The glucocorticoid hormones alter the metabolism of the adipose tissue after an approximately 2-h lag period. The effects are mediated through the nuclear receptors that alter the expression of a wide variety of genes through the mechanisms that are similar to those seen in the other cells. There are many direct metabolic effects of the glucocorticoids on the adipose tissue metabolism, and every year, new effects are added to the list of proteins whose expression is influenced by the glucocorticoids. Furthermore, some enzymatic processes are affected by these hormones only in the presence of the other hormones such as growth hormone (GH) or insulin. Most of the effects of the glucocorticoids are on the gene transcription, and the effects on the mRNA are reflected in the altered levels of the target proteins. The glucocorticoids enhance the leptin release, while reducing that of the inflammatory adipokines and stimulating that of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the presence of insulin. The activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD1) is enhanced by the glucocorticoids along with that of α1 glycoprotein 1 and serum amyloid A release by the adipose tissue. In contrast, the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF)-stimulated lipolysis in the adipose tissue is blocked by the glucocorticoids. It is still unclear which, if any, of these effects account for the insulin resistance due to the glucocorticoids in the adipose tissue. However, recent work suggests that, at least in mice, the reduction in the osteocalcin release by the osteoblasts in the presence of the glucocorticoids accounts for much of the in vivo insulin resistance. In summary, there are multiple direct effects of the glucocorticoids, both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory, on the adipose tissue.

  19. Disrupted glucocorticoid--Immune interactions during stress response in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Shi, Qiaoyun; Kodi, Priyadurga; Savransky, Anya; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Nugent, Katie L; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and immune pathways typically interact dynamically to optimize adaptation to stressful environmental challenges. We tested the hypothesis that a dysfunctional glucocorticoid-immune relationship contributes to abnormal stress response in schizophrenia. Saliva samples from 34 individuals with schizophrenia (20 male, 14 female) and 40 healthy controls (20 male, 20 female) were collected prior to and at 3 time points following completion of a computerized psychological challenge meant to be frustrating. Salivary concentrations of cortisol and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and their response to the challenge were examined. Both cortisol and IL-6 significantly increased in response to stress in the combined sample (both pschizophrenia patients (r=.379, p=.027). The trends were significantly different (Z=3.7, p=.0002). This stress paradigm induces a rise in both cortisol and IL-6. In healthy controls, a more robust acute cortisol response was associated with a steeper decline of IL-6 levels following stress, corresponding to the expected anti-inflammatory effects of cortisol. Patients exhibited the opposite relationship, suggesting an inability to down-regulate inflammatory responses to psychological stress in schizophrenia; or even a paradoxical increase of IL-6 response. This finding may partially underlie abnormalities in inflammatory and stress pathways previously found in the illness, implicating dysregulated stress response in the chronic inflammatory state in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M., E-mail: qchen@email.arizona.edu

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  1. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome caused by ocular glucocorticoids in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Maria Francesca; Valenzise, Mariella; Aversa, Salvatore; Arrigo, Teresa; De Luca, Filippo

    2009-01-01

    A boy aged 7.6 years presented to our Unit of Paediatric Endocrinology for evaluation of obesity. Progressive weight gain (10 kg) started 6 months earlier after an accidental penetrating orbital injury on the right eye. During this period the child has been treated with oral betamethasone (0.5 mg/day) for 1 month and dexamethasone 2% ocular drops (2 hourly by day) for 6 months. Physical examination showed he was 113.5 cm in height (-1.5 SD), weight 36.0 kg, blood pressure 110/90 mmHg (90th centile), body mass index 28 (+5 SD), truncal obesity, buffalo hump, "moon-face", increased lanugo hair and supraclavicular fullness. Endocrinological work-up revealed undetectable levels of basal adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), basal and ACTH-stimulated cortisol and 24 h urine excretion cortisol, confirming the diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome. The abrupt withdrawal of ocular glucocorticoids by the parents evoked two adrenal crises; 4 months later the patient recovered. In conclusion, we would alert doctors that every formulation of glucocorticoids, no ocular drops excluded, can determine severe systemic side effects and iatrogenic Cushing syndrome.

  2. Serum and Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase 1 in Sodium Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyun Lou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitously expressed serum and glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (SGK1 is tightly regulated by osmotic and hormonal signals, including glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. Recently, SGK1 has been implicated as a signal hub for the regulation of sodium transport. SGK1 modulates the activities of multiple ion channels and carriers, such as epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.5, sodium hydrogen exchangers 1 and 3 (NHE1 and NHE3, sodium-chloride symporter (NCC, and sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (NKCC2; as well as the sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase and type A natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR-A. Accordingly, SGK1 is implicated in the physiology and pathophysiology of Na+ homeostasis. Here, we focus particularly on recent findings of SGK1’s involvement in Na+ transport in renal sodium reabsorption, hormone-stimulated salt appetite and fluid balance and discuss the abnormal SGK1-mediated Na+ reabsorption in hypertension, heart disease, edema with diabetes, and embryo implantation failure.

  3. A Case of Glucocorticoid Remediable Aldosteronism and Thoracoabdominal Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Shahrrava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism (GRA is rare familial form of primary aldosteronism characterized by a normalization of hypertension with the administration of glucocorticoids. We present a case of GRA and thoracoabdominal aneurysm complicated by multiple aortic dissections requiring complex surgical and endovascular repairs. Registry studies have shown a high rate of intracranial aneurysms in GRA patients with high case fatality rates. The association of thoracoabdominal aneurysms with GRA has not been described, thus far, in literature. Studies have shown that high tissue aldosterone levels concomitant with salt intake have a significant role in the pathogenesis of aneurysms and this may explain the formation of aneurysms in the intracranial vasculature and aorta. The association of GRA with thoracic aortic aneurysms needs to be further studied to develop screening recommendations for early identification and optimal treatment. Also, the early use of mineralocorticoid antagonists may have a significant preventive and attenuating effect in aneurysm formation, an association which needs to be confirmed in future studies.

  4. Safety and tolerability of high doses of glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakić Branislava D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia includes the use of high doses of glucocorticoides (prednisone and dexamethasone, which significantly increase the success of therapy due to lymphocytolitic effect. The aim: The aim of the study was to determine tolerability of high doses of prednisone and dexamethasone in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the structure and the intensity of adverse effects, occurred after application of these medicines. Subjects and methods: In a prospective study, we analyzed adverse effects of high doses of glucocorticoides in children suffering acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated in the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, since December 2010. until October 2014, were analyzed. This study included 18 patients, aged from 2 to 15 years. Results: Hyperglycemia appeared in 89% of patients treated with prednisone and in 61% of patients treated with dexamethasone. In order to control the high blood glucose level (above 10 mmol /L, in 11% of patients insulin was used. Hypertension appeared in 28% patients treated with prednisone and dexamethasone. Antihypertensives were needed for regulation in 17% patients. Hypopotassemia and hypocalcaemia were significantly more expressed after the use of prednisone in comparison to dexamethasone. In 11% of patients, the treatment with dexamethasone caused depressive behavior, followed by agitation. Conclusion: Adverse effects of dexamethasone and prednisone, administered in high doses in children with ALL were known, expected and reversible. Adverse reactions usually disappeared spontaneously or after short-term symptomatic therapy.

  5. Glucocorticoid regulation of transcription at an amplified, episomal promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrowski, M.C.; Richard-Foy, H.; Wolford, R.G.; Berard, D.S.; Hager, G.L.

    1983-11-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) has been introduced into cultured murine cells, using the 69% transforming fragment of bovine papiloma virus type 1 (BVP). Transformed cells contain up to 200 copies of the chimeric molecules per diploid genome. The restriction endonuclease map of the acquired recombinants, as well as the physical structure of the DNA, indicates that the LTR-BVP molecules present in these cells occur exclusively as unintegrated, extrachromosomal episome. When a 72-base pair direct repeat ''enhancer'' element (derived from the Harvey sarcoma retrovirus) was included in the MMTV LTR-BPV chimeric plasmids, DNA acquired through transfection, with a single exception, was integrated or rearranged or both. Two approaches showed that the MMTV LTR present in the episomal state was capable of supporting glucocorticoid hormone-regulated transcription. The authors have therefore demonstrated the hormone response for the first time in a totally defined primary sequence environment. Significant differences both in the basal level of MMTV-initiated transcription and in the extend of glucocorticoid induction were observed in individual cell lines with similar episomal copy numbers. These phenotypic variations suggest that epigenetic structure is an important component of the mechanism of regulation.

  6. Peptide mimetic of the S100A4 protein modulates peripheral nerve regeneration and attenuates the progression of neuropathy in myelin protein P0 null mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Dmytriyeva, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    and mimicked the S100A4-induced neuroprotection in brain trauma. Here, we investigated a possible function of S100A4 and its mimetics in the pathologies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We found that S100A4 was expressed in the injured PNS and that its peptide mimetic (H3) affected the regeneration...

  7. Yin Yang 1 Promotes Hepatic Gluconeogenesis Through Upregulation of Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Xiong, Xuelian; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Zhijian; Li, Jin; Shi, Guojun; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Huijie; Ning, Guang; Li, Xiaoying

    2013-01-01

    Gluconeogenesis is critical in maintaining blood glucose levels in a normal range during fasting. In this study, we investigated the role of Yin Yang 1 (YY1), a key transcription factor involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Our data showed that hepatic YY1 expression levels were induced in mice during fasting conditions and in a state of insulin resistance. Overexpression of YY1 in livers augmented gluconeogenesis, raising fasting blood glucose levels in C57BL/6 mice, whereas liver-specific ablation of YY1 using adenoviral shRNA ameliorated hyperglycemia in wild-type and diabetic db/db mice. At the molecular level, we further demonstrated that the major mechanism of YY1 in the regulation of hepatic glucose production is to modulate the expression of glucocorticoid receptor. Therefore, our study uncovered for the first time that YY1 participates in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis, which implies that YY1 might serve as a potential therapeutic target for hyperglycemia in diabetes. PMID:23193188

  8. Airway Epithelial Cells Are Crucial Targets of Glucocorticoids in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaßen, Carina; Karabinskaya, Anna; Dejager, Lien; Vettorazzi, Sabine; Van Moorleghem, Justine; Lühder, Fred; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Tuckermann, Jan P; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Libert, Claude; Reichardt, Holger M

    2017-07-01

    Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are a mainstay in the clinical management of asthma, the target cells that mediate their therapeutic effects are unknown. Contrary to our expectation, we found that GC receptor (GR) expression in immune cells was dispensable for successful therapy of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) with dexamethasone. Instead, GC treatment was compromised in mice expressing a defective GR in the nonhematopoietic compartment or selectively lacking the GR in airway epithelial cells. Further, we found that an intact GR dimerization interface was a prerequisite for the suppression of AAI and airway hyperresponsiveness by GCs. Our observation that the ability of dexamethasone to modulate gene expression in airway epithelial cells coincided with its potency to resolve AAI supports a crucial role for transcriptional regulation by the GR in this cell type. Taken together, we identified an unknown mode of GC action in the treatment of allergic asthma that might help to develop more specific therapies in the future. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation Improves Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzino, Gabriele; Irrera, Natasha; Galfo, Federica; Oteri, Giacomo; Atteritano, Marco; Pallio, Giovanni; Mannino, Federica; D'Amore, Angelica; Pellegrino, Enrica; Aliquò, Federica; Anastasi, Giuseppe P; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Bitto, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is a secondary cause of bone loss. Bisphosphonates approved for GIO, might induce jaw osteonecrosis; thus additional therapeutics are required. Adenosine receptor agonists are positive regulators of bone remodeling, thus the efficacy of adenosine receptor stimulation for treating GIO was tested. In a preventive study GIO was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by methylprednisolone (MP) for 60 days. Animals were randomly assigned to receive polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), an adenosine A2 receptor agonist, or PDRN and DMPX (3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A 2 antagonist), or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). Another set of animals was used for a treatment study, following the 60 days of MP-induction rats were randomized to receive (for additional 60 days) PDRN, or PDRN and DMPX (an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist), or zoledronate (as control for gold standard treatment), or vehicle. Control animals were administered with vehicle for either 60 or 120 days. Femurs were analyzed after treatments for histology, imaging, and breaking strength analysis. MP treatment induced severe bone loss, the concomitant use of PDRN prevented the developing of osteoporosis. In rats treated for 120 days, PDRN restored bone architecture and bone strength; increased b-ALP, osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin and stimulated the Wnt canonical and non-canonical pathway. Zoledronate reduced bone resorption and ameliorated the histological features, without significant effects on bone formation. Our results suggest that adenosine receptor stimulation might be useful for preventing and treating GIO.

  10. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation Improves Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Pizzino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO is a secondary cause of bone loss. Bisphosphonates approved for GIO, might induce jaw osteonecrosis; thus additional therapeutics are required. Adenosine receptor agonists are positive regulators of bone remodeling, thus the efficacy of adenosine receptor stimulation for treating GIO was tested. In a preventive study GIO was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by methylprednisolone (MP for 60 days. Animals were randomly assigned to receive polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN, an adenosine A2 receptor agonist, or PDRN and DMPX (3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 antagonist, or vehicle (0.9% NaCl. Another set of animals was used for a treatment study, following the 60 days of MP-induction rats were randomized to receive (for additional 60 days PDRN, or PDRN and DMPX (an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist, or zoledronate (as control for gold standard treatment, or vehicle. Control animals were administered with vehicle for either 60 or 120 days. Femurs were analyzed after treatments for histology, imaging, and breaking strength analysis. MP treatment induced severe bone loss, the concomitant use of PDRN prevented the developing of osteoporosis. In rats treated for 120 days, PDRN restored bone architecture and bone strength; increased b-ALP, osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin and stimulated the Wnt canonical and non-canonical pathway. Zoledronate reduced bone resorption and ameliorated the histological features, without significant effects on bone formation. Our results suggest that adenosine receptor stimulation might be useful for preventing and treating GIO.

  11. Bio-mimetic mineralization potential of collagen hydrolysate obtained from chromium tanned leather waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Madhu, S. [School of Bio Science and Technology, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Chandra Babu, N.K. [Tannery Division, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu (India); Shanthi, C., E-mail: cshanthi@vit.ac.in [School of Bio Science and Technology, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics serve as an alternative to autogenous-free bone grafting by virtue of their excellent biocompatibility. However, chemically synthesized HA lacks the strong load-bearing capacity as required by bone. The bio-mimetic growth of HA crystals on collagen surface provides a feasible solution for synthesizing bone substitutes with the desired properties. This study deals with the utilization of the collagen hydrolysate recovered from leather waste as a substrate for promoting HA crystal growth. Bio-mimetic growth of HA was induced by subjecting the hydrolysate to various mineralization conditions. Parameters that would have a direct effect on crystal growth were varied to determine the optimal conditions necessary. Maximum mineralization was achieved with a combination of 10 mM of CaCl{sub 2}, 5 mM of Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, 100 mM of NaCl and 0.575% glutaraldehyde at a pH of 7.4. The metal–protein interactions leading to formation of HA were identified through Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The crystal dimensions were determined to be in the nanoscale range by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The size and crystallinity of bio-mimetically grown HA indicate that hydrolysate from leather waste can be used as an ideal alternative substrate for bone growth. - Highlights: • Collagen hydrolysate, extracted from leather industry waste is subjected to biomineralization. • Optimal conditions required for HA growth are identified. • FTIR studies reveal higher Ca−COO{sup −} and low C−N stretch with higher HA formation. • AFM and SEM studies reveal nanometer ranged HA crystals.

  12. Smac mimetic-derived augmentation of chemotherapeutic response in experimental pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Margaret A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy, in part due to the overexpression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs. Smac is an endogenous IAP-antagonist, which renders synthetic Smac mimetics attractive anticancer agents. We evaluated the benefits of combining a Smac mimetic, JP1201 (JP, with conventional chemotherapy agents used for PDAC management. Methods Cell viability assays and protein expression analysis were performed using WST-1 reagent and Western blotting, respectively. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V/propidium iodide staining. In vivo tumor growth and survival studies were performed in murine PDAC xenografts. Results JP and gemcitabine (Gem inhibited PDAC cell proliferation with additive effects in combination. The percentage of early apoptotic cells in controls, JP, Gem and JP + Gem was 17%, 26%, 26% and 38%, respectively. JP-induced apoptosis was accompanied by PARP-1 cleavage. Similar additive anti-proliferative effects were seen for combinations of JP with doxorubicin (Dox and docetaxel (DT. The JP + Gem combination caused a 30% decrease in tumor size in vivo compared to controls. Median animal survival was improved significantly in mice treated with JP + Gem (38 d compared to controls (22 d, JP (28 d or Gem (32 d (p = 0.01. Animal survival was also improved with JP + DT treatment (32 d compared to controls (16 d, JP (21 d or DT alone (27 d. Conclusions These results warrant further exploration of strategies that promote chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of tumors and highlight the potential of Smac mimetics in clinical PDAC therapy.

  13. Enzyme-Mimetic Antioxidant Luminescent Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratsinis, Anna; Kelesidis, Georgios A; Zuercher, Stefanie; Krumeich, Frank; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Sotiriou, Georgios A

    2017-12-26

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an abundant molecule associated with biological functions and reacts with natural enzymes, such as catalase. Even though direct H2O2 measurement can be used to diagnose pathological conditions, such as infection and inflammation, H2O2 quantification further enables the detection of disease biomarkers in enzyme-linked assays (e.g., ELISA) in which enzymatic reactions may generate or consume H2O2. Such a quantification is often measured optically with organic dyes in biological media that suffer, however, from poor stability. Currently, the optical H2O2 biosensing without organic-dyes in biological media and at low, submicromolar, concentrations has yet to be achieved. Herein, we rationally design biomimetic artificial enzymes based on antioxidant CeO2 nanoparticles that become luminescent upon their Eu3+ doping. We vary systematically their diameter from 4 to 16 nm and study their catalase-mimetic antioxidant activity, manifested as catalytic H2O2 decomposition in aqueous solutions, revealing a strong nanoparticle surface area dependency. The interaction with H2O2 influences distinctly the particle luminescence rendering them highly sensitive H2O2 biosensors down to 0.15 μM (5.2 ppb) in solutions for biological assays. Our results link two, so far, unrelated research domains, the CeO2 nanoparticle antioxidant activity and luminescence by rare-earth doping. When these enzyme-mimetic nanoparticles are coupled with alcohol oxidase, biosensing can be extended to ethanol exemplifying how their detection potential can be broadened to additional biologically relevant metabolites. The enzyme-mimetic nanomaterial developed here could serve as a starting point of sophisticated in vitro assays toward the highly sensitive detection of disease biomarkers.

  14. Mimetic Theory and the evolutionary paradox of schizophrenia: The archetypal scapegoat hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Daniel Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Schizophrenia poses an evolutionary paradox, being genetically mediated yet associated with reduced fecundity. Numerous hypotheses have attempted to address this, but few describe how the schizophrenic phenotype itself might constitute an evolutionary adaptation. This paper draws on René Girard's theory on human origins, which claims that humans evolved a tendency to mimic both the desires and the behaviours of each other (mimetic theory). This would have promoted social cohesion and co-operation, but at the cost of intra-group rivalry and conflict. The mimetic dynamic would have escalated such conflicts into reciprocal internecine violence, threatening the survival of the entire group. Girard theorised that the "scapegoat mechanism" emerged, by which means such violence was curtailed by the unanimity of "all against one", thus allowing the mimetic impulse to safely evolve further, making language and complex social behaviours possible. Whereas scapegoating may have emerged in the entire population, and any member of a community could be scapegoated if necessary, this paper proposes that the scapegoat mechanism would have worked better in groups containing members who exhibited traits, recognised by all others, which singled them out as victims. Schizophrenia may be a functional adaptation, similar in evolutionary terms to altruism, in that it may have increased inclusive fitness, by providing scapegoat victims, the choice of whom was likely to be agreed upon unanimously, even during internecine conflict, thus restoring order and protecting the group from self-destruction. This evolutionary hypothesis, uses Girardian anthropology to combine the concept of the schizophrenic as religious shaman with that of the schizophrenic as scapegoat. It may help to reconcile divergent philosophical concepts of mental illness, and also help us to better understand, and thus counter, social exclusion and stigmatisation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Arbitrary Order Mixed Mimetic Finite Differences Method with Nodal Degrees of Freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaroshenko, Oleksandr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gyrya, Vitaliy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    In this work we consider a modification to an arbitrary order mixed mimetic finite difference method (MFD) for a diffusion equation on general polygonal meshes [1]. The modification is based on moving some degrees of freedom (DoF) for a flux variable from edges to vertices. We showed that for a non-degenerate element this transformation is locally equivalent, i.e. there is a one-to-one map between the new and the old DoF. Globally, on the other hand, this transformation leads to a reduction of the total number of degrees of freedom (by up to 40%) and additional continuity of the discrete flux.

  16. The Mimetic Finite Element Method and the Virtual Element Method for elliptic problems with arbitrary regularity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13

    We develop and analyze a new family of virtual element methods on unstructured polygonal meshes for the diffusion problem in primal form, that use arbitrarily regular discrete spaces V{sub h} {contained_in} C{sup {alpha}} {element_of} N. The degrees of freedom are (a) solution and derivative values of various degree at suitable nodes and (b) solution moments inside polygons. The convergence of the method is proven theoretically and an optimal error estimate is derived. The connection with the Mimetic Finite Difference method is also discussed. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence rate that is expected from the theory.

  17. Molecular Design, Structures, and Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide-Mimetic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruko; Palermo, Edmund F.; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics which are effective against drug-resistant bacteria without contributing to resistance development. We have designed and developed antimicrobial copolymers with cationic amphiphilic structures based on the mimicry of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. These copolymers exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no adverse hemolytic activity. Notably, these polymers also did not result in any measurable resistance development in E. coli. The peptide-mimetic design principle offers significant flexibility and diversity in the creation of new antimicrobial materials and their potential biomedical applications. PMID:23832766

  18. Aerodynamic Bio-Mimetics of Gliding Dragonflies for Ultra-Light Flying Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Obata

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A detailed investigation including a low-speed flow study is presented on the development of ultra-light dragonfly mimetic flying robots with a focus on the dragonfly’s remarkable gliding capability. It is revealed that the dragonfly’s corrugated wing structure and cruciform configuration provide superior flying characteristics for fixed wing robots in low Reynolds number flight. It was also found that the dragonfly configuration has additional merit in its compatibility with propellers or high lift devices. This combination with such classic aero-engineering makes possible robots with broader flight envelope than conventional fixed-wing flying robots.

  19. Clinical efficacy of glucocorticoid therapy in treatment of drug-induced cholestatic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GE Hongyan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo analyze the clinical efficacy of glucocorticoid therapy in addition to conventional treatment for patients with drug-induced cholestatic liver disease. MethodsA total of 115 patients with drug-induced cholestatic liver disease who were admitted to Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities from January 2010 to December 2014 were collected and divided into glucocorticoid treatment group and non-glucocorticoid treatment group. The glucocorticoid treatment group was given methylprednisolone sodium succinate 120 mg once daily by intravenous injection in addition to conventional treatment. The indicator for glucocorticoid response was defined as 10% decrease of total bilirubin (TBil on the third day or 30% decrease on the seventh day. Then the patients were orally given prednisone tablets 10 mg three times daily based on the level of TBil, and the administration of prednisone tablets was adjusted to twice daily a week later. The course of treatment was less than three weeks. Comparison of continuous data in normal distribution between the two groups was made by t test, and comparison of continuous data not in normal distribution between the two groups was made by rank sum test. ResultsThe levels of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and TBil in the glucocorticoid treatment group decreased significantly on days 3, 7, and 14 of treatment compared with those before treatment (tGGT=3.64, 13.08, 16.22; tALT=2.39, 4.73, 8.36; tTBil=3.46, 7.41, 13.17; all P<0.05. Compared with the non-glucocorticoid treatment group, the glucocorticoid treatment group had significantly lower AST and ALT levels before treatment and on days 3 and 7 of treatment (all P>0.05. The GGT, AST, and TBil levels in the glucocorticoid treatment group were significantly lower than those in the non-glucocorticoid treatment group on day 14 of treatment (t=7.074, 2.929, 2.018; all P<0.05. The average decreasing

  20. Cytokine-induced loss of glucocorticoid function: effect of kinase inhibitors, long-acting β(2-adrenoceptor [corrected] agonist and glucocorticoid receptor ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Rider

    Full Text Available Acting on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, glucocorticoid resistance often leads to suboptimal asthma control. Since glucocorticoid-induced gene expression contributes to glucocorticoid activity, the aim of this study was to use a 2 × glucocorticoid response element (GRE reporter and glucocorticoid-induced gene expression to investigate approaches to combat cytokine-induced glucocorticoid resistance. Pre-treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF or interleukin-1β inhibited dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of the putative anti-inflammatory genes RGS2 and TSC22D3, or just TSC22D3, in primary human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Dexamethasone-induced DUSP1 mRNA was unaffected. In human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, dexamethasone-induced TSC22D3 and CDKN1C expression (at 6 h was reduced by TNF pre-treatment, whereas DUSP1 and RGS2 mRNAs were unaffected. TNF pre-treatment also reduced dexamethasone-dependent 2×GRE reporter activation. This was partially reversed by PS-1145 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK inhibitor VIII, inhibitors of IKK2 and JNK, respectively. However, neither inhibitor affected TNF-dependent loss of dexamethasone-induced CDKN1C or TSC22D3 mRNA. Similarly, inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, phosphoinositide 3-kinase or protein kinase C pathways failed to attenuate TNF-dependent repression of the 2×GRE reporter. Fluticasone furoate, fluticasone propionate and budesonide were full agonists relative to dexamethasone, while GSK9027, RU24858, des-ciclesonide and GW870086X were partial agonists on the 2×GRE reporter. TNF reduced reporter activity in proportion with agonist efficacy. Full and partial agonists showed various degrees of agonism on RGS2 and TSC22D3 expression, but were equally effective at inducing CDKN1C and DUSP1, and did not affect the repression of CDKN1C or TSC22D3

  1. Improved androgen specificity of AR-EcoScreen by CRISPR based glucocorticoid receptor knockout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Nick; Andringa, Dave; de Leeuw, Willem-Jan; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Iida, Mitsuru; Houtman, Corine J; de Boer, Jacob; Kool, Jeroen; Lamoree, Marja H; Hamers, Timo

    2017-12-01

    The AR-EcoScreen is a widely used reporter assay for the detection of androgens and anti-androgens. Endogenous expression of glucocorticoid receptors and their affinity for the androgen responsive element that drives reporter expression, however, makes the reporter cells sensitive to interference by glucocorticoids and less specific for (anti-)androgens. To create a glucocorticoid insensitive derivative of the AR-EcoScreen, CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing was used to develop glucocorticoid receptor knockout mutants by targeting various sites in the glucocorticoid gene. Two mutant cell lines were further characterized and validated against the unmodified AR-EcoScreen with a set of 19 environmentally relevant chemicals and a series of environmental passive sampler extracts with (anti-)androgenic activity. Sequencing of the targeted sites revealed premature stop codons following frame-shift mutations, leading to an absence of functional glucocorticoid receptor expression. The introduced mutations rendered cell lines insensitive to glucocorticoid activation and caused no significant difference in the responsiveness towards (anti-)androgens, compared to the unmodified AR-EcoScreen cells, allowing the selective, GR-independent, determination of (anti-)androgenicity in environmental passive sampler extracts. The increase in selectivity for (anti-)androgens improves reliability of the AR-EcoScreen and will provide higher accuracy in determining (anti-)androgenic potential when applied in toxicity screening and environmental monitoring of both single compounds and mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of teriparatide in the management of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dore RK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Robin K DoreDavid Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Glucocorticoids are commonly prescribed medications to treat multiple diseases across many medical specialties. One of the most common yet largely unappreciated side effect of glucocorticoid use is increased risk of fracture. Many different therapies are indicated to prevent and treat this condition; many guidelines exist that suggest appropriate use of both glucocorticoids and the medications approved to prevent this common side effect of glucocorticoid therapy. Nevertheless, 30%–50% of patients on long-term glucocorticoid therapy sustain a fracture. Teriparatide, recombinant human parathyroid hormone (1–34, is a daily self-injectable therapy for 24 months approved for use in patients taking long-term glucocorticoids. Teriparatide has been shown to increase bone mineral density and reduce vertebral fracture risk in glucocorticoid-treated patients. Glucocorticoids have many adverse effects on bone that teriparatide has been shown to prevent or negate. Given the fact that preventive therapy for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is often not prescribed, one wonders whether a daily self-injectable therapy for this condition would be prescribed by physicians and accepted by patients. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment, guidelines, and persistence data (when available for patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis treated with teriparatide.Keywords: glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, teriparatide, anabolic, PTH, parathyroid hormone

  3. The glucocorticoid receptor in the distal nephron is not necessary for the development or maintenance of dexamethasone-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Julie E; Zhang, Junhui; Velazquez, Heino; Geller, David S

    2010-04-02

    Glucocorticoids are used as a treatment for a variety of conditions and hypertension is a well-recognized side effect of their use. The mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced hypertension is incompletely understood and has traditionally been attributed to promiscuous activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor by cortisol. Multiple lines of evidence, however, point to the glucocorticoid receptor as an important mediator as well. We have developed a mouse model of glucocorticoid-induced hypertension, which is dependent on the glucocorticoid receptor. To determine the site(s) of glucocorticoid receptor action relevant to the development of hypertension, we studied glucocorticoid-induced hypertension in a mouse with a tissue-specific knockout of the glucocorticoid receptor in the distal nephron. Although knockout mice had similar body weight, nephron number and renal histology compared to littermate controls, their baseline blood pressure was mildly elevated. Nevertheless, distal nephron glucocorticoid receptor knockout mice and controls had a similar hypertensive response to dexamethasone. Urinary excretion of electrolytes, both before and after administration of glucocorticoid was also indistinguishable between the two groups. We conclude that the glucocorticoid receptor in the distal nephron is not necessary for the development or maintenance of dexamethasone-induced hypertension in our model. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. TAK1 targeting by glucocorticoids determines JNK and IκB regulation in Toll-like receptor–stimulated macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Christine K.; Vogt, Sherri K.; Kelley, Crystal; Colonna, Marco; Schreiber, Robert D.; Muglia, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids potently attenuate the production of inflammatory mediators by macrophages, a primary effector of innate immunity. Activation of different macrophage Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by their respective ligands presents a powerful system by which to evaluate stimulus-dependent glucocorticoid effects in the same cell type. Here, we test the hypothesis that glucocorticoids, acting through the glucocorticoid receptor, modulate macrophage activation preferentially depending upon the TLR-selective ligand and TLR adapters. We established that 2 adapters, Trif, MyD88, or both, determine the ability of glucocorticoids to suppress inhibitor of κB (IκB) degradation or Janus kinase (JNK) activation. Moreover, the sensitivity of transforming growth factor β–activated kinase 1 (TAK1) activation to glucocorticoids determines these effects. These findings identify TAK1 as a novel target for glucocorticoids that integrates their anti-inflammatory action in innate immunity signaling pathways. PMID:20065289

  5. Pioneer Factors FOXA1 and FOXA2 Assist Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling in Human Endometrial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whirledge, Shannon; Kisanga, Edwina P; Taylor, Robert N; Cidlowski, John A

    2017-11-01

    Successful pregnancy relies on dynamic control of cell signaling to achieve uterine receptivity and the necessary biological changes required for endometrial decidualization, embryo implantation, and fetal development. Glucocorticoids are master regulators of intracellular signaling and can directly regulate embryo implantation and endometrial remodeling during murine pregnancy. In immortalized human uterine cells, we have shown that glucocorticoids and estradiol (E2) coregulate thousands of genes. Recently, glucocorticoids and E2 were shown to coregulate the expression of Left-right determination factor 1 (LEFTY1), previously implicated in the regulation of decidualization. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which glucocorticoids and E2 regulate the expression of LEFTY1, immortalized and primary human endometrial cells were evaluated for gene expression and receptor recruitment to regulatory regions of the LEFTY1 gene. Glucocorticoid administration induced expression of LEFTY1 messenger RNA and protein and recruitment of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and activated polymerase 2 to the promoter of LEFTY1. Glucocorticoid-mediated recruitment of GR was dependent on pioneer factors FOXA1 and FOXA2. E2 was found to antagonize glucocorticoid-mediated induction of LEFTY1 by reducing recruitment of GR, FOXA1, FOXA2, and activated polymerase 2 to the LEFTY1 promoter. Gene expression analysis identified several genes whose glucocorticoid-dependent induction required FOXA1 and FOXA2 in endometrial cells. These results suggest a molecular mechanism by which E2 antagonizes GR-dependent induction of specific genes by preventing the recruitment of the pioneer factors FOXA1 and FOXA2 in a physiologically relevant model. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  6. Methods and Experimental Protocols to Design a Simulated Bio-Mimetic Quadruped Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi El Daou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a bio-mimetic approach to design and simulate a tortoise-like virtual robot. This study takes a multidisciplinary approach: from in vivo and in vitro experiments on animals, data are collected and used to design, control and simulate a bio-mimetic virtual robot using MD ADAMS platform. From the in vitro experiments, the geometrical and inertial properties of body limbs are measured, and a model of tortoise kinematics is derived. From the in vivo experiments the contact forces between each limb and the ground are measured. The contributions of hind and forelimbs in the generation of propelling and braking forces are studied. The motion of the joints between limb segments are recorded and used to solve the inverse kinematics problem. A virtual model of a tortoise-like robot is built; it is a linkage of 15 rigid bodies articulated by 22 degrees of freedom. This model is referred to as TATOR II. It has the inertial and geometrical properties measured during the in vitro experiments. TATOR II motion is achieved using a Proportional-Derivative controller copying the joint angle trajectories calculated from the in vivo experiments.

  7. Heparin-mimetic polyurethane hydrogels with anticoagulant, tunable mechanical property and controllable drug releasing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Yonghui; Zhao, Weifeng; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, novel heparin-mimetic polyurethane hydrogels were prepared by introducing chemical crosslinked sulfated konjac glucomannan (SKGM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicated that the introduction of SKGM and the increase of the molecular weight of diol segments could enlarge the pore sizes of the hydrogels. The swelling behavior corresponded with the SEM results, and the hydrogels could absorb more water after the modification. The modification also led to an improvement in the mechanical property. Meanwhile, the SKGM and the modified polyurethane hydrogels showed excellent hemocompatibility. The thromboplastin time of SKGM could reach up to 182.9s. Gentamycin sulfate (GS) was used as a model drug to be loaded into the hydrogels, and the loading amount was increased ca. 50% after the introduction of SKGM, thus resulting in high bactericidal efficiency. The results indicated that the introduction of SKGM and the alternation in the diol's molecular weight bestowed polyurethane hydrogels with promising properties of integrated blood-compatibility, mechanical properties and drug loading-releasing behavior. Therefore, the heparin-mimetic multifunctional polyurethane hydrogels have great potential to be used in biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Cecilia; Zambonin, Laura; Rizzo, Benedetta; Maraldi, Tullia; Angeloni, Cristina; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance.

  9. BH3 Mimetics Reactivate Autophagic Cell Death in Anoxia-Resistant Malignant Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hetschko

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we investigated the specific roles of Bcl-2 family members in anoxia tolerance of malignant glioma. Flow cytometry analysis of cell death in 17 glioma cell lines revealed drastic differences in their sensitivity to oxygen withdrawal (<0.1% O2. Cell death correlated with mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome C release, and translocation of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged light chain 3 to autophagosomes but occurred in the absence of caspase activation or phosphatidylserine exposure. In both sensitive and tolerant glioma cell lines, anoxia caused a significant up-regulation of BH3-only genes previously implicated in mediating anoxic cell death in other cell types (BNIP3, NIX, PUMA, and Noxa. In contrast, we detected a strong correlation between anoxia resistance and high expression levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 that function to neutralize the proapoptotic activity of BH3-only proteins. Importantly, inhibition of both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL with the small-molecule BH3 mimetics HA14-1 and BH3I-2′ and by RNA interference reactivated anoxia-induced autophagic cell death in previously resistant glioma cells. Our data suggest that endogenous BH3-only protein induction may not be able to compensate for the high expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in anoxia-resistant astrocytomas. They also support the conjecture that BH3 mimetics may represent an exciting new approach for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  10. Stick–slip friction of gecko-mimetic flaps on smooth and rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saurabh; Cadirov, Nicholas; Chary, Sathya; Kaufman, Yair; Hogan, Jack; Turner, Kimberly L.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and understanding of gecko ‘frictional-adhesion’ adhering and climbing mechanism has allowed researchers to mimic and create gecko-inspired adhesives. A few experimental and theoretical approaches have been taken to understand the effect of surface roughness on synthetic adhesive performance, and the implications of stick–slip friction during shearing. This work extends previous studies by using a modified surface forces apparatus to quantitatively measure and model frictional forces between arrays of polydimethylsiloxane gecko footpad-mimetic tilted microflaps against smooth and rough glass surfaces. Constant attachments and detachments occur between the surfaces during shearing, as described by an avalanche model. These detachments ultimately result in failure of the adhesion interface and have been characterized in this study. Stick–slip friction disappears with increasing velocity when the flaps are sheared against a smooth silica surface; however, stick–slip was always present at all velocities and loads tested when shearing the flaps against rough glass surfaces. These results demonstrate the significance of pre-load, shearing velocity, shearing distances, commensurability and shearing direction of gecko-mimetic adhesives and provide us a simple model for analysing and/or designing such systems. PMID:25589569

  11. Stick-slip friction of gecko-mimetic flaps on smooth and rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saurabh; Cadirov, Nicholas; Chary, Sathya; Kaufman, Yair; Hogan, Jack; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-03-06

    The discovery and understanding of gecko 'frictional-adhesion' adhering and climbing mechanism has allowed researchers to mimic and create gecko-inspired adhesives. A few experimental and theoretical approaches have been taken to understand the effect of surface roughness on synthetic adhesive performance, and the implications of stick-slip friction during shearing. This work extends previous studies by using a modified surface forces apparatus to quantitatively measure and model frictional forces between arrays of polydimethylsiloxane gecko footpad-mimetic tilted microflaps against smooth and rough glass surfaces. Constant attachments and detachments occur between the surfaces during shearing, as described by an avalanche model. These detachments ultimately result in failure of the adhesion interface and have been characterized in this study. Stick-slip friction disappears with increasing velocity when the flaps are sheared against a smooth silica surface; however, stick-slip was always present at all velocities and loads tested when shearing the flaps against rough glass surfaces. These results demonstrate the significance of pre-load, shearing velocity, shearing distances, commensurability and shearing direction of gecko-mimetic adhesives and provide us a simple model for analysing and/or designing such systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Cecilia; Zambonin, Laura; Rizzo, Benedetta; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance. PMID:28947927

  13. Development of hydrocolloid microgels as starch granule mimetics: Hydrogel particles fabricated from gelatin and pectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bi-Cheng; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    In this study, hydrocolloid microgels fabricated by electrostatic complexation of gelatin and pectin were developed as possible starch mimetics. The impact of covalent cross-linking on the physicochemical and structural properties of the microgels was investigated. Microgels were formed by acidifying a mixture of gelatin (0.5wt.%) and pectin (0.01wt.%) from pH10 to 5 at 40°C, followed by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde (0 to 2mM). At low glutaraldehyde levels (<0.5mM), cross-linking occurred primarily within the microgels and did not affect particle dimensions, whereas at high levels (2mM), cross-linking connected adjacent microgels leading to the formation of large flocs. Rheological and microscopic analysis showed that the degree of cross-linking impacted the thermal transitions of the microgels. A simulated oral processing study indicated that the melt-in-the-mouth behavior of the hydrocolloid microgels could be made to be similar to that of starch granules by controlling the degree of cross-linking. This study may be useful for designing starch mimetics with improved texture-modifying properties and reduced-calories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Phenotypic and Genetic Divergence among Poison Frog Populations in a Mimetic Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Twomey

    Full Text Available The evolution of Müllerian mimicry is, paradoxically, associated with high levels of diversity in color and pattern. In a mimetic radiation, different populations of a species evolve to resemble different models, which can lead to speciation. Yet there are circumstances under which initial selection for divergence under mimicry may be reversed. Here we provide evidence for the evolution of extensive phenotypic divergence in a mimetic radiation in Ranitomeya imitator, the mimic poison frog, in Peru. Analyses of color hue (spectral reflectance and pattern reveal substantial divergence between morphs. However, we also report that there is a "transition-zone" with mixed phenotypes. Analyses of genetic structure using microsatellite variation reveals some differentiation between populations, but this does not strictly correspond to color pattern divergence. Analyses of gene flow between populations suggest that, while historical levels of gene flow were low, recent levels are high in some cases, including substantial gene flow between some color pattern morphs. We discuss possible explanations for these observations.

  15. A mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem with elected edge bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnikov, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berirao, L [DIPARTMENTO DI MATERMATICA

    2009-01-01

    A new mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem is proposed and analyzed. The unstable P{sub 1}-P{sub 0} discretization is stabilized by adding a small number of bubble functions to selected mesh edges. A simple strategy for selecting such edges is proposed and verified with numerical experiments. The discretizations schemes for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations must satisfy the celebrated inf-sup (or the LBB) stability condition. The stability condition implies a balance between discrete spaces for velocity and pressure. In finite elements, this balance is frequently achieved by adding bubble functions to the velocity space. The goal of this article is to show that the stabilizing edge bubble functions can be added only to a small set of mesh edges. This results in a smaller algebraic system and potentially in a faster calculations. We employ the mimetic finite difference (MFD) discretization technique that works for general polyhedral meshes and can accomodate non-uniform distribution of stabilizing bubbles.

  16. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Prata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance.

  17. Nacre-mimetic bulk lamellar composites reinforced with high aspect ratio glass flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Selen N Gurbuz; Dericioglu, Arcan F

    2016-12-05

    Nacre-mimetic epoxy matrix composites reinforced with readily available micron-sized high aspect ratio C-glass flakes were fabricated by a relatively simple, single-step, scalable, time, cost and man-power effective processing strategy: hot-press assisted slip casting (HASC). HASC enables the fabrication of preferentially oriented two-dimensional inorganic reinforcement-polymer matrix bulk lamellar composites with a micro-scale structure resembling the brick-and-mortar architecture of nacre. By applying the micro-scale design guideline found in nacre and optimizing the relative volume fractions of the reinforcement and the matrix as well as by anchoring the brick-and-mortar architecture, and tailoring the interface between reinforcements and the matrix via silane coupling agents, strong, stiff and tough bio-inspired nacre-mimetic bulk composites were fabricated. As a result of high shear stress transfer lengths and effective stress transfer at the interface achieved through surface functionalization of the reinforcements, fabricated bulk composites exhibited enhanced mechanical performance as compared to neat epoxy. Furthermore, governed flake pull-out mode along with a highly torturous crack path, which resulted from extensive deflection and meandering of the advancing crack around well-aligned high aspect ratio C-glass flakes, have led to high work-of-fracture values similar to nacre.

  18. Therapeutic advances in the treatment of vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Despina; Brogan, Paul A

    2016-04-26

    Considerable therapeutic advances for the treatment of vasculitis of the young have been made in the past 10 years, including the development of outcome measures that facilitate clinical trial design. Notably, these include: a recognition that some patients with Kawasaki Disease require corticosteroids as primary treatment combined with IVIG; implementation of rare disease trial design for polyarteritis nodosa to deliver the first randomised controlled trial for children; first clinical trials involving children for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) vasculitis; and identification of monogenic forms of vasculitis that provide an understanding of pathogenesis, thus facilitating more targeted treatment. Robust randomised controlled trials for Henoch Schönlein Purpura nephritis and Takayasu arteritis are needed; there is also an over-arching need for trials examining new agents that facilitate corticosteroid sparing, of particular importance in the paediatric population since glucocorticoid toxicity is a major concern.

  19. The Ups and Downs of Glucocorticoid Signaling | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that react to stress by regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism. Because of their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, corticosteroids are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. Glucocorticoids are often used to treat arthritis and autoimmune diseases and are also given in combination with other drugs to treat cancers—such as leukemias and lymphomas—or to alleviate side effects from chemotherapy and radiation. In humans, a glucocorticoid called cortisol is released from the adrenal gland approximately every hour to send signals to cells throughout the body. This pulsed release of hormone is called ultradian secretion.  

  20. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  1. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment affects hippocampal development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelle W Noorlander

    Full Text Available Synthetic glucocorticoids are administered to pregnant women at risk for preterm delivery, to enhance fetal lung maturation. The benefit of this treatment is well established, however caution is necessary because of possible unwanted side effects on development of different organ systems, including the brain. Actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by corticosteroid receptors, which are highly expressed in the hippocampus, a brain structure involved in cognitive functions. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of a single antenatal dexamethasone treatment on the development of the mouse hippocampus. A clinically relevant dose of dexamethasone (0.4 mg/kg was administered to pregnant mice at embryonic day 15.5 and the hippocampus was analyzed from embryonic day 16 until adulthood. We investigated the effects of dexamethasone treatment on anatomical changes, apoptosis and proliferation in the hippocampus, hippocampal volume and on total body weight. Our results show that dexamethasone treatment reduced body weight and hippocampal volume transiently during development, but these effects were no longer detected at adulthood. Dexamethasone treatment increased the number of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus until birth, but postnatally no effects of dexamethasone treatment on apoptosis were found. During the phase with increased apoptosis, dexamethasone treatment reduced the number of proliferating cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. The number of proliferative cells was increased at postnatal day 5 and 10, but was decreased again at the adult stage. This latter long-term and negative effect of antenatal dexamethasone treatment on the number of proliferative cells in the hippocampus may have important implications for hippocampal network function.

  2. New possibilities for the treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Baranova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis (OP and a main cause of drug-induced OP. Fractures of the skeleton are registered in 30–50% of patients who have taken oral glucocorticoids (GCs for a long time, during which the frac- tures develop with the use of any daily GC dose and with higher bone mineral density (BMD than in postmenopausal OP. In patients who have taken oral GCs long or in high daily doses, decrease of BMD and low bone tissue quality leading to fractures are largely associated with the reduction of bone formation. This gives proof to the administration of antiosteoporotic agents that enhance the formation of bone during its remodeling. Teriparatide, a recombinant human parathyroid hormone, enhances osteoblast function, decreases the apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes, increases the differentiation of osteoblast precursors, and can prevent the negative effect of exogenous GCs on bone. According to clinical trials results, teriparatide treatment increases BMD and reduces the risk of vertebral fractures in patients who have taken oral GCs long. In accordance of the clinical recommendations for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of GIO, which have been developed by the Russian Osteoporosis Association jointly with the Association of Rheumatologists of Russia and the Russian Respiratory Society, teriparatide is the drug of first choice for the treatment of GIO in men and women at high risk for fractures (with the history of fragility fractures or having high FRAX 10-year absolute fracture risk. Teriparatide may be prescribed in case of previous antiosteoporotic treatment failure (new fractures occurring during treatment and/or continuing to decrease BMD, as well as when other drugs to treat OP are intolerable or when there are contraindications to their use. 

  3. Inflammation in Parkinson’s disease: Role of glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trinidad eHerrero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a major characteristic feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Studies in PDpatients show evidence of augmented levels of potent pro-inflammatory molecules e.g. TNF-α, iNOS,IL-1β whereas in experimental Parkinsonism it has been consistently demonstrated that dopaminergicneurons are particularly vulnerable to activated glia releasing these toxic factors. Recent geneticstudies point to the role of immune system in the etiology of PD, thus in combination withenvironmental factors, both peripheral and CNS-mediated immune responses could play importantroles in onset and progression of PD. Whereas microglia, astrocytes and infiltrating T cells are knownto mediate chronic inflammation, the roles of other immune-competent cells are less well understood.Inflammation is a tightly controlled process. One major effector system of regulation is HPA axis.Glucocorticoids released from adrenal glands upon stimulation of HPA axis, in response to either cellinjury or presence of pathogen, activate their receptor, GR. GR regulates inflammation both throughdirect transcriptional action on target genes and by indirectly inhibiting transcriptional activities oftranscriptional factors such as NF-kB, AP-1 or interferon regulatory factors. In PD patients, the HPAaxis is unbalanced and the cortisol levels are significantly increased, implying a deregulation of GRfunction in immune cells. In experimental Parkinsonism, the activation of microglial GR has a crucialeffect in diminishing microglial cell activation and reducing dopaminergic degeneration. Moreover,glucocorticoids are also known to regulate human brain vasculature as well as blood brain barrierpermeability, any dysfunction in their actions may influence infiltration of cytotoxic moleculesresulting in increased vulnerability of dopamine neurons in PD. Overall, deregulation ofGR actions is likely important in dopamine neuron degeneration throughestablishment of chronic inflammation.

  4. Covariation among glucocorticoid regulatory elements varies seasonally in house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Andrea L; Shimizu, Toru; Martin, Lynn B

    2013-03-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) help individuals cope with changes throughout life; one such change is the seasonal transition through life-history stages. Previous research shows that many animals exhibit seasonal variation in baseline GCs and GC responses to stressors, but the effects of season on other aspects of GC regulation have been less studied. Moreover, whether elements of GC regulation covary within individuals and whether covariation changes seasonally has been not been investigated. Evolutionarily, strong linkages among GC regulatory elements is predicted to enhance system efficiency and regulation, however may reduce the plasticity necessary to ensure appropriate responses under varying conditions. Here, we measured corticosterone (CORT), the major avian GC, at baseline, after exposure to a restraint stressor, and in response to dexamethasone (to assess negative feedback capacity) in wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus) during the breeding and molting seasons. We also measured hippocampal mRNA expression of the two receptors primarily responsible for CORT regulation: the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors (MR and GR, respectively). Consistent with previous studies, restraint-induced CORT was lower during molt than breeding, but negative-feedback was not influenced by season. Receptor gene expression was affected by season, however, as during breeding, the ratio of MR to GR expression was significantly lower than during molt. Furthermore, MR expression was negatively correlated with CORT released in response to a stressor, but only during molt. We found that individuals that most strongly up-regulated CORT in response to restraint were also most effective at reducing CORT via negative feedback; although these relationships were independent of season, they were stronger during molt. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Design and modular parallel synthesis of a MCR derived α-helix mimetic protein-protein interaction inhibitor scaffold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antuch, Walfrido; Menon, Sanjay; Chen, Quin-Zene; Lu, Yingchun; Sakamuri, Sukumar; Beck, Barbara; Schauer-Vukašinović, Vesna; Agarwal, Seema; Hess, Sibylle; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A terphenyl α-helix mimetic scaffold recognized to be capable of disrupting protein-protein interactions was structurally morphed into an easily amenable and versatile multicomponent reaction (MCR) backbone. The design, modular in-parallel library synthesis, initial cell based biological data, and

  6. Wood-mimetic skins prepared using horseradish peroxidase catalysis to induce surface wrinkling of chitosan film upon drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Hironori; Dote, Yuki; Okuda, Noriko; Sumita, Masato; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    We previously developed bio-based wrinkled surfaces induced by wood-mimetic skins upon drying in which microscopic wrinkles were fabricated on a chitosan (CS) film by immersing it in a phenolic acid solution, followed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed surface reaction and drying. However, the detailed structure of the resulting wood-mimetic skins, including crosslinking mode and thickness, has not been clarified due to the difficulty of the analysis. Here, we prepare wrinkled films using ferulic acid (FE), vanillic acid (VA), and homovanillic acid (HO) and characterize their structures to clarify the unknown characteristics of wood-mimetic skin. Chemical and structural analyses of wood-mimetic skins prepared using VA and HO indicate that the crosslinking structure in the skin is composed of ionic bonds between CS and an oligophenolic residue generated by the HRP-catalyzed reaction on the CS surface. Moreover, the quantity of these ionic bonds is related to the skin hardness and wrinkle size. Finally, SEM and TOF-SIMS analyses indicate that the skin thickness is on the submicron order (<200nm). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy and safety of canagliflozin when used in conjunction with incretin-mimetic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulcher, G.; Matthews, D. R.; Perkovic, V.; de Zeeuw, D.; Mahaffey, K. W.; Mathieu, C.; Woo, V.; Wysham, C.; Capuano, G.; Desai, M.; Shaw, W.; Vercruysse, F.; Meininger, G.; Neal, B.

    Aims: To assess the efficacy and safety of canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, in patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in the CANagliflozin cardioVascular Assessment Study (CANVAS) who were on an incretin mimetic [dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor or

  8. Loss of glucocorticoid receptor expression by DNA methylation prevents glucocorticoid induced apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Kay

    Full Text Available Human small cell lung cancer (SCLC is highly aggressive, and quickly develops resistance to therapy. SCLC cells are typically insensitive to glucocorticoids due to impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR expression. This is important as we have previously shown that expression of a GR transgene induces cell death in-vitro, and inhibits tumor growth in-vivo. However, the underlying mechanism for loss of GR expression is unknown. The SCLC cell line, DMS79, has low GR expression, compared to non-SCLC cell lines and normal bronchial epithelial cells. Retroviral GR expression in DMS79 cells caused activation of the apoptotic pathway as evidenced by marked induction of caspase-3 activity. Methylation analysis of the GR promoter revealed some methylation in the 1D, and 1E promoters of the GR gene, however the ubiquitous constitutively active 1C promoter was heavily methylated. In the 1C promoter there was a highly significant increase in DNA methylation in a panel of 14 human SCLC cell lines compared to a mixed panel of GR expressing, and non-expressing cell lines, and to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, within the panel of SCLC cell lines there was a significant negative correlation seen between methylation of the 1C promoter, and GR protein expression. Reversal of GR gene methylation with DNA methyltransferase inhibition caused increased GR mRNA and protein expression in SCLC but not non-SCLC cells. This resulted in increased Gc sensitivity, decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased caspase-3 activity in SCLC cells. These data suggest that DNA methylation decreases GR gene expression in human SCLC cells, in a similar manner to that for conventional tumor suppressor genes.

  9. Radiolabeling and preliminary biodistribution study of (99m)Tc-labeled antibody-mimetic scaffold protein repebody for initial clearance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Sajid; Rho, Jong Kook; Kang, Jung Ae; Lee, Joong-Jae; Kim, Jung Young; Nam, You Ree; Yun, Seong-Jae; Lee, Gyeong Hee; Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dong-Eun; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2017-11-15

    Antibody-mimetic proteins are intensively being developed for biomedical applications including tumor imaging and therapy. Among them, repebody is a new class of protein that consists of highly diverse leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules. Although all possible biomedical applications with repebody are ongoing, it's in vivo biodistribution and excretion pathway has not yet been explored. In this study, hexahistidine (His6)-tag bearing repebody (rEgH9) was labeled with [(99m)Tc]-tricarbonyl, and biodistribution was performed following intravenous (I.V.) or intraperitoneal (I.P.) injection. Repebody protein was radiolabeled with high radiolabeling efficiency (>90%) and radiolabeled compound was more than 99% pure after purification. Biodistribution data indicates radiotracer has a rapid clearance from blood and excreted through the kidneys for intravenous (I.V.) injection, but comparatively slow clearance for an intraperitoneal (I.P.) injection. SPECT-CT images were found to be in agreement with biodistribution data, high activity was found inside kidneys. The observed result for rapid blood clearance and renal excretion of repebody (rEgH9) provide useful information for the further development of therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Action of glucocorticoids on survival of nerve cells : Promoting neurodegeneration or neuroprotection?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, I.; Harkany, T.; Horvath, K.M.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    Extensive studies during the past decades provided compelling evidence that glucocorticoids (GCs) have the potential to affect the development, survival and death of neurones. These observations, however, reflect paradoxical features of GCs, as they may be critically involved in both

  11. Stress, glucocorticoids and memory: implications for treating fear-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique; Schwabe, Lars; Roozendaal, Benno

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones are crucially involved in modulating mnemonic processing of emotionally arousing experiences. They enhance the consolidation of new memories, including those that extinguish older memories, but impair the retrieval of information stored in long-term memory. As strong aversive memories lie at the core of several fear-related disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias, the memory-modulating properties of glucocorticoids have recently become of considerable translational interest. Clinical trials have provided the first evidence that glucocorticoid-based pharmacotherapies aimed at attenuating aversive memories might be helpful in the treatment of fear-related disorders. Here, we review important advances in the understanding of how glucocorticoids mediate stress effects on memory processes, and discuss the translational potential of these new conceptual insights.

  12. Basolateral Amygdala Interacts with Other Brain Regions in Regulating Glucocorticoid Effects on Different Memory Functions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NATHAN, SHEILA V; GRIFFITH, QYANA K; MCREYNOLDS, JAYME R; HAHN, EMILY L; ROOZENDAAL, BENNO

    2004-01-01

    ...‐dependently enhance long‐term memory consolidation. We previously reported that such glucocorticoid effects on memory consolidation rely on noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA...

  13. Endocannabinoids in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala Enhance Memory Consolidation and Enable Glucocorticoid Modulation of Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrizia Campolongo; Benno Roozendaal; Viviana Trezza; Daniela Hauer; Gustav Schelling; James L. McGaugh; Vincenzo Cuomo

    2009-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) modulates the consolidation of memories for emotionally arousing experiences, an effect that involves the activation of the glucocorticoid system...

  14. Increase in prophylaxis of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis by pharmacist feedback : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, C; de Vries, F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303546670; Vinks, T; Kooij, M J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357575695; van Staa, T P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304827762; Bijlsma, J W J; Egberts, A C G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162850050; Bouvy, M L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/153182210

    UNLABELLED: The aim of this study was to determine whether feedback by pharmacists to prescribers of patients eligible for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis prophylaxis would stimulate the prescribing of osteoporosis prophylaxis. The intervention did not significantly increase the prescribing of

  15. Regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by systemic factors including stress, glucocorticoids, sleep, and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Oomen, C.; van Dam, A.-M.; Czéh, B.; Gage, F.H.; Kempermann, G.; Song, H.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes and discusses the regulation of adult neurogenesis and hippocampal cellular plasticity by systemic factors. We focus on the role of stress, glucocorticoids, and related factors such as sleep deprivation and inflammation.

  16. Therapeutic misadventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, N J

    2010-10-01

    Therapeutic misadventure can be defined as an injury or an adverse event caused by medical management rather than by an underlying disease. Within the National Health Service there were over 86,000 reported adverse incidents in 2007. In the USA medication errors have been rated as the fourth highest cause of death. Unfortunately one of the greatest contributors to iatrogenic injury is human error. The potential types of misadventure are infinite. Medication errors are a major part of this, being responsible for over 70% of cases that cause serious harm. However, many medication errors caused by slips, lapses, technical errors and mistakes are preventable; intentional violations of safe operating procedures are not. While medication errors were tolerated by society in the past, the readiness to institute criminal proceedings against health-care professionals has increased greatly in the UK over the last decade. The medication process consists of writing prescriptions, dispensing the product, administering it and monitoring its effects. Prescription errors arise owing to incomplete information, lack of appropriate labelling, environmental factors and human blunders. Even with a perfect prescription the right medication must be dispensed and appropriately labelled. Dispensing errors are not uncommon and may be compounded by non-clinical considerations. Administration of a drug by injection is one of the most dangerous aspects of the medication process, especially in inexperienced hands. The final component of medication supply is monitoring the effect of the medication. With short courses of medication such monitoring is easy, but with long-term medication, particularly with potent drugs where the margin between efficacy and toxicity is small, active procedures may be required to ensure toxicity does not ensue. Despite the endeavour of health-care professions to stick to the rule of 'first, do no harm', in reality this is difficult to achieve all of the time. When

  17. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Juan; Liu, Meng-Ying; Li, Huan; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Han, Zhou; Wu, Hai-Yin; Jing, Xing; Zhou, Hai-Hui; Suh, Hoonkyo; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS) - nitric oxide (NO) pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  18. The Different Roles of Glucocorticoids in the Hippocampus and Hypothalamus in Chronic Stress-Induced HPA Axis Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Han, Zhou; Wu, Hai-Yin; Jing, Xing; Zhou, Hai-Hui; Suh, Hoonkyo; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS) - nitric oxide (NO) pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression. PMID:24831808

  19. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Zhu

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS - nitric oxide (NO pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  20. Risk of cardiovascular events in people prescribed glucocorticoids with iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome: cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is an increased risk of cardiovascular events in people who exhibit iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome during treatment with glucocorticoids. Design Cohort study. Setting 424 UK general practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database. Participants People prescribed systemic glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (n=547) and two comparison groups: those prescribed glucocorticoids and with no diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (n=3231) and those not prescribed systemic glucocorticoids (n=3282). Main outcome measures Incidence of cardiovascular events within a year after diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome or after a randomly selected date, and association between iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome and risk of cardiovascular events. Results 417 cardiovascular events occurred in 341 patients. Taking into account only the first event by patient (coronary heart disease n=177, heart failure n=101, ischaemic stroke n=63), the incidence rates of cardiovascular events per 100 person years at risk were 15.1 (95% confidence interval 11.8 to 18.4) in those prescribed glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome, 6.4 (5.5 to 7.3) in those prescribed glucocorticoids without a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome, and 4.1 (3.4 to 4.8) in those not prescribed glucocorticoids. In multivariate analyses adjusted for sex, age, intensity of glucocorticoid use, underlying disease, smoking status, and use of aspirin, diabetes drugs, antihypertensive drugs, lipid lowering drugs, or oral anticoagulant drugs, the relation between iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome and cardiovascular events was strong (adjusted hazard ratios 2.27 (95% confidence interval 1.48 to 3.47) for coronary heart disease, 3.77 (2.41 to 5.90) for heart failure, and 2.23 (0.96 to 5.17) for ischaemic cerebrovascular events). The adjusted hazard ratio for any cardiovascular event was 4

  1. Risk of cardiovascular events in people prescribed glucocorticoids with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Laurence; Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2012-07-30

    To investigate whether there is an increased risk of cardiovascular events in people who exhibit iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome during treatment with glucocorticoids. Cohort study. 424 UK general practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database. People prescribed systemic glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (n = 547) and two comparison groups: those prescribed glucocorticoids and with no diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (n = 3231) and those not prescribed systemic glucocorticoids (n = 3282). Incidence of cardiovascular events within a year after diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome or after a randomly selected date, and association between iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and risk of cardiovascular events. 417 cardiovascular events occurred in 341 patients. Taking into account only the first event by patient (coronary heart disease n = 177, heart failure n = 101, ischaemic stroke n = 63), the incidence rates of cardiovascular events per 100 person years at risk were 15.1 (95% confidence interval 11.8 to 18.4) in those prescribed glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, 6.4 (5.5 to 7.3) in those prescribed glucocorticoids without a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, and 4.1 (3.4 to 4.8) in those not prescribed glucocorticoids. In multivariate analyses adjusted for sex, age, intensity of glucocorticoid use, underlying disease, smoking status, and use of aspirin, diabetes drugs, antihypertensive drugs, lipid lowering drugs, or oral anticoagulant drugs, the relation between iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and cardiovascular events was strong (adjusted hazard ratios 2.27 (95% confidence interval 1.48 to 3.47) for coronary heart disease, 3.77 (2.41 to 5.90) for heart failure, and 2.23 (0.96 to 5.17) for ischaemic cerebrovascular events). The adjusted hazard ratio for any cardiovascular event was 4.16 (2.98 to 5.82) when the group prescribed glucocorticoids and with

  2. Clinical observation on 1g/L bromfenac sodium hydrate ophthalmic solution associated with glucocorticoid in high myopia after LASEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-He Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the efficacy and safety of 1g/L bromfenac sodium hydrate ophthalmic solution in the partial substitution of glucocorticoid after laser subepithelial keratomileusis(LASEK. METHODS: Totally 104 cases(208 eyeswere received LASEK, which were selected and divided into study group and control group. The study group were adopted 1g/L bromfenac sodium hydrate ophthalmic solution combined with tobramycin dexamethasone eye drops and fluorometholone eye drops, the control group were adopted tobramycin dexamethasone eye drops and fluorometholone eye drops. The changes of visual acuity and intraocular pressure of two groups were recorded before and after surgery, and the score of painness and the occurrence of haze were observed after surgery. RESULTS: At postoperative 1, 2, 3d, respectively, the pain score of the study group were 1.70±0.35, 1.25±0.34, 0.82±0.32, the pain score of the control group were 2.30±0.43, 1.68±0.44, 1.12±0.33, the differences were significant(PP>0.05, and the differences were not significant(P>0.05. At preoperative and postoperative 1, 2wk, 1 and 3mo of surgery, respectively, the intraocular pressure of study group were 17.33±1.58, 7.54±1.28, 7.23±1.58, 7.26±1.47, and 7.30±1.36 mmHg; the intraocular pressure of control group were 17.53±1.43,7.57±1.32,7.73±1.55,7.80±1.38,7.86±1.43 mmHg,the differences were not significant between before and at 2wk after surgery(P>0.05, the differences were significant between the two groups at 2wk, 1mo and 3mo(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION: It is safe and effective that 1g/L bromfenac sodium hydrate ophthalmic solution in the partial substitution of glucocorticoid after laser subepithelial keratomileusis. The patient has a lower intraocular pressure, has similar therapeutic effect as glucocorticoid in vision and antiinflammatory.

  3. Thyroxine mimetics

    OpenAIRE

    Randa F Salam

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones influence heart rate, serum lipids, metabolic rate, body weight, and multiple aspects of lipid, carbohydrate, protein, and mineral metabolism. Although increased thyroid hormone levels can improve serum lipid profiles and reduce fat, these positive effects are counterbalanced by the harmful effects on the heart, muscle, and bone. Thus, attempts to use thyroid hormones for cholesterol-lowering and weight loss purposes have so far been limited. However, over the past decade, th...

  4. Thyroxine mimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa F Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones influence heart rate, serum lipids, metabolic rate, body weight, and multiple aspects of lipid, carbohydrate, protein, and mineral metabolism. Although increased thyroid hormone levels can improve serum lipid profiles and reduce fat, these positive effects are counterbalanced by the harmful effects on the heart, muscle, and bone. Thus, attempts to use thyroid hormones for cholesterol-lowering and weight loss purposes have so far been limited. However, over the past decade, thyroid hormone analogs that are capable of uncoupling the beneficial effects from the deleterious effects have been developed. Such drugs could serve as powerful new tools to address two of the largest medical problems, namely atherosclerosis and obesity. Aggressive reduction in LDL-cholesterol by the use of statins is a cornerstone of preventive cardiovascular risk, but additional therapies to prevent atherosclerosis and its clinical sequelae are still needed. Thyromimetics selective for the liver or the thyroid hormone receptor isoform β1 constitute a novel approach to treat dyslipidemia. In preclinical studies, selective thyromimetics were clearly shown to reduce plasma cholesterol and protect from atherosclerosis through the upregulation of hepatic LDL receptor and promotion of the so-called reverse cholesterol transport. Notably, there is the first evidence from on-going clinical trials that selective thyromimetics may reduce plasma cholesterol in humans also. Most importantly, thyromimetics has a synergistic action when used in combination with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors. Animal data have further suggested that thyromimetics might be useful in the treatment of obesity, hepatic steatosis, and atherosclerosis.

  5. Do the interactions between glucocorticoids and sex hormones regulate the development of the Metabolic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià eAlemany

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is basically a maturity-onset disease. Typically, its manifestations begin to flourish years after the initial dietary or environmental aggression began. Since most hormonal, metabolic or defense responses are practically immediate, the procrastinated response don't seem justified. Only in childhood, the damages of the metabolic syndrome appear with minimal delay. Sex affects the incidence of the metabolic syndrome, but this is more an effect of timing than absolute gender differences, females holding better than males up to menopause, when the differences between sexes tend to disappear. The metabolic syndrome is related to an immune response, countered by a permanent increase in glucocorticoids, which keep the immune system at bay but also induce insulin resistance, alter the lipid metabolism, favor fat deposition, mobilize protein and decrease androgen synthesis. Androgens limit the operation of glucocorticoids, which is also partly blocked by estrogens, since they decrease inflammation (which enhances glucocorticoid release. These facts suggest that the appearance of the metabolic syndrome symptoms depends on the strength (i.e. levels of androgens and estrogens. The predominance of glucocorticoids and the full manifestation of the syndrome in men are favored by decreased androgen activity. Low androgens can be found in infancy, maturity, advanced age, or because of their inhibition by glucocorticoids (inflammation, stress, medical treatment. Estrogens decrease inflammation and reduce the glucocorticoid response. Low estrogen (infancy, menopause again allow the predominance of glucocorticoids and the manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It is postulated that the equilibrium between sex hormones and glucocorticoids may be a critical element in the timing of the manifestation of metabolic syndrome-related pathologies.

  6. Peripheral CLOCK Regulates Target-Tissue Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity in a Circadian Fashion in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.; Lambrou, George I.; Pavlaki, Aikaterini; Koide, Hisashi; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Kino, Tomoshige

    2011-01-01

    Context and Objective Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the “master” circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral “slave” counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. Design and Participants We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs) as non-synchronized controls. Results GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. Conclusions Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night. PMID:21980503

  7. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 regulates glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Stuart A

    2009-11-01

    Glucocorticoid excess is characterized by increased adiposity, skeletal myopathy, and insulin resistance, but the precise molecular mechanisms are unknown. Within skeletal muscle, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) converts cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone in rodents). We aimed to determine the mechanisms underpinning glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and indentify how 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors improve insulin sensitivity.

  8. Peripheral CLOCK regulates target-tissue glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity in a circadian fashion in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Charmandari

    Full Text Available Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the "master" circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral "slave" counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans.We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs as non-synchronized controls.GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo.Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night.

  9. Safety aspects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid in primary total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C C; Pitter, F T; Kehlet, H

    2017-01-01

    Background: Preoperative single high-dose glucocorticoid may have early outcome benefits in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA), but long-term safety aspects have not been evaluated. Methods: From October 2013, the departments reporting to the prospective Lundbeck Foundation....... Conclusions: In this detailed prospective cohort study, preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid administration was not associated with LOS >4 days, readmissions or infectious complications in TKA patients without contraindications....

  10. Glucocorticoid-dependent hypoadrenocorticism with thrombocytopenia and neutropenia mimicking sepsis in a Labrador retriever dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Elisabeth; Vargo, Cheryl; Myers, Sherry

    2011-10-01

    Glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism (GDH) with immune-mediated-neutropenia (IMN) and -thrombocytopenia (IMT) were diagnosed in a 3-year-old Labrador retriever dog. Glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism is rare and diagnostically challenging as clinical signs and laboratory abnormalities are often nonspecific. Immune-mediated cytopenias and other autoimmune disorders, as part of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome have been reported with hypoadrenocorticism in humans. This is the first reported case of hypoadrenocorticism and bicytopenia in a dog.

  11. Glucocorticoid-dependent hypoadrenocorticism with thrombocytopenia and neutropenia mimicking sepsis in a Labrador retriever dog

    OpenAIRE

    Snead, Elisabeth; Vargo, Cheryl; Myers, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism (GDH) with immune-mediated-neutropenia (IMN) and -thrombocytopenia (IMT) were diagnosed in a 3-year-old Labrador retriever dog. Glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism is rare and diagnostically challenging as clinical signs and laboratory abnormalities are often nonspecific. Immune-mediated cytopenias and other autoimmune disorders, as part of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome have been reported with hypoadrenocorticism in humans. This is ...

  12. Combining the antimesothelin immunotoxin SS1P with the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 induces cell death in SS1P-resistant pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollevoet, Kevin; Antignani, Antonella; Fitzgerald, David J; Pastan, Ira

    2014-01-01

    SS1P is an antimesothelin recombinant immunotoxin (RIT). Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines are resistant to SS1P, despite high mesothelin expression. The aim of this study is to examine whether combining SS1P and BH3-mimetic ABT-737 induces cell death in a panel of PDAC cell lines. ABT-737 binds and neutralizes several antiapoptotic BCL2 family proteins, but has a low affinity for the short-lived MCL1 and BCL2A1. SS1P inhibits protein synthesis, which has shown to downregulate MCL1. PDAC cell lines KLM-1, BxPc-3, and Panc 3.014 were resistant to SS1P or ABT-737 alone. Combining both compounds led to a significant increase in cell death. After 48 hours of treatment, cell death was observed in 92% of KLM-1, 55% of BxPc-3, and 23% of Panc 3.014 cells. Panc 3.014 had the highest number of mesothelin-binding sites (92×10(3)), followed by KLM-1 (58×10(3)) and BxPc-3 (3×10(3)). ABT-737 had no effect on SS1P internalization, but enhanced SS1P-induced protein synthesis inhibition significantly in KLM-1, to a lesser extent in BxPc-3, and very little in Panc 3.014. SS1P alone or in combination with ABT-737 downregulated MCL1 in KLM-1 and BxPc-3, but not in Panc 3.014. Similar observations were made for BCL2A1, which had the highest levels in Panc 3.014. Compared with KLM-1, Panc 3.014, and BxPc-3 also had lower proapoptotic BAK and a trend toward higher MCL1. Proapoptotic BAX was similar in KLM-1 and BxPc-3, but lower in Panc 3.014. In conclusion, combining SS1P with ABT-737 overcomes SS1P-resistance in PDAC, although to a variable extent. The efficacy of the combination is mainly associated with the RIT-associated inhibition of protein synthesis and the ability to downregulate MCL1 and BCL2A1, while levels of other key apoptotic proteins may also be important. Our data support the combination of an RIT and a BH3-mimetic, and identify factors that potentially limit the efficacy of such therapeutic approach.

  13. Effects of an Aβ-antibody fragment on Aβ aggregation and astrocytic uptake are modulated by apolipoprotein E and J mimetic peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Montoliu-Gaya

    Full Text Available Aβ-Immunotherapy has long been studied in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD, but not how other molecules involved in the disease can affect antibody performance. We previously designed an antibody fragment, scFv-h3D6, and showed that it precludes Aβ-induced cytotoxicity by withdrawing Aβ oligomers from the amyloid pathway towards a non-toxic, worm-like pathway. ScFv-h3D6 was effective at the behavioral, cellular, and molecular levels in the 3xTg-AD mouse model. Because scFv-h3D6 treatment restored apolipoprotein E (apoE and J (apoJ concentrations to non-pathological values, and Aβ internalization by glial cells was found to be decreased in the presence of these apolipoproteins, we now aimed to test the influence of scFv-h3D6 on Aβ aggregation and cellular uptake by primary human astrocytes in the presence of therapeutic apoE and apoJ mimetic peptides (MPs. Firstly, we demonstrated by CD and FTIR that the molecules used in this work were well folded. Next, interactions between apoE or apoJ-MP, scFv-h3D6 and Aβ were studied by CD. The conformational change induced by the interaction of Aβ with apoE-MP was much bigger than the induced with apoJ-MP, in line with the observed formation of protective worm-like fibrils by the scFv-h3D6/Aβ complex in the presence of apoJ-MP, but not of apoE-MP. ScFv-h3D6, apoJ-MP, and apoE-MP to a different extent reduced Aβ uptake by astrocytes, and apoE-MP partially interfered with the dramatic reduction by scFv-h3D6 while apoJ-MP had no effect on scFv-h3D6 action. As sustained Aβ uptake by astrocytes may impair their normal functions, and ultimately neuronal viability, this work shows another beneficence of scFv-h3D6 treatment, which is not further improved by the use of apoE or apoJ mimetic peptides.

  14. Contribution of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors to the chronotropic and hypertrophic actions of aldosterone in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, Michel F; Python, Magaly; Maturana, Andrés D

    2010-06-01

    Mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids have been involved in the genesis of ventricular arrhythmias associated with pathological heart hypertrophy. We previously observed, using isolated neonate rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, that both aldosterone (Aldo) and corticosterone induced in vitro a marked acceleration of the spontaneous contractions of these cells, a phenomenon dependent on the expression of the low threshold T-type calcium channels. Because both mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediated the chronotropic response to corticosteroids, we characterized the role of each receptor using spironolactone and mifepristone (RU-486) as specific antagonists. We first observed that GR antagonism, but not MR antagonism, completely disrupted the significant correlation existing between the level of T channel mRNA and the beating frequency; this difference could not be explained by a specific regulation of channel expression or activity by one of the receptors. Moreover, the chronotropic action of Aldo was additive to that of forskolin, a direct activator of the cAMP pathway. This additive response was selectively abolished upon GR inhibition. Finally, myocyte hypertrophy induced in vitro by Aldo was completely prevented by GR antagonism, whereas spironolactone had only a marginal effect. These results suggest that, in isolated rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, the activation of both MR and GR is necessary for a complete electrical remodeling and a maximal chronotropic response to corticosteroids. However, GR alone appears involved in the sensitization of the cells to the chronotropic regulation through the cAMP pathway and in the hypertrophic response to steroids. These observations have therapeutic implications given the fact that MR becomes a major target of pharmacological drugs in the clinical practice for preventing cardiac function decompensation and evolution toward heart failure and lethal arrhythmias.

  15. Cistrome-based Cooperation between Airway Epithelial Glucocorticoid Receptor and NF-κB Orchestrates Anti-inflammatory Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Vineela; Sasse, Sarah K; Altonsy, Mohammed O; Berman, Reena; Chu, Hong W; Phang, Tzu L; Gerber, Anthony N

    2016-06-10

    Antagonism of pro-inflammatory transcription factors by monomeric glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has long been viewed as central to glucocorticoid (GC) efficacy. However, the mechanisms and targets through which GCs exert therapeutic effects in diseases such as asthma remain incompletely understood. We previously defined a surprising cooperative interaction between GR and NF-κB that enhanced expression of A20 (TNFAIP3), a potent inhibitor of NF-κB. Here we extend this observation to establish that A20 is required for maximal cytokine repression by GCs. To ascertain the global extent of GR and NF-κB cooperation, we determined genome-wide occupancy of GR, the p65 subunit of NF-κB, and RNA polymerase II in airway epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone, TNF, or both using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing. We found that GR recruits p65 to dimeric GR binding sites across the genome and discovered additional regulatory elements in which GR-p65 cooperation augments gene expression. GR targets regulated by this mechanism include key anti-inflammatory and injury response genes such as SERPINA1, which encodes α1 antitrypsin, and FOXP4, an inhibitor of mucus production. Although dexamethasone treatment reduced RNA polymerase II occupancy of TNF targets such as IL8 and TNFAIP2, we were unable to correlate specific binding sequences for GR or occupancy patterns with repressive effects on transcription. Our results suggest that cooperative anti-inflammatory gene regulation by GR and p65 contributes to GC efficacy, whereas tethering interactions between GR and p65 are not universally required for GC-based gene repression. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. The selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator CORT108297 restores faulty hippocampal parameters in Wobbler and corticosterone-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Maria; Gonzalez Deniselle, Maria Claudia; Hunt, Hazel; de Kloet, E Ronald; De Nicola, Alejandro F

    2014-09-01

    Mutant Wobbler mice are models for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In addition to spinal cord degeneration, Wobbler mice show high levels of blood corticosterone, hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and abnormalities of the hippocampus. Hypersecretion of glucocorticoids increase hippocampus vulnerability, a process linked to an enriched content of glucocorticoid receptors (GR). Hence, we studied if a selective GR antagonist (CORT108297) with null affinity for other steroid receptors restored faulty hippocampus parameters of Wobbler mice. Three months old genotyped Wobbler mice received s.c. vehicle or CORT108297 during 4 days. We compared the response of doublecortin (DCX)+ neuroblasts in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), NeuN+ cells in the hilus of the DG, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)+ astrocytes and the phenotype of Iba1+ microglia in CORT108297-treated and vehicle-treated Wobblers. The number of DCX+ cells in Wobblers was lower than in control mice, whereas CORT108297 restored this parameter. After CORT108297 treatment, Wobblers showed diminished astrogliosis, and changed the phenotype of Iba1+ microglia from an activated to a quiescent form. These changes occurred without alterations in the hypercorticosteronemia or the number of NeuN+ cells of the Wobblers. In a separate experiment employing control NFR/NFR mice, treatment with corticosterone for 5 days reduced DCX+ neuroblasts and induced astrocyte hypertrophy, whereas treatment with CORT108297 antagonized these effects. Normalization of neuronal progenitors, astrogliosis and microglial phenotype by CORT108297 indicates the usefulness of this antagonist to normalize hippocampus parameters of Wobbler mice. Thus, CORT108297 opens new therapeutic options for the brain abnormalities of ALS patients and hyperadrenocorticisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Strong association of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 with peripheral and adipose tissue inflammation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner-Reiter, M H; Kiefer, F; Zeyda, M; Stulnig, T M; Luger, A; Vila, G

    2015-07-01

    The serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) is an early transcriptional target of glucocorticoids and is activated via insulin. Here we investigate the regulation of SGK1 expression in human obesity, diet-induced murine obesity and human monocytic cell line THP-1 monocytes. SGK1 expression was studied in subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue (AT) of 20 morbidly obese and 20 age- and gender-matched non-obese controls in murine diet-induced obesity and the THP-1 cell line. The regulation of SGK1 by inflammatory signals was tested in THP-1 cells. Murine diet-induced obesity is associated with a significant upregulation of Sgk1 in gonadal AT. Sgk1 expression is highest in the macrophage-rich stromal vascular fraction and lower in adipocytes. In humans, AT SGK1 is predominantly expressed in CD14(+) macrophages and significantly upregulated in omental and subcutaneous AT of obese subjects. SGK1 mRNA expression in both omental and subcutaneous AT correlates with body mass index, circulating leptin and C-reactive protein, and the local expression of inflammatory markers including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α. The expression of SGK1 in THP-1 cells is upregulated by inflammatory signals, such as lipopolysaccharide and tumour necrosis factor-α, as well as during the induction of monocyte-to-macrophage maturation. Our data present the first link between SGK1 and obesity-associated inflammation. SGK1 expression is stimulated in response to inflammatory signals and increased in AT macrophages. The characterisation of SGK1 functions in obesity and immunity may help identify potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of obesity.

  18. Peripheral and Central Glucocorticoid Signaling Contributes to Positive Energy Balance in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba, Tássia Karin; Galindo, Lígia Cristina Monteiro; Ferraz-Pereira, Kelli Nogueira; da Silva Aragão, Raquel; Toscano, Ana Elisa; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul

    2017-06-01

    The obesity epidemic has been the target of several studies to understand its etiology. The pathophysiological processes that take to obesity generally relate to the rupture of energy balance. This imbalance can result from environmental and/or endogenous events. Among the endogenous events, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which promotes stress response via glucocorticoid activity, is considered a modulator of energy balance. However, it remains controversial whether the increase in plasma levels of glucocorticoids results in a positive or negative energy balance. Furthermore, there are no studies comparing different routes of administration of glucocorticoids in this context. Here, we investigated the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of a specific agonist for glucocorticoid receptors on food intake and energy expenditure in rats. Sixty-day old rats were treated with i.p. or i.c.v. dexamethasone. Food intake and satiety were evaluated, as well as locomotor activity in order to determine energy expenditure. Both i.p. and i.c.v. dexamethasone increased food intake and decreased energy expenditure. Moreover, i.c.v. dexamethasone delayed the onset of satiety. Together, these results confirm that central glucocorticoid signaling promotes a positive energy balance and supports the role of the glucocorticoid system as the underlying cause of psychological stress-induced obesity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Effects of a single glucocorticoid injection on propylene glycol-treated cows with clinical ketosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Drift, Saskia G A; Houweling, Martin; Bouman, Marina; Koets, Ad P; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Nielen, Mirjam; Jorritsma, Ruurd

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the metabolic effects of glucocorticoids when administered to propylene glycol-treated cows with clinical ketosis. Clinical ketosis was defined by depressed feed intake and milk production, and a maximal score for acetoacetate in urine. All cows received 250 mL oral propylene glycol twice daily for 3 days and were randomly assigned to a single intramuscular injection with sterile isotonic saline solution (n = 14) or dexamethasone-21-isonicotinate (n = 17). Metabolic blood variables were monitored for 6 days and adipose tissue variables for 3 days. β-Hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations in blood decreased in all cows during treatment, but were lower in glucocorticoid-treated cows. Cows treated with glucocorticoids had higher plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, whereas concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids, 3-methylhistidine and growth hormone were unaffected. mRNA expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, BHBA receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type γ in adipose tissue was not affected. This shows that lipolytic effects do not appear to be important in ketotic cows when glucocorticoids are combined with PG. Plasma 3-methyl histidine concentrations were similar in both groups, suggesting that glucocorticoids did not increase muscle breakdown and that the greater rise in plasma glucose in glucocorticoid-treated cows may not be due to increased supply of glucogenic amino acids from muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shoko, E-mail: satosho@rs.tus.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Shirakawa, Hitoshi, E-mail: shirakah@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Tomita, Shuhei, E-mail: tomita@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Tohkin, Masahiro, E-mail: tohkin@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Medical Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 267-8603 (Japan); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: gonzalef@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Komai, Michio, E-mail: mkomai@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  1. Systemic glucocorticoid therapy: risk factors for reported adverse events and beliefs about the drug. A cross-sectional online survey of 820 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Clément; Fardet, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Despite systemic glucocorticoids are widely used, risk factors for most of their adverse events and patients' beliefs about the drug are poorly known. An online survey was conducted between February and July 2013 through the website www.cortisone-info.fr . Demographic (e.g., age, gender) and therapeutic (e.g., type of prescribed glucocorticoid, duration of prescription) data were collected. Patients were further asked to answer questions about glucocorticoid-induced adverse events and their beliefs about efficacy and safety of the drug. Risk factors for adverse events and efficacy/safety beliefs were assessed using multivariate logistic regression models. Eight hundred twenty questionnaires were analyzed (women 74.3 %; median age 49 [34-62] years, median equivalent prednisone dosage 20 [10-48] mg/day). The most frequently reported adverse events were insomnia (n = 477, 58.2 %), mood disturbances (n = 411, 50.1 %), hyperphagia (n = 402, 49.0 %), and lipodystrophy (n = 387, 47.2 %). The risk of some adverse events (e.g., weight gain, easy bruising) increased with the duration of exposure while other adverse events (e.g., insomnia, mood disorders, epigastric pain) were present since the first days of exposure. The risk of hirsutism, altered wound healing, mood disturbances, weight gain, lipodystrophy, hyperphagia, and epigastric pain decreased with age. Cutaneous disorders, morphological changes, and epigastric pain were more frequently reported by women. Interestingly, patients prescribed prednisolone reported less adverse events than those prescribed prednisone. No adverse event, demographical or prescribing characteristics were associated with beliefs about efficacy while factors associated with safety concerns were age (OR: 1.2 [1.1-1.3] per 10-year increase), osteoporosis (OR: 3.3 [1.4-7.9]), easy bruising (OR: 1.6 [1.1-2.3]), insomnia (OR: 1.7 [1.2-2.4]), and weight gain (OR: 1.6 [1.1-2.2]). These results may help clinicians to adapt information

  2. Mucoadhesion and mucosa-mimetic materials--A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Michael T; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V

    2015-11-30

    Mucoadhesion describes an attractive interaction between dosage form and mucosal membrane. The evaluation of mucoadhesive excipients often requires the use of ex vivo mucosal tissues taken from laboratory animals. These can be difficult to source, highly heterogeneous, and require the use of animal products. Thus, from both a user-convenience and ethical point-of-view, it is desirable to produce a synthetic alternative to these tissues-a mucosa-mimetic material. In this mini-review, the use of alternative materials to test the performance of mucoadhesives is reviewed and discussed. There is a surprising prevalence of the use of mucosa-mimics in the literature, which hitherto has not been compiled and compared. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The mimetic finite difference method for the Landau-Lifshitz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugenia; Lipnikov, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz equation describes the dynamics of the magnetization inside ferromagnetic materials. This equation is highly nonlinear and has a non-convex constraint (the magnitude of the magnetization is constant) which poses interesting challenges in developing numerical methods. We develop and analyze explicit and implicit mimetic finite difference schemes for this equation. These schemes work on general polytopal meshes which provide enormous flexibility to model magnetic devices with various shapes. A projection on the unit sphere is used to preserve the magnitude of the magnetization. We also provide a proof that shows the exchange energy is decreasing in certain conditions. The developed schemes are tested on general meshes that include distorted and randomized meshes. The numerical experiments include a test proposed by the National Institute of Standard and Technology and a test showing formation of domain wall structures in a thin film.

  4. Synthetic, structural mimetics of the β-hairpin flap of HIV-1 protease inhibit enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Jay; Chen, Shen-En; Fenstermacher, Katherine J; Naser-Tavakolian, Aurash; Reingewertz, Tali; Salmo, Rosene; Lee, Christian; Williams, Emori; Raje, Mithun; Sundberg, Eric; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Freire, Ernesto; Fletcher, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Small-molecule mimetics of the β-hairpin flap of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) were designed based on a 1,4-benzodiazepine scaffold as a strategy to interfere with the flap-flap protein-protein interaction, which functions as a gated mechanism to control access to the active site. Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggested our small-molecules are competitive inhibitors, which indicates the mode of inhibition is through binding the active site or sterically blocking access to the active site and preventing flap closure, as designed. More generally, a new bioactive scaffold for HIV-1PR inhibition has been discovered, with the most potent compound inhibiting the protease with a modest K(i) of 11 μM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A five-coordinate copper complex with superoxide dismutase mimetic activity from Streptomyces antibioticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechinger, T; Hiller, W; Maichle, C; Strähle, J; Weser, U

    1988-01-01

    A Cu(II) complex of desferrithiocin from Streptomyces antibioticus was prepared and characterized. The first shell atoms, including one nitrogen and four oxygens, were arranged around the copper in a square-planar pyramide. Due to the axially Jahn-Teller-distorted Cu-O distance at 224.7 pm, a distinct Cu2Zn2superoxide dismutase mimetic activity was measured. The Cu-complex survived 600 microM bovine serum albumin and the thermodynamic stability (pK = 17.4) was not very different from that of Cu-EDTA. The electronic absorption properties, circular dichroism and electron paramagnetism were in accordance with those of the type-II copper species.

  6. A novel anti-inflammatory role of NCAM-derived mimetic peptide, FGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Downer, Eric J; Cowley, Thelma R; Lyons, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    as a novel anti-inflammatory agent. Administration of FGL to aged rats attenuated the increased expression of markers of activated microglia, the increase in pro-inflammatory interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and the impairment in long-term potentiation (LTP). We report that the age-related increase in microglial......Age-related cognitive deficits in hippocampus are correlated with neuroinflammatory changes, typified by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. We provide evidence that the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-derived mimetic peptide, FG loop (FGL), acts...... CD200 in vitro. We provide evidence that the increase in CD200 is reliant on IL-4-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction. These findings provide the first evidence of a role for FGL as an anti-inflammatory agent and identify a mechanism by which FGL controls...

  7. Altered placental development in undernourished rats: role of maternal glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun-Hung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maternal undernutrition (MUN during pregnancy may lead to fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, which itself predisposes to adult risk of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. IUGR may stem from insufficient maternal nutrient supply or reduced placental nutrient transfer. In addition, a critical role for maternal stress-induced glucocorticoids (GCs has been suggested to contribute to both IUGR and the ensuing risk of adult metabolic syndrome. While GC-induced fetal organ defects have been examined, there have been few studies on placental responses to MUN-induced maternal stress. Therefore, we hypothesize that 50% MUN associates with increased maternal GC levels and decreased placental HSD11B. This in turn leads to decreased placental and fetal growth, hence the need to investigate nutrient transporters. We measured maternal serum levels of corticosterone, and the placental basal and labyrinth zone expression of glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B 1 (HSD11B-1 predominantly activates cortisone to cortisol and 11-dehydrocorticosterone (11-DHC to corticosterone, although can sometimes drive the opposing (inactivating reaction, and HSD11B-2 (only inactivates and converts corticosterone to 11-DHC in rodents in control and MUN rats at embryonic day 20 (E20. Moreover, we evaluated the expression of nutrient transporters for glucose (SLC2A1, SLC2A3 and amino acids (SLC38A1, 2, and 4. Our results show that MUN dams displayed significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels compared to control dams. Further, a reduction in fetal and placental weights was observed in both the mid-horn and proximal-horn positions. Notably, the placental labyrinth zone, the site of feto-maternal exchange, showed decreased expression of HSD11B1-2 in both horns, and increased HSD11B-1 in proximal-horn placentas, but no change in NR3C1. The reduced placental GCs catabolic capacity was accompanied by downregulation of SLC2A3, SLC

  8. Iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism in a cat following a short therapeutic course of methylprednisolone acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferasin, L

    2001-06-01

    Iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism (or iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome) is an adrenal disorder that may result from long-term administration of glucocorticoids for therapeutic purposes, most often given to treat allergic or immune-mediated disorders. Prolonged treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids can suppress hypothalamic corticotrophin releasing hormone and plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), thus causing a functional inactivity of the adrenal cortex. The result is a clinical syndrome of hyperadrenocorticism but with basal and ACTH-stimulated plasma cortisol concentrations that are consistent with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease). Whilst iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism is relatively frequent in dogs, the diagnosis of iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism in cats is very uncommon because this species has been found to be remarkably resistant to prolonged administration of glucocorticoids. To the author's knowledge, there are only two published clinical cases of feline iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. This report describes a case of iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism in a cat, and shows how normalisation of the adrenal function was achieved with supportive treatment and withdrawal of glucocorticoid administration. Copyright 2001 European Society of Feline Medicine.

  9. Emerging Role of Corticosteroid Binding Globulin in Glucocorticoid-driven Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre Moisan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs are critical for survival since they ensure energy supply necessary to the body in an ever challenging environment. GCs are known to act on appetite, glucose metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and storage. However, in order to be beneficial to the body, GC levels should be maintained in an optimal window of concentrations. Not surprisingly, conditions of GC excess or deficiency, e.g. Cushing’s syndrome or Addison’s disease are associated with severe alterations of energy metabolism. Corticosteroid Binding Globulin (CBG, through its high specific affinity for GCs, plays a critical role in regulating plasma GC levels. Genetic studies in various species including humans have revealed that CBG is the major factor influencing inter-individual genetic variability of plasma GC levels, both in basal and stress conditions. Some, but not all of these genetic studies have also provided data linking CBG levels to body composition. The examination of CBG-deficient mice submitted to hyperlipidic diets unveiled specific roles for CBG in lipid storage and metabolism. The importance of CBG is even more striking when animals are submitted to high-fat diet combined to chronic stress, mimicking our occidental lifestyle. An influence of CBG on appetite has not been reported but remains to be more finely analyzed. Overall, a role of CBG in GC-driven metabolic disorders is emerging in recent studies. Although subtle, the influence of CBG in these diseases could open the way to new therapeutic interventions since CBG is easily accessible in the blood.

  10. Glucocorticoids Have Opposing Effects on Liver Fibrosis in Hepatic Stellate and Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kang Ho; Lee, Jae Man; Zhou, Ying; Harpavat, Sanjiv; Moore, David D

    2016-08-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing process that is protective in the short term, but prolonged fibrotic responses lead to excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components that suppresses hepatocyte regeneration, resulting in permanent liver damage. Upon liver damage, nonparenchymal cells including immune cells and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have crucial roles in the progression and regression of liver fibrosis. Here, we report differential roles of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), acting in immune cells and HSCs, in liver fibrosis. In the carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxin-induced fibrosis model, both steroidal and nonsteroidal GR ligands suppressed expression of fibrotic genes and decreased extracellular matrix deposition but also inhibited immune cell infiltration and exacerbated liver injury. These counteracting effects of GR ligands were dissociated in mice with conditional GR knockout in immune cells (GR(LysM)) or HSC (GR(hGFAP)): the impacts of dexamethasone on immune cell infiltration and liver injury were totally blunted in GR(LysM) mice, whereas the suppression of fibrotic gene expression was diminished in GR(hGFAP) mice. The effect of GR activation in HSC was further confirmed in the LX-2 HSC cell line, in which antifibrotic effects were mediated by GR ligand inhibition of Sma and mad-related protein 3 (SMAD3) expression. We conclude that GR has differential roles in immune cells and HSCs to modulate liver injury and liver fibrosis. Specific activation of HSC-GR without alteration of GR activity in immune cells provides a potential therapeutic approach to treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  11. Separating the Anti-Inflammatory and Diabetogenic Effects of Glucocorticoids Through LXRβ Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rucha; Magomedova, Lilia; Tsai, Ricky; Angers, Stéphane; Orellana, Arturo; Cummins, Carolyn L

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs), including dexamethasone (DEX), are powerful anti-inflammatory drugs. Long-term use of GCs, however, can result in metabolic side effects such as hyperglycemia, hepatosteatosis, and insulin resistance. The GC receptor (GR) and liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ) regulate overlapping genes involved in gluconeogenesis and inflammation. We have previously shown that Lxrβ-/- mice are resistant to the diabetogenic effects of DEX but still sensitive to its immunosuppressive actions. To determine whether this finding could be exploited for therapeutic intervention, we treated mice with GSK2033, a pan-LXR antagonist, alone or combined with DEX. GSK2033 suppressed GC-induced gluconeogenic gene expression without affecting immune-responsive GR target genes. The suppressive effect of GSK2033 on DEX-induced gluconeogenic genes was specific to LXRβ, was liver cell autonomous, and occurred in a target gene-specific manner. Compared with DEX treatment alone, the coadministration of GSK2033 with DEX decreased the recruitment of GR and its accessory factors MED1 and C/EBPβ to the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter. However, GSK2033 had no effect on DEX-mediated suppression of inflammatory genes expressed in the liver or in mouse primary macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharides. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that the gluconeogenic and immunosuppressive actions of GR activation can be mechanistically dissociated by pharmacological antagonism of LXRβ. Treatment with an LXRβ antagonist could allow the safer use of existing GC drugs in patients requiring chronic dosing of anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  12. The 2-phenylbenzotriazole-type water pollutant PBTA-2 has cytochalasin B-mimetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, A; Sakamoto, H; Tadokoro, S; Tada, A; Terao, Y; Nukaya, H; Wakabayashi, K

    2000-01-24

    The 2-phenylbenzotriazole (PBTA)-type water pollutant, 2-[2-(acetylamino)-4-[N-(2-cyanoethyl)ethylamino]-5-methoxyphenyl]-5- amino-7-bromo-4-chloro-2H-benzotriazole (PBTA-2), has been recently identified in samples from the Nishitakase River in Kyoto, Japan, and shows potent mutagenic activities in Salmonella typhimurium in the presence of a microsomal metabolizing system (S9 mix). In the present study, we conducted the in vitro micronucleus (MN) test on PBTA-2 in the absence and presence of S9 mix in two Chinese hamster cell lines, CHL and V79-MZ. In the MN test, PBTA-2 was weakly positive in CHL cells and strongly positive in V79-MZ cells. Because the positive results were accompanied by a statistically significant increase in the number of polynuclear (PN) and/or mitotic (M) cells, we examined treated cells in metaphase to see if numerical chromosome aberrations were being induced. We found that PBTA-2 induces polyploidy in both CHL and V79-MZ cells. A detailed analysis of MN preparations showed that in CHL cells, PBTA-2 predominantly induces equal-sized binucleated cells. Rhodamine phalloidin staining revealed that PBTA-2 causes actin filament abnormalities in both cell lines similar to those caused by cytochalasin B. Cytochalasin B induced PN cells predominantly and dose dependently, and almost all the cells were equal-sized and binucleate. The results suggest that PBTA-2 has cytochalasin B-mimetic activity, although agents affecting actin filaments, such as cytochalasins, phallotoxins and chloropeptide, have been derived only from molds so far. This study also suggests that our MN test protocol may be used to identify chemicals that have cytochalasin B-mimetic activity as well as those that induce numerical aberrations.

  13. A novel approach to oral apoA-I mimetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Navab, Mohamad; Hough, Greg; Gao, Feng; Meriwether, David; Grijalva, Victor; Springstead, James R; Palgnachari, Mayakonda N; Namiri-Kalantari, Ryan; Su, Feng; Van Lenten, Brian J; Wagner, Alan C; Anantharamaiah, G M; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Farias-Eisener, Robin; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Fogelman, Alan M

    2013-04-01

    Transgenic tomato plants were constructed with an empty vector (EV) or a vector expressing an apoA-I mimetic peptide, 6F. EV or 6F tomatoes were harvested, lyophilized, ground into powder, added to Western diet (WD) at 2.2% by weight, and fed to LDL receptor-null (LDLR(-/-)) mice at 45 mg/kg/day 6F. After 13 weeks, the percent of the aorta with lesions was 4.1 ± 4%, 3.3 ± 2.4%, and 1.9 ± 1.4% for WD, WD + EV, and WD + 6F, respectively (WD + 6F vs. WD, P = 0.0134; WD + 6F vs. WD + EV, P = 0.0386; WD + EV vs. WD, not significant). While body weight did not differ, plasma serum amyloid A (SAA), total cholesterol, triglycerides, and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels were less in WD + 6F mice; P < 0.0295. HDL cholesterol and paroxonase-1 activity (PON) were higher in WD + 6F mice (P = 0.0055 and P = 0.0254, respectively), but not in WD + EV mice. Plasma SAA, total cholesterol, triglycerides, LPA, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) levels positively correlated with lesions (P < 0.0001); HDL cholesterol and PON were inversely correlated (P < 0.0001). After feeding WD + 6F: i) intact 6F was detected in small intestine (but not in plasma); ii) small intestine LPA was decreased compared with WD + EV (P < 0.0469); and iii) small intestine LPA 18:2 positively correlated with the percent of the aorta with lesions (P < 0.0179). These data suggest that 6F acts in the small intestine and provides a novel approach to oral apoA-I mimetic therapy.

  14. Apolipoprotein A-I and A-I mimetic peptides: a role in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getz GS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Godfrey S Getz, Catherine A ReardonThe University of Chicago, Department of Pathology, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the westernized world. Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Atherosclerosis is a slowly evolving chronic inflammatory disorder involving the intima of large and medium sized arteries that is initiated in response to high plasma lipid levels, especially LDL. Cells of both the innate and adaptive immunity are involved in this chronic inflammation. Although high plasma LDL levels are a major contributor to most stages of the evolution of atherosclerosis, HDL and its major protein apoA-I possess properties that attenuate and may even reverse atherosclerosis. Two major functions are the ability to induce the efflux of cholesterol from cells, particularly lipid-loaded macrophages, in the artery wall for transfer to the liver, a process referred to as reverse cholesterol transport, and the ability to attenuate the pro-inflammatory properties of LDL. The removal of cellular cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages may also be anti-inflammatory. One of the most promising therapies to enhance the anti-atherogenic, anti-inflammatory properties of HDL is apoA-I mimetic peptides. Several of these peptides have been shown to promote cellular cholesterol efflux, attenuate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages, and to attenuate the pro-inflammatory properties of LDL. This latter effect may be related to their high affinity for oxidized lipids present in LDL. This review discusses the functional properties of the peptides and their effect on experimental atherosclerosis and the results of initial clinical studies in humans.Keywords: apoA-I, mimetic peptides, HDL, anti-inflammatory, atherosclerosis

  15. Clinical significance of peripheral blood lymphocyte sensitivity to glucocorticoids for the differentiation of high-risk patients with decreased allograft function after glucocorticoid withdrawal in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhetaer, Gulimire; Takeuchi, Hironori; Unezaki, Sakae; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Iwamoto, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Yuki; Shimazu, Motohide; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2014-08-01

    A reliable biomarker to differentiate high-risk recipients who will experience a decrease in allograft function after glucocorticoid withdrawal has not been established in renal transplantation. We examined the clinical significance of peripheral blood lymphocyte sensitivity to glucocorticoids in vitro for the differentiation of the high-risk patients after glucocorticoid reduction/withdrawal in renal transplant recipients. The study included 44 renal transplant recipients with stable allograft function. Peripheral lymphocyte responses to suppressive effects of cortisol, methylprednisolone, cyclosporine, and tacrolimus in mitogen assay procedures in vitro were examined. Clinical outcome after glucocorticoid reduction/withdrawal was retrospectively compared between recipients with lymphocytes normally sensitive to the drugs and those with hyposensitivity. The receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was undertaken for setting the cutoff IC50 values of the drugs against the T cell mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation to differentiate the high-risk recipients with decreased allograft function after glucocorticoid withdrawal. The median (range) IC50 value for cortisol in the recipients who showed decreased renal function due to glucocorticoid withdrawal was 10,000 (570.9-72,279.3) ng/mL (n = 9), which was significantly higher than the value of 351.6 (2.0-10,000) ng/mL in the recipients who had not experienced glucocorticoid withdrawal symptoms (n = 35) (P significantly higher than the value of 13.8 (0.7-1000) ng/mL in the recipients who had not experienced glucocorticoid withdrawal symptoms (n = 30) (P significant difference in the median IC50 values of cyclosporine and tacrolimus between the 2 recipient subgroups. The ROC curve analyses for the IC50 values of the immunosuppressive drugs estimated the cutoff value of cortisol and methylprednisolone to be 3580.0 and 21.5 ng/mL, respectively. The ROC AUCs for cortisol and methylprednisolone were 0

  16. Distinct modifications of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation and FKBPs by lipopolysaccharide in depressive female and male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkic, Zeljka; Francija, Ester; Petrovic, Zorica; Franic, Dusanka; Lukic, Iva; Mitic, Milos; Adzic, Miroslav

    2017-09-01

    Inflammation plays a critical role in pathogenesis of depression and can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Accordingly, in this study we investigated the role of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor in mediating the effects of inflammation on behaviour of female and male Wistar rats. We studied the effects of lipopolysaccharide on the levels of glucocorticoid receptors and its co-chaperones FK506 binding protein 52 and FK506 binding protein 51, the levels of glucocorticoid receptor phospho-isoforms, pGR-232 and pGR-246, and glucocorticoid receptor up-stream kinases. In order to assess transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid receptor, we measured mRNA levels of several glucocorticoid receptor-regulated genes. We demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide induced depressive-like behaviour and elevated serum corticosterone in both sexes. However, it affected glucocorticoid receptor signalling in the nucleus of females and males differently - in females it elevated levels of glucocorticoid receptors, pGR-246 and FK506 binding protein 52, while in males it decreased levels of glucocorticoid receptor, both co-chaperons and pGR-246. Alterations in pGR-246 were associated with alterations of c-Jun N-terminal kinases. Altered nuclear levels of total glucocorticoid receptors and pGR-246 were accompanied by sex-specific reduction in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and sex-unspecific reduction in the expression of p11 and glucocorticoid receptor genes. These alterations may ultimately affect different glucocorticoid receptor -associated processes involved in depressive-like behaviour in males and females.

  17. DMPD: Glucocorticoids and the innate immune system: crosstalk with the toll-likereceptor signaling network. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17576036 Glucocorticoids and the innate immune system: crosstalk with the toll-like...07 May 13. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Glucocorticoids and the innate immune system: crosstalk with t...he toll-likereceptor signaling network. PubmedID 17576036 Title Glucocorticoids and the innate immune syst...em: crosstalk with the toll-likereceptor signaling network. Authors Chinenov Y, Rog

  18. Duration of Suppression of Adrenal Steroids after Glucocorticoid Administration

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    John S. Fuqua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocortisone has long been the treatment of choice for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH. However, treatment with this medication remains problematic. Patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency CAH have significant diurnal variation in the secretion of 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP. When considering treatment strategies, this variation must be considered along with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of exogenous glucocorticoids. Orally administered hydrocortisone is highly bioavailable, but it has a short time to maximum concentration (Tmax⁡ and half life (T1/2. While prednisone has a somewhat longer Tmax⁡ and T1/2, they remain relatively short. There have been several studies of the pharmacodynamics of hydrocortisone. We present data indicating that the maximum effect of hydrocortisone in CAH patients is seen 3 hours after a morning dose. After an evening dose, suppression of adrenal hormones continues until approximately 0500 the next day. In both situations, however, there is a large degree of intersubject variability. These data are consistent with earlier published studies. Use of alternate specimen types, possibly in conjunction with delayed release hydrocortisone preparations under development, may allow the practitioner to design a medication regimen that provides improved control of androgen secretion. Whatever dosing strategy is used, clinical judgment is required to ensure the best outcome.

  19. Duration of Suppression of Adrenal Steroids after Glucocorticoid Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee PeterA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocortisone has long been the treatment of choice for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH. However, treatment with this medication remains problematic. Patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency CAH have significant diurnal variation in the secretion of 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP. When considering treatment strategies, this variation must be considered along with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of exogenous glucocorticoids. Orally administered hydrocortisone is highly bioavailable, but it has a short time to maximum concentration ( and half life (. While prednisone has a somewhat longer and , they remain relatively short. There have been several studies of the pharmacodynamics of hydrocortisone. We present data indicating that the maximum effect of hydrocortisone in CAH patients is seen 3 hours after a morning dose. After an evening dose, suppression of adrenal hormones continues until approximately 0500 the next day. In both situations, however, there is a large degree of intersubject variability. These data are consistent with earlier published studies. Use of alternate specimen types, possibly in conjunction with delayed release hydrocortisone preparations under development, may allow the practitioner to design a medication regimen that provides improved control of androgen secretion. Whatever dosing strategy is used, clinical judgment is required to ensure the best outcome.

  20. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis in Children with 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

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    Annamaria Ventura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 21-Hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, resulting from deletions or mutations of the P450 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2. Children with 21-OHD need chronic glucocorticoid (cGC therapy, both to replace congenital deficit in cortisol synthesis and to reduce androgen secretion by adrenal cortex. GC-induced osteoporosis (GIO is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis that results in an early, transient increase in bone resorption accompanied by a decrease in bone formation, maintained for the duration of GC therapy. Despite the conflicting results in the literature about the bone status on GC-treated patients with 21-OHD, many reports consider these subjects to be at risk for osteoporosis and fractures. In bone cells, at the molecular level, GCs regulate various functions including osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and the apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes. In this paper, we focus on the physiology and biosynthesis of endogenous steroid hormones as well as on the effects of GCs on bone cells, highlighting the pathogenetic mechanism of GIO in children with 21-OHD.

  1. Stress, glucocorticoids and ageing of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Moisés Evandro

    2005-03-01

    Ageing has been associated with immunological changes (immunosenescence) that resemble those observed following chronic stress or glucocorticoid (GC) treatment. These changes include thymic involution, lower number of naïve T cells, reduced cell-mediated immunity, and poor vaccination response to new antigens. It follows that immunosenescence could be associated with changes of peripheral GC levels. Indeed, when compared with young subjects, healthy elders are more stressed and show activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, both beneficial and undesirable effects of GCs ultimately depend on the target tissue sensitivity to these steroids. Recent data indicate that peripheral lymphocytes from elders respond poorly to GC treatment in vitro. The present review summarizes recent findings which suggest that immunosenescence may be closely related to both psychological distress and stress hormones. Furthermore, chronically stressed elderly subjects may be particularly at risk of stress-related pathology because of further alterations in GC-immune signalling. Finally, the neuroendocrine hypothesis of immunosenescence is finally reconsidered in which the age-related increase in the cortisol/DHEA ratio is major determinant of immunological changes observed during ageing.

  2. Acute glucocorticoid effects on the multicomponent model of working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Leonardo José; Pradella-Hallinan, Márcia; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo; Pompéia, Sabine

    2011-10-01

    In comparison with basal physiological levels, acute, high levels of cortisol affect learning and memory. Despite reports of cortisol-induced episodic memory effects, no study has used a comprehensive battery of tests to evaluate glucocorticoid effects on the multicomponent model of working memory. Here, we report the results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects study. Twenty healthy young men were randomly assigned to either acute cortisol (30 mg hydrocortisone) or placebo administration. Participants were subjected to an extensive cognitive test battery that evaluated all systems of the multicomponent model of working memory, including various executive domains (shifting, updating, inhibition, planning and access to long-term memory). Compared with placebo, hydrocortisone administration increased cortisol blood levels and impaired working memory in storage of multimodal information in the episodic buffer and maintenance/reverberation of information in the phonological loop. Hydrocortisone also decreased performance in planning and inhibition tasks, the latter having been explained by changes in storage of information in working memory. Thus, hydrocortisone acutely impairs various components of working memory, including executive functioning. This effect must be considered when administering similar drugs, which are widely used for the treatment of many clinical disorders. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Analysis of Chromatin Dynamics during Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Craig J.; Ward, James M.; Crusselle-Davis, Valerie J.; Kissling, Grace E.; Phadke, Dhiral; Shah, Ruchir R.

    2012-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors initiate a genetic program tightly regulated by the chromatin environment of the responsive regions. Using the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a model factor for transcriptional initiation, we classified chromatin structure through formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE). We looked at dynamic changes in FAIRE signals during GR activation specifically at regions of receptor interaction. We found a distribution of GR-responsive regions with diverse responses to activation and chromatin modulation. The majority of GR binding regions demonstrate increases in FAIRE signal in response to ligand. However, the majority GR-responsive regions shared a similar FAIRE signal in the basal chromatin state, suggesting a common chromatin structure for GR recruitment. Supporting this notion, global FAIRE sequencing (seq) data indicated an enrichment of signal surrounding the GR binding site prior to activation. Brg-1 knockdown showed response element-specific effects of ATPase-dependent chromatin remodeling. FAIRE induction was universally decreased by Brg-1 depletion, but to varying degrees in a target specific manner. Taken together, these data suggest classes of nuclear receptor response regions that react to activation through different chromatin regulatory events and identify a chromatin structure that classifies the majority of response elements tested. PMID:22451486

  4. Genetic, functional and molecular features of glucocorticoid receptor binding.

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    Francesca Luca

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are key mediators of stress response and are widely used as pharmacological agents to treat immune diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease, and certain types of cancer. GCs act mainly by activating the GC receptor (GR, which interacts with other transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Here, we combined different functional genomics approaches to gain molecular insights into the mechanisms of action of GC. By profiling the transcriptional response to GC over time in 4 Yoruba (YRI and 4 Tuscans (TSI lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, we suggest that the transcriptional response to GC is variable not only in time, but also in direction (positive or negative depending on the presence of specific interacting transcription factors. Accordingly, when we performed ChIP-seq for GR and NF-κB in two YRI LCLs treated with GC or with vehicle control, we observed that features of GR binding sites differ for up- and down-regulated genes. Finally, we show that eQTLs that affect expression patterns only in the presence of GC are 1.9-fold more likely to occur in GR binding sites, compared to eQTLs that affect expression only in its absence. Our results indicate that genetic variation at GR and interacting transcription factors binding sites influences variability in gene expression, and attest to the power of combining different functional genomic approaches.

  5. SIRT1 in Type 2 Diabetes: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

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    Munehiro Kitada

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM has been increasing worldwide. Therefore, a novel therapeutic strategy by which to prevent T2DM is urgently required. Calorie restriction (CR can retard the aging processes, and delay the onset of numerous age-related diseases including diabetes. Metabolic CR mimetics may be therefore included as novel therapeutic targets for T2DM. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase that is induced by CR, is closely associated with lifespan elongation under CR. SIRT1 regulates glucose/lipid metabolism through its deacetylase activity on many substrates. SIRT1 in pancreatic β-cells positively regulates insulin secretion and protects cells from oxidative stress and inflammation, and has positive roles in the metabolic pathway via the modulation in insulin signaling. SIRT1 also regulates adiponectin secretion, inflammation, glucose production, oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, and circadian rhythms. Several SIRT1 activators, including resveratrol have been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in animal models of insulin resistance. Therefore, SIRT1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of T2DM, implicating with CR. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the biological functions of SIRT1 and discuss its potential as a promising therapeutic target for T2DM.

  6. Antcin A, a steroid-like compound from Antrodia camphorata, exerts anti-inflammatory effect via mimicking glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-ching; Liu, Ya-lin; Li, Feng-yin; Chang, Chi-I; Wang, Sheng-yang; Lee, Kuo-yang; Li, Shun-lai; Chen, Yi-peng; Jinn, Tzyy-rong; Tzen, Jason T C

    2011-07-01

    To determine the active ingredient of Niuchangchih (Antrodia camphorata) responsible for its anti-inflammatory effects and the relevant molecular mechanisms. Five major antcins (A, B, C, H, and K) were isolated from fruiting bodies of Niuchangchih. Structural similarity between the antcins and 2 glucocorticoids (cortisone and dexamethasone) was compared. After incubation with each compound, the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was examined for its migration into the nucleus. Mo lecular docking was performed to model the tertiary structure of GR associated with antcins. Incubation with cortisone, dexamethasone or antcin A (but not antcins B, C, H, and K) led to the migration of glucocorticoid receptor into the nucleus. The minimal concentration of antcin A, cortisone and dexamethasone to induce nuclear migration of glucocorticoid receptor was 10, 1, and 0.1 mol/L, respectively. The results are in agreement with the simulated binding affinity scores of these three ligands docking to the glucocorticoid receptor. Molecular modeling indicates that C-7 of antcin A or glucocorticoids is exposed to a hydrophobic region in the binding cavity of the glucocorticoid receptor, and the attachment of a hydrophilic group to C-7 of the other four antcins presumably results in their being expelled when docking to the cavity. The anti-inflammatory effect of Niuchangchih is, at least, partly attributed to antcin A that mimics glucocorticoids and triggers translocation of glucocorticoid receptor into nucleus to initiate the suppressing inflammation.

  7. Investigation of subclinical bacteriuria in cats with dermatological disease receiving long-term glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Samantha L; Schick, Anthea E; Lewis, Thomas P; Newton, Heide

    2017-08-18

    Dogs receiving long-term glucocorticoids or ciclosporin have an increased frequency of bacteriuria. No studies have investigated the frequency of bacteriuria in cats receiving long-term glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin. To document whether subclinical bacteriuria occurs in cats receiving long-term glucocorticoid and/or ciclosporin for management of chronic disease. Thirty two cats treated with parenteral glucocorticoids and/or oral glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin were included. Thirty two cats receiving oral glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin for at least three months or at least two injections of long-acting glucocorticoids within the preceding six months were evaluated. Thirty four healthy cats were used as a control group. Urinalysis and urine culture was performed on urine samples collected by cystocentesis from each cat. In the glucocorticoid/ciclosporin group, none of 32 cats had a positive urine culture. In the control group, one of 34 cats had a positive urine culture. There were no statistically significant differences between the urinalyses from either group. There was no evidence to suggest that administration of long-term glucocorticoids and/or ciclosporin is associated with bacteriuria in cats. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  8. Occurrence and in vitro bioactivity of estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid compounds in a nationwide screen of United States stream waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In vitro bioactivity concentrations and chemical concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and glucocorticoids from a nationwide screen of United States stream water...

  9. Short-term versus longer duration of glucocorticoid therapy for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Systemic glucocorticoid has been shown to improve the outcome of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the optimal duration remains controversial. To investigate whether a short-term (seven days or fewer) systemic glucocorticoid treatment in patients with COPD exacerbation is non inferior to longer duration (more than seven days) treatment in clinical outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL databases, China Clinical Trials, CNKI, The Chinese biomedical literature database (CBM) and wanfang database to identify randomized controlled trials using systemic glucocorticoid in COPD. At least two review authors independently assessed each potentially eligible trial for its inclusion in the review and its quality. Glucocorticoid is given for a period of seven days or fewer versus systemic given for more than seven days. We retrieved time from building to Apr 20, 2016, and supplemented by manual retrieval into literature references. By adopting the combination of keywords and free word retrieval methods, we performed a routine meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of glucocorticoid on FEV1, FEV1/FVC, PaO2, clinical symptoms, relapse, treatment failure, mortality and side-effects between the two treatment groups. Our search yielded 9 studies involving 874 patients. Six studies were fully published and three were published as abstracts. We obtained data for one study published as abstracts from authors. Short-term treatment varied between three and seven days and longer duration 10-15 days, at equivalent daily doses of glucocorticoid. Mean ages of participants ranged from 60 to 90 years. The FEV1, FEV1/FVC, PaO2 and clinical symptoms between the two treatment groups did not differ significantly by treatment duration. There was no significant difference of relapse, treatment failure, mortality and side-effects between the two treatment groups. These data show that short-term glucocorticoid is as effective as and possibly safer than

  10. The next step for stress research in primates: To identify relationships between glucocorticoid secretion and fitness.

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    Beehner, Jacinta C; Bergman, Thore J

    2017-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are hormones that mediate the energetic demands that accompany environmental challenges. It is therefore not surprising that these metabolic hormones have come to dominate endocrine research on the health and fitness of wild populations. Yet, several problems have been identified in the vertebrate research that also apply to the non-human primate research. First, glucocorticoids should not be used as a proxy for fitness (unless a link has previously been established between glucocorticoids and fitness for a particular population). Second, stress research in behavioral ecology has been overly focused on "chronic stress" despite little evidence that chronic stress hampers fitness in wild animals. Third, research effort has been disproportionately focused on the causes of glucocorticoid variation rather than the fitness consequences. With these problems in mind, we have three objectives for this review. We describe the conceptual framework behind the "stress concept", emphasizing that high glucocorticoids do not necessarily indicate a stress response, and that a stress response does not necessarily indicate an animal is in poor health. Then, we conduct a comprehensive review of all studies on "stress" in wild primates, including any study that examined environmental factors, the stress response, and/or fitness (or proxies for fitness). Remarkably, not a single primate study establishes a connection between all three. Finally, we provide several recommendations for future research in the field of primate behavioral endocrinology, primarily the need to move beyond identifying the factors that cause glucocorticoid secretion to additionally focus on the relationship between glucocorticoids and fitness. We believe that this is an important next step for research on stress physiology in primates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ex vivo stimulation of whole blood as a means to determine glucocorticoid sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnsides C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Burnsides,1,* Jacqueline Corry,1,* Jacob Alexander,1 Catherine Balint,1 David Cosmar,1 Gary Phillips,2 Jeanette I Webster Marketon1,31Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Center for Biostatistics, 3Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA*JC and CB have equally contributed to this workPurpose: Glucocorticoids are commonly prescribed to treat a number of diseases including the majority of inflammatory diseases. Despite considerable interpersonal variability in response to glucocorticoids, an insensitivity rate of about 30%, and the risk of adverse side effects of glucocorticoid therapy, currently no assay is performed to determine sensitivity.Patients and methods: Here we propose a whole blood ex vivo stimulation assay to interrogate known glucocorticoid receptor (GR up- and downregulated genes to indicate glucocorticoid sensitivity. We have chosen to employ real-time PCR in order to provide a relatively fast and inexpensive assay.Results: We show that the GR-regulated genes, GILZ and FKBP51, are upregulated in whole blood by treatment with dexamethasone and that LPS-induction of cytokines (IL-6 and TNFα are repressed by dexamethasone in a dose responsive manner. There is considerable interpersonal variability in the maximum induction of these genes but little variation in the EC50 and IC50 concentrations. The regulation of the GR-induced genes differs throughout the day whereas the suppression of LPS-induced cytokines is not as sensitive to time of day.Conclusion: In all, this assay would provide a method to determine glucocorticoid receptor responsiveness in whole blood.Keywords: glucocorticoid responsiveness, gene regulation, nuclear receptor, GILZ, FKBP51, cytokines

  12. Keratinocyte-targeted overexpression of the glucocorticoid receptor delays cutaneous wound healing.

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    Ana Sanchis

    Full Text Available Delayed wound healing is one of the most common secondary adverse effects associated to the therapeutic use of glucocorticoid (GC analogs, which act through the ligand-dependent transcription factor GC-receptor (GR. GR function is exerted through DNA-binding-dependent and -independent mechanisms, classically referred to as transactivation (TA and transrepression (TR. Currently both TA and TR are thought to contribute to the therapeutical effects mediated by GR; however their relative contribution to unwanted side effects such as delayed wound healing is unknown. We evaluated skin wound healing in transgenic mice with keratinocyte-restricted expression of either wild type GR or a mutant GR that is TA-defective but efficient in TR (K5-GR and K5-GR-TR mice, respectively. Our data show that at days (d 4 and 8 following wounding, healing in K5-GR mice was delayed relative to WT, with reduced recruitment of granulocytes and macrophages and diminished TNF-α and IL-1β expression. TGF-β1 and Kgf expression was repressed in K5-GR skin whereas TGF-β3 was up-regulated. The re-epithelialization rate was reduced in K5-GR relative to WT, as was formation of granulation tissue. In contrast, K5-GR-TR mice showed delays in healing at d4 but re-established the skin breach at d8 concomitant with decreased repression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors relative to K5-GR mice. Keratinocytes from both transgenic mice closed in vitro wounds slower relative to WT, consistent with the in vivo defects in cell migration. Overall, the delay in the early stages of wound healing in both transgenic models is similar to that elicited by systemic treatment with dexamethasone. Wound responses in the transgenic keratinocytes correlated with reduced ERK activity both in vivo and in vitro. We conclude that the TR function of GR is sufficient for negatively regulating early stages of wound closure, while TA by GR is required for delaying later stages of healing.

  13. Role of Adrenal Glucocorticoid Signaling in Prefrontal Cortex Gene Expression and Acute Behavioral Responses to Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Blair N.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Fitting, Sylvia; Shelton, Keith L.; Miles, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid hormones modulate acute and chronic behavioral and molecular responses to drugs of abuse including psychostimulants and opioids. There is growing evidence that glucocorticoids might also modulate behavioral responses to ethanol. Acute ethanol activates the HPA axis, causing release of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones. Our prior genomic studies suggest glucocorticoids play a role in regulating gene expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of DBA2/J (D2) mice following acute ethanol administration. However, few studies have analyzed the role of glucocorticoid signaling in behavioral responses to acute ethanol. Such work could be significant, given the predictive value for level of response to acute ethanol in the risk for alcoholism. Methods We studied whether the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, RU-486, or adrenalectomy (ADX) altered male D2 mouse behavioral responses to acute (locomotor activation, anxiolysis or loss-of-righting reflex (LORR)) or repeated (sensitization) ethanol treatment. Whole genome microarray analysis and bioinformatics approaches were used to identify PFC candidate genes possibly responsible for altered behavioral responses to ethanol following ADX. Results ADX and RU-486 both impaired acute ethanol (2 g/kg) induced locomotor activation in D2 mice without affecting basal locomotor activity. However, neither ADX nor RU-486 altered initiation of ethanol sensitization (locomotor activation or jump counts), ethanol-induced anxiolysis or LORR. ADX mice showed microarray gene expression changes in PFC that significantly overlapped with acute ethanol-responsive gene sets derived by our prior microarray studies. Q-rtPCR analysis verified that ADX decreased PFC expression of Fkbp5 while significantly increasing Gpr6 expression. In addition, high dose RU-486 pre-treatment blunted ethanol-induced Fkbp5 expression. Conclusions Our studies suggest that ethanol’s activation of adrenal glucocorticoid release and subsequent

  14. Superoxide dismutase mimetics. Part 2: synthesis and structure-activity relationship of glyoxylate- and glyoxamide-derived metalloporphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trova, Michael P; Gauuan, Polivina Jolicia F; Pechulis, Anthony D; Bubb, Stephen M; Bocckino, Stephen B; Crapo, James D; Day, Brian J

    2003-07-03

    Novel glyoxylate- and glyoxamide-derived metalloporphyrins 26-58 were synthesized and evaluated as potential superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics. Relative to previously studied MnTBAP analogues, the glyoxylate-derived metalloporphyrins 32, 39, and 54 and glyoxamide-derived metalloporphyrin 49, exhibited enhanced activity in the SOD assay and the majority of the analogues in the current series showed enhanced inhibition of lipid peroxidation and catalase activity.

  15. Collagen mimetic peptide discs promote assembly of a broad range of natural protein fibers through hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Kenneth; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-07-19

    Collagen mimetic peptides that alone formed two-dimensional nanoscale discs driven by hydrophobic interactions were shown in electron microscopy studies to also co-assemble with natural fibrous proteins to produce discs-on-a-string (DoS) nanostructures. In most cases, peptide discs also facilitated bundling of the protein fibers. This provides insight into how synthetic and natural proteins may be combined to develop multicomponent, multi-dimensional architectures at the nanoscale.

  16. Effect of the Nerve Growth Factor Mimetic GK-2 on Brain Structural and Functional State in the Early Postresuscitation Period

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    M. Sh. Avrushchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of the nerve growth factor mimetic GK-2 used to improve the structural and functional state of the brain in the early postresuscitation period. Material and methods. Cardiac arrest was induced in mature male albino rats for 12 minutes, followed by resuscitation. The neurological state of the resuscitated animals was assessed by a scoring scale. On postresuscitation day 7, the density and composition of neuronal populations of Purkinje cells in the lateral cerebellar region and pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector were determined by a differential morphometric analysis. The results were statistically processed using the ANOVA method. Results. The use of GK-2 was found to accelerate neurological recovery in the resuscitated animals. On day 7 after 12-minute cardiac arrest, the resuscitated animals showed neuronal dystrophic changes and death in the neuronal populations highly susceptible to ischemia. It was shown that the systemic administration of the nerve growth factor mimetic GK-2 contributed to a reduction in the magnitude and depth of postresuscitation changes in the cerebellar Purkinje cells and prevented dystrophic changes in the pyramidal cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector. The findings suggest that GK-2 has a neuroprotective effect in the recovery period after total body ischemia. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate the efficiency of the systemic administration of the nerve growth factor mimetic GK-2 in improving the brain structural and functional state in the early postresuscitation period. This determines perspectives for the use of GK-2 to prevent and correct posthypoxic encephalopathies. Key words: the nerve growth factor mimetic GK-2, postresuscitation period, neuronal dystrophic changes and death, neurological status.

  17. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Modulation of Glucocorticoids in the Cardiovascular System

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    Natalie G. Burford

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The collective of endocrine organs acting in homeostatic regulation—known as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis—comprises an integration of the central nervous system as well as peripheral tissues. These organs respond to imminent or perceived threats that elicit a stress response, primarily culminating in the release of glucocorticoids into the systemic circulation by the adrenal glands. Although the secretion of glucocorticoids serves to protect and maintain homeostasis in the typical operation at baseline levels, inadequate regulation can lead to physiologic and psychologic pathologies. The cardiovascular system is especially susceptible to prolonged dysregulation of the HPA axis and glucocorticoid production. There is debate about whether cardiovascular health risks arise from the direct detrimental effects of stress axis activation or whether pathologies develop secondary to the accompanying metabolic strain of excess glucocorticoids. In this review, we will explore the emerging research that indicates stress does have direct effects on the cardiovascular system via the HPA axis activation, with emphasis on the latest research on the impact of glucocorticoids signaling in the vasculature and the heart.

  18. A Mixed Glucocorticoid/Mineralocorticoid Selective Modulator With Dominant Antagonism in the Male Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atucha, Erika; Zalachoras, Ioannis; van den Heuvel, José K; van Weert, Lisa T C M; Melchers, Diana; Mol, Isabel M; Belanoff, Joseph K; Houtman, René; Hunt, Hazel; Roozendaal, Benno; Meijer, Onno C

    2015-11-01

    Adrenal glucocorticoid hormones are potent modulators of brain function in the context of acute and chronic stress. Both mineralocorticoid (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) can mediate these effects. We studied the brain effects of a novel ligand, C118335, with high affinity for GRs and modest affinity for MRs. In vitro profiling of receptor-coregulator interactions suggested that the compound is a "selective modulator" type compound for GRs that can have both agonistic and antagonistic effects. Its molecular profile for MRs was highly similar to those of the full antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone. C118335 showed predominantly antagonistic effects on hippocampal mRNA regulation of known glucocorticoid target genes. Likewise, systemic administration of C118335 blocked the GR-mediated posttraining corticosterone-induced enhancement of memory consolidation in an inhibitory avoidance task. Posttraining administration of C118335, however, gave a strong and dose-dependent impairment of memory consolidation that, surprisingly, reflected involvement of MRs and not GRs. Finally, C118335 treatment acutely suppressed the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as measured by plasma corticosterone levels. Mixed GR/MR ligands, such as C118335, can be used to unravel the mechanisms of glucocorticoid signaling. The compound is also a prototype of mixed GR/MR ligands that might alleviate the harmful effects of chronic overexposure to endogenous glucocorticoids.

  19. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Modulation of Glucocorticoids in the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Natalie G.; Webster, Natalia A.; Cruz-Topete, Diana

    2017-01-01

    The collective of endocrine organs acting in homeostatic regulation—known as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis—comprises an integration of the central nervous system as well as peripheral tissues. These organs respond to imminent or perceived threats that elicit a stress response, primarily culminating in the release of glucocorticoids into the systemic circulation by the adrenal glands. Although the secretion of glucocorticoids serves to protect and maintain homeostasis in the typical operation at baseline levels, inadequate regulation can lead to physiologic and psychologic pathologies. The cardiovascular system is especially susceptible to prolonged dysregulation of the HPA axis and glucocorticoid production. There is debate about whether cardiovascular health risks arise from the direct detrimental effects of stress axis activation or whether pathologies develop secondary to the accompanying metabolic strain of excess glucocorticoids. In this review, we will explore the emerging research that indicates stress does have direct effects on the cardiovascular system via the HPA axis activation, with emphasis on the latest research on the impact of glucocorticoids signaling in the vasculature and the heart. PMID:29035323

  20. Variation of Human Milk Glucocorticoids over 24 hour Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, Shikha; Wall, Clare R; Mitchell, Cameron J; Thorstensen, Eric B; Lai, Ching T; Geddes, Donna T; Cameron-Smith, David

    2017-03-01

    Human milk (HM) contains a complex array of hormones, including members of the glucocorticoid family. The predominant glucocorticoids, cortisol and cortisone may influence the growth and behaviour of the breastfed infant. However, little is understood of the factors regulating the levels of these hormones within HM. The aim of the study was to examine HM cortisol and cortisone concentration, measured in samples collected at each feed during a 24 hour period. Twenty three exclusively breastfeeding mothers collected milk, prior to and after each breastfeeding session over 24 hour period at 3.2(1.60) months. HM cortisol and cortisone levels were measured using high pressure liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy. Cortisone was the predominant glucocorticoid (3.40 ng/ml), and cortisol was detected in all samples (1.62 ng/ml). A positive correlation was found between cortisone and cortisol (r = 0.61, y = 1.93 ± 0.24, p milk expressed for collection either before or immediately after the breastfeed, or between milk collected from the left or right breast. This study shows that HM glucocorticoid concentrations exhibit a 24 hour pattern, with highest peak levels in the early morning, reflecting the circadian pattern as previously reported in plasma. Thus, HM glucocorticoid concentrations are likely to reflect those in the maternal circulation.

  1. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Modulation of Glucocorticoids in the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Natalie G; Webster, Natalia A; Cruz-Topete, Diana

    2017-10-16

    The collective of endocrine organs acting in homeostatic regulation-known as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-comprises an integration of the central nervous system as well as peripheral tissues. These organs respond to imminent or perceived threats that elicit a stress response, primarily culminating in the release of glucocorticoids into the systemic circulation by the adrenal glands. Although the secretion of glucocorticoids serves to protect and maintain homeostasis in the typical operation at baseline levels, inadequate regulation can lead to physiologic and psychologic pathologies. The cardiovascular system is especially susceptible to prolonged dysregulation of the HPA axis and glucocorticoid production. There is debate about whether cardiovascular health risks arise from the direct detrimental effects of stress axis activation or whether pathologies develop secondary to the accompanying metabolic strain of excess glucocorticoids. In this review, we will explore the emerging research that indicates stress does have direct effects on the cardiovascular system via the HPA axis activation, with emphasis on the latest research on the impact of glucocorticoids signaling in the vasculature and the heart.

  2. SDF-1 improves wound healing ability of glucocorticoid-treated adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshiki; Khanh, Vuong Cat; Sato, Kazutoshi; Takeuchi, Kosuke; Carolina, Erica; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Sugaya, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Mishima, Hajime; Ohneda, Osamu

    2017-11-18

    Glucocorticoids cause the delayed wound healing by suppressing inflammation that is required for wound healing process. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) play an important role for wound healing by their cytokine productions including stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1). However, it has not been clear how glucocorticoids affect the wound healing ability of AT-MSCs. In this study, we found that glucocorticoid downregulated SDF-1 expression in AT-MSCs. In addition, glucocorticoid-treated AT-MSCs induced less migration of inflammatory cells and impaired wound healing capacity compared with glucocorticoid-untreated AT-MSCs. Of note, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis-related gene expression was downregulated by glucocorticoid and PGE2 treatment rescued not only SDF-1 expression in the presence of glucocorticoid but also their wound healing capacity in vivo. Furthermore, we found SDF-1-overexpressed AT-MSCs restored wound healing capacity even after treatment of glucocorticoid. Consistent with the results obtained from glucocorticoid-treated AT-MSCs, we found that AT-MSCs isolated from steroidal osteonecrosis donors (sAT-MSCs) who received chronic glucocorticoid therapy showed less SDF-1 expression and impaired wound healing capacity compared with traumatic osteonecrosis donor-derived AT-MSCs (nAT-MSCs). Moreover, the SDF-1 level was also reduced in plasma derived from steroidal osteonecrosis donors compared with traumatic osteonecrosis donors. These results provide the evidence that concomitant application of AT-MSCs with glucocorticoid shows impaired biological modulatory effects that induce impaired wound healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Osteoporosis due to glucocorticoid use in children with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Leanne M

    2005-01-01

    Osteoporosis is increasingly recognized as a complication of chronic childhood illnesses, particularly when glucocorticoids (GCs) are necessary for treatment. Elucidation of the mechanisms leading to bone fragility in these settings requires disentanglement of the relative contributions of myriad risk factors, including disease activity, muscle weakness, immobilization, delayed growth and puberty, compromised nutrition, and osteotoxic medications. Over the years, bone mass and density evaluations by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) have become popular for assessing bone health in children; however, such measurements are difficult to interpret because of the confounding effect of bone size and the lack of DXA-based densitometric criteria for defining osteoporosis in childhood. Recently, a new diagnostic approach for evaluation of densitometric data in children has been suggested, driven by Frost's mechanostat theory. A diagnostic algorithm based on the mechanostat theory of bone-muscle development is proposed for the characterization of bone disease in children with chronic illness. In addition to DXA-based assessments, techniques such as peripheral quantitative computerized tomography and ilial histomorphometry, for which there are pediatric reference data, are gaining ground in the characterization of skeletal changes due to chronic illness. Although these diagnostic techniques expand our understanding of osteoporosis in children, they do not replace clinical assessment. Concrete clinical evidence for GC-induced bone fragility can be seen in spinal changes due to vertebral compression, with spinal morphometry emerging as an essential, but frequently overlooked, tool in the evaluation of children's bone health. Presently, osteoporosis treatment in the chronic illness setting remains experimental and should be restricted to clinical studies. Following an understanding of the natural history of GC-induced osteoporosis in children, randomized, placebo

  4. Glucocorticoid programming of the fetal male hippocampal epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crudo, Ariann; Suderman, Matthew; Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Petropoulos, Sophie; Kostaki, Alisa; Hallett, Michael; Szyf, Moshe; Matthews, Stephen G

    2013-03-01

    The late-gestation surge in fetal plasma cortisol is critical for maturation of fetal organ systems. As a result, synthetic glucocorticoids (sGCs) are administered to pregnant women at risk of delivering preterm. However, animal studies have shown that fetal exposure to sGC results in increased risk of behavioral, endocrine, and metabolic abnormalities in offspring. Here, we test the hypothesis that prenatal GC exposure resulting from the fetal cortisol surge or after sGC exposure results in promoter-specific epigenetic changes in the hippocampus. Fetal guinea pig hippocampi were collected before (gestational day [GD52]) and after (GD65) the fetal plasma cortisol surge (Term∼GD67) and 24 hours after (GD52) and 14 days after (GD65) two repeat courses of maternal sGC (betamethasone) treatment (n = 3-4/gp). We identified extensive genome-wide alterations in promoter methylation in late fetal development (coincident with the fetal cortisol surge), whereby the majority of the affected promoters exhibited hypomethylation. Fetuses exposed to sGC in late gestation exhibited substantial differences in DNA methylation and histone h3 lysine 9 (H3K9) acetylation in specific gene promoters; 24 hours after the sGC treatment, the majority of genes affected were hypomethylated or hyperacetylated. However, 14 days after sGC exposure these differences did not persist, whereas other promoters became hypermethylated or hyperacetylated. These data support the hypothesis that the fetal GC surge is responsible, in part, for significant variations in genome-wide promoter methylation and that prenatal sGC treatment profoundly changes the epigenetic landscape, affecting both DNA methylation and H3K9 acetylation. This is important given the widespread use of sGC in the management of women in preterm labor.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms and haplotypes associated with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeevan, M S; Smith, A K; Dimulescu, I; Unger, E R; Vernon, S D; Heim, C; Reeves, W C

    2007-03-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a significant public health problem of unknown etiology, the pathophysiology has not been elucidated, and there are no characteristic physical signs or laboratory abnormalities. Some studies have indicated an association of CFS with deregulation of immune functions and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. In this study, we examined the association of sequence variations in the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) with CFS because NR3C1 is a major effector of the HPA axis. There were 137 study participants (40 with CFS, 55 with insufficient symptoms or fatigue, termed as ISF, and 42 non-fatigued controls) who were clinically evaluated and identified from the general population of Wichita, KS. Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NR3C1 were tested for association of polymorphisms and haplotypes with CFS. We observed an association of multiple SNPs with chronic fatigue compared to non-fatigued (NF) subjects (P fatigue (by the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory) and with symptoms (assessed by the Centers for Disease Control Symptom Inventory). Subjects homozygous for the major allele of all associated SNPs were at increased risk for CFS with odds ratios ranging from 2.61 (CI 1.05-6.45) to 3.00 (CI 1.12-8.05). Five SNPs, covering a region of approximately 80 kb, demonstrated high linkage disequilibrium (LD) in CFS, but LD gradually declined in ISF to NF subjects. Furthermore, haplotype analysis of the region in LD identified two associated haplotypes with opposite alleles: one protective and the other conferring risk of CFS. These results demonstrate NR3C1 as a potential mediator of chronic fatigue, and implicate variations in the 5' region of NR3C1 as a possible mechanism through which the alterations in HPA axis regulation and behavioural characteristics of CFS may manifest.

  6. Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome Due to Topical Ocular Glucocorticoid Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Daisuke; Takiura, Toshihiko; Keino, Hiroshi; Okada, Annabelle A; Yan, Kunimasa

    2017-02-01

    Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a severe adverse effect of systemic glucocorticoid (GC) therapy in children, but is extremely rare in the setting of topical ocular GC therapy. In this article, we report the case of a 9-year-old girl suffering from idiopathic uveitis who developed CS due to topical ocular GC treatment. She was referred to the ophthalmology department with a complaint of painful eyes, at which time she was diagnosed with bilateral iridocyclitis and started on a treatment of betamethasone sodium phosphate eye drops. Six months after the initiation of topical ocular GC treatment, she was referred to our pediatric department with stunted growth, truncal obesity, purple skin striate, buffalo hump, and moon face. Because her serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone levels were undetectable, she was diagnosed with iatrogenic CS. After the doses of topical ocular GC were reduced, the clinical symptoms of CS were improved. The fact that the amount of topical ocular GC with our patient was apparently less than that of similar previous cases tempted us to perform genetic analysis of her NR3C1 gene. We found that our patient had a single heterozygous nucleotide substitution in the 3' untranslated region of the NR3C1 gene, which may explain why she developed CS. However, additional investigations are required to determine if our findings can be extrapolated to other patients. In conclusion, clinicians should be aware that even extremely low doses of topical ocular steroid therapy can cause iatrogenic CS. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. A rat model of early stage osteonecrosis induced by glucocorticoids

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    Kerachian Mohammad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoid (GC-induced osteonecrosis (ON is an important complication of medical therapy. The exact pathomechanisms of ON has not been clearly elucidated. There is a need for a reproducible animal model that better approximates the clinical scenario. Methods To determine the genetic susceptibility of rats to develop GC-induced femoral head ON, we evaluated 5 different inbred strains of rats (Spontaneous Hypertensive Rat, Wistar Kyoto, Wistar Furth, SASCO Fisher and Lewis. Prednisone pellets (dosage of 1.82-2.56 mg/kg/day were implanted subcutaneously for 90. After 90 days, the femurs were resected and examined histologically and radiographically. Pathological and histological examination was performed. Hematoxylin and eosin (H & E staining was used to delineate the femoral head osteonecrosis lesions as well as abnormalities of articular cartilage and growth plate. Results The greatest differences in H & E staining were seen in the Wistar Kyoto and Wistar Furth groups. In these groups 4 out of 5 and 3 out of 5, respectively, steroid-induced rats revealed growth plate disruption with acellular areas. The TUNEL apoptosis staining assay for apoptosis revealed that 4 out of 5 of Wistar Kyoto rats, 5 out of 5 of Wistar Furth, 2 out of 4 of surviving Lewis and 2 out of 2 of the surviving spontaneous hypertensive rats had apoptotic osteocytes in trabeculae, whereas none of the Fisher rats showed apoptotic osteocytes. Conclusions We postulate that Wistar Kyoto, Wistar Furth and spontaneous hypertensive rats may be strains of rats more susceptible to develop ON of the femoral head while Fisher rats were the most resistant.

  8. Deleterious Effects of High Dose Connexin 43 Mimetic Peptide Infusion After Cerebral Ischaemia in Near-Term Fetal Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J. Gunn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury at birth is associated with 1–3/1000 cases of moderate to severe encephalopathy. Previously, we have shown that connexin 43 hemichannel blockade, with a specific mimetic peptide, reduced the occurrence of seizures, improved recovery of EEG power and sleep state cycling, and improved cell survival following global cerebral ischaemia. In the present study, we examined the dose response for intracerebroventricular mimetic peptide infusion (50 µmol/kg/h for 1 h, followed by 50 µmol/kg/24 h (low dose or 50 µmol/kg/h for 25 h (high dose or vehicle only (control group, starting 90 min after the end of ischaemia, following global cerebral ischaemia, induced by 30 min bilateral carotid artery occlusion, in near-term fetal sheep (128 ± 1 days gestation. Both peptide infusion groups were associated with a transient significant increase in EEG power between 2–12 h after ischaemia. The ischaemia-low dose group showed a significant recovery of EEG power from day five compared to the ischaemia-vehicle and -high dose groups. In contrast, the high dose infusion was associated with greater secondary increase in impedance (brain cell swelling, as well as a trend towards a greater increase in lactate concentration and mortality. These data suggest that higher doses of connexin mimetic peptide are not beneficial and may be associated with adverse outcomes, most likely attributable to uncoupling of connexin 43 gap junctions leading to dysfunction of the astrocytic syncytium.

  9. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  10. Enzyme-mimetic effects of gold@platinum nanorods on the antioxidant activity of ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Ting; He, Weiwei; Wamer, Wayne G.; Hu, Xiaona; Wu, Xiaochun; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Au@Pt nanorods were prepared by growing platinum nanodots on gold nanorods. Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we determined that the mechanisms for oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by Au@Pt nanorods and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) were kinetically similar and yielded similar products. In addition we observed that Au@Pt nanorods were stable with respect to temperature and pH. Using UV-VIS spectroscopy, the apparent kinetics of enzyme-mimetic activity of Au@Pt nanorods were studied and compared with the activity of AAO. With the help of ESR, we found that Au@Pt nanorods did not scavenge hydroxyl radicals but inhibited the antioxidant ability of AA for scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by photoirradiating solutions containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Moreover, the Au@Pt nanorods reduced the ability of AA to scavenge DPPH radicals and superoxide radicals. These results demonstrate that Au@Pt nanorods can reduce the antioxidant activity of AA. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effects of using Pt nanoparticles together with other reducing agents or antioxidants such as AA due to the oxidase-like property of Au@Pt nanorods.Au@Pt nanorods were prepared by growing platinum nanodots on gold nanorods. Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we determined that the mechanisms for oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by Au@Pt nanorods and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) were kinetically similar and yielded similar products. In addition we observed that Au@Pt nanorods were stable with respect to temperature and pH. Using UV-VIS spectroscopy, the apparent kinetics of enzyme-mimetic activity of Au@Pt nanorods were studied and compared with the activity of AAO. With the help of ESR, we found that Au@Pt nanorods did not scavenge hydroxyl radicals but inhibited the antioxidant ability of AA for scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by photoirradiating solutions containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Moreover, the Au@Pt nanorods reduced the ability of AA to scavenge

  11. Learned Avoidance in the Male Syrian Hamster: Investigating the Outcome of a Glucocorticoid Antagonist on Reconsolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Haugsnes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, we used our Conflict Alleyway Apparatus and a glucocorticoid antagonist, mifepristone, to investigate the role of glucocorticoids in the reconsolidation of learned avoidance in defeated male Syrian hamsters. Subjects were tested for memory deficits 48 hours and 96 hours after the drug/vehicle was administered. It were hypothesized that mifepristone administration would produce memory deficits when the defeat memory had been reactivated, and that this deficit would be present 48 hours and 96 hours after the administration. Prolonged deficits that are dependent upon memory reactivation would suggest that glucocorticoids play a role in reconsolidation of learned avoidance. Our results indicated a strong evidence for learned avoidance after defeat; however, we did not find any significant drug effect.

  12. Central actions of glucocorticoids in the control of body fluid homeostasis: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Ruginsk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the control of body fluid homeostasis has been extensively investigated in the past few years. In the present study, we reviewed the recent results obtained using different approaches to investigate the effects of glucocorticoids on the mechanisms of oxytocin and vasopressin synthesis and secretion in response to acute and chronic plasma volume and osmolality changes. The data presented here suggest that glucocorticoids are not only involved in the mechanisms underlying the fast release but also in the transcriptional events that lead to decreased synthesis and secretion of these neuropeptides, particularly oxytocin, under diverse experimental conditions of altered fluid volume and tonicity. The endocannabinoid system, through its effects on glutamatergic neurotransmission within the hypothalamus and the nuclear factor κB-mediated transcriptional activity, seems to be also involved in the specific mechanisms by which glucocorticoids exert their central effects on neurohypophyseal hormone synthesis and secretion.

  13. The Role and Mechanisms of Action of Glucocorticoid Involvement in Memory Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandi, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Adrenal steroid hormones modulate learning and memory processes by interacting with specific glucocorticoid receptors at different brain areas. In this article, certain components of the physiological response to stress elicited by learning situations are proposed to form an integral aspect of the neurobiological mechanism underlying memory formation. By reviewing the work carried out in different learning models in chicks (passive avoidance learning) and rats (spatial orientation in the Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning), a role for brain corticosterone action through the glucocorticoid receptor type on the mechanisms of memory consolidation is hypothesized. Evidence is also presented to relate post-training corticosterone levels to the strength of memory storage. Finally, the possible molecular mechanisms that might mediate the influences of glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity subserving long-term memory formation are considered, mainly by focusing on studies implicating a steroid action through (i) glutamatergic transmission and (ii) cell adhesion molecules. PMID:9920681

  14. Efficacy of Puls-therapy with Glucocorticoids in Patients with Autoimmune Ophtalmopatay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Bogomazova

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is presents the results of estimation efficiency of various schemes pathogenetic glucocorticoids treatment of autoimmune ophthalmopathy. Research of clinical parameters dynamics including subjective and objective attributes, proptosis, dynamics of the soluble form of intercellular molecule adhesion-1 levels was made before treatment and at the end of research (in 6 month follow up after complete course of pathogenetic treatment. The study has demonstrated that combination of glucocorticoids pulse-therapy and mean volume plasmapheresis is the most effective pathogenetic method of autoimmune ophthalmopathy treatment; absence of advantages of the used schemes of treatment for reduction proptosis. Advantages of use of the combined therapy are marked in comparison with monotherapy by glucocorticoids at estimation of subjective attributes.

  15. Glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism secondary to intravascular lymphoma in the adrenal glands of a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, M E; Chapman, P S; Walsh, A

    2017-03-01

    A 2-year-old neutered male German Shepherd dog was presented with weakness, poor appetite and weight loss. Glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism was diagnosed with undetectable pre- and post-ACTH cortisol concentrations but normal sodium and potassium concentrations. Despite appropriate supplementation with glucocorticoids, the patient's weakness progressed and neurological deficits developed. The patient was euthanased. Histopathological analysis of multiple organs, including the adrenal glands, showed an accumulation of neoplastic lymphocytes within blood vessels, consistent with a diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma. Histologically, in both adrenal glands, the architecture of the zona fasciculata and reticularis was disrupted by blood vessels congested with a neoplastic population of T-lymphocytes; the zona glomerulosa remained intact. This is the first report of intravascular lymphoma causing glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism in a dog. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  16. The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl C; Overgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone – Validation of large animal model for tissue engineering and biomaterial research Ming Ding,1* Carl Christian Danielsen,2 Søren Overgaard1 1Orthopaedic Research Laboratory...... of glucocorticoid on cortical bone. Thus, changes in cortical bone beyond cancellous bone might further increase fracture risk. Key works: glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis; microarchitecture; mechanical property; collagen and mineral; sheep cortical bone; tissue engineering......, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark 2Department of Connective Tissue Biology, Institute of Anatomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark Osteopenia in sheep has been successfully induced...

  17. Primary care veterinary usage of systemic glucocorticoids in cats and dogs in three UK practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D; Hendricks, A; Summers, J; Brodbelt, D

    2012-04-01

    To describe systemic glucocorticoid usage in cats and dogs by three primary care -veterinary practices in England and to ascertain risk factors for clinical use. To evaluate consistency of prescribing patterns across clinics. To validate a merged database of primary veterinary clinical data as a functional tool for clinical epidemiological research. A merged database was established from clinical data on 31,273 cat and dog consultations with pharmacotherapy from three veterinary practices in England. Descriptive statistics described systemic glucocorticoid drug use in cats and dogs while mixed-effects logistic regression modelling evaluated risk factors. Individual clinic usage was compared. Overall, 1877 (16·68%) cat consultations and 2913 (14·55%) dog consultations resulted in systemic glucocorticoid therapy. Cats received higher parenteral (Pveterinary clinical database was effective for epidemiological research. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  18. Fat-brain connections: Adipocyte glucocorticoid control of stress and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, Annette D; Herman, James P

    2017-10-16

    Glucocorticoids act via multiple mechanisms to mobilize energy for maintenance and restoration of homeostasis. In adipose tissue, glucocorticoids can promote lipolysis and facilitate adipocyte differentiation/growth, serving both energy-mobilizing and restorative processes during negative energy balance. Recent data suggest that adipose-dependent feedback may also be involved in regulation of stress responses. Adipocyte glucocorticoid receptor (GR) deletion causes increased HPA axis stress reactivity, due to a loss of negative feedback signals into the CNS. The fat-to-brain signal may be mediated by neuronal mechanisms, release of adipokines or increased lipolysis. The ability of adipose GRs to inhibit psychogenic as well as metabolic stress responses suggests that (1) feedback regulation of the HPA axis occurs across multiple bodily compartments, and (2) fat tissue integrates psychogenic stress signals. These studies support a link between stress biology and energy metabolism, a connection that has clear relevance for numerous disease states and their comorbidities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The distorting effect of varying diets on fecal glucocorticoid measurements as indicators of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, A. Charlotte; Abelson, Klas S. P.

    2015-01-01

    concentrations of glucocorticoids be artificially inflated? Can this effect be overcome by measuring the total output of glucocorticoids in excreta? In a controlled laboratory setting we explored the effect in mice. When standard mouse chow – high in dietary fiber – was replaced with a 17% more energy-dense diet......The physiological stress response is frequently gauged in animals, non-invasively, through measuring glucocorticoids in excreta. A concern with this method is, however, the unknown effect of variations in diets on the measurements. With an energy dense diet, leading to reduced defecation, will low...... results were obtained for testosterone metabolites. Although measuring the total output is not feasible in, for example, wildlife studies, the present findings highlight the perilousness of relying on concentrations of hormones in excreta with no associated information of the dietary intake as even...

  20. Electroconvulsive stimulations normalizes stress-induced changes in the glucocorticoid receptor and behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hageman, Ida; Nielsen, Marianne; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of chronic stress, such as 21 days of 6h/daily restraint stress cause changes in neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and alter behaviour. These changes are partly mediated by the glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was threefold: (1) to study how this particular chronic...... stress paradigm influences expression of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor mRNA, (2) to study the effect of previous repeated restraint stress on the behaviours executed in the forced swim test (FST) (e.g. a novel inescapable stress situation) and (3) to investigate the modulating effect...... of electroconvulsive stimulations (ECS) on the neural and behavioural effects of the stress paradigm. The study shows that restraint stress lowered glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels in all hippocampal regions, including the CA3 region which is the site of the characteristic dendritic reorganization seen...