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Sample records for therapeutic antioxidant medical

  1. Molecular hydrogen: a therapeutic antioxidant and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 medicine research has flourished since a landmark publication in Nature Medicine that revealed the antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of hydrogen gas in a focal stroke model. Emerging evidence has consistently demonstrated that molecular hydrogen is a promising therapeutic option for a variety of diseases and the underlying comprehensive mechanisms is beyond pure hydroxyl radicals scavenging. The non-toxicity at high concentrations and rapid cellular diffusion features of molecular hydrogen ensure the feasibility and readiness of its clinical translation to human patients.

  2. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  3. 21 CFR 880.5160 - Therapeutic medical binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5160 Therapeutic medical binder. (a) Identification. A therapeutic medical binder is a device, usually made of cloth, that is intended for medical purposes and that can be secured by ties so...

  4. The antioxidant paradox: what are antioxidants and how should they be used in a therapeutic context for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Michael Y; Arbiser, Jack L

    2014-01-01

    So-called antioxidants have yet to make a clinical impact on the treatment of human cancer. The reasons for this failure are several. First, many agents that are called antioxidants are truly antioxidants at a given dose, but this dose may not have been given in clinical trials. Second, many agents are not antioxidants at all. Third, not all tumors use reactive oxygen as a signaling mechanism. Finally, reactive oxygen inhibition is often insufficient to kill or regress a tumor cell by itself, but requires sequential introduction of a therapeutic agent for maximal effect. We hope to provide a framework for the logical use of these agents in cancer.

  5. Medical-grade collagen peptide in injectables provides antioxidant protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kyo; Maehata, Yojiro; Okada, Yasue; Kusubata, Masashi; Hattori, Shunji; Tanaka, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Tokutomi, Fumiaki; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Komatsu, Tomoko; Otsuka, Takero; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il

    2015-03-01

    Medical-grade collagen peptide is used as an additive agent in pharmaceutical formulations; however, it is unknown as to whether the compound exerts antioxidant effects in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the antioxidant effects of medical-grade collagen peptide on reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical and singlet oxygen using electron spin resonance and spin trapping. We confirmed that medical-grade collagen peptide directly inhibited hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction or by ultraviolet irradiation of hydrogen peroxide, and singlet oxygen. In addition, an antioxidant effect of medical-grade collagen peptide on singlet oxygen was observed in peptide fractions 12-22. The total amount of antioxidant amino acids (Gly, Hyp, Glu, Ala, Cys, Met and His) constituted more than half of the total amino acids in these fractions. These results suggest that the observed antioxidant properties of medical-grade collagen peptide are due to the compound containing antioxidant amino acids. Medical-grade collagen peptide, which is used in pharmaceuticals, and especially in injectables, could provide useful antioxidant properties to protect the active ingredient from oxidation.

  6. Significance of antioxidant potential of plants and its relevance to therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasote, Deepak M; Katyare, Surendra S; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Bae, Hanhong

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been identified as the root cause of the development and progression of several diseases. Supplementation of exogenous antioxidants or boosting endogenous antioxidant defenses of the body is a promising way of combating the undesirable effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced oxidative damage. Plants have an innate ability to biosynthesize a wide range of non-enzymatic antioxidants capable of attenuating ROS- induced oxidative damage. Several in vitro methods have been used to screen plants for their antioxidant potential, and in most of these assays they revealed potent antioxidant activity. However, prior to confirming their in vivo therapeutic efficacy, plant antioxidants have to pass through several physiopharmacological processes. Consequently, the findings of in vitro and in vivo antioxidant potential assessment studies are not always the same. Nevertheless, the results of in vitro assays have been irrelevantly extrapolated to the therapeutic application of plant antioxidants without undertaking sufficient in vivo studies. Therefore, we have briefly reviewed the physiology and redox biology of both plants and humans to improve our understanding of plant antioxidants as therapeutic entities. The applications and limitations of antioxidant activity measurement assays were also highlighted to identify the precise path to be followed for future research in the area of plant antioxidants.

  7. The therapeutic potential of antioxidants, ER chaperones, NO and H2S donors, and statins for treatment of preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza eCindrova-Davies

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a complex multifactorial disease. Placental oxidative stress, a result of deficient spiral artery remodeling, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Antiangiogenic factors secreted from malperfused placenta are instrumental in mediating maternal endothelial dysfunction and consequent symptoms of preeclampsia; the mechanism is likely to involve increased ET-1 secretion and reduced NO bioavailability. Therapeutic interventions so far remain only experimental and there is no established remedy for the treatment of preeclampsia. This review concentrates on the evidence for the therapeutic potential of antioxidants, ER chaperones, NO and H2S donors, and statins. These compounds display pleitropic antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and pro-angiogenic effects in animal and in vitro studies. Although clinical trials on the use of antioxidant vitamins in pregnancy proved largely unsuccessful, the scope for their use still exists given the beneficial cardioprotective effects of antioxidant-rich Mediterranean diet, periconceptual vitamin use and the synergistic effect of vitamin C and l-arginine. Encouraging clinical evidence exists for the use of NO donors, and a clinical trial is underway testing the effect of statins in treatment of preeclampsia. H2S recently emerged as a novel therapeutic agent for cardiovascular disease, and its beneficial effects were also tested in animal models of preeclampsia. It is risky to prescribe any medication to pregnant women on a large scale, and any future therapeutic intervention has to be well tested and safe. Many of the compounds discussed could be potential candidates.

  8. Oral antioxidants for radioprotection during medical imaging examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velauthapillai, Nivethan

    The oncogenic effect of ionizing radiation (IR) is clearly established and occurs in response to DNA damage. Many diagnostic imaging exams make use of IR and the oncogenic risk of IR-based imaging has been calculated. We hypothesized that the DNA damage sustained from IR exposure during medical imaging exams could be reduced by pre-medicating patients with antioxidants. First, we tested and validated a method for measuring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Afterwards, we conducted a pilot clinical study in which we administered oral antioxidants to patients undergoing bone scans, prior to radiotracer injection. We showed that oral antioxidant pre-medication reduced the number of DSBs in PBMCs induced by radiotracer injection. Our study shows proof-of-principle for this simple and inexpensive approach to radioprotection in the clinical setting.

  9. Potential of neuroprotective antioxidant-based therapeutics from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have evaluated antioxidant potential of Peltophorum africanum (weeping wattle), a plant widespread in the tropics and traditionally used, inter alia, for the relief of acute and chronic pain, anxiety and depression. The dried leaves, bark and root of P. africanum were extracted with acetone. Thin layer chromatograms were ...

  10. Antioxidant Therapeutic Strategies for Cardiovascular Conditions Associated with Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Farías

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS refers to the imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the ability to scavenge these ROS by endogenous antioxidant systems, where ROS overwhelms the antioxidant capacity. Excessive presence of ROS results in irreversible damage to cell membranes, DNA, and other cellular structures by oxidizing lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases related to hypoxia, cardiotoxicity and ischemia–reperfusion. Here, we describe the participation of OS in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular conditions such as myocardial infarction, anthracycline cardiotoxicity and congenital heart disease. This review focuses on the different clinical events where redox factors and OS are related to cardiovascular pathophysiology, giving to support for novel pharmacological therapies such as omega 3 fatty acids, non-selective betablockers and microRNAs.

  11. Antioxidant Therapeutic Strategies for Cardiovascular Conditions Associated with Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, Jorge G; Molina, Víctor M; Carrasco, Rodrigo A; Zepeda, Andrea B; Figueroa, Elías; Letelier, Pablo; Castillo, Rodrigo L

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) refers to the imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability to scavenge these ROS by endogenous antioxidant systems, where ROS overwhelms the antioxidant capacity. Excessive presence of ROS results in irreversible damage to cell membranes, DNA, and other cellular structures by oxidizing lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases related to hypoxia, cardiotoxicity and ischemia-reperfusion. Here, we describe the participation of OS in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular conditions such as myocardial infarction, anthracycline cardiotoxicity and congenital heart disease. This review focuses on the different clinical events where redox factors and OS are related to cardiovascular pathophysiology, giving to support for novel pharmacological therapies such as omega 3 fatty acids, non-selective betablockers and microRNAs.

  12. Antioxidant Therapeutic Strategies for Cardiovascular Conditions Associated with Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Víctor M.; Carrasco, Rodrigo A.; Figueroa, Elías; Letelier, Pablo; Castillo, Rodrigo L.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) refers to the imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability to scavenge these ROS by endogenous antioxidant systems, where ROS overwhelms the antioxidant capacity. Excessive presence of ROS results in irreversible damage to cell membranes, DNA, and other cellular structures by oxidizing lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases related to hypoxia, cardiotoxicity and ischemia–reperfusion. Here, we describe the participation of OS in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular conditions such as myocardial infarction, anthracycline cardiotoxicity and congenital heart disease. This review focuses on the different clinical events where redox factors and OS are related to cardiovascular pathophysiology, giving to support for novel pharmacological therapies such as omega 3 fatty acids, non-selective betablockers and microRNAs. PMID:28862654

  13. The Medical Ethics of Clinical Therapeutic Trials*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical therapeutic trials, or human experimentation with drugs, are abso- lutely necessary, because data gained from experiments on animals cannot always be directly extrapolated onto man as being applicable. Variations are also found in the different animal species. Tt is impossible to obtain data in animals regarding.

  14. The Therapeutic Relationship and Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Schizophrenia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCabe, Rosemarie; Bullenkamp, Jens; Hansson, Lars; Lauber, Christoph; Martinez-Leal, Rafael; Roessler, Wulf; Salize, Hans Joachim; Svensson, Bengt; Torres-Gonzalez, Francisco; van den Brink, Rob; Wiersma, Durk; Priebe, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous research has shown that a better therapeutic relationship (TR) predicts more positive attitudes towards antipsychotic medication, but did not address whether it is also linked with actual adherence...

  15. The Medical Ethics of Clinical Therapeutic Trials*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cal investigators of new substances, we have a moral obligation towards patients and humanity to conduct these ... Related to tissue irritation and damage on direct con- tact (topical and parenteral agents only). 11. Controlled ... Experimetlfale that the principle of medical morality consists, then, in never performing in man an ...

  16. Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces Oxidative Damage and Alters Antioxidant Defenses after Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenhaar, Fernanda S.; Medeiros, Tássia M.; Heemann, Fernanda M.; Behling, Camile S.; Putti, Jordana S.; Mahl, Camila D.; Verona, Cleber; da Silva, Ana Carolina A.; Guerra, Maria C.; Gonçalves, Carlos A. S.; Oliveira, Vanessa M.; Riveiro, Diego F. M.; Vieira, Silvia R. R.

    2017-01-01

    After cardiac arrest, organ damage consequent to ischemia-reperfusion has been attributed to oxidative stress. Mild therapeutic hypothermia has been applied to reduce this damage, and it may reduce oxidative damage as well. This study aimed to compare oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in patients treated with controlled normothermia versus mild therapeutic hypothermia during postcardiac arrest syndrome. The sample consisted of 31 patients under controlled normothermia (36°C) and 11 patients treated with 24 h mild therapeutic hypothermia (33°C), victims of in- or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Parameters were assessed at 6, 12, 36, and 72 h after cardiac arrest in the central venous blood samples. Hypothermic and normothermic patients had similar S100B levels, a biomarker of brain injury. Xanthine oxidase activity is similar between hypothermic and normothermic patients; however, it decreases posthypothermia treatment. Xanthine oxidase activity is positively correlated with lactate and S100B and inversely correlated with pH, calcium, and sodium levels. Hypothermia reduces malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, markers of oxidative damage. Concomitantly, hypothermia increases the activity of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase while decreasing the activity of serum paraoxonase-1. These findings suggest that mild therapeutic hypothermia reduces oxidative damage and alters antioxidant defenses in postcardiac arrest patients. PMID:28553435

  17. Oxidative stress in cancer and fibrosis: Opportunity for therapeutic intervention with antioxidant compounds, enzymes, and nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingga Morry

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, mainly contributed by reactive oxygen species (ROS, has been implicated in pathogenesis of several diseases. We review two primary examples; fibrosis and cancer. In fibrosis, ROS promote activation and proliferation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, activating TGF-β pathway in an autocrine manner. In cancer, ROS account for its genomic instability, resistance to apoptosis, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Importantly, ROS trigger cancer cell invasion through invadopodia formation as well as extravasation into a distant metastasis site. Use of antioxidant supplements, enzymes, and inhibitors for ROS-generating NADPH oxidases (NOX is a logical therapeutic intervention for fibrosis and cancer. We review such attempts, progress, and challenges. Lastly, we review how nanoparticles with inherent antioxidant activity can also be a promising therapeutic option, considering their additional feature as a delivery platform for drugs, genes, and imaging agents.

  18. Mitochondrial Oxidative Damage in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Implications for Mitochondrially Targeted Antioxidant Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    P. Hemachandra Reddy

    2006-01-01

    The overall aim of this article is to review current therapeutic strategies for treating AD, with a focus on mitochondrially targeted antioxidant treatments. Recent advances in molecular, cellular, and animal model studies of AD have revealed that amyloid precursor protein derivatives, including amyloid beta (Aβ) monomers and oligomers, are likely key factors in tau hyperphosphorylation, mitochondrial oxidative damage, inflammatory changes, and synaptic failure in the brain ...

  19. Antioxidant Potential of a Polyherbal Antimalarial as an Indicator of Its Therapeutic Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protus Arrey Tarkang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nefang is a polyherbal product composed of Mangifera indica (bark and leaf, Psidium guajava, Carica papaya, Cymbopogon citratus, Citrus sinensis, and Ocimum gratissimum (leaves, used for the treatment of malaria. Compounds with antioxidant activity are believed to modulate plasmodial infection. Antioxidant activity of the constituent aqueous plants extracts, in vitro, was evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, total phenolic content (TPC, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP methods and, in vivo, Nefang (100 and 500 mg kg−1 activity was evaluated in carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative stressed Wistar rats. Superoxide dismutase, catalase activities, and lipid peroxidation by the malondialdehyde and total proteins assays were carried out. P. guajava, M. indica leaf, and bark extracts had the highest antioxidant properties in all three assays, with no statistically significant difference. Rats treated with the carbon tetrachloride had a statistically significant decrease in levels of triglycerides, superoxide dismutase, and catalase (P<0.05 and increase in malondialdehyde activity, total protein levels, and liver and renal function markers, whereas rats treated with Nefang showed increased levels in the former and dose-dependent decrease towards normal levels in the later. These results reveal the constituent plants of Nefang that contribute to its in vivo antioxidant potential. This activity is a good indication of the therapeutic potential of Nefang.

  20. The Therapeutic Relationship and Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCabe, Rosemarie; Bullenkamp, Jens; Hansson, Lars; Lauber, Christoph; Martinez-Leal, Rafael; Roessler, Wulf; Salize, Hans Joachim; Svensson, Bengt; Torres-Gonzalez, Francisco; van den Brink, Rob; Wiersma, Durk; Priebe, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous research has shown that a better therapeutic relationship (TR) predicts more positive attitudes towards antipsychotic medication, but did not address whether it is also linked with actual adherence. This study investigated whether the TR is associated with adherence to

  1. Video Editing and Medication to Produce a Therapeutic Self Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowrick, Peter W.; Raeburn, John M.

    1977-01-01

    Self-modeling requires the production of a videotape in which the subject is seen to perform in a model way. A 4-year-old "hyperactive" boy, initially under psychotropic medication, was unable to role play suitable behaviors. Video editing was used to produce a videotape that when watched by the subject, had therapeutic effects as compared with an…

  2. Porous antioxidant polymer microparticles as therapeutic systems for the airway inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Dahee; Kang, Changsun; Jung, Eunkyeong; Yoo, Donghyuck; Wu, Dongmei; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-07-10

    Inhaling steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is the most common treatment for airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. However, frequent steroid administration causes adverse side effects. Therefore, the successful clinical translation of numerous steroidal drugs greatly needs pulmonary drug delivery systems which are formulated from biocompatible and non-immunogenic polymers. We have recently developed a new family of biodegradable polymer, vanillyl alcohol-containing copolyoxalate (PVAX) which is able to scavenge hydrogen peroxide and exert potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. In this work, we report the therapeutic potential of porous PVAX microparticles which encapsulate dexamethasone (DEX) as a therapeutic system for airway inflammatory diseases. PVAX microparticles themselves reduced oxidative stress and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the lung of ovalbumin-challenged asthmatic mice. However, DEX-loaded porous PVAX microparticles showed significantly enhanced therapeutic effects than PVAX microparticles, suggesting the synergistic effects of PVAX with DEX. In addition, PVAX microparticles showed no inflammatory responses to lung tissues. Given their excellent biocompatibility and intrinsic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, PVAX microparticles hold tremendous potential as therapeutic systems for the treatment of airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Medical decision support systems and therapeutics: The role of autopilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woosley, R L; Whyte, J; Mohamadi, A; Romero, K

    2016-02-01

    For decades, medical practice has increasingly relied on prescription medicines to treat, cure, or prevent illness but their net benefit is reduced by prescribing errors that result in adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and tens of thousands of deaths each year. Optimal prescribing requires effective management of massive amounts of data. Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) can help manage information and support optimal therapeutic decisions before errors are made by operating as the prescribers' "autopilot." © 2015 ASCPT.

  4. Therapeutic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of laser acupuncture on patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Atef M M; Ibrahim, Fatma A A; Abd El-Latif, Noha A; Aziz, Samir W; Elwan, Azhar M; Abdel Aziz, Abdel Aziz A; Elgendy, Aliaa; Elgengehy, Fatema T

    2016-07-01

    The laser acupuncture has many potential therapeutic effects. Currently, they are not evaluated for their therapeutic effects on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of laser acupuncture on the oxidative and antioxidative markers, as well as the inflammatory markers and disease activity of RA patients. The study was conducted on 30 RA patients and 20 healthy subjects. The patients were subjected to laser acupuncture (904 nm, 100 mW power output, 1 minute irradiation time, beam area of 1 cm(2) , total energy per point 6 J, energy density 6 J/ cm(2) , irradiance 0.1 W/cm(2) , frequency 10000 Hz, duty-cycle 100%) for 3 days/week for duration of 4 weeks. The acupuncture points of exposure were LI4, TE5, LI 11, DU 14, LIV3, SP6, GB34, and S36. The levels of oxidative and antioxidant markers were determined by spectrophotometric methods whereas the inflammatory markers were determined by ELISA methods. Lastly, using DAS28 scores the disease activity was assessed. After laser acupuncture, the study group revealed significantly increased plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase activities, blood glutathione (GSH), and plasma ATP concentrations, compared to those before treatment (P acupuncture showed highly significant reduction in disease activity (P acupuncture in alleviating oxidative stress and inflammation, improving antioxidant and energy metabolic status, while also suppressing the disease activity in RA patients. Laser acupuncture is a promising treatment modality to reduce the pain and suffering of RA patients because of its efficiency in inhibiting most of the main factors involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:490-497, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Asthma: Implications for Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hemachandra Reddy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a complex, inflammatory disorder characterized by airflow obstruction of variable degrees, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, and airway inflammation. Asthma is caused by environmental factors and a combination of genetic and environmental stimuli. Genetic studies have revealed that multiple loci are involved in the etiology of asthma. Recent cellular, molecular, and animal-model studies have revealed several cellular events that are involved in the progression of asthma, including: increased Th2 cytokines leading to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the airway, and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction in the activated inflammatory cells, leading to tissue injury in the bronchial epithelium. Further, aging and animal model studies have revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are involved and play a large role in asthma. Recent studies using experimental allergic asthmatic mouse models and peripheral cells and tissues from asthmatic humans have revealed antioxidants as promising treatments for people with asthma. This article summarizes the latest research findings on the involvement of inflammatory changes, and mitochondrial dysfunction/oxidative stress in the development and progression of asthma. This article also addresses the relationship between aging and age-related immunity in triggering asthma, the antioxidant therapeutic strategies in treating people with asthma.

  6. The therapeutic relationship and adherence to antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie McCabe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Previous research has shown that a better therapeutic relationship (TR predicts more positive attitudes towards antipsychotic medication, but did not address whether it is also linked with actual adherence. This study investigated whether the TR is associated with adherence to antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: 134 clinicians and 507 of their patients with schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder participated in a European multi-centre study. A logistic regression model examined how the TR as rated by patients and by clinicians is associated with medication adherence, adjusting for clinician clustering and symptom severity. RESULTS: Patient and clinician ratings of the TR were weakly inter-correlated (r(s = 0.13, p = 0.004, but each was independently linked with better adherence. After adjusting for patient rated TR and symptom severity, each unit increase in clinician rated TR was associated with an increase of the odds ratio of good compliance by 65.9% (95% CI: 34.6% to 104.5%. After adjusting for clinician rated TR and symptom severity, for each unit increase in patient rated TR the odds ratio of good compliance was increased by 20.8% (95% CI: 4.4% to 39.8%. CONCLUSIONS: A better TR is associated with better adherence to medication among patients with schizophrenia. Patients' and clinicians' perspectives of the TR are both important, but may reflect distinct aspects.

  7. Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antioxidants are man-made or natural substances that may prevent or delay some types of cell damage. Antioxidants are found in many foods, including fruits and ... are also available as dietary supplements. Examples of antioxidants include Beta-carotene Lutein Lycopene Selenium Vitamin A ...

  8. Existing and potential therapeutic uses for N-acetylcysteine: the need for conversion to intracellular glutathione for antioxidant benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushworth, Gordon F; Megson, Ian L

    2014-02-01

    N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) has long been used therapeutically for the treatment of acetaminophen (paracetamol) overdose, acting as a precursor for the substrate (l-cysteine) in synthesis of hepatic glutathione (GSH) depleted through drug conjugation. Other therapeutic uses of NAC have also emerged, including the alleviation of clinical symptoms of cystic fibrosis through cysteine-mediated disruption of disulfide cross-bridges in the glycoprotein matrix in mucus. More recently, however, a wide range of clinical studies have reported on the use of NAC as an antioxidant, most notably in the protection against contrast-induced nephropathy and thrombosis. The results from these studies are conflicting and a consensus is yet to be reached regarding the merits or otherwise of NAC in the antioxidant setting. This review seeks to re-evaluate the mechanism of action of NAC as a precursor for GSH synthesis in the context of its activity as an "antioxidant". Results from recent studies are examined to establish whether the pre-requisites for effective NAC-induced antioxidant activity (i.e. GSH depletion and the presence of functional metabolic pathways for conversion of NAC to GSH) have received adequate consideration in the interpretation of the data. A key conclusion is a reinforcement of the concept that NAC should not be considered to be a powerful antioxidant in its own right: its strength is the targeted replenishment of GSH in deficient cells and it is likely to be ineffective in cells replete in GSH. © 2013.

  9. Bioprospecting the Curculigoside-Cinnamic Acid-Rich Fraction from Molineria latifolia Rhizome as a Potential Antioxidant Therapeutic Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Der Jiun; Chan, Kim Wei; Sarega, Nadarajan; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Ithnin, Hairuszah; Ismail, Maznah

    2016-06-17

    Increasing evidence from both experimental and clinical studies depicts the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Specifically, disruption of homeostatic redox balance in accumulated body fat mass leads to obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Strategies for the restoration of redox balance, potentially by exploring potent plant bioactives, have thus become the focus of therapeutic intervention. The present study aimed to bioprospect the potential use of the curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction from Molineria latifolia rhizome as an antioxidant therapeutic agent. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) isolated from M. latifolia rhizome methanolic extract (RME) contained the highest amount of phenolic compounds, particularly curculigoside and cinnamic acid. EAF demonstrated glycation inhibitory activities in both glucose- and fructose-mediated glycation models. In addition, in vitro chemical-based and cellular-based antioxidant assays showed that EAF exhibited high antioxidant activities and a protective effect against oxidative damage in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Although the efficacies of individual phenolics differed depending on the structure and concentration, a correlational study revealed strong correlations between total phenolic contents and antioxidant capacities. The results concluded that enriched phenolic contents in EAF (curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction) contributed to the overall better reactivity. Our data suggest that this bioactive-rich fraction warrants therapeutic potential against oxidative stress-related disorders.

  10. Bioprospecting the Curculigoside-Cinnamic Acid-Rich Fraction from Molineria latifolia Rhizome as a Potential Antioxidant Therapeutic Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der Jiun Ooi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence from both experimental and clinical studies depicts the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Specifically, disruption of homeostatic redox balance in accumulated body fat mass leads to obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Strategies for the restoration of redox balance, potentially by exploring potent plant bioactives, have thus become the focus of therapeutic intervention. The present study aimed to bioprospect the potential use of the curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction from Molineria latifolia rhizome as an antioxidant therapeutic agent. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF isolated from M. latifolia rhizome methanolic extract (RME contained the highest amount of phenolic compounds, particularly curculigoside and cinnamic acid. EAF demonstrated glycation inhibitory activities in both glucose- and fructose-mediated glycation models. In addition, in vitro chemical-based and cellular-based antioxidant assays showed that EAF exhibited high antioxidant activities and a protective effect against oxidative damage in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Although the efficacies of individual phenolics differed depending on the structure and concentration, a correlational study revealed strong correlations between total phenolic contents and antioxidant capacities. The results concluded that enriched phenolic contents in EAF (curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction contributed to the overall better reactivity. Our data suggest that this bioactive-rich fraction warrants therapeutic potential against oxidative stress-related disorders.

  11. Therapeutic effects of orally administrated antioxidant drugs on acute noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, C-H; Du, X; Floyd, R A; Kopke, R D

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the dose-dependent therapeutic effect of the orally administrated antioxidant drugs [4-hydroxy alpha-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone (4-OHPBN) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] on acute noise-induced hearing loss because oral administration is the most commonly used method of drug administration due to its convenience, safety, and economical efficiency. Thirty chinchilla were exposed to a 105 dB octave band noise centered at 4 kHz for 6 h and randomly assigned to a control group (saline only) and three experimental groups [4-OHPBN (10 mg/kg) plus NAC (20 mg/kg), 4-OHPBN (20 mg/kg) plus NAC (50 mg/kg), and 4-OHPBN (50 mg/kg) plus NAC (100 mg/kg)]. The drugs were orally administrated beginning 4 h after noise exposure and then administered twice daily for the next 2 days. Permanent auditory brainstem response threshold shifts, distortion product otoacoustic emission threshold shifts, and the percentage of missing outer hair cell were determined. The oral administration significantly reduced permanent hearing threshold shift, distortion product otoacoustic emission threshold shift, and the percentage of missing outer hair cell in a dose-dependent manner. This result demonstrates that orally administered drugs can treat acute noise-induced hearing loss in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests that oral administration was effective in treating acute noise-induced hearing loss as in intraperitoneal administration.

  12. Free radicals and other reactive oxygen metabolites: clinical relevance and the therapeutic efficacy of antioxidant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkley, G B

    1993-05-01

    As in any new field, justifiable enthusiasm for the potential for antioxidant therapy has led to hyperbole, hastily designed, poorly conceived clinical trials, and premature reporting of uncontrolled, anecdotal indicators of efficacy that have not held up when subjected to close scrutiny or more careful, controlled trial design. This tendency has been augmented by strong pressure for early positive results from a few, but not most, members of the pharmaceutical industry and by a few clinicians in highly competitive fields who were anxious not to be left behind. The sobering reality of negative or, even worse, indeterminate clinical trials has culled the field and educated those that remain. As a result, we are beginning to see the publication of quite promising results from large, well-controlled, carefully designed clinical studies, many, but not all, of which are quite promising. This has been associated with a much better understanding of the basic mechanism of free radical-mediated human disease, without which further substantial progress would be quite limited. Because the manipulation of oxidant-mediated tissue injury represents treating disease at its most basic level, the therapeutic potential of this approach remains not only promising but exciting.

  13. Effect of therapeutic interchange on medication reconciliation during hospitalization and upon discharge in a geriatric population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Wang

    Full Text Available Therapeutic interchange of a same class medication for an outpatient medication is a widespread practice during hospitalization in response to limited hospital formularies. However, therapeutic interchange may increase risk of medication errors. The objective was to characterize the prevalence and safety of therapeutic interchange.Secondary analysis of a transitions of care study. We included patients over age 64 admitted to a tertiary care hospital between 2009-2010 with heart failure, pneumonia, or acute coronary syndrome who were taking a medication in any of six commonly-interchanged classes on admission: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS. There was limited electronic medication reconciliation support available. Main measures were presence and accuracy of therapeutic interchange during hospitalization, and rate of medication reconciliation errors on discharge. We examined charts of 303 patients taking 555 medications at time of admission in the six medication classes of interest. A total of 244 (44.0% of medications were therapeutically interchanged to an approved formulary drug at admission, affecting 64% of the study patients. Among the therapeutically interchanged drugs, we identified 78 (32.0% suspected medication conversion errors. The discharge medication reconciliation error rate was 11.5% among the 244 therapeutically interchanged medications, compared with 4.2% among the 311 unchanged medications (relative risk [RR] 2.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-5.19.Therapeutic interchange was prevalent among hospitalized patients in this study and elevates the risk for potential medication errors during and after hospitalization. Improved electronic systems for managing therapeutic interchange and medication reconciliation

  14. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of the Newer Anti-Epilepsy Medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Krasowski

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past twenty years, 14 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States and/or Europe. These drugs are eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. In general, the clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring has not been established in clinical trials for these new anticonvulsants, and clear guidelines for drug monitoring have yet to be defined. The antiepileptic drugs with the strongest justifications for drug monitoring are lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, and zonisamide. Stiripentol and tiagabine are strongly protein bound and are candidates for free drug monitoring. Therapeutic drug monitoring has lower utility for gabapentin, pregabalin, and vigabatrin. Measurement of salivary drug concentrations has potential utility for therapeutic drug monitoring of lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and topiramate. Therapeutic drug monitoring of the new antiepileptic drugs will be discussed in managing patients with epilepsy.

  15. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of the Newer Anti-Epilepsy Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past twenty years, 14 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States and/or Europe. These drugs are eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. In general, the clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring has not been established in clinical trials for these new anticonvulsants, and clear guidelines for drug monitoring have yet to be defined. The antiepileptic drugs with the strongest justifications for drug monitoring are lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, and zonisamide. Stiripentol and tiagabine are strongly protein bound and are candidates for free drug monitoring. Therapeutic drug monitoring has lower utility for gabapentin, pregabalin, and vigabatrin. Measurement of salivary drug concentrations has potential utility for therapeutic drug monitoring of lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and topiramate. Therapeutic drug monitoring of the new antiepileptic drugs will be discussed in managing patients with epilepsy. PMID:20640233

  16. The Emerging Therapeutic Role of Medical Foods for Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Brian P.; Reyes Ramos, Emmanuel; Borum, Marie

    2017-01-01

    In addition to drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that treat, cure, or mitigate disease, medical foods are a tool to help manage chronic conditions and diseases. A medical food, according to the FDA, is a food that is developed to be eaten or administered enterally under the guidance of a physician and that is meant for the specific dietary management of a condition or disease for which distinctive nutritional requirements, based upon known scientific principles, are established by medical evaluation. A variety of medical foods exist to help manage a wide range of medical conditions, from Alzheimer disease to HIV-associated enteropathy. EnteraGam contains serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, which has been studied extensively in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and HIV-associated enteropathy. VSL#3 is a probiotic that is used in pouchitis for patients with ulcerative colitis as well as irritable bowel syndrome. Modulen IBD is a whole-protein, sole-nutrition formulation used to manage the active phase of Crohn’s disease. Vivonex is an elemental diet that is used in a variety of diseases associated with severe gastrointestinal dysfunction. Medical foods are safe and must have proven efficacy in helping to manage a variety of gastrointestinal conditions and diseases. These therapies represent tools that can be used prior or in addition to traditional medical therapies. This article discusses the history and development of medical foods under the FDA and concentrates specifically on medical foods used to help manage diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:28450817

  17. Blurred Boundaries: The Therapeutics and Politics of Medical Marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    For 5 millennia, Cannabis sativa has been used throughout the world medically, recreationally, and spiritually. From the mid-19th century to the 1930s, American physicians prescribed it for a plethora of indications, until the federal government started imposing restrictions on its use, culminating in 1970 with the US Congress classifying it as a Schedule I substance, illegal, and without medical value. Simultaneous with this prohibition, marijuana became the United States' most widely used illicit recreational drug, a substance generally regarded as pleasurable and relaxing without the addictive dangers of opioids or stimulants. Meanwhile, cannabis never lost its cachet in alternative medicine circles, going mainstream in 1995 when California became the first of 16 states to date to legalize its medical use, despite the federal ban. Little about cannabis is straightforward. Its main active ingredient, δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was not isolated until 1964, and not until the 1990s were the far-reaching modulatory activities of the endocannabinoid system in the human body appreciated. This system's elucidation raises the possibility of many promising pharmaceutical applications, even as draconian federal restrictions that hamstring research show no signs of softening. Recreational use continues unabated, despite growing evidence of marijuana's addictive potential, particularly in the young, and its propensity for inducing and exacerbating psychotic illness in the susceptible. Public approval drives medical marijuana legalization efforts without the scientific data normally required to justify a new medication's introduction. This article explores each of these controversies, with the intent of educating physicians to decide for themselves whether marijuana is panacea, scourge, or both. PubMed searches were conducted using the following keywords: medical marijuana, medical cannabis, endocannabinoid system, CB1 receptors, CB2 receptors, THC, cannabidiol, nabilone

  18. Blurred boundaries: the therapeutics and politics of medical marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J Michael

    2012-02-01

    For 5 millennia, Cannabis sativa has been used throughout the world medically, recreationally, and spiritually. From the mid-19th century to the 1930s, American physicians prescribed it for a plethora of indications, until the federal government started imposing restrictions on its use, culminating in 1970 with the US Congress classifying it as a Schedule I substance, illegal, and without medical value. Simultaneous with this prohibition, marijuana became the United States' most widely used illicit recreational drug, a substance generally regarded as pleasurable and relaxing without the addictive dangers of opioids or stimulants. Meanwhile, cannabis never lost its cachet in alternative medicine circles, going mainstream in 1995 when California became the first of 16 states to date to legalize its medical use, despite the federal ban. Little about cannabis is straightforward. Its main active ingredient, δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was not isolated until 1964, and not until the 1990s were the far-reaching modulatory activities of the endocannabinoid system in the human body appreciated. This system's elucidation raises the possibility of many promising pharmaceutical applications, even as draconian federal restrictions that hamstring research show no signs of softening. Recreational use continues unabated, despite growing evidence of marijuana's addictive potential, particularly in the young, and its propensity for inducing and exacerbating psychotic illness in the susceptible. Public approval drives medical marijuana legalization efforts without the scientific data normally required to justify a new medication's introduction. This article explores each of these controversies, with the intent of educating physicians to decide for themselves whether marijuana is panacea, scourge, or both. PubMed searches were conducted using the following keywords: medical marijuana, medical cannabis, endocannabinoid system, CB1 receptors, CB2 receptors, THC, cannabidiol, nabilone

  19. Evaluation of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiulcer properties of Vaccinium leschenaultii Wight: A therapeutic supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima Nagulsamy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In folklore systems of medicine, bilberry fruit and leaf extracts have been used for the treatment of diarrhoea, dysentery, diabetes, inflammation, and ulcer. The present study was to determine antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiulcerogenic activities of Vaccinium leschenaultii Wight leaf and fruit. The phenolic, tannin, and flavonoid contents of V. leschenaultii leaf and fruit were quantified and were subjected to assess their antioxidant potential using various in vitro systems such as 1, 1 diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical scavenging, phosphomolybdenum, and ferric reducing antioxidant power reduction activities. Based on the antioxidant potential, acetone and methanol extracts of leaf and fruit were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity and protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric damage in a rat model. The quantification of secondary metabolites shows that the phenolic, flavonoid, and tannin contents are higher in methanol extracts of fruit and leaf. The results of antioxidant assays exhibited that the methanol extracts of leaf possesses better 1, 1 diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activity. Oral administration of the acetone fruit and leaf extracts of V. leschenaultii were capable of reducing the edema formation in rats against carrageenan and egg albumin induced inflammation. Moreover, leaf and fruit acetone extracts at the dose of 400 mg/kg highly inhibited ulcer formation. The study concluded that the plant substances such as total phenols, flavonoids along with appreciable antioxidant potential could be the supportive evidence to prove both the anti-inflammatory and antiulcer activities of V. leschenaultii. The traditional importance of this plant will help to reveal the potential of plant to provide alternative phytotherapeutics for human health.

  20. Association between the antioxidant uric acid and depression and antidepressant medication use in 96 989 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, M K; Kobylecki, C J; Afzal, S

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the last decade, several studies have suggested that depression is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant defenses. We tested the hypothesis that high levels of the antioxidant uric acid are associated with lower risk of hospitalization with depression...... and use of prescription antidepressant medication. METHOD: We examined plasma levels of the antioxidant uric acid in 96 989 individuals from two independent cohort studies. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression models were multivariable adjusted for age, gender, alcohol, smoking......, income, body mass index, C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, triglycerides, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and intake of meat and vegetables. Results were performed separately in each study and combined in a meta-analysis. RESULTS: In both studies, high uric acid was associated with lower risk...

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Medication on ADHD: Implications for School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPaul, George J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Information is presented to familiarize school psychologists with (1) behavioral effects and side-effects associated with stimulant medications used for the Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); (2) factors to consider in recommending medicine trials for individual children; (3) methods to assess treatment response within schools; and…

  2. Influence of naturally occurring antioxidants on magnetic nanoparticles: risks, benefits, and possible therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdík, Stefan; Vrbovská, Hanka; Olas, Adam; Babincová, Melánia

    2013-06-01

    We have studied interaction of well known antioxidant L-ascorbic acid with magnetic nanoparticles containing insoluble Fe(III) in their core. In analogy with ferritin, mobilization of iron in the form of water soluble Fe(II) was observed, especially pronounced at higher temperatures. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals are produced. These results suggest possible harmful effects of widely used magnetic nanoparticles as a MRI contrast agents in combination with overload of organism with ascorbic acid in some specific conditions, like fever of patient. On the other hand combination of magnetic nanoparticles and ascorbic acid may be used for a cancer therapy using alternating magnetic field for the release of Fe(II) via Néel relaxation of magnetic moment of used nanoparticles. We have further found that lipoic acid is an efficient antioxidant scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by Fenton reaction from Fe(II).

  3. Role of Antioxidants in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury: New Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Olatz; Álvarez, Antonia; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Urtasun, Andoni; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-01-28

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage is an alarming health and economic problem in spite of the advances in neonatal care. It can cause mortality or detrimental neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy, motor impairment and cognitive deficits in neonates. When hypoxia-ischemia occurs, a multi-faceted cascade of events starts out, which can eventually cause cell death. Lower levels of oxygen due to reduced blood supply increase the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to oxidative stress, a higher concentration of free cytosolic calcium and impaired mitochondrial function, triggering the activation of apoptotic pathways, DNA fragmentation and cell death. The high incidence of this type of lesion in newborns can be partly attributed to the fact that the developing brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Since antioxidants can safely interact with free radicals and terminate that chain reaction before vital molecules are damaged, exogenous antioxidant therapy may have the potential to diminish cellular damage caused by hypoxia-ischemia. In this review, we focus on the neuroprotective effects of antioxidant treatments against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, in the light of the most recent advances.

  4. Role of Antioxidants in Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury: New Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Olatz; Álvarez, Antonia; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Urtasun, Andoni; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic brain damage is an alarming health and economic problem in spite of the advances in neonatal care. It can cause mortality or detrimental neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy, motor impairment and cognitive deficits in neonates. When hypoxia–ischemia occurs, a multi-faceted cascade of events starts out, which can eventually cause cell death. Lower levels of oxygen due to reduced blood supply increase the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to oxidative stress, a higher concentration of free cytosolic calcium and impaired mitochondrial function, triggering the activation of apoptotic pathways, DNA fragmentation and cell death. The high incidence of this type of lesion in newborns can be partly attributed to the fact that the developing brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Since antioxidants can safely interact with free radicals and terminate that chain reaction before vital molecules are damaged, exogenous antioxidant therapy may have the potential to diminish cellular damage caused by hypoxia–ischemia. In this review, we focus on the neuroprotective effects of antioxidant treatments against perinatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, in the light of the most recent advances. PMID:28134843

  5. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Comparison of Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants radioprotection potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Slava; Popov, Dmitri; Lisenkov, Nikolai

    Introduction: This experimental study of biological effects of the Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants which were used for prophylaxis and treatment of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by high doses of the low-LET radiation. An important role of Reactive Oxyden Species (Singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions and bio-radicals)in development of the Acute Radiation Syndromes could be defined as a "central dogma" of radiobiology. Oxida-tion and damages of lipids, proteins, DNA, and RNA are playing active role in development of postradiation apoptosis. However, the therapeutic role of antioxidants in modification of a postradiation injury caused by high doses of radiation remains controversial.Previous stud-ies had revealed that antioxidants did not increase a survival rate of mammals with severe forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by High Doses of the low-LET radiation. The Antiradiation Vaccine(ARV) contains toxoid forms of the Radiation Toxins(RT) from the Specific Radiation Determinants Group (SRD). The RT SRD has toxic and antigenic prop-erties at the same time and stimulates a specific antibody elaboration and humoral response form activated acquired immune system. The blocking antiradiation antibodies induce an im-munologically specific effect and have inhibiting effects on radiation induced neuro-toxicity, vascular-toxicity, gastrointestinal toxcity, hematopoietic toxicity, and radiation induced cytol-ysis of selected groups of cells that are sensitive to radiation. Methods and materials: Scheme of experiments: 1. Irradiated animals with development of Cerebrovascular ARS (Cv-ARS), Cardiovascular ARS (Cr-ARS) Gastrointestinal ARS(GI-ARS), Hematopoietic ARS (H-ARS) -control -were treated with placebo administration. 2. Irradiated animals were treated with antioxidants prophylaxisis and treatment of Cv-ARS, Cr-SRS, GI-ARS, Hp-ARS forms of the ARS. 3. irradiated animals were treated with radioprotection by Antiradiation Vaccine

  6. Rationale of combination therapy with antioxidants in medical management of Peyronie’s disease: results of clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulis, Gianni; Paulis, Andrea; Romano, Gennaro; Barletta, Davide; Fabiani, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a connective tissue disorder involving the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa of the penis. We have published several studies describing a “combined therapy” for PD patients, but the present study aims to clearly demonstrate how the association between various antioxidants in PD treatment can significantly increase the likelihood of therapeutic success. We used the following substances: silymarin, ginkgo biloba, vitamin E, bilberry, topical diclofenac sodium, and pentoxifylline (PTX). We analyzed the therapeutic impact and possible side effects of one or more antioxidants in patients with early-stage PD. To clearly prove that it is possible to achieve better results when combining more than one agent, we designed this study with five treatment groups, corresponding, respectively, to the administration of a single oral antioxidant; two oral antioxidants; three oral antioxidants; five oral antioxidants + local diclofenac; and five oral antioxidants + local diclofenac + PTX by perilesional injection. One hundred and twenty patients were assigned to five groups of treatment designed according to the abovementioned study aim. Outcomes after 6 months of treatment showed that combined antioxidant therapy is effective in treating PD. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the treatment groups with regard to: improvement and disappearance of penile pain; percentage of reduction in the volume of penile plaque; reduction in penile curvature; recovery of erectile function in patients with erectile dysfunction; increase in the International Index of Erectile Function score; and reduction of psychosexual impact. Furthermore, we observed that the clinical efficacy of combined therapy is greater when topical use of diclofenac gel and perilesional injection of PTX are added to oral treatment with more than one antioxidant. Although several articles have already been published reporting the effectiveness of combined

  7. Mitochondria-targeted Antioxidants as a Prospective Therapeutic Strategy for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetisova, Elena; Chernyak, Boris; Korshunova, Galina; Muntyan, Maria; Skulachev, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most widespread chronic neurological diseases that manifests itself by progressive demyelination in the central nervous system. The study of MS pathogenesis begins with the onset of the relapsing-remitting phase of the disease, which becomes apparent due to microglia activation, neuroinflammation and demyelination/ remyelination in the white matter. The following progressive phase is accompanied by severe neurological symptoms when demyelination and neurodegeneration are spread to both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss a possible role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in MS pathogenesis, mechanisms of mtROS generation and effects of some mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as potential components of MS therapy. In the early phase of MS, mtROS stimulate NLRP3 inflammasomes, which is critical for the formation of local inflammatory lesions. Later, mtROS contribute to blood-brain barrier disruption induced by mediators of inflammation, followed by infiltration of leukocytes. ROS generated by leukocytes and activated microglia promote mitochondrial dysfunction and oligodendrocyte cell death. In the progressive phase, neurodegeneration also depends on excessive mtROS generation. Currently, only a few immunomodulatory drugs are approved for treatment of MS. These drugs mainly reduce the number of relapses but do not stop MS progression. Certain dietary and synthetic antioxidants have demonstrated encouraging results in animal models of MS but were ineffective in the completed clinical trials. Novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidants could be promising components of combined programs for MS therapy considering that they can be applied at extremely low doses and concurrently demonstrate anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Teaching of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics in UK medical schools: current status in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Lelia; Haq, Inam; Maxwell, Simon; Llewelyn, Martin

    2010-07-01

    Junior doctors feel poorly prepared by their training in Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and commonly make prescribing errors. Since 1993 the General Medical Council's guidance on undergraduate medical education 'Tomorrow's Doctors' has emphasized the integration of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics teaching within the medical curriculum. With the publication of a new version of Tomorrow's Doctors in 2009, medical schools will be further revising their Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics teaching. Although we know what the recommendations for undergraduate teaching of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics teaching are, there are no published data describing what is currently happening in UK medical schools. This paper describes the course structures, volume and range of teaching and assessment of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics in the UK in 2009. Our data provide a foundation for schools looking to revise the Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Teaching in the light of Tomorrow's Doctors 2009. To describe the current structure, delivery and assessment of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (CPT) teaching in UK medical schools. An online questionnaire was distributed to the person with overall responsibility for CPT teaching at all UK medical schools in June 2009. Thirty of the 32 UK medical schools responded. 60% of schools have a CPT course although in 72% this was an integrated vertical theme. At 70% of schools pharmacologists have overall responsibility for CPT teaching (clinical 67%, non-clinical 33%); at 20% teaching is run by a non-specialist clinician and at 7% by a pharmacist. Teaching is commonly delivered by NHS clinicians (87%) and clinical pharmacists (80%) using lectures (90%) but additionally 50% of schools use e-Learning and 63% have a student formulary. CPT is assessed throughout the curriculum at many schools through written, practical examinations and course work. 90% of schools have specific CPT content in their

  9. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Activity in Hypothermia and Rewarming: Can RONS Modulate the Beneficial Effects of Therapeutic Hypothermia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Alva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothermia is a condition in which core temperature drops below the level necessary to maintain bodily functions. The decrease in temperature may disrupt some physiological systems of the body, including alterations in microcirculation and reduction of oxygen supply to tissues. The lack of oxygen can induce the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals (RONS, followed by oxidative stress, and finally, apoptosis and/or necrosis. Furthermore, since the hypothermia is inevitably followed by a rewarming process, we should also consider its effects. Despite hypothermia and rewarming inducing injury, many benefits of hypothermia have been demonstrated when used to preserve brain, cardiac, hepatic, and intestinal function against ischemic injury. This review gives an overview of the effects of hypothermia and rewarming on the oxidant/antioxidant balance and provides hypothesis for the role of reactive oxygen species in therapeutic hypothermia.

  10. [Antioxidant therapeutic efficiency after the use of carnitine in infertile patients with bacterial or non bacterial prostato-vesiculo-epididymitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, E; Rubino, C; De Palma, A; Longo, G; Lauretta, M; Consoli, S; Arancio, A

    2001-03-01

    In the male genital tract, reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction generated by infiltrating WBC or spermatozoa is one of the major causes of defective sperm function. Recently, we demonstrated that prostato-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE) is the male accessory gland infection more crucial for the establishment of this cellular (sperm and/or WBC oxidative) response. This biochemical stress is due to an imbalance of pro and antioxidants factors and persists even after treatment with antimicrobials. Thus, the antioxidative properties of Carnitines (in terms of combined "Carnitine-Acetil-Carnitine" system) have currently found more attention as part of antimicrobial therapies. In this study, we compared which antioxidative strategy was more beneficial for the treatment of PVE. We selected two groups of infertile patients. One group consisted of 55 abacterial PVE patients (mean age 34 yrs, range 27-40) (group A); the other included other 35 bacterial PVE patients (mean age 35 yrs, range 28-38) (group B). Each group was randomly subdivided into the following treatment subsets: 1) A1 (n = 14) and B1 (n = 23) subsets received respectively a combined antibiotic and/or antiphlogistic regimen (x 14 days/ monthly x 3 months) (first step) followed by L-Carnitine 1 g x 2 day + acetyl-Carnitine 0.5 g x 2/day x other 3 months (second step) and finally no drug x other 3 months (third step). 2) A2 (n = 8) and B2 (n = 16) subsets received, for a 3 month period, in the meantime the combined antibiotic and/or antiphlogistic regimen (x 14 days/monthly) and L-Carnitine 1 g x 2/day + acetyl-Carnitine 0.5 g x 2/day (first step) and finally no drug x other 3 months (second step). 3) A3 (n = 8) and B3 (n = 12) subsets received for a 3-month period L-Carnitine 1 g x 2/day + acetyl-Carnitine 0.5 g x 2 day (first step) and finally no drug x other 3 months (second step). Before and after each step of the therapeutical design, all patients underwent semen and quantitative bacteriological

  11. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of various solvents extracts of Abutilon theophrasti Medic. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chunlian; Yang, Caixia; Zhang, Dexian; Han, Limei; Liu, Yaochuan; Guo, Wenjie; Fan, Ruiming; Liu, Mingchun

    2017-05-01

    This paper described the extraction procedure of six extracts from Abutilon theophrasti Medic. leaves and evaluated antioxidant and antibacterial activity of different extracts by hydroxyl radical, DPPH radical scavenging, broth micro-dilution and agar-well diffusion methods. The six extracts were prepared by the two extraction procedures: (I) water was the extraction solvent; (II) 90% alcohol extract was extracted by petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol in turn. Extract yields were 7.34%, 7.31%, 0.45%, 0.12%, 2.70% and 5.68% for extract I to VI. It was revealed that the various extracts had effective antibacterial activity against four test strains from Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Streptococcus (ATCC 49619), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) and Salmonella (ATCC 01303); meanwhile, the six extracts demonstrated potent antioxidant activity, achieved by hydroxyl radical and DPPH radical scavenging assay. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for the bacterial species ranged from 2.21 to 539.46 mg/ml, diameter of inhibition zone ranged from 2.08 to 15.05mm. The scavenging •OH and DPPH• rates were 62.37% to 81.86% with the concentration 0.06 to 1.89mg/ml and 37.80% to 81.23% with the concentration 1.07 to 35.52mg/ml. According to the results, these extracts have antioxidant and antibacterial activity. In view of all the facts collectively, the six extracts will become natural and nontoxic antioxidant and antibacterial agent, and be applied in food and pharmaceutical industries for the prevention or treatment caused by microorganisms and free radicals.

  12. Establishing and strengthening a medicine and therapeutics committee in a medical college in Nepal: initial experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P Ravi; Humagain, Baburam; Piryani, R M; Jha, Nisha; Osti, Bidur

    2009-04-01

    Drug and Therapeutics Committees (DTCs) serve as a forum to bring together various stakeholders to improve drug use. DTCs are a key intervention to promote rational use of medicines. DTCs are however, functioning in only a limited number of hospitals in Nepal. A Medicine and Therapeutics Committee (MTC) was started at KIST Medical College, a new medical school in Lalitpur district, Nepal to promote the rational use of medicines in February 2008. The MTC has members from various departments and the full support of the administration. The MTC has been involved in preparing the hospital medicine list and limiting the number of brands available in the pharmacy. Measures to regulate pharmaceutical promotion have been undertaken. Pharmacovigilance and medication counseling activities have been started. Educational programs for various levels of staff are regularly carried out and drug use in the hospital is periodically monitored. Initial experiences regarding MTC functioning is positive.

  13. Conversational pursuit of medication compliance in a Therapeutic Community for persons diagnosed with mental disorders*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortari, Luigina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this article, we contribute to the debate on medication compliance by exploring the conversational “technologies” entailed in the process of promoting clients’ adherence to psychopharmacological prescriptions. Using a case study approach, we explore how medication-related problems are dealt with in conversational interaction between the staff members and the clients of a mental health Therapeutic Community (TC) in Italy. Method Four meetings between two staff members (Barbara and Massimo) and the clients of the TC were audio-recorded. The data were transcribed and analyzed using the method of Conversation Analysis. Results Barbara and Massimo recur to practices of topic articulation to promote talk that references the clients’ failure to take the medications. Through these practices they deal with the practical problem of mobilizing the clients’ cooperation in courses of action that fit into the institutional agenda of fostering medication adherence. Conclusions Barbara and Massimo’s conversational practices appear to reflect the assumption that medication-related problems can be reduced to compliance problems. This assumption works to make the clients accountable for their failure to take the medications while shaping a conversational environment that is unreceptive to their complaints about side effects. Implications for the understanding of mental health rehabilitation practice in TCs are discussed. Implications of RehabilitationTherapeutic community staff members should be aware of the challenges and blocks in communicating with their clients.Therapeutic communities can promote staff members’ awareness of communication challenges through reflective workshops in which they can jointly view and comment on interaction with their clients.Reflective workshops can be used to raise awareness of the presuppositions underlying therapeutic community staff members’ communication practices. PMID:24053481

  14. Role of simvastatin and/or antioxidant vitamins in therapeutic angiogenesis in experimental diabetic hindlimb ischemia: effects on capillary density, angiogenesis markers, and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Azab, Mona F; Hazem, Reem M; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2012-09-05

    Therapeutic angiogenesis has emerged as an attractive approach for the management of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic patients. Oxidative stress generated and aggravated by prolonged hyperglycemia may interfere with and destroy the newly formed blood vessels. Angiogenic effect of simvastatin has been reported; however, its exact mechanism is yet to be evaluated. In addition, the exact role of antioxidant vitamins in diabetic peripheral arterial disease is still controversial. The present study was undertaken to investigate the therapeutic potential of simvastatin and antioxidant vitamins (E and C) and their combined effects on angiogenesis in diabetic hind-limb ischemia. Streptozotocin diabetic rats were treated for 6 weeks with simvastatin either alone or in combination with vitamin E or vitamin C. Parameters of angiogenesis, nitric oxide, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and oxidative stress markers were evaluated. CD31 immunostaining revealed an increased capillary density in ischemic gastrocnemious tissue of diabetic rats treated with either simvastatin or its combination with vitamin C. This effect was accompanied by up-regulated plasma levels of HO-1, nitric oxide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its intra-muscular receptor type-2 (Flk-1). Tissue reduced glutathione and antioxidant enzymes activities were normalized in groups treated with antioxidant vitamins or their combination with simvastatin with concomitant blunting of lipid peroxidation. Vitamins E and C, through their antioxidant effects, evidently enhanced the angiogenic effect of simvastatin in ischemic diabetic muscle. Hence, the use of antioxidant vitamins combined with statins to induce therapeutic angiogenesis is a promising strategy in the management of diabetes-associated peripheral arterial disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical Therapies for Stricturing Crohn's Disease: Efficacy and Cross-Sectional Imaging Predictors of Therapeutic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Cécile; Perrey, Antoine; Lambert, Céline; Pereira, Bruno; Goutte, Marion; Dubois, Anne; Goutorbe, Felix; Dapoigny, Michel; Bommelaer, Gilles; Hordonneau, Constance; Buisson, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    Medical therapy efficacy remains controversial in stricturing Crohn's disease. Cross-sectional imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging, has been suggested as very helpful to guide therapeutic decision making. To assess efficacy and predictors of therapeutic failure in patients receiving medical treatments for stricturing Crohn's disease. In this retrospective study, therapeutic failure was defined as symptomatic stricture leading to surgical or endoscopic therapeutics, hospitalization, treatment discontinuation or additional therapy and short-term clinical response as clinical improvement assessed by two physicians. The 55 cross-sectional imaging examinations (33 magnetic resonance imaging and 22 CT scan) before starting medical therapy were analyzed independently by two radiologists. Results were expressed as hazard ratio (HR) or odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Among 84 patients, therapeutic failure rate within 60 months was 66.6%. In multivariate analysis, Crohn's disease diagnosis after 40 years old (HR 3.9, 95% CI [1.37-11.2], p = 0.011), small stricture luminal diameter (HR 1.34, 95% CI [1.01-1.80], p = 0.046), increased stricture wall thickness (HR 1.23, 95% CI [1.04-1.46], p = 0.013) and fistula with abscess (HR 5.63, 95% CI [1.64-19.35], p = 0.006) were associated with therapeutic failure, while anti-TNF combotherapy (HR 0.17, 95% CI [0.40-0.71], p = 0.015) prevented it. Considering 108 therapeutic sequences, the short-term clinical response rate was 65.7%. In multivariate analysis, male gender (OR 0.15, 95% CI [0.03-0.64], p = 0.011), fistula with abscess (OR 0.09, 95% CI [0.01-0.77], p = 0.028) and comb sign (OR 0.23, 95% CI [0.005-0.97], p = 0.047) were associated with short-term clinical failure. Anti-TNF combotherapy seemed to prevent therapeutic failure, and cross-sectional imaging should be systematically performed to help medical management in stricturing Crohn's disease.

  16. Rationale of combination therapy with antioxidants in medical management of Peyronie’s disease: results of clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulis G

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gianni Paulis,1,2 Andrea Paulis,3 Gennaro Romano,4 Davide Barletta,5 Andrea Fabiani6 1Department of Surgical Sciences, Andrology Center, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Uro-Andrology, Peyronie’s Disease Care Center, Rome, Italy; 3Section of Psycho-Sexology, Peyronie’s Disease Care Center, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Urologic Oncology, Section of Avellino, Italian League against Cancer, Avellino, Italy; 5Department of Urology, Andrology Center, San Matteo Hospital, Pavia, Italy; 6Department of Surgery, Section of Urology and Andrology, Macerata, Italy Abstract: Peyronie’s disease (PD is a connective tissue disorder involving the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa of the penis. We have published several studies describing a “combined therapy” for PD patients, but the present study aims to clearly demonstrate how the association between various antioxidants in PD treatment can significantly increase the likelihood of therapeutic success. We used the following substances: silymarin, ginkgo biloba, vitamin E, bilberry, topical diclofenac sodium, and pentoxifylline (PTX. We analyzed the therapeutic impact and possible side effects of one or more antioxidants in patients with early-stage PD. To clearly prove that it is possible to achieve better results when combining more than one agent, we designed this study with five treatment groups, corresponding, respectively, to the administration of a single oral antioxidant; two oral antioxidants; three oral antioxidants; five oral antioxidants + local diclofenac; and five oral antioxidants + local diclofenac + PTX by perilesional injection. One hundred and twenty patients were assigned to five groups of treatment designed according to the abovementioned study aim. Outcomes after 6 months of treatment showed that combined antioxidant therapy is effective in treating PD. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the treatment groups with regard to

  17. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional education session for medical and pharmacy undergraduates on therapeutics and prescribing: the medical student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelvey, Bethany M; Coulman, Sion A; John, Dai N

    2016-01-01

    The current literature on undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE) for pharmacy and medical students highlights a range of positive outcomes, although to date IPE has focused predominantly on student views and experiences of IPE sessions with these opinions being sought at the end of the sessions. This study aimed to evaluate medical students' experiences of therapeutics and prescribing IPE, with pharmacy students, 1 year following the session. Following ethics committee approval, 3rd year medical students at Cardiff University were invited to participate using non-probability sampling. Topic guide development was informed by the literature and research team discussions, including a review of the materials used in the IPE session. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews explored experiences, prior to, during, and after the IPE session. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Eighteen medical students were interviewed; 11 were females. Seven themes were identified, namely 1) refinement of pre-session preparation, 2) session value, 3) learning with a pharmacy student, 4) learning about a pharmacist, 5) learning from a pharmacy student, 6) importance and application of what was learnt into practice, and 7) suggestions for change. This study provides a valuable insight into medical students' experiences of a therapeutics and prescribing IPE session and emphasizes the value they placed on interaction with pharmacy students. Medical students were able to recall clear learning experiences from the IPE session that had taken place 12 months earlier, which itself is an indicator of the impact of the session on the students. Furthermore, they were able to describe how knowledge and skills learnt had been applied to subsequent learning activities. Those developing IPE sessions should consider the following: clarify professional roles in the session content, incorporate IPE as a series of activities, and use small groups of

  18. Therapeutic Efficacy of Topically Applied Antioxidant Medicinal Plant Extracts in a Mouse Model of Experimental Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Bum; Li, Ying; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Hyo Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the therapeutic effects of topical administration of antioxidant medicinal plant extracts in a mouse model of experimental dry eye (EDE). Methods. Eye drops containing balanced salt solution (BSS) or 0.001%, 0.01%, and 0.1% extracts were applied for the treatment of EDE. Tear volume, tear film break-up time (BUT), and corneal fluorescein staining scores were measured 10 days after desiccating stress. In addition, we evaluated the levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, IL-6, interferon- (IFN-) γ, and IFN-γ associated chemokines, percentage of CD4+C-X-C chemokine receptor type 3 positive (CXCR3+) T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) positive cells, and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Results. Compared to the EDE and BSS control groups, the mice treated with topical application of the 0.1% extract showed significant improvements in all clinical parameters, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels, percentage of CD4+CXCR3+ T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-HNE-positive cells, and extracellular ROS production (P extracts improved clinical signs, decreased inflammation, and ameliorated oxidative stress marker and ROS production on the ocular surface of the EDE model mice. PMID:27313829

  19. Impact of obtaining medications from pharmaceutical company assistance programs on therapeutic goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompeter, Jessica M; Havrda, Dawn E

    2009-03-01

    Limited data exist regarding whether improved access to medications for indigent persons through pharmaceutical company assistance programs (PCAPs) leads to attainment of therapeutic goals. To evaluate the impact of obtaining medications through PCAPs with pharmacist assistance versus prescription insurance on the likelihood of achieving therapeutic goals. A retrospective chart review was conducted in a private family practice clinic. Individuals prescribed one or more drugs for the treatment of hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidemia and receiving medication through a PCAP or prescription insurance were included. Eligible records were reviewed for pertinent laboratory and medication information and to assess achievement of hypertension, diabetic, and dyslipidemia goals. A total of 458 persons were eligible for inclusion: 250 with prescription insurance and 208 using a PCAP. The PCAP group was older, with more females and multiple disease states. There was no significant difference between the groups in reaching hypertension goals; the goals were not predicted by PCAP, presence of diabetes, or class of drug. More PCAP individuals (67.1%) achieved hemoglobin A1C values less than 7% compared with patients in the prescription insurance group (39.6%; p = 0.002). The PCAP group had lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) values (95.8 +/- 28.0 mg/dL; mean +/- SD) and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values (40.8 +/- 12.1 mg/dL) compared with the prescription insurance group (111.8 +/- 37.5 mg/dL; p values compared with persons with prescription insurance. The presence of prescription insurance alone does not guarantee reaching therapeutic goals; pharmacist involvement with PCAP and obtaining drugs enhances the likelihood of persons achieving therapeutic goals.

  20. Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children?

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is a psychoactive compound with a long history of recreational and therapeutic use. Current considerations regarding cannabis use for medical purposes in children have been stimulated by recent case reports describing its beneficial effect with refractory epilepsy. Overall, there are insufficient data to support either the efficacy or safety of cannabis use for any indications in children, and an increasing body of data suggests possible harm, most importantly in specific conditions....

  1. STATUS OF ANTIOXIDANT AND LIVER FUNCTION IN TYPE-2 DIABETIC PATIENTS ATTENDING NEPALGUNJ MEDICAL COLLEGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Thanpari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most common metabolic disorders characterized by hyperglycemia due to defects in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. This study aims to investigate the status of antioxidants and liver function in type-2 diabetic patients among patients attending OPD of Nepalgunj Medical College, Banke, Nepal.Methods: A total of 280 samples were recruited to evaluate aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, total bilirubin (TB, glutathione (GSH, and superoxide dismutase (SOD.Determination of all biochemical parameters were carried out using Kit Methods.Results: AST level was elevated in maximum number of patients, 64 (36.57% out of175 males and 59 (56.19% out of 105 females followed by ALT elevation in females and ALP elevation in males, 50 (47.61% out of 105 and 57(32.57% out of 175 respectively.Conclusion: Antioxidants & LFTs were found to be statistically significant when compared with healthy controls.

  2. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional education session for medical and pharmacy undergraduates on therapeutics and prescribing: the medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelvey BM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bethany M Shelvey,1 Sion A Coulman,2 Dai N John2 1School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK Background: The current literature on undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE for pharmacy and medical students highlights a range of positive outcomes, although to date IPE has focused predominantly on student views and experiences of IPE sessions with these opinions being sought at the end of the sessions. This study aimed to evaluate medical students’ experiences of therapeutics and prescribing IPE, with pharmacy students, 1 year following the session. Methods: Following ethics committee approval, 3rd year medical students at Cardiff University were invited to participate using non-probability sampling. Topic guide development was informed by the literature and research team discussions, including a review of the materials used in the IPE session. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews explored experiences, prior to, during, and after the IPE session. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Results: Eighteen medical students were interviewed; 11 were females. Seven themes were identified, namely 1 refinement of pre-session preparation, 2 session value, 3 learning with a pharmacy student, 4 learning about a pharmacist, 5 learning from a pharmacy student, 6 importance and application of what was learnt into practice, and 7 suggestions for change. Conclusion: This study provides a valuable insight into medical students’ experiences of a therapeutics and prescribing IPE session and emphasizes the value they placed on interaction with pharmacy students. Medical students were able to recall clear learning experiences from the IPE session that had taken place 12 months earlier, which itself is an indicator of the impact of the session on the students. Furthermore, they were able to describe how knowledge and skills learnt had been applied to

  3. A survey to medical residents on the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic thoracenteses: a training gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, J M; Cases-Viedma, E; Bielsa, S

    2016-12-01

    Pleural fluid aspiration is a routine procedure for pulmonologists and internists. Our aim was to evaluate technical and methodological aspects of diagnostic and therapeutic thoracenteses performed by last two-year residents of Pulmonology and Internal Medicine. An online 24-item questionnaire was sent to participants, and responses were evaluated according to the medical specialty. The survey was completed by 139 (17.1%) residents (71 internists and 68 pulmonologists). 29.5% and 41% performed one or no diagnostic or therapeutic thoracenteses monthly, respectively. Only 44% used ultrasonography to guide pleural procedures. Less than half of respondents used local anesthesia for diagnostic aspirations. Contrary to current recommendations, 25% of residents employed intramuscular needles for therapeutic aspirations. More than 80% of residents routinely ordered pleural fluid cultures and cytological studies, regardless of the clinical suspicion. About 40% requested imaging studies after a diagnostic thoracentesis. Half or more of the respondents were unaware of pH measurement methodologies, culture type for mycobacteria, and performance of cell blocks. Pulmonologists were more experienced than internists, and also made use of ultrasonography more frequently. This survey highlights gaps of knowledge and skills in conducting diagnostic and therapeutic thoracenteses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  4. Pitfalls associated with the therapeutic reference pricing practice of asthma medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalo, Zoltan; Abonyi-Toth, Zsolt; Bartfai, Zoltan; Voko, Zoltan

    2012-07-20

    Therapeutic reference pricing (TRP) based on the WHO daily defined dose (DDD) is a method frequently employed for the cost-containment of pharmaceuticals. Our objective was to compare average drug use in the real world with DDD and to evaluate whether TRP based on DDD could result in cost savings on maintenance medication and the total direct health expenditures for asthma patients treated with Symbicort Turbuhaler (SYT) and Seretide Diskus (SED) in Hungary. Real-world data were derived from the Hungarian National Health Insurance Fund database. Average doses and costs were compared between the high-dose and medium-dose SYT and SED groups. Multiple linear regressions were employed to adjust the data for differences in the gender and age distribution of patients. 27,779 patients with asthma were included in the analysis. Average drug use was lower than DDD in all groups, 1.38-1.95 inhalations in both SED groups, 1.28-1.97 and 1.74-2.49 inhalations in the medium and high-dose SYT groups, respectively. Although the cost of SED based on the DDD would be much lower than the cost of SYT in the medium-dose groups, no difference was found in the actual cost of the maintenance therapy. No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of total medical costs. Cost-containment initiatives by payers may influence clinical decisions. TRP for inhalation asthma drugs raises special concern, because of differences in the therapeutic profile of pharmaceuticals and the lack of proven financial benefits after exclusion of the effect of generic price erosion. Our findings indicate that the presented TRP approach of asthma medications based on the daily therapeutic costs according to the WHO DDD does not result in reduced public healthcare spending in Hungary. Further analysis is required to show whether TRP generates additional expenditures by inducing switching costs and reducing patient compliance. Potential confounding factors may limit the generalisability of our

  5. Comparison of therapeutic effects of L-Thyroxin, apelin and a combination of both on antioxidant enzymes in the heart of PTU-induced hypothyroid rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Faraji Shahrivar

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is one of the common disorders among hypothyroidism, which, increased the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Reactive oxygen species are associated with atherosclerosis development. Antioxidant defense systems are the scavenger for free radicals. Apelin is an endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor (apelin receptor that exists in most tissues, acts as an adiponectin. It has been identified that apelin administration, improve the antioxidant capacity (TAC. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess, therapeutic effects of apelin, T4 (L-Thyroxin or both on antioxidant capacity in 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU-induced hypothyroid rats. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into five groups: C: control group; P group (hypothyroid: PTU (0.05 % administration for six weeks; P+A, P+T and P+A+T groups: after 4 weeks of PTU administration, animals treated with Apelin (200 μg/kg/day, ip T4 (0.02 µg/g/day, gavage and apelin+T4; for two weeks respectively accompanied by PTU administration. Aplein administration in P+A group and P+A+T group had beneficial effect to lowering of malondialdehyde (MDA content as compared to hypothyroid group (8.52±0.64 and 8.53±1 vs. 13.67±1.64 nmol/g tissue, P<0.05 and also had increasing effect on Superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathion peroxidase (GPx activity and the total antioxidant capacity (TAC content compared to the hypothyroid group. This study showed that apelin was able to improve the oxidant-antioxidant balance in the heart tissue of the hypothyroid rats by elevating of antioxidant enzyme activity.

  6. Does assessing the value for money of therapeutic medical devices require a flexible approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Cynthia P

    2015-02-01

    Regulation criteria for licensing pharmaceuticals and medical devices (MDs) are asymmetric. This has affected the type, quantity and quality of the evidence produced in support of MDs. This paper has three objectives: to examine the reasons behind the current licensing criteria for MDs; to identify key methodological challenges associated with pre- and post-market evaluation of MDs and to assess the extent to which existing methods for the economic evaluation of pharmaceuticals can be applied to the evaluation of MDs. The belief that MDs cannot be properly evaluated stems from a combination of historical events and complexities in implementing rigorous RCTs in this field. Existing challenges to conduct sound economic evaluation of MDs have begun to be addressed in medical research using mixed research methods. While more challenging to implement, robust evaluations of therapeutic MDs can and need to be carried out to safeguard individual's wellbeing.

  7. Therapeutic potential of digitoflavone on diabetic nephropathy: nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-dependent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Gang; Cheng, Xiaolan; Teng, Zhiying; Cai, Xueting; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xiaoyan; Lu, Wuguang; Wang, Xiaoning; Yao, Yuanzhang; Hu, Chunping; Cao, Peng

    2015-07-24

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has emerged as a therapeutic target in many diseases, because it can induce antioxidant enzymes and other cytoprotective enzymes. Moreover, some Nrf2 activators have strong anti-inflammatory activities. Oxidative stress and inflammation are major components involved in the pathology of diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we evaluated the Nrf2-dependent anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of digitoflavone in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy. The molecular mechanisms of digitoflavone were investigated in vitro using SV40-transformed mouse mesangial cells (SV40-Mes13). For the in vivo experiment, diabetes was induced in Nrf2+/+ and Nrf2-/- mice by STZ injection, and digitoflavone was administered 2 weeks after the STZ injection. Digitoflavone induced Nrf2 activation and decreased oxidative damage, inflammation, TGF-β1 expression, extracellular matrix protein expression, and mesangial cell hyperplasia in SV40-Mes13 cells. Digitoflavone-treated Nrf2+/+ mice, but not Nrf2-/- mice, showed attenuated common metabolic disorder symptoms, improved renal performance, minimized pathological alterations, and decreased oxidative damage, inflammatory gene expression, inflammatory cell infiltration, TGF-β1 expression, and extracellular matrix protein expression. Our results show that the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of digitoflavone are mediated by Nrf2 activation and that digitoflavone can be used therapeutically to improve metabolic disorders and relieve renal damage induced by diabetes.

  8. Therapeutic effects of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera) in the prevention of diseases via modulation of anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-tumour activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Arshad H; Aly, Salah M; Ali, Habeeb; Babiker, Ali Y; Srikar, Sauda; Khan, Amjad A

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment of various diseases based on synthetic drugs is expensive, alters genetic and metabolic pathways and also shows adverse side effects. Thus, safe and effective approach is needed to prevent the diseases development and progression. In this vista, Natural products are good remedy in the treatment/management of diseases and they are affordable and effective without any adverse effects. Dates are main fruit in the Arabian Peninsula and are considered to be one of the most significant commercial crops and also have been documented in Holy Quran and modern scientific literatures. Earlier studies have shown that constituents of dates act as potent antioxidant, anti-tumour as well as anti-inflammatory, provide a suitable alternative therapy in various diseases cure. In this review, dates fruits has medicinal value are summarized in terms of therapeutic implications in the diseases control through anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and ant-diabetic effect.

  9. Medication adherence in schizophrenia: The role of insight, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma associated with psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Arnaud; Boyer, Laurent; Husky, Mathilde; Baylé, Franck; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Misdrahi, David

    2017-11-01

    Medication non adherence in schizophrenia is a major cause of relapse and hospitalization and remains for clinicians an important challenge. This study investigates the associations between insight, therapeutic alliance, perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment and medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. In this multicenter study, 72 patients were assessed regarding symptomatology, self-reported adherence with medication, insight, medication side-effects, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test predicted paths among these variables. The data fit a model in which medication adherence was directly predicted by insight, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment. Perceived trauma moderates the role of insight on medication adherence. The final model showed good fit, based on four reliable indices. Greater adherence was correlated with higher insight, higher therapeutic alliance and lower perceived trauma. These three variables appear to be important determinants of patient's medication adherence. Medication adherence could be enhanced by reducing perceived trauma and by increasing insight. The need for mental health providers to acknowledge patients' potentially traumatic experience with psychiatric treatment and the need to encourage greater involvement in care are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pitfalls associated with the therapeutic reference pricing practice of asthma medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalo Zoltan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic reference pricing (TRP based on the WHO daily defined dose (DDD is a method frequently employed for the cost-containment of pharmaceuticals. Our objective was to compare average drug use in the real world with DDD and to evaluate whether TRP based on DDD could result in cost savings on maintenance medication and the total direct health expenditures for asthma patients treated with Symbicort Turbuhaler (SYT and Seretide Diskus (SED in Hungary. Methods Real-world data were derived from the Hungarian National Health Insurance Fund database. Average doses and costs were compared between the high-dose and medium-dose SYT and SED groups. Multiple linear regressions were employed to adjust the data for differences in the gender and age distribution of patients. Results 27,779 patients with asthma were included in the analysis. Average drug use was lower than DDD in all groups, 1.38-1.95 inhalations in both SED groups, 1.28-1.97 and 1.74-2.49 inhalations in the medium and high-dose SYT groups, respectively. Although the cost of SED based on the DDD would be much lower than the cost of SYT in the medium-dose groups, no difference was found in the actual cost of the maintenance therapy. No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of total medical costs. Conclusions Cost-containment initiatives by payers may influence clinical decisions. TRP for inhalation asthma drugs raises special concern, because of differences in the therapeutic profile of pharmaceuticals and the lack of proven financial benefits after exclusion of the effect of generic price erosion. Our findings indicate that the presented TRP approach of asthma medications based on the daily therapeutic costs according to the WHO DDD does not result in reduced public healthcare spending in Hungary. Further analysis is required to show whether TRP generates additional expenditures by inducing switching costs and reducing patient compliance

  11. Resolution of Coccidioides immitis endophthalmitis with an aggressive surgical and medical therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, David C; Shah, Kayur H; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Coccidioides immitis endophthalmitis usually results in enucleation, and there is evidence that vitrectomized eyes are more likely to become enucleated. A 55-year-old man presented to us with steroid-resistant granulomatous uveitis and was eventually diagnosed with C. immitis endophthalmitis. He was treated with an aggressive medical and surgical approach, receiving a total of 16 intravitreal antifungal injections and three vitrectomies, as well as lensectomy and penetrating keratoplasty. At 13 months after presentation, the patient's eye was free of inflammation, and his best corrected visual acuity was 20/25. This is the first reported case of culture-proven C. immitis endophthalmitis with a favorable final outcome. We propose that the good outcome may have been due to our aggressive therapeutic approach.

  12. Angolan Cymbopogon citratus used for therapeutic benefits: nutritional composition and influence of solvents in phytochemicals content and antioxidant activity of leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marta O; Alves, Rita C; Pires, Pedro C; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Vinha, Ana F

    2013-10-01

    Folk medicine is a relevant and effective part of indigenous healthcare systems which are, in practice, totally dependent on traditional healers. An outstanding coincidence between indigenous medicinal plant uses and scientifically proved pharmacological properties of several phytochemicals has been observed along the years. This work focused on the leaves of a medicinal plant traditionally used for therapeutic benefits (Angolan Cymbopogon citratus), in order to evaluate their nutritional value. The bioactive phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity of leaf extracts prepared with different solvents (water, methanol and ethanol) were also evaluated. The plant leaves contained ∼60% of carbohydrates, protein (∼20%), fat (∼5%), ash (∼4%) and moisture (∼9%). The phytochemicals screening revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, and terpenoids in all extracts. Methanolic extracts also contained alkaloids and steroids. Several methods were used to evaluate total antioxidant capacity of the different extracts (DPPH·, NO·, and H₂O₂ scavenging assays, reducing power, and FRAP). Ethanolic extracts presented a significantly higher antioxidant activity (pextracts. Methanolic extracts showed the lowest radical scavenging activities for both DPPH· and NO· radicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer BM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernard M Fischer,1,* Judith A Voynow,2,* Andrew J Ghio3,* 1Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; 3National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. Keywords: cigarette smoking, mucins, gene regulation, Chinese herbs, acupuncture, dietary antioxidants

  14. Phenolic profiling and therapeutic potential of local flora of Azad Kashmir; In vitro enzyme inhibition and antioxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Muhammad Asam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study supports the phytochemical screening, evaluation of antioxidant and enzyme inhibition potential and correlations between antioxidant activities and phenolics of Rumex dentatus (Family: Polygonaceae, Mentha spicata (Family: Lamiaceae, Withania somnifera (Family: Solanaceae, Nerium indicum (Family: Apocynaceae and Artemisia scoparia (Family: Asteraceae. The herbal materials were extracted in ethanol (90% and partitioned between several solvents based on polarities. Total phenols were determined with FC method and ranged 21.33 ± 1.53 - 355.67 ± 6.03 mg GAE/ mg of the extract. Antioxidant activities (DPPH, total iron reducing capacity, phosphomolybdate assay & FRAP and enzyme inhibition potential (Protease, AChE & BChE were performed by the standard protocols. The results showed that all extracts exhibited significant DPPH activity ranging from 12.67 ± 2.08 - 92.67 ± 1.53%. The extracts that were active in DPPH activity also potrayed marvelous FRAP, total iron reducing and phosphomolybdate values. Correlation studies of antioxidant activities and the content of phenolic compounds in plant materials exhibited positive correlation between them. The outcome of enzyme inhibition activity exhibited that about 80% of the fractions under surveillance plants intimated more than 50% inhibition. Isolation of bioactive compounds from these plants is in progress.

  15. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in antioxidant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Mañon Rossi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are used regularly in medical practice to provide objective markers of health status of a person, as well as the physiological response of the body to a pharmacological therapeutic intervention. In the specific case of the use of antioxidant products (antioxidant therapy, it is necessary to measure both biomarkers of oxidative stress level of the person as those that are specific to a physiological or pathological progression of a disease disorder. This paper describes the main biomarkers of oxidative general and specific stress as well as laboratory techniques, which should be taken into account when measuring the effectiveness of antioxidant therapies.

  16. Comparison of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale with therapeutic drug monitoring in apparent treatment-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Raza, Fayez; Velasco, Alejandro; Brinker, Stephanie; Ayers, Colby; Das, Sandeep R; Morisky, Donald E; Halm, Ethan A; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-06-01

    The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) is a questionnaire developed for screening of non-adherence in patients with several chronic conditions, including uncomplicated hypertension. However, its accuracy in predicting non-adherence in patients with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (a-TRH) is not known. Accordingly, we performed a retrospective study in 47 patients with a-TRH who had completed the eight-item MMAS during the initial clinic visit. Non-adherence was defined as presence of undetected serum levels of at least one prescribed antihypertensive drug by therapeutic drug monitoring. We found that 26% of patients were considered to have low adherence score (monitoring. Sensitivity of the MMAS-8 was 26% (95% confidence interval, 10.3%-48.4%) with specificity of 75% (95% confidence interval, 53.3%-90.2%). By multivariate analysis, the MMAS-8 score was not an independent predictor of non-adherence, while certain clinical parameters such as heart rate were found to be independent predictors of non-adherence. Our study suggested limited accuracy of the MMAS-8 in detecting medication non-adherence in a-TRH. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Abortion - medical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... womb (uterus). There are different types of medical abortions: Therapeutic medical abortion is done because the woman has ... Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion

  18. On Informatics Diagnostics and Informatics Therapeutics - Good Medical Informatics Research Is Needed Here.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haux, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    In the era of digitization some new procedures play an increasing role for diagnosis as well as for therapy: informatics diagnostics and informatics therapeutics. Challenges for such procedures are described. It is discussed, when research on such diagnostics and therapeutics can be regarded as good research. Examples are mentioned for informatics diagnostics and informatics therapeutics, which are based on health-enabling technologies.

  19. Using the numerical method in 1836, James Jackson bridged French therapeutic epistemology and American medical pragmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Linda G; Morabia, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    To review James Jackson's analysis of bloodletting among pneumonitis patients at the newly founded Massachusetts General Hospital, in which he implemented the numerical method advocated by Pierre-Charles-Alexandre Louis. The study sample included 34 cases of clinically diagnosed pneumonitis admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital between April 19, 1825, and May 10, 1835, and discharged alive. Patient data were extracted from meticulously kept case books. Jackson calculated mean number of venesections, ounces of blood taken, and days of convalescence within groups stratified by day of the disease when first bloodletting occurred. He also calculated average convalescence within groups stratified by age, sex, prior health, vesication, and day of the disease when the patients were admitted to the hospital. To Jackson's surprise, it "seemed to be of less importance, whether our patients were bled or not, than whether they entered the hospital early or late" after the onset of the pneumonitis. Bloodletting was ineffective. Our multivariate reanalysis of his data confirms his conclusion. Outstandingly for his time, Jackson ruled out unwarranted effects of covariates by tabulating their numerical relations to the duration of pneumonia. Using novel gathering of patient clinical data from hospital records and quantitative analytical methods, Jackson contributed results that challenged conventional wisdom and bridged French therapeutic epistemology and American medical pragmatism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of impact of teaching clinical pharmacology and rational therapeutics to medical undergraduates and interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mira K; Panchal, Jigar R; Shah, Samdih; Iyer, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    To find out the impact of teaching clinical pharmacology and rational therapeutics (CPT) to medical undergraduates (UGs) and interns. This cross-sectional, prospective study was conducted on three UGs batches and interns using two pretested validated structured questionnaires, modified from the work of Tobaiqy et al. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. ANOVA and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. The value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 379 UGs and 96 interns participated in this study. Mean knowledge score of interns was significantly reduced as compared to UGs (P < 0.0001). A significant increase in confidence for unsupervised prescribing of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (99%), oral rehydration salt, iron salts was perceived among interns as compared to UGs (P < 0.05). However, 63.5% confessed problems in selection of drugs, drug-drug interactions, prescribing in special patient population. Although they were confident prescribing fixed dose combination for adult patients (89.5%), majority were hesitant to prescribe opioids (77%), steroids (76%), vaccines (75%), and antihypertensives (62%). The theoretical CPT teaching transfers knowledge to UGs; however, it is not retained in internship and does not adequately prepare interns to prescribe safe and rational drugs.

  1. Oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in sickle cell anaemia patients receiving different treatments and medications for different periods of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belini Junior, Edis; da Silva, Danilo Grünig Humberto; Torres, Lidiane de Souza; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; Cancado, Rodolfo Delfini; Chiattone, Carlos; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia Regina

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate, in a longitudinal study, the profile of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity markers in sickle cell anaemia patients receiving different treatments and medication over different time periods. The three groups were: patients undergoing transfusion therapy and receiving iron chelator deferasirox (DFX group, n = 20); patients receiving deferasirox and hydroxyurea (DFX + HU group, n = 10), and patients receiving only folic acid (FA group, n = 15). Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) assays and trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays were evaluated during two different periods of analysis, T0 and T1 (after ~388 days). Higher FA group TBARS values were observed compared with the DFX + HU group (p = 0.016) at T0; and at T1, higher FA group TBARS values were also observed compared with both the DFX group (p = 0.003) and the DFX + HU group (p = 0.0002). No variation in TEAC values was seen between groups, at either T0 or T1. The mean values of TBARS and TEAC for both the DFX and DFX + HU groups decreased at T1. The antioxidant effects of HU and DFX were observed by through an increase in TEAC levels in DFX and DFX + HU groups when compared with those of normal subjects. Increased TEAC values were not recorded in the FA group, and lipid peroxidation was seen to decrease after DFX and HU use.

  2. Evaluation of Anticancer, Antioxidant, and Possible Anti-inflammatory Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants Used in Indian Traditional Medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Shaikh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer, antioxidant, and possible anti-inflammatory properties of diverse medicinal plants frequently used in Indian traditional medication. The selected botanicals such as Soymida fembrifuga (Roxb. A. Juss. (Miliaceae, Tinospora cordifolia (Willd. Miers. (Menispermaceae, Lavandula bipinnata (L. O. Ktze. (Lamiaceae, and Helicteres isora L. (Sterculiaceae extracted in different solvents were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer and antioxidant activities. The results obtained indicate that H. isora has potent cytotoxic activity toward the selected cancer cells such as HeLa-B75 (34.21±0.24%, HL-60 (30.25±1.36%, HEP-3B (25.36±1.78%, and PN-15 (29.21±0.52%. Interestingly, the selected botanicals selectively inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 more than (COX-1, which are the key enzymes implicated in inflammation. COX-2 inhibition was observed to be in the range of 19.66-49.52% as compared to COX-1 inhibition (3.93-19.61%. The results of the antioxidant study revealed that the selected plants were found to be effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, hydroxyl (OH, and superoxide radical (SOR scavenging agents. High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC fingerprint of flavonoids was used as a measure of quality control of the selected plant samples. The results of the present findings strengthen the potential of the selected plants as a resource for the discovery of novel anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant agents.

  3. Bioactivation antioxidant and transglycating properties of N-acetylcarnosine autoinduction prodrug of a dipeptide L-carnosine in mucoadhesive drug delivery eye-drop formulation: powerful eye health application technique and therapeutic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    A considerable interest in N-acetylcarnosine ocular drug design for eye health is based on clinical strategies to improve ocular drug delivery through metabolic enzymatic activation. Human biology aspects of ocular N-acetylcarnosine deacetylation during its pass through the cornea to the aqueous humor and dipeptide hydrolyzing enzymes are characterized. Novel approaches to ocular drug delivery increasing intraocular bioavailability of N-acetylcarnosine biologically activated metabolite carnosine become an integral development ensuring prolonged retention of the medication in the mucoadhesive precorneal area and facilitating transcorneal penetration of the natural dipeptide with the corneal promoters. A comprehensive list of techniques for peptide drug design, synthesis, purification, and biological analyses was considered: liquid chromatography (LC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), (1) H and (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectroscopy, and spectrophotometry. The antioxidant activity of therapeutics-targeted molecules was studied in aqueous solution and in a lipid membrane environment. A deglycation therapeutic system was developed involving removal, by transglycation of sugar or aldehyde moieties from Schiff bases by histidyl-hydrazide compounds or aldehyde scavenger L-carnosine. Clinical studies included ophthalmoscopy, visual acuity (VA), halometer disability glare tests, slit-image, and retro-illumination photography. N-acetylcarnosine 1% lubricant eye drops are considered as an auto-induction prodrug and natural ocular redox state balance therapies with implications in prevention and treatment of serious eye diseases that involve pathways of continuous oxidative damage to ocular tissues(cataracts, primary open-angle glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration) and sight-threatening glycosylation processes (diabetic retinopathy and consequent visual impairment) important for public health. The results of

  4. Efficacy and safety evaluation of pentoxifylline associated with other antioxidants in medical treatment of Peyronie's disease: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulis G

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gianni Paulis,1,2 Davide Barletta,3 Paolo Turchi,4 Antonio Vitarelli,5 Giuseppe Dachille,6 Andrea Fabiani,7 Romano Gennaro8 1Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Andrology Center, Albano L, 2Castelfidardo Medical Team, Peyronie's Disease Care Center, Rome, 3Department of Urology, Andrology Center, San Matteo Hospital, Pavia, 4Azienda ASL 4 Prato – Andrology Service, Prato, 5Department of Urology, University of Bari, 6Department of Urology, S Giacomo Hospital, Monopoli, Bari, 7Department of Surgery, Section of Urology and Andrology, Macerata, 8Department of Urologic Oncology, Section of Avellino, Italian League Against Cancer, Avellino, Italy Abstract: Peyronie's disease (PD is a chronic disorder involving the tunica albuginea surrounding the corpora cavernosa of the penis. A conservative treatment is indicated in the first stage of disease. The aim of this study was to assess the therapeutic impact and possible side effects of treatment with pentoxifylline (PTX in combination with other antioxidants in 307 patients with early-stage PD. Patients were subdivided into three groups: A, B, and C. Both groups, A and B, comprising of 206 patients, underwent treatment, whereas Group C was the control group (n=101. Treatment lasted 6 months and included the following: Group A: PTX 400 mg twice a day + propolis 600 mg/d + blueberry 160 mg/d + vitamin E 600 mg/d + diclofenac 4% gel twice/a day + PTX 100 mg via perilesional penile injection/every other week (12 injections in all; Group B: the same treatment as Group A except for the penile PTX injections. After the 6-month treatment course, we obtained the following results: actual mean decrease in plaque volume -46.9% and -24.8% in Group A and B, respectively (P<0.0001; mean curvature reduction -10.1° and -4.8°, respectively (P<0.0001; resolution of pain in 67.6% and 67.2% of cases, respectively (P=0.961; recovery of normal penile rigidity in 56.09% and 23.5% of cases, respectively (P=0.005. After 6 months

  5. Antioxidant effect of aqueous extract of four plants with therapeutic potential on gynecological diseases; Semen persicae, Leonurus cardiaca, Hedyotis diffusa, and Curcuma zedoaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shaojian; Fattahi, Amir; Raffel, Nathalie; Hoffmann, Inge; Beckmann, Matthias W; Dittrich, Ralf; Schrauder, Michael

    2017-11-25

    Little information is available concerning antioxidant effects of plant teas (water boiled) which are used more commonly in traditional Chinese medicine than other extracts. Thus, we addressed this issue by evaluating the ability of teas from four different plants with therapeutic potential on gynecological diseases. The aqueous extracts of Semen persicae, Leonurus cardiaca, Hedyotis diffusa, and Curcuma zedoaria rhizome were prepared and then their effects on copper-induced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) oxidation were evaluated by spectrophotometric method. Density gradient ultracentrifugation method was recruited to isolate LDL-C from healthy individuals. Our results showed that adding 10, 20, and 30 µl S. persicae could increase the lag phase duration of LDL-C oxidation compared with control reaction 12, 21, and 33%, respectively. The most effective delay (87%) was observed when 30 µl H. diffusa was added to the reaction. In cases of L. cardiaca and C. zedoaria, we found no significant influence on the lag phase duration (p > 0.05). Moreover, our findings about starting point of the decomposition phase were almost in parallel with the lag phase results, as 30 µl of S. persicae or H. diffusa teas could significantly increase the initiation time of decomposition (p cardiaca and C. zedoaria could have medicinal therapeutic effects partly through direct oxidation prevention.

  6. Therapeutic index in radiotherapy and patient information; Le service medical rendu en radiotherapie: indice therapeutique et information du patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewas, S.; Lartigau, E. [Departement universitaire de radiotherapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, universite Lille 2, 59 - Lille (France)

    2010-07-15

    In oncology, the ratio between cure and morbidity (therapeutic index) is at the heart of treatment. Every radiotherapy needs to optimize the benefice-risk issue defining the optimal medical care. In order to go from global knowledge (evidence-based medicine) to individualized decision, the principle of patients information will have always to be respected. In fine, it will be the patient, guided by his/her physician, to take decision on treatment. (authors)

  7. Discovery and Development of Synthetic and Natural Biomaterials for Protein Therapeutics and Medical Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Andrew J.

    Controlling nonspecific protein interactions is important for applications from medical devices to protein therapeutics. The presented work is a compilation of efforts aimed at using zwitterionic (ionic yet charge neutral) polymers to modify and stabilize the surface of sensitive biomedical and biological materials. Traditionally, when modifying the surface of a material, the stability of the underlying substrate. The materials modified in this dissertation are unique due to their unconventional amorphous characteristics which provide additional challenges. These are poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) rubber, and proteins. These materials may seem dissimilar, but both have amorphous surfaces, that do not respond well to chemical modification. PDMS is a biomaterial extensively used in medical device manufacturing, but experiences unacceptably high levels of non-specific protein fouling when used with biological samples. To reduce protein fouling, surface modification is often needed. Unfortunately conventional surface modification methods, such as Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings, do not work for PDMS due to its amorphous state. Herein, we demonstrate how a superhydrophilic zwitterionic material, poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) (pCBMA), can provide a highly stable nonfouling coating with long term stability due to the sharp the contrast in hydrophobicity between pCBMA and PDMS. Biological materials, such as proteins, also require stabilization to improve shelf life, circulation time, and bioactivity. Conjugation of proteins with PEG is often used to increase protein stability, but has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here we have shown that pCBMA conjugation improves stability in a similar fashion to PEG, but also retains, or even improves, binding affinity due to enhanced protein-substrate hydrophobic interactions. Recognizing that pCBMA chemically resembles the combination of lysine (K) and glutamic acid (E) amino acids, we have shown how zwitterionic

  8. Promising anti-oxidative therapeutic potentials of edible freshwater snail Bellamya bengalensis extract against arsenic-induced rat hepatic tissue and DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sk Sajed Ali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data suggest that arsenic ultimately results in cancer in different parts of the body. Several synthetic therapeutic agents manifest inadequate potency with severe side effects against arsenic toxicity. The flesh of B. bengalensis, has long been used as an ethno-medicine in case of arthritis, blood-impurities, impaired immune system, conjunctivitis and liver anomalies. This potent organism might be a natural choice against arsenic and several other toxicities. Our earlier studies on arsenic-exposed human can correlate carcinogenesis with DNA-damage. In an attempt to investigate the possible protective and therapeutic effect against arsenic induced hepatotoxicity, the extract of B. bengalensis was tested in arsenic intoxicated rat model. The time- and dose-dependent effect of arsenic toxicity was also tested in B. bengalensis. Sodium-meta-arsenite NaAsO2 (0.6 ppm/100g bw/day for 28 days, as earlier reported was treated alone or in combination with the B. bengalensis water extract (BBE, 100 mg/100g bw to rat and compared with vehicle treated control. In a separate experiment, the B. bengalensis was exposed to high concentration of NaAsO2 contaminated water (5 to 20 ppm for 1 to 9 days in laboratory condition and their DNA quality was evaluated in relation to its possible oxidative threat. Any concentration of arsenic was incapable to initiate a significant DNA damage in B. bengalensis. Lipid peroxidation was increased in arsenic exposed B. bengalensis after longer duration of its exposure. Increase in reduced antioxidant like non-protein-soluble thiol (NPSH is concordant with the decrease in lipid peroxidation and DNA stability in this organism. In rat experiment, the BBE supplementation strongly prevented arsenic-induced oxidative, necrotic and apoptotic damages to liver tissue/DNA by strengthening antioxidant systems, which has been shown in hepatic DNA-fragmentation, comet-assay, histo-architecture (hematoxylin/eosin, alkaline

  9. Effect of supplementation during pregnancy with L-arginine and antioxidant vitamins in medical food on pre-eclampsia in high risk population: randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Espino, Salvador; Avila-Vergara, Marco Antonio; Ibarra, Isabel; Ahued, Roberto; Godines, Myrna; Parry, Samuel; Macones, George; Strauss, Jerome F

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a relative deficiency in L-arginine, the substrate for synthesis of the vasodilatory gas nitric oxide, may be associated with the development of pre-eclampsia in a population at high risk. Design Randomised, blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial. Setting Tertiary public hospital in Mexico City. Participants Pregnant women with a history of a previous pregnancy complicated by pre-eclampsia, or pre-eclampsia in a first degree relative, and deemed to be at increased risk of recurrence of the disease were studied from week 14-32 of gestation and followed until delivery. Interventions Supplementation with a medical food—bars containing L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins, antioxidant vitamins alone, or placebo—during pregnancy. Main outcome measure Development of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia. Results 222 women were allocated to the placebo group, 228 received L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins, and 222 received antioxidant vitamins alone. Women had 4-8 prenatal visits while receiving the bars. The incidence of pre-eclampsia was reduced significantly (χ2=19.41; Pvitamins compared with placebo (absolute risk reduction 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.21). Antioxidant vitamins alone showed an observed benefit, but this effect was not statistically significant compared with placebo (χ2=3.76; P=0.052; absolute risk reduction 0.07, 0.005 to 0.15). L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins compared with antioxidant vitamins alone resulted in a significant effect (P=0.004; absolute risk reduction 0.09, 0.05 to 0.14). Conclusions Supplementation during pregnancy with a medical food containing L-arginine and antioxidant vitamins reduced the incidence of pre-eclampsia in a population at high risk of the condition. Antioxidant vitamins alone did not have a protective effect for prevention of pre-eclampsia. Supplementation with L-arginine plus antioxidant vitamins needs to be evaluated in a low risk population to determine the

  10. Comparative evaluation of influence of drugs with antioxidant effect on therapeutic efficiency of radiotherapy and oxidative status in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masyagin V.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of the study is to carry out a comparative analysis of the effect of melatonin (melaxen and of 3-hy-droxypyridine (mexidol on antitumor and antimetastatic influence of radiotherapy and oxidative status in mice with Lewis lung carcinoma. Material: Experiments have been carried out on 95 mice of the line C57BI/6 and weight of 20-22 grams. Cyclophosphan has been intraabdominally administered two times in a dosage of 60mg/kg within the interval of 120 hours — 20-30 min before radiotherapy. It has been located on the area of initial tumor in a dosage of 2 Gr at the same time as cyclophosphan injection. Melaxen and mexidol have been intramuscularly injected in the dosage of 45 and 50 mg/ kg for 14 days. Antitumor and antimetastatic effect of the applied therapy and changes in the oxidative status of the animals have been estimated. The results: Melaxen and mexidol do not decrease antitumour and antimetastatic effects of radiotherapy and prevent the activation of free radical processes in animals with tumors. Mexidol has been more effective than melaxen in correction of superoxide dismutase activity in liver. The drugss under the study do not decrease radiotherapy-induced lipid peroxidation in the initial tumor. Conclusion: Melaxen and mexidol do not decrease the therapeutic efficiency of radiotherapy and correct oxidative status in mice with tumor following antineoplastic treatment.

  11. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional education session for medical and pharmacy undergraduates on therapeutics and prescribing: the medical student perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shelvey BM; Coulman SA; John DN

    2016-01-01

    Bethany M Shelvey,1 Sion A Coulman,2 Dai N John2 1School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK Background: The current literature on undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE) for pharmacy and medical students highlights a range of positive outcomes, although to date IPE has focused predominantly on student views and experiences of IPE sessions with these opinions being sought at the end of the sessions. This study aimed to e...

  12. Completion of therapeutic and safety monitoring tests in Lebanese outpatients on chronic medications: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramia E

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Elsy Ramia, Rony Zeenny Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of laboratory-test monitoring recommended for patients on chronic medication therapies in the Lebanese community setting.Patients and methods: In October 2011, all outpatients visiting selected community pharmacies in Lebanon were screened by pharmacists to evaluate their use of one or more chronic medications requiring safety and/or therapeutic laboratory tests. The list of medications was elaborated after an extensive review of laboratory-test monitoring recommendations from pertinent up-to-date clinical guidelines, medications that have been issued black box warnings for monitoring, and the most current information from the US Food and Drug Administration website. Patients receiving these medications were subjected to a questionnaire assessing the appropriateness of their laboratory-test monitoring. The study was approved by the Lebanese American University’s Institutional Review Board.Results: A total of 284 outpatients, with almost equal distribution by sex, were identified during the aforementioned period to be on one or more of the specified medications. The majority of the sample (68% was younger than 65 years of age. Overall, most of the study group (65% were found to be partially monitored with laboratory tests, while only 27% were fully monitored and 8% were not monitored at all. The study group reported clinic-visit intervals as follows: more than a year (35%, on yearly basis (18%, every 6 months (25%, every 3 months (16%, less than 3 months (6%. Conclusion: Seventy-three percent (73% of the study group were receiving incomplete therapeutic/safety laboratory-test monitoring recommended for patients on chronic medication in the Lebanese community. It is concluded from the results that patients need to better understand the importance of recommended test monitoring for the

  13. Medical error disclosure: from the therapeutic alliance to risk management: the vision of the new Italian code of medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Neri, Margherita

    2014-07-15

    The Italian code of medical deontology recently approved stipulates that physicians have the duty to inform the patient of each unwanted event and its causes, and to identify, report and evaluate adverse events and errors. Thus the obligation to supply information continues to widen, in some way extending beyond the doctor-patient relationship to become an essential tool for improving the quality of professional services. The new deontological precepts intersect two areas in which the figure of the physician is paramount. On the one hand is the need for maximum integrity towards the patient, in the name of the doctor's own, and the other's (the patient's) dignity and liberty; on the other is the physician's developing role in the strategies of the health system to achieve efficacy, quality, reliability and efficiency, to reduce errors and adverse events and to manage clinical risk. In Italy, due to guidelines issued by the Ministry of Health and to the new code of medical deontology, the role of physicians becomes a part of a complex strategy of risk management based on a system focused approach in which increasing transparency regarding adverse outcomes and full disclosure of health- related negative events represent a key factor.

  14. Randomized trial comparing traditional Chinese medical acupuncture, therapeutic massage, and self-care education for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkin, D C; Eisenberg, D; Sherman, K J; Barlow, W; Kaptchuk, T J; Street, J; Deyo, R A

    2001-04-23

    Because the value of popular forms of alternative care for chronic back pain remains uncertain, we compared the effectiveness of acupuncture, therapeutic massage, and self-care education for persistent back pain. We randomized 262 patients aged 20 to 70 years who had persistent back pain to receive Traditional Chinese Medical acupuncture (n = 94), therapeutic massage (n = 78), or self-care educational materials (n = 90). Up to 10 massage or acupuncture visits were permitted over 10 weeks. Symptoms (0-10 scale) and dysfunction (0-23 scale) were assessed by telephone interviewers masked to treatment group. Follow-up was available for 95% of patients after 4, 10, and 52 weeks, and none withdrew for adverse effects. Treatment groups were compared after adjustment for prerandomization covariates using an intent-to-treat analysis. At 10 weeks, massage was superior to self-care on the symptom scale (3.41 vs 4.71, respectively; P =.01) and the disability scale (5.88 vs 8.92, respectively; PMassage was also superior to acupuncture on the disability scale (5.89 vs 8.25, respectively; P =.01). After 1 year, massage was not better than self-care but was better than acupuncture (symptom scale: 3.08 vs 4.74, respectively; P =.002; dysfunction scale: 6.29 vs 8.21, respectively; P =.05). The massage group used the least medications (Pmassage was effective for persistent low back pain, apparently providing long-lasting benefits. Traditional Chinese Medical acupuncture was relatively ineffective. Massage might be an effective alternative to conventional medical care for persistent back pain.

  15. Medical Management of Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Review of Current and Emerging Therapeutic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Adamczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. Evidence suggests a multifactorial etiology and this concept remains supported by the assortment of therapeutic modalities under investigation. The authors provide an updated review of the literature for previous and recent clinical trials evaluating medical treatments in patients with cerebral vasospasm secondary to aSAH. Currently, the strongest evidence supports use of prophylactic oral nimodipine and initiation of triple-H therapy for patients in cerebral vasospasm. Other agents presented in this report include magnesium, statins, endothelin receptor antagonists, nitric oxide promoters, free radical scavengers, thromboxane inhibitors, thrombolysis, anti-inflammatory agents and neuroprotectants. Although promising data is beginning to emerge for several treatments, few prospective randomized clinical trials are presently available. Additionally, future investigational efforts will need to resolve discrepant definitions and outcome measures for cerebral vasospasm in order to permit adequate study comparisons. Until then, definitive recommendations cannot be made regarding the safety and efficacy for each of these therapeutic strategies and medical management practices will continue to be implemented in a wide-ranging manner.

  16. International medical travel and the politics of therapeutic place-making in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ormond, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic version excludes material for which permission has not been granted by the rights holder This thesis examines the shifting relationship between the state and its subjects with regard to responsibility for and entitlement to care. Using Malaysia as a case study the research engages with international medical travel (IMT) as an outcome of the neoliberal retrenchment of the welfare state. I offer a critical reading of postcolonial development strategies that negotiate the benefit...

  17. Japan-China Joint Medical Workshop on Drug Discoveries and Therapeutics 2008: The need of Asian pharmaceutical researchers' cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M; Tang, W

    2008-10-01

    The Japan-China Joint Medical Workshop on Drug Discoveries and Therapeutics 2008 (JCMWDDT 2008) was held from September 29 to October 1, 2008 at The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. JCMWDDT is an international workshop that is mainly organized by Asian editorial members of Drug Discoveries & Therapeutics (http://www.ddtjournal.com/home) for the purpose of promoting research exchanges in the field of drug discovery and therapeutic. This year's JCMWDDT is the second workshop and focused particularly on novel development and technological innovation of anti-influenza agents. The workshop began with an announcement by the Japanese Co-chairperson, Dr. Sekimizu (Department of Microbiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Japan; Editorin- Chief of Drug Discoveries & Therapeutics, DDT) followed by a speech by the Chinese Co-chairperson, Dr. Wenfang Xu (School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shandong University, Shandong, China; Editor in China Office of DDT), with additional speeches by Dr. Norio Matsuki (The University of Tokyo, Japan; Editor of DDT) and Dr. Guanhua Du (Chinese Academy of Medical Science, China; Editor of DDT). Fifty-nine titles were presented in 6 specialized sessions (Research Advances in Drug Discoveries and Therapeutics, Drug Synthesis/Clinical Therapeutics, Medicinal Chemistry/Natural Products, Anti-influenza Drugs, Anti-infection/antiviral Drugs, Biochemistry/Molecular Biology /Pharmacology) and a poster session (Drug Discov Ther 2008; 2, Suppl; available at http://www.ddtjournal.com/Announce/index.htm). An annual outbreak of avian influenza in Asian countries including China and Japan has sparked fears that the virus will mutate and then cause an epidemic in humans. Therefore, Asian researchers need to work together to control this infection. This year's JCMWDDT helped provide an opportunity to reiterate the crucial role of medicinal chemistry in conquering influenza and created an environment for cooperative

  18. Antioxidants as antidepressants: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapagnini, Giovanni; Davinelli, Sergio; Drago, Filippo; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Oriani, Giovannangelo

    2012-06-01

    Depression is a medical condition with a complex biological pattern of aetiology, involving genetic and epigenetic factors, along with different environmental stressors. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress processes might play a relevant role in the pathogenic mechanism(s) underlying many major psychiatric disorders, including depression. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been shown to modulate levels and activity of noradrenaline (norepinephrine), serotonin, dopamine and glutamate, the principal neurotransmitters involved in the neurobiology of depression. Major depression has been associated with lowered concentrations of several endogenous antioxidant compounds, such as vitamin E, zinc and coenzyme Q10, or enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, and with an impairment of the total antioxidant status. These observations introduce new potential targets for the development of therapeutic interventions based on antioxidant compounds. The present review focuses on the possible role of oxidative stress processes in the pathogenesis of depression. The therapeutic potential of antioxidant compounds as a co-adjuvant treatment to conventional antidepressants is discussed. For instance, N-acetyl-cysteine has been shown to have a significant benefit on depressive symptoms in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Additionally, curcumin, the yellow pigment of curry, has been shown to strongly interfere with neuronal redox homeostasis in the CNS and to possess antidepressant activity in various animal models of depression, also thanks to its ability to inhibit monoamine oxidases. There is an urgent need to develop better tolerated and more effective treatments for depressive disorders and several antioxidant treatments appear promising and deserve further study.

  19. Differences in Perceived Need for Medical, Therapeutic, and Family Support Services Among Children With ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevides, Teal W; Carretta, Henry J; Mandell, David S

    2016-02-01

    Identifying racial and ethnic differences in perceived need for treatment among families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) will improve understanding of disparities in care seeking. We described racial and ethnic differences in perceived need for services that children with ASD and their families frequently use. We conducted bivariate analyses of racial and ethnic categories and perceived need for 6 common services used by children with ASD as found in the 2005 to 2006 (n = 2123) and the 2009 to 2010 (n = 3055) National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs data sets. Multivariate logistic regressions within concatenated data sets were conducted to examine associations between racial and ethnic category and perceived service needs while controlling for predisposing, enabling, and child factors. Compared with caregivers of white non-Hispanic children with ASD, caregivers of Hispanic children reported less need for prescription medications in adjusted multivariate analyses. Caregivers of black non-Hispanic children with ASD reported less need for prescription medications and for child and family mental health services than caregivers of white non-Hispanic children. Both English-speaking Hispanic caregivers and black non-Hispanic caregivers reported greater need for occupational, speech, and physical therapy than white non-Hispanic caregivers. No racial or ethnic differences were found in perceived need for specialty medical care or respite care. Caregivers of children with ASD from different racial and ethnic backgrounds may differentially perceive need for different types of care. Their perceptions may in turn affect how they prioritize and seek care, independent of their child's specific needs. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. [Medico-legal assessment of selected cases of perinatal complications resulting in death of the woman during childbirth. Medical error or therapeutic failure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowaniec, Małgorzata; Chowaniec, Czesław; Jabłoński, Christian; Nowak, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    Medico-legal estimation of therapeutic management in cases of perinatal complications, especially those resulting in death of the women during childbirth is usually very difficult. The authors have investigated medical documentation supported by the results of autopsies of cases chosen from the casuistry of the Forensic Medicine Department, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice. Considering the limits of professional liability and legal responsibility of physicians, close attention was paid to standard therapeutic management and increased risk in treatment with regard to that relating to typical salubrious complications. The presented cases of deaths of women during childbirth can be the succeeding opinion in broad discussion on medical errors as well as an attempt to standardise and differentiate the medical error from therapeutic failure which occurred within the reach of risk in the undertaken treatment.

  1. Alternative Medicine as Counter-Conduct: Therapeutic Spaces and Medical Rationality in Contemporary Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusu Corina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the practice of medical pluralism in contemporary Romania, addressing the phenomenon of alternative medicine through the Foucauldian concept of counter-conduct. Employing in-depth interviews with general and alternative practitioners from two towns in Transylvania, and participant observations in spaces where they practice their knowledge, I describe how certain discursive acts reformulate the body and the subject-patient. Alternative therapists construct their practice in direct opposition to several parameters of biomedicine, such as the logic of diagnosis, treatment, and the praxis of patient’s visit to the general practitioner’s office, discussed in the paper. They define their approach as psychosomatic, and set-up the medical space as a confessional space, envisioning a holistic corporeality and the idea of the “inner doctor” in each patient. This conduct would supposedly make the subject “active” and “empowered”, as opposed to the “passive” patient succumbed to the diagnosis of conventional doctors.

  2. Antioxidant supplements for liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2011-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal.......Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  3. [The role of day hospital in optimization of medical care for patients of a therapeutic department of an outpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliaev, P V; Stanke, A A; Vikhrova, T V; Ostrovskikh, G Iu

    2012-01-01

    Day hospital (DH) provides consultations and treatment for all referred patients according to standards of medical care quality. DH has facilities for therapeutic and gastroenterological patients. Treatment in DH is performed according to current standards which cover basic treatment of the diseases (documented medicines, duration of treatment). Efficacy of DH's use of the Standards of Diagnosis and Therapy of Acid-Dependent Diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori (standards of Moscow consensus) is used as illustration. As a result of treatment in DH 93% outpatients resumed their jobs, improvement occurred in 96.7% patients, a complete response was seen in 23%, 1.9% cases failed treatment. Most DH patients (83%) were satisfied with treatment given in DH and think it a convenient replacement of hospital stay.

  4. From Healing the Whole Person: An Argument for Therapeutic Touch as a Complement to Traditional Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene B. Huff

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing popularity and use of therapeutic touch (TT is an issue that has generated controversy and concern within the medical community. While anecdotal and traditional scientific evidence suggest that TT would be an advantageous addition for clinics and hospitals to include in their armamentarium of complementary interventions within the realm of traditional medicine, TT has not become widely available in the U.S. One reason for the lack of availability may be the dearth of conclusive scientific support for TT's efficacy and, therefore, its inclusion in clinic and hospital treatment planning would give it the appearance of legitimate practice, which it may not yet deserve. Whether or not deserved, if TT were added to hospital and clinic treatment protocols without substantial scientific support, it would be thought to have the implicit support of the scientific community, at which point the question of its efficacy would be moot in the minds of many people; thus patients would utilize it, because they believe it works rather than because it works. Since TT has not yet been scientifically proven as per Western standards, leaders of the health care community are likely wary of lending support to TT at this time. If TT can be found to be a scientifically sound therapeutic technique, then it will be more readily accepted in the health care community. This paper reviews TT.

  5. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of New Therapeutic Gases as Medical Counter Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Wink, David

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is the biological damage it induces. As damage is associated with increased oxidative stress, it is important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as both chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and biological signaling molecules for management of the body s response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it is concluded that this approach may have great therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson s and Alzheimer s disease, cataracts, and aging.

  6. A hypothesis on biological protection from space radiation through the use of new therapeutic gases as medical counter measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoenfeld Michael P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is biological damage that is associated with increased oxidative stress. It is therefore important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and as biological signaling molecules for management of the body's response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it can be concluded that this approach may have therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion (IR injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, cataracts, and aging. We envision applying these therapies through inhalation of gas mixtures or ingestion of water with dissolved gases.

  7. Phase II - Procurement of State of the Art Research Equipment to Support Faculty Members with the RNA Therapeutics Institute, a component of the Advanced Therapeutics Cluster at the University of Massachusetts Medical School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Melissa

    2011-10-14

    This project supported the continued development of the RNA Therapeutics Institute at the UMass Medical School. This funding allows for the purchase of critical equipment that will enable faculty members to develop RNA technology in order to better understand the complexity that separates genome sequence from biological function, as well as to reduce the hyperactivity of harmful genes.

  8. Online learning applied to a course on rational therapeutics: an international comparison between final year students of two medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likic, Robert; White, Casey; Cinti, Sandro; Purkiss, Joel; Fantone, Joseph; Chapman, Chris; Bielen, Luka; Francetic, Igor; Engleberg, Cary

    2013-02-01

    Poor prescribing is probably the most common cause of preventable medication errors and many of these events involve junior doctors. In 2009, an electronic problem-based therapeutics course developed at the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) was translated and adapted for use at the University of Zagreb Medical School (UZMS). After students from both schools took the course in 2010, we compared their responses with an online questionnaire addressing the course quality and its effectiveness. There were no statistically significant differences in the overall average grades awarded for the course (UZMS 4.11 ± 0.86 vs. UMMS 3.96 ± 0.93; 95% CI mean difference (MD) -0.36, 0.07; P = 0.175) with both student groups expressing high satisfaction rates with its quality, accessibility and overall design. UZMS students reported spending less time working through the course than their American colleagues (2.14 ± 1.01 vs. 2.89 ± 1.02 on a five point Likert scale; 95% CI MD 0.51, 0.99; P students indicated greater difficulty with course materials (3.54 ± 0.59 vs. 3.25 ± 0.59; 95% CI MD -0.42, -0.15; P students. It is possible to adapt and translate successfully whole online teaching resources and implement them internationally in different countries and health care systems, achieving similar, high student satisfaction rates while decreasing administrative and cost burdens. Web based learning may have great potential to offer a cost effective and safe environment in which prescribing skills can be improved. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. A Review of Pterostilbene Antioxidant Activity and Disease Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise McCormack

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pterostilbene (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxystilbene is a natural dietary compound and the primary antioxidant component of blueberries. It has increased bioavailability in comparison to other stilbene compounds, which may enhance its dietary benefit and possibly contribute to a valuable clinical effect. Multiple studies have demonstrated the antioxidant activity of pterostilbene in both in vitro and in vivo models illustrating both preventative and therapeutic benefits. The antioxidant activity of pterostilbene has been implicated in anticarcinogenesis, modulation of neurological disease, anti-inflammation, attenuation of vascular disease, and amelioration of diabetes. In this review, we explore the antioxidant properties of pterostilbene and its relationship to common disease pathways and give a summary of the clinical potential of pterostilbene in the prevention and treatment of various medical conditions.

  10. Aceptación y uso de herbolaria en medicina familiar Acceptance and use of therapeutic medical plants in family medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genaro Armando Taddei-Bringas

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Explorar el grado de utilización de las plantas medicinales entre la población usuaria y el personal de salud en una unidad urbana de medicina familiar del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio transversal descriptivo. Se diseñó y validó un cuestionario que exploró aceptación y utilización. Se aplicó a 60 médicos familiares, a una muestra aleatoria de 130 trabajadores de la Unidad de Medicina Familiar y a otra de 264 usuarios-pacientes de la misma. El porcentaje de respuesta fue de 78%. RESULTADOS. Se encontró que 83% de los médicos aceptan la herbolaria y 75% la utilizan como recurso terapéutico. Entre el personal de salud, la aceptación y la utilización fue de 100% y, en el caso de los usuarios, 92% la aceptan y 90% la utilizan. Las diferencias entre grupos son significativas (pOBJECTIVE. To explore the degree of usage of therapeutic medical plants among the patients, physicans and health workers in a local Family Mediccal Care Unit of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A transversal descriptive study was performed. A questionnaire focusing on two variables was designed and validated. It was applied to 60 family physicians, a randomized sample of 130 health workers and another of 264 patients of the Family Mediccal Care Unit. Response percentage was 78%. RESULTS. The study found that 83% of family physicians accept the therapeutic use of herbal medicine; moreover, 75% use it as a therapeutic resource. Among health workers, acceptance and use was 100%, while in patients the level of acceptance was of 92% and of use it was 90%. Differences between groups are significant (p<0.05. The more frequently used plants are Gordolobo (Gnaphalium sp., Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus sp., probably E. globulus, spearmint (Mentha sp., camomile (Matricaria chamomilla and prickly pear cladodes (the vegetative parts of the prickly pear, Opuntia sp. Probably Opuntia

  11. Medication adherence and its relationship to the therapeutic alliance: Results from an innovative pilot study within a community pharmacy MTM practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Pringle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine whether patients who received Medication Therapy Management (MTM from community pharmacists using a brief scale to measure Therapeutic Alliance (i.e., MTM + TA would show better medication adherence than patients who received MTM without use of the TA scale (MTM only. Design: Quasi-experimental, using a direct intervention group (MTM + TA and a comparison group of randomly selected claims records from patients who received only the MTM service (MTM only. We used a doubly robust propensity score approach to estimate the average effect of therapeutic alliance on medication adherence. The analysis was limited to the following broad medication categories: antihypertensives, antidiabetic agents, and antihyperlipidemics. Setting: The direct intervention group included patients receiving MTM services from pharmacists in a community pharmacy chain setting. Participants: After matching with claims data, the direct intervention group was n=117, with an average age of 76.4. The comparison group was n=146, with an average age of 76.2. Intervention: Administration of two brief scales designed to measure general health outcomes and TA within the context of MTM (with focus on TA scale administration. Main Outcome Measures Proportion of Days Covered (PDC and PDC80. Results: Using the therapeutic alliance scales in the context of community pharmacist-provided MTM was associated with a 3.1 percentage point increase in patients' overall PDC (p<.001 and an increase of 4.6 percentage points in PDC80 (p=.02 as compared to patients receiving MTM without use of the therapeutic alliance scales. Conclusion: Measuring therapeutic alliance in the context of MTM is associated with improved medication adherence and represents one strategy for enhancing the effectiveness of MTM encounters. Furthermore, administration of the therapeutic alliance scales used very little time; therefore it is likely feasible for pharmacists to routinely use the scales in

  12. Medication adherence and its relationship to the therapeutic alliance: Results from an innovative pilot study within a community pharmacy MTM practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Pringle, PhD.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine whether patients who received Medication Therapy Management (MTM from community pharmacists using a brief scale to measure Therapeutic Alliance (i.e., MTM + TA would show better medication adherence than patients whoreceived MTM without use of the TA scale (MTM only. Design: Quasi-experimental, using a direct intervention group (MTM + TA and a comparison group of randomly selected claims records from patients who received only the MTM service (MTM only. We used a doubly robust propensity score approach to estimate the average effect of therapeutic alliance on medication adherence. The analysis was limited to the following broad medication categories: antihypertensives, antidiabetic agents, and antihyperlipidemics. Setting: The direct intervention group included patients receiving MTM services from pharmacists in a community pharmacy chain setting. Participants: After matching with claims data, the direct intervention group was n=117, with an average age of 76.4. The comparison group was n=146, with an average age of 76.2. Intervention: Administration of two brief scales designed to measure general health outcomes and TA within the context of MTM (with focus on TA scale administration. Main Outcome MeasuresProportion of Days Covered (PDC and PDC80. Results: Using the therapeutic alliance scales in the context of community pharmacistprovided MTM was associated with a 3.1 percentage point increase in patients’ overall PDC (p<.001 and an increase of 4.6 percentage points in PDC80 (p=.02 as compared to patients receiving MTM without use of the therapeutic alliance scales. Conclusion: Measuring therapeutic alliance in the context of MTM is associated with improved medication adherence and represents one strategy for enhancing the effectiveness of MTM encounters. Furthermore, administration of the therapeutic alliance scales used very little time; therefore it is likely feasible for pharmacists to routinely use the scales in

  13. A review of antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Birangane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants play the essential role in reducing the free radicals. Free radicals can cause various changes in human body from DNA mutation to cell death. Free radical formation form the biological basis of several medical problems including cancer. The antioxidants are useful in preventing the transfer of premalignant lesion to malignancy- Hence are usually prescribed in oral premalignant lesions like leukoplakia, lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis. Antioxidants include beta carotene, carotenoid, vitamin C, vitamin E, trace elements like zinc and selenium. Functions of these antioxidants are discussed here.

  14. Long-term pain relief with optimized medical treatment including antioxidants and step-up interventional therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalimar; Midha, Shallu; Hasan, Ajmal; Dhingra, Rajan; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal pain is difficult to treat in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). Medical therapy including antioxidants has been shown to relieve pain of CP in the short-term. Our aim was to study the long-term results of optimized medical and interventional therapy for pain relief in patients with CP with a step-up approach. All consecutive patients with CP were included prospectively in the study. They were treated medically with a well-balanced diet, pancreatic enzymes, and antioxidants (9000 IU beta-carotene, 0.54 g vitamin C, 270 IU vitamin E, 600 µg organic selenium, and 2 g methionine). Endoscopic therapy and/or surgery were offered if medical therapy failed. Pain relief was the primary outcome measure. A total of 313 patients (mean age 26.16 ± 12.17; 244 males) with CP were included; 288 (92%) patients had abdominal pain. The etiology of CP was idiopathic in 224 (71.6%) and alcohol in 82 (26.2%). At 1-year follow-up, significant pain relief was achieved in 84.7% of patients: 52.1% with medical therapy, 16.7% with endoscopic therapy, 7.6% with surgery, and 8.3% spontaneously. The mean pain score decreased from 6.36 ± 1.92 to 1.62 ± 2.10 (P treatment. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Structural, Chemical and Biological Aspects of Antioxidants for Strategies Against Metal and Metalloid Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaran J. S. Flora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of exposure to heavy metals/metalloid. Beneficial renal effects of some medications, such as chelation therapy depend at least partially on the ability to alleviate oxidative stress. The administration of various natural or synthetic antioxidants has been shown to be of benefit in the prevention and attenuation of metal induced biochemical alterations. These include vitamins, N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid, melatonin, dietary flavonoids and many others. Human studies are limited in this regard. Under certain conditions, surprisingly, the antioxidant supplements may exhibit pro-oxidant properties and even worsen metal induced toxic damage. To date, the evidence is insufficient to recommend antioxidant supplements in subject with exposure to metals. Prospective, controlled clinical trials on safety and effectiveness of different therapeutic antioxidant strategies either individually or in combination with chelating agent are indispensable. The present review focuses on structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants particularly related to their chelating properties.

  16. Analyzing the knowledge and attitude of nurses regarding medication error and its prophylactic ways in educational and therapeutic hospitals of Khorramabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh Ghasemi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghasemi SF¹, Valizadeh F¹, Moemen Nasab M2 1. Instructor, Department of Pediatric Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 2. Instructor, Department of Internal and Surgical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Medication errors are the most common avoidable causes of iatrogenic injuries in patients. One out of every three medication errors occurs when a nurse prescribes drug to a patient. Since medication instructions are among the most important parts in the patients treatment process, their inappropriate application can lead to many serious consequences such as incomplete or incorrect therapy, as well as legal problems. The present study was carried out to verify the knowledge and attitude of nurses regarding medication error, and its prophylactic ways in educational and therapeutic hospitals of Khorramabad in 2005. Materials and methods: The samples of this descriptive cross-sectional study included 86 randomly selected nurses who worked in educational and therapeutic hospitals of Khorramabad in 2005. Data collection instruments were a questionnaire and the structured interview. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 13, Chi-square and descriptive statistic test. Results: Analyzing the data indicated that the nurses stated the moot important causes of medication errors as follows: inadequate number of nurses (100%, night and repeated long shifts (83.7%, personal problems of the nurses (79.9%, presence of the patients’ attendants and crowded wards (79.9%, and inappropriate environmental conditions of the wards (73.3%. Fear of receiving reprimands and punishment (88.4%, triviality of errors (57%, and unsupportive attitude of the nursing officials (50% were the most frequently cited reasons for not reporting the medication errors. Moreover, adequate nurse to patient ratio (98.8%, staff continuing education (96

  17. Assessment of smoking prevalence and status among students of senior courses of medico-prophylactic and therapeutic faculties of Samara State Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokina N.A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article provides data on prevalence and smoking status assessment among students of senior courses of medical university, the purpose of the study was to evaluate smoking prevalence and status in students of medical university in order to develop recommendations on healthy life style promotion. 58 senior students, 18 men and 40 women, were under study. Screening survey, spirometry, Fagerstrem test, questionnaires on motivation to stop smoking and test to reveal chronic bronchitis were held. Smoking was highly spread among the students of therapeutic faculty. The longest period of smoking was detected among male students of medico-prophylactic, and the highest intensity was revealed among female students of therapeutic faculty. Nicotine addiction in all groups was described as «very weak» and the highest degree was marked among men of medico-prophylactic faculty in particularly. Unwillingness of students (lack of motivation to stop smoking was determined

  18. Pharmacology and Therapeutics Education in the European Union Needs Harmonization and Modernization: A Cross-sectional Survey Among 185 Medical Schools in 27 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, D J; Tichelaar, J; Okorie, M; Bissell, L; Christiaens, T; Likic, R; Mačìulaitis, R; Costa, J; Sanz, E J; Tamba, B I; Maxwell, S R; Richir, M C; van Agtmael, M A

    2017-11-01

    Effective teaching in pharmacology and clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) is necessary to make medical students competent prescribers. However, the current structure, delivery, and assessment of CPT education in the European Union (EU) is unknown. We sent an online questionnaire to teachers with overall responsibility for CPT education in EU medical schools. Questions focused on undergraduate teaching and assessment of CPT, and students' preparedness for prescribing. In all, 185 medical schools (64%) from 27 EU countries responded. Traditional learning methods were mainly used. The majority of respondents did not provide students with the opportunity to practice real-life prescribing and believed that their students were not well prepared for prescribing. There is a marked difference in the quality and quantity of CPT education within and between EU countries, suggesting that there is considerable scope for improvement. A collaborative approach should be adopted to harmonize and modernize the undergraduate CPT education across the EU. © 2017 The Authors Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  19. Association between plasma soluble RAGE and renal function is unaffected by medication usage and enzymatic antioxidants in chronic kidney disease with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Foo Nian; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Keng, Tee Chau; Ng, Kok Peng; Chua, Kek Heng; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2016-01-30

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between soluble RAGE and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) after controlling for the potential confounding factors such as medication usage and enzymatic antioxidants. A total of 222 CKD patients whose eGFR is less than 60ml/min/1.73m(2) and 111 non-CKD individuals were recruited. The study subjects were classified based on their diabetes status. The plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities as well as plasma soluble RAGE level were measured. The plasma GPx and SOD activities were significantly lower and the plasma soluble RAGE level was significantly higher in the CKD patients than in the non-CKD individuals, regardless of the diabetes status. Soluble RAGE was significantly correlated with eGFR in both diabetic CKD (D-CKD) and non-diabetic CKD (ND-CKD) patients. The association between soluble RAGE and eGFR remained largely unaffected by the confounding factors in D-CKD patients. However, the confounding effect of enzymatic antioxidants in the relationship between eGFR and soluble RAGE was observed in ND-CKD patients. The increased plasma level of soluble RAGE is a better indicator of renal function decline in diabetic CKD patients instead of non-diabetic CKD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Iatrogenic biliary ducts lesions after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a medical technical error or a therapeutic failure in a routinely performed procedure. A medico-legal evaluation of selected cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowaniec, Czesław; Chowaniec, Małgorzata; Kobek, Mariusz; Nowak, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to cholelithiasis is associated with a higher risk of intraoperative lesions of biliary duct in comparison to classic surgery. Technical difficulties, a limited access to operating area, the presence of cholecystic adhesions and inflammatory lesions, as well as possible anomalies or anatomical variations of the extrahepatic biliary ducts pose the risk of damaging the biliary tract. At times, laparoscopic procedures are performed by surgeons with insufficient operator skills and qualifications. The medico-legal evaluation of intraoperative damage to the biliary tract with resulting complications--the so-called "biliary damage"--is very difficult. The presented analysis included six cases of intraoperative biliary ducts lesions evaluated by the Forensic Medicine Department, Medical University, Katowice. Three instances were associated with investigations carried out by public prosecutors in medical error cases, and in three others, civil cases were brought in the court, with the plaintiffs advancing a claim. While defining the scope of the management--both diagnostic, therapeutic and decision-making--in the pre-, intra- and postoperative period, attention was drawn to the prescriptive character of patient management in such cases, including indications for laparoscopic surgery, an increased potential therapeutic risk that also included a possibility of the patient developing "normal, typical" complications, referring the above factors to the scope and limits of the physician's professional and criminal liability and analyzing them to assess whether a medical error had been committed, or else the events had represented a therapeutic failure within the limits of the accepted therapeutic risk. A separate problem emphasized by the authors focused on difficulties in objective evaluation of health-associated consequences that might be defined in a tabular manner as long-term or permanent detriment to health.

  1. Pharmacology and Therapeutics Education in the European Union Needs Harmonization and Modernization: A Cross‐sectional Survey Among 185 Medical Schools in 27 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichelaar, J; Okorie, M; Bissell, L; Christiaens, T; Likic, R; Mačìulaitis, R; Costa, J; Sanz, EJ; Tamba, BI; Maxwell, SR; Richir, MC; van Agtmael, MA

    2017-01-01

    Effective teaching in pharmacology and clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) is necessary to make medical students competent prescribers. However, the current structure, delivery, and assessment of CPT education in the European Union (EU) is unknown. We sent an online questionnaire to teachers with overall responsibility for CPT education in EU medical schools. Questions focused on undergraduate teaching and assessment of CPT, and students' preparedness for prescribing. In all, 185 medical schools (64%) from 27 EU countries responded. Traditional learning methods were mainly used. The majority of respondents did not provide students with the opportunity to practice real‐life prescribing and believed that their students were not well prepared for prescribing. There is a marked difference in the quality and quantity of CPT education within and between EU countries, suggesting that there is considerable scope for improvement. A collaborative approach should be adopted to harmonize and modernize the undergraduate CPT education across the EU. PMID:28295236

  2. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Bernard M; Voynow, Judith A; Ghio, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. PMID:25673984

  3. Cold Environment Exacerbates Brain Pathology and Oxidative Stress Following Traumatic Brain Injuries: Potential Therapeutic Effects of Nanowired Antioxidant Compound H-290/51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José Vicente; Sjöquist, Per-Ove; Patnaik, Ranjana; Ryan Tian, Z; Ozkizilcik, Asya; Sharma, Hari S

    2017-08-30

    The possibility that traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurring in a cold environment exacerbates brain pathology and oxidative stress was examined in our rat model. TBI was inflicted by making a longitudinal incision into the right parietal cerebral cortex (2 mm deep and 4 mm long) in cold-acclimatized rats (5 °C for 3 h daily for 5 weeks) or animals at room temperature under Equithesin anesthesia. TBI in cold-exposed rats exhibited pronounced increase in brain lucigenin (LCG), luminol (LUM), and malondialdehyde (MDA) and marked pronounced decrease in glutathione (GTH) as compared to identical TBI at room temperature. The magnitude and intensity of BBB breakdown to radioiodine and Evans blue albumin, edema formation, and neuronal injuries were also exacerbated in cold-exposed rats after injury as compared to room temperature. Nanowired delivery of H-290/51 (50 mg/kg) 6 and 8 h after injury in cold-exposed group significantly thwarted brain pathology and oxidative stress whereas normal delivery of H-290/51 was neuroprotective after TBI at room temperature only. These observations are the first to demonstrate that (i) cold aggravates the pathophysiology of TBI possibly due to an enhanced production of oxidative stress, (ii) and in such conditions, nanodelivery of antioxidant compound has superior neuroprotective effects, not reported earlier.

  4. Preventive and therapeutic effects of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) extract against DSS-induced ulcerative colitis by regulation of antioxidant and inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, Mehnaz; Hasnat, Md Abul; Lim, Ji-Hong; Lee, Yoon-Mi; Kim, Eun Ok; Um, Byung-Hun; Lim, Beong Ou

    2016-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory disorder caused by hyperactivation of effector immune cells that produce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines. The aims of our study were to determine whether orally administered blueberry extract (BE) could attenuate or prevent the development of experimental colitis in mice and to elucidate the mechanism of action. Female Balb/C mice (n=7) were randomized into groups differing in treatment conditions (prevention and treatment) and dose of BE (50 mg/kg body weight). Acute ulcerative colitis was induced by oral administration of 3% dextran sodium sulfate for 7 days in drinking water. Colonic mucosal injury was assessed by clinical, macroscopic, biochemical and histopathological examinations. BE significantly decreased disease activity index and improved the macroscopic and histological score of colons when compared to the colitis group (P<.05). BE markedly attenuated myeloperoxidase accumulation (colitis group 54.97±2.78 nmol/mg, treatment group 30.78±1.33 nmol/mg) and malondialdehyde in colon and prostaglandin E2 level in serum while increasing the levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase (colitis group 11.94±1.16 U/ml, BE treatment group 16.49±0.39 U/ml) compared with the colitis group (P<.05). mRNA levels of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase cytokines were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that BE attenuates the expression of COX-2 and IL-1β in colonic tissue. Moreover, BE reduced the nuclear translocation of nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) by immunofluorescence analysis. Thus, the anti-inflammatory effect of BE at colorectal sites is a result of a number of mechanisms: antioxidation, down-regulation of the expression of inflammatory mediators and inhibition of the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antioxidant enzymes as potential targets in cardioprotection and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Enzyme antioxidants: the next stage of pharmacological counterwork to the oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Vavaev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The focus in antioxidant research is on enzyme derivative investigations. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD is of particular interest, as it demonstrates in vivo the protective action against development of atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus. The reliable association of coronary artery disease with decreased level of heparin-released EC-SOD was established in clinical research. To create a base for and to develop antioxidant therapy, various SOD isozymes, catalase (CAT, methods of gene therapy, and combined applications of enzymes are used. Covalent bienzyme SOD-CHS-CAT conjugate (CHS, chondroitin sulphate showed high efficacy and safety as the drug candidate. There is an evident trend to use the components of glycocalyx and extracellular matrix for target delivery of medical substances. Development of new enzyme antioxidants for therapeutic application is closely connected with progress in medical biotechnology, pharmaceutical industry, and bioeconomy.

  6. Predictive factors of job satisfaction among nurses in therapeutic-educational centers of Guilan University of Medical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Mirfarhadi

    2014-11-01

    satisfaction in job environment, using a comprehensive program by organization managers and planners seems necessary.* Corresponding Author: Rasht, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery.Email: Saghi_m80@yahoo.com

  7. The therapeutic alliance and therapist adherence as predictors of dropout from cognitive therapy for depression when combined with antidepressant medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Andrew A; Strunk, Daniel R; Ryan, Elizabeth T; DeRubeis, Robert J; Hollon, Steven D; Gallop, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Previous psychotherapy research has examined the therapeutic alliance and therapist adherence as correlates or predictors of symptom change. While some initial evidence suggests the alliance is associated with risk of dropout in cognitive behavioral treatment for depression, evidence of such relations has been limited to date. We examined the relation of these psychotherapy process variables and dropout in the context of cognitive therapy for depression when provided in combination with pharmacotherapy. Patients were randomized to the CT plus pharmacotherapy condition of a clinical trial for chronic or recurrent depression. Consistent with the spirit of personalized medicine, patients were treated until they met remission and recovery criteria (or reached the maximum allowable time in the study). In a sample of 176 patients, we examined observer-rated alliance and therapist adherence in the first three CT sessions as potential predictors of treatment dropout. The therapeutic alliance and one facet of therapist adherence (i.e., Behavioral Methods/Homework) predicted reduced odds of dropout. Therapist use of Negotiating/Structuring predicted greater likelihood of dropout, but only when other variables were included in the model. Process ratings were not available for concurrent pharmacotherapy sessions. A minority of patients did not have session recordings available. Results are consistent with the possibility that the therapeutic alliance and therapists' focus on homework and behavioral methods promote treatment retention in combined treatment for depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  9. Antioxidant activity of insect gall extracts of Pistacia integerrima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshwarappa, Ravi Shankara Birur; Lakshmikantha, Ramachandra Yarappa; Subaramaihha, Sundara Rajan; Subbaiah, Sujan Ganapathy Pasura; Surendranath, Austin Richard; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2015-01-01

    Pistacia integerrima (P. integerrina) insect galls are widely used in ayurveda and siddha system of medicine as karkatasringi. The use of leaf galls as a rejuvenator may be attributed to antioxidant property, however there is less scientific evidence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and the antioxidant potential of leaf gall extracts (aqueous and ethanol) of P. integerrina, which is extensively used in the preparation of traditional medications. The antioxidant activities of aqueous and ethanolic leaf gall extracts were examined using diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl scavenging and ferric reducing power (FRAP) methods. The presences of phenolics, tannins, phytosterols, triterpenoids, saponins, flavonoids and reducing sugars were identified in both the extracts. In comparison to the aqueous extract, the ethanolic extract had the highest total phenolic and flavonoid content at 234 ±2.4 mg of GAE/g d.w. and 95.5 ±3.2 mg of QUE/g d.w., respectively. This higher content of total phenolics and flavonoids found in the ethanolic extract was directly associated with higher antioxidant activity. This study demonstrates the poetnet antioxidant activities of P. integerrima leaf gall extracts. Further, there was a strong association between the higher antioxidant activities with that of higher total phenolic and flavonoid content in the ethanolic leaf gall extracts of P. integerrima. The results encourage the use of P. integerrima leaf gall extracts for medicinal health, functional food and nutraceuticals applications, due to their antioxidant properties. Future work will be interesting to learn the chemical composition and better understand the mechanism of action of the antioxidants present in the extract for development as a drug for therapeutic application.

  10. Evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness of prescribed medications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Findings from a tertiary care hospital, Lahore, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bareera Rana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was aimed to highlight the current prescribing pattern of oral hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus and to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of these therapeutic categories in achieving target glycemic control. Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional, observational study of 6 months' duration conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Lahore, Pakistan. Results: The current research recruited 145 patients presented in diabetes management center of a tertiary care hospital in Lahore, Pakistan. Mean age of the participants was 50.2 (± 8.5 years. Out of the 145 patients, 63% were females and 37% were males. Most patients were diagnosed to have diabetes within the past 5 years. Diabetes-induced neuropathy was the most common complication (71.7% among the patients. A large proportion of these patients (70.3% were also suffering from other comorbidities among which the most common one is hypertension. The average number of prescribed medications was 1.31. Metformin was prescribed to a majority of patients (64% as monotherapy while 28.96% received combination therapy. Mean glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c before and after 3 months of treatment was 8.5 (± 2.3 and 8.04 (± 2.1, respectively. Inferential statistics show a strong association between HBA1c and life style modifications and adherence to medication therapy (P = 0.05. However, the correlation between HBA1c and Morisky score and duration of disease was inverse and weak (P = 0.6, 0.4. The t-test values show a small difference between HBA1c values before and after 3 months (t = 0.440 and 0.466, respectively. Conclusion: Optimization of medication regimen and continuous patient education regarding life style modification and adherence to medication therapy are necessitated to bring HBA1c values near to target.

  11. Therapeutics role of olive fruits/oil in the prevention of diseases via modulation of anti-oxidant, anti-tumour and genetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Arshad H; Albutti, Aqel S; Aly, Salah M

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment for various diseases is based on synthetic drugs are effective but they show adverse effect and also alter the genetic and metabolic activity. Moreover, some drugs prepared from plants and their constituents show potentiality with more efficacy than synthetic agents used in clinical therapy. Earlier report has shown that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly related with reduced risk of developing various diseases. Several epidemiological studies has shown that, the incidence heart disease and cancers is lowest in the Mediterranean basin as compared to the part of the world because of their diet rich in olives and olive products. Olives are commonly consumed in Mediterranean and Arabian Peninsula and also have been documented in Holy Quran and modern scientific literatures. Earlier studies have shown that, the constituents from olive such as oleuropein, squalene and hydroxytyrosol modulate the genes functions and other activities. In this review, the medicinal value of olives and their constituents are summarized in terms of therapeutic approach in the diseases management through regulation of various activities.

  12. Therapeutic misadventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, N J

    2010-10-01

    Therapeutic misadventure can be defined as an injury or an adverse event caused by medical management rather than by an underlying disease. Within the National Health Service there were over 86,000 reported adverse incidents in 2007. In the USA medication errors have been rated as the fourth highest cause of death. Unfortunately one of the greatest contributors to iatrogenic injury is human error. The potential types of misadventure are infinite. Medication errors are a major part of this, being responsible for over 70% of cases that cause serious harm. However, many medication errors caused by slips, lapses, technical errors and mistakes are preventable; intentional violations of safe operating procedures are not. While medication errors were tolerated by society in the past, the readiness to institute criminal proceedings against health-care professionals has increased greatly in the UK over the last decade. The medication process consists of writing prescriptions, dispensing the product, administering it and monitoring its effects. Prescription errors arise owing to incomplete information, lack of appropriate labelling, environmental factors and human blunders. Even with a perfect prescription the right medication must be dispensed and appropriately labelled. Dispensing errors are not uncommon and may be compounded by non-clinical considerations. Administration of a drug by injection is one of the most dangerous aspects of the medication process, especially in inexperienced hands. The final component of medication supply is monitoring the effect of the medication. With short courses of medication such monitoring is easy, but with long-term medication, particularly with potent drugs where the margin between efficacy and toxicity is small, active procedures may be required to ensure toxicity does not ensue. Despite the endeavour of health-care professions to stick to the rule of 'first, do no harm', in reality this is difficult to achieve all of the time. When

  13. Next Generation Sequencing Identifies Five Major Classes of Potentially Therapeutic Enzymes Secreted by Lucilia sericata Medical Maggots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Zdeněk; Vogel, Heiko; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Rupp, Oliver; Goesmann, Alexander; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Lucilia sericata larvae are used as an alternative treatment for recalcitrant and chronic wounds. Their excretions/secretions contain molecules that facilitate tissue debridement, disinfect, or accelerate wound healing and have therefore been recognized as a potential source of novel therapeutic compounds. Among the substances present in excretions/secretions various peptidase activities promoting the wound healing processes have been detected but the peptidases responsible for these activities remain mostly unidentified. To explore these enzymes we applied next generation sequencing to analyze the transcriptomes of different maggot tissues (salivary glands, gut, and crop) associated with the production of excretions/secretions and/or with digestion as well as the rest of the larval body. As a result we obtained more than 123.8 million paired-end reads, which were assembled de novo using Trinity and Oases assemblers, yielding 41,421 contigs with an N50 contig length of 2.22 kb and a total length of 67.79 Mb. BLASTp analysis against the MEROPS database identified 1729 contigs in 577 clusters encoding five peptidase classes (serine, cysteine, aspartic, threonine, and metallopeptidases), which were assigned to 26 clans, 48 families, and 185 peptidase species. The individual enzymes were differentially expressed among maggot tissues and included peptidase activities related to the therapeutic effects of maggot excretions/secretions. PMID:27119084

  14. Medical Management of Hypovitaminosis D With Cholecalciferol and Elastic Therapeutic Taping in Red-legged Seriema (Cariama cristata) Chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Caitlin A; Kinney, Matthew E; Hanley, Christopher S; Padilla, Luis R

    2016-03-01

    Three hand-reared, 50-53 day-old, red-legged seriema (Cariama cristata) chicks were evaluated for acute lameness and reluctance to ambulate. Two of the 3 chicks presented with angular limb deformities of the proximal tarsometatarsi and external rotation of the legs. Radiographs demonstrated decreased opacity of the long bone of the legs, with poorly delineated cortices and deviation of the proximal tarsometarsi. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol revealed all 3 chicks were deficient in vitamin D(3) at presentation. The chicks were administered injectable vitamin D(3) (cholecalciferol), oral vitamin D(3), and an ultraviolet B (UV-B) light was placed in their enclosure. Elastic, therapeutic taping was used to correct angular limb deformities present in 2 of the 3 chicks. Taping was continued until the angular limb deformities were corrected and lameness resolved. Hypovitaminosis D is a common cause of metabolic bone disease in captive avian species. Cholecalciferol administration, UV-B light supplementation, and elastic, therapeutic taping were effective treatments for osteodystrophy and secondary angular limb deformities due to hypovitaminosis D. This multifaceted treatment may be useful in other long-legged juvenile birds with similar clinical signs.

  15. Next Generation Sequencing Identifies Five Major Classes of Potentially Therapeutic Enzymes Secreted by Lucilia sericata Medical Maggots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Zdeněk; Vogel, Heiko; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Rupp, Oliver; Goesmann, Alexander; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Lucilia sericata larvae are used as an alternative treatment for recalcitrant and chronic wounds. Their excretions/secretions contain molecules that facilitate tissue debridement, disinfect, or accelerate wound healing and have therefore been recognized as a potential source of novel therapeutic compounds. Among the substances present in excretions/secretions various peptidase activities promoting the wound healing processes have been detected but the peptidases responsible for these activities remain mostly unidentified. To explore these enzymes we applied next generation sequencing to analyze the transcriptomes of different maggot tissues (salivary glands, gut, and crop) associated with the production of excretions/secretions and/or with digestion as well as the rest of the larval body. As a result we obtained more than 123.8 million paired-end reads, which were assembled de novo using Trinity and Oases assemblers, yielding 41,421 contigs with an N50 contig length of 2.22 kb and a total length of 67.79 Mb. BLASTp analysis against the MEROPS database identified 1729 contigs in 577 clusters encoding five peptidase classes (serine, cysteine, aspartic, threonine, and metallopeptidases), which were assigned to 26 clans, 48 families, and 185 peptidase species. The individual enzymes were differentially expressed among maggot tissues and included peptidase activities related to the therapeutic effects of maggot excretions/secretions.

  16. Next Generation Sequencing Identifies Five Major Classes of Potentially Therapeutic Enzymes Secreted by Lucilia sericata Medical Maggots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Franta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lucilia sericata larvae are used as an alternative treatment for recalcitrant and chronic wounds. Their excretions/secretions contain molecules that facilitate tissue debridement, disinfect, or accelerate wound healing and have therefore been recognized as a potential source of novel therapeutic compounds. Among the substances present in excretions/secretions various peptidase activities promoting the wound healing processes have been detected but the peptidases responsible for these activities remain mostly unidentified. To explore these enzymes we applied next generation sequencing to analyze the transcriptomes of different maggot tissues (salivary glands, gut, and crop associated with the production of excretions/secretions and/or with digestion as well as the rest of the larval body. As a result we obtained more than 123.8 million paired-end reads, which were assembled de novo using Trinity and Oases assemblers, yielding 41,421 contigs with an N50 contig length of 2.22 kb and a total length of 67.79 Mb. BLASTp analysis against the MEROPS database identified 1729 contigs in 577 clusters encoding five peptidase classes (serine, cysteine, aspartic, threonine, and metallopeptidases, which were assigned to 26 clans, 48 families, and 185 peptidase species. The individual enzymes were differentially expressed among maggot tissues and included peptidase activities related to the therapeutic effects of maggot excretions/secretions.

  17. Treatment of stable COPD: antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. MacNee

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that an increased oxidative burden occurs in the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and this results in an imbalance between oxidants/antioxidants or oxidative stress, which may play a role in many of the processes involved in the pathogenesis of COPD. These include enhanced proteolytic activity, mucus hypersecretion and the enhanced inflammatory response in the lungs to inhaling tobacco smoke, which is characteristic of COPD. COPD is now recognised to have multiple systemic consequences, such as weight loss and skeletal muscle dysfunction. It is now thought that oxidative stress may extend beyond the lungs and is involved in these systemic effects. Antioxidant therapy therefore would seem to be a logical therapeutic approach in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There is a need for more potent antioxidant therapies to test the hypothesis that antioxidant drugs may be a new therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  18. Moral worlds and therapeutic quests : a study of medical pluralism and treatment-seeking in the lower Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Budden, Ashwin

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is about the social and psychocultural dimensions of medical pluralism and treatment seeking in Santarém, a rapidly growing municipality in the Brazilian Amazon. Based on a year-and-a-half of ethnographic fieldwork in urban and rural settings, it comparatively examines how popular religions and cosmopolitan health institutions define and manage (or fail to manage) sickness, psychosocial impairment, and emotional distress. It also reveals lived experiences of informants who s...

  19. Thermal and resonance neutrons generated by various electron and X-ray therapeutic beams from medical linacs installed in polish oncological centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konefał, Adam; Orlef, Andrzej; Łaciak, Marcin; Ciba, Aleksander; Szewczuk, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Background High-energy photon and electron therapeutic beams generated in medical linear accelerators can cause the electronuclear and photonuclear reactions in which neutrons with a broad energy spectrum are produced. A low-energy component of this neutron radiation induces simple capture reactions from which various radioisotopes originate and in which the radioactivity of a linac head and various objects in the treatment room appear. Aim The aim of this paper is to present the results of the thermal/resonance neutron fluence measurements during therapeutic beam emission and exemplary spectra of gamma radiation emitted by medical linac components activated in neutron reactions for four X-ray beams and for four electron beams generated by various manufacturers’ accelerators installed in typical concrete bunkers in Polish oncological centers. Materials and methods The measurements of neutron fluence were performed with the use of the induced activity method, whereas the spectra of gamma radiation from decays of the resulting radioisotopes were measured by means of a portable high-purity germanium detector set for field spectroscopy. Results The fluence of thermal neutrons as well as resonance neutrons connected with the emission of a 20 MV X-ray beam is ∼106 neutrons/cm2 per 1 Gy of a dose in water at a reference depth. It is about one order of magnitude greater than that for the 15 MV X-ray beams and about two orders of magnitude greater than for the 18–22 MeV electron beams regardless of the type of an accelerator. Conclusion The thermal as well as resonance neutron fluence depends strongly on the type and the nominal potential of a therapeutic beam. It is greater for X-ray beams than for electrons. The accelerator accessories and other large objects should not be stored in a treatment room during high-energy therapeutic beam emission to avoid their activation caused by thermal and resonance neutrons. Half-lives of the radioisotopes originating from

  20. Therapeutic Effects of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ocular Surface Damage Induced by Benzalkonium Chloride Preserved Anti-glaucoma Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Yu, Fen-Fen; Zhong, Yi-Min; Guo, Xin-Xing; Mao, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-preserved drugs is often associated with ocular surface toxicity. Ocular surface symptoms had a substantial impact on the glaucoma patients’ quality of life and compliance. This study aimed to investigate the effects of sodium hyaluronate (SH) on ocular surface toxicity induced by BAC-preserved anti-glaucoma medications treatment. Methods: Fifty-eight patients (101 eyes), who received topical BAC-preserved anti-glaucoma medications treatment and met the severe dry eye criteria, were included in the analysis. All patients were maintained the original topical anti-glaucoma treatment. In the SH-treated group (56 eyes), unpreserved 0.3% SH eye drops were administered with 3 times daily for 90 days. In the control group (55 eyes), phosphate-buffered saline were administered with 3 times daily for 90 days. Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, break-up time (BUT) test, corneal fluorescein staining, corneal and conjunctival rose Bengal staining, Schirmer test, and conjunctiva impression cytology were performed sequentially on days 0 and 91. Results: Compared with the control group, SH-treated group showed decrease in OSDI scores (Kruskal-Wallis test: H = 38.668, P < 0.001), fluorescein and rose Bengal scores (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test: z = −3.843, P < 0.001, and z = −3.508, P < 0.001, respectively), increase in tear film BUT (t-test: t = −10.994, P < 0.001) and aqueous tear production (t-test: t = −10.328, P < 0.001) on day 91. The goblet cell density was increased (t-test: t = −9.981, P < 0.001), and the morphology of the conjunctival epithelium were also improved after SH treatment. Conclusions: SH significantly improved both symptoms and signs of ocular surface damage in patients with BAC-preserved anti-glaucoma medications treatment. SH could be proposed as a new attempt to reduce ocular surface toxicity, and alleviate symptoms of ocular surface damage in BAC-preserved anti

  1. Scientific rhetoric in the consolidation of a therapeutic monopoly. Medical discourses of Spanish radiotherapists, 1895-1936.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Doménech, R M

    1997-08-01

    This paper analyses the medical discourses produced by the pioneers of Spanish radiotherapy in order to market their new therapy and to establish their monopoly. Social negotiation (persuasion and consensus) involved radiologists arguing against surgeons, gynaecologists, dermatologists and otorhinolaryngologists (ENT specialists). The arguments revolved around the scientific foundations of radiotherapy, the ability to control the doses, and the value of doctors' clinical experience. Radiotherapists argued that the difficulties of their practice necessitated special expertise; they negotiated over the range of use of radiotherapy, beginning with palliative applications, and going on to establish wider claims of advantage over existing treatments.

  2. The adjunct therapeutic effect of lasers with medication in the management of orofacial pain: double blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanat, Dariush; Ebrahimi, Hooman; Lavaee, Fatemeh; Alipour, Abbass

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser therapy in conjunction with a pharmaceutical approach to alleviate myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome. A few clinical studies have evaluated the analgesic effect of laser therapy on orofacial pain, most of which reported controversial results. Myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS), trigeminal neuralgia, and atypical facial pain are the most common facial pain. A double-blind randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of GaAs laser (peak power 10 W; pulse frequency 3000 Hz; average power 0.012 W; wavelength 980 nm; irradiation duration 300 sec; and dose 12.73 J/cm(2)) on the management of common orofacial pain. The laser group (n=30) received 10 sessions of treatment with GaAs laser. The control group (n=30) was treated identically with sham laser. All patients received the appropriate pharmaceutical treatment as well. Visual analog scale (VAS) was recorded for all patients at baseline, and immediately, 2, and 4 months after the final treatment session. The qualitative variables among the groups were compared using the χ(2) test. Both groups demonstrated a significant reduction in pain with the progression of time (p0.05). Whereas laser therapy in the present study failed to show any significance over the control group, the role of covariates such as radiation parameters (wave length, dose) should not be overlooked. We found no significant level of efficacy for the GaAs laser in the management of common orofacial pain. Further studies are suggested to evaluate the efficacy of other types of lasers with different parameters in the management of orofacial pains.

  3. Perspectives of Patients, Doctors and Medical Students at a Public University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro Regarding Tuberculosis and Therapeutic Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Elizabeth da Trindade; Hennington, Élida Azevedo; Siqueira, Hélio Ribeiro de; Rolla, Valeria Cavalcanti; Mannarino, Celina

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) identifies 8.7 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) annually around the world. The unfavorable outcomes of TB treatment prevent the achievement of the WHO's cure target. To evaluate existing intersections in the conceptions relative to the knowledge of TB, the experience of the illness and the treatment. Doctors, medical students and patients were selected from a public university in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 2011 to 2013. The data were obtained by semi-structured individual and focus group interviews, participant observation and a field journal. The inclusion of patients was interrupted due to saturation, and the inclusion of doctors and medical students stopped due to exhaustion. The theoretical background included symbolic Interactionism, and the analysis used rounded Theory. The analysis prioritized the actions/interactions axis. Twenty-three patients with pulmonary TB, seven doctors and 15 medical students were included. In the interviews, themes such as stigma, self-segregation, and difficulties in assistance emerged, in addition to defense mechanisms such as denial, rationalization, isolation and other mental mechanisms, including guilt, accountability and concealment of the disease. Aspects related to the assistance strategy, the social support network, bonding with the healthcare staff and the doctor-patient relationship were highlighted as adherence enablers. Doctors and students recommended an expansion of the theoretical and practical instruction on TB during medical students' education. The existence of health programs and policies was mentioned as a potential enabler of adherence. The main concepts identified were the stigma, self-segregation, guilt, responsibility, concealment and emotional repercussions. In relation to the facilitation of therapeutic adherence, the concepts identified were the bonds with healthcare staff, the doctor-patient relationship, assistance and educational health strategies.

  4. Role of stem cell research in therapeutic purpose--a hope for new horizon in medical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Ajit Kumar; Singh, Divya; Gupta, Jyoti

    2010-01-01

    regulation). Efforts are being done to grow both embryonic and adult stem cells using "tissue culture engineering" in vitro. SCs could be used for various therapeutic purposes like Parkinson's patients, Alzheimer's disease & other neurological disorders patients, repairing for damaged heart muscles and for type I diabetes patients as an alternative source of chemotherapy including trauma patients which is not only expensive but lack of side effect too.

  5. The therapeutic efficacy of intensive medical therapy in ameliorating high-density lipoprotein dysfunction in subjects with type two diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Sangeeta; Kheniser, Karim; Li, Ling; Bena, James; Kasumov, Takhar

    2016-08-27

    To determine whether 12 months of intensive medical therapy (IMT) improves HDL functionality parameters in subjects with type II diabetes (T2D). Retrospective, randomized, and controlled 12-month IMT intervention trial that enrolled 13-subjects with T2D (age 51- years, fasting glucose 147 mg/dL, body mass index [BMI] 36.5 kg/m(2)) and nine healthy control (46-years, fasting glucose 90 mg/dL, BMI 26.5 kg/m2). Subjects with T2D underwent IMT and HDL functionality measures (pro-inflammatory index of high-density lipoprotein (pHDL)), paraoxonase one (PON1), ceruloplasmin (Cp), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were performed on samples at baseline and at 12-months following IMT. At baseline, pHDL index was significantly higher in subjects with T2D (p therapy alone may only have relatively miniscule effects on the aforementioned factors, in relation to the aggregate.

  6. The pharmacology of the antioxidant lipoic acid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, G.Ph.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Bast, A.

    1997-01-01

    1. Lipoic acid is an example of an existing drug whose therapeutic effect has been related to its antioxidant activity. 2. Antioxidant activity is a relative concept: it depends on the kind of oxidative stress and the kind of oxidizable substrate (e.g., DNA, lipid, protein). 3. In vitro, the final

  7. High total serum cholesterol, medication coverage and therapeutic control: an analysis of national health examination survey data from eight countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fihn, Stephan D; Mokdad, Ali H; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Hasegawa, Toshihiko; Lim, Stephen S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the fraction of individuals with high total serum cholesterol who get diagnosed and effectively treated in eight high- and middle-income countries. Methods Using data from nationally representative health examination surveys conducted in 1998–2007, we studied a probability sample of 79 039 adults aged 40–79 years from England, Germany, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, Scotland, Thailand and the United States of America. For each country we calculated the prevalence of high total serum cholesterol (total serum cholesterol ≥ 6.2 mmol/l or ≥ 240 mg/dl) and the mean total serum cholesterol level. We also determined the fractions of individuals being diagnosed, treated with cholesterol-lowering medication and effectively controlled (total serum cholesterol < 6.2 mmol/l or < 240 mg/dl). Findings The proportion of undiagnosed individuals was highest in Thailand (78%; 95% confidence interval, CI: 74–82) and lowest in the United States (16%; 95% CI: 13–19). The fraction diagnosed but untreated ranged from 9% in Thailand (95% CI: 8–11) to 53% in Japan (95% CI: 50–57). The proportion being treated who had attained evidence of control ranged from 4% in Germany (95% CI: 3–5) to 58% in Mexico (95% CI: 54–63). Time series estimates showed improved control of high total serum cholesterol over the past two decades in England and the United States. Conclusion The percentage of people with high total serum cholesterol who are effectively treated remains small in selected high- and middle-income countries. Many of those affected are unaware of their condition. Untreated high blood cholesterol represents a missed opportunity in the face of a global epidemic of chronic diseases. PMID:21346920

  8. Banning antimicrobial growth promoters in feedstuffs does not result in increased therapeutic use of antibiotics in medicated feed in pig farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Sabine; Gassner, Beat; Giger, Thomas; Zwahlen, Roland

    2004-05-01

    We analysed prescription patterns for medicated feedstuffs to find out whether the ban on nutritive antimicrobial growth promotion introduced in Switzerland in 1999 had caused an increase in the therapeutic use of antimicrobial agents given orally to piglets and fattening pigs. From 1996 to 2001, a total of 6427 prescriptions were evaluated for medicated pig feed delivered to pig farms in the Swiss canton of St Gall. Prescribed daily doses (PDD) were derived for 14 active ingredients. The overall amount and the potency of antimicrobial agents were measured in relation to the size of the pig population (PDD/population). The use of antimicrobial agents decreased between 1996 (1200 kg) and 1999 (708 kg) and increased thereafter from 779 kg in 2000 to 936 kg in 2001. The PDD/population (6.1 in 1996 and 3.6 in 1999) remained low (3.3 in 2000 and 3.4 in 2001). The difference between the two parameters can be explained by changes in prescribing patterns, namely a reduction in antimicrobial therapy of respiratory diseases in fattening pigs and a shift to antimicrobial treatment of gastrointestinal-tract infections in piglets using drugs with a high PDD. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Determination of antioxidant activity of saffron taken from the flower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-03

    Aug 3, 2011 ... Laboratory of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Lebanese University, Lebanon. Accepted 19 ... Key words: Crocus sativus, oxidative stress, free radicals, Lebanese saffron, antioxidant activity, free radicals scavengers. ..... cellular aging and atherosclerosis, heart disease, stroke,.

  10. Antioxidant and anti-neoplastic activities of Picrorhiza kurroa extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, V; Guha, Gunjan; Kumar, R Ashok

    2011-02-01

    Picrorhizakurroa Royle ex Benth., a well-known traditional herb from the Scrophulariaceae family has a remarkable reputation among the indigenous medical practitioners. The antioxidant and anti-neoplastic activities of methanolic and aqueous extracts of P. kurroa rhizome were investigated in the present study. The total phenolic content was determined by a spectrophotometric method. The antioxidant efficacies of the extracts were studied employing radical scavenging assays (DPPH· and ·OH), ferric reducing antioxidant property (FRAP) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay for testing inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the extracts was tested by XTT assay in MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma), Hep3B (human hepatocellular carcinoma) and PC-3 (human prostate cancer) cell lines. The ability of the extracts to induce apoptosis was also investigated. Both extracts exhibited promising antioxidant potentials. The extracts were also observed to be cytotoxic at the tested dosage and were able to target cells towards apoptosis. The study concludes that P. kurroa possess diverse therapeutic potentials which might be useful in development of drugs or their precursors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A thermoresponsive biodegradable polymer with intrinsic antioxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; van Lith, Robert; Baler, Kevin; Hoshi, Ryan A; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2014-11-10

    Oxidative stress in tissue can contribute to chronic inflammation that impairs wound healing and the efficacy of cell-based therapies and medical devices. We describe the synthesis and characterization of a biodegradable, thermoresponsive gel with intrinsic antioxidant properties suitable for the delivery of therapeutics. Citric acid, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm) were copolymerized by sequential polycondensation and radical polymerization to produce poly(polyethylene glycol citrate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PPCN). PPCN was chemically characterized, and the thermoresponsive behavior, antioxidant properties, morphology, potential for protein and cell delivery, and tissue compatibility in vivo were evaluated. The PPCN gel has a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 26 °C and exhibits intrinsic antioxidant properties based on its ability to scavenge free radicals, chelate metal ions, and inhibit lipid peroxidation. PPCN displays a hierarchical architecture of micropores and nanofibers, and contrary to typical thermoresponsive polymers, such as PNIPAAm, PPCN gel maintains its volume upon formation. PPCN efficiently entrapped and slowly released the chemokine SDF-1α and supported the viability and proliferation of vascular cells. Subcutaneous injections in rats showed that PPCN gels are resorbed over time and new connective tissue formation takes place without signs of significant inflammation. Ultimately, this intrinsically antioxidant, biodegradable, thermoresponsive gel could potentially be used as an injectable biomaterial for applications where oxidative stress in tissue is a concern.

  12. Antioxidant System in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şemsettin Karaca

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In healthy body, oxygen species and antioxidant defence mechanisms work in balance. Overproduction or inadequate removal of reactive oxygen species result in oxidative stress, leading to lipid peroxidation, DNA mutation or breakage, activation or inactivation of enzymes, protein oxidation. Clinically, these cause several unfavorable effects included erythema, edema, wrinkles, photoaging, inflammation, autoimmune reactions, hipersensitivity reactions, keratinization disorders, neoplastic or preneoplastic lesions. Although reactive oxygen species play a role in various skin diseases, their biological targets and pathogenic mode of action are still not fully understood. In addition, strategies in the therapeutic management of reactive oxygen species effects in are still lacking. The aim of this review is to give information to readers about reactive oxygen species, antioxidants and skin disorders influenced by reactive oxygen species.

  13. Cancer Incidence of Child Population of the Russian Federation and its Provision of Medical Care (Doctors, Bedspace, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Technologies: Analysis of Statistical Data for 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Rykov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer is the second most common cause of death in children. The organization of cancer care for children requires further reforming and rational use of available resources.Objective: Our aim was to assess the provision of federal districts (FD with cancer specialists and relevant bedspace needed for providing medical care for children with newly diagnosed malignant disease.Methods: The ecological study investigated reports of regional ministries and departments of health of 82 subjects of the Russian Federation for 2013. It was analyzed the morbiden (newly diagnosed cases of cancer of children aged 0–17 years, the provision of bedspace, doctors, diagnostic and therapeutic technologies.Results: In 2013 it was registered 3378 children with cancer. The average incidence rate in Russia amounted to 12.4 per 100 thousand of the child population, in the RF subjects index values ranged from 5.5 to 21.8. 1705 (50.5% patients were sent to federal clinics. In total, in 2013 in Russia there were 51 children's oncology departments with 2021 beds (including beds in non-core departments, therewith, the provision of bedspace varied by FD from 0.40 to 1.13 per 10 thousand of the child population. Treatment of children with cancer was carried out by 390 doctors, 138 (35.4% among them did not have a certificate of Pediatric Oncology. The provision of doctors varied by FD from 0.06 to 0.20 per 10 thousand of the child population. The availability of modern diagnostic tools in the RF remains at a relatively low level. As a result, 76.6% of all newly diagnosed cancers were stage III–IV.Conclusion: It is required the improving of the vertical and the amount of specialized medical care for children with newly diagnosed cancer.

  14. Efficacy of Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) and/N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) Supplementation on Nutritional and Antioxidant Status of Male Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirabbasi, Elham; Shahar, Suzana; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Manap, Roslina Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant therapy has a potential to be introduced as therapeutic modality for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. This study aimed to determine the effect of antioxidant supplementation [ascorbic acid and N-Acetylcysteine (NAC)] on nutritional and antioxidant status in male COPD patients. A parallel and single blind randomised controlled clinical trial (RCT) was conducted at two medical centers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Seventy-nine subjects were recruited and randomly divided into four trial arms (i.e., NAC, vitamin C, NAC+vitamin C and control groups) for six mo. The primary outcome was changes in body mass index by estimating power of 90% and significance level of psupplementation of NAC or vitamin C improved nutritional and antioxidant status of subjects.

  15. In vivo Pharmacological Evaluations of Pilocarpine-Loaded Antioxidant-Functionalized Biodegradable Thermogels in Glaucomatous Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Feng; Luo, Li-Jyuan; Lai, Jui-Yang

    2017-02-01

    To alleviate oxidative stress-induced ocular hypertension, grafting of antioxidant molecules to drug carriers enables a dual-function mechanism to effectively treat glaucomatous intraocular pressure (IOP) dysregulation. Providing potential application for intracameral administration of antiglaucoma medications, this study, for the first time, aims to examine in vivo pharmacological efficacy of pilocarpine-loaded antioxidant-functionalized biodegradable thermogels in glaucomatous rabbits. A series of gallic acid (GA)-grafted gelatin-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (GN) polymers were synthesized via redox reactions at 20-50 °C. Our results showed that raising redox radical initiation reaction temperature maximizes GA grafting level, antioxidant activity, and water content at 40 °C. Meanwhile, increase in overall hydrophilicity of GNGA carriers leads to fast polymer degradation and early pilocarpine depletion in vivo, which is disadvantageous to offer necessary pharmacological performance at prolonged time. By contrast, sustained therapeutic drug concentrations in aqueous humor can be achieved for long-term (i.e., 28 days) protection against corneal aberration and retinal injury after pilocarpine delivery using dual-function optimized carriers synthesized at 30 °C. The GA-functionalized injectable hydrogels are also found to contribute significantly to enhancement of retinal antioxidant defense system and preservation of histological structure and electrophysiological function, thereby supporting the benefits of drug-containing antioxidant biodegradable thermogels to prevent glaucoma development.

  16. Antioxidant therapy in idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Majzoub

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Additional randomized controlled studies are required to confirm the efficacy and safety of antioxidant supplementation in the medical treatment of idiopathic male infertility as well as the dosage required to improve semen parameters, fertilization rates, and pregnancy outcomes in iOAT.

  17. Antioxidative defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals occur constantly during metabolism and take part in numerous physiological processes, such as: intra-cellular and inter-cellular signalization, gene expression, removal of damaged or senescent cells, and control of the tone of blood vessels. However, there is an increased quantity of free radicals in situations of so-called oxidative stress, when they cause serious damage to cellular membranes (peroxidation of their lipids, damage of membrane proteins, and similar, to interior cellular protein molecules, as well as DNA molecules and carbohydrates. This is precisely why the organism has developed numerous mechanisms for removing free radicals and/or preventing their production. Some of these are enzyme-related and include superoxide-dismutase, catalase, glutathione-peroxidase, and others. Other, non-enzyme mechanisms, imply antioxidative activities of vitamins E and C, provitamin A, coenzyme Q, reduced glutation, and others. Since free radicals can leave the cell that has produced them and become dispersed throughout the body, in addition to antioxidative defense that functions within cellular structures, antioxidant extra-cellular defense has also been developed. This is comprised by: transferrin, lactoferrin, haptoglobin, hemopexin, ceruloplasmin, albumins, extra-cellular isoform SOD, extracellular glutathione-peroxidase, glucose, bilirubin, urates, and many other molecules.

  18. Evaluation of real-time data obtained from gravimetric preparation of antineoplastic agents shows medication errors with possible critical therapeutic impact: Results of a large-scale, multicentre, multinational, retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkola, R; Czejka, M; Bérubé, J

    2017-08-01

    Medication errors are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality especially with antineoplastic drugs, owing to their narrow therapeutic index. Gravimetric workflow software systems have the potential to reduce volumetric errors during intravenous antineoplastic drug preparation which may occur when verification is reliant on visual inspection. Our aim was to detect medication errors with possible critical therapeutic impact as determined by the rate of prevented medication errors in chemotherapy compounding after implementation of gravimetric measurement. A large-scale, retrospective analysis of data was carried out, related to medication errors identified during preparation of antineoplastic drugs in 10 pharmacy services ("centres") in five European countries following the introduction of an intravenous workflow software gravimetric system. Errors were defined as errors in dose volumes outside tolerance levels, identified during weighing stages of preparation of chemotherapy solutions which would not otherwise have been detected by conventional visual inspection. The gravimetric system detected that 7.89% of the 759 060 doses of antineoplastic drugs prepared at participating centres between July 2011 and October 2015 had error levels outside the accepted tolerance range set by individual centres, and prevented these doses from reaching patients. The proportion of antineoplastic preparations with deviations >10% ranged from 0.49% to 5.04% across sites, with a mean of 2.25%. The proportion of preparations with deviations >20% ranged from 0.21% to 1.27% across sites, with a mean of 0.71%. There was considerable variation in error levels for different antineoplastic agents. Introduction of a gravimetric preparation system for antineoplastic agents detected and prevented dosing errors which would not have been recognized with traditional methods and could have resulted in toxicity or suboptimal therapeutic outcomes for patients undergoing anticancer treatment.

  19. Evaluation of Ayurvedic plants for stimulating intrinsic antioxidant responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Dutt Shukla

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage caused by free radicals plays an important role in the causation and progression of many diseases, including aging. Free radical damage is countered by many mechanisms, including both active antioxidant enzymatic activity in our body and passive antioxidants. Antioxidant response of our body can accommodate increased oxidative damage in diseased states to a level but beyond that level, additional antioxidants are required to combat the increased stress. Apart from the regular dietary sources of antioxidants, many traditional herbal medicines demonstrate a potential to boost antioxidant activity. Rasayana chikitsa that deals with rejuvenation and revitalization is a branch of the Indian traditional medical system of Ayurveda. We review some select herbs described in Rasayana chikitsa that have been assessed by modern means for stimulating intrinsic antioxidant responses in humans. A critical evaluation of Rasayana chikitsa will likely provide urgently needed, actual stimulants of our physiological antioxidant responses and not just more passive antioxidants to an already large catalogue.

  20. Critical evaluation of ayurvedic plants for stimulating intrinsic antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sunil Dutt; Bhatnagar, Maheep; Khurana, Sukant

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage caused by free radicals plays an important role in the causation and progression of many diseases, including aging. Free-radical damage is countered by many mechanisms, including both active antioxidant enzymatic activity in our body and passive antioxidants. Antioxidant response of our body can accommodate increased oxidative damage in diseased states to a level but beyond that level, additional antioxidants are required to combat the increased stress. Apart from the regular dietary sources of antioxidants, many traditional herbal medicines demonstrate a potential to boost antioxidant activity. Rasayana chikitsa that deals with rejuvenation and revitalization is a branch of the Indian traditional medical system of ayurveda. We review some select herbs described in rasayana chikitsa that have been assessed by modern means for stimulating intrinsic antioxidant responses in humans. A critical evaluation of rasayana chikitsa will likely provide urgently needed, actual stimulants of our physiological antioxidant responses and not just more passive antioxidants to add to an already large catalog.

  1. Antioxidant plants and diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri, Hamid; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Baradaran, Azar; Rafieian-kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing rapidly and it is expected to increase by 2030. Other than currently available therapeutic options, there are a lot of herbal medicines, which have been recommended for its treatment. Herbal medicines have long been used for the treatment of DM because of the advantage usually having no or less side-effects. Most of these plants have antioxidant activities and hence, prevent or treat hard curable diseases, other than having the property of...

  2. Meta-analysis: antioxidant supplements for liver diseases - the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, L L; Nikolova, D

    2010-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  3. Therapeutic Uses of Triphala in Ayurvedic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniston, Kate; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The aim of this article is to review the current literature on the therapeutic uses and efficacy of Triphala. Herbal remedies are among the most ancient medicines used in traditional systems of healthcare such as Ayurveda. Triphala, a well-recognized and highly efficacious polyherbal Ayurvedic medicine consisting of fruits of the plant species Emblica officinalis (Amalaki), Terminalia bellerica (Bibhitaki), and Terminalia chebula (Haritaki), is a cornerstone of gastrointestinal and rejuvenative treatment. Methods: A search of the PubMed database was conducted. Results: In addition, numerous additional therapeutic uses described both in the Ayurvedic medical literature and anecdotally are being validated scientifically. In addition to laxative action, Triphala research has found the formula to be potentially effective for several clinical uses such as appetite stimulation, reduction of hyperacidity, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, antibacterial, antimutagenic, adaptogenic, hypoglycemic, antineoplastic, chemoprotective, and radioprotective effects, and prevention of dental caries. Polyphenols in Triphala modulate the human gut microbiome and thereby promote the growth of beneficial Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus while inhibiting the growth of undesirable gut microbes. The bioactivity of Triphala is elicited by gut microbiota to generate a variety of anti-inflammatory compounds. Conclusions: This review summarizes recent data on pharmacological properties and clinical effects of Triphala while highlighting areas in need of additional investigation and clinical development. PMID:28696777

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species and the Aging Eye: Specific Role of Metabolically Active Mitochondria in Maintaining Lens Function and in the Initiation of the Oxidation-Induced Maturity Onset Cataract--A Novel Platform of Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants With Broad Therapeutic Potential for Redox Regulation and Detoxification of Oxidants in Eye Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2016-01-01

    The aging eye appears to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. A great deal of research indicates that dysfunctional mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS). More than 95% of O2 produced during normal metabolism is generated by the electron transport chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are also the major target of ROS. Cataract formation, the opacification of the eye lens, is one of the leading causes of human blindness worldwide, accounting for 47.8% of all causes of blindness. Cataracts result from the deposition of aggregated proteins in the eye lens and lens fiber cell plasma membrane damage, which causes clouding of the lens, light scattering, and obstruction of vision. ROS-induced damage in the lens cell may consist of oxidation of proteins, DNA damage, and/or lipid peroxidation, all of which have been implicated in cataractogenesis. This article is an attempt to integrate how mitochondrial ROS are altered in the aging eye along with those protective and repair therapeutic systems believed to regulate ROS levels in ocular tissues and how damage to these systems contributes to age-onset eye disease and cataract formation. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants might be used to effectively prevent ROS-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins in the inner mitochondrial membrane in vivo. As a result of the combination of weak metal chelating, OH and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid, and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biologic membranes and aqueous environments and act as the antiapoptotic natural drug compounds The authors developed and patented the new ophthalmic compositions, including N-acetylcarnosine, acting as a prodrug of naturally targeted to mitochondria L-carnosine endowed with pluripotent antioxidant activities combined with mitochondria

  5. Therapeutic development in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Jeffrey M; Leonardi, Craig L

    2014-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have provided the basis for development of new therapeutic approaches to psoriasis. New, more effective therapies target specific molecules in the inflammatory cascade involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.The biologic era of psoriasis therapy began with inhibitors of T-cell activation, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin (IL)-12/23. Continued investigation has led to therapies and therapeutic candidates that target IL-17, IL-23, phosphodiesterase-4, and isomers of Janus kinase. 2014 by Frontline Medical Communications Inc.

  6. [Utilization of radionuclide therapy facility and assembly-temporary type therapeutic facility for medical treatment of radioactivity contaminated patients in nuclear emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naoyuki; Satro, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    2011-05-01

    Medical management of patients internally contaminated in nuclear emergency needs, in addition to general medical treatment, to evaluate doses due to intakes of radioactive materials, to conduct effective treatment with stable isotopes and chelating agents and to keep public away from radioactive materials in and excreted from patients. The idea of medical treatment for internal contamination is demonstrated in the general principles on medical management of victims in nuclear emergency issued by the Cabinet Office in Japan. However, if impressive number patients with internal contamination are generated, the current medical management scheme in nuclear emergency is not able to admit them. The utilization of radionuclide therapy facilities where patients with thyroid diseases are treated with radioisotope and assembly-temporary housing type treatment facilities dedicated for internal contaminated patients may be expected to complement the medical management scheme in nuclear emergency. The effect or more medical management system for patients internally contaminated may become one of the safety nets in the contemporary society that inclines to use nuclear energy on account of accessibility.

  7. Antioxidant supplementation enhances bacterial peritonitis in mice by inhibiting phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Manish; Sharma, Deepak; Khan, Nazir M; Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh Kumar; Jawali, Narendra

    2014-03-01

    Antioxidants are known to exhibit numerous health benefits including anti-ageing, anti-apoptotic and immuno-stimulatory effects. However, we present the data showing counterproductive effects of therapeutically relevant antioxidants on bacterial clearance by the immune system in a murine peritonitic model. The antioxidants ascorbic acid, glutathione and N-acetylcysteine augmented morbidity and mortality in mice carrying Eshcerichia coli-induced acute bacterial peritonitis. Treatment of peritonitic mice with antioxidants significantly increased their bacterial load in the range of 0.3-2 logs. Antioxidant administration to peritonitic mice resulted in decreased numbers of macrophages, B-cells and dendritic cells at the primary site of infection and increased neutrophil infiltration. Serum TNF-α levels were also decreased in antioxidant-treated peritonitic mice. In vitro experiments showed that antioxidants reduced the phagocytic efficacy of peritoneal macrophages by ~60-75% and also decreased E. coli-induced oxidative burst in macrophages cells. Taken together, our data indicate that the antioxidants increased the severity of peritonitis by decreasing the phagocytic efficiency, oxidative burst, and TNF-α production, and increasing neutrophil infiltration. Based on these results, we propose that antioxidant supplementation during the course of bacterial infection is not recommended as it could be detrimental for the host. In addition, the present study underlines the importance of timing and context of antioxidant administration rather than indiscriminate usage to gain the best possible therapeutic advantage of these redox compounds.

  8. Therapeutic applications of melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a methoxyindole synthesized within the pineal gland. The hormone is secreted during the night and appears to play multiple roles within the human organism. The hormone contributes to the regulation of biological rhythms, may induce sleep, has strong antioxidant action and appears to contribute to the protection of the organism from carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. At a therapeutic level as well as in prevention, melatonin is used for the management of sleep disorders and jet lag, for the resynchronization of circadian rhythms in situations such as blindness and shift work, for its preventive action in the development of cancer, as additive therapy in cancer and as therapy for preventing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23515203

  9. Kant and therapeutic privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Chris

    2008-08-01

    Given Kant's exceptionless moral prohibition on lying, one might suspect that he is committed to a similar prohibition on withholding diagnostic and prognostic information from patients. I confirm this suspicion by adapting arguments against therapeutic privilege from his arguments against lying. However, I show that all these arguments are importantly flawed and submit that they should be rejected. A more compelling Kantian take on informed consent and therapeutic privilege is achievable, I argue, by focusing on Kant's duty of beneficence, which requires us to aim at furthering others' ends. But I show that there are some cases in which furthering a patient's ends requires withholding material medical information from her. Although I concede that these cases are probably quite rare, I conclude that the best Kantian thinking agrees with that of therapeutic privilege's advocates.

  10. Differences in Adverse Event Reporting Rates of Therapeutic Failure Between Two Once-daily Extended-release Methylphenidate Medications in Canada: Analysis of Spontaneous Adverse Event Reporting Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Wyllie, Laura; van Stralen, Judy; Castillon, Genaro; Sherman, Stephen E; Almagor, Doron

    2017-10-01

    Our study evaluated adverse events of therapeutic failure (and specifically reduced duration of action) with the use of a branded product, Osmotic Release Oral System (OROS) methylphenidate, which is approved for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and a generic product (methylphenidate, methylphenidate ER-C), which was approved for marketing in Canada based on bioequivalence to OROS methylphenidate. This study was initiated following reports that some US-marketed generic methylphenidate ER products had substantially higher reporting rates of therapeutic failure than did the referenced brands. Through methodology similar to that used by the US Food and Drug Administration to investigate the issue with the US-marketed generic, reporting rates were calculated from cases of therapeutic failure identified in the Canadian Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online database for a 1-year period beginning 8 months after each product launch. Corresponding population exposure was estimated from the number of tablets dispensed. An in-depth analysis of narratives of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) with the use of the generic product was conducted in duplicate by 2 physicians to assess causality and to characterize the potential safety risk and clinical pattern of therapeutic failure. Similar secondary analyses were conducted on the US-marketed products. Reporting rates of therapeutic failure with the use of methylphenidate ER-C (generic) and OROS methylphenidate (brand name) were 411.5 and 37.5 cases per 100,000 patient-years, respectively (reporting rate ratio, 10.99; 95% CI, 5.93-22.21). In-depth analysis of narratives of 230 ICSRs of therapeutic failure with the Canadian-marketed generic determined that all ICSRs were either probably (60 [26%]) or possibly (170 [74%]) causally related to methylphenidate ER-C. Clinical symptoms suggestive of overdose were present in 31 reports of loss of efficacy (13.5%) and occurred primarily in the morning, and

  11. In-vitro antioxidant study of certain common fruits – Gooseberry, Guava, and Tamarind

    OpenAIRE

    Anu S

    2014-01-01

    Most medicinal plants are used as antioxidants in traditional medicine, and their claim for therapeutic properties because of its capacity to scavenge oxygen free radical. As they have low levels of antioxidants or inhibition of the antioxidant enzymes, cause oxidative stress, and may damage or kill cells. In the present work I demonstrated the antioxidant activity of some common fruits such as Gooseberry (Emblica officinalis Gaertn), Guava (Psidium guavajava Linn) and Tamarind (T...

  12. Therapeutic drug monitoring, a practical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kees Neef, C.; Touw, D.J.

    Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) is an indispensable tool in therapeutic handling and medication safety. A definition of TDM is: Therapeutic drug monitoring is a system of quality assurance of a drug management system, aiming that the right drug is given tot the right patient in the right dose in

  13. [The necessity of new approaches to the elaboration of the projects for the sanitary (mountainous sanitary) protection districts around the therapeutic and health-promotion facilities, health resorts and their natural medical resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, A N; Adilov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The international experience gained during the past two centuries indicates that the most efficient and rational way to ensure the protection of the territories occupied by the therapeutic and health-promotion facilities, spa centres, and health resorts together with their natural medical resources is to set up sanitary (mountainous sanitary) protection districts or zones along the perimeter of these territories. Beginning from 2000, numerous changes and amendments have been annually introduced in the Russian legislation intended to ensure efficacious control over the rational exploitation of the territories of therapeutic and health-promotion value and their natural medical resources. These initiatives have negative effect on the activities of these organizations and the quality of the services they are expected to provide. Taken together these effects lead to the degradation of the spa and health resort business. Bearing in mind the current conditions for economic activities, it is proposed, in contrast to the former global approach, to envisage in the aforementioned projects the establishment of the sanitary (mountainous sanitary) protection districts or zones and determine their borders based on the results of the assessment of their potential for the protection of therapeutic factors and other valuable resources. Equally important is the maximum reduction of the areas of the second and third zones taking into account their relevant objective characteristics. In certain cases, the protective district may coincide with the second zone. As far as the federal health resorts and large territories of special health-promotion value are concerned, some of them may have two or more sanitary (mountainous sanitary) protection districts. Both the owners and the users of these territories should be provided the necessary and sufficient possibilities for the rational nature use at the grounds and in the adjacent water areas suitable for the development of health resort

  14. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect counts as a medicine. It can be readily ... you take something for a long-term therapeutic effect, tell your doctor about it. He or she ...

  15. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Cleva; Kross, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals. PMID:22408440

  16. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Kross

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals.

  17. Rescue procedures in the major trauma of upper extremities – The role of the polish medical air rescue in the therapeutic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gałązkowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the growing use of various types of industrial and agricultural machinery, occupational accidents are among the most serious ones and quite frequently result in the permanent posttraumatic disability of the injured person. In Poland, a replantation service has been operating since 2010. Each day, one out of six centres provides emergency replantation service accepting amputation calls from across the country. Patients qualified for replantation often need to be transported from places located even several hundred kilometres from the target hospital. Material and Methods: The analysis covered 174 Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS missions and 112 interhospital transports. The data were obtained as a result of a retrospective analysis of the air and medical documentation of 23 460 missions carried out by the Polish Medical Air Rescue (Samodzielny Publiczny Zakład Opieki Zdrowotnej Lotnicze Pogotowie Ratunkowe – SP ZOZ LPR aircrafts in the years 2011–2013. Results: In the period under study, the Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopters dressed 135 patients with upper extremity amputations at the scene and transported them to hospitals as part of HEMS missions. At the same time, SP ZOZ LPR aircrafts made 102 interhospital transports. Ninety patients were qualified for treatment in replantation service centres. The average air transport time was 76 min, while the total transport time was 172.3 min. With transport exceeding 300 km, the average time advantage over the ground transport was approximately 1.5 h. Conclusions: In justified cases, the use of helicopters and airplanes is an optimal method of transporting patients with the major trauma to upper extremities. Med. Pr. 2014;65(6:765–776

  18. Emerging Role of Antioxidants in the Protection of Uveitis Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Umesh C S; Kalariya, Nilesh M; Ramana, Kota V

    2011-01-01

    Current understanding of the role of oxidative stress in ocular inflammatory diseases indicates that antioxidant therapy may be important to optimize the treatment. Recently investigated antioxidant therapies for ocular inflammatory diseases include various vitamins, plant products and reactive oxygen species scavengers. Oxidative stress plays a causative role in both non-infectious and infectious uveitis complications, and novel strategies to diminish tissue damage and dysfunction with antioxidant therapy may ameliorate visual complications. Preclinical studies with experimental animals and cell culture demonstrate significance of anti-inflammatory effects of a number of promising antioxidant agents. Many of these antioxidants are under clinical trial for various inflammatory diseases other than uveitis such as cardiovascular, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. Well planned interventional clinical studies of the ocular inflammation will be necessary to sufficiently investigate the potential medical benefits of antioxidant therapies for uveitis. This review summarizes the recent investigation of novel antioxidant agents for ocular inflammation, with selected studies focused on uveitis. PMID:21182473

  19. ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriraja Vrushabaiah Kanakapura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy are the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy are microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. Antioxidant status is reduced in DM-induced retinopathy and nephropathy. Present study is undertaken to evaluate the degree of oxidative stress in diabetic neuropathy patients. The aim of the study is to study on oxidative stress as measured by lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde and antienzyme status in type II DM patients with neuropathy and compared them with a controlled nondiabetic group. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study included 100 subjects from Sapthagiri Medical College, Bangalore, from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, of age group 50 to 70 yrs. out of which 50 patients were non-insulin-dependent DM with neuropathy and rest 50 age and sex matched apparently healthy individuals (control group. Antioxidant status was assessed by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione reductase (GR, Catalase and Reduced Glutathione (GSH. RESULTS It showed a significant increase p<0.001 in FBS, PPBS, TC, TG, LDL, VLDL, CAT, MDA, while HDL, GSH, GPX, GR and SOD were found to be decreased significantly (p 0.001. CONCLUSION MDA was significantly elevated in diabetic group, whereas antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and reduced glutathione were significantly decreased, which might be helpful in risk assessment of various complications of DM. The data suggests that alteration in antioxidant status and MDA may help to predict the risk of diabetic neuropathy.

  20. Nano-antioxidants: An emerging strategy for intervention against neurodegenerative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhir, Rajat; Yadav, Aarti; Sunkaria, Aditya; Singhal, Nitin

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress has for long been linked to the neuronal cell death in many neurodegenerative conditions. Conventional antioxidant therapies have been less effective in preventing neuronal damage caused by oxidative stress due to their inability to cross the blood brain barrier. Nanoparticle antioxidants constitute a new wave of antioxidant therapies for prevention and treatment of diseases involving oxidative stress. It is believed that nanoparticle antioxidants have strong and persistent interactions with biomolecules and would be more effective against free radical induced damage. Nanoantioxidants include inorganic nanoparticles possessing intrinsic antioxidant properties, nanoparticles functionalized with antioxidants or antioxidant enzymes to function as an antioxidant delivery system. Nanoparticles containing antioxidants have shown promise as high-performance therapeutic nanomedicine in attenuating oxidative stress with potential applications in treating and preventing neurodegenerative conditions. However, to realize the full potential of nanoantioxidants, negative aspects associated with the use of nanoparticles need to be overcome to validate their long term applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical therapeutic itineraries of women with breast cancer diagnosis affiliated to the People's Health Insurance in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada-Tayabas, Luz María; Salcedo, Liseth Amell; Espino, Joel Monárrez

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe the medical itineraries followed by breast cancer women affiliated to the People's Health Insurance in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico. We used an ethnographic approach based on oral histories of 12 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the year prior to the first meeting. Two face-to-face sessions per participant lasting 60 minutes each were conducted followed by a telephone interview. Content and diachronic analyses were used. Three main itineraries were identified: (1) diagnostic process, (2) final diagnosis to treatment, and (3) cancer control and relapse. Findings suggested that infrastructure and human resources to adequately screen and timely diagnose breast cancer were scant and insufficiently trained, respectively. Deferral of medical assessment was related with lack of information about breast cancer consequences, with women being afraid of a positive result, and with economic constraints. The current screening program needs to be redesigned to prevent diagnostic delays, as these seem to explain the high frequency of advanced stages reported at the time of diagnosis.

  2. Medical therapeutic itineraries of women with breast cancer diagnosis affiliated to the People's Health Insurance in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Tejada-Tayabas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to describe the medical itineraries followed by breast cancer women affiliated to the People's Health Insurance in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico. We used an ethnographic approach based on oral histories of 12 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the year prior to the first meeting. Two face-to-face sessions per participant lasting 60 minutes each were conducted followed by a telephone interview. Content and diachronic analyses were used. Three main itineraries were identified: (1 diagnostic process, (2 final diagnosis to treatment, and (3 cancer control and relapse. Findings suggested that infrastructure and human resources to adequately screen and timely diagnose breast cancer were scant and insufficiently trained, respectively. Deferral of medical assessment was related with lack of information about breast cancer consequences, with women being afraid of a positive result, and with economic constraints. The current screening program needs to be redesigned to prevent diagnostic delays, as these seem to explain the high frequency of advanced stages reported at the time of diagnosis.

  3. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K [Castro Valley, CA

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  4. Clinical applications of therapeutic phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim KH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kyung Hee Kim,1 Ki Young Oh,2 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, South Korea Abstract: Phlebotomy is the removal of blood from the body, and therapeutic phlebotomy is the preferred treatment for blood disorders in which the removal of red blood cells or serum iron is the most efficient method for managing the symptoms and complications. Therapeutic phlebotomy is currently indicated for the treatment of hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with hyperferritinemia. This review discusses therapeutic phlebotomy and the related disorders and also offers guidelines for establishing a therapeutic phlebotomy program. Keywords: therapeutic phlebotomy, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

  5. Antioxidants in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj V Pai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer′s disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology.

  6. Antioxidants in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Varadraj V.; Shukla, Pankaj; Kikkeri, Naveen Narayanshetty

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer′s disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology.

  7. Antioxidant Activities of Stilbenoids from Rheum emodi Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan Chai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheum emodi Wall has been reported to possess protective effect in many inflammatory diseases and oxidative stress-related injuries. This study aims to investigate antioxidant power of stilbenoids from R. emodi and then explore the material basis for its antioxidant potential. The most abundant stilbenoid piceatannol-4′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PICG and its aglycon piceatannol (PICE were isolated from R. emodi rhizome. Using well-accepted antioxidant chemicals as reference, antioxidant activity of these stilbenoids was examined by measuring DPPH and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferric reducing power, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation in vitro. Both PICG and PICE displayed promising antioxidant activity in all the four assays. Comparisons among the tested compounds indicated that PICE has the most potent antioxidant activity and the presence of 3′-hydroxyl group may enhance antioxidant activity of stilbenoids. The antioxidative effect of PICE at the cellular level was further demonstrated on the model of hydrogen-peroxide-induced H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts injury. Taking into account the rapid in vivo metabolic transformation of PICG into PICE it can be inferred that the most abundant stilbenoid PICG may be an important constituent responsible for the antioxidant potential of R. emodi and promising to be developed as an antioxidant agent for supplementary or therapeutic use.

  8. Antioxidant Activities of Stilbenoids from Rheum emodi Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Fang; Li, Yan-Li; Liu, Ke; Xu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Rheum emodi Wall has been reported to possess protective effect in many inflammatory diseases and oxidative stress-related injuries. This study aims to investigate antioxidant power of stilbenoids from R. emodi and then explore the material basis for its antioxidant potential. The most abundant stilbenoid piceatannol-4'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PICG) and its aglycon piceatannol (PICE) were isolated from R. emodi rhizome. Using well-accepted antioxidant chemicals as reference, antioxidant activity of these stilbenoids was examined by measuring DPPH and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferric reducing power, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation in vitro. Both PICG and PICE displayed promising antioxidant activity in all the four assays. Comparisons among the tested compounds indicated that PICE has the most potent antioxidant activity and the presence of 3'-hydroxyl group may enhance antioxidant activity of stilbenoids. The antioxidative effect of PICE at the cellular level was further demonstrated on the model of hydrogen-peroxide-induced H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts injury. Taking into account the rapid in vivo metabolic transformation of PICG into PICE it can be inferred that the most abundant stilbenoid PICG may be an important constituent responsible for the antioxidant potential of R. emodi and promising to be developed as an antioxidant agent for supplementary or therapeutic use.

  9. Targeting oxidative stress through antioxidants in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Parul; Kumar, Ashwini; Kumar, Awanish

    2018-01-08

    The myriad of complications associated with diabetes is closely linked with the generation of reactive species or free radicals leading to oxidative and nitrosative stress. Increased oxidative stress is an important cause and result of diabetes and it is thought to underlie the cellular changes that lead to diabetic complications. The whole cause and effect form a vicious circle, underlying many layers of potential therapeutics in its research. In this regards, this review outlines the briefs about the correlation of type 2 diabetes and oxidative (or nitrosative) stress and also compiles the potentiality of various antioxidants that are being or can be used for alleviating the oxidative stress. Since the complications are like a knit matrix of numerous deteriorating mechanisms, a single antioxidant therapeutic approach cannot be an answer. Therefore, it is important to develop new fixed-dose combinations of effective antioxidants that target key reactive oxygen (or nitrogen)-producing sources, mimic endogenous antioxidants and scavenge the reactive species generated balancing the pro and antioxidant cycle. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical trial data with therapeutic antioxidants in type 2 diabetes along with a brief focus on success and failures of antioxidant-based therapy.

  10. Bioprospecting medicinal plants for antioxidant components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, Ahmed Yacouba; Hashim, Rokiah; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza; Sulaiman, Othman; Ang, Lily Zuin Ping; Ooi, Kheng Leong

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate antioxidant activities of seven medicinal plant species and their fractions, and to identify their phenolic compounds. Two extractions were processed and further fractionated by column chromatography to evaluate the concentration that inhibit 50% of 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-suslfonic acid, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radicals, and their ferric reducing antioxidant power. The identification of the fractions of phenolic compounds was done by ultra performance liquid chromatography. The aqueous-acetone extracts of Feretia apodanthera and Ozoroa insignis exhibited the highest antioxidant potentials comparable to those of the standard quercetin. Their subsequently silica gel column fractionation showed three most active fractions from which the major constituents quercetin, myricetin, kampferol, rutin and isoquercetin were identified. These plant species have potent antioxidant profiles and polyphenol compounds that may help to manage with radical related disease and aging. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Review Paper: Polyphenolic Antioxidants and Neuronal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ataie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages, modulate intracellular signaling and ultimately leads to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. To review antioxidants preventive effects on oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases we accumulated data from international medical journals and academic informations' sites. According to many studies, antioxidants could reduce toxic neuronal damages and many studies confirmed the efficacy of polyphenol antioxidants in fruits and vegetables to reduce neuronal death and to diminish oxidative stress. This systematic review showed the antioxidant activities of phytochemicals which play as natural neuroprotectives with low adverse effects against some neurodegenerative diseases as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases.

  12. Redox Modulations, Antioxidants, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraunberger, Erik A.; Laliberté, Victoria L. M.; Duong, Angela; Andreazza, Ana C.

    2016-01-01

    Although antioxidants, redox modulations, and neuropsychiatric disorders have been widely studied for many years, the field would benefit from an integrative and corroborative review. Our primary objective is to delineate the biological significance of compounds that modulate our redox status (i.e., reactive species and antioxidants) as well as outline their current role in brain health and the impact of redox modulations on the severity of illnesses. Therefore, this review will not enter into the debate regarding the perceived medical legitimacy of antioxidants but rather seek to clarify their abilities and limitations. With this in mind, antioxidants may be interpreted as natural products with significant pharmacological actions in the body. A renewed understanding of these often overlooked compounds will allow us to critically appraise the current literature and provide an informed, novel perspective on an important healthcare issue. In this review, we will introduce the complex topics of redox modulations and their role in the development of select neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26640614

  13. Therapeutic approaches to cellulite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jeremy B; Cohen, Joel L; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaminer, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cellulite is a condition that affects the vast majority of women. Although it is of no danger to one's overall health, cellulite can be psychosocially debilitating. Consequently, much research has been devoted to understanding cellulite and its etiopathogenesis. With additional insights into the underlying causes of its clinical presentation, therapeutic modalities have been developed that offer hope to cellulite sufferers. This review examines evidence for topical treatments, noninvasive energy-based devices, and recently developed minimally invasive interventions that may finally provide a solution. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  14. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not respond to physician counseling and dietary manipulations. What's a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect ... drug package or on your prescription label. Medications for IBS First line treatment has traditionally been aimed ...

  15. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... respond to physician counseling and dietary manipulations. What's a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect ... drug package or on your prescription label. Medications for IBS First line treatment has traditionally been aimed ...

  16. Towards a better understanding of the therapeutic applications and corresponding mechanisms of action of honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rifat Ullah; Naz, Shabana; Abudabos, Alaeldein M

    2017-11-03

    Honey is a bee-derived supersaturated solution composed of complex contents mainly glucose, fructose, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. Composition of honey may vary due to the difference in nectar, season, geography, and storage condition. Honey has been used since times immemorial in folk medicine and has recently been rediscovered as an excellent therapeutic agent. In the past, honey was used for a variety of ailments without knowing the scientific background and active ingredients of honey. Today, honey has been scientifically proven for its antioxidant, regulation of glycemic response, antitumor, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and cardiovascular potentiating agent. It can be used as a wound dressing and healing substance. Honey is different in color, flavor, sensory perception, and medical response. Apart from highlighting the nutritional facts of honey, we collected the finding of the published literature to know the mechanism of action of honey in different diseases. This review covers the composition, physiochemical characteristics, and some medical uses.

  17. Antioxidant potentialities and Antiradical Activities of Oxalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion and application of results: The results indicated that Oxalis corniculata could be an important dietary source of antioxidants with high scavenging abilities as well as rich in biomolecules that are precursors of most biologically active chemicals of medical importance. These findings may thus, justify their wide ...

  18. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed. PMID:26540040

  19. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-11-02

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  20. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  1. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Antiproliferative Activities of the Plant Lebanese Crataegus Azarolus L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallassy, Hany; Fayyad-Kazan, Mohammad; Makki, Rawan; EL-Makhour, Yolla; Hamade, Eva; Rammal, Hasan; Leger, David Y.; Sol, Vincent; Fayyad-Kazan, Hussein; Liagre, Bertrand; Badran, Bassam

    2017-01-01

    Background In the present study, phytochemical screening, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative capacities of 3 extracts from leaves of Lebanese Crataegus azarolus L. were evaluated. Material/Methods Fresh leaves were dissolved in 3 different solvents: distilled water, ethanol, and methanol. The chemical composition was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the content of essential oil of this plant was examined by gas chromatography (GC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The antioxidant potential was evaluated using DPPH radical scavenging and Fe2+ chelating activity assays. Anti-inflammatory effect was investigated by measuring the secreted amounts of the proinflammatory mediator PGE2 using ELISA technique, as well as by assaying the mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines (IL-α, IL-β, and Il-6), chemokines (CCL3 and CCL4) and inflammation-sensitive COX2 and iNOS enzymes using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The antiproliferative effect was evaluated using the XTT viability assay. Results The obtained results show that alcohol (methanol and ethanol) extracts were rich in bioactive molecules with medical relevance and exerted substantial antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative capacities. On the other hand, aqueous extract contained fewer chemical components and exhibited less therapeutic efficiency. Conclusions Our observations indicate that Crataegus azarolus L. could be used for treating diseases related to oxidative stress, inflammatory reactions, and uncontrolled cell growth. PMID:28769026

  2. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Wright

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer.

  3. Antioxidant effects of chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives are considered to promote diverse activities, including antioxidant, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant, antitumor and anticancer, antimicrobial, hypocholesterolemic, and antidiabetic effects, one of the most crucial of which is the antioxidant effect. By modulating and improving physiological functions, chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives may provide novel therapeutic applications for the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases. Antioxidant activity of chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives can be attributed to in vitro and in vivo free radical-scavenging activities. Antioxidant effect of chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives may be used as functional ingredients in food formulations to promote consumer health and to improve the shelf life of food products. This chapter presents an overview of the antioxidant activity of chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives with the potential utilization in the food and pharmaceutical industries. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. New Prophylactic and Therapeutic Strategies for Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sookyoung; Park, Kanghui; Lee, Youngjeon; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2013-03-01

    Melatonin production by the pineal gland in the vertebrate brain has attracted much scientific attention. Pineal melatonin is regulated by photoperiodicity, whereas circadian secretion of melatonin produced in the gastrointestinal tract is regulated by food intake. Thus, the circadian rhythm of pineal melatonin depends upon whether a species is diurnal or nocturnal. Spinal cord injury (SCI) involves damage to the spinal cord caused by trauma or disease that results in compromise or loss of body function. Melatonin is the most efficient and commonly used pharmacological antioxidant treatment for SCI. Melatonin is an indolamine secreted by the pineal gland during the dark phase of the circadian cycle. Neurorehabilitation is a complex medical process that focuses on improving function and repairing damaged connections in the brain and nervous system following injury. Physical activity associated with an active lifestyle reduces the risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and depression and protects against neurological conditions, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and ischemic stroke. Physical activity has been shown to increase the gene expression of several brain neurotrophins (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], nerve growth factor, and galanin) and the production of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2, which promotes neuronal survival, differentiation, and growth. In summary, melatonin is a neural protectant, and when combined with therapeutic exercise, the hormone prevents the progression of secondary neuronal degeneration in SCI. The present review briefly describes the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying SCI, focusing on therapeutic targets and combined melatonin and exercise therapy, which can attenuate secondary injury mechanisms with minimal side effects.

  5. Delivery aspects of antioxidants in diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Lakshmi Sailaja; Katiyar, Sameer; Kumar, Ashutosh; Khan, Wahid

    2015-05-01

    Ample research has been done to study the role of oxidative stress due to the generation of excess reactive species in initiation and progression of diabetic complications. A positive result has been indicated hypothesizing that abating this oxidative stress can prove to be an alternate strategy in therapy apart from oral antidiabetic drugs. But these dietary antioxidants are less efficient because of poor solubility, permeability, instability on storage, gastrointestinal degradation and first-pass metabolism. This review gives a brief insight into the molecular mechanism of oxidative stress in development of diabetic complications. Major hurdles limiting the translation of antioxidants to clinical area are also discussed. Various delivery approaches including both conventional and novel drug delivery systems explored so far for combating these challenges in antioxidant delivery are also explored. Mitochondrial targeting of such molecules is also briefly discussed. A thorough study of clinical efficacy and safety of antioxidants on long-term use judging its clinical applicability is required. The clinical success of antioxidants as a therapeutic strategy involves a combination of effective design of drug delivery carrier that are in turn related to their degradation profile, possibility of cellular uptake at defined site of action and so on and clinical and preclinical trials that will provide a base for the design of dose and administration regimen.

  6. Nutraceutical Antioxidants as Novel Neuroprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Linseman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A variety of antioxidant compounds derived from natural products (nutraceuticals have demonstrated neuroprotective activity in either in vitro or in vivo models of neuronal cell death or neurodegeneration, respectively. These natural antioxidants fall into several distinct groups based on their chemical structures: (1 flavonoid polyphenols like epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG from green tea and quercetin from apples; (2 non-flavonoid polyphenols such as curcumin from tumeric and resveratrol from grapes; (3 phenolic acids or phenolic diterpenes such as rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid, respectively, both from rosemary; and (4 organosulfur compounds including the isothiocyanate, L-sulforaphane, from broccoli and the thiosulfonate allicin, from garlic. All of these compounds are generally considered to be antioxidants. They may be classified this way either because they directly scavenge free radicals or they indirectly increase endogenous cellular antioxidant defenses, for example, via activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 transcription factor pathway. Alternative mechanisms of action have also been suggested for the neuroprotective effects of these compounds such as modulation of signal transduction cascades or effects on gene expression. Here, we review the literature pertaining to these various classes of nutraceutical antioxidants and discuss their potential therapeutic value in neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Antioxidants of Edible Mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarski, Maja; Klaus, Anita; Jakovljevic, Dragica; Todorovic, Nina; Vunduk, Jovana; Petrović, Predrag; Niksic, Miomir; Vrvic, Miroslav M; van Griensven, Leo

    2015-10-27

    Oxidative stress caused by an imbalanced metabolism and an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) lead to a range of health disorders in humans. Our endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms and our dietary intake of antioxidants potentially regulate our oxidative homeostasis. Numerous synthetic antioxidants can effectively improve defense mechanisms, but because of their adverse toxic effects under certain conditions, preference is given to natural compounds. Consequently, the requirements for natural, alternative sources of antioxidant foods identified in edible mushrooms, as well as the mechanistic action involved in their antioxidant properties, have increased rapidly. Chemical composition and antioxidant potential of mushrooms have been intensively studied. Edible mushrooms might be used directly in enhancement of antioxidant defenses through dietary supplementation to reduce the level of oxidative stress. Wild or cultivated, they have been related to significant antioxidant properties due to their bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols, polysaccharides, vitamins, carotenoids and minerals. Antioxidant and health benefits, observed in edible mushrooms, seem an additional reason for their traditional use as a popular delicacy food. This review discusses the consumption of edible mushrooms as a powerful instrument in maintaining health, longevity and life quality.

  8. Antioxidants of Edible Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Kozarski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by an imbalanced metabolism and an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS lead to a range of health disorders in humans. Our endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms and our dietary intake of antioxidants potentially regulate our oxidative homeostasis. Numerous synthetic antioxidants can effectively improve defense mechanisms, but because of their adverse toxic effects under certain conditions, preference is given to natural compounds. Consequently, the requirements for natural, alternative sources of antioxidant foods identified in edible mushrooms, as well as the mechanistic action involved in their antioxidant properties, have increased rapidly. Chemical composition and antioxidant potential of mushrooms have been intensively studied. Edible mushrooms might be used directly in enhancement of antioxidant defenses through dietary supplementation to reduce the level of oxidative stress. Wild or cultivated, they have been related to significant antioxidant properties due to their bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols, polysaccharides, vitamins, carotenoids and minerals. Antioxidant and health benefits, observed in edible mushrooms, seem an additional reason for their traditional use as a popular delicacy food. This review discusses the consumption of edible mushrooms as a powerful instrument in maintaining health, longevity and life quality.

  9. ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION IN THE TREATMENT OF AGING-ASSOCIATED DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eConti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is generally considered an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants species, which often results into indiscriminate and global damage at the organismal level. Elderly people are more susceptible to oxidative stress and this depends, almost in part, from a decreased performance of their endogenous antioxidant system. As many studies reported an inverse correlation between systemic levels of antioxidants and several diseases, primarily cardiovascular diseases, but also diabetes and neurological disorders, antioxidant supplementation has been foreseen as an effective preventive and therapeutic intervention for aging-associated pathologies. However, the expectations of this therapeutic approach have often been partially disappointed by clinical trials. The interplay of both endogenous and exogenous antioxidants with the systemic redox system is very complex and represents an issue that is still under debate. In this review a selection of recent clinical studies concerning antioxidants supplementation and the evaluation of their influence in aging-related diseases is analyzed. The controversial outcomes of the antioxidants supplementation therapy that might partially depend, among others, from an underestimation of the patient specific metabolic demand and genetic background, are presented.

  10. Antioxidants: Beyond the Hype

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. The SU.VI.MAX Study: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the health effects of antioxidant vitamins and minerals. Arch Intern Med. ... Stiles W, Statkute L, et al. Double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of ... F. Effect of lutein and antioxidant dietary supplementation on contrast ...

  11. Antioxidants of edible mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozarski, Maja; Klaus, Anita; Jakovljevic, Dragica; Todorovic, Nina; Vunduk, Jovana; Petrović, Predrag; Niksic, Miomir; Vrvic, Miroslav M.; Griensven, Van Leo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by an imbalanced metabolism and an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) lead to a range of health disorders in humans. Our endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms and our dietary intake of antioxidants potentially regulate our oxidative homeostasis. Numerous synthetic

  12. Targeted Riluzole Delivery by Antioxidant Nanovectors for Treating Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0612 TITLE: Targeted Riluzole Delivery by Antioxidant Nanovectors for Treating Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis...29 Mar 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeted Riluzole Delivery by Antioxidant Nanovectors for Treating Amyotrophic Lateral...potent antioxidant capabilities, and 2) possess the ability to serve as carriers for other potentially therapeutic molecules by James Tour, PhD of

  13. Antioxidant plants and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM is increasing rapidly and it is expected to increase by 2030. Other than currently available therapeutic options, there are a lot of herbal medicines, which have been recommended for its treatment. Herbal medicines have long been used for the treatment of DM because of the advantage usually having no or less side-effects. Most of these plants have antioxidant activities and hence, prevent or treat hard curable diseases, other than having the property of combating the toxicity of toxic or other drugs. In this review other than presenting new findings of DM, the plants, which are used and have been evaluated scientifically for the treatment of DM are introduced.

  14. Antioxidant plants and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Hamid; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Baradaran, Azar; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing rapidly and it is expected to increase by 2030. Other than currently available therapeutic options, there are a lot of herbal medicines, which have been recommended for its treatment. Herbal medicines have long been used for the treatment of DM because of the advantage usually having no or less side-effects. Most of these plants have antioxidant activities and hence, prevent or treat hard curable diseases, other than having the property of combating the toxicity of toxic or other drugs. In this review other than presenting new findings of DM, the plants, which are used and have been evaluated scientifically for the treatment of DM are introduced.

  15. The therapeutic relationship after psychiatric admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Eric

    2014-03-01

    The therapeutic relationship is one of the most central and important factors in the treatment of mental health disorders. A better therapeutic relationship is associated with service engagement, medication adherence, and satisfaction with services. This study aimed to compare the demographic and clinical factors associated with the therapeutic relationship in voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric service users. We found that individuals who had been admitted involuntarily, who had a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, and who reported higher levels of perceived pressures on admission were more likely to have a poorer therapeutic relationship with their consultant psychiatrist. Greater levels of insight and treatment satisfaction, together with higher levels of procedural justice experienced on admission, were associated with a better therapeutic relationship. We found that the level of perceived coercion on admission was not related to the therapeutic relationship. Targeted interventions to improve the therapeutic relationship, particularly for involuntarily admitted service users, are discussed.

  16. Antioxidant Micronutrients: Therapeutic Counter Measures for Chemical Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    necrosis (AEN), bronchiolar exudates (BE), bronchiolar inflammatory cell infiltrates (BICI), bronchiolar epithelial necrosis (BEN), BALT necrosis (BN...Bronchiolar epithelial necrosis (BEN), BALT necrosis (BN), Tracheal exudates (TE), Tracheal inflammatory cell infiltrates (TICI), Tracheal epithelial...BICI), Bronchiolar epithelial necrosis (BEN), BALT necrosis (BN), Tracheal exudates (TE), Tracheal inflammatory cell infiltrates (TICI), Tracheal

  17. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of native Rosa sp. from British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ocksook; Jovel, Eduardo M; Towers, G H Neil; Wahbe, Tanya R; Cho, Dongwuk

    2007-05-01

    Indigenous traditional knowledge and western science have revealed the potential for significant nutritional and therapeutic benefits among natural antioxidants. We investigated antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of rose hip extracts (Rosa nutkana, Rosa pisocarpa and Rosa woodsii) from wild British Columbia populations using liposome oxidation and disc diffusion assays. All extracts exhibited strong antioxidant activity. R. nutkana pericarp extracts contained high phenolic concentrations and showed greater antioxidant and antimicrobial activity than seed extracts. R. woodsii seed extracts had a higher phenolic concentration and greater antioxidant activity than pericarp extracts. Antioxidant activity was correlated with antimicrobial activity, and both extracts showed antimicrobial activity against yeast and Gram-positive bacteria. Our study is the first to demonstrate the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of wild British Columbia roses. The effectiveness of selected species compared with standards demonstrates the significance of this natural resource to the continued health of human populations, and the need for conservation practices.

  18. Recent Progress Toward Hydrogen Medicine: Potential of Molecular Hydrogen for Preventive and Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    Persistent oxidative stress is one of the major causes of most lifestyle-related diseases, cancer and the aging process. Acute oxidative stress directly causes serious damage to tissues. Despite the clinical importance of oxidative damage, antioxidants have been of limited therapeutic success. We have proposed that molecular hydrogen (H2) has potential as a “novel” antioxidant in preventive and therapeutic applications [Ohsawa et al., Nat Med. 2007: 13; 688-94]. H2 has a number of advantages as a potential antioxidant: H2 rapidly diffuses into tissues and cells, and it is mild enough neither to disturb metabolic redox reactions nor to affect reactive oxygen species (ROS) that function in cell signaling, thereby, there should be little adverse effects of consuming H2. There are several methods to ingest or consume H2, including inhaling hydrogen gas, drinking H2-dissolved water (hydrogen water), taking a hydrogen bath, injecting H2-dissolved saline (hydrogen saline), dropping hydrogen saline onto the eye, and increasing the production of intestinal H2 by bacteria. Since the publication of the first H2 paper in Nature Medicine in 2007, the biological effects of H2 have been confirmed by the publication of more than 38 diseases, physiological states and clinical tests in leading biological/medical journals, and several groups have started clinical examinations. Moreover, H2 shows not only effects against oxidative stress, but also various anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. H2 regulates various gene expressions and protein-phosphorylations, though the molecular mechanisms underlying the marked effects of very small amounts of H2 remain elusive. PMID:21736547

  19. Nutritional and medical applications of spirulina microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S M; Khosravi-Darani, K; Mozafari, M R

    2013-06-01

    Spirulina spp. and its processing products are employed in agriculture, food industry, pharmaceutics, perfumery and medicine. Spirulina has several pharmacological activities such as antimicrobial (including antiviral and antibacterial), anticancer, metalloprotective (prevention of heavy-metal poisoning against Cd, Pb, Fe, Hg), as well as immunostimulant and antioxidant effects due to its rich content of protein, polysaccharide, lipid, essential amino and fatty acids, dietary minerals and vitamins. This article serves as an overview, introducing the basic biochemical composition of this algae and moves to its medical applications. For each application the basic description of disease, mechanism of damage, particular content of Spirulina spp. for treatment, in vivo and/or in vitro usage, factors associated with therapeutic role, problems encountered and advantages are given.

  20. Antioxidant Stabilisation of Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyapnikov, Yurii A.

    1981-06-01

    Physicochemical aspects of the stabilisation of polymers are discussed. Attention is paid mainly to the aging and stabilisation of polymers under processing conditions. Topics considered are the kinetics and mechanism of the high-temperature oxidation of polymers, critical phenomena in the inhibited oxidation of polymers, the theory of synergism and antagonism among antioxidants, the reasons for differences in efficiency of antioxidants, and certain aspects of the relation between the efficiency of antioxidants and their molecular structure. A list of 132 references is included.

  1. Antioxidant gene therapy against neuronal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Annadurai, Anandhan; Wang, Fang; Skotak, Maciej; Chandra, Namas; Li, Ming; Pappa, Aglaia; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Razo, Luz Maria Del; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common hallmark of neuronal cell death associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, as well as brain stroke/ischemia and traumatic brain injury. Increased accumulation of reactive species of both oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) has been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, energy impairment, alterations in metal homeostasis and accumulation of aggregated proteins observed in neurodegenerative disorders, which lead to the activation/modulation of cell death mechanisms that include apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic pathways. Thus, the design of novel antioxidant strategies to selectively target oxidative stress and redox imbalance might represent important therapeutic approaches against neurological disorders. This work reviews the evidence demonstrating the ability of genetically encoded antioxidant systems to selectively counteract neuronal cell loss in neurodegenerative diseases and ischemic brain damage. Because gene therapy approaches to treat inherited and acquired disorders offer many unique advantages over conventional therapeutic approaches, we discussed basic research/clinical evidence and the potential of virus-mediated gene delivery techniques for antioxidant gene therapy. PMID:24333264

  2. Free radicals, antioxidant defense systems, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing Qin; Kosten, Thomas R; Zhang, Xiang Yang

    2013-10-01

    The etiopathogenic mechanisms of schizophrenia are to date unknown, although several hypotheses have been suggested. Accumulating evidence suggests that excessive free radical production or oxidative stress may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia as evidenced by increased production of reactive oxygen or decreased antioxidant protection in schizophrenic patients. This review aims to summarize the basic molecular mechanisms of free radical metabolism, the impaired antioxidant defense system and membrane pathology in schizophrenia, their interrelationships with the characteristic clinical symptoms and the implications for antipsychotic treatments. In schizophrenia, there is accumulating evidence of altered antioxidant enzyme activities and increased levels of lipid peroxidation, as well as altered levels of plasma antioxidants. Moreover, free radical-mediated abnormalities may contribute to specific aspects of schizophrenic symptomatology and complications of its treatment with antipsychotic drugs, as well as the development of tardive dyskinesia (TD). Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies implicated by the accumulating data on oxidative stress mechanisms for the treatment of schizophrenia are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antioxidative properties of flavonoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowedes, T.C.F.; Luttikhold, J.; Stijn, van M.F.M.; Visser, M.; Norren, van K.; Vermeulen, M.A.R.; Leeuwen, P.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence accumulates that a family of plant compounds, known as flavonoids, can prevent or slow down the progression of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Flavonoids are considered beneficial, this is often attributed to their powerful antioxidant

  4. Antioxidants: Protecting Healthy Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workout Nutrition Timing Your Pre- and Post-Workout Nutrition weights and fruits Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet For Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Antioxidants - Protecting Healthy Cells Reviewed by Wendy Marcason, ...

  5. Atmospheric oxidation and antioxidants

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    1993-01-01

    Volume I reviews current understanding of autoxidation, largely on the basis of the reactions of oxygen with characterised chemicals. From this flows the modern mechanism of antioxidant actions and their application in stabilisation technology.

  6. Antioxidant supplements and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage to cells and tissues is considered involved in the aging process and in the development of chronic diseases in humans, including cancer and cardiovascular diseases, the leading causes of death in high-income countries. This has stimulated interest in the preventive potential of a...... of antioxidant supplements. Today, more than one half of adults in high-income countries ingest antioxidant supplements hoping to improve their health, oppose unhealthy behaviors, and counteract the ravages of aging....

  7. Antioxidants in Translational Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Harald H H W; Stocker, Roland; Vollbracht, Claudia; Paulsen, Gøran; Riley, Dennis; Daiber, Andreas; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2015-11-10

    It is generally accepted that reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging molecules or antioxidants exert health-promoting effects and thus their consumption as food additives and nutraceuticals has been greatly encouraged. Antioxidants may be beneficial in situations of subclinical deficiency and increased demand or acutely upon high-dose infusion. However, to date, there is little clinical evidence for the long-term benefit of most antioxidants. Alarmingly, recent evidence points even to health risks, in particular for supplements of lipophilic antioxidants. The biological impact of ROS depends not only on their quantities but also on their chemical nature, (sub)cellular and tissue location, and the rates of their formation and degradation. Moreover, ROS serve important physiological functions; thus, inappropriate removal of ROS may cause paradoxical reductive stress and thereby induce or promote disease. Any recommendation on antioxidants must be based on solid clinical evidence and patient-relevant outcomes rather than surrogate parameters. Such evidence-based use may include site-directed application, time-limited high dosing, (functional) pharmacological repair of oxidized biomolecules, and triggers of endogenous antioxidant response systems. Ideally, these approaches need guidance by patient stratification through predictive biomarkers and possibly imaging modalities.

  8. Focus on nutrition: antioxidants in cancer treatment: helpful or harmful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lisa M

    2009-04-01

    Nutrition is an important component of the care of dogs and cats with cancer, and dietary supplement use is common in this patient population. Antioxidants are thought to be among the most commonly used supplements. While antioxidants have potential benefits for cancer patients, they also may have detrimental effects. Therefore, information regarding the overall diet, including dietary supplements, should be collected for every cancer patient and carefully assessed, with specific attention to antioxidants, to identify areas in which the patient's medical care can be optimized.

  9. Antioxidant Capacity and Antimutagenic Potential of Murraya koenigii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Zahin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the intake of antioxidants with increased consumption of fruits and vegetables and medicinal herbs contributes towards reduced risk of certain diseases including cancers. This study aims to evaluate the broad-spectrum antioxidant and antimutagenic activities as well as to elucidate phytochemical profile of an Indian medicinal plant Murraya koenigii (curry leaves. Leaves of the plant were successively fractionated in various organic solvents. Benzene fraction demonstrated the highest phenolic content followed by petroleum ether. The benzene fraction showed maximum antioxidant activity in all tested assays, namely, phosphomolybdenum, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC assays. Based on the promising broad-spectrum antioxidant activity, benzene fraction was further evaluated for antimutagenic activity and showed a dose-dependent antimutagenic response in Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay. It inhibited 72–86% mutagenicity induced by sodium azide, methyl methanesulfonate, benzo(apyrene, and 2-aminoflourene at the maximum tested concentration (100 μg/mL in Salmonella typhimurium tester strains. At least 21 compounds were detected by GC/MS. The findings clearly demonstrated that phenolic-rich benzene fraction has promising broad-spectrum antioxidant and antimutagenic property and needs further evaluation to exploit its therapeutic potential.

  10. Antioxidant capacity and antimutagenic potential of Murraya koenigii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahin, Maryam; Aqil, Farrukh; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the intake of antioxidants with increased consumption of fruits and vegetables and medicinal herbs contributes towards reduced risk of certain diseases including cancers. This study aims to evaluate the broad-spectrum antioxidant and antimutagenic activities as well as to elucidate phytochemical profile of an Indian medicinal plant Murraya koenigii (curry) leaves. Leaves of the plant were successively fractionated in various organic solvents. Benzene fraction demonstrated the highest phenolic content followed by petroleum ether. The benzene fraction showed maximum antioxidant activity in all tested assays, namely, phosphomolybdenum, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) assays. Based on the promising broad-spectrum antioxidant activity, benzene fraction was further evaluated for antimutagenic activity and showed a dose-dependent antimutagenic response in Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay. It inhibited 72-86% mutagenicity induced by sodium azide, methyl methanesulfonate, benzo(a)pyrene, and 2-aminoflourene at the maximum tested concentration (100 μg/mL) in Salmonella typhimurium tester strains. At least 21 compounds were detected by GC/MS. The findings clearly demonstrated that phenolic-rich benzene fraction has promising broad-spectrum antioxidant and antimutagenic property and needs further evaluation to exploit its therapeutic potential.

  11. Radio-protective role of antioxidant agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shirazi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation interacts with biological systems to produce reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species which attack various cellular components. Radio-protectors act as prophylactic agents to shield healthy cells and tissues from the harmful effects of radiation. Past research on synthetic radio-protectors has brought little success, primarily due to the various toxicity-related problems. Results of experimental research show that antioxidant nutrients, such as vitamin E and herbal products and melatonin, are protective against the damaging effects of radiation, with less toxicity and side effects. Therefore, we propose that in the future, antioxidant radio-protective agents may improve the therapeutic index in radiation oncology treatments.

  12. Antioxidant activity of Paraguayan plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, E; Tournier, H A; Mordujovich de Buschiazzo, P; Saavedra, G; Schinella, G R

    2003-02-01

    The antioxidant properties of six medical herbs used in the traditional Paraguayan medicine were studied using free radical-generating systems. The methanol extracts from Aristolochia giberti, Cecropia pachystachya, Eugenia uniflora, Piper fulvescens, Schinus weinmannifolia and Schinus terebinthifolia protected against enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation in microsomal membranes of rat. C. pachystachya, E. uniflora, S. weinmannifolia and S. terebinthifolia showed the highest scavenging activity on the superoxide and DPPH radicals.

  13. Food Processing Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, F J; Zamora, R

    Food processing has been carried out since ancient times as a way to preserve and improve food nutritional and organoleptic properties. Although it has some undesirable consequences, such as the losses of some nutrients and the potential formation of toxic compounds, a wide range of benefits can be enumerated. Among them, the increased total antioxidant capacity of many processed foods has been known for long. This consequence has been related to both the release or increased availability of natural antioxidants and the de novo formation of substances with antioxidant properties as a consequence of the produced reactions. This review analyzes the chemical changes produced in foods during processing with special emphasis on the formation of antioxidants as a consequence of carbonyl-amine reactions produced by both carbohydrate- and lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. It discusses the lastest advances produced in the characterization of carbonyl-amine adducts and their potential action as primary (free radical scavengers), secondary (chelating and other ways to prevent lipid oxidation), and tertiary (carbonyl scavengers as a way to avoid lipid oxidation consequences) antioxidants. Moreover, the possibility of combining amino compounds with different hydrophobicity, such as aminophospholipids and proteins, with a wide array of reactive carbonyls points out to the use of carbonyl-amine reactions as a new way to induce the formation of a great variety of substances with antioxidant properties and very variable hydrophilia/lipophilia. All presented results point out to carbonyl-amine reactions as an effective method to generate efficacious antioxidants that can be used in food technology. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Scientific basis for the therapeutic use of Withania somnifera (ashwagandha): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, L C; Singh, B B; Dagenais, S

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the literature regarding Withania somnifera (ashwagandha, WS) a commonly used herb in Ayurvedic medicine. Specifically, the literature was reviewed for articles pertaining to chemical properties, therapeutic benefits, and toxicity. This review is in a narrative format and consists of all publications relevant to ashwagandha that were identified by the authors through a systematic search of major computerized medical databases; no statistical pooling of results or evaluation of the quality of the studies was performed due to the widely different methods employed by each study. Studies indicate ashwagandha possesses anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antistress, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, hemopoietic, and rejuvenating properties. It also appears to exert a positive influence on the endocrine, cardiopulmonary, and central nervous systems. The mechanisms of action for these properties are not fully understood. Toxicity studies reveal that ashwagandha appears to be a safe compound. Preliminary studies have found various constituents of ashwagandha exhibit a variety of therapeutic effects with little or no associated toxicity. These results are very encouraging and indicate this herb should be studied more extensively to confirm these results and reveal other potential therapeutic effects. Clinical trials using ashwagandha for a variety of conditions should also be conducted.

  15. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About IBS Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... About Us What is ... a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect counts as a medicine. It can be readily ...

  16. Mycetoma medical therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welsh, Oliverio; Al-Abdely, Hail Mater; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment...

  17. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome ( ... take for a therapeutic effect counts as a medicine. It can be readily available over-the-counter, ...

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a medication? Anything you take for a therapeutic effect counts as a medicine. It can be readily available over-the-counter, in a pharmacy or grocery store, or limited by prescription only. ...

  19. [New therapeutic options in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heufelder, A E

    2003-10-16

    The basis for a therapeutic concept for obesity comprises specific measures aimed at changing inappropriate lifestyle habits (overeating, unsuitable diet, sedentary lifestyle) and psychological counseling (identification of bad eating habits, motivation, intensive coaching). Education by a physician on an individual or small-group basis, with emphasis on the practical implementation of fitness training (endurance and muscle building!), together with modification of the diet, has proved successful. In parallel with this, supportive anti-obesity medication makes a useful contribution to weight reduction and the control of risk factors. Evidence-based anti-obesity drugs such as sibutramine and orlistat facilitate the start of weight reduction, thus providing additional motivation of success, and support the long-term effect by stabilizing the weight loss. Health insurance carriers should, in future, selectively support evaluated and approved medication-based and non-medication-based weight-reduction programs, and reimburse the patient who has successfully participated in one.

  20. Skin and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljsak, Borut; Dahmane, Raja; Godic, Aleksandar

    2013-04-01

    It is estimated that total sun exposure occurs non-intentionally in three quarters of our lifetimes. Our skin is exposed to majority of UV radiation during outdoor activities, e.g. walking, practicing sports, running, hiking, etc. and not when we are intentionally exposed to the sun on the beach. We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc.). UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. At this point it would be reasonable to ingest additional antioxidants and/or to apply them on the skin in topical preparations. We review endogenous and exogenous skin protection with antioxidants.

  1. Bioprospecting plants for natural antioxidants: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Qureshi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species damage cellular proteins and lipids or form DNA adducts when present in high concentration that promotes carcinogenic activities. Plants have been the primary therapy for such ailments since ancient times. This paper reviews some medicinal plants having antioxidant activities useful for healing cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neuro-protection. A brief overview of the use of medicinal plants and their main constituents effective against reactive oxygen species-based diseases are presented. This overview will attract the interest of investigators aiming at the design of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of various reactive oxygen species-based conditions.

  2. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Bains

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO, is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials.

  3. Correlation of total antioxidant capacity with reactive oxygen species (ROS) consumption measured by oxidative conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çekiç, Sema Demirci; Çetinkaya, Aydan; Avan, Aslı Neslihan; Apak, Reşat

    2013-06-05

    Although both antioxidant capacity and oxidative conversion (hazard) are important in food and bioanalytical chemistry, there is considerable confusion in the literature between the results of these two types of assays. After the generation of ROS in the medium via Fe(III)-H₂O₂ reaction, attenuation of total oxidative conversion (TOC; as measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPD) assays) was tested for possible correlation with the total antioxidant capacity (TAC; as measured by cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (ABTS/TEAC) assays) of the introduced antioxidant sample. The inverse relationship between oxidative conversion and antioxidant capacity was processed to establish a curvilinear relationship between the absolute values of TAC increments and TOC decrements as a function of added antioxidant concentration. This simple relationship may form a bridge between the two diverse disciplines of medical biochemistry and food analytical chemistry mainly using TOC and TAC results, respectively.

  4. Total dietary antioxidant capacity, individual antioxidant intake and breast cancer risk: the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantavos, Athanasios; Ruiter, Rikje; Feskens, Edith F; de Keyser, Catherine E; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H; Franco, Oscar H; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C

    2015-05-01

    Some studies suggest a favorable role of antioxidants on breast cancer risk but this is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess whether overall dietary antioxidant capacity, as assessed by dietary ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), and individual dietary antioxidant intake were associated with breast cancer risk. Data was used from women participating in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study among subjects aged 55 years and older (N = 3,209). FRAP scores and antioxidant intake (i.e., vitamin A, C, E, selenium, flavonoids and carotenoids) was assessed at baseline by a food frequency questionnaire. Incident cases of breast cancer were confirmed through medical reports. During a median follow-up of 17 years, 199 cases with breast cancer were identified. High dietary FRAP score was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer [hazard ratio (HR): 0.68; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.49, 0.96]. No overall association between individual antioxidant intake and breast cancer risk was found. However, low intake of alpha carotene and beta carotene was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer among smokers (HR: 2.48; 95% CI: 1.21, 5.12 and HR: 2.31; 95% CI: 1.12, 4.76 for alpha and beta carotene, respectively) and low intake of flavonoids was associated with breast cancer risk in women over the age of 70 (HR: 1.80; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.99). These results suggest that high overall dietary antioxidant capacity is associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. Individual effects of dietary carotenoids and dietary flavonoids may be restricted to subgroups such as smokers and elderly. © 2014 UICC.

  5. Free radicals, oxidative stress and importance of antioxidants in human health

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    K.I. Priyadarsini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS is a collective term used for oxygen containing free radicals, depending on their reactivity and oxidizing ability. ROS participate in a variety of chemical reactions with biomolecules leading to a pathological condition known as oxidative stress. Antioxidants are employed to protect biomolecules from the damaging effects of such ROS. In the beginning, antioxidant research was mainly aimed at understanding free radical reactions of ROS with antioxidants employing biochemical assays and kinetic methods. Later on, studies began to be directed to monitor the ability of anti-oxidants to modulate cellular signaling proteins like receptors, secondary messengers, transcription factors, etc. Of late several studies have indicated that antioxidants can also have deleterious effects on human health depending on dosage and bio-availability. It is therefore, necessary to validate the utility of antioxidants in improvement of human health in order to take full advantage of their therapeutic potential.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of ozone in patients with diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Al-Dalain, Saied M; Menéndez, Silvia; Re, Lamberto; Giuliani, Attilia; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; Alvarez, Hector; Fernández-Montequín, José Ignacio; León, Olga Sonia

    2005-10-31

    Oxidative stress is suggested to have an important role in the development of complications in diabetes. Because ozone therapy can activate the antioxidant system, influencing the level of glycemia and some markers of endothelial cell damage, the aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of ozone in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic feet and to compare ozone with antibiotic therapy. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed with 101 patients divided into two groups: one (n = 52) treated with ozone (local and rectal insufflation of the gas) and the other (n = 49) treated with topical and systemic antibiotics. The efficacy of the treatments was evaluated by comparing the glycemic index, the area and perimeter of the lesions and biochemical markers of oxidative stress and endothelial damage in both groups after 20 days of treatment. Ozone treatment improved glycemic control, prevented oxidative stress, normalized levels of organic peroxides, and activated superoxide dismutase. The pharmacodynamic effect of ozone in the treatment of patients with neuroinfectious diabetic foot can be ascribed to the possibility of it being a superoxide scavenger. Superoxide is considered a link between the four metabolic routes associated with diabetes pathology and its complications. Furthermore, the healing of the lesions improved, resulting in fewer amputations than in control group. There were no side effects. These results show that medical ozone treatment could be an alternative therapy in the treatment of diabetes and its complications.

  7. Therapeutic uses of magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Mary P; Volpe, Stella Lucia; Mao, Jun James

    2009-07-15

    Magnesium is an essential mineral for optimal metabolic function. Research has shown that the mineral content of magnesium in food sources is declining, and that magnesium depletion has been detected in persons with some chronic diseases. This has led to an increased awareness of proper magnesium intake and its potential therapeutic role in a number of medical conditions. Studies have shown the effectiveness of magnesium in eclampsia and preeclampsia, arrhythmia, severe asthma, and migraine. Other areas that have shown promising results include lowering the risk of metabolic syndrome, improving glucose and insulin metabolism, relieving symptoms of dysmenorrhea, and alleviating leg cramps in women who are pregnant. The use of magnesium for constipation and dyspepsia are accepted as standard care despite limited evidence. Although it is safe in selected patients at appropriate dosages, magnesium may cause adverse effects or death at high dosages. Because magnesium is excreted renally, it should be used with caution in patients with kidney disease. Food sources of magnesium include green leafy vegetables, nuts, legumes, and whole grains.

  8. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies.

  9. Therapeutic applications of ultrasonography in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Mago; Soheyl Sheikh; Shambulingappa Pallagatti; Amit Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography is one of the most common imaging modality used in dental as well as medical sciences. The use of ultrasonography when discovered was as a therapeutic aid, but in recent times, it has become one of the most common imaging modality next to conventional radiology. Currently, its use as a therapeutic aid has been rediscovered along with its association with other specialized imaging. The aim of this paper is to highlight such advancements in the field of ultrasonography.

  10. Therapeutic applications of ultrasonography in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Mago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography is one of the most common imaging modality used in dental as well as medical sciences. The use of ultrasonography when discovered was as a therapeutic aid, but in recent times, it has become one of the most common imaging modality next to conventional radiology. Currently, its use as a therapeutic aid has been rediscovered along with its association with other specialized imaging. The aim of this paper is to highlight such advancements in the field of ultrasonography.

  11. [Therapeutic approaches in court-ordered therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Emmanuelle; De Jésus, Arnaud; Cano, Jean-Philippe; Raymondaud, Séverine; Rouveyrol, Éric; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre

    As is the case with other contexts of mental health treatments, the therapeutic approaches to court-ordered therapy are varied. They are based on the principle of their clinical indication and must be delivered by therapists trained in the specific area. The classic therapeutic approaches are used: medication, psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically inspired therapies, cognitive behavioural therapies, group therapies and body-oriented approach. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Antioxidant properties of HDL

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    Handrean eSoran

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available High-density lipoprotein (HDL provides a pathway for the passage of lipid peroxides and lysophospholipids to the liver via hepatic scavenger receptors. Perhaps more importantly, HDL actually metabolises lipid hydroperoxides preventing their accumulation on low-density lipoprotein (LDL, thus impeding its atherogenic structural modification. A number of candidates have been suggested to be responsible for HDL’s antioxidant function, with paraoxonase-1 (PON1 perhaps the most prominent. Here we review the evidence for HDL anti-oxidative function and the potential contributions of apolipoproteins, lipid transfer proteins, paraoxonases and other enzymes associated with HDL.

  13. Renoprotective effect of the antioxidant curcumin: Recent findings

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    Joyce Trujillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For years, there have been studies based on the use of natural compounds plant-derived as potential therapeutic agents for various diseases in humans. Curcumin is a phenolic compound extracted from Curcuma longa rhizome commonly used in Asia as a spice, pigment and additive. In traditional medicine of India and China, curcumin is considered as a therapeutic agent used in several foods. Numerous studies have shown that curcumin has broad biological functions particularly antioxidant and antiinflammatory. In fact, it has been established that curcumin is a bifunctional antioxidant; it exerts antioxidant activity in a direct and an indirect way by scavenging reactive oxygen species and inducing an antioxidant response, respectively. The renoprotective effect of curcumin has been evaluated in several experimental models including diabetic nephropathy, chronic renal failure, ischemia and reperfusion and nephrotoxicity induced by compounds such as gentamicin, adriamycin, chloroquine, iron nitrilotriacetate, sodium fluoride, hexavalent chromium and cisplatin. It has been shown recently in a model of chronic renal failure that curcumin exerts a therapeutic effect; in fact it reverts not only systemic alterations but also glomerular hemodynamic changes. Another recent finding shows that the renoprotective effect of curcumin is associated to preservation of function and redox balance of mitochondria. Taking together, these studies attribute the protective effect of curcumin in the kidney to the induction of the master regulator of antioxidant response nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (Nrf2, inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction, attenuation of inflammatory response, preservation of antioxidant enzymes and prevention of oxidative stress. The information presented in this paper identifies curcumin as a promising renoprotective molecule against renal injury.

  14. Astrocytes pathology in ALS: A potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Sonja

    2017-06-15

    The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are multifactorial and include genetic and environmental factors. Nowadays, it is well accepted that neuronal loss is driven by non-cell autonomous toxicity. Non-neuronal cells, such as astrocytes, have been described to significantly contribute to motoneuron cell death and disease progression in cell culture experiments and animal models of ALS. Astrocytes are essential for neuronal survival and function by regulating neurotransmitter and ion homeostasis, immune response, blood flow and glucose uptake, antioxidant defence and growth factor release. Based on their significant functions in "housekeeping" the central nervous system (CNS), they are no longer thought to be passive bystanders but rather contributors to ALS pathogenesis. Findings from animal models have broadened our knowledge about different pathomechanisms in ALS, but therapeutic approaches to impede disease progression failed. So far, there is no cure for ALS and effective medication to slow down disease progression is limited. Targeting only a single aspect of this multifactorial disease may exhibit therapeutic limitations. Hence, novel cellular targets must be defined and new pharmaceutical strategies, such as combinatorial drug therapies are urgently needed. The present review discusses the physiological role of astrocytes and current hypotheses of astrocyte pathology in ALS. Furthermore, recent investigation of potential drug candidates in astrocyte cell culture systems and animal models, as well as data obtained from clinical trials, will be addressed. The central role of astrocytes in ALS pathogenesis makes them a promising target for pharmaceutical interventions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. ANTIOXIDANT POTENCY OF WATER KEFIR

    OpenAIRE

    Muneer Alsayadi M.S.; Yaser Al Jawfi; Meriem Belarbi; Fatima Z. Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have strong relationship with several diseases. Many fermented foods were reported to be important sources for antioxidant compounds. Antioxidant activity of water kefir never reported in the scientific literature. The objective of this study was to detect and investigate the antioxidant potency of water kefir. Water kefir was prepared by fermentation of sugar solution with kefir grains for 24h. Antioxidant activity of fresh water kefir drink and its extract with...

  16. Antioxidant, anti-alpha-glucosidase and pancreatic beta-cell protective effects of methanolic extract of Ensete superbum Cheesm seeds

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    Solomon Habtemariam

    2017-02-01

    Conclusions: The reputed antidiabetic therapeutic uses of the seeds extract of E. superbum may be justified on the basis of inhibition of carbohydrate enzymes, antioxidant effects and pancreatic β-cell protection.

  17. Antioxidants for female subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showell, Marian G; Mackenzie-Proctor, Rebecca; Jordan, Vanessa; Hart, Roger J

    2017-07-28

    A couple may be considered to have fertility problems if they have been trying to conceive for over a year with no success. This may affect up to a quarter of all couples planning a child. It is estimated that for 40% to 50% of couples, subfertility may result from factors affecting women. Antioxidants are thought to reduce the oxidative stress brought on by these conditions. Currently, limited evidence suggests that antioxidants improve fertility, and trials have explored this area with varied results. This review assesses the evidence for the effectiveness of different antioxidants in female subfertility. To determine whether supplementary oral antioxidants compared with placebo, no treatment/standard treatment or another antioxidant improve fertility outcomes for subfertile women. We searched the following databases (from their inception to September 2016) with no language or date restriction: Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group (CGFG) specialised register, the Cochrane Central Register of Studies (CENTRAL CRSO), MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and AMED. We checked reference lists of appropriate studies and searched for ongoing trials in the clinical trials registers. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared any type, dose or combination of oral antioxidant supplement with placebo, no treatment or treatment with another antioxidant, among women attending a reproductive clinic. We excluded trials comparing antioxidants with fertility drugs alone and trials that only included fertile women attending a fertility clinic because of male partner infertility. Two review authors independently selected eligible studies, extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. The primary review outcome was live birth; secondary outcomes included clinical pregnancy rates and adverse events. We pooled studies using a fixed-effect model, and calculated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the dichotomous

  18. Effects of the whole-body cryotherapy on a total antioxidative status and activities of some antioxidative enzymes in blood of patients with multiple sclerosis-preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Elżbieta; Mrowicka, Małgorzata; Katarzyna MALINOWSKA; Żołyński, Krystian; Kędziora, Józef

    2010-01-01

    Objective. There is evidence that multiple sclerosis (MS) is not only characterized by immune mediated inflammatory reactions but also by neurodegenerative processes. Neutralization of oxidative stress and excitotoxicity, might represent a therapeutic approach to provide neuroprotection in MS. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in total antioxidative status and activities of chosen antioxidative enzymes, such as : SOD, CAT in erythrocytes of patients with MS befor...

  19. Antioxidant activity and protecting health effects of common medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrovánková, Soňa; Mišurcová, Ladislava; Machů, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants are traditionally used in folk medicine as natural healing remedies with therapeutic effects such as prevention of cardiovascular diseases, inflammation disorders, or reducing the risk of cancer. In addition, pharmacological industry utilizes medicinal plants due to the presence of active chemical substances as agents for drug synthesis. They are valuable also for food and cosmetic industry as additives, due to their preservative effects because of the presence of antioxidants and antimicrobial constituents. To commonly used medicinal plants with antioxidant activity known worldwide belong plants from several families, especially Lamiaceae (rosemary, sage, oregano, marjoram, basil, thyme, mints, balm), Apiaceae (cumin, fennel, caraway), and Zingiberaceae (turmeric, ginger). The antioxidant properties of medicinal plants depend on the plant, its variety, environmental conditions, climatic and seasonal variations, geographical regions of growth, degree of ripeness, growing practices, and many other factors such as postharvest treatment and processing. In addition, composition and concentration of present antioxidants, such as phenolic compounds, are related to antioxidant effect. For appropriate determination of antioxidant capacity, the extraction technique, its conditions, solvent used, and particular assay methodology are important. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ulcer: An Antioxidative Trail Weaved with Immunomodulatory Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Chatterjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Amla (Phyllanthus emblica L., apart from its food value, can be used as a gastroprotective agent in non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID-induced gastropathy. It has been suggested that the antioxidative property of amla is the key to its therapeutic effect. Hence, on the basis of in vitro antioxidative potential, the ethanolic extract of amla (eAE was selected for in vivo study in NSAID-induced ulcer. Intriguingly, eAE showed biphasic activity in ulcerated mice, with healing effect observed at 60 mg/kg and an adverse effect at 120 mg/kg.The dose-dependent study revealed that switching from anti-oxidant to pro-oxidant shift and immunomodulatory property could be the major cause for its biphasic effect, as evident from the total antioxidant status, thiol concentration, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content followed by mucin content, PGE2 synthesis and cytokine status. Further, Buthionine sulfoxamine (BSO pretreatment established the potential impact of antioxidative property in the healing action of eAE. However, eAE efficiently reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF- and IL-1 levels and appreciably upregulate anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10 concentration. In conclusion, gastric ulcer healing induced by eAE was driven in a dose-specific manner through the harmonization of the antioxidative property and modulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine level.

  1. Topical applied nutraceutical antioxidant formulation reduces ocular oxidative stress

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    Peter F. Kador

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral nutraceutical antioxidants have shown disappointing clinical results in reducing oxidation-induced age-related cataract and other ocular diseases.Based on the hypothesis that nutraceuticals do not adequately reach the lens by oral administration, we have developed a unique topical antioxidant formulation whose active ingredients have the reported ability to reduce oxidative stress through free radical scavenging and chelating activity. This topical nutraceutical formulation was designed to mimic the in vivo activity of multifunctional antioxidants, compoundswhich arebeing developed in our laboratory toindependently scavenge free radicals and selectively bind redox metals.A comparison of the efficacy of this topical nutraceutical to multifunctional antioxidants in laboratory animal models of oxidation-induced lens changes, retinal changes,and dry eye is reviewed.Although it is less potent than the small molecule multifunctional antioxidants that will require FDA approval, the topical nutraceutical formulation beneficially reduces ocular oxidative stress.These studies suggest that this topical antioxidant may fill an unmet therapeutic need by providing a nutraceutical that beneficially reduces the effects of oxidation on age-related ocular diseases

  2. Potential Therapeutic Effects of Psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; Griffiths, Roland R

    2017-07-01

    Psilocybin and other 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist classic psychedelics have been used for centuries as sacraments within indigenous cultures. In the mid-twentieth century they were a focus within psychiatry as both probes of brain function and experimental therapeutics. By the late 1960s and early 1970s these scientific inquires fell out of favor because classic psychedelics were being used outside of medical research and in association with the emerging counter culture. However, in the twenty-first century, scientific interest in classic psychedelics has returned and grown as a result of several promising studies, validating earlier research. Here, we review therapeutic research on psilocybin, the classic psychedelic that has been the focus of most recent research. For mood and anxiety disorders, three controlled trials have suggested that psilocybin may decrease symptoms of depression and anxiety in the context of cancer-related psychiatric distress for at least 6 months following a single acute administration. A small, open-label study in patients with treatment-resistant depression showed reductions in depression and anxiety symptoms 3 months after two acute doses. For addiction, small, open-label pilot studies have shown promising success rates for both tobacco and alcohol addiction. Safety data from these various trials, which involve careful screening, preparation, monitoring, and follow-up, indicate the absence of severe drug-related adverse reactions. Modest drug-related adverse effects at the time of medication administration are readily managed. US federal funding has yet to support therapeutic psilocybin research, although such support will be important to thoroughly investigate efficacy, safety, and therapeutic mechanisms.

  3. Antioxidant Nanoplatforms for Dermal Delivery: Melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Aroha Sanchez; Campmany, Ana Cristina Calpena; Naveros, Beatriz Clares

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin is emerging as a promising therapeutic agent, mainly due to its role as antioxidant. Substantial evidences show that melatonin is potentially effective in a variety of diseases as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. The excellent antioxidant capacity with pharmacokinetics characteristics and the emerging search for new pharmaceutical nanotechnology based systems, make it particularly attractive to elaborate nanoplatforms based on melatonin for biomedical or cosmetic dermal applications. Different nanosystems for dermal delivery have been investigated. This review focuses on nanocarrier production strategies, dermal melatonin application and delivery advances in vivo and in vitro. Equally, future perspectives of this assisted melatonin delivery have also been discussed. In the current review, we have revised relevant articles of the available literature using the major scientific databases. One hundred and thirteen papers were included in the review, the majority of which represent latest researches in nanosized platforms for the dermal delivery of melatonin including liposomes, ethosomes, niosomes, polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles and cyclodextrins. Furthermore, relevant papers reporting in vitro and in vivo application studies of these nano-based melatonin platforms were also discussed. The use of nanoplatforms for the dermal melatonin delivery as antioxidant agent could improve the efficacy of conventional melatonin administration due to the preservation of the drug from premature oxidation and the enhancement of drug permeation through the skin providing greater exposure times. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Delayed Posthypoxic Leukoencephalopathy: Improvement with Antioxidant Therapy

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    Franklin King

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Delayed posthypoxic leukoencephalopathy (DPHL may result from a variety of hypoxic insults, including respiratory depression from an opiate overdose. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism of DPHL remains uncertain. We describe a patient with a typical case of DPHL who responded clinically to antioxidant treatment. Methods: Clinical, serological, and radiographic investigations were undertaken in the evaluation of the patient. Results: A 63-year-old man developed altered mental status 10 days following recovery from an opiate overdose and aspiration pneumonia that required intubation. The clinical course and brain imaging were consistent with DPHL. Initiation of antioxidant therapy with vitamin E, vitamin C, B-complex vitamins, and coenzyme Q10 coincided with the prompt reversal of clinical deterioration. Conclusions: The potential therapeutic effect of antioxidants on DPHL needs to be explored in future cases. If this relationship indeed holds true, it would be consistent with the hypothesis that formation of reactive oxygen species during reperfusion plays a role in the pathophysiology of this disorder.

  5. Mechanical Ventilation Antioxidant Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kimberly P; Clochesy, John M; Goldstein, Lawrence S; Owen, Hugh

    2015-09-01

    Many patients each year require prolonged mechanical ventilation. Inflammatory processes may prevent successful weaning, and evidence indicates that mechanical ventilation induces oxidative stress in the diaphragm, resulting in atrophy and contractile dysfunction of diaphragmatic myofibers. Antioxidant supplementation might mitigate the harmful effects of the oxidative stress induced by mechanical ventilation. To test the clinical effectiveness of antioxidant supplementation in reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation. A randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled double-blind design was used to test whether enterally administered antioxidant supplementation would decrease the duration of mechanical ventilation, all-cause mortality, and length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital. Patients received vitamin C 1000 mg plus vitamin E 1000 IU, vitamin C 1000 mg plus vitamin E 1000 IU plus N-acetylcysteine 400 mg, or placebo solution as a bolus injection via their enteral feeding tube every 8 hours. Clinical and statistically significant differences in duration of mechanical ventilation were seen among the 3 groups (Mantel-Cox log rank statistic = 5.69, df = 1, P = .017). The 3 groups did not differ significantly in all-cause mortality during hospitalization or in the length of stay in the intensive care unit or hospital. Enteral administration of antioxidants is a simple, safe, inexpensive, and effective intervention that decreases the duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  7. Anti-obesity and antioxidant activity of dietary flavonoids from Dioscorea steriscus tubers

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    Pamhidzai Dzomba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate antioxidant and anti-obesity activity of flavonoids extracted by solvent cold percolation and preparative thin liquid chromatography from Dioscorea steriscus tubers. Methods: 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH antiradical activity was employed to investigate antioxidant activity while chromogenic method was used to determine alpha amylase inhibition activity and spectrophotometric methods using triolein as a substrate was used to investigate lipase activity. Results: Thin liquid chromatography profiling revealed eight different flavonoid types. Ethyl acetate extract yielded two types, Rf values 0.38 and 0.40; chloroform extract also yielded two types Rf values 0.06 and 0.51, while ethanol extract yielded four types with Rf values 0.16, 0.33, 0.65 and 0.96. All the extracted flavonoids exhibited antioxidant activity with ethanol extracts exhibiting the greatest antiradical activity. The order of enzyme inhibition capacity was ethyl acetatemedication sold in drug stores. Anti-α amylase activity and anti-lipase activity for herbex was (78.38±0.02% and (76.07±0.09% respectively, while that for ethanolic extract (Rf =0.96 was (93.66±0.00% and (95.88±0.13%. Conclusions: Results of the present study show that Dioscorea steriscus consists of bioactive compounds that can act as lipase and α-amylase inhibitors and therefore can be useful for the development of functional foods against obesity. It can also be used as a source of lead compounds for designing new ant-obesity therapeuticals.

  8. [MEDICAL CANNABIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna

    2016-02-01

    The cannabis plant has been known to humanity for centuries as a remedy for pain, diarrhea and inflammation. Current research is inspecting the use of cannabis for many diseases, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dystonia, and chronic pain. In inflammatory conditions cannabinoids improve pain in rheumatoid arthritis and:pain and diarrhea in Crohn's disease. Despite their therapeutic potential, cannabinoids are not free of side effects including psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, dependence and abuse. Controlled clinical studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cannabis are few and small, whereas pressure for expanding cannabis use is increasing. Currently, as long as cannabis is classified as an illicit drug and until further controlled studies are performed, the use of medical cannabis should be limited to patients who failed conventional better established treatment.

  9. Dragon's blood: botany, chemistry and therapeutic uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepika; Bleakley, Bruce; Gupta, Rajinder K

    2008-02-12

    Dragon's blood is one of the renowned traditional medicines used in different cultures of world. It has got several therapeutic uses: haemostatic, antidiarrhetic, antiulcer, antimicrobial, antiviral, wound healing, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, etc. Besides these medicinal applications, it is used as a coloring material, varnish and also has got applications in folk magic. These red saps and resins are derived from a number of disparate taxa. Despite its wide uses, little research has been done to know about its true source, quality control and clinical applications. In this review, we have tried to overview different sources of Dragon's blood, its source wise chemical constituents and therapeutic uses. As well as, a little attempt has been done to review the techniques used for its quality control and safety.

  10. Oxidative stress in COPD, pathogenesis and therapeutic views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, characterised by partially reversible contracture of small respiratory airways seems to be among leading causes of death in the world. COPD is characterized by inflammation, protease/antiprotease imbalance, genetic variability and oxidative stress. The latter refers to a condition in which oxidative agents overcome against antioxidants. In this review literature, the consequences of oxidative stress in COPD, such as systemic and pulmonary neutrophil influx, hypersecretion, dual and reciprocal effects with inflammatory contributors and systemic manifestations are discussed. In addition, a review of oxidative stress biomarkers as well as therapeutic strategies based on recent researches for antioxidant supplementation therapy is provided.

  11. Generation of reactive oxygen species in the anterior eye segment. Synergistic codrugs of N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant act as a powerful therapeutic platform for the treatment of cataracts and primary open-angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Babizhayev

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial targeting of compounds with universal types of antioxidant activity represents a promising approach for treating a number of ROS-related ocular diseases of the aging eye and can be implicated in the management of cataracts and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  12. Nanoceria as Antioxidant: Synthesis and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The therapeutic application of nanomaterials has been a focus of numerous studies in the past decade. Due to its unique redox properties, cerium oxide (ceria) is finding widespread use in the treatment of medical disorders caused by the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). The radical-scavenging rol...

  13. Therapeutic use exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J; Kirkendall, D; Vouillamoz, M

    2006-01-01

    Football players who have either physical symptoms or disease after injury may need to be treated with specific medicines that are on the list of prohibited substances. Therapeutic use exemption may be granted to such players, in accordance with strictly defined criteria—these are presented in this article. Procedures of how to request for an abbreviated or a standard therapeutic use exemption are explained, and data on therapeutic use exemptions (UEFA and FIFA, 2004 and 2005) are also presented. PMID:16799102

  14. Therapeutic Benefits of Cannabis: A Patient Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Charles W; Webb, Sandra M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research regarding the therapeutic benefits of cannabis (“marijuana”) has been almost non-existent in the United States since cannabis was given Schedule I status in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. In order to discover the benefits and adverse effects perceived by medical cannabis patients, especially with regards to chronic pain, we hand-delivered surveys to one hundred consecutive patients who were returning for yearly re-certification for medical cannabis use in Hawai‘i.

  15. [Etiology of colorectal cancer and antioxidant barrier of the organism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, Alicja; Kubiak, Katarzyna; Cybulska, Magdalena; Kula, Agnieszka; Dziki, Łukasz; Malinowska, Katarzyna

    2010-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious medical and economic problem in Poland, as the detection and results of its treatment are very low. Due to this fact, medical research is still conducted in order to find out the symptoms of this tumor and proper preventive measures. According to one hypothesis of carcinogenesis, the process of creating the tumor begins and develops when the balance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their deactivation by the "antioxidant protective barrier of the organism" is disturbed. As a result of this theory, it has been decided to examine the plasma concentration of the dietary minerals which work as antioxidants. The results entailed conclusions which prove the free radicals theory of carcinogenesis. They also confirm the part which the antioxidant protective barrier plays in the defence against ROS and their carcinogenic consequences.

  16. Health Promotion by Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyoku Nishino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Background: Various antioxidnats from daily foods are expected to prevent lifestyle-related diseases. For example, natural carotenoid beta-cryptoxanthin seems to be a promising antioxidant, and based upon epidemiological data it was shown to be a possible cancer preventing agent. For this reason, we chose to study beta-cryptoxanthin more extensively.Methods and Results: From the result of clinical trial using beta-cryptoxanthin-enriched Mandarin orange juice, it was proven to potentiate the preventive activity of multi-carotenoid mixture against liver cancer in the patients with chronic viral hepatitis-induced liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, beta-cryptoxanthin also has preventive activity against alcohol-induced gamma-GTP elevation, and obesity.Conclusion: An antioxidant beta -cryptoxanthin seems to be valuable for health promotion.

  17. "Lycopene: A Promising Antioxidant"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshumalee Nisheeth

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene is a red colored fat soluble carotenoid, which gives tomatoes and several other fruits their deep red colour. It has shown potential role in prevention and cure of various systemic and oral diseases including malignancies due to its antioxidant and other cancer preventing properties. Lycopene with its 11 conjugated and 2 non conjugated double bonds is the most efficient singIet oxygen quencher and is considered most potent antioxidant among carotenoids. It has shown to be efficient in the management of oral cancer and precancer like leukoplakia and has shown the potential in the management of other oral mucosal lesions thought to arise due to free radical onslaught such as oral lichen planes.

  18. Fundamentals of Medical Ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    Postema, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    This book sets out the physical and engineering principles of acoustics and ultrasound as used for medical applications. It covers the basics of linear acoustics, wave propagation, non-linear acoustics, acoustic properties of tissue, transducer components, and ultrasonic imaging modes, as well as the most common diagnostic and therapeutic applications. It offers students and professionals in medical physics and engineering a detailed overview of the technical aspects of medical ultrasonic imaging, whilst serving as a reference for clinical and research staff.

  19. Free Radicals and Antioxidants in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL ... This paper reviews the biology of ROS/RNS, their pathways through which they relate to the pathology of cardiovascular disease and discusses the putative roles that antioxidants, including phenolics, may play in controlling oxidative stress and reduce the incidence of ...

  20. Study of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, lipid profile and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Study of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, lipid profile and immunologic factor in coronary artery disease in East Azarbijan. Khaki-khatibi F1*, Yaghoubi A.R2, Rahbani N.M1. 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, 2Cardiovascular Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Tabriz. University of Medical Sciences. Tabriz ...

  1. Therapeutic applications of collagenase (metalloproteases: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzeh Alipour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive therapeutic methods have recently been used in medical sciences. Enzymes have shown high activity at very low concentrations in laboratories and pharmaceutical, enabling them to play crucial roles in different biological phenomena related to living organism, especially human medicine. Recently, using the therapeutic methods based on non-invasive approaches has been emphasized in medical society. Researchers have focused on producing medicines and tools reducing invasive procedures in medical. Collagenases are proteins which catalyze chemical processes and break the peptide bonds in collagen. Collagen may be generated more than the required amount or produced in unsuitable sites or may not degrade after a certain time. In such cases, using an injectable collagenase or its ointment can be helpful in collagen degradation. In both in vitro and in vivo tests, it has been revealed that collagenases have several therapeutic properties in wound healing, burns, nipple pain and some diseases including intervertebral disc herniation, keloid, cellulite, lipoma among others. This review describes the therapeutic application of collagenase in medical sciences and the process for its production using novel methods, paving the way for more effective and safe applications of collagenases.

  2. Chicanoizing the Therapeutic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, William S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Focusing on the drug addiction problem and its antecedent conditions in a Chicano population, the article examines several therapeutic interventions suggested by these conditions and indicates how they might be incorporated into a drug addiction Therapeutic Community treatment program designed to meet the needs of Chicano drug addicts. (Author/NQ)

  3. Therapeutic Crisis Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Martha J.; Powers, Jane Levine

    1993-01-01

    Describes Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI) program as providing staff with skills, knowledge, and confidence to manage child in crisis to bring about a "maximum amount of lasting response." Contends that, by applying principles of TCI training, direct care worker can attain therapeutic control and maintain dignity of both adult and child…

  4. Trends in Therapeutic Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the rapid, dramatic changes taking place in therapeutic recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The article notes the impact of changes in managed care, examines programming trends in therapeutic recreation (adventure/outdoor education, competitive sports, handcycling, health enhancement activities, and…

  5. A review of experimental studies of hydrogen as a new therapeutic agent in emergency and critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Meihua; Zhang, Hongying; Yu, Congjun; Wang, Fan; Sun, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant chemical element in the Universe, but is seldom regarded as a therapeutic agent. Recent evidence has shown that hydrogen is a potent antioxidative, antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory agent and so may have potential medical applications in cells, tissues and organs. There are several methods to administer hydrogen, such as inhalation of hydrogen gas, aerosol inhalation of a hydrogen-rich solution, drinking hydrogen dissolved in water, injecting hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) and taking a hydrogen bath. Drinking hydrogen solution (saline/pure water/other solutions saturated with hydrogen) may be more practical in daily life and more suitable for daily consumption. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on the use of hydrogen in emergency and critical care medicine using different disease models.

  6. Influence of Chemotherapy on the Antioxidant Status of Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bich Na; Jung, Sora; Darvin, Maxim E; Eucker, Jan; Kühnhardt, Dagmar; Sehouli, Jalid; Chekerov, Radoslav; Patzelt, Alexa; Fuss, Harald; Yu, Ruo-Xi; Lademann, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia is a frequent dermal side-effect during chemotherapy. Previous investigations showed radical formation subsequent to doxorubicin infusion and preventative and therapeutic effects of an antioxidant-containing ointment. Using a non-invasive vivomeasuring system (Biozoom®; Biozoom Services GmbH, Kassel, Germany) changes in the antioxidant status (as measured by relative carotenoid concentration) of the skin prior to and after intravenous administration of paclitaxel, docetaxel and 5-fluorouracil were investigated in 42 patients with cancer. A significant decrease of antioxidant concentration subsequent to intravenous administration was found for all investigated chemotherapeutic agents. The mean concentration of carotenoids decreased from 3.59±1.26 arbitrary units (a.u.) to 3.41±1.28 a.u. (p<0.001) after paclitaxel administration, from 6.33±2.43 to 5.63±2.29 a.u. after docetaxel (p=0.027) and from 4.26±1.81 to 3.98±1.53 a.u. (p=0.042) after 5-fluorouracil infusion. Oxidative stress might play a significant role in the pathomechanism of palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia associated with paclitaxel, docetaxel and 5-fluorouracil. Therefore, an antioxidant-containing ointment might serve as preventative and therapeutic option. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Reporting therapeutic discourse in a therapeutic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, G E

    1988-03-01

    Research in nurses' communications has concentrated on nurse to patient interactions. Those few studies which focus on nurse to nurse communications seem to be generated by a pragmatic and normative concern with effective information sharing. In this paper, which describes one aspect of a larger case study of a hospital-based therapeutic community, the description and analysis of nurses' reports flows not from a normative model of professional practice, but rather an exploration of how professional practice is articulated as discourse in nurses' written accounts. Foucault's ideas about therapeutic discourse inform the theoretical framework of the research. Ethnomethodological concerns with the importance of documentary analysis provide the methodological rationale for examining nurses' 24-hour report documents, as official discourse, reflecting therapeutic practice in this setting. A content analysis of nurses' reports, collected over a period of 4 months, demonstrated the importance of domesticity and ordinary everyday activities in nurses' accounts of hospital life. Disruption to the 'life as usual' domesticity in the community seemed to be associated with admission to and discharge from the hospital when interpersonal and interactional changes between patients occur. It is suggested that nurses in general hospital wards and more orthodox psychiatric settings might usefully consider the impact of admissions and discharges on the group of patients they manage, and make this a discursive focus of their work.

  8. "light-on" sensing of antioxidants using gold nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lianzhe

    2014-05-20

    Depletion of intracellular antioxidants is linked to major cytotoxic events and cellular disorders, such as oxidative stress and multiple sclerosis. In addition to medical diagnosis, determining the concentration of antioxidants in foodstuffs, food preservatives, and cosmetics has proved to be very vital. Gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) have a core size below 2 nm and contain several metal atoms. They have interesting photophysical properties, are readily functionalized, and are safe to use in various biomedical applications. Herein, a simple and quantitative spectroscopic method based on Au-NCs is developed to detect and image antioxidants such as ascorbic acid. The sensing mechanism is based on the fact that antioxidants can protect the fluorescence of Au-NCs against quenching by highly reactive oxygen species. Our method shows great accuracy when employed to detect the total antioxidant capacity in commercial fruit juice. Moreover, confocal fluorescence microscopy images of HeLa cells show that this approach can be successfully used to image antioxidant levels in living cells. Finally, the potential application of this "light-on" detection method in multiple logic gate fabrication was discussed using the fluorescence intensity of Au-NCs as output. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  9. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial activity of Pedicularis sibthorpii Boiss. And Pedicularis wilhelmsiana Fisch ex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh khodaie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This research paper presents antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Pedicularis sibthorpii and Pedicularis wilhelmsiana which grow in Azerbaijan/Iran with claimed a lot of therapeutic effects. Methods: DPPH assay and agar well diffusion method were carried out to determine antioxidant and antimicrobial activities respectively. Results: Methanolic extract showed better antioxidant activity compared to other crude extracts (n-hexane and dichloromethane. Methanolic extracts of both Pedicularis sibthorpii and Pedicularis wilhelmsiana were found to have antibacterial activity especially against gram positive strains of S. ureus, S.epidermidis. No antifungal activity was observed in the tested extracts. Conclusion: Existence of some phenolic compounds in methanolic extracts, such as phenylethanoids and flavonoids (found in other species of Pedicularis, which cause both antioxidant and antibacterial activities, is probable. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of the methanolic extracts supports further studies related to phytochemical investigation and bioassay of different fractions to isolate pure compounds of plants.

  10. Antimutagenic profile of antioxidant vitamins in drosophila mulation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, P K; Sinha, S P

    2008-04-01

    To assess the antimutagenicity of antioxidant vitamins (vitamins A, C, and E) as expressed by their efficacy to lower aflatoxin-induced mutations. The Muller-5 method for mutation detection was used to assay the frequency of X-chromosome linked recessive lethal mutations (XRLMs) in Drosophila. Larvae were exposed to dietary concentration of aflatoxins and/or the human therapeutic doses of any of the three antioxidant vitamins. Absence of normal eyed males among M2 progeny gave an indication of mutation induction. Aflatoxin supplimentation significantly increased the incidence of XRLMs in Drosophila. Mutation frequency was also raised a little above the control level in case of vitamin treatment. However, notable mitigation in mutation frequency was registered when aflatoxin-treated larvae were concomitantly fed with any of the three antioxidant vitamins. Aflatoxin exposure can enhance the frequency of gene mutation in Drosophila which is significantly lowered by each of the three antioxidant vitamins. The degree of amelioration produced by them is almost identical. This mitigation is based on the scavenging/trapping by antioxidant vitamins of DNA-reactive products (metabolites and radicals) emanating from aflatoxin metabolism.

  11. Protective Role for Antioxidants in Acute Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M. Dennis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury causes significant morbidity and mortality in the community and clinic. Various pathologies, including renal and cardiovascular disease, traumatic injury/rhabdomyolysis, sepsis, and nephrotoxicity, that cause acute kidney injury (AKI, induce general or regional decreases in renal blood flow. The ensuing renal hypoxia and ischemia promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS such as superoxide radical anions, peroxides, and hydroxyl radicals, that can oxidatively damage biomolecules and membranes, and affect organelle function and induce renal tubule cell injury, inflammation, and vascular dysfunction. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased oxidative damage, and various endogenous and synthetic antioxidants that mitigate source and derived oxidants are beneficial in cell-based and animal studies. However, the benefit of synthetic antioxidant supplementation in human acute kidney injury and renal disease remains to be realized. The endogenous low-molecular weight, non-proteinaceous antioxidant, ascorbate (vitamin C, is a promising therapeutic in human renal injury in critical illness and nephrotoxicity. Ascorbate may exert significant protection by reducing reactive oxygen species and renal oxidative damage via its antioxidant activity, and/or by its non-antioxidant functions in maintaining hydroxylase and monooxygenase enzymes, and endothelium and vascular function. Ascorbate supplementation may be particularly important in renal injury patients with low vitamin C status.

  12. Mallotus roxburghianus modulates antioxidant responses in pancreas of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, V K; Chenkual, L; Gurusubramanian, G

    2016-03-01

    Mallotus roxburghianus has long been used by Mizo tribal people for the treatment of diabetes. Scientific validation at known doses may provide information about its safety and efficacy. Methanolic leaf extract of M. roxburghianus (MRME 100 and 400mg/kg) was tested in comparison with normal and alloxan diabetic rats for 28 days p.o. in terms of body and pancreatic weight, blood glucose level, antioxidant enzymes, expression of visfatin and PCNA, histopathology and histomorphometric measurements of pancreas. The results were evaluated statistically using ANOVA, correlation and regression and Principal component analysis (PCO). MRME (100 and 400mg/kg) treatment significantly (p<0.0001) decreased the body weight, blood glucose level, improved the mass and size of pancreas, elevated the levels of antioxidant enzymes and up regulate the expression of visfatin and PCNA. PCO analysis was good to fitness and prediction distinguishes the therapeutic effects of M. roxburghianus from the alloxan induced diabetic rats. MRME has significant role in protecting animals from alloxan-induced diabetic oxidative stress in pancreas and exhibited promising antihyperglycaemic and antioxidant activities along with significant reversal of disturbed antioxidant status and lipid peroxidative damage. Pancreatic architecture and physiology under diabetic oxidative stress have been significantly modulated by MRME and validated as a drug candidate for antidiabetic treatment. M. roxburghianus treatment restores the antioxidant enzyme system and rejuvenates the islets mass in alloxanized rat by accelerating visfatin and PCNA expression in pancreatic tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    PERRONE, DONATELLA; ARDITO, FATIMA; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; DIOGUARDI, MARIO; TROIANO, GIUSEPPE; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; LAINO, LUIGI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26640527

  14. Paradoxical Roles of Antioxidant Enzymes: Basic Mechanisms and Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xin Gen; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Bao, Yongping; Ho, Ye-Shih; Reddi, Amit R.; Holmgren, Arne; Arnér, Elias S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are generated from aerobic metabolism, as a result of accidental electron leakage as well as regulated enzymatic processes. Because ROS/RNS can induce oxidative injury and act in redox signaling, enzymes metabolizing them will inherently promote either health or disease, depending on the physiological context. It is thus misleading to consider conventionally called antioxidant enzymes to be largely, if not exclusively, health protective. Because such a notion is nonetheless common, we herein attempt to rationalize why this simplistic view should be avoided. First we give an updated summary of physiological phenotypes triggered in mouse models of overexpression or knockout of major antioxidant enzymes. Subsequently, we focus on a series of striking cases that demonstrate “paradoxical” outcomes, i.e., increased fitness upon deletion of antioxidant enzymes or disease triggered by their overexpression. We elaborate mechanisms by which these phenotypes are mediated via chemical, biological, and metabolic interactions of the antioxidant enzymes with their substrates, downstream events, and cellular context. Furthermore, we propose that novel treatments of antioxidant enzyme-related human diseases may be enabled by deliberate targeting of dual roles of the pertaining enzymes. We also discuss the potential of “antioxidant” nutrients and phytochemicals, via regulating the expression or function of antioxidant enzymes, in preventing, treating, or aggravating chronic diseases. We conclude that “paradoxical” roles of antioxidant enzymes in physiology, health, and disease derive from sophisticated molecular mechanisms of redox biology and metabolic homeostasis. Simply viewing antioxidant enzymes as always being beneficial is not only conceptually misleading but also clinically hazardous if such notions underpin medical treatment protocols based on modulation of redox pathways. PMID:26681794

  15. Advancing Stem Cell Biology toward Stem Cell Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Scadden, David; Srivastava, Alok

    2012-01-01

    Here, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Clinical Translation Committee introduces a series of articles outlining the current status, opportunities, and challenges surrounding the clinical translation of stem cell therapeutics for specific medical conditions.

  16. [PLURAL THERAPEUTIC ITINERARIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the strategies employed by Nahua community of Mexixo to deal with health problems. Drawing on qualitative research, it discusses the choice of plural therapeutic itineraries, including the use of informal and formal healthcare.

  17. Dietary Intake of Antioxidants and Serum Levels of Total Antioxidant Status (TAS in MS Patients with that of Normal Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ehsan Hejazi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Hejazi E1, Amaani R2, Sharafodin-zadeh N3 1. M.sc Student of Nutritional Sciences, Department of Nutritional, Faculty of Para-Medicine, Jondi-shapour University of Medical Sciences 2. Associate Professor, Department of Nutritional, Faculty of Para-Medicine, Jondi-shapour University of Medical Sciences 3. Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Jondi-shapour University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS, with an etiology that is not yet fully understood. Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of MS. The aim of this study was to compare dietary intake of antioxidants and serum levels of Total Antioxidant Status (TAS in MS patients with that of normal subjects. Materials and methods: Serum levels of TAS and dietary intake of the main antioxidants of twenty one MS patients (16 women were compared with age and gender matched healthy controls. Serum samples were collected and frozen for further spectrophotometer analysis. Food frequency questionnaires and 24-hour dietary recalls for 3 days of all subjects were obtained. Results: There was no significant difference in serum levels of TAS between the two groups. No significant difference was seen in consumption of dietary antioxidant sources between them. Additionally, daily intake of vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A, folate and dietary fiber were not significantly different between groups. Conclusion: There is a lack of evidence on the possible relationship and benefits of dietary antioxidant in MS patients. More research is required to assess the effectiveness of diet interventions on antioxidant status in MS patients.

  18. Geriatric content in pharmacotherapy and therapeutics textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Jane R; Delafuente, Jeffrey C; Odegard, Peggy Soule

    2006-12-15

    To determine the extent to which therapeutics textbooks address age-related medication information. Criteria for 5 disease states prevalent among geriatric patients were developed based on the content of a geriatric textbook and from expert reviewers' input. The criteria were used to determine the degree to which geriatric content was addressed in 3 therapeutics textbooks. The therapeutics textbooks contained less than half of the critical points for 3 disease states: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus (31%, 33%, and 46%, respectively). In addition, the textbooks addressed only one half to two thirds of the criteria for the remaining 2 disease states of osteoarthritis and dementia (55% and 68%, respectively). Criteria specific to the elderly were addressed less often than criteria that were important but not unique to the elderly (38% and 63%, respectively). Current therapeutics textbooks have significant gaps in geriatric medication information. Users of these textbooks must supplement them with primary literature or a geriatric textbook for more comprehensive medication therapy management information.

  19. Antioxidants and the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemeli, Eduardo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Anderson, Diana

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that antioxidants, either endogenous or from the diet, play a key role in preserving health. They are able to quench radical species generated in situations of oxidative stress, either triggered by pathologies or xenobiotics, and they protect the integrity of DNA from genotoxicants. Nevertheless, there are still many compounds with unclear or unidentified prooxidant/antioxidant activities. This is of concern since there is an increase in the number of compounds synthesized or extracted from vegetables to which humans might be exposed. Despite the well-established protective effects of fruit and vegetables, the antioxidant(s) responsible have not all been clearly identified. There might also be alternative mechanisms contributing to the protective effects for which a comprehensive description is lacking. In the last two decades, the Comet assay has been extensively used for the investigation of the effects of antioxidants and many reports can be found in the literature. The Comet assay, a relatively fast, simple, and sensitive technique for the analysis of DNA damage in all cell types, has been applied for the screening of chemicals, biomonitoring and intervention studies. In the present review, several of the most well-known antioxidants are considered. These include: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, selenium, iron chelators, melatonin, melanin, vitamins (A, B, C and E), carotenes, flavonoids, isoflavones, tea polyphenols, wine polyphenols and synthetic antioxidants. Investigations showing beneficial as well as non-beneficial properties of the antioxidants selected, either at the in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo level are discussed.

  20. Therapeutic Gene Editing Safety and Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Christopher T; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2017-10-01

    Therapeutic gene editing is significant for medical advancement. Safety is intricately linked to the specificity of the editing tools used to cut at precise genomic targets. Improvements can be achieved by thoughtful design of nucleases and repair templates, analysis of off-target editing, and careful utilization of viral vectors. Advancements in DNA repair mechanisms and development of new generations of tools improve targeting of specific sequences while minimizing risks. It is important to plot a safe course for future clinical trials. This article reviews safety and specificity for therapeutic gene editing to spur dialogue and advancement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirchgessner Annette

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death in industrialized countries and the most frequent cause of permanent disability in adults worldwide. Despite advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, therapeutic options remain limited. Only recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rt-PA for thrombolysis is currently approved for use in the treatment of this devastating disease. However, its use is limited by its short therapeutic window (three hours, complications derived essentially from the risk of hemorrhage, and the potential damage from reperfusion/ischemic injury. Two important pathophysiological mechanisms involved during ischemic stroke are oxidative stress and inflammation. Brain tissue is not well equipped with antioxidant defenses, so reactive oxygen species and other free radicals/oxidants, released by inflammatory cells, threaten tissue viability in the vicinity of the ischemic core. This review will discuss the molecular aspects of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischemic stroke and potential therapeutic strategies that target neuroinflammation and the innate immune system. Currently, little is known about endogenous counterregulatory immune mechanisms. However, recent studies showing that regulatory T cells are major cerebroprotective immunomodulators after stroke suggest that targeting the endogenous adaptive immune response may offer novel promising neuroprotectant therapies.

  2. Impact of Antioxidants on Cardiolipin Oxidation in Liposomes: Why Mitochondrial Cardiolipin Serves as an Apoptotic Signal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhmatikov, Alexey V; Voskoboynikova, Natalia; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Skulachev, Maxim V; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y

    2016-01-01

    Molecules of mitochondrial cardiolipin (CL) get selectively oxidized upon oxidative stress, which triggers the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In a chemical model most closely resembling the mitochondrial membrane-liposomes of pure bovine heart CL-we compared ubiquinol-10, ubiquinol-6, and alpha-tocopherol, the most widespread naturally occurring antioxidants, with man-made, quinol-based amphiphilic antioxidants. Lipid peroxidation was induced by addition of an azo initiator in the absence and presence of diverse antioxidants, respectively. The kinetics of CL oxidation was monitored via formation of conjugated dienes at 234 nm. We found that natural ubiquinols and ubiquinol-based amphiphilic antioxidants were equally efficient in protecting CL liposomes from peroxidation; the chromanol-based antioxidants, including alpha-tocopherol, were 2-3 times less efficient. Amphiphilic antioxidants, but not natural ubiquinols and alpha-tocopherol, were able, additionally, to protect the CL bilayer from oxidation by acting from the water phase. We suggest that the previously reported therapeutic efficiency of mitochondrially targeted amphiphilic antioxidants is owing to their ability to protect those CL molecules that are inaccessible to natural hydrophobic antioxidants, being trapped within respiratory supercomplexes. The high susceptibility of such occluded CL molecules to oxidation may have prompted their recruitment as apoptotic signaling molecules by nature.

  3. Protective effect of different antioxidant agents in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Salucci

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin cells can respond to UVB-induced damage either by tolerating it, or restoring it through antioxidant activation and DNA repair mechanisms or, ultimately, undergoing programmed cell death, when damage is massive. Nutritional factors, in particular, food antioxidants, have attracted much interest because of their potential use in new preventive, protective, and therapeutic strategies for chronic degenerative diseases, including skin inflammation and cancer. Some polyphenols, present in virgin olive oil, well tolerated by organism after oral administration, show a variety of pharmacological and clinical benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and neuro-protective activities. Here, the protective effects of antioxidant compounds against UV-induced apoptosis have been described in HaCat cell line. Human keratinocytes were pre-treated with antioxidants before UVB exposure and their effects have been evaluated by means of ultrastructural analyses. After UVB radiation, a known cell death trigger, typical apoptotic features, absent in control condition and in antioxidant alone-treated cells, appear. An evident numerical decrease of ultrastructural apoptotic patterns and TUNEL positive nuclei can be observed when natural antioxidants were supplied before cell death induction. These data have been confirmed by molecular investigation of caspase activity. In conclusion, this paper highlights antioxidant compound ability to prevent apoptotic cell death in human keratinocytes exposed to UVB, suggesting, for these molecules, a potential role in preventing skin damage. 

  4. Fullerenes as Anti-Aging Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Yuliana P; Alperovich, Igor; Zolotukhin, Petr; Prazdnova, Evgenia; Mazanko, Maria; Belanova, Anna; Chistyakov, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Here we review fullerenes biological effects focusing on their antioxidant and anti-ageing action. A scope of various poisonous and healing properties reported in literature for fullerene and its derivatives is analyzed. The review begins with the history of fullerenes discovery and their main properties. Then we focus on the longevity and antioxidant action, including the confrontation of available experimental data and theoretical modeling of buckminsterfullerene C60. Special attention is given to our hypothesis concerning the possibility of fullerenes to act as mitochondria protonophore and various simulations of the transport of C60 and its hydroxylated and other derivatives through lipid bilayer membranes, which can account for scavenging capacity of fullerenes for reactive oxygen species and their acting as mild mitochondrial respiration uncouplers. Extension of the theoretical modeling to the mitochondria membranes and implications on the real biological systems is analyzed. Finally, we focus on the toxicity evaluation and current therapeutic usage of fullerenes. The review contains a comprehensive discussion of both papers published by 2016 and our own research results.

  5. Alpha-fetoprotein, identified as a novel marker for the antioxidant effect of placental extract, exhibits synergistic antioxidant activity in the presence of estradiol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Yeon Choi

    Full Text Available Placenta, as a reservoir of nutrients, has been widely used in medical and cosmetic materials. Here, we focused on the antioxidant properties of placental extract and attempted to isolate and identify the main antioxidant factors. Porcine placental extracts were prepared through homogenization or acid hydrolysis, and their antioxidant activity was investigated in the human keratinocyte HaCaT cell line. Treatment with homogenized placental extract (H-PE increased the cell viability of H2O2-treated HaCaT cells more than two-fold. H-PE treatment suppressed H2O2-induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death and decreased intracellular ROS levels in H2O2-treated HaCaT cells. The antioxidant factors in H-PE were found to be thermo-unstable and were thus expected to include proteins. The candidate antioxidant proteins were fractionated with cation-exchange, anion-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography, and the antioxidant properties of the chromatographic fractions were investigated. We obtained specific antioxidant fractions that suppressed ROS generation and ROS-induced DNA strand breaks. From silver staining and MALDI-TOF analyses, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP precursor was identified as a main marker for the antioxidant effect of H-PE. Purified AFP or ectopically expressed AFP exhibited synergistic antioxidant activity in the presence of estradiol. Taken together, our data suggest that AFP, a serum glycoprotein produced at high levels during fetal development, is a novel marker protein for the antioxidant effect of the placenta that exhibits synergistic antioxidant activity in the presence of estradiol.

  6. Therapeutic angiogenesis: a fantastic new adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjai, Kishore J; Chowdhury, Pertha; Grines, Cindy L

    2002-06-01

    A significant proportion of patients with coronary artery disease have symptoms refractory to medical treatment, yet are unsuitable for conventional revascularization techniques, like percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass surgery. Such patients are potential candidates for alternative forms of coronary revascularization, like therapeutic angiogenesis. This strategy is designed to promote the development of supplemental collateral blood vessels that will act as endogenous bypass conduits. Two major avenues for achieving therapeutic angiogenesis are currently under intense investigation: gene therapy (the introduction of new genetic material into somatic cells to synthesize proteins that are missing, defective, or desired for specific therapeutic purposes) and protein-based therapy (administration of the growth factors, instead of the genes encoding for the growth factors responsible for angiogenesis). This article provides a concise review of the "components" of gene and protein-based therapy, namely, the growth factors, the vector (for gene therapy), the route of delivery, the therapeutic target, the desired therapeutic effect, and quantifiable clinical end points for trials of angiogenesis. Based on preliminary studies, the authors believe that therapeutic angiogenesis represents a promising novel therapy for treatment of the ischemic heart. In the future, angiogenesis will likely be offered as an adjunct to conventional revascularization strategies in subsets of patients who are only "suboptimally" revascularized with conventional techniques, and might evolve into a stand-alone treatment for some patients with nonrevascularizable disease.

  7. Antioxidant relevance to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    Human ecology requires both oxygen and water with the generation from food of an immediate energy source, ATP, by oxidative phosphorylation. A continuing balance between oxidation and antioxidation is necessary for longer less-disabled lives, taking account of oxidative stresses and the critical roles of oxidants in defence against infection, tissue repair and signalling. Antioxidant capacity is derived both exogenously (from food, beverage and sunlight) and endogenously (from enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways). A number of oxidant food factors service antioxidant metallo-enzymes. The capacity operates extra- or intracellularly. Uric acid is the major antioxidant in primate blood. Uric acid synthesis is increased by dietary fructose from fruit, sugary foods and drinks. This indirect antioxidant effect of fruit is separate from that attributable to its flavonoids. Alcohol also increases serum uric acid. Urate excess and retention is associated with disease. The high prevalence of hyperuricaemia in NE Asia presents a major public health dilemma in regard to putative benefits and risks. Foods with high antioxidant activity include berries, nuts and legumes, tomatoes and sweet potato leaves. Each of the antioxidants in these foods is pleiotropic being inter-alia anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic or anti-neoplastic. Moreover, food matrices and patterns contribute to the safety of antioxidant consumption. There is no evidence to date that isolated antioxidants as food supplements improve health outcomes or survival; and some that indicate unacceptable risk. Their use as biomarkers of food cannot justify their isolated use. Nevertheless, a spectrum of dietary pluripotential antioxidants for tissues, metabolic and immune systems is advantageous.

  8. [Therapeutic possibilities after traumatic experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2008-12-01

    Acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are frequent, but not obligatory psychological sequelae following trauma. A major subgroup of patients face a chronic course of illness associated with an increased psychiatric comorbidity and significant impairments in psychosocial adaptation. The typical psychopathological symptoms of ASD and PTSD are best described within a multifactorial model integrating both neurobiological and psychosocial influences. The complex etiopathogenesis of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder favours multimodal approaches in the treatment. Differential psychotherapeutic and pharmacological strategies are available. In a critical survey on empirical studies, psychological debriefing cannot be considered as a positive approach to be recommended as general preventive measure during the immediate posttraumatic phase. Positive effects of cognitive-behavioral interventions can be established for ASD. Psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy and EMDR show promising results in the treatment of PTSD. Major clinical restrictions of patient sampling within special research facilities, however, do not allow an unconditional generalization of these data to psychiatric routine care. In an empirical analysis the SSRIs are the most and best studied medications for ASD and PTSD. In comparison to tricyclic antidepressants SSRIs demonstrate a broader spectrum of therapeutic effects and are better tolerated. The substance classes of SSNRI, DAS, SARI and NaSSA are to be considered as drugs of second choice. They promise a therapeutic efficacy equivalent to the SSRIs, being investigated so far only in open studies. MAO-inhibitors may dispose of a positive therapeutic potential, their profile of side effects must be respected, however. Mood stabilizers and atypical neuroleptics may be used first and foremost in add-on strategies. Benzodiazepines should be used only with increased caution for a short time in states of

  9. [Therapeutic Aggressiveness and Liquid Oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón Duarte, F J; Rodríguez Calvo, M S; Amor Pan, J R

    2017-01-01

    Aggressiveness criteria proposed in the scientific literature a decade ago provide a quality judgment and are a reference in the care of patients with advanced cancer, but their use is not generalized in the evaluation of Oncology Services. In this paper we analyze the therapeutic aggressiveness, according to standard criteria, in 1.001 patients with advanced cancer who died in our Institution between 2010 and 2013. The results seem to show that aggressiveness at the end of life is present more frequently than experts recommend. About 25% of patients fulfill at least one criterion of aggressiveness. This result could be explained by a liquid Oncology which does not prioritize the patient as a moral subject in the clinical appointment. Medical care is oriented to necessities and must be articulated in a model focused on dignity and communication. Its implementation through Advanced Care Planning, consideration of patient's values and preferences, and Limitation of therapeutic effort are ways to reduce aggressiveness and improve clinical practice at the end of life. We need to encourage synergic and proactive attitudes, adding the best of cancer research with the best clinical care for the benefit of human being, moral subject and main goal of Medicine.

  10. Plant Phenolics: Extraction, Analysis and Their Antioxidant and Anticancer Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Dai

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolics are broadly distributed in the plant kingdom and are the most abundant secondary metabolites of plants. Plant polyphenols have drawn increasing attention due to their potent antioxidant properties and their marked effects in the prevention of various oxidative stress associated diseases such as cancer. In the last few years, the identification and development of phenolic compounds or extracts from different plants has become a major area of health- and medical-related research. This review provides an updated and comprehensive overview on phenolic extraction, purification, analysis and quantification as well as their antioxidant properties. Furthermore, the anticancer effects of phenolics in-vitro and in-vivo animal models are viewed, including recent human intervention studies. Finally, possible mechanisms of action involving antioxidant and pro-oxidant activity as well as interference with cellular functions are discussed.

  11. Beneficial effect of the antioxidant riboflavin on gene expression of extracellular matrix elements, antioxidants and oxidases in keratoconic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Isabella M Y; McGhee, Charles N J; Sherwin, Trevor

    2014-07-01

    Keratoconus manifests as a conical protrusion of the cornea and is characterised by stromal thinning. This causes debilitating visual impairment which may necessitate corneal transplantation. Therapeutic targets related to disease mechanisms are currently lacking, as the pathobiology remains unclear. Many pathological features may be manifestations of defects in wound healing and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated functions. In a wide range of tissue and cell types, antioxidant exposure has beneficial effects on both of these pathways. This study investigated the effect of treatment with the antioxidant riboflavin on wound healing and ROS-associated functions in keratoconus. Stromal cells were isolated from human central keratoconic (n = 3) and normal (n = 3) corneas. Total RNA was extracted and reverse-transcribed into complementary DNA. The gene expression of 22 genes involved in repair (eight normal and four repair-type extracellular matrix constituents) and ROS-associated processes (eight antioxidants and two ROS-synthesising oxidases) was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This was also performed on keratoconic stromal cells treated in vitro with riboflavin (n = 3). In stromal cells from untreated keratoconic corneas (compared with untreated normal corneas), there was an up-regulation of 7/12 extracellular matrix elements. Four of eight antioxidants and two of two oxidases were also increased. In treated keratoconic corneas (compared with untreated keratoconic corneas), six out of eight normal extracellular matrix constituents were up-regulated and two of four repair-type molecules were reduced. An increase was also observed in seven out of eight antioxidants and there was a diminution in two out of two oxidases. Riboflavin encourages the synthesis of a normal extracellular matrix and reduces reactive oxygen species levels in keratoconus. This supports the occurrence of wound healing and ROS-associated abnormalities in keratoconus

  12. Measurement of antioxidant activity and antioxidant compounds under versatile extraction conditions: II. The immuno-biochemical antioxidant properties of black sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, John J; Ghadieh, Rana M; Hasan, Hiba A; Nakhal, Yasmine K; Hanbali, Lama B

    2013-01-01

    substantiate the measurable antioxidant activities and contents of P. cerasus extracts under versatile conditions of mild exposure, an effect bearing significant fluctuation with biochemical properties. Since many of those molecules are known to have immuno-biochemical constituencies, antioxidant compounds in sour cherries may have putative antiinflammatory potential and applications in medicinal chemistry, corroborating the observation of regulating and attenuating the growth of microorganisms of medical importance in vitro.

  13. The Antioxidant Activities and Total Phenolic of Artemisia Martima, Achillea Millefolium and Matricaria Recutica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mirzaei

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Consumption of plant derived antioxidant contributes to reducing risks of certain chronic and degenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to study the antioxidant activities and total phenolic of Artemisia Martima, Achillea Millefolium and Matricaria Recutica Materials & Methods: The present study was conducted at Yasuj University of Medical Sciences in 2009. The Stem and flower sample of plants were air-dried, and then grinded and were finally extracted by ethanol: water (70: 30 for 48 h in room temperature. Extracts were filtered and dried under vacuum system. The antioxidant activity of three ethanol extract of the medicinal plants, Artemisia martima, Achillea millefolium and Matricaria recutica, were analyzed by five different methods (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical, 2, 20azinobis- (3-ethylbenzthiazoline -6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radical cation,Ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP, phosphomolybdenum (PMB and reducing power ( RP. In addition, for determination of antioxidant components, the total phenolic content was also analyzed. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS software. Results: For all antioxidant activity assays, Artemisia martima had the highest antioxidant activity value and also total phenol content. Antioxidant capacity analyses revealed that the FRAP and DPPH had comparable results. Antioxidant activity at 1 mg/mL, in ABTS were in the order Artemisia martima> Achillea millefolium> Matricaria recutica. Similar trend was observed for PMB content. RP, FRAP and DPPH were in the order Artemisia martima> Matricaria recutica > Achillea millefolium . Conclusion: The extracts showed a variety of antioxidant activities in all antioxidant assay system. This study demonstrated that Artemisia martima crude extract exhibit significant antioxidant activity.

  14. Investigation of antioxidant potentials of solvent extracts from different anatomical parts of Asphodeline anatolica E. Tuzlaci: an endemic plant to Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Gokhan; Aktumsek, Abdurrahman

    2014-01-01

    The genus Asphodeline (Liliaceae) is represented in Turkey by 20 taxa, which are traditionally used for medicinal purposes in Anatolia. In this study, we tested the phytochemical content and antioxidant effect of different solvent extracts obtained from different anatomical parts of Asphodeline anatolica. The different extracts of each plant parts were tested for antioxidant activity using different chemical assays. The total antioxidant components were also calculated. Generally, acetone extracts produced the seed and root exhibited significantly higher antioxidant activity with high antioxidant components. Total phenolic content of extracts were significantly correlated with antioxidant potentials (except for, metal chelating activity). On the basis of the results obtained, A. anatolica extracts should be regarded as a valuable source of natural antioxidants for food and therapeutic applications.

  15. Lymphedema and Therapeutic Lymphangiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Saito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is a disorder of the lymphatic vascular system characterized by impaired lymphatic return and swelling of the extremities. Lymphedema is divided into primary and secondary forms based on the underlying etiology. Despite substantial advances in both surgical and conservative techniques, therapeutic options for the management of lymphedema are limited. Although rarely lethal, lymphedema is a disfiguring and disabling condition with an associated decrease in the quality of life. The recent impressive expansion of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms governing lymphangiogenesis provides new possibilities for the treatment of lymphedema. This review highlights the lymphatic biology, the pathophysiology of lymphedema, and the therapeutic lymphangiogenesis using hepatocyte growth factor.

  16. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  17. Antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidant efficacies of zerumbone on the formation, development, and establishment of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemn, Hassan Othman; Noordin, Muhammad Mustapha; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Hazilawati, Hamza; Zuki, Abubakr; Chartrand, Max Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the high incidence of cholesterol-induced cardiovascular disease, particularly atherosclerosis, the current study was designed to investigate the preventive and therapeutic efficacies of dietary zerumbone (ZER) supplementation on the formation and development of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with a high cholesterol diet. A total of 72 New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly on two experimental studies carried out 8 weeks apart. The first experiment was designed to investigate the prophylactic efficacy of ZER in preventing early developed atheromatous lesion. The second experimental trial was aimed at investigating the therapeutic effect of ZER in reducing the atherosclerotic lesion progression and establishment. Sudanophilia, histopathological, and ultrastructural changes showed pronounced reduction in the plaque size in ZER-medicated aortas. On the other hand, dietary supplementation of ZER for almost 10 weeks as a prophylactic measure indicated substantially decreasing lipid profile values, and similarly, plaque size in comparison with high-cholesterol non-supplemented rabbits. Furthermore, the results of oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarker evaluation indicated that ZER is a potent antioxidant in suppressing the generation of free radicals in terms of atherosclerosis prevention and treatment. ZER significantly reduced the value of malondialdehyde and augmented the value of superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, our data indicated that dietary supplementation of ZER at doses of 8, 16, and 20 mg/kg alone as a prophylactic measure, and as a supplementary treatment with simvastatin, significantly reduced early plague formation, development, and establishment via significant reduction in serum lipid profile, together with suppression of oxidative damage, and therefore alleviated atherosclerosis lesions. PMID:26347047

  18. [Anticancer drugs: Which prices for therapeutic innovations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Anthony; Maraninchi, Dominique; Marino, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    The expanding knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying tumor development made it possible the recent emergence of new therapeutic approaches that are considered as undoubtedly innovative. Yet, to define and to evaluate the magnitude of a drug innovation require an examination of its intrinsic drug properties, medical utility as well as its mode of emergence. Recently, international academic societies, such as ESMO and ASCO, have proposed practical tools that may help quantifying the medical value of a given innovation. Currently, the sustained flux of therapeutic innovations in oncology is associated with an unprecedented growth of costs, the actual determinants of which remain under debate, but raising the critical issue of drugs pricing, and their potential individual or societal "financial toxicity". Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Potentials of Rheum emodi Rhizome Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatadri Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine antioxidant and cytotoxic efficacies of methanolic and aqueous extracts of Rheum emodi Wall. ex Meissn. rhizome. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, inhibitory effect on lipid peroxidation and Fe3+ reducing antioxidant property have been used to investigate antioxidant properties of the extracts. Cytotoxicity of the extracts was tested on MDA-MB-435S and Hep3B cell lines. Both extracts displayed extensive cytotoxicity to the tested cell lines. The extracts were studied for their ability to protect pBR322 DNA from damage by UV induced photolysis of H2O2. The aqueous extract, though inferior to methanolic extract in its antioxidant potential exhibited efficiency in DNA protection, while the methanolic extract failed to protect the DNA. The amount of total polyphenolics in the extracts was measured by spectrophotometric method. The methanolic extract contained higher polyphenolic contents than aqueous extract. Significant positive correlations were observed (P < .05 between results of phenolic content estimation and that of antioxidant assays. Hence, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis was performed to identify few major phenolic compounds that might be responsible for these therapeutic properties. These results indicate that rhizome of R. emodi possesses antioxidant and cytotoxic activities and therefore have therapeutic potential.

  20. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  1. Therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ken; Roosinovich, Elena; Ma, Barbara; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that most cervical cancers are causally associated with HPV infection. This realization has led to efforts to control HPV-associated malignancy through prevention or treatment of HPV infection. Currently, commercially available HPV vaccines are not designed to control established HPV infection and associated premalignant and malignant lesions. To treat and eradicate pre-existing HPV infections and associated lesions which remain prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines are needed. DNA vaccination has emerged as a particularly promising form of therapeutic HPV vaccines due to its safety, stability and ability to induce antigen-specific immunity. This review focuses on improving the potency of therapeutic HPV vaccines through modification of dendritic cells (DCs) by [1] increasing the number of antigen-expressing/antigen-loaded DCs, [2] improving HPV antigen expression, processing and presentation in DCs, and [3] enhancing DC and T cell interaction. Continued improvement in therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines may ultimately lead to an effective DNA vaccine for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:20066511

  2. Estimation of the impact of warfarin's time-in-therapeutic range on stroke and major bleeding rates and its influence on the medical cost avoidance associated with novel oral anticoagulant use-learnings from ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, and RE-LY trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Alpesh; Deitelzweig, Steve; Jing, Yonghua; Makenbaeva, Dinara; Wiederkehr, Daniel; Lin, Jay; Graham, John

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin's time-in-therapeutic range (TTR) is highly variable among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of variations in wafarin's TTR on rates of stroke/systemic embolism (SSE) and major bleedings among NVAF patients in the ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, and RE-LY trials. Additionally, differences in medical costs for clinical endpoints when novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were used instead of warfarin at different TTR values were estimated. Quartile ranges of TTR values and corresponding event rates (%/patient - year = %/py) of SSE and major bleedings among NVAF patients treated with warfarin were estimated from published literature and FDA documents. The associations of SSE and major bleeding rates with TTR values were evaluated by regression analysis and then the calculated regression coefficients were used in analysis of medical cost differences associated with use of each NOAC versus warfarin (2010 costs; US payer perspective) at different TTRs. Each 10 % increase in warfarin's TTR correlated with a -0.32%/py decrease in SSE rate (R(2) = 0.61; p estimated medical cost decreased from -$902 to -$83 for apixaban, from -$506 to +$314 for rivaroxaban, and from -$596 to +$223 for dabigatran. Among NVAF patients there is a significant negative correlation between warfarin's TTR and SSE rate, but not major bleedings. The variations in warfarin's TTR impacted the economic comparison of use of individual NOACs versus warfarin.

  3. Gene therapy in glaucoma-3: Therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel-Monem Soliman Mahdy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, several promising genetic therapeutic approaches had been investigated. Some are either used to stop apoptosis and halt further glaucomatous damage, wound healing modulating effect or long lasting intraocular pressure lowering effects than the conventional commercially available antiglaucoma medications. Method of Literature Search The literature was searched on the Medline database using the PubMed interface. The key words for search were glaucoma, gene therapy, and genetic diagnosis of glaucoma.

  4. Bee Pollen: Chemical Composition and Therapeutic Application

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Komosinska-Vassev; Pawel Olczyk; Justyna Kaźmierczak; Lukasz Mencner; Krystyna Olczyk

    2015-01-01

    Bee pollen is a valuable apitherapeutic product greatly appreciated by the natural medicine because of its potential medical and nutritional applications. It demonstrates a series of actions such as antifungal, antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, anticancer immunostimulating, and local analgesic. Its radical scavenging potential has also been reported. Beneficial properties of bee pollen and the validity for their therapeutic use in various pathological condition ha...

  5. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatmah A Matough

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is considered to be one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. There is a growing scientific and public interest in connecting oxidative stress with a variety of pathological conditions including diabetes mellitus (DM as well as other human diseases. Previous experimental and clinical studies report that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of complications of both types of DM. However, the exact mechanism by which oxidative stress could contribute to and accelerate the development of complications in diabetic mellitus is only partly known and remains to be clarified. On the one hand, hyperglycemia induces free radicals; on the other hand, it impairs the endogenous antioxidant defense system in patients with diabetes. Endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms include both enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways. Their functions in human cells are to counterbalance toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS. Common antioxidants include the vitamins A, C, and E, glutathione (GSH, and the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and glutathione reductase (GRx. This review describes the importance of endogenous antioxidant defense systems, their relationship to several pathophysiological processes and their possible therapeutic implications in vivo.

  6. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant C. Nelson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1 To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2 To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3 To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine.

  7. Antioxidants in HIV positive children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Aruna; Dias, Bina F

    2008-04-01

    To assess the antioxidant status in HIV positive children. HIV positive children under the age group of 3-12 years from lower socio-economic strata were chosen for the study (Group 1). The values were compared with normal children (Group 2) not suffering from any disease in the same age group and similar socio-economic strata. The antioxidants chosen for the present study were vitamin A (Retinol), vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) and vitamin E (alpha tocopherol). Results obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using student 't' test (in the present study 'z' test was applied). The antioxidants vitamin A, C and E decreased in HIV positive children as compared to controls. Vitamin A was significant to the level of pchildren is due to increased utilization of antioxidant micronutrients because of increased oxidative stress caused due to free radicals.

  8. Antioxidants based on fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalk Christian

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoxidation is the cause for deterioration of organic materials. Many commercial products react with atmospheric oxygen under loss of quality. To retard unwanted oxidative damage and to prolong the useful life of the substrates, antioxidants are used to protect the organic matter. We linked phenolic compounds with fatty acids to obtain fatty acid conjugates with antioxidative action. The conjugates have a similar constitution like hindered phenols e.g. tert.-butyl-hydroxy-anisole (BHA and show good antioxidative action in the Rancimat-test. Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant and a strong reducing agent. Its action is based on a ketoene-diol structure. We were able to insert an analogous structure into a fatty acid chain. The products we obtained have similar oxidation potentials as ascorbic acid

  9. Biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant) of fractions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bryophytes like other lower plants (non-vascular plants) are not traditionally employed for therapeutic purposes. Hence this study evaluated the in vitro anti-oxidant potentials and anti-inflammatory activities of the fractions and methanolic extract of Moss (Philonotis hastata, Duby) with a view to studying its ...

  10. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Oliverio; Al-Abdely, Hail Mater; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2014-10-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  11. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliverio Welsh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  12. Chemical composition and antioxidant capacities of phytococktail extracts from trans-Himalayan cold desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Priyanka; Bajpai, Prabodh Kumar; Tayade, Amol Bapurao; Chaurasia, Om Prakash; Srivastava, Ravi Bihari; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2013-10-07

    Himalayan plants are widely used in traditional system of medicine both as prophylactics and therapeutics for high altitude maladies. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant capacities and bioactive compounds of methanol and n-hexane extracts of the phytococktail comprising of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides), apricot (Prunus armeniaca) and roseroot (Rhodiola imbricata) from trans-Himalaya. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging capacities and lipid peroxidation inhibition (LPI) property of the extracts were determined. Total antioxidant power was determined by ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Total polyphenol, flavonoid, flavonol, proanthocyanidin and carotenoid were also estimated for both extracts. We have identified and quantified the phyto-chemotypes present in the methanol and n-hexane extracts by hyphenated gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique. Antioxidant capacity assays using DPPH, ABTS, NO, LPI and FRAP exhibited analogous results where the phytococktail showed high antioxidant action. The phytococktail was also found to possess high quantity of total polyphenol, flavonoid, flavonol and carotenoid. A significant and linear correlation was found between the antioxidant capacities and bioactive principles. A total of 32 phyto-chemotypes were identified from these extracts by GC/MS chemometric fingerprinting. Major phyto-chemotypes identified by GC/MS were glycosides, phenylpropanoids and derivatives, terpenoids, alkaloids, phytosterols, fatty acids and esters, alkaloids and derivatives, organic acid esters and aromatic ethers with positive biological and pharmacological actions. The phytococktail extracts were found to contain considerable amount of diverse bioactive compounds with high antioxidant capacities. The presence of hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants in the phytococktail could have

  13. Oxidants and antioxidants in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Svendsen, Ove

    2007-01-01

    Important infectious diseases in farm animals, such as pneumonia and enteritis, are thought to be associated with the so-called oxidative stress, i.e. a chemical phenomenon involving an imbalance in the redox status of the individual animal. The specifics of oxidative stress and how it may result...... theoretically, oxidative stress should be easily prevented with antioxidants yet the use of antioxidants as therapy remains controversial. The present knowledge on oxidative stress in farm animals is the topic of this review....

  14. Food-Derived Antioxidant Polysaccharides and Their Pharmacological Potential in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known to impair architecture and function of cells, which may lead to various chronic diseases, and therefore therapeutic and nutritional interventions to reduce oxidative damages represent a viable strategy in the amelioration of oxidative stress-related disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past decade, a variety of natural polysaccharides from functional and medicinal foods have attracted great interest due to their antioxidant functions such as scavenging free radicals and reducing oxidative damages. Interestingly, these antioxidant polysaccharides are also found to attenuate neuronal damages and alleviate cognitive and motor decline in a range of neurodegenerative models. It has recently been established that the neuroprotective mechanisms of polysaccharides are related to oxidative stress-related pathways, including mitochondrial function, antioxidant defense system and pathogenic protein aggregation. Here, we first summarize the current status of antioxidant function of food-derived polysaccharides and then attempt to appraise their anti-neurodegeneration activities.

  15. [Limitations to the physician's discretionary and therapeutic freedom and to the provision of health care for the general population by a shortage of financial and human resources--the rules of Section 2 Para. 1 and 4 of the Medical Professional Code of conduct and how much they are really worth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Jörg-Dietrich

    2007-01-01

    Up to the early 1990's the health care system was essentially characterised through:--the insured' right of choice of therapist,--therapeutic freedom of patients and physicians, and--the freedom of establishment for medical doctors.--In accordance with the Hospital Funding Act the hospital system was--in compliance with federal constitutional law using capacity requirements--based on the "fire-fighting" principle, i.e. that if required, every patient should have access to a suitable hospital bed within about 15 minutes.--The responsibility for ensuring the provision of general and specialist health care services had been conferred by the government to the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (1955) in the legal form of a public corporation. In the face of a foreseeable rise in expenses as a result of advances in medicine and a higher demand for health care services because of the demographic development (long-life society) the Advisory Council for Concerted Action in Health Care concludes in its Annual Report that maintaining this level of health care for all people is not financially viable any longer. This is why the state--on the basis of the Health Care Reform Act of 2002 and the Statutory Health Insurance System Modernisation Act of 2004--retreated from the provision of services in the ambulatory and inpatient setting by privatising these sectors and by proclaiming competition (introduction of diagnosis-related groups). Presently, the once liberal performance tradition is more and more turning into a centrally planned system in the spirit of "From Therapeutic Freedom to Therapeutic Programmes". The guidelines that on the basis of the methods of evidence-based medicine were developed by the international community of physicians for the treatment of patients with defined diagnoses and intended to be decision aids for individual treatment decisions are now used to implement disease management programmes for the provision of health care to

  16. Measurement of antioxidant activity and antioxidant compounds under versatile extraction conditions: I. the immuno-biochemical antioxidant properties of sweet cherry (Prunus avium) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanbali, Lama B; Ghadieh, Rana M; Hasan, Hiba A; K Nakhal, Yasmine; Haddad, John J

    2013-01-01

    bearing significant biochemical properties of a variety of extraction methods. Further studies are currently investigating the effect of specific antioxidants of P. avium on microbial growth in vitro per se. Since many of the aforementioned molecules hold immunobiochemical constituencies, antioxidant compounds in sweet cherries may have putative anti-inflammatory potential in medicinal chemistry, corroborating the observation of regulating/attenuating the growth of microorganisms of medical importance in vitro.

  17. Antioxidant and antidiabetic properties of tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids after in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Tao; Wang, Ye; Li, Yu-Ting; Gowd, Vemana; Niu, Xin-He; Yang, Hai-Ying; Chen, Li-Shui; Chen, Wei; Sun, Chong-de

    Oxidative stress and diabetes have a tendency to alter protein, lipid, and DNA moieties. One of the strategic methods used to reduce diabetes-associated oxidative stress is to inhibit the carbohydrate-digesting enzymes, thereby decreasing gastrointestinal glucose production. Plant-derived natural antioxidant molecules are considered a therapeutic tool in the treatment of oxidative stress and diabetes. The objective of this study was to identify tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids and evaluate the effect of in vitro digestion on their antioxidant and antidiabetic properties. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated the presence of rutin as a major component and quercitrin as a minor component of both digested and non-digested flavonoids. Both extracts showed a significant antioxidant capacity, but digested flavonoids showed reduced activity compared to non-digested. There were some decreases of the antioxidant activities (2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) of digested tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids compared with non-digested. Flavonoids from both groups significantly inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and α-glucosidase activity. Both digested and non-digested flavonoids markedly increased glucose consumption and glycogen content in HepG2 cells. Tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids showed appreciable antioxidant and antidiabetic properties, even after digestion. Tartary buckwheat rice appears to be a promising functional food with potent antioxidant and antidiabetic properties.

  18. Evaluation of antioxidant activity of Manihot esculenta Crantz in wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahekar, Satish Eknath; Kale, Ranjana Sushil

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the antioxidant activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Manihot esculenta Crantz leaves (MEC) in wistar rats. Ethanolic extract of MEC leaves in the doses of 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg were used in wistar rats of either sex. The oxidative stress was produced by overdose of acetaminophen and estimation of serum concentration of various enzymes such as malonaldehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and catalase (CAT) were measured by standard biochemical methods. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) was used as a standard drug for assessment of antioxidant status. Results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Student's unpaired t-test. When compared with the standard antioxidant silymarin, MEC extract did not exhibit antioxidant activity in terms of MDA level reduction. However, it significantly increased serum levels of the antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GSH, and CAT) exerting a potent antioxidant effect in a graded manner. The observed results suggest that MEC could be a potential source of antioxidants. However, further studies are required to explore this therapeutic property of plant.

  19. Antioxidant gap and lipid peroxidation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Relationship to disease manifestations and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha B. Patil

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore relationships between total antioxidant gap and lipid peroxidation with respect to the disease severity of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, which may have further implications in understanding rheumatoid pathology and therapeutic management of the disease. Method: The present of study was designed to investigate the relationship between antioxidant gap and certain antioxidant parameters with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis patients. A significantly increased lipid peroxidation, measured as malondialdehyde (MDA, was demonstrated in the plasma of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Results: MDA was observed in RA patients (0.98暲0.34 毺 mol/L than those found in controls (0.98暲0.34 毺 mol/L. The antioxidant gap was significantly decreased. total antioxidant gap (0.34暲0.14 mmol/L and total antioxidant capacity (1.34 暲0.16 mmol/L were significantly lower in RA patients as compared to healthy controls (0.76暲0.33 and 1.78暲0.35 mmol/Lrespectivel. Discussion: The excessive production of ROS disturbs redox status including antioxidant gap and can exacerbating inflammation and affecting tissue damage in RA, as exemplified by their strong association with disease activity

  20. Ameliorating effects of antioxidative compounds from four plant extracts in experimental models of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that oxidative stress plays a major role in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and ultimate destruction, as well as in different complications of diabetes, therapy with antioxidants has assumed an important place in diabetes management. The relatively limited effects of established antioxidant compounds have stimulated efforts to develop new therapeutic strategies, e.g. to increase the endogenous antioxidant defenses through pharmacological modulation of key antioxidant enzymes. Plant extracts are gaining popularity in treating diabetes because many substances synthesized by higher plants and fungi possess antioxidant activities and can prevent or protect tissues against the damaging effects of free radicals. This review summarizes experimental models of diabetes and possible mechanisms that lie behind the antioxidative effects of α-lipoic acid (LA, a powerful antioxidant and compound that stimulates cellular glucose uptake, as well as of plant extracts from sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa, edible mushroom (Lactarius deterrimus and natural products containing β-glucans in the treatment of diabetes. Their roles in preventing pancreatic β-cell death and in ameliorating the effects of severe diabetic complications are discussed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173020

  1. Evaluation of diverse antioxidant activities of Galium aparine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Jasia; Khan, Muhammad R.; Shabbir, Maria; Rashid, Umbreen; Jan, Shumaila; Zai, Jawaid A.

    2013-02-01

    Methanol extract and its n-hexane, ethyl acetate, butanol and aqueous fraction of Galium aparine L. (Rubiacea) were evaluated in vitro for their antioxidant capacity (DPPH, superoxide radical, phosphomolybdate assay); reducing power (ABTS, hydroxyl, hydrogen peroxide, to reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ ions) and to estimate total flavonoid and phenolic contents. All the free radical generating assay models depicted differential positive scavenging activity but considerable magnitude for all the fractions. The results showed that aqueous fraction strongly scavenge the DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals. A significantly high correlation coefficient existed between IC50 values of DPPH and superoxide radical with total phenolic content and phosphomolybdate assay with total flavonoid contents, respectively. These results suggested that aqueous fraction can be a good source of antioxidant therapeutic in oxidative stress damages.

  2. Dimethyl fumarate modulates antioxidant and lipid metabolism in oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to pathology associated with inflammatory brain disorders and therapies that upregulate antioxidant pathways may be neuroprotective in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Dimethyl fumarate, a small molecule therapeutic for multiple sclerosis, activates cellular antioxidant signaling pathways and may promote myelin preservation. However, it is still unclear what mechanisms may underlie this neuroprotection and whether dimethyl fumarate affects oligodendrocyte responses to oxidative stress. Here, we examine metabolic alterations in oligodendrocytes treated with dimethyl fumarate by using a global metabolomic platform that employs both hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and shotgun lipidomics. Prolonged treatment of oligodendrocytes with dimethyl fumarate induces changes in citric acid cycle intermediates, glutathione, and lipids, indicating that this compound can directly impact oligodendrocyte metabolism. These metabolic alterations are also associated with protection from oxidant challenge. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which dimethyl fumarate could preserve myelin integrity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  3. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  4. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    Oral administration of therapeutic peptides could benefit millions of chronically ill people worldwide, through easier and less stigmatized therapy, and likely improve the long-term effects of currently widespread disease mismanagement. However, oral peptide delivery is a formidable task due......, but it is not widely studied in an oral context. As acylation furthermore increases interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells, it offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation...... to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation...

  5. Therapeutic use of cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Kay; Green, Anita J

    Therapeutic cannabis use raises a number of dilemmas for nurses. This article examines the legal, political and ethical challenges raised by the use of cannabis by people with life-limiting or terminal illnesses in their own homes. (Throughout this paper, the term cannabis refers to illegal cannabis unless specified.) A literature review of databases from 1996 was conducted and internet material was also examined. Evidence on the therapeutic use of cannabis suggests it may produce improvements in quality of life, which has led to increased use among people with life-limiting illnesses. The cannabis used is usually obtained illegally, which can have consequences for both those who use it and nurses who provide treatment in the community.

  6. In vitro antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of endophytic fungi isolated from Eugenia jambolana Lam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manila; Yadav, Amita; Yadav, Jaya Parkash

    2014-09-01

    To elucidate the antioxidant activity and total phenolic content (TPC) of ethyl acetate extracts of endophytic fungi isolated from Eugenia jambolana by three different antioxidant assays. Twenty one different endophytic fungal extracts were screened for presence of various phytochemicals, TPC and in vitro antioxidant activity. TPC was tested by Folin-Ciocalteau reagent based assay. DPPH free radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging and reducing power assays were used to evaluate the antioxidant activity. Alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids, saponins, and terpenes were the main phytochemicals presents in all 21 endophytes. A significant positive correlation was found between antioxidant activity and TPC in fungal extracts. There is 36% endophytic extracts having high phenolic content exhibited potent antioxidant activity. Chaetomium sp., Aspergillus sp., Aspergillus peyronelii and Aspergillus niger strain showed the highest antioxidant activity ranging from 50% to 80% having 58 mg/g to 60 mg/g GAE total phenolics. Ascorbic acid used as a standard showed 90% reducing potential. The results reveal that metabolites produced by endophytic fungi isolated from Eugenia jambolana can be a potential source of novel natural antioxidant compounds. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Leech Therapeutic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abdualkader, A. M.; A M Ghawi; Alaama, M.; M. Awang; A Merzouk

    2013-01-01

    Hematophagous animals including leeches have been known to possess biologically active compounds in their secretions, especially in their saliva. The blood-sucking annelids, leeches have been used for therapeutic purposes since the beginning of civilization. Ancient Egyptian, Indian, Greek and Arab physicians used leeches for a wide range of diseases starting from the conventional use for bleeding to systemic ailments, such as skin diseases, nervous system abnormalities, urinary and reproduct...

  8. Reactive Secondary Sequence Oxidative Pathology Polymer Model and Antioxidant Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To provide common Organic Chemistry/Polymer Science thermoset free-radical crosslinking Sciences for Medical understanding and also present research findings for several common vitamins/antioxidants with a new class of drugs known as free-radical inhibitors. Study Design Peroxide/Fenton transition-metal redox couples that generate free radicals were combined with unsaturated lipid oils to demonstrate thermoset-polymer chain growth by crosslinking with the ?-?-unsaturated aldehyde acrolei...

  9. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Plöckinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs, dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided.

  10. The effect of arbutin on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity in the serum of cyclosporine-treated rats

    OpenAIRE

    Khadir, Fatemeh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Joorsaraee, Seyyed Gholamali; Feizi, Farideh; Sorkhi, Hadi; Yousefi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a potent immunosuppressant drug with therapeutic and toxic actions. The use of CsA is limited by its toxicity. Several researchers had proposed that oxidative stress could play an important role in CsA-induced toxicity. Arbutin has recently been shown to possess antioxidative and free radical scavenging abilities. The present study was designed to investigate the in vivo effects of arbutin on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity in the serum of cyclo...

  11. [Therapeutic effects of a new taurine derivative in chronic hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khnychenko, L K; Bul'on, V V; Sapronov, N S; Kudriashova, N I

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic properties of a novel taurin N-phenylakyl derivative (TAU-15) in a dose 25 mg/kg were studied in male rats on models of chronic toxic hepatitis and partial hepatectomy. A hepatoprotective action of TAU-15 was established which is due to antioxidative action of TAU-15 and its ability to normalize protein-synthetizing activity of hepatocytes.

  12. Evaluation of therapeutic activity of hypogeous Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes from North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita Stanikunaite; James M. Trappe; Shabana I. Khan; Samir A. Rossu

    2007-01-01

    This study is the first broad investigation of therapeutic activities of hypogeous truffles and trufflelike fungi (Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes) from North America. Twenty-two species from 12 families were evaluated in several biological assays for antimicrobial, antimalarial, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, antituberculosis, and anticancer activities. Biological...

  13. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 343

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-07-07

    Jul 7, 2002 ... Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of llorin. P.M.B. ISIS. Ilorin. ... syrup depending on group. Setting: College of Medicine of the University of Lagos Medical Microbiology and .... therapeutic at this dosage as the concentration of the active ingredients.

  14. Analyses of antioxidant status and nucleotide alterations in genes encoding antioxidant enzymes in patients with benign and malignant thyroid disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Siti Fatimah Ramli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthesis of thyroid hormones and regulation of their metabolism involve free radicals that may affect redox balance in the body. Thyroid disorders causing variations in the levels of thyroid hormones may alter cellular oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to measure the antioxidant activities and biomarkers of oxidative stress in serum and red blood cells (RBC of patients with benign and malignant thyroid disorders and to investigate if changes in the antioxidant activities in these patients were linked to alterations in genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes. Methods Forty-one patients with thyroid disorders from University of Malaya Medical Centre were recruited. They were categorised into four groups: multinodular goitre (MNG (n = 18, follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA (n = 7, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC (n = 10, and follicular thyroid cancer (FTC (n = 6. Serum and RBC of patients were analysed for antioxidant activities, antioxidant enzymes, and biomarkers of oxidative stress. Alterations in genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes were analysed using whole exome sequencing and PCR–DNA sequencing. Results Patients with thyroid disorders had significantly higher serum superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities compared to control, but had lower activities in RBC. There were no significant changes in serum glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity. Meanwhile, GPx activity in RBC was reduced in PTC and FTC, compared to control and the respective benign groups. Antioxidant activities in serum were decreased in the thyroid disorder groups when compared to the control group. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA were elevated in the serum of FTA group when compared to controls, while in the RBC, only the MNG and PTC groups showed higher MDA equivalents than control. Serum reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in PTC group of both serum and RBC were significantly higher than control group. Whole exome sequencing has resulted in

  15. Antioxidants as precision weapons in war against cancer chemotherapy induced toxicity – Exploring the armoury of obscurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchanlata Singh

    2018-02-01

    The effect of supplementation of thirteen different antioxidants and their analogues as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy has been compiled in this article. The present review encompasses a total of 174 peer-reviewed original articles from 1967 till date comprising 93 clinical trials with a cumulative number of 18,208 patients, 56 animal studies and 35 in vitro studies. Our comprehensive data suggests that antioxidant has superior potential of ameliorating chemotherapeutic induced toxicity. Antioxidant supplementation during chemotherapy also promises higher therapeutic efficiency and increased survival times in patients.

  16. Overview of Nrf2 as Therapeutic Target in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Carmona-Aparicio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a biochemical state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidant defenses. It is involved in the physiopathology of degenerative and chronic neuronal disorders, such as epilepsy. Experimental evidence in humans and animals support the involvement of oxidative stress before and after seizures. In the past few years, research has increasingly focused on the molecular pathways of this process, such as that involving transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, which plays a central role in the regulation of antioxidant response elements (ARE and modulates cellular redox status. The aim of this review is to present experimental evidence on the role of Nrf2 in this neurological disorder and to further determine the therapeutic impact of Nrf2 in epilepsy.

  17. Frankincense--therapeutic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yasiry, Ali Ridha Mustafa; Kiczorowska, Bożena

    2016-01-04

    Recently, increasing interest in natural dietary and therapeutic preparations used as dietary supplements has been observed. One of them is frankincense. This traditional medicine of the East is believed to have anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, and even anxiolytic and anti-neurotic effects. The present study aims to verify the reported therapeutic properties of Boswellia resin and describe its chemical composition based on available scientific studies. The main component of frankincense is oil (60%). It contains mono- (13%) and diterpenes (40%) as well as ethyl acetate (21.4%), octyl acetate (13.4%) and methylanisole (7.6%). The highest biological activity among terpenes is characteristic of 11-keto-ß-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-11-keto-ß-boswellic acid and acetyl-α-boswellic acid. Contemporary studies have shown that resin indeed has an analgesic, tranquilising and anti-bacterial effects. From the point of view of therapeutic properties, extracts from Boswellia serrata and Boswellia carterii are reported to be particularly useful. They reduce inflammatory conditions in the course of rheumatism by inhibiting leukocyte elastase and degrading glycosaminoglycans. Boswellia preparations inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and prevent the release of leukotrienes, thus having an anti-inflammatory effect in ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis and sinusitis. Inhalation and consumption of Boswellia olibanum reduces the risk of asthma. In addition, boswellic acids have an antiproliferative effect on tumours. They inhibit proliferation of tumour cells of the leukaemia and glioblastoma subset. They have an anti-tumour effect since they inhibit topoisomerase I and II-alpha and stimulate programmed cell death (apoptosis).

  18. Frankincense – therapeutic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ridha Mustafa Al-Yasiry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing interest in natural dietary and therapeutic preparations used as dietary supplements has been observed. One of them is frankincense. This traditional medicine of the East is believed to have anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, and even anxiolytic and anti-neurotic effects. The present study aims to verify the reported therapeutic properties of Boswellia resin and describe its chemical composition based on available scientific studies. The main component of frankincense is oil (60%. It contains mono- (13% and diterpenes (40% as well as ethyl acetate (21.4%, octyl acetate (13.4% and methylanisole (7.6%. The highest biological activity among terpenes is characteristic of 11-keto-ß-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-11-keto-ß-boswellic acid and acetyl-α-boswellic acid. Contemporary studies have shown that resin indeed has an analgesic, tranquilising and anti-bacterial effects. From the point of view of therapeutic properties, extracts from Boswellia serrata and Boswellia carterii are reported to be particularly useful. They reduce inflammatory conditions in the course of rheumatism by inhibiting leukocyte elastase and degrading glycosaminoglycans. Boswellia preparations inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and prevent the release of leukotrienes, thus having an anti-inflammatory effect in ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis and sinusitis. Inhalation and consumption of Boswellia olibanum reduces the risk of asthma. In addition, boswellic acids have an antiproliferative effect on tumours. They inhibit proliferation of tumour cells of the leukaemia and glioblastoma subset. They have an anti-tumour effect since they inhibit topoisomerase I and II-alpha and stimulate programmed cell death (apoptosis.

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Non-Psychotropic Cannabidiol in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Fujiwara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis contains the psychoactive component delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC, and the non-psychoactive components cannabidiol (CBD, cannabinol, and cannabigerol. It is well-known that delta9-THC and other cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists are neuroprotective during global and focal ischemic injury. Additionally, delta9-THC also mediates psychological effects through the activation of the CB1 receptor in the central nervous system. In addition to the CB1 receptor agonists, cannabis also contains therapeutically active components which are CB1 receptor independent. Of the CB1 receptor-independent cannabis, the most important is CBD. In the past five years, an increasing number of publications have focused on the discovery of the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective effects of CBD. In particular, CBD exerts positive pharmacological effects in ischemic stroke and other chronic diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cerebroprotective action of CBD is CB1 receptor-independent, long-lasting, and has potent anti-oxidant activity. Importantly, CBD use does not lead to tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic possibility of CBD as a cerebroprotective agent, highlighting recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms, and therapeutic time window of CBD in ischemic stroke.

  20. Antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidant efficacies of zerumbone on the formation, development, and establishment of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemn HO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Othman Hemn,1,2 Muhammad Mustapha Noordin,1 Heshu Sulaiman Rahman,1,2 Hamza Hazilawati,1 Abubakr Zuki,1 Max Stanley Chartrand3  1Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sulaimani, Sulaimani City, Kurdistan, Republic of Iraq; 3DigiCare, Behavioral Research, Casa Grande, AZ, USA Abstract: Owing to the high incidence of cholesterol-induced cardiovascular disease, particularly atherosclerosis, the current study was designed to investigate the preventive and therapeutic efficacies of dietary zerumbone (ZER supplementation on the formation and development of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with a high cholesterol diet. A total of 72 New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly on two experimental studies carried out 8 weeks apart. The first experiment was designed to investigate the prophylactic efficacy of ZER in preventing early developed atheromatous lesion. The second experimental trial was aimed at investigating the therapeutic effect of ZER in reducing the atherosclerotic lesion progression and establishment. Sudanophilia, histopathological, and ultrastructural changes showed pronounced reduction in the plaque size in ZER-medicated aortas. On the other hand, dietary supplementation of ZER for almost 10 weeks as a prophylactic measure indicated substantially decreasing lipid profile values, and similarly, plaque size in comparison with high-cholesterol non-supplemented rabbits. Furthermore, the results of oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarker evaluation indicated that ZER is a potent antioxidant in suppressing the generation of free radicals in terms of atherosclerosis prevention and treatment. ZER significantly reduced the value of malondialdehyde and augmented the value of superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, our data indicated that dietary supplementation of ZER at doses of 8, 16, and 20 mg

  1. [Therapeutic applications of digestive endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, J A; Pérez, L; Madureri, V

    1976-01-01

    Endoscopy has proven useful as a diagnostic tool and recently many useful therapeutic possibilities have been proposed. The authors discuss their experience with therapeutic endoscopic procedures and present new ones for treatment of Acalasia and small sliding hiatal hernia.

  2. ANTIOXIDANT POTENCY OF WATER KEFIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Alsayadi M.S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have strong relationship with several diseases. Many fermented foods were reported to be important sources for antioxidant compounds. Antioxidant activity of water kefir never reported in the scientific literature. The objective of this study was to detect and investigate the antioxidant potency of water kefir. Water kefir was prepared by fermentation of sugar solution with kefir grains for 24h. Antioxidant activity of fresh water kefir drink and its extract with (0.125–5 mg/ml was evaluated using 2,2,-diphenyl-1-pricrylhydrozyl (DPPH scavenging method, and inhibition of ascorbate autoxidation and the reducing power of water kefir were determined, Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA and ascorbic acid were used for comparison. Water kefir demonstrated great ability to DPPH scavenging ranged (9.88-63.17%. And inhibit ascorbate oxidation by (6.08-25.57% increased in consequent with concentration raising. These results prime to conclude that water kefir could be promisor source of natural antioxidants with good potency in health developing.

  3. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis y Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. [Is therapeutic deadlock inevitable?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignat, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Many long-term treatments appear to be an expression of therapeutic deadlock. The situation leads to a questioning of the concept of chronicity and the identification of the determining factors of situations which are apparently blocked, marked by the search for solutions taking a back seat to the taking of action. The interaction between patients' mental apparatus and the care apparatus lies at the heart of the question, interpreted from an institutional, collective and individual perspective, supported by the clinical and psychopathological approach, and the return to the prioritisation of the thought. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Hot Topics and Challenges of Regenerative Nanoceria in Application of Antioxidant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new antioxidant, nanoceria is of significant importance in applications of medical and biological fields. In comparison with conventional organic antioxidants, nanoceria has multienzyme mimetic activity by Ce4+/Ce3+ redox cycle. This unique regenerative/autocatalytic property has been widely used in the aspects of free-radical scavenger, radiation protection, oxidative-stress-related disease, drug delivery, biosensor, tissue engineering, cancer biomarker, and anti-inflammatory. This paper reviews the latest breakthrough of nanoceria as an antioxidant in applications of medical and biological fields on the base of the authors’ research works on resistance to oxidation and cytotoxicity. The challenges of nanoceria encountered in applications in medical and biological fields are commented as well.

  6. Antioxidant capacity total in non-melanoma skin cancer and its relationship with food consumption of antioxidant nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Betânia e Silva de Almendra; de Castro, Laís Lima; Aguiar, Jordana Rayane Sousa; de Araújo, Camila Guedes Borges; Visacri, Marília Berlofa; Tuan, Bruna Taliani; Pincinato, Eder de Carvalho; Moriel, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    The non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common cancer and accounts for more than half of the diagnoses of cancer, and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most frequent cutaneous neoplasm, corresponding to 70-80% of cutaneous tumors. Oxidative stress is an important trigger for skin carcinogenesis. Thus, it is important to evaluate oxidative stress, in order to discern effective therapeutic strategies able to stop it or attenuate it, thereby prevent the installation of non-melanoma skin cancer. Cross-sectional study with controls, involving 84 individuals of both sexes aged between 38-84 years, divided into two groups: control group of healthy people(n = 24) and the case group included individuals who presented non-melanoma skin and they have undergoing surgery (n = 60). The blood samples of the individuals were obtained for evaluation of biomarkers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostane, nitrite, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant capacity). The usual dietary intake and nutritional status of the subjects were evaluated. The significance level for this study was 5%. Patients in the case group had higher serum concentrations of biomarkers of oxidative stress, F2-isoprostane concentrations were significantly higher compared to controls. The results showed high rates of overweight and obesity in the case and control groups. The dietary concentrations of antioxidant minerals zinc, copper and selenium in the case group were significantly lower compared to controls. The correlation between markers of oxidative stress and dietary concentrations of antioxidant nutrients showed the influence of food intake of vitamins A and E in reducing oxidative stress, since these nutrients behave as important antioxidants, acting as sweepers of RL, by removing of the body the negative effects on the redox balance of the skin. We emphasize the importance of adopting healthy eating habits that optimize the consumption of antioxidant nutrients as a strategy to

  7. Effect of growth stages on total phenolics content and antioxidant activity of Fumaria vaillantii L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mehdizadeh*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Plant extracts and their constituents are known to exert biological effects, especially antioxidant activity. Fumaria vaillantii (Fumariaceae has several therapeutic effects in traditional medicine. Antioxidants are able to protect the human body from oxidative damage connected to the reaction of free radicals. Synthetic antioxidants have toxic and carcinogenic effects on human health; therefore, their application has been limited. Thus, there has been an increasing interest in the natural antioxidant compounds to prevent the foods from deterioration. In this study, the antioxidant activity of F. vaillantii extracts at three stages of growth has been evaluated. Methods: The ethanol extracts from the aerial parts of the plants at different phenological stages were prepared and the total phenolics content was determined by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Also, the antioxidant activity were determined by three methods as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, ferric-ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and phosphomolybdenum complex tests. All experiments were carried out in triplicate, and data were subjected to ANOVA according to the SAS software. Results: Total phenolics content of vegetative, budding and flowering stages were 68.38, 71.11 and 56.42 mg GAE/g extract, respectively. Although flowering stage showed the highest antioxidant activity in phosphomolybdenum complex, in DPPH and FRAP methods, it decreased from vegetative to flowering stages. Conclusion: According to the results, the Iranian F. vaillantii extract from vegetative stage was a potential source of natural antioxidants for food and pharmaceutical industries that can be used in different industries.

  8. The proper time for antioxidant consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Michaël; Schaefer, H Martin

    2014-04-10

    Consuming food rich in antioxidants may help organisms to increase their antioxidant defences and avoid oxidative damage. Under the hypothesis that organisms actively consume food for its antioxidant properties, they would need to do so in view of other physiological requirements, such as energy requirements. Here, we observed that Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) consumed most seeds rich in antioxidants in the middle of the day, while their consumption of staple seeds more profitable in energy intake (and poor in antioxidants) was maximal in the morning and the evening. This consumption of seeds rich in antioxidants in the middle of the day may be explicable (1) because birds took advantage of a time window associated with relaxed energy requirements to ingest antioxidant resources, or (2) because birds consumed antioxidant resources as a response to the highest antioxidant requirements in the middle of the day. If the latter hypothesis holds true, having the possibility to ingest antioxidants should be most beneficial in terms of oxidative balance in the middle of the day. Even though feeding on seeds rich in antioxidants improved Gouldian finches' overall antioxidant capacity, we did not detect any diurnal effect of antioxidant intake on plasma oxidative markers (as measured by the d-ROM and the OXY-adsorbent tests). This indicates that the diurnal pattern of antioxidant intake that we observed was most likely constrained by the high consumption of staple food to replenish or build up body reserves in the morning and in the evening, and not primarily determined by elevated antioxidant requirements in the middle of the day. Consequently, animals appear to have the possibility to increase antioxidant defences by selecting food rich in antioxidants, only when energetic constraints are relaxed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rhizophora mangle L. (red mangrove: A species with potential therapeutic uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada I. Regalado

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Check the properties attributed to medicinal plants is of vital importance as an alternative in the medical therapy and as a source of development of new drugs. Medicinal plants offer a path with great possibilities, an encouraging alternative for the control of various diseases in man. Mangroves are a resource of great significance for Cuba and the world, mangrove vegetation is represented in this country for four tree species, where Rhizophora mangle L. also known as red mangrove, is now the dominant species. Due to the pharmacological results found in this species as healing, antiseptic, antimicrobial, anti-ulcer, treatment of open wounds, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antidiarrheal, insecticide, larvicide among others; it could be an important source of new products aimed at solving health problems of great current relevance, but using this species for drug development has been limited by the damage it can cause to the ecosystem over-exploitation of mangroves. The objective of this scientific review is to show the benefits and therapeutic potential of R. mangle from a review of existing information and the main results in the researches on this species.

  10. Melasma. Etiologic and therapeutic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, P E

    1995-12-01

    Melasma is a common acquired symmetric hypermelanosis characterized by irregular light- to gray-brown macules and patches involving sun-exposed areas of skin. Etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of melasma include genetic influences, exposure to UV radiation, pregnancy, hormonal therapies, cosmetics, phototoxic drugs, and antiseizure medications. Melasma is often a therapeutically challenging disease, and current treatments include hypopigmenting agents, chemical peels, and lasers. Hypopigmenting agents include phenolic and nonphenolic derivatives. Phenolic agents include hydroquinone and hydroquinone combination preparations. Despite controversies regarding the issue of hydroquinone-induced ochronosis, hydroquinone remains the most effective topically applied bleaching agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of melasma. Nonphenolic bleaching agents include tretinoin and azelaic acid. Superficial, medium, and deep chemical peels are more often used in lighter-complexioned patients. Such peels should be used with caution in blacks. Although lasers have demonstrated significant efficacy in the treatment of a variety of hyperpigmentary disorders, their precise efficacy and place in the therapy of melasma have yet to be established. In the hierarchy of therapies for melasma, the treating physician must consider the devastating psychosocial impact of pigmentary imperfections within the realm of the benefits and risks associated with each treatment.

  11. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  12. Therapeutic Uses of Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharias E. Suntres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membrane vesicles with a diameter of 40–100 nm that are secreted by many cell types into the extracellular milieu. Exosomes are found in cell culture supernatants and in different biological fluids and are known to be secreted by most cell types under normal and pathological conditions. Considerable research is focusing on the exploitation of exosomes in biological fluids for biomarkers in the diagnosis of disease. More recently, exosomes are being exploited for their therapeutic potential. Exosomes derived from dendritic cells, tumor cells, and malignant effusions demonstrate immunomodulatory functions and are able to present antigens to T-cells and stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses. Exosomes have also been examined for their therapeutic potential in the treatment of infections such as toxoplasmosis, diphtheria, tuberculosis and atypical severe acute respiratory syndrome as well as autoimmune diseases. Attempts to find practical applications for exosomes continue to expand with the role of exosomes as a drug delivery system for the treatment of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases and cancers.

  13. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, James

    2016-05-15

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. © 2016 Shorter. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Medical marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized ...

  15. Medical applications of microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, Jan; Lapes, M.

    2004-04-01

    Medical applications of microwaves (i.e. a possibility to use microwave energy and/or microwave technique and technology for therapeutical purposes) are a quite new and a very rapidly developing field. Microwave thermotherapy is being used in medicine for the cancer treatment and treatment of some other diseases since early eighties. In this contribution we would like to offer general overview of present activities in the Czech Republic, i.e. clinical applications and results, technical aspects of thermo therapeutic equipment and last but not least, prospective diagnostics based on microwave principals ant technology and instrumentation.

  16. Does therapeutic massage support mental well-being?

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaye, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Massage was once a traditional medical practice of many ancient cultures. Today, the practice of modern therapeutic massage is embedded within the field of complementary or alternative medicine (CAM). The demand for evidence based medicine requires the integration of clinical expertise with the best available external evidence from systematic research. Thus in the last twenty years the therapeutic uses of massage have broadened and research has sought to investigate its physical, physiologica...

  17. Recent progress in the therapeutic applications of nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Melani; D'Souza, Gerard G M

    2011-04-01

    The field of pharmaceutical and medical nanotechnology has grown rapidly in recent decades and offers much promise for therapeutic advances. This review is intended to serve as a quick summary of the major areas in the therapeutic application of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology for therapeutic application falls into two broad categories of particulate systems and nanoengineered devices. Recent studies appear to focus on the development of multifunctional particles for drug delivery and imaging and the development of nanotechnology-based biosensors for diagnostic applications. Cancer treatment and diagnosis appears to be the principal focus of many of these applications, but nanotechnology is also finding application in tissue engineering and surface engineering of medical implants. Particulate drug delivery systems in general appear to be poised for increased use in the clinic, whereas nanoengineered implants and diagnostic sensors might well be the next major wave in the medical use of nanotechnology.

  18. [The effect of exogenous antioxidants on the antioxidant status of erythrocytes and hepcidin content in blood of patients with disorders of iron metabolism regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbinina, S P; Levina, A A; Lisovskaia, I L; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2013-01-01

    In many diseases associated with impairments in iron metabolism, erythrocytes exhibit an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress induced in vitro. In this study, we have examined the antioxidant status of erythrocytes from healthy donors and from 12 patients with disorders of iron homeostasis by measuring the extent of t-BHP-induced hemolysis in vitro. The extent of hemolysis observed with patient erythrocytes was significantly higher than that observed in experiment with normal cells. After therapeutic infusions of the antioxidants mexidol or emoxypin, oxidative hemolysis in patients was restored to normal values and blood hepcidin content increased significantly. A significant correlation was observed between hepcidin concentration after treatment and t-BHP-induced hemolysis before treatment. These data suggest that antioxidants may exert a favorable effect under pathological conditions associated with iron overload disease.

  19. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of polyphenols from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-17

    May 17, 2010 ... The antioxidant properties and antimicrobial potential of three ethnomedicinal plants, (Momordica charanta, Senna alata and Nauclea lafifolia) extracted with acetone were investigated. Polyphenols from the medicinal plants were screened for their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities against pathogenic.

  20. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of polyphenols from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyphenols from four medicinal plants of Burkina Faso, Combretum micranthum, Khaya senegalensis, Pterocarpus erinaceus and Sida acuta, were screened for their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities against pathogenic bacteria. The medicinal plants displayed different polyphenols contents and antioxidant activities.

  1. Physicochemical and antioxidant properties of Algerian honey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khalil, Ibrahim; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Boukraâ, Laïd; Benhanifia, Mokhtar; Islam, Asiful; Islam, Nazmul; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Gan, Siew Hua

    2012-01-01

    ...), color intensity, total sugar and sucrose content were measured. Several biochemical and antioxidant tests were performed to determine the antioxidant properties of the honey samples. The mean pH was 3.84...

  2. Antioxidant food supplements in human health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hiramatsu, Midori; Packer, Lester; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    1999-01-01

    ... of many of nature's antioxidant substances; grapes: starting source for red wine production; rich in antioxidants; onions: rich source of the bioflavonoid quercetin. This book is printed on acid-...

  3. Proximate and Phytochemical composition and antioxidant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Indigenous landraces of Omani fenugreek seeds are a rich source of protein, dietary fiber, and many important bioactive components, which were found to be significantly correlatedwith its antioxidant properties. Keywords: Omani fenugreek, landraces, phytochemical composition, antioxidant properties.

  4. Physicochemical and antioxidant properties of black garlic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Il Sook; Cha, Han Sam; Lee, Young Soon

    2014-01-01

    .... To clarify how BG changes during the 35 day aging period, the physicochemical characteristics, antioxidant contents, and antioxidant activities were evaluated under controlled conditions of 70 °C and 90% relative humidity...

  5. Total dietary antioxidant capacity, individual antioxidant intake and breast cancer risk: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantavos, A.; Ruiter, R.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Keyser, de C.E.; Hofman, A.; Stricker, B.H.C.; Franco, O.H.; Kiefte-de Jong, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Some studies suggest a favorable role of antioxidants on breast cancer risk but this is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess whether overall dietary antioxidant capacity, as assessed by dietary ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), and individual dietary antioxidant intake

  6. Conservative Nonhormonal Options for the Treatment of Male Infertility: Antibiotics, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, Aldo E; Condorelli, Rosita A; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; La Vignera, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The nonhormonal medical treatment can be divided into empirical, when the cause has not been identified, and nonempirical, if the pathogenic mechanism causing male infertility can be solved or ameliorated. The empirical nonhormonal medical treatment has been proposed for patients with idiopathic or noncurable oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and for normozoospermic infertile patients. Anti-inflammatory, fibrinolytic, and antioxidant compounds, oligo elements, and vitamin supplementation may be prescribed. Infection, inflammation, and/or increased oxidative stress often require a specific treatment with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and/or antioxidants. Combined therapies can contribute to improve sperm quality.

  7. Antioxidant properties of catechins: Comparison with other antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzesik, Michalina; Naparło, Katarzyna; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela

    2018-02-15

    Antioxidant properties of five catechins and five other flavonoids were compared with several other natural and synthetic compounds and related to glutathione and ascorbate as key endogenous antioxidants in several in vitro tests and assays involving erythrocytes. Catechins showed the highest ABTS-scavenging capacity, the highest stoichiometry of Fe3+ reduction in the FRAP assay and belonged to the most efficient compounds in protection against SIN-1 induced oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123, AAPH-induced fluorescein bleaching and hypochlorite-induced fluorescein bleaching. Glutathione and ascorbate were less effective. (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin were the most effective compounds in protection against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis while (-)-epicatechin gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and (-)-epigallocatechin protected at lowest concentrations against hypochlorite-induced hemolysis. Catechins [(-)-epigallocatechin gallate and (-)-epicatechin gallate)] were most efficient in the inhibition of AAPH-induced oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorodihydroflurescein contained inside erythrocytes. Excellent antioxidant properties of catechins and other flavonoids make them ideal candidates for nanoformulations to be used in antioxidant therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Melatonin and Nitrones As Potential Therapeutic Agents for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Romero

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a disease of aging affecting millions of people worldwide, and recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA is the only treatment approved. However, r-tPA has a low therapeutic window and secondary effects which limit its beneficial outcome, urging thus the search for new more efficient therapies. Among them, neuroprotection based on melatonin or nitrones, as free radical traps, have arisen as drug candidates due to their strong antioxidant power. In this Perspective article, an update on the specific results of the melatonin and several new nitrones are presented.

  9. Streptomyces sp. MUM212 as a Source of Antioxidants with Radical Scavenging and Metal Chelating Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loh Teng-Hern Tan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species and other radicals potentially cause oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA which may ultimately lead to various complications including mutations, carcinogenesis, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, aging, and inflammatory disease. Recent reports demonstrate that Streptomyces bacteria produce metabolites with potent antioxidant activity that may be developed into therapeutic drugs to combat oxidative stress. This study shows that Streptomyces sp. MUM212 which was isolated from mangrove soil in Kuala Selangor, Malaysia, could be a potential source of antioxidants. Strain MUM212 was characterized and determined as belonging to the genus Streptomyces using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. The MUM212 extract demonstrated significant antioxidant activity through DPPH, ABTS and superoxide radical scavenging assays and also metal-chelating activity of 22.03 ± 3.01%, 61.52 ± 3.13%, 37.47 ± 1.79%, and 41.98 ± 0.73% at 4 mg/mL, respectively. Moreover, MUM212 extract was demonstrated to inhibit lipid peroxidation up to 16.72 ± 2.64% at 4 mg/mL and restore survival of Vero cells from H2O2-induced oxidative damages. The antioxidant activities from the MUM212 extract correlated well with its total phenolic contents; and this in turn was in keeping with the gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis which revealed the presence of phenolic compounds that could be responsible for the antioxidant properties of the extract. Other chemical constituents detected included hydrocarbons, alcohols and cyclic dipeptides which may have contributed to the overall antioxidant capacity of MUM212 extract. As a whole, strain MUM212 seems to have potential as a promising source of novel molecules for future development of antioxidative therapeutic agents against oxidative stress-related diseases.

  10. Antiradical and antioxidant activities of new bio-antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheva, V D; Saso, L; Angelova, S E; Foti, M C; Slavova-Kasakova, A; Daquino, C; Enchev, V; Firuzi, O; Nechev, J

    2012-02-01

    Antioxidants could be promising agents for management of oxidative stress-related diseases. New biologically active compounds, belonging to a rare class of natural lignans with antiangiogenic, antitumoral and DNA intercalating properties, have been recently synthesized. These compounds are benzo[kl]xanthene lignans (1,2) and dihydrobenzofuran neolignans (3,4). The radical scavenging and chain-breaking antioxidant activities of compounds 1-4 were studied by applying different methods: radical scavenging activity by DPPH rapid test, chain-breaking antioxidant activity and quantum chemical calculations. All studied compounds were found to be active as DPPH scavengers but reaction time with DPPH and compounds' concentrations influenced deeply the evaluation. The highest values of radical scavenging activity (%RSAmax) and largest rate constants for reaction with DPPH were obtained for compounds 2 and 3. Comparison of %RSAmax with that of standard antioxidants DL-α-tocopherol (TOH), caffeic acid (CA) and butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT) give the following new order of %RSA max: TOH (61.1%) > CA (58.6%) > 3 (36.3%) > 2 (28.1%) > 4 (6.7%) > 1 (3.6%) = BHT (3.6%). Chain-breaking antioxidant activities of individual compounds (0.1-1.0 mM) and of their equimolar binary mixtures (0.1 mM) with TOH were determined from the kinetic curves of lipid autoxidation at 80 °C. On the basis of a comparable kinetic analysis with standard antioxidants a new order of the antioxidant efficiency (i.e., protection factor, PF) of compounds 1-4 were obtained: 2 (7.2) ≥ TOH (7.0) ≥ CA (6.7) > 1 (3.1) > 3 (2.2) > ferulic acid FA (1.5) > 4 (0.6); and of the antioxidant reactivity (i.e. inhibition degree, ID): 2 (44.0) > TOH (18.7) > CA (9.3) > 1 (8.4) > 3 (2.8) > FA (1.0) > 4 (0.9). The important role of the catecholic structure in these compounds, which is responsible for the high chain-breaking antioxidant activity, is discussed and a reaction

  11. Therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Devasena T

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights nanoparticles used in the diagnosis and treatment of prominent diseases and toxic conditions. Ecofriendly methods which are ideal for the synthesis of medicinally valued nanoparticles are explained and the characteristic features of these particles projected. The role of these particles in the therapeutic field, and the induced biological changes in some diseases are discussed. The main focus is on inflammation, oxidative stress and cellular membrane integrity alterations. The effect of nanoparticles on these changes produced by various agents are highlighted using in vitro and in vivo models. The mechanism of nanoparticles in ameliorating the biological changes is supported by relevant images and data. Finally, the brief demonstrates recent developments on the use of nanoparticles in diagnosis or sensing of some biological materials and biologically hazardous environmental materials.

  12. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  13. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  14. Therapeutic effects of reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín HIDALGO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reading is an act that requires isolation and loneliness, which allows rewriting the narratives through the identification between the reader and the character, the involvement in the fact narrated and singular recreation by every single reader. The act of reading allows stepping aside from reality. The reading as well as the writing perform the therapeutic effect of helping to understand the illness and to know experiences of others patients that can be useful for the accompaniment, overcoming and/or making decisions. There is not a concrete literary that could be universally recommend to every patient, but all the genre can be useful to some patient. However, poetry, novel and autobiographies are frequently referred as the manuscripts that provide help and consolation.

  15. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    polymerized in a controlled manner with carrier monomers of historically proven biocompatible polymers. The carrier polymers, the loading of ribavirin as well as the size of the polymer were varied systematically with the aid of an automated synthesis platform. These polymers were tested in a cellular assay...... of reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, which not only controls the size of polymer, but also allows the introduction of a terminal amine on the polymer which can be used for further conjugation. This has allowed for not only fluorescent labeling of the polymer, but also protein......The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5780 - Medical support stocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5780 Medical support stocking. (a) Medical support stocking to prevent the pooling of blood...) Identification. A medical support stocking for general medical purposes is a device that is constructed of...

  17. Therapeutic Approaches in CLIPPERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Guillaume; Allou, Thibaut; Labauge, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    CLIPPERS for chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids, is a steroid-sensitive and steroid-dependent brainstem inflammatory disease of unknown origin. Since its first description in 2010, about 60 cases have been reported throughout the world. The mean age at onset is 50 years and men seem to be more frequently affected. In patients without chronic corticosteroid therapy or immunosuppressive agents, the disease had a relapsing remitting course, and the mean annualized relapse rate was 0.5. During attacks, although clinical and radiological improvement after high doses of corticosteroids was systematically observed, patients could display subsequent disability and hindbrain atrophy. Since no progressive course was observed, clinical and radiological sequelae were correlated with previous severe attacks. Therefore, maintaining the disease in remission may prevent the accumulation of disability. In the literature, no relapse occurred when chronic corticosteroid therapy was maintained above 20 mg per day. However, steroids side effects led to propose corticosteroid-sparing therapies. Unfortunately, no controlled therapy studies for CLIPPERS have been performed yet, and no therapeutic recommendations exist. Using the PubMed database, all articles having the following keywords "chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids" and "CLIPPERS" have been analysed. Considering that the mean annual relapse rate was 0.5, and that no relapse occurred when corticosteroid therapy was maintained above 20 mg per day, the therapeutic efficiency of corticosteroid-sparing agents was considered as "probable" when patients had a relapse-free period ≥24 months, in the absence of concomitant corticosteroid therapy. Corticosteroid-sparing agents whose efficiency is "probable" are methotrexate in two cases, cyclophosphamide in one case and hydroxychloroquine in one case. Considering the

  18. Antioxidant status in canine cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Plavec Tanja; Nemec-Svete Alenka; Butinar J.; Tozon Nataša; Prezelj Marija; Kandel Bettina; Kessler M

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the antioxidant status in canine cancer patients. Patients with multicentric lymphoma, oral fibrosarcoma, mast cell tumor, malignant melanoma, appendicular osteosarcoma, nasal tumors and peripheral ameloblastoma were selected. Each group consisted of 6 patients. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and enzyme antioxidants: glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured in serum and whole blood, respectively,...

  19. Analysis of Two Methods to Evaluate Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasina, Florencia; Carabio, Claudio; Celano, Laura; Thomson, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This exercise is intended to introduce undergraduate biochemistry students to the analysis of antioxidants as a biotechnological tool. In addition, some statistical resources will also be used and discussed. Antioxidants play an important metabolic role, preventing oxidative stress-mediated cell and tissue injury. Knowing the antioxidant content…

  20. 21 CFR 181.24 - Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Antioxidants. 181.24 Section 181.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Antioxidants. Substances classified as antioxidants, when migrating from food-packaging material (limit of...

  1. Antioxidants in bakery products: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanditha, B; Prabhasankar, P

    2009-01-01

    Fats impart taste and texture to the product but it is susceptible to oxidation leading to the development of rancidity and off-flavor. Since ancient times it has been in practice to use antioxidants in foods. Discovery of synthetic antioxidants has revolutionized the use of antioxidants in food. The effect of these antioxidants in bakery products were reviewed and found to be effective in enhancing the shelf life. Animal experimental studies have shown that some of the synthetic antioxidants had toxigenic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects. Hence there is an increasing demand for the use of natural antioxidants in foods, especially in bakery products. Some of the natural antioxidants such as alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and ascorbic acid were already used in bakery products. These natural antioxidants are found to be effective in enhancing the shelf life of bakery products but not to the extent of synthetic antioxidants. Baking processing steps may lower the antioxidative activity but techniques such as encapsulation of antioxidants can retain their activity. Antioxidative activity of the plant extracts such as garcinia, curcumin, vanillins, and mint were reviewed but studies on their role in bakery products were limited or very few. Hence there is a wide scope for study under this direction in depth.

  2. Comparative Antioxidant, Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine and compare the antioxidant, antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of leaf infusions of Ilex laurina and Ilex paraguariensis in colon cancer cells. Methods: Antioxidant activity was determined by ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) and FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power). Cytotoxic ...

  3. Phytochemical constituents and antioxidant properties of acetone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical constituents and antioxidant properties of acetone extract of Cleome gynandra (L.) growing in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. ... Conclusion: C. gynandra possesses high secondary metabolites which accounts for its strong antioxidant ability thus justifying its use as natural occurring antioxidants in folkloric ...

  4. Preliminary investigations of antioxidation of dihydromyricetin in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results showed that DMY was more efficient than the synthetical antioxidant. The high antioxidant activity of DMY is attributed to the special chemical structure, including the quantity and positions of the hydroxy groups in the molecule. DMY was harmless and highly effective to be a good natural antioxidant.

  5. Oxidative Stress Type Influences the Properties of Antioxidants Containing Polyphenols in RINm5F Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Auberval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro methods currently used to screen bioactive compounds focus on the use of a single model of oxidative stress. However, this simplistic view may lead to conflicting results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of two natural extracts (a mix of red wine polyphenols (RWPs and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG with three models of oxidative stress induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, a mixture of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase (HX/XO, or streptozotocin (STZ in RINm5F beta cells. We employed multiple approaches to validate their potential as therapeutic treatment options, including cell viability, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidant enzymes expression. All three oxidative stresses induced a decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, whereas the level of ROS production was variable depending on the type of stress. The highest level of ROS was found for the HX/XO-induced stress, an increase that was reflected by higher expression antioxidant enzymes. Further, both antioxidant compounds presented beneficial effects during oxidative stress, but EGCG appeared to be a more efficient antioxidant. These data indicate that the efficiency of natural antioxidants is dependent on both the nature of the compound and the type of oxidative stress generated.

  6. Oxidative stress and the antioxidant enzyme system in the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Yeon Shim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants are vulnerable to the oxidative stress due to the production of large amounts of free radicals, antioxidant system insufficiency, and immature oligodendroglial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a pivotal role in the development of periventricular leukomalacia. The three most common ROS are superoxide (O2&#8226;-, hydroxyl radical (OH&#8226;, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Under normal physiological conditions, a balance is maintained between the production of ROS and the capacity of the antioxidant enzyme system. However, if this balance breaks down, ROS can exert toxic effects. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase are considered the classical antioxidant enzymes. A recently discovered antioxidant enzyme family, peroxiredoxin (Prdx, is also an important scavenger of free radicals. Prdx1 expression is induced at birth, whereas Prdx2 is constitutively expressed, and Prdx6 expression is consistent with the classical antioxidant enzymes. Several antioxidant substances have been studied as potential therapeutic agents; however, further preclinical and clinical studies are required before allowing clinical application.

  7. Protective Effect of Antioxidants on Neuronal Dysfunction and Plasticity in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Panneerselvam, Archana S; Purushottam, Meera; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Guillemin, Gilles J; Kandasamy, Mahesh

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterised by movement disorders, cognitive impairments, and psychiatric problems. The abnormal generation of reactive oxygen species and the resulting oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage in neurons upon CAG mutations in the HTT gene have been hypothesized as the contributing factors of neurodegeneration in HD. The potential use of antioxidants against free radical toxicity has been an emerging field in the management of ageing and many neurodegenerative disorders. Neural stem cells derived adult neurogenesis represents the regenerative capacity of the adult brain. The process of adult neurogenesis has been implicated in the cognitive functions of the brain and is highly modulated positively by different factors including antioxidants. The supportive role of antioxidants to reduce the severity of HD via promoting the functional neurogenesis and neuroprotection in the pathological adult brain has great promise. This review comprehends the recent studies describing the therapeutic roles of antioxidants in HD and other neurologic disorders and highlights the scope of using antioxidants to promote adult neurogenesis in HD. It also advocates a new line of research to delineate the mechanisms by which antioxidants promote adult neurogenesis in HD.

  8. Peroxiredoxin6, a Multitask Antioxidant Enzyme Involved in the Pathophysiology of Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Francesca; Della Morte, David; Capuani, Barbara; Pastore, Donatella; Bellia, Alfonso; Sbraccia, Paolo; Di Daniele, Nicola; Lauro, Renato; Lauro, Davide

    2018-01-02

    Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. NCDs mainly comprise diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer, and neurological degenerative diseases, which kill more than 80% of population, especially the elderly, worldwide. Recent Advances: Several recent theories established NCDs as multifactorial diseases, where a combination of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors contributes to their pathogenesis. Nevertheless, recent findings suggest that the common factor linking all these pathologies is an increase in oxidative stress and the age-related loss of the antioxidant mechanisms of defense against it. Impairment in mitochondrial homeostasis with consequent deregulation in oxidative stress balance has also been suggested. Therefore, antioxidant proteins deserve particular attention for their potential role against NCDs. In particular, peroxiredoxin(Prdx)6 is a unique antioxidant enzyme, belonging to the Prdx family, with double properties, peroxidase and phospholipase activities. Through these activities, Prdx6 has been shown to be a powerful antioxidant enzyme, implicated in the pathogenesis of different NCDs. Recently, we described a phenotype of diabetes mellitus in Prdx6 knockout mice, suggesting a pivotal role of Prdx6 in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases. Increasing awareness on the role of antioxidant defenses in the pathogenesis of NCDs may open novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the burden of this pandemic phenomenon. However, knowledge of the role of Prdx6 in NCD prevention and pathogenesis is still not clarified. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  9. Protective Effect of Antioxidants on Neuronal Dysfunction and Plasticity in Huntington’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirunavukkarasu Velusamy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is characterised by movement disorders, cognitive impairments, and psychiatric problems. The abnormal generation of reactive oxygen species and the resulting oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage in neurons upon CAG mutations in the HTT gene have been hypothesized as the contributing factors of neurodegeneration in HD. The potential use of antioxidants against free radical toxicity has been an emerging field in the management of ageing and many neurodegenerative disorders. Neural stem cells derived adult neurogenesis represents the regenerative capacity of the adult brain. The process of adult neurogenesis has been implicated in the cognitive functions of the brain and is highly modulated positively by different factors including antioxidants. The supportive role of antioxidants to reduce the severity of HD via promoting the functional neurogenesis and neuroprotection in the pathological adult brain has great promise. This review comprehends the recent studies describing the therapeutic roles of antioxidants in HD and other neurologic disorders and highlights the scope of using antioxidants to promote adult neurogenesis in HD. It also advocates a new line of research to delineate the mechanisms by which antioxidants promote adult neurogenesis in HD.

  10. Antioxidant synergistic effects of Osmanthus fragrans flowers with green tea and their major contributed antioxidant compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Shuqin Mao; Kaidi Wang; Yukun Lei; Shuting Yao; Baiyi Lu; Weisu Huang

    2017-01-01

    The antioxidant synergistic effects of Osmanthus fragrans flowers with green tea were evaluated, and their major antioxidant compounds contributed to the total amount of synergy were determined. The antioxidant compounds in O. fragrans flowers with green tea were identified by LC-MS and quantified by UPLC-PDA. The synergistic antioxidant interactions between O. fragrans flowers with green tea and their antioxidant compounds were tested using the Prieto?s model after the simulated digestion. T...

  11. Therapeutic benefits of cannabis: a patient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Charles W; Webb, Sandra M

    2014-04-01

    Clinical research regarding the therapeutic benefits of cannabis ("marijuana") has been almost non-existent in the United States since cannabis was given Schedule I status in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. In order to discover the benefits and adverse effects perceived by medical cannabis patients, especially with regards to chronic pain, we hand-delivered surveys to one hundred consecutive patients who were returning for yearly re-certification for medical cannabis use in Hawai'i. The response rate was 94%. Mean and median ages were 49.3 and 51 years respectively. Ninety-seven per cent of respondents used cannabis primarily for chronic pain. Average pain improvement on a 0-10 pain scale was 5.0 (from 7.8 to 2.8), which translates to a 64% relative decrease in average pain. Half of all respondents also noted relief from stress/anxiety, and nearly half (45%) reported relief from insomnia. Most patients (71%) reported no adverse effects, while 6% reported a cough or throat irritation and 5% feared arrest even though medical cannabis is legal in Hawai'i. No serious adverse effects were reported. These results suggest that Cannabis is an extremely safe and effective medication for many chronic pain patients. Cannabis appears to alleviate pain, insomnia, and may be helpful in relieving anxiety. Cannabis has shown extreme promise in the treatment of numerous medical problems and deserves to be released from the current Schedule I federal prohibition against research and prescription.

  12. In vitro antioxidant studies in leaves of Annona species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, R; Rajeswari, V; Kumar, T Sathish

    2007-05-01

    Antioxidant potential of leaves of three different species of Annona was studied by using different in vitro models eg., 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothizoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS), nitric oxide, superoxide, hydroxy radical and lipid peroxidation. The ethanolic extract of A. muricata at 500 microg/ml showed maximum scavenging activity (90.05%) of ABTS radical cation followed by the scavenging of hydroxyl radical (85.88%) and nitric oxide (72.60%) at the same concentration. However, the extract showed only moderate lipid peroxidation inhibition activity. In contrast, the extract of A. reticulata showed better activity in quenching DPPH (89.37%) and superoxide radical (80.88%) respectively. A.squamosa extract exhibited least inhibition in all in vitro antioxidant models excepting hydroxyl radical (79.79%). These findings suggest that the extracts of A. muricata possess potent in vitro antioxidant activity as compared to leaves of A. squamosa and A. reticulata suggesting its role as an effective free radical scavenger, augmenting its therapeutic

  13. Oxidative Stress and the Use of Antioxidants in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Shirley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Transient or permanent interruption of cerebral blood flow by occlusion of a cerebral artery gives rise to an ischaemic stroke leading to irreversible damage or dysfunction to the cells within the affected tissue along with permanent or reversible neurological deficit. Extensive research has identified excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death as key contributory pathways underlying lesion progression. The cornerstone of treatment for acute ischaemic stroke remains reperfusion therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA. The downstream sequelae of events resulting from spontaneous or pharmacological reperfusion lead to an imbalance in the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS over endogenous anti-oxidant protection strategies. As such, anti-oxidant therapy has long been investigated as a means to reduce the extent of injury resulting from ischaemic stroke with varying degrees of success. Here we discuss the production and source of these ROS and the various strategies employed to modulate levels. These strategies broadly attempt to inhibit ROS production or increase scavenging or degradation of ROS. While early clinical studies have failed to translate success from bench to bedside, the combination of anti-oxidants with existing thrombolytics or novel neuroprotectants may represent an avenue worthy of clinical investigation. Clearly, there is a pressing need to identify new therapeutic alternatives for the vast majority of patients who are not eligible to receive rt-PA for this debilitating and devastating disease.

  14. INVITROAND INVIVOEVALUATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIOXIDANT POTENTIAL OF STEVIA EXTRACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moselhy, Said S; Ghoneim, Magdy A; Khan, Jehan A

    2016-01-01

    The current trend globally is the utilization of natural products as therapeutic agents given its minimum side effects. The leaves of Stevia contain several active ingredient compounds such as rebaudioside. Stevia extract have been used for many purposes. Active oxygen radicals can induce base modifications, DNA breakage, and intracellular protein crosslink's. This study was done to evaluate the potential of stevia extract as antibacterial and antioxidants actions. Antibacterial activity of different extracts of stevia was tested in vitro against different species of bacteria and hepato-protective efficacy was testes in rats injected with CCl 4 as hepatotoxic. Acetone extract exhibited antibacterial activity against selected five bacteria species. The acetone extract suppressed the elevation of serum ALT (p stevia extract showed prevention against deleterious effects of CCl 4 by lowering lipid peroxidation and enhancement of antioxidant activities as SOD and CAT. The protection trial is better than treatment trial. Total phenolic content of aqueous and acetone extracts were found 30 mg and 85 mg gallic /gm extract respectively. While the total flavonoids were 40 mg and 80 mg quercetin/g respectively. The GC-MS analysis showed that monoterpene and indole are the main components. Aqueous extract don't show any antibacterial activity against the tested strains. The antioxidant properties were attributable to its phenolic content to scavenge free radicals. Acetone extract possess a potent antimicrobial and activity against deleterious effect of CCl 4 -caused liver damage.

  15. Beta-carotene as antioxidant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Plas, R.M. van der; Berg, H. van den; Haenen, G.R.M.M.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Beta-carotene has been shown to exhibit a good radical-trapping antioxidant activity in vitro. We were interested to see if dietary β-carotene in combination with various intake levels for vitamin A would also inhibit lipid peroxidation. Design: Sixty male Wistar rats received vitamin A

  16. Antioxidant effects of green tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    FORESTER, SARAH C.; LAMBERT, JOSHUA D.

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of green tea (Camellia sinensis) may provide protection against chronic diseases, including cancer. Green tea polyphenols are believed to be responsible for this cancer preventive effect, and the antioxidant activity of the green tea polyphenols has been implicated as a potential mechanism. This hypothesis has been difficult to study in vivo due to metabolism of these compounds and poor understanding of the redox environment in vivo. Green tea polyphenols can be direct antioxidants by scavenging reactive oxygen species or chelating transition metals as has been demonstrated in vitro. Alternatively, they may act indirectly by up-regulating phase II antioxidant enzymes. Evidence of this latter effect has been observed in vivo, yet more work is required to determine under which conditions these mechanisms occur. Green tea polyphenols can also be potent pro-oxidants, both in vitro and in vivo, leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical, and superoxide anion. The potential role of these pro-oxidant effects in the cancer preventive activity of green tea is not well understood. The evidence for not only the antioxidant, but also pro-oxidant, properties of green tea are discussed in the present review. PMID:21538850

  17. Antioxidant activity of Potentilla fruticosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miliauskas, G.; Beek, van T.A.; Venskutonis, P.R.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Waard, de P.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular structures of the radical scavenging compounds present in extracts of Potentilla fruticosa blossoms were elucidated and the antioxidant activities of various extracts were determined. The activities of the different fractions were monitored by off-line and on-line RP-HPLC DPPH. and

  18. Antioxidant activity of banana flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, S; Presannakumar, G; Vijayalakshmi, N R

    2008-06-01

    The antioxidant activity of flavonoids from banana (Musa paradisiaca) was studied in rats fed normal as well as high fat diets. Concentrations of peroxidation products namely malondialdehyde, hydroperoxides and conjugated diens were significantly decreased whereas the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase were enhanced significantly. Concentrations of glutathione were also elevated in the treated animals.

  19. Fruit antioxidants during vinegar processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakir, Sena; Toydemir, Gamze; Boyacioglu, Dilek; Beekwilder, Jules; Capanoglu, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vinegars based on fruit juices could conserve part of the health-associated compounds present in the fruits. However, in general very limited knowledge exists on the consequences of vinegar-making on different antioxidant compounds from fruit. In this study vinegars derived from apple

  20. Antioxidant capacity and physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marciniak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is a presentation of current knowledge regarding the changes of plasma antioxidant capacity observed in response to physical exercise. Human body created the enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems, which play a protective role in the harmful impact of free radicals. Those two systems constitute what is known as the plasma total antioxidant capacity. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (NOS in combination with oxidation processes increases in some tissues during physiological response to physical exercise. These changes are observed after single bout of exercise as well as after regular training. The response of human body to physical exercise can be analysed using various models of exercise test. Application of repeated type of exhaustion allows for characterizing the ability of human body to adjust to the increased energy loss and increased oxygen consumption. This article presents the characteristics of components of plasma antioxidant capacity, the mechanisms of free radicals production and their role in human body. It discusses also the currently used methods of detecting changes in total antioxidant capacity and its individual elements in response to single bout of exercise and regular training. It presents the review of literature about research performed in groups of both regularly training and low exercise activity individuals as well as in group of healthy subjects and patients with circulation diseases.

  1. Antioxidant activity of Cinnamomum cassia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Ching; Wu, Sue-Jing; Chang, Cheng-Hsiung; Ng, Lean-Teik

    2003-08-01

    The antioxidant activities of hot water extracts (HWECC) and ethanol extracts (EECC) from the dry bark of Cinnamomum cassia Presl were evaluated in this study. Results showed that at 1.0 mg/mL, the ethanol extracts of C. cassia (96.30%) exhibited a greater inhibition than the alpha-tocopherol (93.74%) on FeCl(2)-ascorbic acid induced lipid peroxidation of rat liver homogenate in vitro. From 0.05 to 1.0 mg/mL, the EECC demonstrated the highest superoxide anions scavenging activity and the strongest anti-superoxide formation activity (p < 0.05). The same extract also showed an excellent antioxidant activity in enzymatic and nonenzymatic liver tissue oxidative systems. EECC revealed the strongest antioxidant activity followed by alpha-tocopherol and HWECC. Compared to alpha-tocopherol, the IC(50) values of EECC were found to be lower in thiobarbituric acid test (IC(50) = 0.24 mg/mL vs 0.37 mg/mL), in cytochrome c test (IC(50) = 0.16 mg/mL vs 0.27 mg/mL) and in xanthine oxidase inhibition test (IC(50) = 0.09 mg/mL vs 0.19 mg/mL). The present study concludes that EECC could be used as a good source of antioxidant in the dietary supplement. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Antioxidative activity of Geranium macrorrhizum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miliauskas, G.; Beek, van T.A.; Venskutonis, P.R.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Waard, de P.

    2004-01-01

    The composition of radical-scavenging compounds from Geranium macrorrhizum leaves was analyzed and the antioxidative activities of various extracts was determined. Seven compounds, namely gallic acid, ellagic acid, 4-galloyl quinic acid, the flavonoid quercetin and three of its glycosides,

  3. Effects of nutritional supplement of ginger root on antioxidant status in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majid fartashvand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginger (Zingiber officinale is a medicinal plant and pungent food spice, which has antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ginger on antioxidant status of blood in healthy sheep. In this study, dried ginger root powder was added to the ration of 10 male yearling sheep (treatment group, at the rate of 1g/head/day for a period of 2 months. In the second group (n = 10 sheep, a single dose of vitamin E+selenium injection was administered intramuscularly (positive control group and the control group (n=10 sheep received no medication or special additives. Blood samples were collected regularly at 2 week intervals and enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, catalase (CAT and total antioxidant levels were measured. Ginger increased total antioxidant capacity of serum and blood levels of SOD, GPX and CAT, which was significant compared to the control group (p

  4. Antioxidative Potentials Of Some Medical Plants On Lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Parker

    2014-02-12

    hepatocellular membrane protective effects of the plant extracts. ALP functions as a biochemical marker enzyme for maintaining membrane integrity. Increase in its plasma activity indicates peroxidation of cell membrane which.

  5. Antioxidative Potentials Of Some Medical Plants On Lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Parker

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... This study was embarked upon in order to evaluate the effects of the chloroform extracts of the leaves of Psidium guajava, Anacardium occidentale and Eucalyptus globulus and fruits of Xylopia aethiopica on hepatic marker ... most protective. In addition, the P. guajava extract exerted more hepatoprotection.

  6. Bee Pollen: Chemical Composition and Therapeutic Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Komosinska-Vassev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee pollen is a valuable apitherapeutic product greatly appreciated by the natural medicine because of its potential medical and nutritional applications. It demonstrates a series of actions such as antifungal, antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, anticancer immunostimulating, and local analgesic. Its radical scavenging potential has also been reported. Beneficial properties of bee pollen and the validity for their therapeutic use in various pathological condition have been discussed in this study and with the currently known mechanisms, by which bee pollen modulates burn wound healing process.

  7. Therapeutic and reproductive cloning: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of the science and ethics of human cloning. It summarises the key scientific milestones in the development of nuclear transplantation, explains the importance of cloning to research into the medical potential of embryonic stem cells, and discusses the well-worn distinction between 'therapeutic' and 'reproductive' cloning. Suggesting that this distinction will be impossible to police, it goes on to consider the ethics of full human cloning. It is concluded that it represents an unacceptable form of parental despotism, and that the genetic engineering and cloning of future human beings will fracture the foundations of modern humanism.

  8. Therapeutic Applications of Rose Hips from Different Rosa Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Mármol

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rosa species, rose hips, are widespread wild plants that have been traditionally used as medicinal compounds for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. The therapeutic potential of these plants is based on its antioxidant effects caused by or associated with its phytochemical composition, which includes ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds and healthy fatty acids among others. Over the last few years, medicinal interest in rose hips has increased as a consequence of recent research that has studied its potential application as a treatment for several diseases including skin disorders, hepatotoxicity, renal disturbances, diarrhoea, inflammatory disorders, arthritis, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and cancer. In this review, the role of different species of Rosa in the prevention of treatment of various disorders related to oxidative stress, is examined, focusing on new therapeutic approaches from a molecular point of view.

  9. Quercetin: A wonder bioflvonoid with therapeutic potential in disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Gupta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, considerable efforts have been made to develop health promising nutritional supplements. Quercetin is a plant-derived bioflavonoid which is recently gaining scientific interest for its antioxidant free radical scavenging effects and anti-inflammatory properties. This wonder flavanol exhibits therapeutic potential in various ailments like cancer, coronary artery, asthma and alzheimer (neurodegeneration diseases. Additional clinical uses include treatment of inflammatory conditions like gout, pancreatitis and prostatitis. It has been extensively studied for its gastroprotective effects, anti-obesity action, immune booster, reducing risk of cataract and reduction of diabetic complications. The present review briefly discusses about biological activity, mechanism of action and therapeutic potential of quercetin in prevention and mitigation of diseases.

  10. Bioactive compounds of sea cucumbers and their therapeutic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shujuan; Feng, Wenjing; Hu, Song; Liang, Shixiu; An, Nina; Mao, Yongjun

    2016-05-01

    Sea cucumbers belong to the Class Holothuroidea of marine invertebrates. They are commercially valuable and prized as a food and folk medicine in Asia. Nutritionally, sea cucumbers have an impressive profile of valuable nutrients such as vitamins, minerals and amino acids. A number of unique biological and pharmacological activities/properties, including anticancer, anticoagulant/antithrombotic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antihyperlipidemic, antihyperglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antihypertension and radioprotective, have been ascribed to various compounds isolated from sea cucumbers. The therapeutic properties and medicinal benefits of sea cucumbers can be linked to the presence of a wide array of bioactives, especially triterpene glycosides, acid mucopolysaccharide, sphingoid bases, glycolipids, fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, polysaccharides, phospholipids, cerebrosides, phosphatidylcholines, and other extracts and hydrolysates. This review highlights the valuable bioactive components as well as the multiple therapeutic properties of sea cucumbers with a view to exploring their potential uses as functional foods and a natural source of new multifunctional drugs.

  11. Therapeutic Applications of Rose Hips from Different Rosa Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol, Inés; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Jiménez-Moreno, Nerea; Ancín-Azpilicueta, Carmen; Rodríguez-Yoldi, María Jesús

    2017-05-25

    Rosa species, rose hips, are widespread wild plants that have been traditionally used as medicinal compounds for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. The therapeutic potential of these plants is based on its antioxidant effects caused by or associated with its phytochemical composition, which includes ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds and healthy fatty acids among others. Over the last few years, medicinal interest in rose hips has increased as a consequence of recent research that has studied its potential application as a treatment for several diseases including skin disorders, hepatotoxicity, renal disturbances, diarrhoea, inflammatory disorders, arthritis, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and cancer. In this review, the role of different species of Rosa in the prevention of treatment of various disorders related to oxidative stress, is examined, focusing on new therapeutic approaches from a molecular point of view.

  12. In vitro antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, J; Farine, J C; Garay, R P; Hannaert, P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium dobesilate, a vascular protective agent, was tested in vitro for its scavenging action against oxygen free radicals. Calcium dobesilate was as potent as rutin to scavenge hydroxyl radicals (IC50 = 1.1 vs 0.7 microM, respectively). It was also able to scavenge superoxide radicals, but with 23 times less potency than rutin (IC50 = 682 vs 30 microM, respectively). Calcium dobesilate significantly reduced platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced chemiluminescence in human PMN cells and lipid peroxidation by oxygen free radicals in human erythrocyte membranes, although these actions required calcium dobesilate concentrations > or = 50 microM. Finally, in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells, magnesium dobesilate reduced the increase in cytosolic free calcium induced by hydrogen peroxide and inhibited phenazine methosulfate-induced cell potassium loss. In conclusion, calcium dobesilate was effective in scavenging hydroxyl radicals in vitro, at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Conversely, higher concentrations of the compound were required to scavenge superoxide radicals or to protect the cells against the deleterious effects of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Further studies in vivo are required to determine if these antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate can play a role in its vascular protective mechanisms.

  13. Biomaterials and therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    A number of organic and inorganic, synthetic or natural derived materials have been classified as not harmful for the human body and are appropriate for medical applications. These materials are usually named biomaterials since they are suitable for introduction into living human tissues of prosthesis, as well as for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapies, tissue regeneration and many other clinical applications. Recently, nanomaterials and bioabsorbable polymers have greatly enlarged the fields of application of biomaterials attracting much more the attention of the biomedical community. In this review paper I am going to discuss the most recent advances in the use of magnetic nanoparticles and biodegradable materials as new biomedical tools.

  14. Grado de adherencia terapéutica a los fármacos del metabolismo óseo-mineral: ¿toman nuestros pacientes la medicación prescrita? Degree of therapeutic adherence to bone mineral metabolism drugs: Do our patients take the prescribed medication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Nieves Cazorla Santana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Los fármacos del metabolismo óseo-mineral tienen gran importancia el tratamiento de los pacientes de hemodiálisis, pero desconocemos las preferencias, y el grado de conocimiento de estos fármacos. Los objetivos del estudio fueron conocer el grado de adherencia terapéutica a los fármacos del metabolismo oseo-mineral, e identificar los factores más relevantes que influyen en la adherencia a este tipo de tratamiento. Pacientes y métodos: Se realizó un estudio transversal en un Centro de hemodiálisis, incluyendo 106 pacientes. Utilizamos el cuestionario simplificado de adherencia a la medicación (SMAQ¹ y un cuestionario específico sobre cumplimiento y preferencias, para conocer el grado de adherencia. Resultados: El 37,7% de los pacientes fue incumplidor según el cuestionario SMAQ. De ellos, el 34% no tomaba la medicación a la misma hora (PBone mineral metabolism drugs are of great importance in treating haemodialysis patients, but we are unaware of their preferences and degree of knowledge of these drugs. The aims of the study were to find out the degree of therapeutic adherence to bone mineral metabolism drugs and to identify the most relevant factors that influence adherence to this type of treatment. Patients and methods: A transversal study was carried out at a haemodialysis centre, including 106 patients. We used the simplified medication adherence questionnaire (SMAQ¹ and a specific questionnaire on compliance and preferences, in order to find out the degree of adherence. Results: 37.7% of the patients were non-compliant, according to the SMAQ. Of these, 34% did not take the medication at the same time (P<0.000, 5.7% did not comply with the treatment at weekends (P<0.010, 13.2% stop taking the medication when they feel unwell (P<0.010; and in the last week, 18% acknowledged that they forgot the treatment 1 day (P= 0.001 and between 2-3 days (12,5%. 52% did not have preferences for any phosphorus chelant and 60.4% knew about

  15. [Adjuvant antioxidant therapy in varicocele infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamidov, S I; Ovchinnikov, R I; Popova, A Yu; Avakyan, A Yu; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-06-01

    Infertility affects an estimated 15% of couples globally. Male factor infertility accounts for about a half of infertility cases. About 40% of infertile men have varicocele. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of a complex of acetyl-L-carnitine, L-carnitine fumarate and alpha-lipoic acid (SpermActin-forte) (SA) for adjuvant antioxidant therapy after microsurgical varicocelectomy (MVE) in men with varicocele and assess its impact on the level of DNA fragmentation in sperm cells. This is an open, prospective, randomized trial comprising 114 men aged 25-45 (mean 34.1+/-12.1) years who underwent MVE. The patients were allocated to receive either adjuvant SA (n=38), SA in combination with a vitamin complex (VC) (n=38) or no adjuvant therapy (n=38). The efficacy was assessed at 3 months by testing standard semen parameters and the level of sperm DNA fragmentation. MVE led to a 21.7% increase in the progressive sperm motility compared to the baseline level. In patients receiving SA, this was by 76.7% due to active sperm motility (category A) at 3 months. MVE with concurrent supplementation of SA resulted in a 22.3% decrease in the level of sperm DNA fragmentation at 3 months. When used in the postoperative period after MVE, SA and VC resulted in a 27% increase in the sperm concentration at 3 months. There were no side effects of pharmacotherapy. The statistical significance of the change in variables was calculated using the Wilcoxon test. Critical level =0.05 was established for all criteria. Using nutraceuticals (SA) after MVE is an effective and safe adjuvant antioxidant therapy of male infertility in patients with varicocele which leads to an improvement in the basic sperm parameters (sperm concentration and motility) and a decrease in the level of sperm DNA fragmentation in the short term. Adjuvant antioxidant therapy of varicocele infertility potentiates the effects of monotherapy (both medical and surgical), leads to an increase in its

  16. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  17. Therapeutics of postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Michael; Sharma, Verinder

    2017-05-01

    Postpartum depression is a prevalent disorder affecting many women of reproductive age. Despite increasing public awareness, it is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated leading to significant maternal morbidity and adverse child outcomes. When identified, postpartum depression is usually treated as major depressive disorder. Many studies have identified the postpartum as a period of high risk for first presentations and relapses of bipolar disorder. Areas covered: This article reviews the acute and prophylactic treatment of postpartum major depressive disorder, bipolar depression and major depressive disorder with mixed features. The safety of antidepressant and mood stabilizing medications in pregnancy and breastfeeding will also be reviewed. Expert commentary: Differentiating postpartum major depressive disorder and postpartum bipolar depression can be difficult given their clinical similarities but accurate identification is vital for initiating proper treatment. Antidepressants are the mainstay of drug treatment for postpartum major depressive disorder, yet randomized controlled trials have shown conflicting results. A paucity of evidence exists for the effectiveness of antidepressant prophylaxis in the prevention of recurrences of major depressive disorder. Mood stabilizing medications reduce the risk of postpartum bipolar depression relapse but no randomized controlled trials have examined their use in the acute or prophylactic treatment of postpartum bipolar depression.

  18. Factors affecting the use of antioxidant supplements in patients with late AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu AL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alice L Yu,1 Tobias Paul,1 Markus Schaumberger,1 Ulrich Welge-Lussen2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen, Germany Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the use of oral antioxidant supplements in patients with late age-related macular degeneration (AMD and to identify influencing factors that may affect the use of such supplements. Methods: The study included 47 patients with late AMD. Using a questionnaire, the patients were asked for their demographic, ophthalmologic, and systemic data, their source of recommendation of antioxidant use for AMD, and/or their reasons for nonuse. The demographic, ophthalmologic, and systemic information was correlated with use or nonuse of oral antioxidant supplements for AMD. Results: Sixty-eight percent (32/47 of patients took antioxidant supplements for AMD and 32% (15/47 of patients did not. There were no statistically significant differences in demographic, ophthalmologic, and systemic parameters between patients with late AMD who used supplements and those who did not. Two thirds of patients with late AMD (66%, 31/47 reported being recommended oral antioxidant supplements for AMD by their ophthalmologist. Patients who did not use antioxidant supplements either did not obtain any recommendation or did not believe in their benefits. Conclusion: This study shows that most patients with late AMD use antioxidant supplements despite the recommendation to do so being missing in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. Our study emphasizes the importance of seeking further therapeutic options for patients with late AMD. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, antioxidants, micronutrients, Age-Related Eye Disease Study

  19. Medical nutrition therapy planning

    OpenAIRE

    Torović Ljilja; Grujičić Maja; Pavlović-Trajković Ljiljana; Jovičić Jelena; Novaković Budimka; Balać Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Diet has vital, preventive and therapeutic functions. Medical nutrition therapy is a part of the Standardized Nutrition Care Process integrated in health care systems. Material and methods. An overview of the Nutrition Care Process model and the application of nutrition guidelines based on literature, reports, documents and programmes of international health, food and physical activity authorities was done. Results. The Nutrition Care Process model requires registered diet...

  20. Cellular antioxidant activity of common fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Kelly L; Kang, Xinmei; He, Xiangjiu; Dong, Mei; Zhang, Qingyuan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2008-09-24

    Measurement of antioxidant activity using biologically relevant assays is important in the screening of fruits for potential health benefits. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay quantifies antioxidant activity in cell culture and was developed to meet the need for a more biologically representative method than the popular chemistry antioxidant capacity measures. The objective of the study was to determine the cellular antioxidant activity, total phenolic contents, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values of 25 fruits commonly consumed in the United States. Pomegranate and berries (wild blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, and blueberry) had the highest CAA values, whereas banana and melons had the lowest. Apples were found to be the largest contributors of fruit phenolics to the American diet, and apple and strawberries were the biggest suppliers of cellular antioxidant activity. Increasing fruit consumption is a logical strategy to increase antioxidant intake and decrease oxidative stress and may lead to reduced risk of cancer.

  1. Natural Antioxidants: Fascinating or Mythical Biomolecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Van Staden

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on the use, properties, characteristics and sources of antioxidants especially phenolic compounds, flavonoids, vitamins, synthetic chemicals and some micronutrients began in the late 18th century. Since then antioxidant research has received considerable attention and over a hundred thousand papers have been published on the subject. This has led to a rampant use of antioxidants in order to try to obtain and preserve optimal health. A number of nutraceuticals and food supplements are frequently fortified with synthetic or natural antioxidants. However, some research outcomes have led to the belief that antioxidants exist as mythical biomolecules. This review provides a critical evaluation of some common in vitro antioxidant capacity methods, and a discussion on the role and controversies surrounding non-enzymatic biomolecules, in particular phenolic compounds and non-phenolic compounds, in oxidative processes in an attempt of stemming the tidal wave that is threatening to swamp the concept of natural antioxidants.

  2. Probiotics as potential antioxidants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vijendra; Shah, Chandni; Mokashe, Narendra; Chavan, Rupesh; Yadav, Hariom; Prajapati, Jashbhai

    2015-04-15

    Probiotics are known for their health beneficial effects and are established as dietary adjuncts. Probiotics have been known for many beneficial health effects. In this view, there is interest to find the potential probiotic strains that can exhibit antioxidant properties along with health benefits. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that probiotics exhibit antioxidant potential. In this view, consumption of probiotics alone or foods supplemented with probiotics may reduce oxidative damage, free radical scavenging rate, and modification in activity of crucial antioxidative enzymes in human cells. Incorporation of probiotics in foods can provide a good strategy to supply dietary antioxidants, but more studies are needed to standardize methods and evaluate antioxidant properties of probiotics before they can be recommended for antioxidant potential. In this paper, the literature related to known antioxidant potential of probiotics and proposing future perspectives to conduct such studies has been reviewed.

  3. Therapeutic vaccines for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamesipour, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Numerous therapeutic strategies are used to treat leishmaniasis. The treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is solely depends on antimonate derivatives with safety issues and questionable efficacy and there is no fully effective modality to treat CL caused by Leishmania tropica and Leishmania braziliensis. There is no prophylactic vaccine available against any form of leishmaniasis. Immunotherapy for CL has a long history; immunotherapy trials of first and second generation vaccines showed promising results. The current article briefly covers the prophylactic vaccines and explains different immunotherapy strategies that have been used to treat leishmaniasis. This paper does not include experimental vaccines and only lays emphasis on human trials and those vaccines which reached human trials. Immunotherapy is currently used to successfully treat several disorders; Low cost, limited side effects and no possibility to develop resistance make immunotherapy a valuable choice especially for infectious disease with chemotherapy problems. Efforts are needed to explore the immunological surrogate marker(s) of cure and protection in leishmaniasis and overcome the difficulties in standardization of crude Leishmania vaccines. One of the reasons for anti-leishmaniasis vaccine failure is lack of an appropriate adjuvant. So far, not enough attention has been paid to develop vaccines for immunotherapy of leishmaniasis.

  4. Kinetoplastida: new therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croft S.L.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available New formulations and therapeutic switching of the established drugs, amphotericin B and paromomycin, together with the discovery of miltefosine, have significantly improved the opportunities for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL chemotherapy. However, for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, Chagas disease and cutaneous leishmaniases there has been limited progress. For HAT, a novel diamidine, parfuramidine, is in phase III clinical trial for early-stage disease, but for the treatment of late-stage disease there are no new drugs and combinations of eflornithine with melarsoprol or nifurtimox have been the focus of clinical studies. For Chagas disease, different classes of compounds that have validated biochemical targets, sterol biosynthesis methylases and cysteine proteases, are in various stages of development. The genome sequences that are now available for the pathogens that cause the leishmaniases and trypanosomiases, and new methods for rapid validation of targets, are part of the solution to discover new drugs. The integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, project planning and interaction with the pharma/biotech sector are essential if progress is to be made. Although there are financial constraints, the appearance of new funding sources and not-for-profit product development partnerships offers hope for drug development.

  5. Leech Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdualkader, A. M.; Ghawi, A. M.; Alaama, M.; Awang, M.; Merzouk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hematophagous animals including leeches have been known to possess biologically active compounds in their secretions, especially in their saliva. The blood-sucking annelids, leeches have been used for therapeutic purposes since the beginning of civilization. Ancient Egyptian, Indian, Greek and Arab physicians used leeches for a wide range of diseases starting from the conventional use for bleeding to systemic ailments, such as skin diseases, nervous system abnormalities, urinary and reproductive system problems, inflammation, and dental problems. Recently, extensive researches on leech saliva unveiled the presence of a variety of bioactive peptides and proteins involving antithrombin (hirudin, bufrudin), antiplatelet (calin, saratin), factor Xa inhibitors (lefaxin), antibacterial (theromacin, theromyzin) and others. Consequently, leech has made a comeback as a new remedy for many chronic and life-threatening abnormalities, such as cardiovascular problems, cancer, metastasis, and infectious diseases. In the 20th century, leech therapy has established itself in plastic and microsurgery as a protective tool against venous congestion and served to salvage the replanted digits and flaps. Many clinics for plastic surgery all over the world started to use leeches for cosmetic purposes. Despite the efficacious properties of leech therapy, the safety, and complications of leeching are still controversial. PMID:24019559

  6. The promising trajectory of autism therapeutics discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jill L; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2014-07-01

    Pharmacological interventions for neurodevelopmental disorders are increasingly tractable. Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Currently, the standard of care is early behavioral therapy. No approved medical treatments for the diagnostic symptoms are available. Strong evidence for genetic causes of autism implicates proteins that mediate synaptic transmission and structure. Mouse models with targeted mutations in these synaptic genes display behavioral symptoms relevant to the social communication abnormalities and repetitive behaviors that define autism spectrum disorder (ASD), along with biological abnormalities in synaptic physiology and morphology. As we discuss here, promising pharmacological targets, emerging from the mouse model studies, are now being pursued in early clinical trials. Thus, a high-prevalence disorder that was previously considered to be medically untreatable is now moving into the therapeutic arena. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerging therapeutic strategies for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Schubert, Karen E; Cummings, David E

    2006-12-01

    The rising tide of obesity is one of the most pressing health issues of our time, yet existing medicines to combat the problem are disappointingly limited in number and effectiveness. Fortunately, a recent burgeoning of mechanistic insights into the neuroendocrine regulation of body weight provides an expanding list of molecular targets for novel, rationally designed antiobesity pharmaceuticals. In this review, we articulate a set of conceptual principles that we feel could help prioritize among these molecules in the development of obesity therapeutics, based on an understanding of energy homeostasis. We focus primarily on central targets, highlighting selected strategies to stimulate endogenous catabolic signals or inhibit anabolic signals. Examples of the former approach include methods to enhance central leptin signaling through intranasal leptin delivery, use of superpotent leptin-receptor agonists, and mechanisms to increase leptin sensitivity by manipulating SOCS-3, PTP-1B, ciliary neurotrophic factor, or simply by first losing weight with traditional interventions. Techniques to augment signaling by neurochemical mediators of leptin action that lie downstream of at least some levels of obesity-associated leptin resistance include activation of melanocortin receptors or 5-HT2C and 5-HT1B receptors. We also describe strategies to inhibit anabolic molecules, such as neuropeptide Y, melanin-concentrating hormone, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids. Modulation of gastrointestinal satiation and hunger signals is discussed as well. As scientists continue to provide fundamental insights into the mechanisms governing body weight, the future looks bright for development of new and better antiobesity medications to be used with diet and exercise to facilitate substantial weight loss.

  8. Therapeutic strategies in pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonello eFuso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a life-threatening condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. It is clinically classified into five groups: patients in the first group are considered to have pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH whereas patients of the other groups have PH that is due to cardiopulmonary or other systemic diseases. The management of patients with PH has advanced rapidly over the last decade and the introduction of specific treatments especially for PAH has lead to an improved outcome. However, despite the progress in the treatment, the functional limitation and the survival of these patients remain unsatisfactory and there is no cure for PAH. Therefore the search for an ideal therapy still goes on. At present, two levels of treatment can be identified: primary and specific therapy. Primary therapy is directed at the underlying cause of the PH. It also includes a supportive therapy consisting in oxygen supplementation, diuretics, and anticoagulation which should be considered in all patients with PH. Specific therapy is directed at the PH itself and includes treatment with vasodilatators such as calcium channel blockers and with vasodilatator and pathogenetic drugs such as prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. These drugs act in several pathogenetic mechanisms of the PH and are specific for PAH although they might be used also in the other groups of PH. Finally, atrial septostomy and lung transplantation are reserved for patients refractory to medical therapy. Different therapeutic approaches can be considered in the management of patients with PH. Therapy can be established on the basis of both the clinical classification and the functional class. It is also possible to adopt a goal-oriented therapy in which the timing of treatment escalation is determined by inadequate response to known prognostic indicators.

  9. Opinion - Are we over oxidized? Oxidative stress, cardiovascular disease, and the future of intervention studies with antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg J Dusting

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Greg J Dusting1, Chris Triggle21Howard Florey Institute, University of Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, VIC, AustraliaAre we over oxidized? A number of recent clinical trials with antioxidants, notably vitamin C and E, have provided no support for the commonly held view that increasing our intake of antioxidants will offset the ravages of cardiovascular disease as well as other diseases (for extensive critical reviews see: Kritharides and Stocker 2002; Antoniades et al 2003; Touyz 2004. Is this conclusion justified? The role of antioxidant dietary adjuncts and therapy in prevention and treatment remains a highly important clinical question. In this opinion article we address the question: Is there a future for antioxidant therapy in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease? We conclude that there is a need for better-designed studies as well as a re-thinking of the choice of antioxidants.

  10. Antioxidative potential of two chemically characterized Ocimum (Tulsi species extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karishma Agarwal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ocimum sanctum and Ocimum kilimandscharicum are cultivated in Indian subcontinent both for the religious and medicinal properties. Traditionally, the leaves have been reported for their enormous therapeutic potentials but the roots which are otherwise considered as a waste part have not been explored for their pharmacological activity. Methods: Total phenolic content, free radical scavenging and ferric reducing antioxidant potential of various extracts from Ocimum sanctum and Ocimum kilimandscharicum were assessed and compared. In vitro antioxidant activity was estimated spectrophotometrically and the most potent ethyl acetate extract was chemically characterized by developing the chemical fingerprint and quantifying the probable constituents with the help of HPLC/LC-MS techniques. Results: The ethyl acetate extract of both the species exhibited significant free radical scavenging potential and also reduced the ferric ions. It was observed that ethyl acetate extract have superior ferric reducing potential than other tested extracts, which were evidenced by high ferrous sulphate equivalent value of 77.05 ± 1.54 and 80.98 ± 0.80 at 100 µg/ml for O. sanctum and O. kilimandscharium respectively. The ferric reducing capacity of ethyl acetate extract for both the species was also evidenced by an elevated optical density of 1.64 ± 0.12 and 2.14 ± 0.08. Ocimum sanctum exhibited better antioxidant capacity (11.31 ± 0.20 AScE as compared to Ocimum kilimandscharium (9.08 ± 0.27 AScE. The total phenolic and flavonoid content were estimated by spectrophotometric method and tentatively characterized by HPLC/LC-MS profiling which revealed the presence of rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid along with its derivatives such as caffeoyl-dihydroxyphenyllactoyl-tartaric acid. Conclusion: The ethyl acetate extract of both the species being rich in phenolic and flavonoid contents exhibited potent antioxidant activity. The presence of flavonoid in ethyl

  11. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  12. Cannabidiol and (−)Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol are neuroprotective antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, A. J.; Grimaldi, M.; Axelrod, J.; Wink, D.

    1998-01-01

    The neuroprotective actions of cannabidiol and other cannabinoids were examined in rat cortical neuron cultures exposed to toxic levels of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. Glutamate toxicity was reduced by both cannabidiol, a nonpsychoactive constituent of marijuana, and the psychotropic cannabinoid (−)Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabinoids protected equally well against neurotoxicity mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, 2-amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5-yl)propionic acid receptors, or kainate receptors. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-induced toxicity has been shown to be calcium dependent; this study demonstrates that 2-amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5-yl)propionic acid/kainate receptor-type neurotoxicity is also calcium-dependent, partly mediated by voltage sensitive calcium channels. The neuroprotection observed with cannabidiol and THC was unaffected by cannabinoid receptor antagonist, indicating it to be cannabinoid receptor independent. Previous studies have shown that glutamate toxicity may be prevented by antioxidants. Cannabidiol, THC and several synthetic cannabinoids all were demonstrated to be antioxidants by cyclic voltametry. Cannabidiol and THC also were shown to prevent hydroperoxide-induced oxidative damage as well as or better than other antioxidants in a chemical (Fenton reaction) system and neuronal cultures. Cannabidiol was more protective against glutamate neurotoxicity than either ascorbate or α-tocopherol, indicating it to be a potent antioxidant. These data also suggest that the naturally occurring, nonpsychotropic cannabinoid, cannabidiol, may be a potentially useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of oxidative neurological disorders such as cerebral ischemia. PMID:9653176

  13. Plant derived antioxidants and antifibrotic drugs: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaraj Ezhilarasan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis occurs as a wound-healing process after several forms of chronic hepatic injury. Activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cells play pivotal role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Many researchers, from the therapeutic perspective, have focused their attention on searching for novel agents with inhibitory effects on hepatic stellate cells proliferation and activation to prevent hepatic fibrogenesis and a number of plant derived antioxidants have been tested as anti-fibrogenic agents, they generally suppress proliferation and collagen synthesis. Plants remain an imperative source of novel drugs, novel drug leads and new chemical entities. The plant based drug discovery resulted primarily in the development of antioxidant, anti-cancer and other anti-infectious agents and continues to contribute to the new leads in clinical trials. This review summarizes some of those most important plant derived anti-fibrotic drugs and their beneficial effects on experimentally induced hepatic fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. The plant derived antioxidant compounds described herein are curcumin, silymarin, silibinin, baicalein, resveratrol, salvianolic acids, tetrandine, quercetin and berberine. Studies from ours and as demonstrated by pervious workers much information has been accumulated over the past two decades through in vivo and in vitro. In light of those studies, it has been confirmed that plants derived antioxidants, particularly flavanoids, show a significant influence to block hepatic fibrosis regardless of any etiology. This review outlines recent progress in the use of plant derived drugs against experimentally induced liver fibrosis by in vitro and in vivo studies and summarizes the possible mechanisms anti-fibrotic effects of these compounds.

  14. Antioxidant Capacities of Fractions of Bamboo Shaving Extract and Their Antioxidant Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jinyan; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Gongnian; Chen, Feng; Lee, Bolim; Ge, Qing; You, Yuru; Liu, Shiwang; Zhang, Ying

    2016-07-30

    This research was conducted for evaluation of antioxidant activities of four fractions from bamboo shavings extract (BSE) and their antioxidant components. The antioxidant capacities of BSE and four fractions on ABTS, DPPH, FRAP and total antioxidant capacity assays exhibited the following descending order: DF > n-butanol fraction (BF) > BSE ≈ ethyl acetate fraction (AF) > water fraction (WF). Among the identified phenolic compounds, caffeic acid exhibited the highest antioxidant capacities on DPPH, FRAP and total antioxidant capacity assays. An extremely significant positive correlation between the antioxidant activities with the contents of total flavonoids, total phenolic acids, or total phenolics was observed in this study. The result indicated that the bamboo shaving extract and its solvent fractions could act as natural antioxidants in light of their potent antioxidant activities.

  15. Therapeutic advances in tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alfonso; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-09-15

    Although tremor is a highly prevalent movement disorder, progress in this field is limited because of the poor understanding of many of the underlying conditions. This review summarizes recent treatment attempts since 2013. For essential tremor, recent innovations are phase I or II studies of Octanol, several clinically relevant refinements for deep brain stimulation, and the development of the new magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound technique. Further new invasive and noninvasive electrical and magnetic stimulation techniques have been tested for essential tremor and parkinsonian tremor. For multiple sclerosis tremor, some open-label observations have shown positive results (natalizumab, dalfampridine, levetiracetam), whereas controlled trials using cannabinoids have been negative. Functional tremor has shown a positive response to retrainment. Neuroprosthetic devices have been tested in a variety of tremor conditions. Several promising medical and surgical treatment trials are underway and will be completed shortly. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Therapeutical approaches in melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prignano, Francesca; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Buggiani, Gionata; Lotti, Torello

    2007-07-01

    Melasma (cloasma) is a typical hypermelanosis and a common dermatologic skin disease that involves sun-exposed areas of the skin. It mostly affects women of reproductive age. Solar and ultraviolet exposure are the most crucial etiologic factors. Pregnancy, certain endocrine disorders and hormonal treatments, cosmetics, phototoxic drugs, and antiseizure medications are well-known inducing and exacerbating factors. A classification of melasma is based on Wood's light examination, classifying it in four major clinical types and patterns: epidermal, dermal, mixed, and indeterminate. Different treatment options are currently available for melasma. The choice of proper treatment should take into account the type of melasma to be treated, the skin complexion of the patient, possible previous treatments, the expectations and compliance of the patient, and the season in which the treatment is started.

  17. [Hypertriglyceridemia: therapeutic strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugnet-Anceau, Christine; Moret, Myriam; Moulin, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Causes of hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) vary according to their severity and to their character pure or mixed. Environmental factors including caloric intake excess, fructose overload, alcohol consumption, metabolic syndrom, diabetes, and drug exposure are mostly involved in pure, mild HTG. In contrast, the main etiology of mixed HTG (combined dyslipidemia) is familial combined hyperlipidemia which is commonly associated with metabolic syndrome. Major HTG (> 10 g/L) results mostly from genetic disorder in lipid metabolism with a variable contribution of environmental factors. The complications of HTG are an increased risk of acute pancreatitis (TG > 10 g/L) and a controversial atherogenic risk. Lifestyle modification is the treatment cornerstone. Nevertheless, statins are generally considered as the first drug if a medication is necessary for mixed hyperlipidemia. Fibrates may be used in combination with statin for patient with high atherogenic risk and simultaneous residual hypertriglycéridémie and low HDLc or in high risk patient with severe pure hypertriglyceridemia.

  18. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Burnstock

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  19. Trichilia catigua: therapeutic and cosmetic values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Longhini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Medicinal plants play an important role in human health care. It is estimated that about 25–30% of all drugs are evaluated as therapeutic agents derived from natural products. Research in the pharmaceutical industry has demonstrated that for complex diseases, natural products still represent a valuable source for the production of new chemical compounds, since they possess privileged structures. Among Brazilian biodiversity, "catuaba" is popularly used as a tonic to treat fatigue, stress, impotence, memory deficits, and digestive disorders. Studies show antibacterial, trypanocidal, antioxidant, antiarrhythmic, antidepressant, improvement of memory, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities, as well as phytocosmetic activity in cellulite treatment and in anti-ageing. The Brazilian plants known and used as catuaba are represented by more than twenty different species; however, the plant most commonly found in Brazil as "catuaba" is the species Trichilia catigua A. Juss., Meliaceae. Thus, the aim of this paper is to present a review of T. catigua, with emphasis on biological activities, chemical and analytical development and formulations in order to provide a broader and deeper insight, seeking a herbal medicine and/or phytocosmetic as well as future prospects for commercial exploitation and directions for future studies.

  20. Therapeutical aspect of trichomoniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukićević Jelica

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichomoniasis is frequent, parasitic and sexually transmitted infection of genitourinary tract. It is treated by metronidazole (5-nitroimidazole according to protocol recommended by Center for Disease Control (CDC formerly called: Communicable Disease Center [19]. The resistance of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV strains to metronidazole (MND was described in USA in 1960, and later on in many European countries [8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]. In these cases, due to persistent trichomonas infection, it is necessary to repeat MND treatment with moderate modification of dose and/or length of its application. Nevertheless, oncogenic and toxic effects of MND have to be taken into consideration. OBJECT The aim of this study was to investigate and analyze the incidence of TV in STD and lower susceptibility of certain TV strains to MND were analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS In three-year period (1999-2001 612 patients (244 females and 368 males suspected of STD were examined clinically and microbiologically at the Institute of Dermatovenereology in Belgrade. The patients detected for TV were treated according to CDC protocol. The affected were considered cured if there was no manifest clinical infection, and no TV verified by microbiological test. Results TV was isolated in 216 patients (35.29 % of all subjects. Trichomonas infection was found in 90 (36.88 % out of 244 tested females and in 126 (32.34 % of 368 males. Clinically manifested infection, with extensive urethral and vaginal secretion, was recorded in 161 patients, while the asymptomatic form was found in 55 subjects. This result indicates the predominance of manifested trichomonas infections (75.54 % of cases. The difference of distribution of clinical forms of trichomoniasis, in relation to sex, was not statistically significant (c2=0.854; p>0.05. The patients with verified trichomonas infection were treated by metronidazole according to CDC protocol. The recommended therapeutical scheme consisted of three

  1. Influence of substituent heteroatoms on the cytoprotective properties of pyrimidinol antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Khdour, Omar M; Schmierer, Margaret; Bandyopadhyay, Indrajit; Hecht, Sidney M

    2017-03-01

    Recently, we described the optimization of novel pyrimidinol-based antioxidants as potential therapeutic molecules for targeting mitochondrial diseases. That study focused on improving the potency and metabolic stability of pyrimidinol antioxidants. This led us to consider the possibility of altering the positions of the exocyclic alkoxy and alkylamino substituents on the pyrimidinol scaffold. Twelve new analogues were prepared and their biological activities were investigated. The metabolic stability of the prepared regioisomers was also assessed in vitro using bovine liver microsomes. Unexpectedly, the 2-alkoxy-4-alkylamino substituted pyrimidinol antioxidants were found to have properties in protecting mitochondrial function superior to the isomeric 4-alkoxy-2-alkylamino substituted pyrimidinols evaluated in all earlier studies. This observation suggests a possible mode of action involving the intermediacy of an ortho-iminoquinone, a species not previously associated with mitochondrial respiratory chain function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Polymer directed self-assembly of pH-responsive antioxidant nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Christina; Amin, Devang; Messersmith, Phillip B; Anthony, John E; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-03-31

    We have developed pH-responsive, multifunctional nanoparticles based on encapsulation of an antioxidant, tannic acid (TA), using flash nanoprecipitation, a polymer directed self-assembly method. Formation of insoluble coordination complexes of tannic acid and iron during mixing drives nanoparticle assembly. Tuning the core material to polymer ratio, the size of the nanoparticles can be readily tuned between 50 and 265 nm. The resulting nanoparticle is pH-responsive, i.e., stable at pH 7.4 and soluble under acidic conditions due to the nature of the coordination complex. Further, the coordination complex can be coprecipitated with other hydrophobic materials such as therapeutics or imaging agents. For example, coprecipitation with a hydrophobic fluorescent dye creates fluorescent nanoparticles. In vitro, the nanoparticles have low cytotoxicity and show antioxidant activity. Therefore, these particles may facilitate intracellular delivery of antioxidants.

  3. Camel Milk as a Potential Therapy as an Antioxidant in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Y. AL-Ayadhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a vital role in the pathology of several neurological diseases, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD; those studies proposed that GSH and antioxidant enzymes have a pathophysiological role in autism. Furthermore, camel milk has emerged to have potential therapeutic effects in autism. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of camel milk consumption on oxidative stress biomarkers in autistic children, by measuring the plasma levels of glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and myeloperoxidase before and 2 weeks after camel milk consumption, using the ELISA technique. All measured parameters exhibited significant increase after camel milk consumption (. These findings suggest that camel milk could play an important role in decreasing oxidative stress by alteration of antioxidant enzymes and nonenzymatic antioxidant molecules levels, as well as the improvement of autistic behaviour as demonstrated by the improved Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS.

  4. The Correlation between Chemical Structures and Antioxidant, Prooxidant, and Antitrypanosomatid Properties of Flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luiz Baldim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids have demonstrated in vivo and in vitro leishmanicidal, trypanocidal, antioxidant, and prooxidant properties. The chemotherapy of trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis lacks efficacy, presents high toxicity, and is related to the development of drug resistance. Thus, a series of 40 flavonoids were investigated with the purpose of correlating these properties via structure and activity analyses based on integrated networks and QSAR models. The classical groups for the antioxidant activity of flavonoids were combined in order to explain the influence of antioxidant and prooxidant activities on the antiparasitic properties. These analyses become useful for the development of efficient treatments for leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis. Finally, the dual activity of flavonoids presenting both anti- and prooxidant activities revealed that the existence of a balance between these two features could be important to the development of adequate therapeutic strategies.

  5. Curcumin as potential therapeutic natural product: a nanobiotechnological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shome, Soumitra; Talukdar, Anupam Das; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Bhattacharya, Mrinal Kanti; Upadhyaya, Hrishikesh

    2016-12-01

    Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems can resolve the poor bioavailability issue allied with curcumin. The therapeutic potential of curcumin can be enhanced by making nanocomposite preparation of curcumin with metal oxide nanoparticles, poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles and solid lipid nanoparticles that increases its bioavailability in the tissue. Curcumin has manifold therapeutic effects which include antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anticancer, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Curcumin can inhibit diabetes, heavy metal and stress-induced hypertension with its antioxidant, chelating and inhibitory effects on the pathways that lead to hypertension. Curcumin is an anticancer agent that can prevent abnormal cell proliferation. Nanocurcumin is an improved form of curcumin with enhanced therapeutic properties due to improved delivery to the diseased tissue, better internalization and reduced systemic elimination. Curcumin has multiple pharmacologic effects, but its poor bioavailability reduces its therapeutic effects. By conjugating curcumin to metal oxide nanoparticles or encapsulation in lipid nanoparticles, dendrimers, nanogels and polymeric nanoparticles, the water solubility and bioavailability of curcumin can be improved and thus increase its pharmacological effectiveness. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. Carbon monoxide in gastrointestinal physiology and its potential in therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Simon J.; Verhulst, Pieter-Jan; Bharucha, Adil; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2013-01-01

    Background While carbon monoxide (CO) is a known toxin, it is now recognized that CO is also an important signaling molecule involved in physiology and pathophysiology. Aims To summarize our current understanding of the role of endogenous CO in the regulation of gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology and potential therapeutic applications of modulating CO. Methods This review is based on a comprehensive search of the Ovid Medline comprehensive database and supplemented by our ongoing studies evaluating the role of CO in gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology. Results CO derived from heme oxygenase-2 is predominantly involved in neuromodulation and in setting the smooth muscle membrane potential while CO derived from heme oxygenase-1 has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties which protect gastrointestinal smooth muscle from damage caused by injury or inflammation. Exogenous CO is being explored as a therapeutic agent in a variety of gastrointestinal disorders including diabetic gastroparesis, postoperative ileus, organ transplantation, inflammatory bowel disease and sepsis. However, identifying the appropriate mechanism for safely delivering CO in humans is a major challenge. Conclusions CO is an important regulator of gastrointestinal function and protects the gastrointestinal tract against noxious injury. CO is a promising therapeutic target in conditions associated with gastrointestinal injury and inflammation. Elucidating the mechanisms by which CO works and developing safe CO delivery mechanisms are necessary to refine therapeutic strategies. PMID:23992228

  7. The therapeutic potential of cannabis and cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotenhermen, Franjo; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten

    2012-07-01

    Cannabis-based medications have been a topic of intense study since the endogenous cannabinoid system was discovered two decades ago. In 2011, for the first time, a cannabis extract was approved for clinical use in Germany. Selective literature review. Cannabis-based medications exert their effects mainly through the activation of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). More than 100 controlled clinical trials of cannabinoids or whole-plant preparations for various indications have been conducted since 1975. The findings of these trials have led to the approval of cannabis-based medicines (dronabinol, nabilone, and a cannabis extract [THC:CBD=1:1]) in several countries. In Germany, a cannabis extract was approved in 2011 for the treatment of moderate to severe refractory spasticity in multiple sclerosis. It is commonly used off label for the treatment of anorexia, nausea, and neuropathic pain. Patients can also apply for government permission to buy medicinal cannabis flowers for self-treatment under medical supervision. The most common side effects of cannabinoids are tiredness and dizziness (in more than 10% of patients), psychological effects, and dry mouth. Tolerance to these side effects nearly always develops within a short time. Withdrawal symptoms are hardly ever a problem in the therapeutic setting. There is now clear evidence that cannabinoids are useful for the treatment of various medical conditions.

  8. Antioxidant neolignans from Cordia americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Lucía R; Cirigliano, Adriana; Fabani, María P; Lima, Beatriz; Alberti, Sebastián; Kramer, Fernando; Tapia, Alejandro A; Cabrera, Gabriela; Palermo, Jorge A; Sánchez, Marianela

    2013-12-01

    Five new neolignans with a bicyclo[2.2.2]octene framework were isolated from an ethanolic extract of the bark of Cordia americana. The structures and relative configurations of the compounds were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic methods. All the isolated compounds showed good antioxidant activities in the DPPH radical scavenging (0.5-100 µg/mL) and Ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, 1-100 µg/mL) assays. One of the compounds displayed mild fungistatic activity at 0.1 µmol/spot against Fusarium virguliforme while, at the same time, all compounds were inactive against several strains of Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria at all assayed concentrations (10-1,000 µg/mL). Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Antioxidants: Are we abusing it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T G Shrihari

    2012-01-01

    The antitumor activity of micronutrients is by their capability of destroying cancer cells through three major mechanisms: (i Tumor inhibition by immune cytokines; (ii stimulation of cancer suppressor genes, such as ′wild-type p54′ and diminished expression or dysregulation of oncogenes, such as mutant p53 and H-ras; (iii inhibition of angiogenesis-stimulating factors, such as transforming growth factor alpha (TGFa. Studies have shown that antioxidants are not the′ magic bullet′ for the treatment of premalignant oral mucosal lesions or the prevention of second primary malignancies. However, there is a role for antioxidants if used judiciously in selected cases that can be monitored carefully. An important principle is that the treatment should not be more harmful than the damage that the lesion can cause.

  10. Biosensing Technologies for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghello, Anna; Tartaggia, Stefano; Alvau, Maria Domenica; Polo, Federico; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2017-07-20

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the clinical practice of measuring pharmaceutical drug concentrations in patients' biofluids at designated intervals to allow a close and timely control of their dosage. This practice allows for rapid medical intervention in case of toxicity-related issues and/or adjustment of dosage to better fit the therapeutic demand. Currently, TDM is performed in centralized laboratories employing instruments, such as immunoassay analyzers and mass spectrometers that can be run only by trained personnel. However the time required for the preparation, samples analysis, and data processing, together with the related financial cost, severely affects the application of TDM in medical practices. Therefore, a new generation of analytical tools is necessary to respond to the timely need of drug administration or reduction aiming at effectively treating oncologic patients. Technological advances in the field of nanosciences and biosensors offer the unique opportunity to address such issues. The interest for the so-called nanobiosensors is considerably increasing, particularly in drug discovery and clinical chemistry, even though there are only few examples reporting their use for TDM. The techniques employing nanobiosensors are mainly based on electrochemical, optical, and mass detection systems. In this review we described the most promising methodologies that, in our opinion, will bring TDM towards the next stage of clinical practice in the future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. A Systematic Review of Oxidative Stress and Safety of Antioxidants in Diabetes: Focus on Islets and Their Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayakumar Karunakaran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays an important role in diabetic complications, especially β-cell dysfunction and failure. Under physiological conditions, reactive oxygen species serve as second messengers that facilitate signal transduction and gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. However, under pathological conditions, an imbalance in redox homeostasis leads to aberrant tissue damage and β-cell death due to a lack of antioxidant defense systems. Taking into account the vulnerability of islets to oxidative damage, induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes or exogenous antioxidant administration has been proposed as a way to protect β-cells against diabetic insults. Here, we consider recent insights into how the redox response becomes deregulated under diabetic conditions, as well as the therapeutic benefits of antioxidants, which may provide clues for developing strategies aimed at the treatment or prevention of diabetes associated with β-cell failure.

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pleading the defence of therapeutic privilege

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    therapeutic alliance in health care, which denotes shared decision making between doctor and patient and, hence, a reconciliation and collaboration between the parties.' When determining whether or not the medical practitioner's non-disclosure was reasonable under the circumstances the court should consider expert ...

  13. Production parameters of the therapeutic Rh radionuclide using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Production cross-sections of the therapeutic 105Rh radionuclide from proton-induced reactions on natural palladium target were measured using stacked-foil activation technique com- bined with high resolution γ-ray spectrometry at the MC50 cyclotron of the Korea Institute of. Radiological and Medical Sciences.

  14. READING PHILEMON AS THERAPEUTIC NARRATIVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-29

    Mar 29, 2010 ... Contrary to an initial impression, the narrative therapeutic approach does not emerge from a completely psychological ... Furthermore, a narrative therapeutic reading does not exist in a vacuum, therefore this investigation ..... converted to Christianity, Philemon supported other believers in various ways ...

  15. Antioxidant therapy: myth or reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Selles, Alberto J. [Center of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Havana (Cuba)]. E-mail: alberto@cqf.co.cu

    2005-07-15

    New terms such as oxidative stress, antioxidant products or pro-oxidant risks are becoming familiar and an increasing number of international scientific conferences and the publication of thousands of scientific articles is an indication of the growing interest that the subject awakens. The most publicized example is perhaps the French paradox, based on the apparent compatibility of a high fat diet with a low incidence of coronary atherosclerosis attributed to the regular consumption, by the French, of red wine and/or grape juice. Flavonoids, and other phenolic substances contained in red wine, are assigned with antioxidant properties, which lower the oxidation of low density lipoproteins and consequently, the risk of atherogenic diseases. Other examples are the aging process and its correlation with an increase of free radicals, and the correlation between the initiation and promotion of cancer and tissue injury by free radicals, which has induced the intake of antioxidant products as chemical factors that prevent the onset of the disease. Currently, the incidence of oxidative stress on the onset and evolution of more than 100 diseases is claimed by several researchers. All these are 'realities', which on the other hand, are lacking of more clinical evidence, are considered by both physicians and health regulatory bodies, either as 'myths' or of 'secondary' importance. In the attempts to destroy those myths, results of chemical, pre-clinical, and clinical works with a crude extract of mango (Mangifera indica L.) stem bark, which has been developed in Cuba, are reviewed, with a strong experimental evidence of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. (author)

  16. Measuring circulating antioxidants in wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alan; Klasing, Kirk; Ricklefs, Robert

    2007-05-01

    Antioxidants protect against free radical damage, which is associated with various age-related pathologies. Antioxidants are also an important buffer against the respiratory burst of the immune system. This protection presumably has costs and therefore might underlie important life-history trade-offs. Studying such trade-offs in a comparative context requires field-applicable methods for assessing antioxidant capacity in wild animals. Here, we present modifications to a simple spectrophotometric assay (the TEAC or TAS assay) that can be applied to miniscule amounts of blood plasma to determine circulating antioxidant capacity. Additionally, uric acid, the most abundant circulating antioxidant, should be measured independently. Uric acid in birds is derived from amino acid catabolism, perhaps incidentally to its antioxidant function. The assay was validated in experimental studies on chickens showing effects of diet on antioxidant capacity, and in field measurements on 92 species of birds, which demonstrate substantial species differences in constitutive antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, most wild birds demonstrate a dramatic change in antioxidant capacity due to stress. These results show that this technique detects variation appropriate for both interspecific and intraspecific studies, and that antioxidants and uric acid change in response to conditions of interest to field ecologists, such as diet and stress.

  17. Antioxidant activity of carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinamonti, S; Venturoli, L; Leis, M; Chicca, M; Barbieri, A; Sostero, S; Ravenna, F; Daffonchio, L; Novellini, R; Ciaccia, A

    2001-09-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals are involved in many respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate (CLS) is a mucoactive drug effective in the treatment of bronchopulmonary diseases characterized by mucus alterations, including COPD. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of CLS was studied in vitro in three different oxygen radical producing systems, i.e. bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) from patients affected by COPD, ultrasound treated human serum and cultured human lung endothelial cells challenged with elastase. BAL, exposed or not to different concentrations of CLS (1.5-30 mM), was assayed for free radical content by fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) or by cytochrome c reduction kinetics. Human serum was treated with ultrasound in the presence or absence of CLS (1.5, 2.5 mM) or N-acetyl cysteine (NAC; 4, 5 mM) and assayed for free radical content by FADU. Human endothelial cells cultured in vitro from pulmonary artery were incubated with elastase (0.3 IU/mL), in the presence or absence of glutathione (GSH; 0.65 mM) or CLS (0.16 mM). The supernatant was tested for cytochrome c reduction kinetics whereas cell homogenates were assessed for xanthine oxidase (XO) content by SDS-PAGE. Results showed that CLS is more effective as an in vitro scavenger in comparison to GSH and NAC. CLS reduced the damage of DNA from healthy donors exposed to COPD-BAL and was able to quench clastogenic activity induced in human serum by exposure to ultrasound at concentrations as low as 2.5 mM. NAC protect DNA from radical damage, starting from 5 mM. In human lung endothelial cells cultured in presence of elastase, CLS (0.16 mM) decreased xanthine oxidase activity. These results suggest that CLS could act by interfering with the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into superoxide-producing xanthine oxidase. The antioxidant activity of CLS could contribute to its therapeutic activity by reducing radical

  18. Rethinking Therapeutic Misconception in Biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tupasela, Aaro; Snell, Karoliina; Cañada, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Some authors have noted that in biobank research participants may be guided by what is called therapeutic misconception, whereby participants attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures.This article argues that the notion of therapeutic misconception is increasingly less justified when...... evaluating biobanks. We present four examples taken from recent developments in biobanking to argue why the notion of therapeutic misconception is problematic in that biobanking practices are increasingly seeking to bridge research and treatment in diff erent ways. In this article we explore examples where...... underpinnings for the need to separate research and treatment, and thus the notion of therapeutic misconception in the fi rst place. We call this tension between research and treatment ambivalent research advancement to highlight the difficulties that various actors have in managing such shifts within...

  19. [Antioxidant properties of essential oils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misharina, T A; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I

    2009-01-01

    By the method of capillary gas-liquid chromatography we studied antioxidant properties and stability during the storage of hexane solutions of 14 individual essential oils from black and white pepper (Piper nigrum L.), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum L.), nutmeg (Myristica fragrans Houtt.), mace (Myristica fragrans Houtt), juniperberry (Juniperus communis L.), seed of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., var. dulce Thelling), caraway (Carvum carvi L.), dry leaves of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Bl.), marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), laurel (Laurus nobilis L.), ginger (Zingiber officinale L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and clove bud (Caryophyllus aromaticus L.). We assessed the antioxidant properties by the oxidation of aliphatic aldehyde (trans-2-hexenal) into the according carbon acid. We established that essential oils of garlic, clove bud, ginger and leaves of cinnamon have the maximal efficiency of inhibition of hexenal oxidation (80-93%), while black pepper oil has the minimal (49%). Antioxidant properties of essential oils with a high content of substituted phenols depended poorly on its concentration in model systems. We studied the changes in essential oils content during the storage of its hexane solutions for 40 days in the light and out of the light and compared it with the stability of essential oils stored for a year out of the light.

  20. Systemic antioxidants and skin health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Gloria; Torres, Abel

    2012-09-01

    Most dermatologists agree that antioxidants help fight free radical damage and can help maintain healthy skin. They do so by affecting intracellular signaling pathways involved in skin damage and protecting against photodamage, as well as preventing wrinkles and inflammation. In today's modern world of the rising nutraceutical industry, many people, in addition to applying topical skin care products, turn to supplementation of the nutrients missing in their diets by taking multivitamins or isolated, man-made nutraceuticals, in what is known as the Inside-Out approach to skin care. However, ingestion of large quantities of isolated, fragmented nutrients can be harmful and is a poor representation of the kind of nutrition that can be obtained from whole food sources. In this comprehensive review, it was found that few studies on oral antioxidants benefiting the skin have been done using whole foods, and that the vast majority of current research is focused on the study of compounds in isolation. However, the public stands to benefit greatly if more research were to be devoted toward the impact that physiologic doses of antioxidants (obtained from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains) can have on skin health, and on health in general.

  1. Global antioxidant response of meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Celia; Barrio, Ángela; Del Mar Cavia, María; Alonso-Torre, Sara

    2017-06-01

    The global antioxidant response (GAR) method uses an enzymatic digestion to release antioxidants from foods. Owing to the importance of digestion for protein breakdown and subsequent release of bioactive compounds, the aim of the present study was to compare the GAR method for meat with the existing methodologies: the extraction-based method and QUENCHER. Seven fresh meats were analyzed using ABTS and FRAP assays. Our results indicated that the GAR of meat was higher than the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assessed with the traditional extraction-based method. When evaluated with GAR, the thermal treatment led to an increase in the TAC of the soluble fraction, contrasting with a decreased TAC after cooking measured using the extraction-based method. The effect of thermal treatment on the TAC assessed by the QUENCHER method seemed to be dependent on the assay applied, since results from ABTS differed from FRAP. Our results allow us to hypothesize that the activation of latent bioactive peptides along the gastrointestinal tract should be taken into consideration when evaluating the TAC of meat. Therefore, we conclude that the GAR method may be more appropriate for assessing the TAC of meat than the existing, most commonly used methods. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. [Classification and therapeutic strategy for chronic tonsillitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal'chun, V T

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to further develop and substantiate classification of chronic tonsillitis with due regard for etiology and pathogenesis of this disease. The author pays special attention to the fact that the toxico-allergic effect of focal infection of palatine tonsils (chronic tonsillitis, CT) is significantly more pronounced than that of focal infections of a different localization. The toxico-allergic manifestations of chronic tonsillitis are not infrequently realized through the associated non-specific infectious local and general complications and catalyze pathogenesis of the concomitant diseases. The classification developed taking into consideration etiology and pathogenesis of CT distinguishes two forms of chronic tonsillitis, viz. simple and toxico-allergic (TAF) CT, the latter being subdivided into two variants differing in the character of manifestations (TAF-1 and TAF-II). The clinical, morphological, and immunological characteristics of either form are described. It is emphasized that the most informative signs and symptoms of CT include the recurrence rate of tonsillitis in the medical history, purulent discharge from the tonsillar crypts apparent upon compression of their anterior surface with a spatula, and toxico-allergic reactions in combination with local signs and tonsillitis in the medical history. The therapeutic strategies for each forms of CT are specifies. The use of conservative therapy is recommended as the principal method for the treatment of the simple form, the strict compliance with the prescribed therapeutic modalities and repetition of the second therapeutic course within 3-4 months after the initial one being of primary importance. The treatment of TAF-1 should be started from conservative therapy the duration of which needs to be reduced in the absence of the marked desired effect bearing in mind the possibility of development of local and systemic complications. TAF-II requires urgent tonsillectomy because

  3. Do drug advertisements provide therapeutic information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimson, G V

    1977-01-01

    In this study of advertisements appearing in medical periodicals and by direct mail advertising to general practitioners, Dr. Stimson, a sociologist, concludes that from what is intended to provide therapeutic information hardly any therapeutic information is provided. He reminds the reader of the safeguards which surround all drug advertising by law and by the code of practice of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry but these safeguards do not appear to control real or potential sins of omission. Frequently in these advertisements the literature relating to the drug is quoted but Dr. Stimson found that it was difficult to trace all the papers quoted in different types of medical library. (Some references quoted were to unpublished papers but surely the blame should be shared in this situation?) Dr. Stimson also gives a vivid and fascinating glimpse of what he calls the 'images and stereotypes' of the patients who, it is claimed, would benefit from the drug being advertised. Certainly most general practitioners must be aware that when they prescribe that image is displaced by an individual but the portrait gallery is indeed depressing. However, to balance these advertisements drug companies issue data sheets which must be more informative than advertisements and conform to regulations in their format. Unfortunately data sheets are only issued every 15 months whereas the 'average general practitioner is potentially exposed to 1,300 advertisements every month'. In other words, the data sheet and not the advertisement should be the guideline but it arrives too infrequently to offset the lack of therapeutic information contained in advertisements. PMID:870694

  4. Towards further understanding on the antioxidative activities of Prunus persica fruit: A comparative study with four different fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Naveen; Sharma, Rajesh; Kar, Anand

    2014-11-01

    In the present study we have evaluated the antioxidant activities of different fractions (hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fractions) of Prunus persica fruit. For extraction simple warring blender method was employed and total phenolic and flavonoid contents were correlated with different antioxidant activities (total antioxidant, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), H2O2 scavenging, superoxide radical scavenging, iron chelating and their reducing power properties). Different in vitro antioxidant studies showed that ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions had the maximum activities that were well correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents. Maximum yield (25.14 ± 2.2%) was obtained in its aqueous fraction. Both ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions showed significant inhibitory effects on different antioxidant activities. A significantly high correlation coefficient existed between total antioxidant activities and with total phenolic as well as total flavonoid contents. It appears that ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of P. persica may serve as new potential sources of natural antioxidants and could be of therapeutic use in treating several diseases.

  5. Aqueous extracts of Lippia turbinata and Aloysia citriodora (Verbenaceae): assessment of antioxidant capacity and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portmann, Erika; Nigro, Marcela M López; Reides, Claudia G; Llesuy, Susana; Ricco, Rafael A; Wagner, Marcelo L; Gurni, Alberto A; Carballo, Marta A

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to make a contribution to the knowledge of aqueous extracts of Lippia turbinata and Aloysia citriodora (Verbenaceae; infusion and decoction) in relation with the establishment of its antioxidant activity and lack of DNA damage, for its potential use in therapeutics. The cytogenotoxic profile was evaluated through genotoxic biomarkers such as mitotic index, cellular proliferation kinetics, sister chromatid exchanges, single-cell gel electrophoresis assay, and micronucleus test in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. No statistical differences were found (P > .05) between control and exposed cultures, even between both aqueous extracts. The total antioxidant capacity was shown to be higher in the decoction than in the infusion and both aqueous extracts protected against protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation, the decoction being more efficient than the infusion (P < .005). These results suggest the safe use of these medicinal plants as chemoecologic agents in therapeutics.

  6. Design, synthesis and evaluation of seleno-dihydropyrimidinones as potential multi-targeted therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Rômulo F S; Barbosa, Flavio A R; Nascimento, Vanessa; de Oliveira, Aldo S; Brighente, Inês M C; Braga, Antonio Luiz

    2014-06-07

    In this paper we report the design, synthesis and evaluation of a series of seleno-dihydropyrimidinones as potential multi-targeted therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The compounds show excellent results as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, being as active as the standard drug. All these compounds also show very good antioxidant activity through different mechanisms of action.

  7. Therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markun, Stefan; Holzer, Barbara M; Rodak, Roksana; Kaplan, Vladimir; Wagner, Claudia C; Battegay, Edouard; Zimmerli, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Patients with multimorbidity are an increasing concern in healthcare. Clinical practice guidelines, however, do not take into account potential therapeutic conflicts caused by co-occurring medical conditions. This makes therapeutic decisions complex, especially in emergency situations. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity. We reviewed electronic records of all patients ≥18 years with two or more concurrent active medical conditions, admitted from the emergency department to the hospital ward of the University Hospital Zurich in January 2009. We cross-tabulated all active diagnoses with treatments recommended by guidelines for each diagnosis. Then, we identified potential therapeutic conflicts and classified them as either major or minor conflicts according to their clinical significance. 166 emergency inpatients with multimorbidity were included. The mean number of active diagnoses per patient was 6.6 (SD±3.4). We identified a total of 239 therapeutic conflicts in 49% of the of the study population. In 29% of the study population major therapeutic conflicts, in 41% of the patients minor therapeutic conflicts occurred. Therapeutic conflicts are common among multimorbid patients, with one out of two experiencing minor, and one out of three experiencing major therapeutic conflicts. Clinical practice guidelines need to address frequent therapeutic conflicts in patients with co-morbid medical conditions.

  8. Therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Markun

    Full Text Available Patients with multimorbidity are an increasing concern in healthcare. Clinical practice guidelines, however, do not take into account potential therapeutic conflicts caused by co-occurring medical conditions. This makes therapeutic decisions complex, especially in emergency situations.The aim of this study was to identify and quantify therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity.We reviewed electronic records of all patients ≥18 years with two or more concurrent active medical conditions, admitted from the emergency department to the hospital ward of the University Hospital Zurich in January 2009. We cross-tabulated all active diagnoses with treatments recommended by guidelines for each diagnosis. Then, we identified potential therapeutic conflicts and classified them as either major or minor conflicts according to their clinical significance.166 emergency inpatients with multimorbidity were included. The mean number of active diagnoses per patient was 6.6 (SD±3.4. We identified a total of 239 therapeutic conflicts in 49% of the of the study population. In 29% of the study population major therapeutic conflicts, in 41% of the patients minor therapeutic conflicts occurred.Therapeutic conflicts are common among multimorbid patients, with one out of two experiencing minor, and one out of three experiencing major therapeutic conflicts. Clinical practice guidelines need to address frequent therapeutic conflicts in patients with co-morbid medical conditions.

  9. Therapeutic Touch dan Nyeri Pasca Pembedahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumpuni Mumpuni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penanganan nyeri pada pasien yang dilakukan oleh profesi perawat lebih banyak mengacu pada pendekatan terapi medis dan farmakologis. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh therapeutic touch terhadap nyeri pasien pasca operasi. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain kuasi eksperimental yang dilakukan pada 60 orang responden, terdiri dari 30 orang kelompok intervensi dengan therapeutic touch dan 30 orang kelompok kontrol dengan teknik napas dalam. Penelitian berlangsung di ruang rawat bedah pasien dewasa RSUD Pasar Rebo. Data dikumpulkan dari bulan April hingga Oktober 2012. Hasil penelitian dengan uji Wilcoxon Signed Ranks menunjukkan adanya perbedaan yang signifikan antara skala nyeri sebelum dan sesudah tindakan baik pada kelompok intervensi maupun kelompok kontrol (nilai p = 0,000. Hasil uji Mann-Whitney pun memperlihatkan adanya perbedaan yang signifikan pada penurunan skala nyeri antara kelompok intervensi dengan kelompok kontrol (nilai p = 0,000. Pain management for patients by nurses refers to medical therapy and pharmacological approaches. This study aimed to determine the effect of therapeutic touch on post-operative pain. This study used a quasi-experimental design conducted on 60 respondents, comprised 30 person for intervention group (therapeutic touch and 30 person for control group (deep-breaths technique. The study conducted in the surgical ward for adult patients at Pasar Rebo Hospital Jakarta. Data collected from April until October 2012. The result of Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test showed a significant difference between the pain scale before and after treatment either the intervention group or the control group (p value = 0.000. The Mann-Whitney test’s result also showed a significant difference in pain reduction between the scale of the intervention group with the control group (p value = 0.000.

  10. The role of therapeutic alliance in mindfulness interventions: therapeutic alliance in mindfulness training for smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Simon B; Davis, James M; Hoyt, William T

    2013-09-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions have enjoyed a marked increase in support within biomedical and psychological research and practice in the past two decades. Despite the widespread application of these treatments for a range of psychological and medical conditions, there remains a lack of consensus regarding mechanisms through which these interventions effect change. One plausible yet underexplored mechanism is the therapeutic alliance between participants and mindfulness instructors. In this report, data are presented on therapeutic alliance from the mindfulness arm (n = 37) of a randomized controlled trial of a mindfulness-based smoking cessation treatment. Results suggest that client-reported therapeutic alliance measured midtreatment did not significantly predict primary smoking outcomes. Alliance did predict improvement in posttreatment scores on several outcome variables linked to mindfulness practice, including emotion regulation (β = -.24, p = .042), mindfulness (β = .33, p = .007), negative affect (β = -.33, p = .040), as well as treatment compliance (β = .39, p = .011). Implications of these relationships and the possible role of therapeutic alliance in mindfulness treatments are explored. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Medical error

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    Studies in the USA have shown that medical error is the 8th most common cause of death.2,3. The most common causes of medical error are:- administration of the wrong medication or wrong dose of the correct medication, using the wrong route of administration, giving a treatment to the wrong patient or at the wrong time.4 ...

  12. Effect of Antioxidants Supplementation on Aging and Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    If aging is due to or contributed by free radical reactions, as postulated by the free radical theory of aging, lifespan of organisms should be extended by administration of exogenous antioxidants. This paper reviews data on model organisms concerning the effects of exogenous antioxidants (antioxidant vitamins, lipoic acid, coenzyme Q, melatonin, resveratrol, curcumin, other polyphenols, and synthetic antioxidants including antioxidant nanoparticles) on the lifespan of model organisms. Mechanisms of effects of antioxidants, often due to indirect antioxidant action or to action not related to the antioxidant properties of the compounds administered, are discussed. The legitimacy of antioxidant supplementation in human is considered. PMID:24783202

  13. Antioxidant activities of leaf galls extracts of Terminalia chebula (Gaertn.) Retz. (Combretaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshwarappa, Ravi Shankara Birur; Ramachandra, Y L; Subaramaihha, Sundara Rajan; Subbaiah, Sujan Ganapathy Pasura; Austin, Richard Surendranath; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals are implicated in several metabolic diseases and the antioxidant therapy has gained an utmost importance in the treatment. The medicinal properties of plants have been investigated and explored for their potent antioxidant activities to counteract metabolic disorders. In this study, the chemical composition and free radical scavenging potential of leaf gall extracts (ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform and aqueous) of Terminelia chebula is evaluated, which is extensively used in the preparation of traditiona medications to treat various metabolic diseases. The presences of phenolics, flavonoids, triterpens, saponins, glycosides, phytosterols, reducing sugars were identified in the extracts according to standard procedures. The free radical scavenging activities of the extract were also analysed by standard procedures. The methanol extract had the highest total phenolic and flavonoid content. The antioxidant activities of leaf gall extracts were examined using diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH), Super oxide radical scavenging, Hydroxyl scavenging and ferric reducing power (FRAP) methods. In all the methods, the ethanolic extract showed higher free radical scavenging potential than all the other extracts. As the higher content of both total phenolics and flavonoids were found in the ethanolic extract, so the significantly high antioxidant activity can be positively correlated to the high content of total polyphenols/flavonoids of the ethanol extract. The results of this study confirm the folklore use of T. chebula leaves gall extracts as a natural antioxidant and justify its ethnobotanical use. Further, the results of antioxidant properties encourage the use of T. chebula leave gall extracts for medicinal health, functional food and nutraceutical applications.

  14. Passiflora incarnata treatment during gestation and lactation: toxicological and antioxidant evaluation in wistar dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Maria Boll

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Passiflora incarnata is marketed in many countries as a phytomedicine. Even though the directions of most marketed phytomedicines recommend them to be used under medical supervision, reproductive and developmental studies are sparse and not mandatory for regulatory purposes. In this study, a reproductive toxicity evaluation of P. incarnata was conducted in Wistar rats gavaged (30 or 300 mg/kg during pregnancy and lactation. Moreover, considering that antioxidant properties have been attributed to flavonoids present in the genus Passiflora, it was also evaluated the antioxidant/pro-oxidant balance in the plasma of these dams and the antioxidant potential in an in vitro test. P. incarnata treatment did not influence dams´ body weight as well as reproductive (gestation length, post-implantation loss, litter size, litter weight and hepatic (albumin, AST, ALT, GGT parameters. The antioxidant property of P. incarnata was evidenced both in vivo (increase in the total antioxidant plasmatic potential and in vitro (decrease in neutrophil-induced respiratory burst. The results from the present study indicate that under the experimental conditions evaluated, P. incarnata treatment during gestation and lactation presented antioxidant activity in the absence of maternal reproductive toxicity.

  15. Antioxidant Enriched Fractions from Zingiber Officinale Roscoe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Rahath Kubra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale Roscoe has many diverse properties and medicinal values such as antioxidant potential combined with the properties of a spice. Dried ginger (DG were extracted with aqueous ethanol and freeze-dried. The extract was evaluated for antioxidant potential, using 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging, antioxidant capacity and reducing power assays. DG extract was further fractionated into methanol (Mfr and water-soluble (Wfr fractions. The Mfr exhibited higher antioxidant capacity when compared to DG extract. Higher antioxidant potential of the methanol fraction may be due to the presence higher polyphenols and [6]-gingerol content. This suggests that alcoholic soluble fraction possess enormous scope to enhance the antioxidant potential when used as a supplement in various food as well as pharmaceutical formulations / products.

  16. Antioxidant Activity from Various Tomato Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Sri Iswari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tomato is one of the high antioxidant potential vegetables. Nowadays, there are many techniques of tomato processings instead of fresh consumption, i.e. boiled, steamed, juiced and sauteed. Every treatment of cooking will influence the chemical compound inside the fruits and the body's nutrition intake. It is important to conduct the research on antioxidant compound especially lycopene, β-carotene, vitamin C, α-tocopherol, and its activity after processing. This research has been done using the experimental method. Tomatoes were cooked into six difference ways, and then it was extracted using the same procedure continued with antioxidant measurement. The research results showed that steaming had promoted the higher antioxidant numbers (lycopene. α-tocopherol, β-carotene and vitamin C and higher TCA and antioxidant activities in the tomatoes than other processings. It was indicated that steaming was the best way to enhance amount, capacity and activities of antioxidants of the tomatoes.

  17. Antioxidants: Enhancing oral and general health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Shetti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals and antioxidant therapy have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. Antioxidants are compounds that destroy the free radicals in the body, thereby preventing harmful oxidation-reduction reactions. Antioxidants are critical for maintaining optimum health and well-being. The best sources of antioxidants are fruits and vegetables, which provide a variety of antioxidants such as Vitamins A, C, E, and carotenoids. Currently available data are compatible with the notion that these vitamins act as chemopreventives against some important cancers, e.g., carotenoids for lung cancer, ascorbic acid for salivary gland cancer, tocopherols for head and neck cancers, etc. Thus, a greater consumption of fruits and vegetables should be encouraged as they are the natural sources of these chemopreventive antioxidants along with other protective factors packaged by nature.

  18. Phenolipids as antioxidants in emulsified systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Bayrasy, Christelle; Laguerre, Mickäel

    along with their corresponding alkyl esters (C4-C20). The methods used to evaluate the antioxidative effect of the different phenolipids were the CAT assay (o/w emulsion), antioxidant assays (DPPH, Iron chelating and reducing power) and partitioning studies. Moreover, the results from the CAT assay...... to an increase of the antioxidative effect. When the phenolic compound reaches a certain point of lipophilicity its antioxidative effect decreases. Thus, the polar paradox hypothesis is not valid when the alkyl chain length is above a certain length. Futhermore, the length of the alkyl chain for optimal...... antioxidant effect has been shown to be influenced by the specific phenolic compound and the type of emulsion. The overall aim for our work was to evaluate phenolipids with different lipophilicity as antioxidants in emulsified food. In the study presented here caffeic, ferulic and coumaric acid were selected...

  19. Antioxidant and phytochemical analysis of Ranunculus arvensis L. extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Muhammad Zeeshan; Ali, Amjad; Ahmad, Ayaz; Saeed, Asma; Malik, Salman Akbar

    2015-06-30

    Ranunculus arvensis L. (R. arvensis) has long been used to treat a variety of medical conditions such as arthritis, asthma, hay fever, rheumatism, psoriasis, gut diseases and rheumatic pain. Here, we screened R. arvensis for antioxidant activity, phytochemical and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses. The chloroform, chloroform:methanol, methanol, methanol:acetone, acetone, methanol:water and water extracts of R. arvensis were examined for DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging assay, hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay, phosphomolybdenum assay, reducing power assay, flavonoid content, phenolic content and high performance liquid chromatography analysis. Significant antioxidant activity was displayed by methanol extract (IC 50 34.71 ± 0.02) in DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Total flavonoids and phenolics ranged 0.96-6.0 mg/g of extract calculated as rutin equivalent and 0.48-1.43 mg/g of extract calculated as gallic acid equivalent respectively. Significant value of rutin and caffeic acid was observed via high performance liquid chromatography. These results showed that extracts of R. arvensis exhibited significant antioxidant activities. Moreover, R. arvensis is a rich source of rutin, flavonoids and phenolics.

  20. Partitioning of selected antioxidants in mayonnaise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Schwarz, K.; Stockmann, H.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined partitioning of alpha-, beta-, and gamma- tocopherol and six polar antioxidants (Trolox, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, propyl gallate, gallic acid, and catechin) in mayonnaise. Partitioning of antioxidants between different phases was determined after separation of mayonnaise...... acid and catechin) to 83% (Trolox). Accordingly, proportions of 6% (Trolox) to 80% (gallic acid and catechin) were found in the aqueous phase. Similar trends were observed after dialysis. After ultracentrifugation, large proportions of polar antioxidants were found in the "emulsion phase...