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Sample records for thepseudotetraploid frog xenopus

  1. Accelerated Gene Evolution and Subfunctionalization in thePseudotetraploid Frog Xenopus Laevis

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    Hellsten, Uffe; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Grammar, Timothy C.; Harland,Richard M.; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2007-03-01

    Ancient whole genome duplications have been implicated in the vertebrate and teleost radiations, and in the emergence of diverse angiosperm lineages, but the evolutionary response to such a perturbation is still poorly understood. The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis experienced a relatively recent tetraploidization {approx} 40 million years ago. Analysis of the considerable amount of EST sequence available for this species together with the genome sequence of the related diploid Xenopus tropicalis provides a unique opportunity to study the genomic response to whole genome duplication.

  2. Biophysics of underwater hearing in the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elepfandt, A

    1995-01-01

    Anesthetized clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) were stimulated with underwater sound and the tympanic disk vibrations were studied using laser vibrometry. The tympanic disk velocities ranged from 0.01 to 0.5 mm/s (at a sound pressure of 2 Pa) in the frequency range of 0.4-4 kHz and were 20-40 dB high...

  3. The Genome of the Western Clawed Frog Xenopus tropicalis

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    Hellsten, Uffe; Harland, Richard M.; Gilchrist, Michael J.; Hendrix, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Shu, Shengqiang; Taher, Leila; Blitz, Ira L.; Blumberg, Bruce; Dichmann, Darwin S.; Dubchak, Inna; Amaya, Enrique; Detter, John C.; Fletcher, Russell; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Goodstein, David; Graves, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Grimwood, Jane; Kawashima, Takeshi; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan M.; Mead, Paul E.; Mitros, Therese; Ogino, Hajime; Ohta, Yuko; Poliakov, Alexander V.; Pollet, Nicolas; Robert, Jacques; Salamov, Asaf; Sater, Amy K.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Terry, Astrid; Vize, Peter D.; Warren, Wesley C.; Wells, Dan; Wills, Andrea; Wilson, Richard K.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Grainger, Robert; Grammer, Timothy; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Richardson, Paul M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2009-10-01

    The western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an important model for vertebrate development that combines experimental advantages of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis with more tractable genetics. Here we present a draft genome sequence assembly of X. tropicalis. This genome encodes over 20,000 protein-coding genes, including orthologs of at least 1,700 human disease genes. Over a million expressed sequence tags validated the annotation. More than one-third of the genome consists of transposable elements, with unusually prevalent DNA transposons. Like other tetrapods, the genome contains gene deserts enriched for conserved non-coding elements. The genome exhibits remarkable shared synteny with human and chicken over major parts of large chromosomes, broken by lineage-specific chromosome fusions and fissions, mainly in the mammalian lineage.

  4. Eugenol for anesthesia of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis).

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    Guénette, Sarah A; Hélie, Pierre; Beaudry, Francis; Vachon, Pascal

    2007-05-01

    To determine the level of anesthesia attained in Xenopus laevis frogs with eugenol at different doses and by different routes of administration. Prospective experimental trial. Sixty X. laevis nonbreeding female frogs weighing between 90 and 140 g. Three different routes of administration were tested - subcutaneous injections into the dorsal lymph sacs, topical administration using a gauze patch, and immersion in a bath containing eugenol. Following the determination of the best route of administration, the acetic acid test, the withdrawal reflex, righting reflex, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were used to evaluate central nervous system depression following eugenol bath administration. In an additional group, the response to a surgical incision of the abdominal wall was evaluated. The pharmacokinetics of eugenol were determined following bath immersion administration, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated following blood concentration determination by tandem liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. It was not possible to induce anethesia with subcutaneous and patch administration, independent of the eugenol dose administered. The immersion bath was the only efficacious route for anesthesia inducing surgical anesthesia for at least 30 minutes with postoperative analgesia. Histopathology of selected tissues (heart, lung, liver, kidneys, eyes) showed no evidence of lesions 24 hours following bath immersion. The elimination half-life (T(1/2)) was 4 hours. When administered as a single-bath immersion (dose 350 mg L(-1)) for 15 minutes, eugenol may serve as an effective anesthetic in X. laevis frogs for short surgical procedures.

  5. [Case of cutaneous necrosis in African clawed frogs Xenopus laevis after the topical application of eugenol].

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    Ross, Andréanne; Guénette, Sarah Annie; Hélie, Pierre; Vachon, Pascal

    2006-11-01

    Case of cutaneous necrosis in African Clawed frogs Xenopus laevis after the topical application of eugenol. African Clawed frogs showed necrotic cutaneous lesions after a topical application of high concentrations of eugenol, an analgesic and anesthetic agent. Microscopically, ulceration of the epidermis, a loss of mucous and serous glands as well as an infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed.

  6. Eugenol Anesthesia in African Clawed Frogs (Xenopus laevis) of Different Body Weights

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    Goulet, Félix; Hélie, Pierre; Vachon, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to determine the duration of anesthesia in Xenopus laevis frogs of different body weights relative to exposure time in a eugenol (350 µL/L) bath. Two groups of 5 female frogs each weighing 7.5 ± 2.1 g (small frogs) or 29.2 ± 7.4 g (medium frogs) were used. The acetic acid test (AAT), withdrawal reflex, righting reflex, heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation were used to evaluate CNS depression after eugenol bath administration. No responses to the AAT, withdrawal reflex, and righting reflex were seen for 1 h (small frogs) or 0.5 h (medium frogs) after immersion in a eugenol bath for 5 or 10 min, respectively. Oxygen saturation was not affected by anesthesia, but heart rate was depressed for as long as 1 h in both groups of frogs. Surgical anesthesia evaluated by using skin and abdominal incisions revealed that small frogs were anesthetized for a maximum of 15 min compared with 30 min in medium frogs. Frogs showed no ill effects 24 h after eugenol bath administration. These results suggest that body weight is an important parameter to consider when using a eugenol bath for anesthesia of Xenopus frogs. PMID:20819393

  7. Effects of Endocrine Disruptors Ethinylestradiol and Procloraz on the vocal system of the frog Xenopus tropicalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Nørum, Ulrik; Korsgaard, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    for studying the effects of endocrine disruptors on sexual differentiation. We exposed tadpoles and metamorphs of the species Xenopus tropicalis to the synthetic estrogen ethinylestradiol and the fungicide prochloraz. Prochloraz masculinized the larynx of female frogs while ethinylestradiol had no effect...

  8. Hargreaves does not evaluate nociception following a surgical laparotomy in Xenopus leavis frogs.

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    Vachon, P

    2014-10-01

    The present study was performed to determine the effectiveness of the Hargreaves test for the evaluation of nociception in frogs, more precisely to determine if cutaneous thresholds to a radiant heat stimulus would increase with analgesics following an abdominal laparotomy performed under general anaesthesia. Non breeding female Xenopus leavis frogs (3 groups (non-anaesthetized, anaesthetized with tricaine methanesulfonate (MS222), with or without an abdominal laparotomy) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hargreaves test. Cutaneous thresholds were evaluated at baseline and following anaesthetic recovery (over 8 h) at six different body locations. Increased reaction times were observed in the gular area only at 1 h post-recovery following a MS222 bath immersion in frogs with (p nociception induced by an abdominal laparotomy and consequently cannot be used to evaluate analgesics in X. leavis frogs. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Further Development and Validation of the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX).

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    1992-11-23

    high osmosis water to culture the adults with no temperature bake oven in which glassware can be apparent adverse effects on results. Only non- heated...Toxicol 14(1&2):143-160, 199 1. Laevis. Bull Environ Contain Toxicol 22:159-166, 1979. Friedman M, Rayburn JR, Bantle JA: Developmental toxicology of potato ...160. Friedman, M., Rayburn, J.R., and Bantle, J.A. 1990. Developmental toxicology of potato alkaloids in the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus

  10. The effect of food properties on grasping and manipulation in the aquatic frog, Xenopus laevis.

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    Anzeraey, Aude; Aumont, Madeleine; Decamps, Thierry; Herrel, Anthony; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle

    2017-10-05

    The ability to grasp an object is fundamental from an evolutionary perspective. Involved in many daily activities, grasping has been extensively studied in primates and other mammals. Yet, other groups of tetrapods, including anurans, have also evolved significant forelimb prehensile capacities that are often thought to have originated in an arboreal context. However, grasping is also observed in aquatic species. Yet, how aquatic frogs use their forelimbs to capture and manipulate prey remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to explore how the grasping and manipulation of food items in aquatic frogs is impacted by food properties such as size and mobility. To do so we use the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis and quantified the use of the hands and fingers while processing mobile and stationary prey of different sizes (small, intermediate, and large prey). Our results show that X. laevis is able to individualize the digits and that the mobility and the length of the prey significantly influence the kind of grasping pattern used. Grasping abilities are thus not specific to terrestrial, nor arboreal species. These results illustrate how prey properties impact grasping and manipulation strategies in an aquatic frog and shed further light on the ecological contexts that may have given rise to the origin of grasping in frogs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Bioconcentration and Metabolism of Pyriproxyfen in Tadpoles of African Clawed Frogs, Xenopus laevis.

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    Ose, Keiko; Miyamoto, Mitsugu; Fujisawa, Takuo; Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2017-11-22

    Bioconcentration and metabolism of pyriproxyfen uniformly labeled with 14C at the phenoxyphenyl ring were studied using tadpoles of African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, exposed to water at the nominal concentrations of 3 and 300 ppb for 22 days under the flow-through conditions, with a following 3 day depuration phase. Neither meaningful mortality nor abnormal behavior was observed in control and exposure groups throughout the study. After the rapid uptake to tadpoles, pyriproxyfen was extensively metabolized and excreted, and as a result, steady-state bioconcentration factors and depuration half-lives ranged from 550 to 610 and from 0.34 to 0.54 days, respectively. The metabolites were mostly distributed in the liver or gastrointestinal tract. The major metabolic reactions were hydroxylation at the 4' position of the phenoxyphenyl group and cleavage of the ether linkage, followed by sulfate conjugation.

  12. Lateral Line Scene Analysis in the Purely Aquatic Frog Xenopus laevis Daudin (Pipidae).

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    Elepfandt, Andreas; Lebrecht, Silke; Schroedter, Kirsten; Brudermanns, Britta; Hillig, Renate; Schuberth, Claire; Fliess, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The ability to locate and discriminate water surface waves that impinge simultaneously from multiple directions was studied in the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Monofrequency waves of 5-30 Hz were presented from point sources at a distance of 10 cm from the frog, unless stated otherwise, and the animal's response turn towards the wave origin examined. Two-choice conditioning with two simultaneous frontal waves at a 90-degree inter-wave angle revealed discrimination thresholds lower than 1 Hz for 10- to 20-Hz source wave frequencies. Smaller inter-wave angles resulted in larger thresholds, and no discrimination was found below 40°. If a third wave was added from behind, the frequency discrimination of the two frontal waves deteriorated, with 18 Hz being discriminated from waves differing by at least 2.75 Hz. Subjects also discriminated between two simultaneous waves of equal frequency presented from differing distances. At a distance of 10 cm, the discrimination threshold was 0.95 cm. Thus, X. laevis is capable of discriminating source distances in an overlap on the basis of wave curvatures. The detection of source directions among four, six or eight waves of equal frequency and distance was investigated by measuring the angular distribution of the response turns. Turns were significantly more closely oriented towards sources than to intermediate directions. The orientation accuracy did not degrade with the number of waves. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Immune roles of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) tadpole granulocytes during Frog Virus 3 ranavirus infections.

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    Koubourli, Daphne V; Wendel, Emily S; Yaparla, Amulya; Ghaul, Jonathan R; Grayfer, Leon

    2017-07-01

    Infections by Frog Virus 3 (FV3) and other ranaviruses (RVs) are contributing to the amphibian declines, while the mechanisms controlling anuran tadpole susceptibility and adult frog resistance to RVs, including the roles of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) during anti-FV3 responses, remain largely unknown. Since amphibian kidneys represent an important FV3 target, the inability of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) tadpoles to mount effective kidney inflammatory responses to FV3 is thought to contribute to their susceptibility. Here we demonstrate that a recombinant X. laevis granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) generates PMNs with hallmark granulocyte morphology. Tadpole pretreatment with G-CSF prior to FV3 infection reduces animal kidney FV3 loads and extends their survival. Moreover, G-CSF-derived PMNs are resistant to FV3 infection and express high levels of TNFα in response to this virus. Notably, FV3-infected tadpoles fail to recruit G-CSFR expressing granulocytes into their kidneys, suggesting that they lack an integral inflammatory effector population at this site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Matter of the Heart: The African Clawed Frog Xenopus as a Model for Studying Vertebrate Cardiogenesis and Congenital Heart Defects

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    Hempel, Annemarie; Kühl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The African clawed frog, Xenopus, is a valuable non-mammalian model organism to investigate vertebrate heart development and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of human congenital heart defects (CHDs). In this review, we outline the similarities between Xenopus and mammalian cardiogenesis, and provide an overview of well-studied cardiac genes in Xenopus, which have been associated with congenital heart conditions. Additionally, we highlight advantages of modeling candidate genes d...

  15. The morphology and attachment of Protopolystoma xenopodis (Monogenea: Polystomatidae infecting the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

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    Theunissen Maxine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis (Anura: Pipidae is host to more than 25 parasite genera encompassing most of the parasitic invertebrate groups. Protopolystoma xenopodis Price, 1943 (Monogenea: Polystomatidae is one of two monogeneans infecting X. laevis. This study focussed on the external morphology of different developmental stages using scanning electron microscopy, histology and light microscopy. Eggs are released continuously and are washed out when the frog urinates. After successful development, an active swimming oncomiracidium leaves the egg capsule and locates a potential post-metamorphic clawed frog. The oncomiracidium migrates to the kidney where it attaches and starts to feed on blood. The parasite then migrates to the urinary bladder where it reaches maturity. Eggs are fusiform, about 300 μm long, with a smooth surface and are operculated. Oncomiracidia are elongated and cylindrical in shape, with an oval posterior cup-shaped haptor that bears a total of 20 sclerites; 16 marginal hooklets used for attachment to the kidney of the host and two pairs of hamulus primordia. Cilia from the 64 ciliated cells enable the oncomiracidium to swim for up to 24 h when the cilia subsequently curl up, become non-functional and are shed from the body. The tegument between the ciliated cells bears a series of sensory papillae. The body of the mature parasite is elongated and pyriform and possesses an opisthaptor armed with three pairs of suckers and two pairs of falciform hooks to ensure a firm grip on the flexible internal surface of the urinary bladder.

  16. A Matter of the Heart: The African Clawed Frog Xenopus as a Model for Studying Vertebrate Cardiogenesis and Congenital Heart Defects

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    Annemarie Hempel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The African clawed frog, Xenopus, is a valuable non-mammalian model organism to investigate vertebrate heart development and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of human congenital heart defects (CHDs. In this review, we outline the similarities between Xenopus and mammalian cardiogenesis, and provide an overview of well-studied cardiac genes in Xenopus, which have been associated with congenital heart conditions. Additionally, we highlight advantages of modeling candidate genes derived from genome wide association studies (GWAS in Xenopus and discuss commonly used techniques.

  17. A Matter of the Heart: The African Clawed Frog Xenopus as a Model for Studying Vertebrate Cardiogenesis and Congenital Heart Defects.

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    Hempel, Annemarie; Kühl, Michael

    2016-06-04

    The African clawed frog, Xenopus, is a valuable non-mammalian model organism to investigate vertebrate heart development and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of human congenital heart defects (CHDs). In this review, we outline the similarities between Xenopus and mammalian cardiogenesis, and provide an overview of well-studied cardiac genes in Xenopus , which have been associated with congenital heart conditions. Additionally, we highlight advantages of modeling candidate genes derived from genome wide association studies (GWAS) in Xenopus and discuss commonly used techniques.

  18. Analgesic effects of meloxicam, morphine sulfate, flunixin meglumine, and xylazine hydrochloride in African-clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis).

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    Coble, Dondrae J; Taylor, Douglas K; Mook, Deborah M

    2011-05-01

    We evaluated analgesic use and analgesiometry in aquatic African-clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis). We used the acetic acid test (AAT) to assess the analgesic potential of systemic xylazine hydrochloride, meloxicam, flunixin meglumine, and morphine sulfate after injection into the dorsal lymph sac. Flunixin meglumine provided better analgesia than did the other drugs, most evident at 5 and 9 h after administration. Because the AAT was associated with the development of dermal lesions, we discontinued use of this assay and chose the Hargreaves test as an alternative method of measuring nociception in Xenopus. This assay is commonly performed in rodents, but its efficacy in an aquatic species such as Xenopus was unknown prior to this study. We found that the Hargreaves test was an effective measure of nociception in Xenopus, and we used it to evaluate the effectiveness of the nonopiod agents xylazine hydrochloride, meloxicam, and flunixin meglumine both in the absence of surgery and after surgical oocyte harvest. Similar to findings from the AAT, flunixin meglumine provided better analgesia in the Hargreaves test than did the other agents when analyzed in the absence of surgical intervention. Results were equivocal after oocyte harvest. Although surgical oocyte harvest is a common procedure in Xenopus, and currently there are no published recommendations for analgesia after this invasive surgery. Future studies are needed to clarify the efficacy of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs for that purpose.

  19. Structural and functional characteristics of xenavidin, the first frog avidin from Xenopus tropicalis

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    Airenne Tomi T

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avidins are proteins with extraordinarily high ligand-binding affinity, a property which is used in a wide array of life science applications. Even though useful for biotechnology and nanotechnology, the biological function of avidins is not fully understood. Here we structurally and functionally characterise a novel avidin named xenavidin, which is to our knowledge the first reported avidin from a frog. Results Xenavidin was identified from an EST sequence database for Xenopus tropicalis and produced in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. The recombinant xenavidin was found to be homotetrameric based on gel filtration analysis. Biacore sensor analysis, fluorescently labelled biotin and radioactive biotin were used to evaluate the biotin-binding properties of xenavidin - it binds biotin with high affinity though less tightly than do chicken avidin and bacterial streptavidin. X-ray crystallography revealed structural conservation around the ligand-binding site, while some of the loop regions have a unique design. The location of structural water molecules at the entrance and/or within the ligand-binding site may have a role in determining the characteristic biotin-binding properties of xenavidin. Conclusion The novel data reported here provide information about the biochemically and structurally important determinants of biotin binding. This information may facilitate the discovery of novel tools for biotechnology.

  20. Extracellular Ca2+ Is Required for Fertilization in the African Clawed Frog, Xenopus laevis.

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    Wozniak, Katherine L; Mayfield, Brianna L; Duray, Alexis M; Tembo, Maiwase; Beleny, David O; Napolitano, Marc A; Sauer, Monica L; Wisner, Bennett W; Carlson, Anne E

    2017-01-01

    The necessity of extracellular Ca2+ for fertilization and early embryonic development in the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is controversial. Ca2+ entry into X. laevis sperm is reportedly required for the acrosome reaction, yet fertilization and embryonic development have been documented to occur in high concentrations of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Here we sought to resolve this controversy. Using the appearance of cleavage furrows as an indicator of embryonic development, we found that X. laevis eggs inseminated in a solution lacking added divalent cations developed normally. By contrast, eggs inseminated in millimolar concentrations of BAPTA or EGTA failed to develop. Transferring embryos to varying solutions after sperm addition, we found that extracellular Ca2+ is specifically required for events occurring within the first 30 minutes after sperm addition, but not after. We found that the fluorescently stained sperm were not able to penetrate the envelope of eggs inseminated in high BAPTA, whereas several had penetrated the vitelline envelope of eggs inseminated without a Ca2+ chelator, or with BAPTA and saturating CaCl2. Together these results indicate that fertilization does not occur in high concentrations of Ca2+ chelators. Finally, we found that the jelly coat includes >5 mM of readily diffusible Ca2+. Taken together, these data are consistent with requirement of extracellular Ca2+ for fertilization. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the jelly coat surrounding the egg acts as a reserve of readily available Ca2+ ions to foster fertilization in changing extracellular milieu.

  1. Overland movement in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis): empirical dispersal data from within their native range.

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    De Villiers, F André; Measey, John

    2017-01-01

    Dispersal forms are an important component of the ecology of many animals, and reach particular importance for predicting ranges of invasive species. African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) move overland between water bodies, but all empirical studies are from invasive populations with none from their native southern Africa. Here we report on incidents of overland movement found through a capture-recapture study carried out over a three year period in Overstrand, South Africa. The maximum distance moved was 2.4 km with most of the 91 animals, representing 5% of the population, moving ∼150 m. We found no differences in distances moved by males and females, despite the former being smaller. Fewer males moved overland, but this was no different from the sex bias found in the population. In laboratory performance trials, we found that males outperformed females, in both distance moved and time to exhaustion, when corrected for size. Overland movement occurred throughout the year, but reached peaks in spring and early summer when temporary water bodies were drying. Despite permanent impoundments being located within the study area, we found no evidence for migrations of animals between temporary and permanent water bodies. Our study provides the first dispersal kernel for X. laevis and suggests that it is similar to many non-pipid anurans with respect to dispersal.

  2. Inbreeding Ratio and Genetic Relationships among Strains of the Western Clawed Frog, Xenopus tropicalis.

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    Takeshi Igawa

    Full Text Available The Western clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis, is a highly promising model amphibian, especially in developmental and physiological research, and as a tool for understanding disease. It was originally found in the West African rainforest belt, and was introduced to the research community in the 1990s. The major strains thus far known include the Nigerian and Ivory Coast strains. However, due to its short history as an experimental animal, the genetic relationship among the various strains has not yet been clarified, and establishment of inbred strains has not yet been achieved. Since 2003 the Institute for Amphibian Biology (IAB, Hiroshima University has maintained stocks of multiple X. tropicalis strains and conducted consecutive breeding as part of the National BioResource Project. In the present study we investigated the inbreeding ratio and genetic relationship of four inbred strains at IAB, as well as stocks from other institutions, using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and mitochondrial haplotypes. Our results show successive reduction of heterozygosity in the genome of the IAB inbred strains. The Ivory Coast strains clearly differed from the Nigerian strains genetically, and three subgroups were identified within both the Nigerian and Ivory Coast strains. It is noteworthy that the Ivory Coast strains have an evolutionary divergent genetic background. Our results serve as a guide for the most effective use of X. tropicalis strains, and the long-term maintenance of multiple strains will contribute to further research efforts.

  3. Application of frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus to ecological risk assessment.

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    Hoke, Robert A; Ankley, Gerald T

    2005-10-01

    An expert workshop recently was convened to consider the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX) as a screening method for identifying the potential developmental toxicity of single chemicals and chemical mixtures. One recommendation from the workshop was that, in order to determine the utility of FETAX for ecological risk assessments, additional consideration of how the assay is conducted is necessary. In addition, a comparative evaluation would be useful of FETAX endpoints (i.e., survival, malformations, growth) versus each other, endpoints from aquatic toxicity tests using more commonly tested species of cladocerans and fish, and tests with other amphibian species. This review provides an evaluation and critique of the current FETAX protocol from two perspectives: Practical considerations relative to conducting the test and sensitivity of the assay (and associated endpoints) compared to tests with other species. Several aspects of the current standard protocol, including test temperature, diet, loading rates, and chemical exposure options, need to be modified to ensure that the assay is robust technically. Evaluation of FETAX data from the open literature indicates that growth is the most sensitive endpoint in the assay, followed by malformations and then survival; unfortunately, the growth endpoint often is not considered or reported in the assay. Comparison of FETAX data with acute toxicity data from tests with other amphibians or traditional aquatic test species indicates FETAX is relatively insensitive. This suggests that environmental risk assessments using acute hazard data from tests with traditional aquatic test species usually would be more protective of native amphibian species than risk assessments that use hazard data from FETAX.

  4. Impacts of Climate Change on the Global Invasion Potential of the African Clawed Frog Xenopus laevis.

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    Ihlow, Flora; Courant, Julien; Secondi, Jean; Herrel, Anthony; Rebelo, Rui; Measey, G John; Lillo, Francesco; De Villiers, F André; Vogt, Solveig; De Busschere, Charlotte; Backeljau, Thierry; Rödder, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    By altering or eliminating delicate ecological relationships, non-indigenous species are considered a major threat to biodiversity, as well as a driver of environmental change. Global climate change affects ecosystems and ecological communities, leading to changes in the phenology, geographic ranges, or population abundance of several species. Thus, predicting the impacts of global climate change on the current and future distribution of invasive species is an important subject in macroecological studies. The African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), native to South Africa, possesses a strong invasion potential and populations have become established in numerous countries across four continents. The global invasion potential of X. laevis was assessed using correlative species distribution models (SDMs). SDMs were computed based on a comprehensive set of occurrence records covering South Africa, North America, South America and Europe and a set of nine environmental predictors. Models were built using both a maximum entropy model and an ensemble approach integrating eight algorithms. The future occurrence probabilities for X. laevis were subsequently computed using bioclimatic variables for 2070 following four different IPCC scenarios. Despite minor differences between the statistical approaches, both SDMs predict the future potential distribution of X. laevis, on a global scale, to decrease across all climate change scenarios. On a continental scale, both SDMs predict decreasing potential distributions in the species' native range in South Africa, as well as in the invaded areas in North and South America, and in Australia where the species has not been introduced. In contrast, both SDMs predict the potential range size to expand in Europe. Our results suggest that all probability classes will be equally affected by climate change. New regional conditions may promote new invasions or the spread of established invasive populations, especially in France and Great Britain.

  5. Multiple mechanisms promote the retained expression of gene duplicates in the tetraploid frog Xenopus laevis.

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    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication provides a window of opportunity for biological variants to persist under the protection of a co-expressed copy with similar or redundant function. Duplication catalyzes innovation (neofunctionalization, subfunction degeneration (subfunctionalization, and genetic buffering (redundancy, and the genetic survival of each paralog is triggered by mechanisms that add, compromise, or do not alter protein function. We tested the applicability of three types of mechanisms for promoting the retained expression of duplicated genes in 290 expressed paralogs of the tetraploid clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Tests were based on explicit expectations concerning the ka/ks ratio, and the number and location of nonsynonymous substitutions after duplication. Functional constraints on the majority of paralogs are not significantly different from a singleton ortholog. However, we recover strong support that some of them have an asymmetric rate of nonsynonymous substitution: 6% match predictions of the neofunctionalization hypothesis in that (1 each paralog accumulated nonsynonymous substitutions at a significantly different rate and (2 the one that evolves faster has a higher ka/ks ratio than the other paralog and than a singleton ortholog. Fewer paralogs (3% exhibit a complementary pattern of substitution at the protein level that is predicted by enhancement or degradation of different functional domains, and the remaining 13% have a higher average ka/ks ratio in both paralogs that is consistent with altered functional constraints, diversifying selection, or activity-reducing mutations after duplication. We estimate that these paralogs have been retained since they originated by genome duplication between 21 and 41 million years ago. Multiple mechanisms operate to promote the retained expression of duplicates in the same genome, in genes in the same functional class, over the same period of time following duplication, and sometimes in the same pair of

  6. Jumping performance in the highly aquatic frog, Xenopus tropicalis: sex-specific relationships between morphology and performance

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    Anthony Herrel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Frogs are characterized by a morphology that has been suggested to be related to their unique jumping specialization. Yet, the functional demands associated with jumping and swimming may not be that different as suggested by studies with semi-aquatic frogs. Here, we explore whether features previously identified as indicative of good burst swimming performance also predict jumping performance in a highly aquatic frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Moreover, we test whether the morphological determinants of jumping performance are similar in the two sexes and whether jumping performance differs in the two sexes. Finally we test whether jumping capacity is positively associated with burst swimming and terrestrial endurance capacity in both sexes. Our results show sex-specific differences in jumping performance when correcting for differences in body size. Moreover, the features determining jumping performance are different in the two sexes. Finally, the relationships between different performance traits are sex-dependent as well with females, but not males, showing a trade-off between peak jumping force and the time jumped to exhaustion. This suggests that different selective pressures operate on the two sexes, with females being subjected to constraints on locomotion due to their greater body mass and investment in reproductive capacity. In contrast, males appear to invest more in locomotor capacity giving them higher performance for a given body size compared to females.

  7. Use of the enhanced frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX) to determine chemically-induced phenotypic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingling; Zhu, Jingmin; Rotchell, Jeanette M; Wu, Lijiao; Gao, Jinjuan; Shi, Huahong

    2015-03-01

    The frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX) is an established method for the evaluation of the developmental toxicities of chemicals. To develop an enhanced FETAX that is appropriate for common environmental contaminants, we exposed Xenopus tropicalis embryos to eight compounds, including tributyltin, triphenyltin, CdCl2, pyraclostrobin, picoxystrobin, coumoxystrobin, all-trans-retinoic acid and 9-cis-retinoic acid. Multiple malformations were induced in embryos particularly following exposure to tributyltin, triphenyltin and pyraclostrobin at environmentally relevant concentrations. Based on the range of observed malformations, we proposed a phenotypic assessment method with 20 phenotypes and a 0-5 scoring system. This derived index exhibited concentration-dependent relationships for all of the chemicals tested. Furthermore, the phenotype profiles were characteristic of the different tested chemicals. Our results indicate that malformation phenotypes can be quantitatively integrated with the primary endpoints in conventional FETAX assessments to allow for increased sensitivity and measurement of quantitative effects and to provide indicative mechanistic information for each tested chemical. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Immune Defenses against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a Fungus Linked to Global Amphibian Declines, in the South African Clawed Frog, Xenopus laevis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jeremy P.; Reinert, Laura K.; Harper, Laura K.; Woodhams, Douglas C.; Rollins-Smith, Louise A.

    2010-01-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a chytrid fungus that causes the lethal skin disease chytridiomycosis in amphibians. It is regarded as an emerging infectious disease affecting diverse amphibian populations in many parts of the world. Because there are few model amphibian species for immunological studies, little is known about immune defenses against B. dendrobatidis. We show here that the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is a suitable model for investigating immunity to this pathogen. After an experimental exposure, a mild infection developed over 20 to 30 days and declined by 45 days postexposure. Either purified antimicrobial peptides or mixtures of peptides in the skin mucus inhibited B. dendrobatidis growth in vitro. Skin peptide secretion was maximally induced by injection of norepinephrine, and this treatment resulted in sustained skin peptide depletion and increased susceptibility to infection. Sublethal X-irradiation of frogs decreased leukocyte numbers in the spleen and resulted in greater susceptibility to infection. Immunization against B. dendrobatidis induced elevated pathogen-specific IgM and IgY serum antibodies. Mucus secretions from X. laevis previously exposed to B. dendrobatidis contained significant amounts of IgM, IgY, and IgX antibodies that bind to B. dendrobatidis. These data strongly suggest that both innate and adaptive immune defenses are involved in the resistance of X. laevis to lethal B. dendrobatidis infections. PMID:20584973

  9. Immune defenses against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a fungus linked to global amphibian declines, in the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jeremy P; Reinert, Laura K; Harper, Laura K; Woodhams, Douglas C; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2010-09-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a chytrid fungus that causes the lethal skin disease chytridiomycosis in amphibians. It is regarded as an emerging infectious disease affecting diverse amphibian populations in many parts of the world. Because there are few model amphibian species for immunological studies, little is known about immune defenses against B. dendrobatidis. We show here that the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is a suitable model for investigating immunity to this pathogen. After an experimental exposure, a mild infection developed over 20 to 30 days and declined by 45 days postexposure. Either purified antimicrobial peptides or mixtures of peptides in the skin mucus inhibited B. dendrobatidis growth in vitro. Skin peptide secretion was maximally induced by injection of norepinephrine, and this treatment resulted in sustained skin peptide depletion and increased susceptibility to infection. Sublethal X-irradiation of frogs decreased leukocyte numbers in the spleen and resulted in greater susceptibility to infection. Immunization against B. dendrobatidis induced elevated pathogen-specific IgM and IgY serum antibodies. Mucus secretions from X. laevis previously exposed to B. dendrobatidis contained significant amounts of IgM, IgY, and IgX antibodies that bind to B. dendrobatidis. These data strongly suggest that both innate and adaptive immune defenses are involved in the resistance of X. laevis to lethal B. dendrobatidis infections.

  10. Cloning of Interleukin-10 from African Clawed Frog (Xenopus tropicalis), with the Finding of IL-19/20 Homologue in the IL-10 Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Zhitao; Zhang, Qihuan; Wang, Zisheng; Zhao, Weihong; Gao, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays an important role in immune system. In the present study, the IL-10 gene of African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis) was first cloned, and its expression pattern and 3D structure were also analyzed. The frog IL-10 mRNA encoded 172 amino acids which possessed several conserved features found in IL-10s from other species, including five-exon/four-intron genomic structure, conserved four cysteine residues, IL-10 family motif, and six ?-...

  11. Genetics, Morphology, Advertisement Calls, and Historical Records Distinguish Six New Polyploid Species of African Clawed Frog (Xenopus, Pipidae) from West and Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben J; Carter, Timothy F; Greenbaum, Eli; Gvoždík, Václav; Kelley, Darcy B; McLaughlin, Patrick J; Pauwels, Olivier S G; Portik, Daniel M; Stanley, Edward L; Tinsley, Richard C; Tobias, Martha L; Blackburn, David C

    2015-01-01

    African clawed frogs, genus Xenopus, are extraordinary among vertebrates in the diversity of their polyploid species and the high number of independent polyploidization events that occurred during their diversification. Here we update current understanding of the evolutionary history of this group and describe six new species from west and central sub-Saharan Africa, including four tetraploids and two dodecaploids. We provide information on molecular variation, morphology, karyotypes, vocalizations, and estimated geographic ranges, which support the distinctiveness of these new species. We resurrect Xenopus calcaratus from synonymy of Xenopus tropicalis and refer populations from Bioko Island and coastal Cameroon (near Mt. Cameroon) to this species. To facilitate comparisons to the new species, we also provide comments on the type specimens, morphology, and distributions of X. epitropicalis, X. tropicalis, and X. fraseri. This includes significantly restricted application of the names X. fraseri and X. epitropicalis, the first of which we argue is known definitively only from type specimens and possibly one other specimen. Inferring the evolutionary histories of these new species allows refinement of species groups within Xenopus and leads to our recognition of two subgenera (Xenopus and Silurana) and three species groups within the subgenus Xenopus (amieti, laevis, and muelleri species groups).

  12. Expression of pluripotency factors in larval epithelia of the frog Xenopus: Evidence for the presence of cornea epithelial stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kimberly J.; Thomas, Alvin G.; Henry, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biology of somatic stem cells in self renewing tissues represents an exciting field of study, especially given the potential to harness these cells for tissue regeneration and repair in treating injury and disease. The mammalian cornea contains a population of basal epithelial stem cells involved in cornea homeostasis and repair. Research has been restricted to mammalian systems and little is known about the presence or function of these stem cells in other vertebrates. Therefore, we carried out studies to characterize frog cornea epithelium. Careful examination shows that the Xenopus larval cornea epithelium consists of three distinct layers that include an outer epithelial layer and underlying basal epithelium, in addition to a deeper fibrous layer that contains the main sensory nerve trunks that give rise to numerous branches that extend into these epithelia. These nerves convey sensory and presumably also autonomic innervation to those tissues. The sensory nerves are all derived as branches of the trigeminal nerve/ganglion similar to the situation encountered in mammals, though there appear to be some potentially interesting differences, which are detailed in this paper. We show further that numerous pluripotency genes are expressed by cells in the cornea epithelium, including: sox2, p63, various oct4 homologs, c-myc, klf4 and many others. Antibody localization revealed that p63, a well known mammalian epithelial stem cell marker, was localized strictly to all cells in the basal cornea epithelium. c-myc, was visualized in a smaller subset of basal epithelial cells and adjacent stromal tissue predominately at the periphery of the cornea (limbal zone). Finally, sox2 protein was found to be present throughout all cells of both the outer and basal epithelia, but was much more intensely expressed in a distinct subset of cells that appeared to be either multinucleate or possessed multi-lobed nuclei that are normally located at the periphery of the

  13. The history and development of FETAX (ASTM standard guide, E-1439 on conducting the frog embryo teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, J.N.; Bantle, J.A.; Linder, G.; ,

    2003-01-01

    The energy crisis of the 1970's and 1980's prompted the search for alternative sources of fuel. With development of alternate sources of energy, concerns for biological resources potentially adversely impacted by these alternative technologies also heightened. For example, few biological tests were available at the time to study toxic effects of effluents on surface waters likely to serve as receiving streams for energy-production facilities; hence, we began to use Xenopus laevis embryos as test organisms to examine potential toxic effects associated with these effluents upon entering aquatic systems. As studies focused on potential adverse effects on aquatic systems continued, a test procedure was developed that led to the initial standardization of FETAX. Other .than a limited number of aquatic toxicity tests that used fathead minnows and cold-water fishes such as rainbow trout, X. laevis represented the only other aquatic vertebrate test system readily available to evaluate complex effluents. With numerous laboratories collaborating, the test with X. laevis was refined, improved, and developed as ASTM E-1439, Standard Guide for the Conducting Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). Collabrative work in the 1990s yielded procedural enhancements, for example, development of standard test solutions and exposure methods to handle volatile organics and hydrophobic compounds. As part of the ASTM process, a collaborative interlaboratory study was performed to determine the repeatability and reliability of FETAX. Parallel to these efforts, methods were also developed to test sediments and soils, and in situ test methods were developed to address "lab-to-field extrapolation errors" that could influence the method's use in ecological risk assessments. Additionally, a metabolic activation system composed of rat liver microsomes was developed which made FETAX more relevant to mammalian studies.

  14. Xenopus laevis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histidine and carnosine reduce muscle fatigue in. Xenopus laevis. Lesley Whitaker and G.N. Louw. Zoology Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch. The inclusion of either histidine or carnosine in a frog Ringer's perfusate at a concentration of 20 mmol/dm3 reduced fatigve in the gastrocnemius muscle of ...

  15. Regulation of the insulin-Akt signaling pathway and glycolysis during dehydration stress in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Wei; Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-12-01

    Estivation is an adaptive stress response utilized by some amphibians during periods of drought in the summer season. In this study, we examine the regulation of the insulin signaling cascade and glycolysis pathway in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis during the dehydration stress induced state of estivation. We show that in the brain and heart of X. laevis, dehydration reduces the phosphorylation of the insulin growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), and this is followed by similar reductions in the phosphorylation of the Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase. Interestingly, phosphorylation levels of IGF-1R and mTOR were not affected in the kidney, and phosphorylation levels of P70S6K and the ribosomal S6 protein were elevated during dehydration stress. Animals under estivation are also susceptible to periods of hypoxia, suggesting that glycolysis may also be affected. We observed that protein levels of many glycolytic enzymes remained unchanged during dehydration; however, the hypoxia response factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) protein was elevated by greater than twofold in the heart during dehydration. Overall, we provide evidence that shows that the insulin signaling pathway in X. laevis is regulated in a tissue-specific manner during dehydration stress and suggests an important role for this signaling cascade in mediating the estivation response.

  16. Unequal contribution of native South African phylogeographic lineages to the invasion of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte De Busschere

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to both deliberate and accidental introductions, invasive African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis populations have become established worldwide. In this study, we investigate the geographic origins of invasive X. laevis populations in France and Portugal using the phylogeographic structure of X. laevis in its native South African range. In total, 80 individuals from the whole area known to be invaded in France and Portugal were analysed for two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes, allowing a comparison with 185 specimens from the native range. Our results show that native phylogeographic lineages have contributed differently to invasive European X. laevis populations. In Portugal, genetic and historical data suggest a single colonization event involving a small number of individuals from the south-western Cape region in South Africa. In contrast, French invasive X. laevis encompass two distinct native phylogeographic lineages, i.e., one from the south-western Cape region and one from the northern regions of South Africa. The French X. laevis population is the first example of a X. laevis invasion involving multiple lineages. Moreover, the lack of population structure based on nuclear DNA suggests a potential role for admixture within the invasive French population.

  17. Cloning of Interleukin-10 from African Clawed Frog (Xenopus tropicalis, with the Finding of IL-19/20 Homologue in the IL-10 Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitao Qi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays an important role in immune system. In the present study, the IL-10 gene of African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis was first cloned, and its expression pattern and 3D structure were also analyzed. The frog IL-10 mRNA encoded 172 amino acids which possessed several conserved features found in IL-10s from other species, including five-exon/four-intron genomic structure, conserved four cysteine residues, IL-10 family motif, and six α-helices. Real-time PCR showed that frog IL-10 mRNA was ubiquitous expressed in all examined tissues, highly in some immune related tissues including kidney, spleen, and intestine and lowly in heart, stomach, and liver. The frog IL-10 mRNA was upregulated at 24 h after LPS stimulation, indicating that it plays a part in the host immune response to bacterial infection. Another IL, termed as IL-20, was identified from the frog IL-10 locus, which might be the homologue of mammalian IL-19/20 according to the analysis results of the phylogenetic tree and the sequence identities.

  18. Cloning of interleukin-10 from African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis), with the Finding of IL-19/20 homologue in the IL-10 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Zhang, Qihuan; Wang, Zisheng; Zhao, Weihong; Gao, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays an important role in immune system. In the present study, the IL-10 gene of African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis) was first cloned, and its expression pattern and 3D structure were also analyzed. The frog IL-10 mRNA encoded 172 amino acids which possessed several conserved features found in IL-10s from other species, including five-exon/four-intron genomic structure, conserved four cysteine residues, IL-10 family motif, and six α-helices. Real-time PCR showed that frog IL-10 mRNA was ubiquitous expressed in all examined tissues, highly in some immune related tissues including kidney, spleen, and intestine and lowly in heart, stomach, and liver. The frog IL-10 mRNA was upregulated at 24 h after LPS stimulation, indicating that it plays a part in the host immune response to bacterial infection. Another IL, termed as IL-20, was identified from the frog IL-10 locus, which might be the homologue of mammalian IL-19/20 according to the analysis results of the phylogenetic tree and the sequence identities.

  19. First parasitological study of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis, Amphibia in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Castillo

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduced species can arrive into new territories with parasites; however, these species are expected to face lower parasite richness than in their original regions. Both introduced hosts and parasites can affect native fauna. Since their release into the wild in Chile following laboratory use, Xenopus laevis Daudin, 1802 has widely spread throughout central Chile. The only pathogen described on the host is the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Longcore, Pessier, Nichols, 1999; thus, this is the first parasitological study of this species in Chile. In 10 localities in central Chile, 179 specimens of X. laevis were captured and examined for parasites in the gastrointestinal tube, cavities, lungs, liver, and skin. Only nine specimens of the genus Contracaecum Railliet, Henry, 1912 were found in six specimens of X. laevis from a private dam in La Patagua. It is likely that these parasites originated from species of native birds. This is the first record of Contracaecum sp. in Chilean amphibians.

  20. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  1. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Peña-Villalobos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis.

  2. hmmr mediates anterior neural tube closure and morphogenesis in the frog Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Angela; Hagenlocher, Cathrin; Ott, Tim; Schambony, Alexandra; Feistel, Kerstin

    2017-10-01

    Development of the central nervous system requires orchestration of morphogenetic processes which drive elevation and apposition of the neural folds and their fusion into a neural tube. The newly formed tube gives rise to the brain in anterior regions and continues to develop into the spinal cord posteriorly. Conspicuous differences between the anterior and posterior neural tube become visible already during neural tube closure (NTC). Planar cell polarity (PCP)-mediated convergent extension (CE) movements are restricted to the posterior neural plate, i.e. hindbrain and spinal cord, where they propagate neural fold apposition. The lack of CE in the anterior neural plate correlates with a much slower mode of neural fold apposition anteriorly. The morphogenetic processes driving anterior NTC have not been addressed in detail. Here, we report a novel role for the breast cancer susceptibility gene and microtubule (MT) binding protein Hmmr (Hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, RHAMM) in anterior neurulation and forebrain development in Xenopus laevis. Loss of hmmr function resulted in a lack of telencephalic hemisphere separation, arising from defective roof plate formation, which in turn was caused by impaired neural tissue narrowing. hmmr regulated polarization of neural cells, a function which was dependent on the MT binding domains. hmmr cooperated with the core PCP component vangl2 in regulating cell polarity and neural morphogenesis. Disrupted cell polarization and elongation in hmmr and vangl2 morphants prevented radial intercalation (RI), a cell behavior essential for neural morphogenesis. Our results pinpoint a novel role of hmmr in anterior neural development and support the notion that RI is a major driving force for anterior neurulation and forebrain morphogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of the molecular structure, expression and bioactivity of the TNFSF13B (BAFF) gene of the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Zhou, Lidan; Zong, Xicui; Cao, Xiang; Ji, Xuemei; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Shuangquan

    2013-03-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF), a member of the tumor necrosis factor family, is critical to B cell survival, proliferation, maturation, and immunoglobulin secretion and to T cell activation. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of BAFF from the South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis, designated xlBAFF) was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques and RT-PCR. The full-length cDNA of xlBAFF consists of 1204 bases including an open reading frame (ORF) of 801 nucleotides that are translated into a predicted 266 amino acid protein. Sequence comparison indicated that the amino acids of xlBAFF possessed the TNF signature, including a transmembrane domain, a putative furin protease cleavage site and three cysteine residues. The predicted three-dimensional (3D) structure of the xlBAFF monomer revealed that it was very similar to its counterparts. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that xlBAFF could be detected in various tissues and predominantly expressed in the spleen and other lymphoid tissue. The soluble xlBAFF had been cloned into a pET28a vector to express the recombinant protein. The His6-xlBAFF was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli. BL21 (DE3) and its expressions were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. After purification, laser scanning confocal microscopy analysis showed that xlBAFF could bind to its receptors on B cells. CCK-8 assays revealed that xlBAFF is not only able to promote survival/proliferation of South African clawed frog lymphocytes but also able to stimulate survival/proliferation of mouse B cells. These results will allow for further investigation the use of X. laevis as an in vivo model for related studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Developmental expression of the protein product of Vg1, a localized maternal mRNA in the frog Xenopus laevis.

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, L; Matthews, G; Tabe, L; Colman, A

    1989-01-01

    Vg1 is a maternal mRNA localized in the vegetal cortex of Xenopus laevis oocytes, that encodes a protein homologous to the mammalian growth factor TGF-beta. Using a polyclonal antibody to a T7-Vg1 fusion protein, we have identified the native protein. We find that a single protein of Mr 40 kd is immunoprecipitated following in vitro translation of oocyte poly(A)+ RNA, whilst two proteins of Mr 45 and 43.5 kd are immunoprecipitated from oocyte and embryo extracts. Synthesis of at least the 40 ...

  5. Ontogeny of hypoxic modulation of cardiac performance and its allometry in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T-C Francis; Burggren, Warren W

    2013-01-01

    The ontogeny of cardiac hypoxic responses, and how such responses may be modified by rearing environment, are poorly understood in amphibians. In this study, cardiac performance was investigated in Xenopus laevis from 2 to 25 days post-fertilization (dpf). Larvae were reared under either normoxia or moderate hypoxia (PO₂ = 110 mmHg), and each population was assessed in both normoxia and acute hypoxia. Heart rate (f(H)) of normoxic-reared larvae exhibited an early increase from 77 ± 1 beats min⁻¹ at 2 dpf to 153 ± 1 beats min⁻¹ at 4 dpf, followed by gradual decreases to 123 ± 3 beats min⁻¹ at 25 dpf. Stroke volume (SV), 6 ± 1 nl, and cardiac output (CO), 0.8 ± 0.1 μl min⁻¹, at 5 dpf both increased by more than 40-fold to 25 dpf with rapid larval growth (~30-fold increase in body mass). When exposed to acute hypoxia, normoxic-reared larvae increased f(H) and CO between 5 and 25 dpf. Increased SV in acute hypoxia, produced by increased end-diastolic volume (EDV), only occurred before 10 dpf. Hypoxic-reared larvae showed decreased acute hypoxic responses of EDV, SV and CO at 7 and 10 dpf. Over the period of 2-25 dpf, cardiac scaling with mass showed scaling coefficients of -0.04 (f(H)), 1.23 (SV) and 1.19 (CO), contrary to the cardiac scaling relationships described in birds and mammals. In addition, f(H) scaling in hypoxic-reared larvae was altered to a shallower slope of -0.01. Collectively, these results indicate that acute cardiac hypoxic responses develop before 5 dpf. Chronic hypoxia at a moderate level can not only modulate this cardiac reflex, but also changes cardiac scaling relationship with mass.

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: Western clawed frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Xenopus_tropicalis_L.png Xenopus_tropica...lis_NL.png Xenopus_tropicalis_S.png Xenopus_tropicalis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropicalis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropical...is&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropical...is&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropicalis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=137 ...

  7. Targeted integration of genes in Xenopus tropicalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Zhaoying; Tian, Dandan; Xin, Huhu

    2017-01-01

    With the successful establishment of both targeted gene disruption and integration methods in the true diploid frog Xenopus tropicalis, this excellent vertebrate genetic model now is making a unique contribution to modelling human diseases. Here, we summarize our efforts on establishing homologous...... recombination-mediated targeted integration in Xenopus tropicalis, the usefulness, and limitation of targeted integration via the homology-independent strategy, and future directions on how to further improve targeted gene integration in Xenopus tropicalis....

  8. Sublethal Toxic Effects and Induction of gGutathione S-transferase by Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins (SCCPs and C-12 alkane (dodecane in Xenopus laevis Frog Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Burýšková

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs are important industrial chemicals with high persistence in the environment but poorly characterized ecotoxicological effects. We studied embryotoxic effects of commercial mixture of SCCP (carbon length C-12, 56% of chlorine; CP56-12 and non-chlorinated n-alkane (dodecane, C-12 in the 96h Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay - Xenopus (FETAX. Only weak lethal effects were observed for both substances (the highest tested concentration 500 mg/L of both chemicals caused up to 11% mortality. On the other hand, we observed developmental malformations and reduced embryo growth at 5 mg/l and higher concentrations. However, the effects were not related to chlorination pattern as both SCCPs and dodecane induced qualitatively similar effects. SCCPs also significantly induced phase II detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST in Xenopus laevis embryos even at 0.5 mg/L, and this biomarker might be used as another early warning of chronic toxic effects. Our results newly indicate significant developmental toxicity of both SCCPs and n-dodecane to aquatic organisms along with inductions of specific biochemical toxicity mechanisms.

  9. Connexins in the early development of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis (Amphibia: The role of the connexin43 carboxyl terminal tail in the establishment of the dorso-ventral axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Cofre

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Connexins are a family of related proteins identified in vertebrate forming gap junctions, which mediate cell-to-cell communication in early embryos, with an important role in establishing embryonic asymmetry and ‘communication compartments’. By in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR and western blotting we show that a Cx43-like molecule is present in oocytes and embryos of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis, with specific localization in the animal-vegetal axis. This specific distribution is suggestive for an important role for this protein in the establishment of the dorso-ventral axis. Antisense RNA and antibodies directed against rat carboxyl terminal tail of the Cx43 (CT-Cx43 and injected in 1-cell stage Xenopus embryos, induced pronounced alterations in nervous system development, with a severe ventralization phenotype. Coherently, the overexpression of CT-Cx43 produced a dorsalization of the embryos. In antisense treated embryos, the expression of the beta-catenin gene is eliminated from the Nieuwkoop center, the pattern expression of the Chordin, Xnot and Xbra is modified, with no effect in expression of the Goosecoid gene. In CT-Cx43 mRNA treated embryos the pattern of expression of the beta-catenin, Chordin, Goosecoid, Xnot and engrailed-2 genes is modified. The expression of beta-catenin is increased in the Nieuwkoop center, the expression pattern of Chordin and Goosecoid is expanded to the posterior neural plate and engrailed-2 presents ectopic expression in the ventral region. Taken together our data suggest a role for CT-Cx43 as a maternal determinant with a critical function in the formation of the dorso-ventral axis in Xenopus laevis. The Cx43 may be one of the earliest markers of the dorso-ventral axis in these embryos and could possibly be acting through regionalization of factors responsible for the establishment of this axis.

  10. Molecular footprinting of skeletal tissues in the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula and the clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis identifies conserved and derived features of vertebrate calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eEnault

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolutionary emergence and subsequent diversification of the vertebrate skeleton requires a comprehensive view of the diverse skeletal cell types found in distinct developmental contexts, tissues and species. To date, our knowledge of the molecular nature of the shark calcified extracellular matrix, and its relationships with osteichthyan skeletal tissues, remain scarce. Here, based on specific combinations of expression patterns of the Col1a1, Col1a2 and Col2a1 fibrillar collagen genes, we compare the molecular footprint of endoskeletal elements from the chondrichthyan Scyliorhinus canicula and the tetrapod Xenopus tropicalis. We find that, depending on the anatomical location, Scyliorhinus skeletal calcification is associated to cell types expressing different subsets of fibrillar collagen genes, such as high levels of Col1a1 and Col1a2 in the neural arches, high levels of Col2a1 in the tesserae, or associated to a drastic Col2a1 downregulation in the centrum. We detect low Col2a1 levels in Xenopus osteoblasts, thereby revealing that the osteoblastic expression of this gene was significantly reduced in the tetrapod lineage. Finally, we uncover a striking parallel, from a molecular and histological perspective, between the vertebral cartilage calcification of both species and discuss the evolutionary origin of endochondral ossification.

  11. Effects of cadmium, estradiol-17β and their interaction on gonadal condition and metamorphosis of male and female African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bibek; Patino, Reynaldo

    2010-01-01

    To assess interaction effects between cadmium (Cd, a putative xenoestrogen) and estradiol-17?? (E2) on sex differentiation and metamorphosis, Xenopus laevis were exposed to solvent-control (0.005% ethanol), Cd (10 ??g L-1), E2 (1 ??g L-1), or Cd and E2 (Cd + E2) in FETAX medium from fertilization to 75 d postfertilization. Each treatment was applied to four aquaria, each with 30 fertilized eggs. Mortality was recorded and animals were sampled as they completed metamorphosis (Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 66). Gonadal sex of individuals (including tadpoles ???NF stage 55 at day 75) was determined gross-morphologically and used to compute sex ratios. Time course and percent completion of metamorphosis, snout-vent length (SVL), hindlimb length (HLL) and weight were analyzed for each gender separately. Survival rates did not differ among treatments. The E2 and Cd + E2 treatments significantly skewed sex ratios towards females; however, no sex-ratio differences were observed between the control and Cd treatments or between the E2 and Cd + E2 treatments. Time course of metamorphosis was generally delayed and percent completion of metamorphosis was generally reduced in males and females exposed to Cd, E2 or their combination compared to control animals. In males, but not females, the effect of Cd + E2 was greater than that of individual chemicals. Weight at completion of metamorphosis was reduced only in females and only by the Cd + E2 treatment. In conclusion, although Cd at an environmentally relevant concentration did not exhibit direct or indirect feminizing effects in Xenopus tadpoles, the metal and E2 both had similar inhibitory effects on metamorphosis that were of greater magnitude in males than females.

  12. Effects of cadmium, estradiol-17beta and their interaction on gonadal condition and metamorphosis of male and female African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bibek; Patino, Reynaldo

    2010-01-01

    To assess interaction effects between cadmium (Cd, a putative xenoestrogen) and estradiol-17beta (E(2)) on sex differentiation and metamorphosis, Xenopus laevis were exposed to solvent-control (0.005% ethanol), Cd (10microgL(-1)), E(2) (1microgL(-1)), or Cd and E(2) (Cd+E(2)) in FETAX medium from fertilization to 75d postfertilization. Each treatment was applied to four aquaria, each with 30 fertilized eggs. Mortality was recorded and animals were sampled as they completed metamorphosis (Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 66). Gonadal sex of individuals (including >or= tadpoles NF stage 55 at day 75) was determined gross-morphologically and used to compute sex ratios. Time course and percent completion of metamorphosis, snout-vent length (SVL), hindlimb length (HLL) and weight were analyzed for each gender separately. Survival rates did not differ among treatments. The E(2) and Cd+E(2) treatments significantly skewed sex ratios towards females; however, no sex-ratio differences were observed between the control and Cd treatments or between the E(2) and Cd+E(2) treatments. Time course of metamorphosis was generally delayed and percent completion of metamorphosis was generally reduced in males and females exposed to Cd, E(2) or their combination compared to control animals. In males, but not females, the effect of Cd+E(2) was greater than that of individual chemicals. Weight at completion of metamorphosis was reduced only in females and only by the Cd+E(2) treatment. In conclusion, although Cd at an environmentally relevant concentration did not exhibit direct or indirect feminizing effects in Xenopus tadpoles, the metal and E(2) both had similar inhibitory effects on metamorphosis that were of greater magnitude in males than females.

  13. Tebuconazole disrupts steroidogenesis in Xenopus laevis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Luong, Xuan; Hansen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A 27-day controlled exposure study of adult male African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) was conducted to examine the mechanism by which tebuconazole may disrupt steroidogenesis. The fungicide was measured by LC-MS/MS in tank water and in target tissues (adipose, kidney, liver, and brain), and we...

  14. Development of the venous pole of the heart in the frog Xenopus laevis: a morphological study with special focus on the development of the venoatrial connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahr, Maike; Männer, Jörg

    2011-06-01

    The heart of lung-breathing vertebrates normally shows an asymmetric arrangement of its venoatrial connections along the left-right (L-R) body axis. The systemic venous tributaries empty into the right atrium while the pulmonary venous tributaries empty into the left atrium. The ways by which this asymmetry evolves from the originally symmetrically arranged embryonic venous heart pole are poorly defined. Here we document the development of the venous heart pole in Xenopus laevis (stages 40-46). We show that, prior to the appearance of the mouth of the common pulmonary vein (MCPV), the systemic venous tributaries empty into a bilaterally symmetric chamber (sinus venosus) that is demarcated from the developing atriums by a circular ridge of tissue (sinu-atrial ridge). A solitary MCPV appears during stage 41. From the time point of its first appearance onwards, the MCPV lies cranial to the sinu-atrial ridge and to the left of the developing interatrial septum and body midline. L-R lineage analysis shows that the interatrial septum and MCPV both derive from the left body half. The CPV, therefore, opens from the beginning into the future left atrium. The definitive venoatrial connections are established by the formation of a septal complex that divides the lumen of the venous heart pole into systemic and pulmonary venous flow pathways. This complex arises from the anlage of the interatrial septum and the left half of the sinu-atrial ridge. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Cartilage Marker Gene Expression Patterns during Axolotl and Xenopus Limb Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Mitogawa

    Full Text Available Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum can completely regenerate lost limbs, whereas Xenopus laevis frogs cannot. During limb regeneration, a blastema is first formed at the amputation plane. It is thought that this regeneration blastema forms a limb by mechanisms similar to those of a developing embryonic limb bud. Furthermore, Xenopus laevis frogs can form a blastema after amputation; however, the blastema results in a terminal cone-shaped cartilaginous structure called a "spike." The causes of this patterning defect in Xenopus frog limb regeneration were explored. We hypothesized that differences in chondrogenesis may underlie the patterning defect. Thus, we focused on chondrogenesis. Chondrogenesis marker genes, type I and type II collagen, were compared in regenerative and nonregenerative environments. There were marked differences between axolotls and Xenopus in the expression pattern of these chondrogenesis-associated genes. The relative deficit in the chondrogenic capacity of Xenopus blastema cells may account for the absence of total limb regenerative capacity.

  16. The Pesticide Malathion Disrupts "Xenopus" and Zebrafish Embryogenesis: An Investigative Laboratory Exercise in Developmental Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotti, Diana C.; Davis, Sarah N.; Cook, Leslie W.; Willoughby, Ian R.; Paradise, Christopher J.; Lom, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Malathion is an organophosphorus insecticide, which is often sprayed to control mosquitoes. When applied to aquatic habitats, malathion can also influence the embryogenesis of non-target organisms such as frogs and fish. We modified the frog embryo teratogen assay in "Xenopus" (FETAX), a standard toxicological assay, into an investigative…

  17. Early development of the thymus in Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hoon; Williams, Allison; Hong, Chang-Soo; You, Youngjae; Senoo, Makoto; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Xenopus laevis has been a model of choice for comparative and developmental studies of the immune system, little is known about organogenesis of the thymus, a primary lymphoid organ in vertebrates. Here we examined the expression of three transcription factors that have been functionally associated with pharyngeal gland development, gcm2, hoxa3 and foxn1, and evaluated the neural crest contribution to thymus development. Results In most species Hoxa3 is expressed in the third pharyngeal pouch endoderm where it directs thymus formation. In Xenopus, the thymus primordium is derived from the second pharyngeal pouch endoderm, which is hoxa3-negative, suggesting that a different mechanism regulates thymus formation in frogs. Unlike other species foxn1 is not detected in the epithelium of the pharyngeal pouch in Xenopus, rather, its expression is initiated as thymic epithelial cell starts to differentiate and express MHC class II molecules. Using transplantation experiments we show that while neural crest cells populate the thymus primordia, they are not required for the specification and initial development of this organ or for T cell differentiation in frogs. Conclusions These studies provide novel information on early thymus development in Xenopus, and highlight a number of features that distinguish Xenopus from other organisms. PMID:23172757

  18. Diseases of frogs and toads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D.E.; Converse, K.A.; Majumdar, S.K.; Huffman, J.E.; Brenner, F.J.; Panah, A.I.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter presents information on infectious diseases of free-living frogs and toads that have completed metamorphosis. The diseases discussed in this chapter pertain principally to sub-adult and adult frogs and toads that are at least 60-90 days removed from completion of metamorphosis. The main emphasis of this chapter is the diseases found in amphibians of Canada and the United States. Diseases of recent metamorphs, larvae and amphibian eggs are presented in the chapters Diseases of Amphibian Eggs and Embryos and Diseases of Tadpoles. The smallest disease agents (viruses and bacteria) are presented first, followed by fungi, protozoa, helminths and ectoparasites. Diseases presented in this chapter are Ranaviral (iridovirus) infection Lucke frog herpesvirus (kidney cancer) Frog erythrocytic virus West Nile virus Red-leg disease (bacterial septicemia) Salmonellosis Chytrid fungal infection Basidiobolus fungi Dermosporidiosis Ichthyophoniasis Dermocystidium & Dermomycoides Myxozoa Ribeiroia flukes and Amphibian malformations Clinostomum metacercaria Aspects of each disease are presented to assist the biologist with recognition of diseases in the field. Hence, the major emphases for identification of diseases are the epizootiological aspects (host species, life stage, casualty numbers, etc) and gross findings ('lesions'). Descriptions of the microscopical, ultrastructural and cultural characteristics of each infectious agent were considered beyond the scope of this text. Detailed cultural and microscopical features of these disease agents are available in other reviews (Taylor et al., 2001; Green, 2001). Some diseases, while common in captive and zoo amphibians, are exceptionally rare in free-living frogs and toads, and therefore are omitted from this review. Among the diseases not presented are infections by chlamydia and mycobacteria, which occur principally in captive colonies of African clawed frogs (Xenopus, Hymenochirus, et al.) and northern leopard frogs

  19. Induced breeding of Clarias anguillaris with Xenopus laevies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Riped Clarias anguillaris (total body weight (TBW), 350 – 600 g; mean weight, 434.44 + 79.39 g) broodstock were treated with frog, Xenopus laevis (mean weight was 68.55±20.34 g) crude pituitary glands at three replicates of three treatment levels of 1 pituitary (T1), 2 pituitaries (T2) and 3 pituitaries (T3) per brood stock and ...

  20. Antifungal activity of epithelial secretions from selected frog species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of skin secretions from selected frogs (Amietia fuscigula, Strongylopus grayi and Xenopus laevis) and one toad (Amietophrynus pantherinus) of the south Western Cape Province of South Africa. Initially, different extraction techniques for the collection of skin secretions ...

  1. Macro and Trace Element Accumulation in Edible Crabs and Frogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tissue accumulation of five macroelements (Na, Mg, K, Ca, Fe) and twelve trace elements (Vd, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Pb) were assessed in the organs of the edible frogs; Xenopus laevis and Rana esculentus, and whole body of the crab, Callinestes caught from Alaro Stream Floodplain (Ibadan, ...

  2. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  3. Cas de necrose cutanée chez des grenouilles africaines à griffes Xenopus laevis suite à une application topique d'eugénol.

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Andréanne; Guénette, Sarah Annie; Hélie, Pierre; Vachon, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Case of cutaneous necrosis in African Clawed frogs Xenopus laevis after the topical application of eugenol. African Clawed frogs showed necrotic cutaneous lesions after a topical application of high concentrations of eugenol, an analgesic and anesthetic agent. Microscopically, ulceration of the epidermis, a loss of mucous and serous glands as well as an infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed.

  4. Phylogenetic and expression analysis of amphibian Xenopus Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Miyuki; Matsumoto, Misako; Tochinai, Shin; Seya, Tsukasa

    2007-04-01

    An anuran amphibian, South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), is used to study the immune system, as it possesses a set of acquired immune system represented by T and B lymphocytes and the immunoglobulins. The acquired immune system is impaired throughout the larva and the metamorphosis stage in the amphibians. On the other hand, the role of innate immune system in the tadpole remains unclear. Recently, insect Toll protein homologues, namely, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), have been identified as sensors recognizing microbe-pattern molecules in vertebrates. Whole-genome analysis of Xenopus tropicalis supported the existence of the tlr genes in the frog. In this study, we annotated 20 frog tlr gene nucleotide sequences from the latest genome assembly version 4.1 on the basis of homology and identified cDNAs of the predicted frog TLR proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the repertoire of the frog TLRs consisted of both fish- and mammalian-type TLRs. We showed that the frog TLRs are constitutively expressed in the tadpole as well as in the adult frog. Our results suggest that tadpoles are protected from microbes by the innate system that includes TLRs, despite impaired acquired immune system in tadpoles. This is the first report on the properties of TLRs in the most primitive terrestrial animals like amphibia.

  5. A Xenopus tropicalis oligonucleotide microarray works across species using RNA from Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Andrew D; Goldstone, Kim; Smith, James C; Gilchrist, Mike; Amaya, Enrique; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2005-03-01

    Microarrays have great potential for the study of developmental biology. As a model system Xenopus is well suited for making the most of this potential. However, Xenopus laevis has undergone a genome wide duplication meaning that most genes are represented by two paralogues. This causes a number of problems. Most importantly the presence of duplicated genes mean that a X. laevis microarray will have less or even half the coverage of a similar sized microarray from the closely related but diploid frog Xenopus tropicalis. However, to date, X. laevis is the most commonly used amphibian system for experimental embryology. Therefore, we have tested if a microarray based on sequences from X. tropicalis will work across species using RNA from X. laevis. We produced a pilot oligonucleotide microarray based on sequences from X. tropicalis. The microarray was used to identify genes whose expression levels changed during early X. tropicalis development. The same assay was then carried out using RNA from X. laevis. The cross species experiments gave similar results to those using X. tropicalis RNA. This was true at the whole microarray level and for individual genes, with most genes giving similar results using RNA from X. laevis and X. tropicalis. Furthermore, the overlap in genes identified between a X. laevis and a X. tropicalis set of experiments was only 12% less than the overlap between two sets of X. tropicalis experiments. Therefore researchers can work with X. laevis and still make use of the advantages offered by X. tropicalis microarrays.

  6. Teratogenic effects of five anticancer drugs on Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidori, Marina; Piscitelli, Concetta; Russo, Chiara; Smutná, Marie; Bláha, Luděk

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, the environmental presence of pharmaceuticals - including anticancer drugs - is an emerging issue. Because of the lack of appropriate critical studies about anticancer drug effects in frogs, the aim of the present study was to investigate lethal and teratogenic effects of five anticancer drugs widely used in large quantities, i.e. 5-flourouracil, capecitabine, cisplatin, etoposide, and imatinib, in the embryos of the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, using FETAX - Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay in Xenopus. None of the studied anticancer drugs induced statistically significant mortality within the concentrations tested (0.01-50mg/L, depending on the studied compound), and no growth inhibition of embryos after a 96-h exposure was observed. Except for cisplatin, the other pharmaceuticals induced an increase of developmental malformations such as abdominal edema, axial flexure, head, eyes, gut and heart malformations with statistically significant effects observed at the highest concentrations tested (50mg/L for 5-flourouracil; 30mg/L for etoposide and 20mg/L for capecitabine and imatinib). The results indicate that anticancer drugs can affect embryogenesis mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Xenopus collected in Africa (1871-2000 and in California (2001-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vance T Vredenburg

    Full Text Available International trade of the invasive South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis, a subclinical carrier of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatis (Bd has been proposed as a major means of introduction of Bd into naïve, susceptible amphibian populations. The historical presence of Bd in the indigenous African population of Xenopus is well documented. However, there are no reports documenting the presence of Bd in wild Xenopus populations in the US, particularly in California where introduced populations are well-established after intentional or accidental release. In this report, a survey was conducted on 178 archived specimens of 6 species of Xenopus collected in Africa from 1871-2000 and on 23 archived specimens (all wild-caught Xenopus laevis collected in California, USA between 2001 and 2010. The overall prevalence rate of Bd in the tested Xenopus was 2.8%. The earliest positive specimen was X. borealis collected in Kenya in 1934. The overall prevalence of Bd in the X. laevis collected in California was 13% with 2 positive specimens from 2001 and one positive specimen from 2003. The positive Xenopus (3/23 collected in California were collected in 2001 (2/3 and 2003 (1/3. These data document the presence of Bd-infected wild Xenopus laevis in California. The findings reported here support the prevailing hypothesis that Bd was present as a stable, endemic infection in Xenopus populations in Africa prior to their worldwide distribution likely via international live-amphibian trade.

  8. Polystyrene nanoparticles affect Xenopus laevis development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tussellino, Margherita; Ronca, Raffaele [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Biology (Italy); Formiggini, Fabio [Italian Institute of Technology, Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Health Care IIT@CRIB (Italy); Marco, Nadia De [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Biology (Italy); Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo Antonio [Italian Institute of Technology, Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Health Care IIT@CRIB (Italy); Carotenuto, Rosa, E-mail: rosa.carotenuto@unina.it [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Biology (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    Exposing living organisms to nanoparticulates is potentially hazardous, in particular when it takes place during embryogenesis. In this investigation, we have studied the effects of 50-nm-uncoated polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) as a model to investigate the suitability of their possible future employments. We have used the standardized Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus test during the early stages of larval development of Xenopus laevis, and we have employed either contact exposure or microinjections. We found that the embryos mortality rate is dose dependent and that the survived embryos showed high percentage of malformations. They display disorders in pigmentation distribution, malformations of the head, gut and tail, edema in the anterior ventral region, and a shorter body length compared with sibling untreated embryos. Moreover, these embryos grow more slowly than the untreated embryos. Expressions of the mesoderm markers, bra (T-box Brachyury gene), myod1 (myogenic differentiation1), and of neural crest marker sox9 (sex SRY (determining region Y-box 9) transcription factor sox9), are modified. Confocal microscopy showed that the nanoparticles are localized in the cytoplasm, in the nucleus, and in the periphery of the digestive gut cells. Our data suggest that PSNPs are toxic and show a potential teratogenic effect for Xenopus larvae. We hypothesize that these effects may be due either to the amount of NPs that penetrate into the cells and/or to the “corona” effect caused by the interaction of PSNPs with cytoplasm components. The three endpoints of our study, i.e., mortality, malformations, and growth inhibition, suggest that the tests we used may be a powerful and flexible bioassay in evaluating pollutants in aquatic embryos.

  9. Calcium Signaling and Meiotic Exit at Fertilization in Xenopus Egg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Stefanov, Vasily E.; Iwasaki, Tetsushi; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Fukami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that mediates egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species studied. However, signaling pathways leading to calcium generation and the mechanisms of calcium-induced exit from meiotic arrest vary substantially among species. Here, we review the pathways of calcium signaling and the mechanisms of meiotic exit at fertilization in the eggs of the established developmental model, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We also discuss calcium involvement in the early fertilization-induced events in Xenopus egg, such as membrane depolarization, the increase in intracellular pH, cortical granule exocytosis, cortical contraction, contraction wave, cortical rotation, reformation of the nuclear envelope, sperm chromatin decondensation and sister chromatid segregation. PMID:25322156

  10. Investigation of Blood Flow and the Effect of Vasoactive Substances in Cutaneous Blood Vessels of "Xenopus Laevis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škorjanc, Aleš; Belušic, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a preparation of frog skin was presented, which can be used to demonstrate the basic concepts of blood flow regulation in a very clear and attractive way to high school and university students. In a freshly euthanized "Xenopus," a patch of abdominal skin was exposed from the internal side and viewed with a USB…

  11. A Western Blot Protocol for Detection of Proteins Heterologously Expressed in Xenopus laevis Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, are often used for expression and biochemical characterization of transporter proteins as the oocytes are particularly suitable for uptake assays and electrophysiological recordings. Assessment of the expression level of expressed transporters at the individual oocyte level is often desirable when comparing properties of wild type and mutant transporters. However, a large content of yolk platelets in the oocyte cytoplasm makes this a challenging task. Here we report a method for fast and easy, semiquantitative Western blot analysis of proteins heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

  12. Formation of cell masses in the myelencephalon of the clawed frog ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An important process in the organization of developing nervous system is the clustering of neurons with similar properties to form nuclei. The development of myelencephalon of Xenopus muelleri, a pipid frog that retains a lateral line system throughout life, was studied in Nissl stained serial sections. The results showed that ...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Frog Pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans Ecovar Liflandii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobias, Nicholas J.; Doig, Kenneth D.; Medema, Marnix H.; Chen, Honglei; Haring, Volker; Moore, Robert; Seemann, Torsten; Stinear, Timothy P.

    In 2004, a previously undiscovered mycobacterium resembling Mycobacterium ulcerans (the agent of Buruli ulcer) was reported in an outbreak of a lethal mycobacteriosis in a laboratory colony of the African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis. This mycobacterium makes mycolactone and is one of several

  14. High-Magnification In Vivo Imaging of Xenopus Embryos for Cell and Developmental Biology

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Esther K. Kieserman, Chanjae Lee, Ryan S. Gray, Tae Joo Park and John B. Wallingford Corresponding author ([]()). ### INTRODUCTION Embryos of the frog *Xenopus laevis* are an ideal model system for in vivo imaging of dynamic biological processes, from the inner workings of individual cells to the reshaping of tissues during embryogenesis. Their externally developing embryos are more amenable to in vivo analysis than in...

  15. Frog eat frog: exploring variables influencing anurophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. John Measey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Frogs are generalist predators of a wide range of typically small prey items. But descriptions of dietary items regularly include other anurans, such that frogs are considered to be among the most important of anuran predators. However, the only existing hypothesis for the inclusion of anurans in the diet of post-metamorphic frogs postulates that it happens more often in bigger frogs. Moreover, this hypothesis has yet to be tested.Methods. We reviewed the literature on frog diet in order to test the size hypothesis and determine whether there are other putative explanations for anurans in the diet of post-metamorphic frogs. In addition to size, we recorded the habitat, the number of other sympatric anuran species, and whether or not the population was invasive. We controlled for taxonomic bias by including the superfamily in our analysis.Results. Around one fifth of the 355 records included anurans as dietary items of populations studied, suggesting that frogs eating anurans is not unusual. Our data showed a clear taxonomic bias with ranids and pipids having a higher proportion of anuran prey than other superfamilies. Accounting for this taxonomic bias, we found that size in addition to being invasive, local anuran diversity, and habitat produced a model that best fitted our data. Large invasive frogs that live in forests with high anuran diversity are most likely to have a higher proportion of anurans in their diet.Conclusions. We confirm the validity of the size hypothesis for anurophagy, but show that there are additional significant variables. The circumstances under which frogs eat frogs are likely to be complex, but our data may help to alert conservationists to the possible dangers of invading frogs entering areas with threatened anuran species.

  16. Remobilization of Tol2 transposons in Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells Dan E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Class II DNA transposons are mobile genetic elements that move DNA sequence from one position in the genome to another. We have previously demonstrated that the naturally occurring Tol2 element from Oryzias latipes efficiently integrates its corresponding non-autonomous transposable element into the genome of the diploid frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Tol2 transposons are stable in the frog genome and are transmitted to the offspring at the expected Mendelian frequency. Results To test whether Tol2 transposons integrated in the Xenopus tropicalis genome are substrates for remobilization, we injected in vitro transcribed Tol2 mRNA into one-cell embryos harbouring a single copy of a Tol2 transposon. Integration site analysis of injected embryos from two founder lines showed at least one somatic remobilization event per embryo. We also demonstrate that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline and re-integration can result in the generation of novel GFP expression patterns in the developing tadpole. Although the parental line contained a single Tol2 transposon, the resulting remobilized tadpoles frequently inherit multiple copies of the transposon. This is likely to be due to the Tol2 transposase acting in discrete blastomeres of the developing injected embryo during the cell cycle after DNA synthesis but prior to mitosis. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that single copy Tol2 transposons integrated into the Xenopus tropicalis genome are effective substrates for excision and random re-integration and that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline. This is an important step in the development of 'transposon hopping' strategies for insertional mutagenesis, gene trap and enhancer trap screens in this highly tractable developmental model organism.

  17. Potential protective effect of L-cysteine against the toxicity of acrylamide and furan in exposed Xenopus laevis embryos: an interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The embryo toxicities of two food-processing-induced toxic compounds, acrylamide and furan, with and without added L-cysteine were examined individually and in mixtures using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The following measures of developmental toxicity were used (a) 96-h LC5...

  18. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression during Xenopus tropicalis tadpole tail regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Love Nick R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms governing vertebrate appendage regeneration remain poorly understood. Uncovering these mechanisms may lead to novel therapies aimed at alleviating human disfigurement and visible loss of function following injury. Here, we explore tadpole tail regeneration in Xenopus tropicalis, a diploid frog with a sequenced genome. Results We found that, like the traditionally used Xenopus laevis, the Xenopus tropicalis tadpole has the capacity to regenerate its tail following amputation, including its spinal cord, muscle, and major blood vessels. We examined gene expression using the Xenopus tropicalis Affymetrix genome array during three phases of regeneration, uncovering more than 1,000 genes that are significantly modulated during tail regeneration. Target validation, using RT-qPCR followed by gene ontology (GO analysis, revealed a dynamic regulation of genes involved in the inflammatory response, intracellular metabolism, and energy regulation. Meta-analyses of the array data and validation by RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization uncovered a subset of genes upregulated during the early and intermediate phases of regeneration that are involved in the generation of NADP/H, suggesting that these pathways may be important for proper tail regeneration. Conclusions The Xenopus tropicalis tadpole is a powerful model to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of vertebrate appendage regeneration. We have produced a novel and substantial microarray data set examining gene expression during vertebrate appendage regeneration.

  19. Whole-genome sequence of the Tibetan frog Nanorana parkeri and the comparative evolution of tetrapod genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Bo; Xiong, Zi-Jun; Xiang, Xue-Yan; Liu, Shi-Ping; Zhou, Wei-Wei; Tu, Xiao-Long; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Yang, Min-Min; Chen, Hong-Man; Li, Fang; Zhou, Long; Feng, Shao-Hong; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Guo-Jie; Irwin, David; Hillis, David M; Murphy, Robert W; Yang, Huan-Ming; Che, Jing; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-03-17

    The development of efficient sequencing techniques has resulted in large numbers of genomes being available for evolutionary studies. However, only one genome is available for all amphibians, that of Xenopus tropicalis, which is distantly related from the majority of frogs. More than 96% of frogs belong to the Neobatrachia, and no genome exists for this group. This dearth of amphibian genomes greatly restricts genomic studies of amphibians and, more generally, our understanding of tetrapod genome evolution. To fill this gap, we provide the de novo genome of a Tibetan Plateau frog, Nanorana parkeri, and compare it to that of X. tropicalis and other vertebrates. This genome encodes more than 20,000 protein-coding genes, a number similar to that of Xenopus. Although the genome size of Nanorana is considerably larger than that of Xenopus (2.3 vs. 1.5 Gb), most of the difference is due to the respective number of transposable elements in the two genomes. The two frogs exhibit considerable conserved whole-genome synteny despite having diverged approximately 266 Ma, indicating a slow rate of DNA structural evolution in anurans. Multigenome synteny blocks further show that amphibians have fewer interchromosomal rearrangements than mammals but have a comparable rate of intrachromosomal rearrangements. Our analysis also identifies 11 Mb of anuran-specific highly conserved elements that will be useful for comparative genomic analyses of frogs. The Nanorana genome offers an improved understanding of evolution of tetrapod genomes and also provides a genomic reference for other evolutionary studies.

  20. Remobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in the germline of Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yergeau Donald A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system has been used for germline transgenesis of the diploid frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Injecting one-cell embryos with plasmid DNA harboring an SB transposon substrate together with mRNA encoding the SB transposase enzyme resulted in non-canonical integration of small-order concatemers of the transposon. Here, we demonstrate that SB transposons stably integrated into the frog genome are effective substrates for remobilization. Results Transgenic frogs that express the SB10 transposase were bred with SB transposon-harboring animals to yield double-transgenic 'hopper' frogs. Remobilization events were observed in the progeny of the hopper frogs and were verified by Southern blot analysis and cloning of the novel integrations sites. Unlike the co-injection method used to generate founder lines, transgenic remobilization resulted in canonical transposition of the SB transposons. The remobilized SB transposons frequently integrated near the site of the donor locus; approximately 80% re-integrated with 3 Mb of the donor locus, a phenomenon known as 'local hopping'. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that SB transposons integrated into the X. tropicalis genome are effective substrates for excision and re-integration, and that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline. This is an important step in the development of large-scale transposon-mediated gene- and enhancer-trap strategies in this highly tractable developmental model system.

  1. Xenopus in Space and Time: Fossils, Node Calibrations, Tip-Dating, and Paleobiogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannatella, David

    2015-01-01

    Published data from DNA sequences, morphology of 11 extant and 15 extinct frog taxa, and stratigraphic ranges of fossils were integrated to open a window into the deep-time evolution of Xenopus. The ages and morphological characters of fossils were used as independent datasets to calibrate a chronogram. We found that DNA sequences, either alone or in combination with morphological data and fossils, tended to support a close relationship between Xenopus and Hymenochirus, although in some analyses this topology was not significantly better than the Pipa + Hymenochirus topology. Analyses that excluded DNA data found strong support for the Pipa + Hymenochirus tree. The criterion for selecting the maximum age of the calibration prior influenced the age estimates, and our age estimates of early divergences in the tree of frogs are substantially younger than those of published studies. Node-dating and tip-dating calibrations, either alone or in combination, yielded older dates for nodes than did a root calibration alone. Our estimates of divergence times indicate that overwater dispersal, rather than vicariance due to the splitting of Africa and South America, may explain the presence of Xenopus in Africa and its closest fossil relatives in South America.

  2. A perchlorate sensitive iodide transporter in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah L; Carr, James A; Willis, Ray E; Pressley, Thomas A

    2008-03-01

    Nucleotide sequence comparisons have identified a gene product in the genome database of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) as a probable member of the solute carrier family of membrane transporters. To confirm its identity as a putative iodide transporter, we examined the function of this sequence after heterologous expression in mammalian cells. A green monkey kidney cell line transfected with the Xenopus nucleotide sequence had significantly greater (125)I uptake than sham-transfected control cells. The uptake in carrier-transfected cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of perchlorate, a competitive inhibitor of mammalian Na(+)/iodide symporter. Tissue distributions of the sequence were also consistent with a role in iodide uptake. The mRNA encoding the carrier was found to be expressed in the thyroid gland, stomach, and kidney of tadpoles from X. laevis, as well as the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. The ovaries of adult X. laevis also were found to express the carrier. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the putative X. laevis iodide transporter is orthologous to vertebrate Na(+)-dependent iodide symporters. We conclude that the amphibian sequence encodes a protein that is indeed a functional Na(+)/iodide symporter in X. laevis, as well as R. catesbeiana.

  3. Plasticity of lung development in the amphibian, Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Rose

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to previous studies, we found that Xenopus laevis tadpoles raised in normoxic water without access to air can routinely complete metamorphosis with lungs that are either severely stunted and uninflated or absent altogether. This is the first demonstration that lung development in a tetrapod can be inhibited by environmental factors and that a tetrapod that relies significantly on lung respiration under unstressed conditions can be raised to forego this function without adverse effects. This study compared lung development in untreated, air-deprived (AD and air-restored (AR tadpoles and frogs using whole mounts, histology, BrdU labeling of cell division and antibody staining of smooth muscle actin. We also examined the relationship of swimming and breathing behaviors to lung recovery in AR animals. Inhibition and recovery of lung development occurred at the stage of lung inflation. Lung recovery in AR tadpoles occurred at a predictable and rapid rate and correlated with changes in swimming and breathing behavior. It thus presents a new experimental model for investigating the role of mechanical forces in lung development. Lung recovery in AR frogs was unpredictable and did not correlate with behavioral changes. Its low frequency of occurrence could be attributed to developmental, physical and behavioral changes, the effects of which increase with size and age. Plasticity of lung inflation at tadpole stages and loss of plasticity at postmetamorphic stages offer new insights into the role of developmental plasticity in amphibian lung loss and life history evolution.

  4. Transcription factors Mix1 and VegT, relocalization of vegt mRNA, and conserved endoderm and dorsal specification in frogs

    OpenAIRE

    Sudou, Norihiro; Garcés-Vásconez, Andrés; López-Latorre, María A.; Taira, Masanori; del Pino, Eugenia M.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factors VegT and Mix1 are markers of the future gut (presumptive endoderm) of the frog Xenopus laevis. VegT and Mix1 proteins localized to the embryo vegetal hemisphere, providing an equivalent identity to the presumptive endoderm in the five frog species that were analyzed. Moreover, VegT protein localized to the animal hemisphere in embryos of all frogs. Similarly, vegt transcripts relocalized to the dorso-animal region of the egg after fertilization in X. laevis, suggesti...

  5. Xenopus Vocalizations Are Controlled by a Sexually Differentiated Hindbrain Central Pattern Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Heather J.; Yu, Heather J.; Yamaguchi, Ayako

    2008-01-01

    Male and female African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) produce rhythmic, sexually distinct vocalizations as part of courtship and mating. We found that Xenopus vocal behavior is governed by a sexually dimorphic central pattern generator (CPG) and that fictive vocalizations can be elicited from an in vitro brain preparation by application of serotonin or by electrical stimulation of a premotor nucleus. Male brains produced fictive vocal patterns representing two calls commonly produced by males in vivo (advertisement and amplectant call), as well as one call pattern (release call) that is common for juvenile males and females in vivo but rare for adult males. Female brains also produced fictive release call. The production of male calls is androgen dependent in Xenopus; to test the effects of androgens on the CPG, we examined fictive calling in the brains of testosterone-treated females. Both fictive male advertisement call and release call were produced. This suggests that all Xenopus possess a sexually undifferentiated pattern generator for release call. Androgen exposure leads to a gain-of-function, allowing the production of male-specific call types without prohibiting the production of the undifferentiated call pattern. We also demonstrate that the CPG is located in the brainstem and seems to rely on the same nuclei in both males and females. Finally, we identified endogenous serotonergic inputs to both the premotor and motor nuclei in the brainstem that may regulate vocal activity in vivo. PMID:17287524

  6. Catecholamines are present in larval Xenopus laevis: a potential source for cardiac control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloberg, Angélica Jacobsson; Fritsche, Regina

    2002-02-15

    Changes in noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A), and dopamine (DA) levels in the heart, kidneys, and whole body (without heart and kidneys) during embryonic development were investigated in the frog, Xenopus laevis using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In addition, the presence of cells immunoreactive to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) and/or phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in the heart of Xenopus larvae was investigated using immunohistochemical techniques. The presence of nerve fibers was visualized using antibodies against acetylated tubulin (AcT). NA and DA concentrations in the heart were low and steady in NF 40-56, showed an increased value at NF 57, and decreased again in froglets. A trend toward higher concentrations of A was observed at NF 43-49 and NF 57. Cells immunoreactive to TH, DBH, and PNMT were found in the heart from NF 40, and the TH immunoreactive cells became more abundant in the whole heart at later stages. The presence of catecholamines in the non-innervated larval heart together with the finding of TH/DBH/PNMT immunoreactive cells suggests that catecholamines are synthesized and stored in the heart and could therefore have a paracrine role in cardiac control in Xenopus larvae. Detectable concentrations of catecholamines were also found in kidneys and whole bodies (except heart and kidneys). Therefore, catecholamine-producing cells outside the heart can be an important source of circulating catecholamines involved in adrenergic cardiac control in Xenopus larvae. Copyright 2002 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

  7. Microvascularization and histomorphology of lateral line organs in adult Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Nicolas; Minnich, Bernd; Lametschwandtner, Alois

    2014-05-01

    The microvasculariaztion of the lateral line organs (LLOs) of the adult pipid frog, Xenopus laevis was studied by scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts (VCCs) and correlative light microscopy of paraplast embedded tissues sections. Scanning electron micrographs of VCCs revealed that each neuromast within the LLO rests on a distinct bowl-like capillary network (vascular bowl). One to three vascular bowls were supplied by an ascending arteriole and drained by a descending venule towards the skin deep dermal vascular network. Blood flow regulation mechanisms in form of intimal cushions were present at the origin of ascending arterioles supplying LLOs, microvenous valves were present at the confluence of deep dermal venules and veins. This together with sprouting and nonsprouting angiogenesis (intussusceptive microvascular growth) found in vascular bowls demonstrate that in adult Xenopus the capillary bed of LLO's still can be adjusted to changing energetic needs. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Courtship in Frogs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 12. Courtship in Frogs Role of Acoustic Communication in Amphibian Courtship Behaviour. Debjani Roy. General Article Volume 1 Issue 12 December 1996 pp 39-48 ...

  9. Next generation sequencing and comparative analyses of Xenopus mitogenomes

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    Lloyd Rhiannon E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genomes comprise a small but critical component of the total DNA in eukaryotic organisms. They encode several key proteins for the cell’s major energy producing apparatus, the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Additonally, their nucleotide and amino acid sequences are of great utility as markers for systematics, molecular ecology and forensics. Their characterization through nucleotide sequencing is a fundamental starting point in mitogenomics. Methods to amplify complete mitochondrial genomes rapidly and efficiently from microgram quantities of tissue of single individuals are, however, not always available. Here we validate two approaches, which combine long-PCR with Roche 454 pyrosequencing technology, to obtain two complete mitochondrial genomes from individual amphibian species. Results We obtained two new xenopus frogs (Xenopus borealis and X. victorianus complete mitochondrial genome sequences by means of long-PCR followed by 454 of individual genomes (approach 1 or of multiple pooled genomes (approach 2, the mean depth of coverage per nucleotide was 9823 and 186, respectively. We also characterised and compared the new mitogenomes against their sister taxa; X. laevis and Silurana tropicalis, two of the most intensely studied amphibians. Our results demonstrate how our approaches can be used to obtain complete amphibian mitogenomes with depths of coverage that far surpass traditional primer-walking strategies, at either the same cost or less. Our results also demonstrate: that the size, gene content and order are the same among xenopus mitogenomes and that S. tropicalis form a separate clade to the other xenopus, among which X. laevis and X. victorianus were most closely related. Nucleotide and amino acid diversity was found to vary across the xenopus mitogenomes, with the greatest diversity observed in the Complex 1 gene nad4l and the least diversity observed in Complex 4 genes (cox1-3. All protein

  10. Stable magnetic field gradient levitation of Xenopus laevis: toward low-gravity simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, J M; Lin, K; Denegre, J M; Mowry, K L

    1997-08-01

    We have levitated, for the first time, living biological specimens, embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis, using a large inhomogeneous magnetic field. The magnetic field/field gradient product required for levitation was 1430 kG2/cm, consistent with the embryo's susceptibility being dominated by the diamagnetism of water and protein. We show that unlike any other earth-based technique, magnetic field gradient levitation of embryos reduces the body forces and gravity-induced stresses on them. We discuss the use of large inhomogeneous magnetic fields as a probe for gravitationally sensitive phenomena in biological specimens.

  11. Characterization of Xenopus tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2: a role in regulating matrix metalloproteinase activity during development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezhen Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Frog metamorphosis is totally dependent on thyroid hormone (T3 and mimics the postembryonic period around birth in mammals. It is an excellent model to study the molecular basis of postembryonic development in vertebrate. We and others have shown that many, if not all, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, which cleave proteins of the extracellular matrix as well as other substrates, are induced by T3 and important for metamorphosis. MMP activity can be inhibited by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMPs. There are 4 TIMPs in vertebrates and their roles in postembryonic development are poorly studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the TIMP2 genes in Xenopus laevis and the highly related species Xenopus tropicalis and discovered that TIMP2 is a single copy gene in Xenopus tropicalis as in mammals but is duplicated in Xenopus laevis. Furthermore, the TIMP2 locus in Xenopus tropicalis genome is different from that in human, suggesting an evolutionary reorganization of the locus. More importantly, we found that the duplicated TIMP2 genes were similarly regulated in the developing limb, remodeling intestine, resorbing tail during metamorphosis. Unexpectedly, like its MMP target genes, the TIMP2 genes were upregulated by T3 during both natural and T3-induced metamorphosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that TIMP2 is highly conserved among vertebrates and that the TIMP2 locus underwent a chromosomal reorganization during evolution. Furthermore, the unexpected upregulation of TIMP2 genes during metamorphosis suggests that proper balance of MMP activity is important for metamorphosis.

  12. Amphibian (Xenopus sp.) iodothyronine deiodinase ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA-MED amphibian thyroid group is currently screening chemicals for inhibition of human iodothyronine deiodinase activity as components of the thyroid system important in human development. Amphibians are a bellwether taxonomic group to gauge toxicity of chemicals in the environment. Amphibian thyroid function is not only important in development but also metamorphosis. Xenopus sp. have been used extensively as model organisms and are well characterized genetically. We propose to screen a list of chemicals (selected from the human DIO screening results) to test for inhibition of Xenopus deiodinases. Large quantities of the enzymes will be produced using an adenovirus system. Our preliminary results show that there may be catalytic differences between human and Xenopus deiodinases. The Twin Ports Early Career Scientists is a new group formed within the Duluth-Superior scientific community. This presentation will provide a basic introduction to my research and our mission at EPA, and help to establish networking and collaboration relationships across disciplines and institutions.

  13. The lens regenerative competency of limbal vs. central regions of mature Xenopus cornea epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Paul W.; Henry, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    The frog, Xenopus laevis, is capable of completely regenerating a lens from the cornea epithelium. Because this ability appears to be limited to the larval stages of Xenopus, virtually all the work to understand the mechanisms regulating this process has been limited to pre-metamorphic tadpoles. It has been reported that the post-metamorphic cornea is competent to regenerate under experimental conditions, despite the fact that the in vivo capacity to regenerate is lost; however, that work didn’t examine the regenerative potential of different regions of the cornea. A new model suggests that cornea-lens regeneration in Xenopus may be driven by oligopotent stem cells, and not by transdifferentiation of mature cornea cells. We investigated the regenerative potential of the limbal region in post-metamorphic cornea, where the stem cells of the cornea are thought to reside. Using EdU (5-Ethynyl-2’-deoxyuridine), we identified long-term label retaining cells in the basal cells of peripheral post-metamorphic Xenopus cornea, consistent with slow-cycling stem cells of the limbus that have been described in other vertebrates. Using this data to identify putative stem cells of the limbal region in Xenopus, we tested the regenerative competency of limbal regions and central cornea. All three regions showed a similarly high ability for the cells of the basal epithelium to express lens proteins when cultured in proximity to larval retina. Thus, the regenerative competency in post-metamorphic cornea is not restricted to stem cells of the limbal region, but also occurs in the transit amplifying cells throughout the basal layer of the cornea epithelium. PMID:27569373

  14. Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 expression responds to freezing, anoxia, and dehydration stresses in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaobo; Storey, Janet M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2009-01-01

    Natural freezing survival by wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) involves multiple organ-specific changes in gene expression. Screening of a cDNA library made from brain of frozen frogs revealed freeze-responsive up-regulation of the glycolytic enzyme, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1). Northern blots showed an approximately two-fold increase in pgk1 transcripts in brain of frozen frogs whereas PGK1 protein levels rose by three- to five-fold within 4-8 hr of freezing. Freezing also elevated pgk1 transcripts in liver but not in skin. Both transcript and protein levels also rose in response to two of the component stresses of freezing (anoxia and dehydration) with a particularly pronounced (11-fold) increase in PGK1 protein in brain in response to anoxia. Amino acid sequence analysis showed 92.5% identity between wood frog and Xenopus laevis PGK1 and 86-88% identity with the zebrafish, chicken, and human protein. Four unique amino acid substitutions in the wood frog protein could be important in maintaining the functional conformation of the wood frog protein at low body temperatures. Elevated amounts of PGK1, one of the ATP-generating reactions of glycolysis, in wood frog brain during freezing would enhance the glycolytic capacity of the organ and support the maintenance of cellular energetics under the ischemic conditions of the frozen state. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  15. Tebuconazole disrupts steroidogenesis in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Luong, Xuan; Hansen, Martin; Styrishave, Bjarne; Hayes, Tyrone

    2015-11-01

    A 27-day controlled exposure study of adult male African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) was conducted to examine the mechanism by which tebuconazole may disrupt steroidogenesis. The fungicide was measured by LC-MS/MS in tank water and in target tissues (adipose, kidney, liver, and brain), and we observed tissue-specific bioconcentration with BCF up to 238. Up to 10 different steroid hormones were quantified in gonads using LC-MS/MS and in plasma using GC-MS/MS and a radioimmunoassay was performed for further measurement of androgens. In order to assess whether effects increased with exposure or animals adapted to the xenobiotic, blood samples were collected 12 days into the study and at termination (day 27). After 12 days of exposure to 100 and 500μgL(-1) tebuconazole, plasma levels of testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were increased, while plasma 17β-estradiol (E2) concentrations were greatly reduced. Exposure to 0.1μgL(-1), on the other hand, resulted in decreased levels of T and DHT, with no effects observed for E2. After 27 days of exposure, effects were no longer observed in circulating androgen levels while the suppressive effect on E2 persisted in the two high-exposure groups (100 and 500μgL(-1)). Furthermore, tebuconazole increased gonadal concentrations of T and DHT as well as expression of the enzyme CYP17 (500μgL(-1), 27 days). These results suggest that tebuconazole exposure may supress the action of CYP17 at the lowest exposure (0.1μgL(-1)), while CYP19 suppression dominates at higher exposure concentrations (increased androgens and decreased E2). Increased androgen levels in plasma half-way into the study and in gonads at termination may thus be explained by compensatory mechanisms, mediated through increased enzymatic expression, as prolonged exposure had no effect on circulating androgen levels. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Validation of the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test in the Amphibian Xenopus laevis using in situ nick translation and comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Pollock, K; Gosálvez, J; Arroyo, F; López-Fernández, C; Guille, M; Noble, A; Johnston, S D

    2014-01-01

    The integrity of sperm DNA is becoming increasingly recognised as an important parameter of semen quality, but there are no published reports of this procedure for any amphibian. The primary aim of this study was to apply a modified sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test (Halomax) to an amphibian sperm model (African clawed frog; Xenopus laevis) and to validate the assay against in situ nick translation (ISNT) and the double-comet assay procedure. Inactivated spermatozoa were collected from fr...

  17. Hedgehog inhibition causes complete loss of limb outgrowth and transformation of digit identity in Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopper, Geffrey F; Richards-Hrdlicka, Kathryn L; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-03-01

    The study of the tetrapod limb has contributed greatly to our understanding of developmental pathways and how changes to these pathways affect the evolution of morphology. Most of our understanding of tetrapod limb development comes from research on amniotes, with far less known about mechanisms of limb development in amphibians. To better understand the mechanisms of limb development in anuran amphibians, we used cyclopamine to inhibit Hedgehog signaling at various stages of development in the western clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis, and observed resulting morphologies. We also analyzed gene expression changes resulting from similar experiments in Xenopus laevis. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in X. tropicalis results in limb abnormalities including reduced digit number, missing skeletal elements, and complete absence of limbs. In addition, posterior digits assume an anterior identity by developing claws that are usually only found on anterior digits, confirming Sonic hedgehog's role in digit identity determination. Thus, Sonic hedgehog appears to play mechanistically separable roles in digit number specification and digit identity specification as in other studied tetrapods. The complete limb loss observed in response to reduced Hedgehog signaling in X. tropicalis, however, is striking, as this functional role for Hedgehog signaling has not been found in any other tetrapod. This changed mechanism may represent a substantial developmental constraint to digit number evolution in frogs. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Functional joint regeneration is achieved using reintegration mechanism in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Rio; Yamada, Shigehito; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-02-01

    A functional joint requires integration of multiple tissues: the apposing skeletal elements should form an interlocking structure, and muscles should insert into skeletal tissues via tendons across the joint. Whereas newts can regenerate functional joints after amputation, Xenopus laevis regenerates a cartilaginous rod without joints, a "spike." Previously we reported that the reintegration mechanism between the remaining and regenerated tissues has a significant effect on regenerating joint morphogenesis during elbow joint regeneration in newt. Based on this insight into the importance of reintegration, we amputated frogs' limbs at the elbow joint and found that frogs could regenerate a functional elbow joint between the remaining tissues and regenerated spike. During regeneration, the regenerating cartilage was partially connected to the remaining articular cartilage to reform the interlocking structure of the elbow joint at the proximal end of the spike. Furthermore, the muscles of the remaining part inserted into the regenerated spike cartilage via tendons. This study might open up an avenue for analyzing molecular and cellular mechanisms of joint regeneration using Xenopus.

  19. Fishing on chips: up-and-coming technological advances in analysis of zebrafish and Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Skommer, Joanna; Huang, Yushi; Akagi, Jin; Adams, Dany; Levin, Michael; Hall, Chris J; Crosier, Philip S; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Biotests performed on small vertebrate model organisms provide significant investigative advantages as compared with bioassays that employ cell lines, isolated primary cells, or tissue samples. The main advantage offered by whole-organism approaches is that the effects under study occur in the context of intact physiological milieu, with all its intercellular and multisystem interactions. The gap between the high-throughput cell-based in vitro assays and low-throughput, disproportionally expensive and ethically controversial mammal in vivo tests can be closed by small model organisms such as zebrafish or Xenopus. The optical transparency of their tissues, the ease of genetic manipulation and straightforward husbandry, explain the growing popularity of these model organisms. Nevertheless, despite the potential for miniaturization, automation and subsequent increase in throughput of experimental setups, the manipulation, dispensing and analysis of living fish and frog embryos remain labor-intensive. Recently, a new generation of miniaturized chip-based devices have been developed for zebrafish and Xenopus embryo on-chip culture and experimentation. In this work, we review the critical developments in the field of Lab-on-a-Chip devices designed to alleviate the limits of traditional platforms for studies on zebrafish and clawed frog embryo and larvae. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  20. The effect of 900 and 1800 MHz GSM-like radiofrequency irradiation and nicotine sulfate administration on the embryonic development of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boga, Ayper; Emre, Mustafa; Sertdemir, Yasar; Akillioglu, Kubra; Binokay, Secil; Demirhan, Osman

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GSM-like radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF EMR) and nicotine sulfate (NS) exposure on Xenopus embryonic development.The developmental effects of GSM-like RF-EMR (900-1800 MHz, at a SAR value of 1W/kg and NS on Xenopus laevis embryos were investigated). Following the application of radiofrequency radiation and/or NS administration, the embryos were closely examined in order to determine their possible teratogenic effects. Xenopus frogs obtained from the Department of Physiology of the Cukurova University, in accordance described by the Standard Guide of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Following the exposure of Xenopus embryos to RF-EMR at 900 and 1800 MHz (1.0W/kg) for 4, 6 and 8h; the whole body specific energy absorption rate (SAR) of the embryos was calculated. With the exception of irradiation at 1800 MHz no dramatic developmental anomalies were observed in the Xenopus embryos in association with RF-EMR applications. Combined RF-EMR and NS applications resulted in dramatic abnormalities and death among the Xenopus embryos. The study results indicated that GSM-like RF-EMR (e.g. radiation from cell phones) was not as harmful to Xenopus embryos as might have been expected. However, the combined effects of GSM-like RF-EMR and NS on Xenopus embryos were more severe than the effect of RF-EMR or NS alone. In conclusion, the study results appear to suggest that the combined use of nicotine and cell phones might result in more pronounced detrimental effects on the health of smokers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome-wide transcriptional response of Silurana (Xenopus tropicalis to infection with the deadly chytrid fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Bree Rosenblum

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases are of great concern for both wildlife and humans. Several highly virulent fungal pathogens have recently been discovered in natural populations, highlighting the need for a better understanding of fungal-vertebrate host-pathogen interactions. Because most fungal pathogens are not fatal in the absence of other predisposing conditions, host-pathogen dynamics for deadly fungal pathogens are of particular interest. The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (hereafter Bd infects hundreds of species of frogs in the wild. It is found worldwide and is a significant contributor to the current global amphibian decline. However, the mechanism by which Bd causes death in amphibians, and the response of the host to Bd infection, remain largely unknown. Here we use whole-genome microarrays to monitor the transcriptional responses to Bd infection in the model frog species, Silurana (Xenopus tropicalis, which is susceptible to chytridiomycosis. To elucidate the immune response to Bd and evaluate the physiological effects of chytridiomycosis, we measured gene expression changes in several tissues (liver, skin, spleen following exposure to Bd. We detected a strong transcriptional response for genes involved in physiological processes that can help explain some clinical symptoms of chytridiomycosis at the organismal level. However, we detected surprisingly little evidence of an immune response to Bd exposure, suggesting that this susceptible species may not be mounting efficient innate and adaptive immune responses against Bd. The weak immune response may be partially explained by the thermal conditions of the experiment, which were optimal for Bd growth. However, many immune genes exhibited decreased expression in Bd-exposed frogs compared to control frogs, suggesting a more complex effect of Bd on the immune system than simple temperature-mediated immune suppression. This study generates important baseline data for ongoing

  2. Frogs and climate change in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Minter, Leslie Rory

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between frog declines and climate change, discusses the possible impact of climate change on the South African frog fauna, and highlights the necessity for increased research and monitoring of our frog populations.

  3. Induction of ovulation in Xenopus without hCG injection: the effect of adding steroids into the aquatic environment

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    Iwashina Yu-ki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is widely used in studies of oogenesis, meiotic cell cycle and early embryonic development. However, in order to perform such studies, eggs are normally collected after the injection of hCG into the dorsal lymph sac of fully-grown female frogs following pre-injection of PMSF. Although this protocol is established and used as standard laboratory approach, there are some concerns over whether the injections could cause the transmission of deleterious microorganisms. Moreover, these injection protocols require a competent skilled worker to carry out the procedure efficiently. Methods Recently, we established a novel method to induce fish ovulation by simply adding the natural maturation-inducing hormone of teleosts, 17 alpha, 20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20 beta-DHP, into the surrounding water. In the present study, we demonstrate how we can induce ovulation in frogs using the same methodology. Results In frogs, progesterone was effective in the induction of oocyte maturation in vitro. We then examined the ability of progesterone to induce ovulation in frogs. However treatment of frogs with progesterone alone only occasionally induced ovulation in vivo. The number of oocytes and the frequency of ovulation were significantly lower than that induced by hCG-injection. Thus, conditions were improved by using a combination of progesterone with estradiol and by pre-treating frogs with low concentrations of progesterone or estradiol. Finally, we established an efficient means of inducing ovulation in frogs which involved pre-treatment of frogs with salt solution followed by a mixture of estradiol and progesterone at high concentration. The frequency and numbers of oocytes obtained were identical to those resulting from PMSG-hCG induction. Fertilization rate of eggs ovulated by the new treatment method was comparable to eggs obtained by hCG-injection and juveniles developed normally

  4. Developing Xenopus Embryos Recover by Compacting and Expelling Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

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    Holt, Brian D.; Shawky, Joseph H.; Dahl, Kris Noel; Davidson, Lance A.; Islam, Mohammad F.

    2015-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes are high aspect ratio nanomaterials that are being developed for use in materials, technological and biological applications due to their high mechanical stiffness, optical properties, and chemical inertness. Because of their prevalence, it is inevitable that biological systems will be exposed to nanotubes, yet studies of the effects of nanotubes on developing embryos have been inconclusive and are lacking for single-wall carbon nanotubes exposed to the widely studied model organism Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog). Microinjection of experimental substances into the Xenopus embryo is a standard technique for toxicology studies and cellular lineage tracing. Here we report the surprising finding that superficial (12.5 ± 7.5 μm below the membrane) microinjection of nanotubes dispersed with Pluronic F127 into one-to-two cell Xenopus embryos resulted in the formation and expulsion of compacted, nanotube-filled, punctate masses, at the blastula to mid-gastrula developmental stages, which we call “boluses”. Such expulsion of microinjected materials by Xenopus embryos has not been reported before and is dramatically different from the typical distribution of the materials throughout the progeny of the microinjected cells. Previous studies of microinjections of nanomaterials such as nanodiamonds, quantum dots or spherical nanoparticles report that nanomaterials often induce toxicity and remain localized within the embryos. In contrast, our results demonstrate an active recovery pathway for embryos after exposure to Pluronic F127-coated nanotubes, which we speculate is due to a combined effect of the membrane activity of the dispersing agent, Pluronic F127, and the large aspect ratio of nanotubes. PMID:26153061

  5. Xenopus genomic data and browser resources.

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    Vize, Peter D; Zorn, Aaron M

    2017-06-15

    The two species of Xenopus most commonly used in biomedical research are the diploid Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis and the tetraploid Xenopus laevis. The X. tropicalis genome sequence has been available since 2010 and this year the X. laevis, genome from two distinct genetic backgrounds has been published. Multiple genome assemblies available for both species and transcriptomic and epigenetic data sets are growing rapidly, all of which are available from a variety of web resources. This review describes the contents of these resources, how to locate and download genomic data, and also how to view and manipulate these data on various public genome browsers, with an emphasis on Xenbase, the Xenopus model organism database. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lithobates sylvaticus (wood frog)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Pam

    2016-01-01

    A single specimen found southwest of Hattiesburg in Timberton (31.270391oN, 89.327675oW; WGS 84). 23 July 2015. Gary, Kat, and Ron Lukens. Verifi ed by Kenneth Krysko, Florida Museum of Natural History (UF-Herpetology 176455). This species has never been recorded from the state of Mississippi before (Dodd 2013. Frogs of the United States and Canada – Volume 2. John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 982 pp.). According to Dodd (2013), the closest population is located in east central Alabama, approximately 400 km to the northeast, as documented by Davis and Folkerts (1986. Brimleyana 12:29-50).

  7. Evolution of advertisement calls in African clawed frogs.

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    Tobias, Martha L; Evans, Ben J; Kelley, Darcy B

    2011-01-01

    For most frogs, advertisement calls are essential for reproductive success, conveying information on species identity, male quality, sexual state and location. While the evolutionary divergence of call characters has been examined in a number of species, the relative impacts of genetic drift or natural and sexual selection remain unclear. Insights into the evolutionary trajectory of vocal signals can be gained by examining how advertisement calls vary in a phylogenetic context. Evolution by genetic drift would be supported if more closely related species express more similar songs. Conversely, a poor correlation between evolutionary history and song expression would suggest evolution shaped by natural or sexual selection. Here, we measure seven song characters in 20 described and two undescribed species of African clawed frogs (genera Xenopus and Silurana ) and four populations of X. laevis . We identify three call types - click, burst and trill - that can be distinguished by click number, call rate and intensity modulation. A fourth type is biphasic, consisting of two of the above. Call types vary in complexity from the simplest, a click, to the most complex, a biphasic call. Maximum parsimony analysis of variation in call type suggests that the ancestral type was of intermediate complexity. Each call type evolved independently more than once and call type is typically not shared by closely related species. These results indicate that call type is homoplasious and has low phylogenetic signal. We conclude that the evolution of call type is not due to genetic drift, but is under selective pressure.

  8. Evolution of advertisement calls in African clawed frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Martha L.; Evans, Ben J.; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary For most frogs, advertisement calls are essential for reproductive success, conveying information on species identity, male quality, sexual state and location. While the evolutionary divergence of call characters has been examined in a number of species, the relative impacts of genetic drift or natural and sexual selection remain unclear. Insights into the evolutionary trajectory of vocal signals can be gained by examining how advertisement calls vary in a phylogenetic context. Evolution by genetic drift would be supported if more closely related species express more similar songs. Conversely, a poor correlation between evolutionary history and song expression would suggest evolution shaped by natural or sexual selection. Here, we measure seven song characters in 20 described and two undescribed species of African clawed frogs (genera Xenopus and Silurana) and four populations of X. laevis. We identify three call types — click, burst and trill — that can be distinguished by click number, call rate and intensity modulation. A fourth type is biphasic, consisting of two of the above. Call types vary in complexity from the simplest, a click, to the most complex, a biphasic call. Maximum parsimony analysis of variation in call type suggests that the ancestral type was of intermediate complexity. Each call type evolved independently more than once and call type is typically not shared by closely related species. These results indicate that call type is homoplasious and has low phylogenetic signal. We conclude that the evolution of call type is not due to genetic drift, but is under selective pressure. PMID:24723737

  9. Identical skin toxins by convergent molecular adaptation in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelants, Kim; Fry, Bryan G; Norman, Janette A; Clynen, Elke; Schoofs, Liliane; Bossuyt, Franky

    2010-01-26

    The Tree of Life is rife with adaptive convergences at all scales and biological levels of complexity. However, natural selection is not likely to result in the independent evolution of identical gene products. Here we report such a striking example of evolutionary convergence in the toxic skin secretions of two distantly related frog lineages. Caeruleins are important decapeptides in pharmacological and clinical research [1] and are commonly believed to represent a single evolutionary class of peptides [2-4]. Instead, our phylogenetic analyses combining transcriptome and genome data reveal that independently evolved precursor genes encode identical caeruleins in Xenopus and Litoria frogs. The former arose by duplication from the cholecystokinin (cck) gene, whereas the latter was derived from the gastrin gene. These hormone genes that are involved in many physiological processes diverged early in vertebrate evolution, after a segmental duplication during the Cambrian period. Besides implicating convergent mutations of the peptide-encoding sequence, recurrent caerulein origins entail parallel shifts of expression from the gut-brain axis to skin secretory glands. These results highlight extreme structural convergence in anciently diverged genes as an evolutionary mechanism through which recurrent adaptation is attained across large phylogenetic distances. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pilot morpholino screen in Xenopus tropicalis identifies a novel gene involved in head development.

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    Kenwrick, Sue; Amaya, Enrique; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2004-02-01

    The diploid frog X. tropicalis has recently been adopted as a model genetic system, but loss-of-function screens in Xenopus have not yet been performed. We have undertaken a pilot functional knockdown screen in X. tropicalis for genes involved in nervous system development by injecting antisense morpholino (MO) oligos directed against X. tropicalis mRNAs. Twenty-six genes with primary expression in the nervous system were selected as targets based on an expression screen previously conducted in X. laevis. Reproducible phenotypes were observed for six and for four of these, a second MO gave a similar result. One of these genes encodes a novel protein with previously unknown function. Knocking down this gene, designated pinhead, results in severe microcephaly, whereas, overexpression results in macrocephaly. Together with the early embryonic expression in the anterior neural plate, these data indicate that pinhead is a novel gene involved in controlling head development. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Uptake of /sup 35/S sulphate by Xenopus cartilage. The influence of growth hormone and prolactin

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    Ishii, Takehisa; Kikuyama, Sakae (Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1984-08-01

    Hypohysectomized juvenile Xenopus were injected with growth hormone (GH) or prolactin (PRL) of either ovine or bullfrog origin. The growth promoting activity of these hormones was measured by monitoring the uptake of /sup 35/S sulphate by the xiphisternal cartilage in vitro. Analysis of the labelled cartilage revealed that the acid mucopolysaccharide fraction contained about 60-80 % of the label most of which was incorporated into chondroitin sulphates. All of the hormones tested enhaced the /sup 35/S sulphate uptake dose-dependently. Among them bullfrog GH was most effective, then followed ovine GH and ovine PRL. Bullfrog PRL was far less effective than other three. The sensitive assay for frog GH developed in the present experiment may be applicable to the assay for somatomedin-like activity and contribute to the analysis of the mode of action of GH in amphibians.

  12. Movements of the large intestine in the anuran larvae, Xenopus laevis.

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    Naitoh, T; Miura, A; Akiyoshi, H; Wassersug, R J

    1990-01-01

    1. The contractile behavior of the large intestine of Xenopus laevis tadpoles was studied. 2. The large intestine is divided into a colon and rectum, and shows three types of movements: rhythmic ascending (antiperistaltic) waves of contraction originating at the anal end of the large bowel, rhythmic longitudinal contractions in the rectum and colon, and irregular contractions. The first two patterns occur in the large bowel in situ and thus appear mature. The last one occurred only in older preparations, and thus appeared pathological. 3. Antiperistaltic waves of contractions and longitudinal contractions are generated independent of each other, suggesting that circular muscles and longitudinal muscles contract separately. 4. Acetylcholine, adrenaline and noradrenaline augment motility. 5. The premetamorphic motility of the large bowel is similar to that seen in adult frogs. Comparable motility was not observed elsewhere in the larval alimentary tract. The large intestine appears to be the first portion of the anuran alimentary tract to acquire the adult physiological and morphological profile.

  13. Xenopus oocyte electrophysiology in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Deorphanization of the large group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for which an endogenous activating ligand has not yet been identified (orphan GPCRs) has become increasingly difficult. A specialized technique that has been successfully applied to deorphanize some of these GPCRs involves...... two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings of currents through ion channels, which are activated by GPCRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The ion channels that couple to GPCR activation in Xenopus oocytes can be endogenous calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) or heterologously...... expressed G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs). We will describe a general approach for expression of GPCRs in Xenopus oocytes and characterization of these using electrophysiological recordings. We will focus on the detection of GPCR activation by recordings of currents through...

  14. Limb Regeneration in Xenopus laevis Froglet

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    Makoto Suzuki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Limb regeneration in amphibians is a representative process of epimorphosis. This type of organ regeneration, in which a mass of undifferentiated cells referred to as the “blastema” proliferate to restore the lost part of the amputated organ, is distinct from morphallaxis as observed, for instance, in Hydra, in which rearrangement of pre-existing cells and tissues mainly contribute to regeneration. In contrast to complete limb regeneration in urodele amphibians, limb regeneration in Xenopus, an anuran amphibian, is restricted. In this review of some aspects regarding adult limb regeneration in Xenopus laevis, we suggest that limb regeneration in adult Xenopus, which is pattern/tissue deficient, also represents epimorphosis.

  15. Identification of genes associated with regenerative success of Xenopus laevis hindlimbs

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    Barker Donna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epimorphic regeneration is the process by which complete regeneration of a complex structure such as a limb occurs through production of a proliferating blastema. This type of regeneration is rare among vertebrates but does occur in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis, traditionally a model organism for the study of early development. Xenopus tadpoles can regenerate their tails, limb buds and the lens of the eye, although the ability of the latter two organs to regenerate diminishes with advancing developmental stage. Using a heat shock inducible transgene that remains silent unless activated, we have established a stable line of transgenic Xenopus (strain N1 in which the BMP inhibitor Noggin can be over-expressed at any time during development. Activation of this transgene blocks regeneration of the tail and limb of Xenopus tadpoles. Results In the current study, we have taken advantage of the N1 transgenic line to directly compare morphology and gene expression in same stage regenerating vs. BMP signalling deficient non-regenerating hindlimb buds. The wound epithelium of N1 transgenic hindlimb buds, which forms over the cut surface of the limb bud after amputation, does not transition normally into the distal thickened apical epithelial cap. Instead, a basement membrane and dermis form, indicative of mature skin. Furthermore, the underlying mesenchyme remains rounded and does not expand to form a cone shaped blastema, a normal feature of successful regeneration. Using Affymetrix Gene Chip analysis, we have identified genes linked to regenerative success downstream of BMP signalling, including the BMP inhibitor Gremlin and the stress protein Hsp60 (no blastema in zebrafish. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes involved in embryonic development and growth are significantly over-represented in regenerating early hindlimb buds and that successful regeneration in the Xenopus hindlimb correlates with the induction of

  16. Vestibular lesion-induced developmental plasticity in spinal locomotor networks during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

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    Anna Beyeler

    Full Text Available During frog metamorphosis, the vestibular sensory system remains unchanged, while spinal motor networks undergo a massive restructuring associated with the transition from the larval to adult biomechanical system. We investigated in Xenopus laevis the impact of a pre- (tadpole stage or post-metamorphosis (juvenile stage unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL on young adult swimming performance and underlying spinal locomotor circuitry. The acute disruptive effects on locomotion were similar in both tadpoles and juvenile frogs. However, animals that had metamorphosed with a preceding UL expressed restored swimming behavior at the juvenile stage, whereas animals lesioned after metamorphosis never recovered. Whilst kinematic and electrophysiological analyses of the propulsive system showed no significant differences in either juvenile group, a 3D biomechanical simulation suggested that an asymmetry in the dynamic control of posture during swimming could account for the behavioral restoration observed in animals that had been labyrinthectomized before metamorphosis. This hypothesis was subsequently supported by in vivo electromyography during free swimming and in vitro recordings from isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations. Specifically, animals lesioned prior to metamorphosis at the larval stage exhibited an asymmetrical propulsion/posture coupling as a post-metamorphic young adult. This developmental alteration was accompanied by an ipsilesional decrease in propriospinal coordination that is normally established in strict left-right symmetry during metamorphosis in order to synchronize dorsal trunk muscle contractions with bilateral hindlimb extensions in the swimming adult. Our data thus suggest that a disequilibrium in descending vestibulospinal information during Xenopus metamorphosis leads to an altered assembly of adult spinal locomotor circuitry. This in turn enables an adaptive compensation for the dynamic postural asymmetry induced by the

  17. Molecular Cloning of phd1 and Comparative Analysis of phd1, 2, and 3 Expression in Xenopus laevis

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    Dandan Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive gene targeting studies in mice have revealed that prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs play important roles in murine embryonic development; however, the expression patterns and function of these genes during embryogenesis of other vertebrates remain largely unknown. Here we report the molecular cloning of phd1 and systematic analysis of phd1, phd2, and phd3 expression in embryos as well as adult tissues of Xenopus laevis. All three phds are maternally provided during Xenopus early development. The spatial expression patterns of phds genes in Xenopus embryos appear to define a distinct synexpression group. Frog phd2 and phd3 showed complementary expression in adult tissues with phd2 transcription levels being high in the eye, brain, and intestine, but low in the liver, pancreas, and kidney. On the contrary, expression levels of phd3 are high in the liver, pancreas, and kidney, but low in the eye, brain, and intestine. All three phds are highly expressed in testes, ovary, gall bladder, and spleen. Among three phds, phd3 showed strongest expression in heart.

  18. Phylogeny, Functional Annotation, and Protein Interaction Network Analyses of the Xenopus tropicalis Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

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    Wuyi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous survey identified 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins, but it was proved to be incomplete, and the functional information and regulatory networks of frog bHLH transcription factors were not fully known. Therefore, we conducted an updated genome-wide survey in the Xenopus tropicalis genome project databases and identified 105 bHLH sequences. Among the retrieved 105 sequences, phylogenetic analyses revealed that 103 bHLH proteins belonged to 43 families or subfamilies with 46, 26, 11, 3, 15, and 4 members in the corresponding supergroups. Next, gene ontology (GO enrichment analyses showed 65 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and KEGG pathways counted in frequency. To explore the functional pathways, regulatory gene networks, and/or related gene groups coding for Xenopus tropicalis bHLH proteins, the identified bHLH genes were put into the databases KOBAS and STRING to get the signaling information of pathways and protein interaction networks according to available public databases and known protein interactions. From the genome annotation and pathway analysis using KOBAS, we identified 16 pathways in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. From the STRING interaction analysis, 68 hub proteins were identified, and many hub proteins created a tight network or a functional module within the protein families.

  19. The embryonic development of Xenopus laevis under a low frequency electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boga, Ayper; Binokay, Secil; Emre, Mustafa; Sertdemir, Yasar

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a low frequency electric field on the early embryonic development of frogs. The embryos of African clawed toads, Xenopus laevis, were exposed to a 20-μA electric current during the cleavage stages. The developmental processes of embryos during and after electric field exposure were monitored for teratogenic effects. All the embryos continuously exposed to the electric field died without undergoing any developmental processes. However, when the embryos were exposed to the electric field for 20-min periods (four times/over 2 d), the embryos developed into both normal tadpoles (70 %) and malformed tadpoles with light edema, reduced pigmentation, or axial anomalies, such as crooked tails. After exposure, the control embryos were at development stage 35.5 (2 d 2 h), while the normal embryos of the assay group were at developmental stage 41(3 d 4 h). There was a 1 d 2 h difference between the two developmental stages, revealing the importance of that time period for embryogenesis. In conclusion, the effects of electric current on Xenopus embryos are dependent on the initial developmental stage and the duration of exposure.

  20. Ca-sensitive sodium absorption in the colon of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krattenmacher, R; Voigt, R; Clauss, W

    1990-01-01

    Transepithelial electrogenic Na transport (INa) was investigated in the colon of the frog Xenopus laevis with electrophysiological methods in vitro. The short circuit current (Isc) of the voltage-clamped tissue was 24.2 +/- 1.8 microA.cm-2 (n = 10). About 60% of this current was generated by electrogenic Na transport. Removal of Ca2+ from the mucosal Ringer solution stimulated INa by about 120%. INa was not blockable by amiloride (0.1 mmol.l-1), a specific Na-channel blocker in epithelia, but a fully and reversible inhibition was achieved by mucosal application of 1 mmol.l-1 lanthanum (La3+). No Na-self-inhibition was found, because INa increased linearly with the mucosal Na concentration. A stimulation of INa by antidiuretic hormones was not possible. The analysis of fluctuations in the short circuit current (noise analysis) indicated that Na ions pass the apical cell membrane via a Ca-sensitive ion channel. The results clearly demonstrate that in the colon of Xenopus laevis Na ions are absorbed through Ca-sensitive apical ion channels. They differ considerably in their properties and regulation from the amiloride-sensitive Na channel which is "typically" found in the colon of vertebrates.

  1. Teratogenic effects of organic extracts from the Pearl River sediments on Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cong; Liu, Xinhui; Wu, Dan; Liu, Guannan; Tao, Li; Fu, Wenjun; Hou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity of organic extracts from the Pearl River sediments was investigated with Xenopus laevis embryos. The effects of sediment organic extracts on the mortality, body length and malformation of X. laevis embryos were tested by the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The 96-h LC₅₀ values for X. laevis embryos ranged from 62 to 137 g/L (g extracted sediment per L), and the toxicity effect on body length of larvae was not significant under 20 g/L. However, the teratogenic effects produced by sediment organic extracts were diverse, including edema, hypopigmentation, cardiac and ocular malformations, abdomen recurved and curved spine. The percentage of malformations increased with increasing sediment organic extracts, and even reached almost 100% at 10 and 20 g/L in Guangzhou district. A gradient of pollution in the Pearl River sediments was discerned from the teratogenic toxicity. Guangzhou district showed higher teratogenic toxicity compared with Panyu and Nansha districts as a possible consequence of high levels of PAHs, PCBs, OCPs and NP in the sediments. The teratogenic effects of organic extracts from the Pearl River sediments were successfully assessed which indicated the feasibility of teratogenic potential studies of sediments using X. laevis embryos. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Serotonin signaling is required for Wnt-dependent GRP specification and leftward flow in Xenopus.

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    Beyer, Tina; Danilchik, Michael; Thumberger, Thomas; Vick, Philipp; Tisler, Matthias; Schneider, Isabelle; Bogusch, Susanne; Andre, Philipp; Ulmer, Bärbel; Walentek, Peter; Niesler, Beate; Blum, Martin; Schweickert, Axel

    2012-01-10

    In vertebrates, most inner organs are asymmetrically arranged with respect to the main body axis [1]. Symmetry breakage in fish, amphibian, and mammalian embryos depends on cilia-driven leftward flow of extracellular fluid during neurulation [2-5]. Flow induces the asymmetric nodal cascade that governs asymmetric organ morphogenesis and placement [1, 6, 7]. In the frog Xenopus, an alternative laterality-generating mechanism involving asymmetric localization of serotonin at the 32-cell stage has been proposed [8]. However, no functional linkage between this early localization and flow at neurula stage has emerged. Here, we report that serotonin signaling is required for specification of the superficial mesoderm (SM), which gives rise to the ciliated gastrocoel roof plate (GRP) where flow occurs [5, 9]. Flow and asymmetry were lost in embryos in which serotonin signaling was downregulated. Serotonin, which we found uniformly distributed along the main body axes in the early embryo, was required for Wnt signaling, which provides the instructive signal to specify the GRP. Importantly, serotonin was required for Wnt-induced double-axis formation as well. Our data confirm flow as primary mechanism of symmetry breakage and suggest a general role of serotonin as competence factor for Wnt signaling during axis formation in Xenopus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Distribution of BDE-99 and effects on metamorphosis of BDE-99 and -47 after oral exposure in Xenopus tropicalis

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    Carlsson, Gunnar [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden) and Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU), P.O. Box 7054, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: gunnar.carlsson@bvf.slu.se; Kulkarni, Pushkar [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Larsson, Pia [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Norrgren, Leif [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU), P.O. Box 7054, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    The high concentrations of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) in the environment have raised the need for generating more information about the impact of these substances on animals. To study the distribution of {sup 14}C-labelled 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether ({sup 14}C-BDE-99) in Xenopus tropicalis (West African clawed frog) {sup 14}C-BDE-99 was administered by dietary exposure to tadpoles at stage 54 or to juvenile frogs at stage 66. Whole-body autoradiography and liquid scintillation counting were used to examine the distribution of the substance at different survival times. Further, X. tropicalis tadpoles were dietarily exposed to the PBDE congeners BDE-47 and BDE-99 to study the effects on metamorphosis process. Measurements like body weight, body length, hind limb length and developmental stage as well as histological measurements on thyroid glands were performed after 14 days of exposure. Autoradiograms revealed high concentrations and long term retention of {sup 14}C-BDE-99 in adipose tissue and melanin in frogs exposed both as tadpoles and juveniles. Further, a difference in uptake was recorded between the exposures at stages 54 and 66, implying that the juvenile frogs have higher uptake and more prolonged retention of the chemical than the tadpoles. Hind limb length was reduced in tadpoles dietarily exposed to 1 mg/g feed of both BDE congeners. This was associated with reduced body weight and body length for BDE-47, suggesting general toxicity. Tadpoles exposed to BDE-99 also showed lower developmental stage but no effects on body weight or body length, suggesting possible thyroid hormone disruption. Higher concentrations of both congeners caused increased mortality. Thus, it can be concluded that in the present study, BDE-99 was retained for a longer period in the juvenile frogs than in metamorphosing tadpoles and that BDE-99 had an impact on X. tropicalis metamorphosis that might be of thyroid disrupting origin.

  4. A comparison of electronic and traditional cigarette butt leachate on the development of Xenopus laevis embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Tatum Parker

    Full Text Available Potential developmental toxicities of three different cigarette butt leachates were evaluated using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay–Xenopus (FETAX. Xenopus laevis embryos were exposed to regular cigarette butt (RCB, menthol (MCB and electronic (ECB in concentrations ranging from 0 to 4 butts/l for RCB and MCB and 0–10 butts/l for ECB. The embryos were from stage 8 to 11 and were exposed for a 96-h period in static renewal test conditions. Median lethal concentration (LC50, malformation (EC50, non-observed adverse effect concentration (NOAEC, and lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC were calculated. Results from these studies suggest that each tested leachate is teratogenic for X. laevis embryos. The lowest LC50 was determined for ECB exposure at 17.9 cigarette butts/L. The LC50 value was the highest with RCB and MCB having LC50 s of approximately 1 cigarette butt/L. There were notable EC50 differences with RCB having the highest and ECB the lowest. The NOAEC and LOAEC levels for RCB and MCB were below 1 cigarette butt/L for both mortality and malformations; over 8 butts/L for ECB mortality and over 4 butts/L for malformations. From these results, we conclude that RCB leachate is the most toxic compound, while MCB leachate has the higher teratogenicity. ECB leachate has the lowest toxic and teratogenic effects on embryos but there were still noticeable effects. The results confirmed that the FETAX assay can be useful in an integrated biological hazard assessment for the preliminary screening for ecological risks of cigarette butts, and electronic cigarettes, in aquatic environment. Keywords: Cigarette butt leachate, Xenopus laevis, Development

  5. Cold acclimation-induced up-regulation of the ribosomal protein L7 gene in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaobo; De Croos, J N Amritha; Storey, Kenneth B

    2008-11-15

    Natural freezing survival by the wood frog, Rana sylvatica, involves multiple organ-specific changes in gene expression. The present study used differential display PCR to find cold-responsive genes in wood frog skin. A cDNA was retrieved from skin that was in higher amounts in cold- versus warm-acclimated frogs. The cDNA was used to probe a wood frog liver cDNA library and retrieve a long sequence that, after the further application of 5'RACE, was shown to encode the full sequence of the ribosomal large subunit protein 7 (RPL7) (GenBank accession number AF175983). Wood frog RPL7 contained 246 amino acids and shared 90% identity with Xenopus laevis RPL7, 82-83% with chicken and zebrafish homologues, and 79% with mammalian RPL7. Multiple binding domains found in human RPL7 showed differing degrees of conservation in the frog protein. Transcript levels of rpl7 were elevated up to 4-fold in skin of cold-acclimated frogs as compared with warm-acclimated animals. Organ-specific responses by rpl7 transcripts also occurred when frogs were given survivable freezing exposures. Transcripts rose by 1.8-3.3 fold in brain and skeletal muscle during freezing but were unaffected in central organs such as liver and heart. Up-regulation of rpl7 also occurred in brain of anoxia-exposed frogs and RPL7 protein levels increased strongly in heart under both freezing and dehydration stresses. Cold- and freezing-responsive up-regulation of the rpl7 gene and RPL7 protein in selected organs suggests that targeted changes in selected ribosomal proteins may be an integral part of natural freeze tolerance.

  6. Host-Defense Peptides with Therapeutic Potential from Skin Secretions of Frogs from the Family Pipidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael Conlon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin secretions from frogs belonging to the genera Xenopus, Silurana, Hymenochirus, and Pseudhymenochirus in the family Pipidae are a rich source of host-defense peptides with varying degrees of antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicities to mammalian cells. Magainin, peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa, caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF, and xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF peptides have been isolated from norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from several species of Xenopus and Silurana. Hymenochirins and pseudhymenochirins have been isolated from Hymenochirus boettgeri and Pseudhymenochirus merlini. A major obstacle to the development of these peptides as anti-infective agents is their hemolytic activities against human erythrocytes. Analogs of the magainins, CPF peptides and hymenochirin-1B with increased antimicrobial potencies and low cytotoxicities have been developed that are active (MIC < 5 μM against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Despite this, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents has not been realized so that alternative clinical applications as anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-diabetic, or immunomodulatory drugs are being explored.

  7. Absence of invasive Chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in native Fijian ground frog (Platymantis vitiana populations on Viwa-Tailevu, Fiji Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Narayan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first survey of chytridiomycosis (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis- Bd in the endangered Fijian ground frog (Platymantis vitiana population on Viwa-Tailevu, Fiji Islands. This fungal pathogen has been implicated as the primary cause of amphibian declines worldwide. Few cases have been reported from tropical Asia however it was recently documented in 4 species of frogs in Indonesia. Two hundred individual frogs were swabbed from 5 different sites on Viwa Island. Swabs were tested to quantify the number of Bd zoospore equivalents using real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR technique. We found zero (% prevalence of Bd in ground frogs. The lack of Bd may be due to 1 hot weather all year round inhibiting the spread of Bd, 2 Bd may be absent from Viwa Island due to a lack of amphibian introductions (not introduced or importation of exotic frogs such as Rana catesbeia-na, or Xenopus spp or pet trade spp or 3 the lack of introduction by human vectors due to the geographic isolation, and low visitation of non-local people into the island. While it is difficult to test these hypotheses, a precautionary approach would suggest an effective quarantine is required to protect Fiji’s endemic frogs from future disease outbreak. Conservation effort and research is needed at international level to assist the Fiji government in monitoring and protecting their unique endemic amphibians from outbreaks of B. dendrobatidis.

  8. Dehydration triggers differential microRNA expression in Xenopus laevis brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-11-15

    African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, although primarily aquatic, have a high tolerance for dehydration, being capable of withstanding the loss of up to 32-35% of total water body water. Recent studies have shown that microRNAs play a role in the response to dehydration by the liver, kidney and ventral skin of X. laevis. MicroRNAs act by modulating the expression of mRNA transcripts, thereby affecting diverse biochemical pathways. In this study, 43 microRNAs were assessed in frog brains comparing control and dehydrated (31.2±0.83% of total body water lost) conditions. MicroRNAs of interest were measured using a modified protocol which employs polyadenylation of microRNAs prior to reverse transcription and qPCR. Twelve microRNAs that showed a significant decrease in expression (to 41-77% of control levels) in brains from dehydrated frogs (xla-miR-15a, -150, -181a, -191, -211, -218, -219b, -30c, -30e, -31, -34a, and -34b) were identified. Genomic analysis showed that the sequences of these dehydration-responsive microRNAs were highly conserved as compared with the comparable microRNAs of mice (91-100%). Suppression of these microRNAs implies that translation of the mRNA transcripts under their control could be enhanced in response to dehydration. Bioinformatic analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted the top two KEGG pathways that these microRNAs collectively regulate: 1. Axon guidance, and 2. Long-term potentiation. Previous studies indicated that suppression of these microRNAs promotes neuroprotective pathways by increasing the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and activating anti-apoptotic pathways. This suggests that similar actions may be triggered in X. laevis brains as a protective response to dehydration. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia T Meier

    Full Text Available There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression. Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

  10. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Natalia T; Haslam, Iain S; Pattwell, David M; Zhang, Guo-You; Emelianov, Vladimir; Paredes, Roberto; Debus, Sebastian; Augustin, Matthias; Funk, Wolfgang; Amaya, Enrique; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Hardman, Matthew J; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis) skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression). Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

  11. Further Development and Validation of the frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay - Xenopus (FETAX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-28

    al. (42) reported teratogenic responses in rabbits, chickens , mice and rats when DMSO was administered at very high doses. However, at low doses few...species (120 hrs or 5 days) and for similar embryological events to occur during exposure. The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) has been established in... embryological stages. Differing exposure periods (time) can strongly influence bioassay results as the assumption that internal toxicant levels are equal to the

  12. Pan-African phylogeography of a model organism, the African clawed frog "Xenopus laevis"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Furman, B. L. S.; Bewick, A. J.; Harrison, T. L.; Greenbaum, E.; Gvoždík, Václav; Kusamba, C.; Evans, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 4 (2015), s. 909-925 ISSN 0962-1083 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : gene flow * phylogeography * population genetics * species limits Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 5.947, year: 2015

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: African clawed frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g Xenopus_laevis_NL.png Xenopus_laevis_S.png Xenopus_laevis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=11 ...

  14. Gene expression and localization of two types of AQP5 in Xenopus tropicalis under hydration and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yuki; Sano, Takahiro; Tsuchiya, Nobuhito; Okada, Reiko; Mochida, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2014-07-01

    Two types of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) genes (aqp-xt5a and aqp-xt5b) were identified in the genome of Xenopus tropicalis by synteny comparison and molecular phylogenetic analysis. When the frogs were in water, AQP-xt5a mRNA was expressed in the skin and urinary bladder. The expression of AQP-xt5a mRNA was significantly increased in dehydrated frogs. AQP-xt5b mRNA was also detected in the skin and increased in response to dehydration. Additionally, AQP-xt5b mRNA began to be slightly expressed in the lung and stomach after dehydration. For the pelvic skin of hydrated frogs, immunofluorescence staining localized AQP-xt5a and AQP-xt5b to the cytoplasm of secretory cells of the granular glands and the apical plasma membrane of secretory cells of the small granular glands, respectively. After dehydration, the locations of both AQPs in their respective glands did not change, but AQP-xt5a was visualized in the cytoplasm of secretory cells of the small granular glands. For the urinary bladder, AQP-xt5a was observed in the apical plasma membrane and cytoplasm of a number of granular cells under normal hydration. After dehydration, AQP-xt5a was found in the apical membrane and cytoplasm of most granular cells. Injection of vasotocin into hydrated frogs did not induce these changes in the localization of AQP-xt5a in the small granular glands and urinary bladder, however. The results suggest that AQP-xt5a might be involved in water reabsorption from the urinary bladder during dehydration, whereas AQP-xt5b might play a role in water secretion from the small granular gland. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Guinea Worm in a Frog

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-09

    Dr. Mark Eberhard, a retired parasitologist and CDC guest researcher, discusses Guinea worm infection in a wild-caught frog.  Created: 3/9/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/9/2017.

  16. Salmonella Infection and Water Frogs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-01-12

    This podcast, featuring lead investigator Shauna Mettee, discusses the first known outbreak of Salmonella in people due to contact with water frogs.  Created: 1/12/2010 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 1/12/2010.

  17. Leap-Frogging Newton's Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturiarachi, A. Bathi

    2002-01-01

    Using Newton's method as an intermediate step, we introduce an iterative method that approximates numerically the solution of f(x) = 0. The method is essentially a leap-frog Newton's method. The order of convergence of the proposed method at a simple root is cubic and the computational efficiency in general is less, but close to that of Newton's…

  18. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Abinaya

    Full Text Available Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: "FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations" is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies. FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog.

  19. CARE AND FEEDING OF FROGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Margaret; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: mpan@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    'Propellers' are features in Saturn's A ring associated with moonlets that open partial gaps. They exhibit non-Keplerian motion (Tiscareno et al.); the longitude residuals of the best-observed propeller, 'Bleriot', appear consistent with a sinusoid of period {approx}4 years. Pan and Chiang proposed that propeller moonlets librate in 'frog resonances' with co-orbiting ring material. By analogy with the restricted three-body problem, they treated the co-orbital material as stationary in the rotating frame and neglected non-co-orbital material. Here we use simple numerical experiments to extend the frog model, including feedback due to the gap's motion, and drag associated with the Lindblad disk torques that cause Type I migration. Because the moonlet creates the gap, we expect the gap centroid to track the moonlet, but only after a time delay t{sub delay}, the time for a ring particle to travel from conjunction with the moonlet to the end of the gap. We find that frog librations can persist only if t{sub delay} exceeds the frog libration period P{sub lib}, and if damping from Lindblad torques balances driving from co-orbital torques. If t{sub delay} << Pl{sub ib}, then the libration amplitude damps to zero. In the case of Bleriot, the frog resonance model can reproduce the observed libration period P{sub lib} {approx_equal} 4 yr. However, our simple feedback prescription suggests that Bleriot's t{sub delay} {approx} 0.01P{sub lib}, which is inconsistent with the observed libration amplitude of 260 km. We urge more accurate treatments of feedback to test the assumptions of our toy models.

  20. Molecular Cloning of cDNA Encoding an Aquaglyceroporin, AQP-h9, in the Japanese Tree Frog, Hyla japonica: Possible Roles of AQP-h9 in Freeze Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Atsushi; Takiya, Yu; Sakamoto, Joe; Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Okada, Reiko

    2015-06-01

    In order to study the freeze-tolerance mechanism in the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica, wecloned a eDNA encoding aquaporin (AQP) 9 from its liver. The predicted amino acid sequence ofH. japonica AQP9 (AQP-h9) contained six putative transmembrane domains and two conservedAsn-Pro-Aia motifs, which are characteristic of AQPs. A swelling assay using Xenopus laevisoocytes injected with AQP-h9 cRNA showed that AQP-h9 facilitated water and glycerol permeation,confirming its property as an aquaglyceroporin. Subsequently, glycerol concentrations in serumand tissue extracts were compared among tree frogs that were hibernating, frozen, or thawed afterfreezing. Serum glycerol concentration of thawed frogs was significantly higher than that of hibernatingfrogs. Glycerol content in the liver did not change in the freezing experiment, whereas thatin the skeletal muscle was elevated in thawed frogs as compared with hibernating or frozen frogs. Histological examination of the liver showed that erythrocytes aggregated in the sinusoids during hibernation and freezing, and immunoreactive AQP-h9 protein was detected over the erythrocytes. The AQP-h9 labeling was more intense in frozen frogs than in hibernating frogs, but nearly undetectable in thawed frogs. For the skeletal muscle, weak labels for AQP-h9 were observed in the cytoplasm of myocytes of hibernating frogs. AQP-h9 labeling was markedly enhanced by freezing and was decreased by thawing. These results indicate that glycerol may act as a c;:ryoprotectant in H. japonica and that during hibernation, particularly during freezing, AQP-h9 may be involved in glycerol uptake in erythrocytes in the liver and in intracellular glycerol transport in the skeletal muscle cells.

  1. Exploring nervous system transcriptomes during embryogenesis and metamorphosis in Xenopus tropicalis using EST analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegnez Maurice

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The western African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an anuran amphibian species now used as model in vertebrate comparative genomics. It provides the same advantages as Xenopus laevis but is diploid and has a smaller genome of 1.7 Gbp. Therefore X. tropicalis is more amenable to systematic transcriptome surveys. We initiated a large-scale partial cDNA sequencing project to provide a functional genomics resource on genes expressed in the nervous system during early embryogenesis and metamorphosis in X. tropicalis. Results A gene index was defined and analysed after the collection of over 48,785 high quality sequences. These partial cDNA sequences were obtained from an embryonic head and retina library (30,272 sequences and from a metamorphic brain and spinal cord library (27,602 sequences. These ESTs are estimated to represent 9,693 transcripts derived from an estimated 6,000 genes. Comparison of these cDNA sequences with protein databases indicates that 46% contain their start codon. Further annotation included Gene Ontology functional classification, InterPro domain analysis, alternative splicing and non-coding RNA identification. Gene expression profiles were derived from EST counts and used to define transcripts specific to metamorphic stages of development. Moreover, these ESTs allowed identification of a set of 225 polymorphic microsatellites that can be used as genetic markers. Conclusion These cDNA sequences permit in silico cloning of numerous genes and will facilitate studies aimed at deciphering the roles of cognate genes expressed in the nervous system during neural development and metamorphosis. The genomic resources developed to study X. tropicalis biology will accelerate exploration of amphibian physiology and genetics. In particular, the model will facilitate analysis of key questions related to anuran embryogenesis and metamorphosis and its associated regulatory processes.

  2. A comparison of electronic and traditional cigarette butt leachate on the development of Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Tatiana Tatum; Rayburn, James

    2017-01-01

    Potential developmental toxicities of three different cigarette butt leachates were evaluated using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). Xenopus laevis embryos were exposed to regular cigarette butt (RCB), menthol (MCB) and electronic (ECB) in concentrations ranging from 0 to 4 butts/l for RCB and MCB and 0-10 butts/l for ECB. The embryos were from stage 8 to 11 and were exposed for a 96-h period in static renewal test conditions. Median lethal concentration (LC50), malformation (EC50), non-observed adverse effect concentration (NOAEC), and lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC) were calculated. Results from these studies suggest that each tested leachate is teratogenic for X. laevis embryos. The lowest LC50 was determined for ECB exposure at 17.9 cigarette butts/L. The LC50 value was the highest with RCB and MCB having LC50 s of approximately 1 cigarette butt/L. There were notable EC50 differences with RCB having the highest and ECB the lowest. The NOAEC and LOAEC levels for RCB and MCB were below 1 cigarette butt/L for both mortality and malformations; over 8 butts/L for ECB mortality and over 4 butts/L for malformations. From these results, we conclude that RCB leachate is the most toxic compound, while MCB leachate has the higher teratogenicity. ECB leachate has the lowest toxic and teratogenic effects on embryos but there were still noticeable effects. The results confirmed that the FETAX assay can be useful in an integrated biological hazard assessment for the preliminary screening for ecological risks of cigarette butts, and electronic cigarettes, in aquatic environment.

  3. PEX11β induces peroxisomal gene expression and alters peroxisome number during early Xenopus laevis development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanovski Sashko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisomes are organelles whose roles in fatty acid metabolism and reactive oxygen species elimination have contributed much attention in understanding their origin and biogenesis. Many studies have shown that de novo peroxisome biogenesis is an important regulatory process, while yeast studies suggest that total peroxisome numbers are in part regulated by proteins such as Pex11, which can facilitate the division of existing peroxisomes. Although de novo biogenesis and divisions are likely important mechanisms, the regulation of peroxisome numbers during embryonic development is poorly understood. Peroxisome number and function are particularly crucial in oviparous animals such as frogs where large embryonic yolk and fatty acid stores must be quickly metabolized, and resulting reactive oxygen species eliminated. Here we elucidate the role of Pex11β in regulating peroxisomal gene expression and number in Xenopus laevis embryogenesis. Results Microinjecting haemagglutinin (HA tagged Pex11β in early embryos resulted in increased RNA levels for peroxisome related genes PMP70 and catalase at developmental stages 10 and 20, versus uninjected embryos. Catalase and PMP70 proteins were found in punctate structures at stage 20 in control embryos, whereas the injection of ectopic HA-Pex11β induced their earlier localization in punctate structures at stage 10. Furthermore, the peroxisomal marker GFP-SKL, which was found localized as peroxisome-like structures at stage 20, was similarly found at stage 10 when co-microinjected with HA-Pex11β. Conclusions Overexpressed Pex11β altered peroxisomal gene levels and induced the early formation of peroxisomes-like structures during development, both of which demonstrate that Pex11β may be a key regulator of peroxisome number in early Xenopus embryos.

  4. Observation of Frog Species in State University of Malang as a Preliminary Effort on Frog Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Wulandari, Dian Ratri; Habibi, Muhammad; Listyorini, Dwi

    2013-01-01

    Frog is an amphibian which widely distributed around the world. Indonesia houses 450 species which represent 11% of frog species in the world. In Java Island living 42 species of frogs and toads. Frogs can be used as an environment indicator due to the presence of frog in a particular place indicates that the place is stay natural and unpolluted. State University of Malang Campus #1 which is located in the heart of Malang District has been developing rapidly, currently. Thus, it requires for ...

  5. Metabolomic approach for identifying and visualizing molecular tissue markers in tadpoles of Xenopus tropicalis by mass spectrometry imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Goto-Inoue

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In developmental and cell biology it is crucial to evaluate the dynamic profiles of metabolites. An emerging frog model system using Xenopus tropicalis, whose genome sequence and inbred strains are available, is now ready for metabolomics investigation in amphibians. In this study we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MSI analysis to identify and visualize metabolomic molecular markers in tadpoles of Xenopus tropicalis. We detected tissue-specific peaks and visualized their distribution in tissues, and distinguished 19 tissues and their specific peaks. We identified, for the first time, some of their molecular localizations via tandem mass spectrometric analysis: hydrocortisone in artery, L-DOPA in rhombencephalon, taurine in eye, corticosterone in gill, heme in heart, inosine monophosphate and carnosine in muscle, dopamine in nerves, and phosphatidylethanolamine (16:0/20:4 in pharynx. This is the first MALDI-MSI study of X. tropicalis tadpoles, as in small tadpoles it is hard to distinguish and dissect the various organs. Furthermore, until now there has been no data about the metabolomic profile of each organ. Our results suggest that MALDI-MSI is potentially a powerful tool for examining the dynamics of metabolomics in metamorphosis as well as conformational changes due to metabolic changes.

  6. Development of a new approach for targeted gene editing in primordial germ cells using TALENs in Xenopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nakajima

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A gene of interest can be efficiently modified using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs (Christian et al., 2010;Li et al., 2011. However, if a target gene is essential for development, growth and fertility, use of TALENs with high mutagenic activity in F0 frogs could result in developmental disorders or sterility, which would reduce the number of F1 progeny and make F1 phenotypical analysis difficult. We used the 3′ untranslated region of DEADSouth gene (DS-3′ of Xenopus tropicalis to solve this problem, because the addition of the DS-3′ to mRNA is known to induce primordial germ cell (PGC-specific expression and reduce the stability in somatic cells of mRNA in Xenopus laevis. At first, we inserted the X. tropicalis DS-3′ downstream of the EGFP termination codon and confirmed that the EGFP expression was specifically detected in PGCs for three weeks. Therefore, we inserted the DS-3′ downstream of the termination codon of the TALEN coding sequence. The tyrosinase gene was selected as the target gene for TALEN because the bi-allelic mutation of this gene is easily discernible by the albino phenotype. When fertilized eggs were microinjected with TALEN mRNAs fused to the DS-3′, their sperm and oocytes had a high rate (84–100% of target-gene modification in contrast to the lower rate (0–45% of nucleotide alteration observed in somatic cells.

  7. Ancient T-Independence of Mucosal IgX/A: Gut Microbiota Unaffected by Larval Thymectomy in Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashoof, Sara; Goodroe, Anna; Du, Christina C.; Eubanks, Jeannine O.; Jacobs, Natalie; Steiner, Jörg M.; Tizard, Ian; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies address the influence of the gut microbiome on the immune system, but few dissect the effect of T cells on gut microbiota and mucosal responses. We have employed larval thymectomy in Xenopus to study the gut microbiota with and without the influence of T lymphocytes. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to assess the relative abundance of bacterial groups present in the stomach, small and large intestine. Clostridiaceae was the most abundant family throughout the gut, while Bacteroidaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Flavobacteriaceae also were well represented. Unifrac analysis revealed no differences in microbiota distribution between thymectomized and unoperated frogs. This is consistent with immunization data showing that levels of the mucosal immunoglobulin IgX are not altered significantly by thymectomy. This study in Xenopus represents the oldest organisms that exhibit class switch to a mucosal isotype and is relevant to mammalian immunology, as IgA appears to have evolved from IgX based upon phylogeny, genomic synteny, and function. PMID:22929561

  8. Maternal Wnt/β-catenin signaling coactivates transcription through NF-κB binding sites during Xenopus axis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Armstrong

    Full Text Available Maternal Wnt/β-Catenin signaling establishes a program of dorsal-specific gene expression required for axial patterning in Xenopus. We previously reported that a subset of dorsally expressed genes depends not only on Wnt/β-Catenin stimulation, but also on a MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor/IL1-receptor (TLR/IL1-R signaling pathway. Here we show that these two signal transduction cascades converge in the nucleus to coactivate gene transcription in blastulae through a direct interaction between β-Catenin and NF-κB proteins. A transdominant inhibitor of NF-κB, ΔNIκBα, phenocopies loss of MyD88 protein function, implicating Rel/NF-κB proteins as selective activators of dorsal-specific gene expression. Sensitive axis formation assays in the embryo demonstrate that dorsalization by Wnt/β-Catenin requires NF-κB protein activity, and vice versa. Xenopus nodal-related 3 (Xnr3 is one of the genes with dual β-Catenin/NF-κB input, and a proximal NF-κB consensus site contributes to the regional activity of its promoter. We demonstrate in vitro binding of Xenopus β-Catenin to several XRel proteins. This interaction is observed in vivo upon Wnt-stimulation. Finally, we show that a synthetic luciferase reporter gene responds to both endogenous and exogenous β-Catenin levels in an NF-κB motif dependent manner. These results suggest that β-Catenin acts as a transcriptional co-activator of NF-κB-dependent transcription in frog primary embryonic cells.

  9. Maternal Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Coactivates Transcription through NF-κB Binding Sites during Xenopus Axis Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Neil J.; Fagotto, François; Prothmann, Christian; Rupp, Ralph A. W.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal Wnt/β-Catenin signaling establishes a program of dorsal-specific gene expression required for axial patterning in Xenopus. We previously reported that a subset of dorsally expressed genes depends not only on Wnt/β-Catenin stimulation, but also on a MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor/IL1-receptor (TLR/IL1-R) signaling pathway. Here we show that these two signal transduction cascades converge in the nucleus to coactivate gene transcription in blastulae through a direct interaction between β-Catenin and NF-κB proteins. A transdominant inhibitor of NF-κB, ΔNIκBα, phenocopies loss of MyD88 protein function, implicating Rel/NF-κB proteins as selective activators of dorsal-specific gene expression. Sensitive axis formation assays in the embryo demonstrate that dorsalization by Wnt/β-Catenin requires NF-κB protein activity, and vice versa. Xenopus nodal-related 3 (Xnr3) is one of the genes with dual β-Catenin/NF-κB input, and a proximal NF-κB consensus site contributes to the regional activity of its promoter. We demonstrate in vitro binding of Xenopus β-Catenin to several XRel proteins. This interaction is observed in vivo upon Wnt-stimulation. Finally, we show that a synthetic luciferase reporter gene responds to both endogenous and exogenous β-Catenin levels in an NF-κB motif dependent manner. These results suggest that β-Catenin acts as a transcriptional co-activator of NF-κB-dependent transcription in frog primary embryonic cells. PMID:22590521

  10. Planar cell polarity enables posterior localization of nodal cilia and left-right axis determination during mouse and Xenopus embryogenesis.

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    Dragana Antic

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Left-right asymmetry in vertebrates is initiated in an early embryonic structure called the ventral node in human and mouse, and the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP in the frog. Within these structures, each epithelial cell bears a single motile cilium, and the concerted beating of these cilia produces a leftward fluid flow that is required to initiate left-right asymmetric gene expression. The leftward fluid flow is thought to result from the posterior tilt of the cilia, which protrude from near the posterior portion of each cell's apical surface. The cells, therefore, display a morphological planar polarization. Planar cell polarity (PCP is manifested as the coordinated, polarized orientation of cells within epithelial sheets, or as directional cell migration and intercalation during convergent extension. A set of evolutionarily conserved proteins regulates PCP. Here, we provide evidence that vertebrate PCP proteins regulate planar polarity in the mouse ventral node and in the Xenopus gastrocoel roof plate. Asymmetric anterior localization of VANGL1 and PRICKLE2 (PK2 in mouse ventral node cells indicates that these cells are planar polarized by a conserved molecular mechanism. A weakly penetrant Vangl1 mutant phenotype suggests that compromised Vangl1 function may be associated with left-right laterality defects. Stronger functional evidence comes from the Xenopus GRP, where we show that perturbation of VANGL2 protein function disrupts the posterior localization of motile cilia that is required for leftward fluid flow, and causes aberrant expression of the left side-specific gene Nodal. The observation of anterior-posterior PCP in the mouse and in Xenopus embryonic organizers reflects a strong evolutionary conservation of this mechanism that is important for body plan determination.

  11. Sex chromosome differentiation and the W- and Z-specific loci in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Takahashi, Shuji; Wada, Mikako; Uno, Yoshinobu; Matsuda, Yoichi; Kondo, Mariko; Fukui, Akimasa; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Taira, Masanori; Ito, Michihiko

    2017-06-15

    Genetic sex-determining systems in vertebrates include two basic types of heterogamety; XX (female)/XY (male) and ZZ (male)/ZW (female) types. The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis has a ZZ/ZW-type sex-determining system. In this species, we previously identified a W-specific sex (female)-determining gene dmw, and specified W and Z chromosomes, which could be morphologically indistinguishable (homomorphic). In addition to dmw, we most recently discovered two genes, named scanw and ccdc69w, and one gene, named capn5z in the W- and Z-specific regions, respectively. In this study, we revealed the detail structures of the W/Z-specific loci and genes. Sequence analysis indicated that there is almost no sequence similarity between 278kb W-specific and 83kb Z-specific sequences on chromosome 2Lq32-33, where both the transposable elements are abundant. Synteny and phylogenic analyses indicated that all the W/Z-specific genes might have emerged independently. Expression analysis demonstrated that scanw and ccdc69w or capn5z are expressed in early differentiating ZW gonads or testes, thereby suggesting possible roles in female or male development, respectively. Importantly, the sex-determining gene (SDG) dmw might have been generated after allotetraploidization, thereby indicating the construction of the new sex-determining system by dmw after species hybridization. Furthermore, by direct genotyping, we confirmed that diploid WW embryos developed into normal female frogs, which indicate that the Z-specific region is not essential for female development. Overall, these findings indicate that sex chromosome differentiation has started, although no heteromorphic sex chromosomes are evident yet, in X. laevis. Homologous recombination suppression might have promoted the accumulation of mutations and transposable elements, and enlarged the W/Z-specific regions, thereby resulting in differentiation of the W/Z chromosomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolution of vertebrate transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 channels: opposite temperature sensitivity between mammals and western clawed frogs.

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    Shigeru Saito

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential (TRP channels serve as temperature receptors in a wide variety of animals and must have played crucial roles in thermal adaptation. The TRP vanilloid (TRPV subfamily contains several temperature receptors with different temperature sensitivities. The TRPV3 channel is known to be highly expressed in skin, where it is activated by warm temperatures and serves as a sensor to detect ambient temperatures near the body temperature of homeothermic animals such as mammals. Here we performed comprehensive comparative analyses of the TRPV subfamily in order to understand the evolutionary process; we identified novel TRPV genes and also characterized the evolutionary flexibility of TRPV3 during vertebrate evolution. We cloned the TRPV3 channel from the western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis to understand the functional evolution of the TRPV3 channel. The amino acid sequences of the N- and C-terminal regions of the TRPV3 channel were highly diversified from those of other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV3 channels, although central portions were well conserved. In a heterologous expression system, several mammalian TRPV3 agonists did not activate the TRPV3 channel of the western clawed frog. Moreover, the frog TRPV3 channel did not respond to heat stimuli, instead it was activated by cold temperatures. Temperature thresholds for activation were about 16 °C, slightly below the lower temperature limit for the western clawed frog. Given that the TRPV3 channel is expressed in skin, its likely role is to detect noxious cold temperatures. Thus, the western clawed frog and mammals acquired opposite temperature sensitivity of the TRPV3 channel in order to detect environmental temperatures suitable for their respective species, indicating that temperature receptors can dynamically change properties to adapt to different thermal environments during evolution.

  13. CAP1 expression is developmentally regulated in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KhosrowShahian, F; Hubberstey, A V; Crawford, M J

    2002-05-01

    We have cloned and characterized a Xenopus member of the cyclase associated protein (CAP) gene family. xCAP1 is expressed as a maternal transcript, but is up-regulated prior to gastrulation and subsequently localizes to head mesenchyme, lens, otic vesicle, and trunk mesoderm including the pronephros. At different stages, the gene also appears to differentiate surface from deep (sensorial) ectoderm. As in Drosophila, Xenopus CAP1 is expressed in the developing eye, specifically in the differentiating lens. However, in distinction to Drosophila, Xenopus CAP1 does not express in periodically arrayed neural bands.

  14. Assessment of frog meat utilisation in Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the respondents (100%) buy the frogs utilised, have knowledge of the sellers and were unaware of frog farms in Nigeria. All the respondents (100%) considered frog meat desirable and preferred it when dried. Almost all the respondents (98.0%) have consumed frog meat more than 10 times. Majority of the respondents ...

  15. Frog oocytes to unveil the structure and supramolecular organization of human transport proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J Bergeron

    Full Text Available Structural analyses of heterologously expressed mammalian membrane proteins remain a great challenge given that microgram to milligram amounts of correctly folded and highly purified proteins are required. Here, we present a novel method for the expression and affinity purification of recombinant mammalian and in particular human transport proteins in Xenopus laevis frog oocytes. The method was validated for four human and one murine transporter. Negative stain transmission electron microscopy (TEM and single particle analysis (SPA of two of these transporters, i.e., the potassium-chloride cotransporter 4 (KCC4 and the aquaporin-1 (AQP1 water channel, revealed the expected quaternary structures within homogeneous preparations, and thus correct protein folding and assembly. This is the first time a cation-chloride cotransporter (SLC12 family member is isolated, and its shape, dimensions, low-resolution structure and oligomeric state determined by TEM, i.e., by a direct method. Finally, we were able to grow 2D crystals of human AQP1. The ability of AQP1 to crystallize was a strong indicator for the structural integrity of the purified recombinant protein. This approach will open the way for the structure determination of many human membrane transporters taking full advantage of the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that generally yields robust functional expression.

  16. De novo Transcriptome Assemblies of Rana (Lithobates catesbeiana and Xenopus laevis Tadpole Livers for Comparative Genomics without Reference Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inanc Birol

    Full Text Available In this work we studied the liver transcriptomes of two frog species, the American bullfrog (Rana (Lithobates catesbeiana and the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis. We used high throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq data to assemble and annotate these transcriptomes, and compared how their baseline expression profiles change when tadpoles of the two species are exposed to thyroid hormone. We generated more than 1.5 billion RNA-seq reads in total for the two species under two conditions as treatment/control pairs. We de novo assembled these reads using Trans-ABySS to reconstruct reference transcriptomes, obtaining over 350,000 and 130,000 putative transcripts for R. catesbeiana and X. laevis, respectively. Using available genomics resources for X. laevis, we annotated over 97% of our X. laevis transcriptome contigs, demonstrating the utility and efficacy of our methodology. Leveraging this validated analysis pipeline, we also annotated the assembled R. catesbeiana transcriptome. We used the expression profiles of the annotated genes of the two species to examine the similarities and differences between the tadpole liver transcriptomes. We also compared the gene ontology terms of expressed genes to measure how the animals react to a challenge by thyroid hormone. Our study reports three main conclusions. First, de novo assembly of RNA-seq data is a powerful method for annotating and establishing transcriptomes of non-model organisms. Second, the liver transcriptomes of the two frog species, R. catesbeiana and X. laevis, show many common features, and the distribution of their gene ontology profiles are statistically indistinguishable. Third, although they broadly respond the same way to the presence of thyroid hormone in their environment, their receptor/signal transduction pathways display marked differences.

  17. Rapamycin treatment causes developmental delay, pigmentation defects, and gastrointestinal malformation on Xenopus embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Ohata, Yoshihisa [Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Mori, Shoko [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Matsukawa, Shinya [Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Michiue, Tatsuo [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Baien, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Kuroda, Hiroki, E-mail: ehkurod@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Does famous anti-aging drug rapamycin work from the beginning of life? The answer is yes. {yields} This study shows that developmental speed of frog embryo was dose-dependently decreased by rapamycin treatment. {yields} In additions, morphogenetic effects such as less pigmentations and gut malformation are occurred by rapamycin. -- Abstract: Rapamycin is a drug working as an inhibitor of the TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway and influences various life phenomena such as cell growth, proliferation, and life span extension in eukaryote. However, the extent to which rapamycin controls early developmental events of amphibians remains to be understood. Here we report an examination of rapamycin effects during Xenopus early development, followed by a confirmation of suppression of TOR downstream kinase S6K by rapamycin treatment. First, we found that developmental speed was declined in dose-dependent manner of rapamycin. Second, black pigment spots located at dorsal and lateral skin in tadpoles were reduced by rapamycin treatment. Moreover, in tadpole stages severe gastrointestinal malformations were observed in rapamycin-treated embryos. Taken together with these results, we conclude that treatment of the drug rapamycin causes enormous influences on early developmental period.

  18. Effect of allyl isothiocyanate on developmental toxicity in exposed Xenopus laevis embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Russell Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pungent natural compound allyl isothiocyanate isolated from the seeds of Cruciferous (Brassica plants such as mustard is reported to exhibit numerous beneficial health-promoting antimicrobial, antifungal, anticarcinogenic, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. Because it is also reported to damage DNA and is toxic to aquatic organisms, the objective of the present study was to determine whether it possesses teratogenic properties. The frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX was used to determine the following measures of developmental toxicity of the allyl isothiocyanate: (a 96-h LC50, defined as the median concentration causing 50% embryo lethality; (b 96-h EC50, defined as the median concentration causing 50% malformations of the surviving embryos; and (c teratogenic malformation index (TI, equal to 96-h LC50/96-h EC50. The quantitative results and the photographs of embryos before and after exposure suggest that allyl isothiocyanate seems to exhibit moderate teratogenic properties. The results also indicate differences in the toxicity of allyl isothiocyanate toward exposed embryos observed in the present study compared to reported adverse effects of allyl isothiocyanate in fish, rodents, and humans. The significance of the results for food safety and possible approaches to protect against adverse effects of allyl isothiocyanate are discussed.

  19. A Tunable Silk Hydrogel Device for Studying Limb Regeneration in Adult Xenopus Laevis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Golding

    Full Text Available In certain amphibian models limb regeneration can be promoted or inhibited by the local wound bed environment. This research introduces a device that can be utilized as an experimental tool to characterize the conditions that promotes limb regeneration in the adult frog (Xenopus laevis model. In particular, this device was designed to manipulate the local wound environment via a hydrogel insert. Initial characterization of the hydrogel insert revealed that this interaction had a significant influence on mechanical forces to the animal, due to the contraction of the hydrogel. The material and mechanical properties of the hydrogel insert were a factor in the device design in relation to the comfort of the animal and the ability to effectively manipulate the amputation site. The tunable features of the hydrogel were important in determining the pro-regenerative effects in limb regeneration, which was measured by cartilage spike formation and quantified by micro-computed tomography. The hydrogel insert was a factor in the observed morphological outcomes following amputation. Future work will focus on characterizing and optimizing the device's observed capability to manipulate biological pathways that are essential for limb regeneration. However, the present work provides a framework for the role of a hydrogel in the device and a path forward for more systematic studies.

  20. Effects of GSM-like radiofrequency irradiation during the oogenesis and spermiogenesis of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boga, Ayper; Emre, Mustafa; Sertdemir, Yasar; Uncu, İbrahim; Binokay, Secil; Demirhan, Osman

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of GSM-like radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) on the oogenesis, and spermiogenesis of Xenopus laevis, and so the development of the embryos obtained from Normal Females+Normal Males (i.e. "N(F)+N(M)"); Normal Females+RF-exposed Males (i.e. "N(F)+RF(M)"); RF-exposed Female+Normal Male (i.e. "RF(F)+N(M)"); and RF-exposed Female+RF-exposed Male (i.e. "RF(F)+RF(M)". Various, assessments were performed to determine potential teratogenic effects and mortality, body growth and behavior on first generation embryos. After exposing adults frogs of both sexes to 900MHz RF-EMR (at 1.0W/kg) for 8h a day over a 5-week period, the embryos' specific energy absorption rate (SAR) was calculated. In our present study (control group; 2.2% abnormal, 0.0% dead); with the N(F)+RF(M) combination, the long-term exposure of adult males to GSM-like radiation at 900MHz (RF: 2W) for 5 week/8h/day resulted in normal, abnormal and dead embryo ratios of 88.3%, 3.3% and 8.3%, respectively (poogenesis exhibited a more aggressive behavior compared to the control group. Cell phones radiation can thus lead to detrimental effects in humans' male and female reproductive cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatic confinement of newly produced erythrocytes caused by low-temperature exposure in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Shun; Iemura, Hitomi; Kuramochi, Yuko; Nogawa-Kosaka, Nami; Nishikawa, Hironori; Okui, Takehito; Aizawa, Youichi; Kato, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Diminished erythrocyte count and erythropoiesis have been reported during hypothermia in some ectothermic animals. In this study, the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, was used to investigate the cause of hypothermia-induced anemia. We developed a new model of hypothermia at 5°C and monitored blood cell count and erythropoiesis on several days. Erythrocyte count declined by 30% on the first day following cold exposure (5°C) and mRNA expression of hemeoxygenase-1 was enhanced 10-fold; accumulation of iron as a result of heme degradation was observed in the liver. One day after low-temperature exposure, erythropoietin mRNA expression was elevated in the liver and lung compared with that at normal temperature (22°C) by qRT-PCR analysis. Examination of liver sections (i.e. the erythropoietic organ) showed an increase in o-dianisidine-positive erythrocytes in the hepatic sinusoid 5 days after the onset of low-temperature exposure compared with normal liver. Peripheral erythrocyte count remained low, indicating that newly produced erythrocytes did not migrate from the liver to the circulation during hypothermia. In conclusion, this study reveals hypothermic anemia as being associated with hepatic erythrocyte destruction; prolonged anemia during low-temperature exposure is concomitant with newly produced erythrocytes being confined to the liver and may lead to new insights into vertebrate hematopoiesis.

  2. Gene expression analysis of the ovary of hybrid females of Xenopus laevis and X. muelleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone John H

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspecific hybrids of frogs of the genus Xenopus result in sterile hybrid males and fertile hybrid females. Previous work has demonstrated a dramatic asymmetrical pattern of misexpression in hybrid males compared to the two parental species with relatively few genes misexpressed in comparisons of hybrids and the maternal species (X. laevis and dramatically more genes misexpressed in hybrids compared to the paternal species (X. muelleri. In this work, we examine the gene expression pattern in hybrid females of X. laevis × X. muelleri to determine if this asymmetrical pattern of expression also occurs in hybrid females. Results We find a similar pattern of asymmetry in expression compared to males in that there were more genes differentially expressed between hybrids and X. muelleri compared to hybrids and X. laevis. We also found a dramatic increase in the number of misexpressed genes with hybrid females having about 20 times more genes misexpressed in ovaries compared to testes of hybrid males and therefore the match between phenotype and expression pattern is not supported. Conclusion We discuss these intriguing findings in the context of reproductive isolation and suggest that divergence in female expression may be involved in sterility of hybrid males due to the inherent sensitivity of spermatogenesis as defined by the faster male evolution hypothesis for Haldane's rule.

  3. Signaling and transcriptional regulation in neural crest specification and migration: lessons from xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Caterina; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is a population of highly migratory and multipotent cells, which arises from the border of the neural plate in vertebrate embryos. In the last few years, the molecular actors of neural crest early development have been intensively studied, notably by using the frog embryo, as a prime model for the analysis of the earliest embryonic inductions. In addition, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular and cellular basis of Xenopus cranial neural crest migration, by combining in vitro and in vivo analysis. In this review, we examine how the action of previously known neural crest-inducing signals [bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), wingless-int (Wnt), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)] is controlled by newly discovered modulators during early neural plate border patterning and neural crest specification. This regulation controls the induction of key transcription factors that cooperate to pattern the premigratory neural crest progenitors. These data are discussed in the perspective of the gene regulatory network that controls neural and neural crest patterning. We then address recent findings on noncanonical Wnt signaling regulation, cell polarization, and collective cell migration which highlight how cranial neural crest cells populate their target tissue, the branchial arches, in vivo. More than ever, the neural crest stands as a powerful and attractive model to decipher complex vertebrate regulatory circuits in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Faret, Gabriela; Muñoz, Rosana; Méndez-Olivos, Emilio E; Lee-Liu, Dasfne; Tapia, Victor S; Larraín, Juan

    2017-02-01

    Here we present a protocol for the husbandry of Xenopus laevis tadpoles and froglets, and procedures to study spinal cord regeneration. This includes methods to induce spinal cord injury (SCI); DNA and morpholino electroporation for genetic studies; in vivo imaging for cell analysis; a swimming test to measure functional recovery; and a convenient model for screening for new compounds that promote neural regeneration. These protocols establish X. laevis as a unique model organism for understanding spinal cord regeneration by comparing regenerative and nonregenerative stages. This protocol can be used to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in nervous system regeneration, including neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation and neurogenesis, extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms involved in axon regeneration, glial response and scar formation, and trophic factors. For experienced personnel, husbandry takes 1-2 months; SCI can be achieved in 5-15 min; and swimming recovery takes 20-30 d.

  5. Neuronal, neurohormonal, and autocrine control of Xenopus melanotrope cell activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos, E.W.; Scheenen, W.J.J.M.; Jenks, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    Amphibian pituitary melanotropes are used to investigate principles of neuroendocrine translation of neural input into hormonal output. Here, the steps in this translation process are outlined for the melanotrope cell of Xenopus laevis, with attention to external stimuli, neurochemical messengers,

  6. Voltage-dependent activation of frog eggs by a sperm surface disintegrin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilling, F M; Magie, C R; Nuccitelli, R

    1998-10-01

    Fertilin, a sperm protein of the metalloprotease/disintegrin/cysteine-rich (MDC) family, plays a critical role in sperm-egg binding in mammals. Peptides corresponding to the disintegrin domain of fertilin and antibodies against fertilin have been shown to inhibit mammalian sperm-egg binding and fusion. A protein from the same family, xMDC16, was recently cloned from frog (Xenopus laevis) testis and was found to be involved in frog sperm-egg binding. Here we report that xMDC16 is localized predominantly on the posterior surface of egg jelly-activated sperm, and peptides from the disintegrin domain of this protein activate eggs when applied near the egg surface. Egg activation was dependent on (1) specific amino acid residues (KTX); (2) the presence of divalent cations, but not external Ca2+ alone; and (3) voltage across the egg plasma membrane. This is the first demonstration of egg activation in vertebrates by the surface application of a peptide derived from a sperm surface protein, supporting a model for egg activation that involves a signal transducing receptor for sperm in the egg's plasma membrane. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  7. Built for rowing: frog muscle is tuned to limb morphology to power swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Christopher T; Clemente, Christofer J

    2013-07-06

    Rowing is demanding, in part, because drag on the oars increases as the square of their speed. Hence, as muscles shorten faster, their force capacity falls, whereas drag rises. How do frogs resolve this dilemma to swim rapidly? We predicted that shortening velocity cannot exceed a terminal velocity where muscle and fluid torques balance. This terminal velocity, which is below Vmax, depends on gear ratio (GR = outlever/inlever) and webbed foot area. Perhaps such properties of swimmers are 'tuned', enabling shortening speeds of approximately 0.3Vmax for maximal power. Predictions were tested using a 'musculo-robotic' Xenopus laevis foot driven either by a living in vitro or computational in silico plantaris longus muscle. Experiments verified predictions. Our principle finding is that GR ranges from 11.5 to 20 near the predicted optimum for rowing (GR ≈ 11). However, gearing influences muscle power more strongly than foot area. No single morphology is optimal for producing muscle power. Rather, the 'optimal' GR decreases with foot size, implying that rowing ability need not compromise jumping (and vice versa). Thus, despite our neglect of additional forces (e.g. added mass), our model predicts pairings of physiological and morphological properties to confer effective rowing. Beyond frogs, the model may apply across a range of size and complexity from aquatic insects to human-powered rowing.

  8. Severe sparganosis in Australian tree frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Young, Sam; Speare, Rick

    2009-10-01

    Spargana of Spirometra erinacei infect many vertebrate species, but severe disease from sparganosis has been reported from few host species. Information on the effects of this common, introduced tapeworm of cats on Australian frogs is lacking. Our survey to detect significant diseases in free-ranging amphibians in eastern Australia between 1993 and 2000 revealed that infection with spargana (plerocercoids) of S. erinacei occurred in 12/243 (4.9%) sick frogs. Infections occurred in skeletal muscle and subcutis, especially the thighs, of large adults of Litoria caerulea, Litoria aurea, Litoria gracilenta, and Litoria peronii. Three frogs were also infected in the coelomic cavity. Heavy burdens in seven frogs were associated with poor body condition and debilitating lesions, whereas lighter infections in five sick frogs were considered likely to be incidental to other diseases. In severe infections, a large proportion of thigh muscle was replaced with spargana and various amounts of fibrosis, and some frogs also had myonecrosis, granulomatous inflammation, hemorrhage, and skin ulceration. Concurrent infections were common. Our findings suggest sparganosis is one of a few currently recognized serious diseases affecting free-ranging frogs in Australia.

  9. Assessment of laryngeal muscle and testicular cell types in Xenopus laevis (Anura Pipidae) inhabiting maize and non-maize growing areas of South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E.E.; Du Preez, L.H.; Gentles, A.; Solomon, K.R.; Tandler, B.; Carr, J.A.; Van Der Kraak, G. L.; Kendall, R.J.; Giesy, J.P.; Gross, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adult African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) inhabiting water bodies in maize-growing areas (MGA) of South Africa would exhibit differences in testicular structure compared to frogs from water bodies in non-maize-growing areas (NMGA) in the same locale. Adults of both sexes were collected during the autumn of 2002 in South Africa, and stereological analytical techniques were used to quantify the distribution of testicular cell types. In addition, total laryngeal mass was used as a gauge of secondary sex differences in animals from MGA and NMGA study sites. Evaluation of the total laryngeal mass revealed that there were no statistically significant differences between X. laevis of the same sex from the NMGA and MGA sites. Mean percent fractional-volume values for seminiferous tubule distribution of testicular cell types of mature X. laevis, ranged from 3-4% for spermatogonia, 26-28% for spermatocytes, 54-57% for spermatozoa, and 14-15% for other cells types. The mean percent volume for blood vessels ranged from 0.3-0.4%. These values did not differ significantly between frogs from NMGA and MGA areas. Collectively, these data demonstrated no differences in gonadal and laryngeal development in X. laevis collected in South Africa from MGA and NMGA areas and that there is little evidence for an effect of agricultural chemicals used in maize production functioning as endocrine disrupters in this species. Screening of X. laevis testes revealed a small incidence of Stage 1 testicular oocytes in adult male frogs collected from the NMGA (3%) and MGA (2%).

  10. Frog Call Survey Summary 2002-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Since 2002, Patuxent Research Refuge has conducted frog surveys on South Tract, Central Tract, and North Tract locations. These surveys are conducted by Patuxent...

  11. Region 6 Northern Leopard Frog Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains a collection of completed questionnaires and related additional data regarding the status review of the northern leopard frog. On July 1,...

  12. Papuan Hylid Frogs of the Genus Hyla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyler, M.J.

    1968-01-01

    CONTENTS Introduction............... 3 History of the study of Papuan Hyla......... 4 The Papuan frog fauna............ 6 Materials, methods and terminology.......... 8 Geographical nomenclature............ 11 Locality names.............. 14 The genus Hyla Laurenti............ 16 Checklist of Papuan

  13. Comparison of TALEN scaffolds in Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nakajima

    2013-11-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs are facile and potent tools used to modify a gene of interest for targeted gene knockout. TALENs consist of an N-terminal domain, a DNA-binding domain, and a C-terminal domain, which are derived from a transcription activator-like effector, and the non-specific nuclease domain of FokI. Using Xenopus tropicalis (X. tropicalis, we compared the toxicities and somatic mutation activities of four TALEN architectures in a side-by-side manner: a basic TALEN, a scaffold with the same truncated N- and C-terminal domains as GoldyTALEN, a scaffold with the truncated N- and C-terminal domains and an obligate heterodimeric nuclease domain, and a scaffold with the truncated N- and C-terminal domains and an obligate heterodimeric Sharkey nuclease domain. The strongest phenotype and targeted somatic gene mutation were induced by the injection of TALEN mRNAs containing the truncated N- and C-terminal domains and an obligate heterodimeric nuclease domain. The obligate heterodimeric TALENs exhibited reduced toxicity compared to the homodimeric TALENs, and the homodimeric GoldyTALEN-type scaffold showed both a high activity of somatic gene modification and high toxicity. The Sharkey mutation in the heterodimeric nuclease domain reduced the TALEN-mediated somatic mutagenesis.

  14. Ca2+ homeostasis regulates Xenopus oocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lu; Hodeify, Rawad; Haun, Shirley; Charlesworth, Amanda; MacNicol, Angus M; Ponnappan, Subramaniam; Ponnappan, Usha; Prigent, Claude; Machaca, Khaled

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to the well-defined role of Ca2+ signals during mitosis, the contribution of Ca2+ signaling to meiosis progression is controversial, despite several decades of investigating the role of Ca2+ and its effectors in vertebrate oocyte maturation. We have previously shown that during Xenopus oocyte maturation, Ca2+ signals are dispensable for entry into meiosis and for germinal vesicle breakdown. However, normal Ca2+ homeostasis is essential for completion of meiosis I and extrusion of the first polar body. In this study, we test the contribution of several downstream effectors in mediating the Ca2+ effects during oocyte maturation. We show that calmodulin and calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMK2) are not critical downstream Ca2+ effectors during meiotic maturation. In contrast, accumulation of Aurora kinase A (AURKA) protein is disrupted in cells deprived of Ca2+ signals. Since AURKA is required for bipolar spindle formation, failure to accumulate AURKA may contribute to the defective spindle phenotype following Ca2+ deprivation. These findings argue that Ca2+ homeostasis is important in establishing the oocyte's competence to undergo maturation in preparation for fertilization and embryonic development.

  15. Chemical Screening Using Cell-FreeXenopusEgg Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadus, Matthew R; Lee, Ethan

    2018-02-23

    Most drug screening methods use purified proteins, cultured cells, and/or small model organisms such as Xenopus , zebrafish, flies, or nematodes. These systems have proven successes in drug discovery, but they also have weaknesses. Although purified cellular components allow for identification of compounds with activity against specific targets, such systems lack the complex biological interactions present in cellular and organismal screens. In vivo systems overcome these weaknesses, but the lack of cellular permeability, efflux by cellular pumps, and/or toxicity can be major limitations. Xenopus laevis egg extract, a concentrated and biologically active cytosol, can potentially overcome these weaknesses. Drug interactions occur in a near-physiological milieu, thereby functioning in a "truer" endogenous manner than purified components. Also, Xenopus egg extract is a cell-free system that lacks intact plasma membranes that could restrict drug access to potential targets. Finally, Xenopus egg extract is readily manipulated at the protein level: Proteins are easily depleted or added to the system, an important feature for analyzing drug effects in disease states. Thus, Xenopus egg extract offers an attractive media for screening drugs that merges strengths of both in vitro and in vivo systems. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Development of a Reproductive Toxicity Test Using Xenopus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bantle, John

    1998-01-01

    ...)) in order to examine the effects of cadmium (Cd) upon oogenesis and progeny. Frogs were exposed for a period of 21 days and then either bred to untreated males or their ovaries were examined to determine effects upon oogenesis...

  17. N1-Src Kinase Is Required for Primary Neurogenesis in Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Philip A; Bradley, Isobel C; Pizzey, Alastair R; Isaacs, Harry V; Evans, Gareth J O

    2017-08-30

    The presence of the neuronal-specific N1-Src splice variant of the C-Src tyrosine kinase is conserved through vertebrate evolution, suggesting an important role in complex nervous systems. Alternative splicing involving an N1-Src-specific microexon leads to a 5 or 6 aa insertion into the SH3 domain of Src. A prevailing model suggests that N1-Src regulates neuronal differentiation via cytoskeletal dynamics in the growth cone. Here we investigated the role of n1-src in the early development of the amphibian Xenopus tropicalis, and found that n1-src expression is regulated in embryogenesis, with highest levels detected during the phases of primary and secondary neurogenesis. In situ hybridization analysis, using locked nucleic acid oligo probes complementary to the n1-src microexon, indicates that n1-src expression is highly enriched in the open neural plate during neurula stages and in the neural tissue of adult frogs. Given the n1-src expression pattern, we investigated a possible role for n1-src in neurogenesis. Using splice site-specific antisense morpholino oligos, we inhibited n1-src splicing, while preserving c-src expression. Differentiation of neurons in the primary nervous system is reduced in n1-src-knockdown embryos, accompanied by a severely impaired touch response in later development. These data reveal an essential role for n1-src in amphibian neural development and suggest that alternative splicing of C-Src in the developing vertebrate nervous system evolved to regulate neurogenesis.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The Src family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases acts in signaling pathways that regulate cell migration, cell adhesion, and proliferation. Srcs are also enriched in the brain, where they play key roles in neuronal development and neurotransmission. Vertebrates have evolved a neuron-specific splice variant of C-Src, N1-Src, which differs from C-Src by just 5 or 6 aa. N1-Src is poorly understood and its high similarity to C-Src has made it difficult to

  18. Effects of 17α-trenbolone and melengestrol acetate on Xenopus laevis growth, development, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Bryson E; Blackwell, Brett R; Faust, Derek R; Wooten, Kimberly J; Maul, Jonathan D; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    The synthetic growth-promoting hormones trenbolone and melengestrol acetate have been detected in the environment near beef cattle feedlots and are reportedly transported via wind-borne particulate matter. Therefore, movement of synthetic hormones from beef cattle feedlots to water bodies via particulate matter is possible. Our objective was to evaluate potential effects of 17α-trenbolone (17α-TB), melengestrol acetate (MGA), and combinations of both on growth, development, and survival of Xenopus laevis larvae. On post-hatch day 2 (stage 33/34), X. laevis larvae were exposed to three nominal concentrations of 17α-TB (10, 100, and 500 ng/L), MGA (1, 10, and 100 ng/L), a combination of both (1/10, 10/100, and 100/500 ng/L MGA/17α-TB), frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus medium, or a solvent control. Significant increases in all X. laevis growth metrics were observed among larvae in the 1 ng/L MGA + 10 ng/L 17α-TB and 10 ng/L MGA + 100 ng/L 17α-TB treatments. Stage of development was increased among larvae in the 1 ng/L MGA + 10 ng/L 17α-TB treatment group and significantly decreased among those in the 500 ng/L 17α-TB treatment. Total body mass and snout-vent length of X. laevis larvae were significantly reduced in the 100 ng/L MGA and 100 ng/L MGA + 500 ng/L 17α-TB treatment groups. Larvae exposed to 500 ng/L 17α-TB had decreased total body mass, snout-vent length, and total length. In general, growth measurements decreased with increasing concentration of MGA, 17α-TB, or a combination of both. Survival among all treatments was not significantly different from controls. Amphibians exposed to MGA and 17α-TB in the environment may experience alterations in growth and development.

  19. A glyphosate micro-emulsion formulation displays teratogenicity in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Patrizia; Saibene, M; Bacchetta, R; Mantecca, P; Colombo, A

    2018-02-01

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient in broad-spectrum herbicide formulations used in agriculture, domestic area and aquatic weed control worldwide. Its market is growing steadily concurrently with the cultivation of glyphosate-tolerant transgenic crops and emergence of weeds less sensitive to glyphosate. Ephemeral and lentic waters near to agricultural lands, representing favorite habitats for amphibian reproduction and early life-stage development, may thus be contaminated by glyphosate based herbicides (GBHs) residues. Previous studies on larval anuran species highlighted increased mortality and growth effects after exposure to different GBHs in comparison to glyphosate itself, mainly because of the surfactants such as polyethoxylated tallow amine present in the formulations. Nevertheless, these conclusions are not completely fulfilled when the early development, characterized by primary organogenesis events, is considered. In this study, we compare the embryotoxicity of Roundup ® Power 2.0, a new GBH formulation currently authorized in Italy, with that of technical grade glyphosate using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). Our results evidenced that glyphosate was not embryolethal and only at the highest concentration (50 mg a.e./L) caused edemas. Conversely, Roundup ® Power 2.0 exhibited a 96 h LC50 of 24.78 mg a.e./L and a 96 h EC50 of 7.8 mg a.e./L. A Teratogenic Index of 3.4 was derived, pointing out the high teratogenic potential of the Roundup ® Power 2.0. Specific concentration-dependent abnormal phenotypes, such as craniofacial alterations, microphthalmia, narrow eyes and forebrain regionalization defects were evidenced by gross malformation screening and histopathological analysis. These phenotypes are coherent with those evidenced in Xenopus laevis embryos injected with glyphosate, allowing us to hypothesize that the teratogenicity observed for Roundup ® Power 2.0 may be related to the improved efficacy in delivering

  20. Functional analysis for gut microbes of the brown tree frog

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weng, Francis Cheng-Hsuan; Yang, Yi-Ju; Wang, Daryi

    2016-01-01

    .... In amphibians, the bacteria in the intestinal tract show a drop in bacterial counts. The proportion of pathogenic bacteria is greater in hibernating frogs than that found in nonhibernating frogs...

  1. Generation of Transgenic Xenopus laevis: II. Sperm Nuclei Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Shoko; Kroll, Kristin L; Amaya, Enrique

    2007-09-01

    INTRODUCTIONManipulating genes specifically during later stages of amphibian embryonic development requires fine control over the time and place of expression. These protocols describe an efficient nuclear-transplantation-based method of transgenesis developed for Xenopus laevis. The approach enables stable expression of cloned gene products in Xenopus embryos. Because the transgene integrates into the genome prior to fertilization, the resulting embryos are not chimeric, eliminating the need to breed to the next generation to obtain nonmosaic transgenic animals. The procedure is based on restriction-enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) and can be divided into three parts: (I) high-speed preparation of egg extracts, (II) sperm nuclei preparation, and (III) nuclear transplantation. This protocol describes a method for the preparation of sperm nuclei from Xenopus laevis. Sperm suspensions are prepared by filtration and centrifugation, and then treated with lysolecithin to disrupt the plasma membrane of the cells. Sperm nuclei can be stored frozen in small aliquots at -80°C.

  2. First-generation linkage map for the European tree frog (Hyla arborea) with utility in congeneric species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresnes, Christophe; Brelsford, Alan; Perrin, Nicolas

    2014-11-26

    Western Palearctic tree frogs (Hyla arborea group) represent a strong potential for evolutionary and conservation genetic research, so far underexploited due to limited molecular resources. New microsatellite markers have recently been developed for Hyla arborea, with high cross-species utility across the entire circum-Mediterranean radiation. Here we conduct sibship analyses to map available markers for use in future population genetic applications. We characterized eight linkage groups, including one sex-linked, all showing drastically reduced recombination in males compared to females, as previously documented in this species. Mapping of the new 15 markers to the ~200 My diverged Xenopus tropicalis genome suggests a generally conserved synteny with only one confirmed major chromosome rearrangement. The new microsatellites are representative of several chromosomes of H. arborea that are likely to be conserved across closely-related species. Our linkage map provides an important resource for genetic research in European Hylids, notably for studies of speciation, genome evolution and conservation.

  3. Probing the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome for biological function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powers TuShun R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The senses of hearing and balance depend upon mechanoreception, a process that originates in the inner ear and shares features across species. Amphibians have been widely used for physiological studies of mechanotransduction by sensory hair cells. In contrast, much less is known of the genetic basis of auditory and vestibular function in this class of animals. Among amphibians, the genus Xenopus is a well-characterized genetic and developmental model that offers unique opportunities for inner ear research because of the amphibian capacity for tissue and organ regeneration. For these reasons, we implemented a functional genomics approach as a means to undertake a large-scale analysis of the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome through microarray analysis. Results Microarray analysis uncovered genes within the X. laevis inner ear transcriptome associated with inner ear function and impairment in other organisms, thereby supporting the inclusion of Xenopus in cross-species genetic studies of the inner ear. The use of gene categories (inner ear tissue; deafness; ion channels; ion transporters; transcription factors facilitated the assignment of functional significance to probe set identifiers. We enhanced the biological relevance of our microarray data by using a variety of curation approaches to increase the annotation of the Affymetrix GeneChip® Xenopus laevis Genome array. In addition, annotation analysis revealed the prevalence of inner ear transcripts represented by probe set identifiers that lack functional characterization. Conclusions We identified an abundance of targets for genetic analysis of auditory and vestibular function. The orthologues to human genes with known inner ear function and the highly expressed transcripts that lack annotation are particularly interesting candidates for future analyses. We used informatics approaches to impart biologically relevant information to the Xenopus inner ear transcriptome

  4. Histone titration against the genome sets the DNA-to-cytoplasm threshold for the Xenopus midblastula transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Amanda A; Jukam, David; Straight, Aaron F; Skotheim, Jan M

    2015-03-10

    During early development, animal embryos depend on maternally deposited RNA until zygotic genes become transcriptionally active. Before this maternal-to-zygotic transition, many species execute rapid and synchronous cell divisions without growth phases or cell cycle checkpoints. The coordinated onset of transcription, cell cycle lengthening, and cell cycle checkpoints comprise the midblastula transition (MBT). A long-standing model in the frog, Xenopus laevis, posits that MBT timing is controlled by a maternally loaded inhibitory factor that is titrated against the exponentially increasing amount of DNA. To identify MBT regulators, we developed an assay using Xenopus egg extract that recapitulates the activation of transcription only above the DNA-to-cytoplasm ratio found in embryos at the MBT. We used this system to biochemically purify factors responsible for inhibiting transcription below the threshold DNA-to-cytoplasm ratio. This unbiased approach identified histones H3 and H4 as concentration-dependent inhibitory factors. Addition or depletion of H3/H4 from the extract quantitatively shifted the amount of DNA required for transcriptional activation in vitro. Moreover, reduction of H3 protein in embryos induced premature transcriptional activation and cell cycle lengthening, and the addition of H3/H4 shortened post-MBT cell cycles. Our observations support a model for MBT regulation by DNA-based titration and suggest that depletion of free histones regulates the MBT. More broadly, our work shows how a constant concentration DNA binding molecule can effectively measure the amount of cytoplasm per genome to coordinate division, growth, and development.

  5. Agglutination of Jelly Coat and Cortical Granule Components and the Block to Polyspermy in the Amphibian Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, Ron E.; Nishihara, Tatsuro; Hedrick, Jerry L.

    1974-01-01

    A block to polyspermy in amphibians is established at fertilization by the conversion of the vitelline envelope to the fertilization envelope. In Xenopus laevis a major ultrastructural change in the envelope at fertilization is the appearance of an electron-dense layer, termed the F layer, between the envelope and the inner-most jelly coat layer, J1. The F layer is derived, at least in part, from materials released from the cortical granules. Further definition of the origin and chemical nature of the F layer was sought by using isolated cortical granule (CG) exudate and jelly coat layer J1. In double diffusion experiments, the isolated components interacted in an agglutination reaction producing a band of precipitation. The agglutination involved α-galactoside residues and metal ions (Ca++). Employing chemically modified jelly, we demonstrated that sulfhydryl-disulfide interchanges were not involved in the agglutination and, with 35S-labeled jelly, that the agglutinating J1 component possessed sulfate esters. Both the CG exudate and the J1 components contained carbohydrate, as evidenced by their lectin reactivity. A number of ionic polymers, both natural and synthetic, were tested as chemical analogs of CG exudate and J1; none gave an agglutination band. Dissolved jelly coat material from eggs of two different species of frogs agglutinated with CG exudate, while jelly from sea urchin eggs and hyaluronic acid from mammalian eggs did not. Thus, the agglutination reaction was chemically and phylogenetically specific. An electron-dense layer, similar to the F layer, formed on the outer of the vitelline envelope when jellied unfertilized eggs were immersed in CG exudate; such eggs were not fertilizable. We suggest that in Xenopus laevis, and perhaps other organisms as well, an agglutination type of reaction between cortical granule components and egg integuments is a participant in the structural and molecular events establishing a block to polyspermy. Images PMID

  6. Xenopus pax6 mutants affect eye development and other organ systems, and have phenotypic similarities to human aniridia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takuya; Fisher, Marilyn; Nakajima, Keisuke; Odeleye, Akinleye O; Zimmerman, Keith B; Fish, Margaret B; Yaoita, Yoshio; Chojnowski, Jena L; Lauderdale, James D; Netland, Peter A; Grainger, Robert M

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the Pax6 gene cause ocular defects in both vertebrate and invertebrate animal species, and the disease aniridia in humans. Despite extensive experimentation on this gene in multiple species, including humans, we still do not understand the earliest effects on development mediated by this gene. This prompted us to develop pax6 mutant lines in Xenopus tropicalis taking advantage of the utility of the Xenopus system for examining early development and in addition to establish a model for studying the human disease aniridia in an accessible lower vertebrate. We have generated mutants in pax6 by using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN) constructs for gene editing in X. tropicalis. Embryos with putative null mutations show severe eye abnormalities and changes in brain development, as assessed by changes in morphology and gene expression. One gene that we found is downregulated very early in development in these pax6 mutants is myc, a gene involved in pluripotency and progenitor cell maintenance and likely a mediator of some key pax6 functions in the embryo. Changes in gene expression in the developing brain and pancreas reflect other important functions of pax6 during development. In mutations with partial loss of pax6 function eye development is initially relatively normal but froglets show an underdeveloped iris, similar to the classic phenotype (aniridia) seen in human patients with PAX6 mutations. Other eye abnormalities observed in these froglets, including cataracts and corneal defects, are also common in human aniridia. The frog model thus allows us to examine the earliest deficits in eye formation as a result of pax6 lesions, and provides a useful model for understanding the developmental basis for the aniridia phenotype seen in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Histone titration against the genome sets the DNA-to-cytoplasm threshold for the Xenopus midblastula transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Amanda A.; Jukam, David; Straight, Aaron F.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    During early development, animal embryos depend on maternally deposited RNA until zygotic genes become transcriptionally active. Before this maternal-to-zygotic transition, many species execute rapid and synchronous cell divisions without growth phases or cell cycle checkpoints. The coordinated onset of transcription, cell cycle lengthening, and cell cycle checkpoints comprise the midblastula transition (MBT). A long-standing model in the frog, Xenopus laevis, posits that MBT timing is controlled by a maternally loaded inhibitory factor that is titrated against the exponentially increasing amount of DNA. To identify MBT regulators, we developed an assay using Xenopus egg extract that recapitulates the activation of transcription only above the DNA-to-cytoplasm ratio found in embryos at the MBT. We used this system to biochemically purify factors responsible for inhibiting transcription below the threshold DNA-to-cytoplasm ratio. This unbiased approach identified histones H3 and H4 as concentration-dependent inhibitory factors. Addition or depletion of H3/H4 from the extract quantitatively shifted the amount of DNA required for transcriptional activation in vitro. Moreover, reduction of H3 protein in embryos induced premature transcriptional activation and cell cycle lengthening, and the addition of H3/H4 shortened post-MBT cell cycles. Our observations support a model for MBT regulation by DNA-based titration and suggest that depletion of free histones regulates the MBT. More broadly, our work shows how a constant concentration DNA binding molecule can effectively measure the amount of cytoplasm per genome to coordinate division, growth, and development. PMID:25713373

  8. Transcription factors Mix1 and VegT, relocalization of vegt mRNA, and conserved endoderm and dorsal specification in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudou, Norihiro; Garcés-Vásconez, Andrés; López-Latorre, María A; Taira, Masanori; Del Pino, Eugenia M

    2016-05-17

    Protein expression of the transcription factor genes mix1 and vegt characterized the presumptive endoderm in embryos of the frogs Engystomops randi, Epipedobates machalilla, Gastrotheca riobambae, and Eleutherodactylus coqui, as in Xenopus laevis embryos. Protein VegT was detected in the animal hemisphere of the early blastula in all frogs, and only the animal pole was VegT-negative. This finding stimulated a vegt mRNA analysis in X. laevis eggs and embryos. vegt mRNA was detected in the animal region of X. laevis eggs and early embryos, in agreement with the VegT localization observed in the analyzed frogs. Moreover, a dorso-animal relocalization of vegt mRNA occurred in the egg at fertilization. Thus, the comparative analysis indicated that vegt may participate in dorsal development besides its known roles in endoderm development, and germ-layer specification. Zygotic vegt (zvegt) mRNA was detected as a minor isoform besides the major maternal (mvegt) isoform of the X. laevis egg. In addition, α-amanitin-insensitive vegt transcripts were detected around vegetal nuclei of the blastula. Thus, accumulation of vegt mRNA around vegetal nuclei was caused by relocalization rather than new mRNA synthesis. The localization of vegt mRNA around vegetal nuclei may contribute to the identity of vegetal blastomeres. These and previously reportedly localization features of vegt mRNA and protein derive from the master role of vegt in the development of frogs. The comparative analysis indicated that the strategies for endoderm, and dorsal specification, involving vegt and mix1, have been evolutionary conserved in frogs.

  9. Protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt5-Mep50 methylates histones H2A and H4 and the histone chaperone nucleoplasmin in Xenopus laevis eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Carola; Chitta, Raghu; Woo, Eileen; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Chait, Brian T; Hunt, Donald F; Shechter, David

    2011-12-09

    Histone proteins carry information contained in post-translational modifications. Eukaryotic cells utilize this histone code to regulate the usage of the underlying DNA. In the maturing oocytes and eggs of the frog Xenopus laevis, histones are synthesized in bulk in preparation for deposition during the rapid early developmental cell cycles. During this key developmental time frame, embryonic pluripotent chromatin is established. In the egg, non-chromatin-bound histones are complexed with storage chaperone proteins, including nucleoplasmin. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a complex of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (Prmt5) and the methylosome protein 50 (Mep50) isolated from Xenopus eggs that specifically methylates predeposition histones H2A/H2A.X-F and H4 and the histone chaperone nucleoplasmin on a conserved motif (GRGXK). We demonstrate that nucleoplasmin (Npm), an exceedingly abundant maternally deposited protein, is a potent substrate for Prmt5-Mep50 and is monomethylated and symmetrically dimethylated at Arg-187. Furthermore, Npm modulates Prmt5-Mep50 activity directed toward histones, consistent with a regulatory role for Npm in vivo. We show that H2A and nucleoplasmin methylation appears late in oogenesis and is most abundant in the laid egg. We hypothesize that these very abundant arginine methylations are constrained to pre-mid blastula transition events in the embryo and therefore may be involved in the global transcriptional repression found in this developmental time frame.

  10. Linking early determinants and cilia-driven leftward flow in left-right axis specification of Xenopus laevis: a theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweickert, Axel; Walentek, Peter; Thumberger, Thomas; Danilchik, Mike

    2012-02-01

    In vertebrates, laterality - the asymmetric placement of the viscera including organs of the gastrointestinal system, heart and lungs - is under the genetic control of a conserved signaling pathway in the left lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). A key feature of this pathway, shared by embryos of all non-avian vertebrate classes analyzed to date (e.g. fish, amphibia and mammals) is the formation of a transitory midline epithelial structure. Remarkably, the motility of cilia projecting from this epithelium produce a leftward-directed movement of extracellular liquid. This leftward flow precedes any sign of asymmetry in gene expression. Numerous analyses have shown that this leftward flow is not only necessary, but indeed sufficient to direct laterality. Interestingly, however, cilia-independent mechanisms acting much earlier in development in the frog Xenopus have been reported during the earliest cleavage stages, a period before any major zygotic gene transcription. The relationship between these two distinct mechanisms is not understood. In this review we present the conserved and critical steps of Xenopus LR axis formation. Next, we address the basic question of how an early asymmetric activity might contribute to, feed into, or regulate the conserved cilia-dependent pathway. Finally, we discuss the possibility that Spemann's organizer is itself polarized in the left-right dimension. In attempting to reconcile the sufficiency of the cilia-dependent pathway with potential earlier-acting asymmetries, we offer a general practical experimental checklist for the Xenopus community working on the process of left-right determination. This approach indicates areas where work still needs to be done to clarify the relationship between early determinants and cilia-driven leftward flow. Copyright © 2011 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prominin-1 localizes to the open rims of outer segment lamellae in Xenopus laevis rod and cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhou; Anderson, David W; Papermaster, David S

    2012-01-25

    Prominin-1 expresses in rod and cone photoreceptors. Mutations in the prominin-1 gene cause retinal degeneration in humans. In this study, the authors investigated the expression and subcellular localization of xlProminin-1 protein, the Xenopus laevis ortholog of prominin-1, in rod and cone photoreceptors of this frog. Antibodies specific for xlProminin-1 were generated. Immunoblotting was used to study the expression and posttranslational processing of xlProminin-1 protein. Immunocytochemical light and electron microscopy and transgenesis were used to study the subcellular distribution of xlProminin-1. xlProminin-1 is expressed and is subject to posttranslational proteolytic processing in the retina, brain, and kidney. xlProminin-1 is differently expressed and localized in outer segments of rod and cone photoreceptors of X. laevis. Antibodies specific for the N or C termini of xlProminin-1 labeled the open rims of lamellae of cone outer segments (COS) and the open lamellae at the base of rod outer segments (ROS). By contrast, anti-peripherin-2/rds antibody, Xper5A11, labeled the closed rims of cone lamellae adjacent to the ciliary axoneme and the rims of the closed ROS disks. The extent of labeling of the basal ROS by anti-xlProminin-1 antibodies varied with the light cycle in this frog. The entire ROS was also faintly labeled by both antibodies, a result that contrasts with the current notion that prominin-1 localizes only to the basal ROS. These findings suggest that xlProminin-1 may serve as an anti-fusogenic factor in the regulation of disk morphogenesis and may help to maintain the open lamellar structure of basal ROS and COS disks in X. laevis photoreceptors.

  12. Ascl1 phospho-status regulates neuronal differentiation in a Xenopus developmental model of neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke A. Wylie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB, although rare, accounts for 15% of all paediatric cancer mortality. Unusual among cancers, NBs lack a consistent set of gene mutations and, excluding large-scale chromosomal rearrangements, the genome seems to be largely intact. Indeed, many interesting features of NB suggest that it has little in common with adult solid tumours but instead has characteristics of a developmental disorder. NB arises overwhelmingly in infants under 2 years of age during a specific window of development and, histologically, NB bears striking similarity to undifferentiated neuroblasts of the sympathetic nervous system, its likely cells of origin. Hence, NB could be considered a disease of development arising when neuroblasts of the sympathetic nervous system fail to undergo proper differentiation, but instead are maintained precociously as progenitors with the potential for acquiring further mutations eventually resulting in tumour formation. To explore this possibility, we require a robust and flexible developmental model to investigate the differentiation of NB's presumptive cell of origin. Here, we use Xenopus frog embryos to characterise the differentiation of anteroventral noradrenergic (AVNA cells, cells derived from the neural crest. We find that these cells share many characteristics with their mammalian developmental counterparts, and also with NB cells. We find that the transcriptional regulator Ascl1 is expressed transiently in normal AVNA cell differentiation but its expression is aberrantly maintained in NB cells, where it is largely phosphorylated on multiple sites. We show that Ascl1's ability to induce differentiation of AVNA cells is inhibited by its multi-site phosphorylation at serine-proline motifs, whereas overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs and MYCN inhibit wild-type Ascl1-driven AVNA differentiation, but not differentiation driven by a phospho-mutant form of Ascl1. This suggests that the maintenance of ASCL1

  13. A comparative survey of the frequency and distribution of polymorphism in the genome of Xenopus tropicalis.

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    Chris Showell

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring DNA sequence variation within a species underlies evolutionary adaptation and can give rise to phenotypic changes that provide novel insight into biological questions. This variation exists in laboratory populations just as in wild populations and, in addition to being a source of useful alleles for genetic studies, can impact efforts to identify induced mutations in sequence-based genetic screens. The Western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis (X. tropicalis has been adopted as a model system for studying the genetic control of embryonic development and a variety of other areas of research. Its diploid genome has been extensively sequenced and efforts are underway to isolate mutants by phenotype- and genotype-based approaches. Here, we describe a study of genetic polymorphism in laboratory strains of X. tropicalis. Polymorphism was detected in the coding and non-coding regions of developmental genes distributed widely across the genome. Laboratory strains exhibit unexpectedly high frequencies of genetic polymorphism, with alleles carrying a variety of synonymous and non-synonymous codon substitutions and nucleotide insertions/deletions. Inter-strain comparisons of polymorphism uncover a high proportion of shared alleles between Nigerian and Ivory Coast strains, in spite of their distinct geographical origins. These observations will likely influence the design of future sequence-based mutation screens, particularly those using DNA mismatch-based detection methods which can be disrupted by the presence of naturally occurring sequence variants. The existence of a significant reservoir of alleles also suggests that existing laboratory stocks may be a useful source of novel alleles for mapping and functional studies.

  14. FROG: The Fast & Realistic OPENGL Displayer

    CERN Document Server

    Quertenmont, Loic

    2009-01-01

    FROG is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy experiment. It is suitable to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light (<3 MB) and fast (browsing time ~20 events per second for a large High Energy Physics experiment) and can run on various operating systems, as its object-oriented structure (C++) relies on the cross-platform OPENGL and GLUT libraries. Moreover, FROG does not require installation of third party libraries for the visualisation. This document describes the features and principles of FROG version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisations, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally, several examples of its current applications are presented for illustration.

  15. Muscles of the pes of hylid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Thomas C

    2004-05-01

    Complete or partial dissection of the foot musculature of 404 hylid frogs representing 247 species and 33 genera, along with representatives of eight other families, revealed a number of apomorphic characters that distinguish the hyloid frogs (Hylidae plus Allophryne and Centrolenidae) from other bufonoid frogs. Additional characters were found to define some of the hylid subfamilies. Addition of characters from the foot musculature to Duellman's phylogenetic tree of the hyloids produced a tree in which Allophryne and Centrolenidae are nested within Hylidae. Support was found for the monophyly of the 30-chromosome group within Hyla, and for a large number of the groups that comprise "Boana," viz., the Hyla albomarginata, H. albopunctata, H. boans (except H. vasta), H. geographica, and H. pulchella groups, but foot muscle characters provide no information relating to relationships of the West Indies hylines. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. FROG The Fast and Realistic OPENGL Displayer

    CERN Document Server

    Quertenmont, Loic

    2009-01-01

    FROG is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy experiment. It is suitable to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light ($<3\\textrm{MB}$) and fast (browsing time ~20 events per second for a large High Energy Physics experiment) and can run on various operating systems, as its object-oriented structure (C++) relies on the cross-platform OPENGL and GLUT libraries. Moreover, FROG does not require installation of third party libraries for the visualisation. This document describes the features and principles of FROG version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisations, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally, several examples of its current applications are presented for illustration.

  17. Seeing the future: using Xenopus to understand eye regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ai-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Studies of Xenopus eye development have contributed considerably to the understanding of vertebrate neurogenesis, including eye field specification, cell fate determination and identification of genes critical for eye formation. This knowledge has served as a solid foundation for cellular and molecular examinations of the robust regenerative capacity of the Xenopus eye. The retina, lens, and the optic nerve are capable of regeneration after injury in both larval and adult stages. Here, we discuss the current models for studying eye regeneration in Xenopus and their potential applications for providing insights into human eye diseases. As Xenopus has many of the same tools that are available for other regeneration models, we thus highlight the distinct strengths and versatility of this organism that make it especially suited for extrapolating and testing strategies aimed at promoting regeneration and repair in eye tissues. Furthermore, we outline a promising future for the use of new techniques and approaches to address outstanding questions in understanding eye regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Plasticity in the melanotrope neuroendocrine interface of Xenopus laevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenks, B.G.; Kidane, A.H.; Scheenen, W.J.; Roubos, E.W.

    2007-01-01

    Melanotrope cells of the amphibian pituitary pars intermedia produce alpha-melanophore-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), a peptide which causes skin darkening during adaptation to a dark background. The secretory activity of the melanotrope of the South African clawed toad Xenopus laevis is regulated

  19. Xenopus Dab2 is required for embryonic angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Sun-Cheol

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms governing the formation of the embryonic vascular system remain poorly understood. Here, we show that Disabled-2 (Dab2, a cytosolic adaptor protein, has a pivotal role in the blood vessel formation in Xenopus early embryogenesis. Results Xenopus Disabled-2 (XDab2 is spatially localized to the blood vessels including the intersomitic veins (ISV in early embryos. Both antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO-mediated knockdown and overexpression of XDab2 inhibit the formation of ISV, which arise from angiogenesis. In addition, we found that activin-like signaling is essential for this angiogenic event. Functional assays in Xenopus animal caps reveal that activin-like signals induce VEGF expression and this induction can be inhibited by XDab2 depletion. However, XDab2 MO has no effects on the induction of other target genes by activin-like signals. Furthermore, we show that the disruption of the sprouting ISV in XDab2-depleted embryos can be rescued by coexpression of VEGF. Conclusion Taking together, we suggest that XDab2 regulates the embryonic angiogenesis by mediating the VEGF induction by activin-like signaling in Xenopus early development.

  20. Xenopus laevis embryos and tadpoles as models for testing for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xenopus laevis embryos and tadpoles as models for testing for pollution by zinc, copper, lead and cadmium. ... Metals affected the growth of the tadpoles by reducing body length with increasing concentrations. An increase in the concentration of each metal resulted in an increase in the frequency and severity of ...

  1. The Observation of Frog Species at State University of Malang as a Preliminary Effort on Frog Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Dian Ratri Wulandari; Muhammad Habibi; Dwi Listyorini

    2013-01-01

    Frog is an amphibian which is widely spread around the world. Indonesia houses 450 species which represent 11% of frog species in the world. In Java Island alone, there live 42 species of frogs and toads. Frogs can be used as an environment indicator in that the presence of frog in a particular place indicates that the place stays natural and unpolluted. The 1st Campus of State University of Malang, which is located in the heart of Malang District, has been developing rapidly currently. Thus,...

  2. Individual variation in thermal performance curves: swimming burst speed and jumping endurance in wild-caught tropical clawed frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careau, Vincent; Biro, Peter A; Bonneaud, Camille; Fokam, Eric B; Herrel, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    The importance of studying individual variation in locomotor performance has long been recognized as it may determine the ability of an organism to escape from predators, catch prey or disperse. In ectotherms, locomotor performance is highly influenced by ambient temperature (Ta), yet several studies have showed that individual differences are usually retained across a Ta gradient. Less is known, however, about individual differences in thermal sensitivity of performance, despite the fact that it could represent adaptive sources of phenotypic variation and/or additional substrate for selection to act upon. We quantified swimming and jumping performance in 18 wild-caught tropical clawed frogs (Xenopus tropicalis) across a Ta gradient. Maximum swimming velocity and acceleration were not repeatable and individuals did not differ in how their swimming performance varied across Ta. By contrast, time and distance jumped until exhaustion were repeatable across the Ta gradient, indicating that individuals that perform best at a given Ta also perform best at another Ta. Moreover, thermal sensitivity of jumping endurance significantly differed among individuals, with individuals of high performance at low Ta displaying the highest sensitivity to Ta. Individual differences in terrestrial performance increased with decreasing Ta, which is opposite to results obtained in lizards at the inter-specific and among-individual levels. To verify the generality of these patterns, we need more studies on individual variation in thermal reaction norms for locomotor performance in lizards and frogs.

  3. Characterization of the neuropeptide Y system in the frog Silurana tropicalis (Pipidae): three peptides and six receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, G; Xu, B; Larsson, T A; Heldin, J; Bergqvist, C A; Fredriksson, R; Conlon, J M; Lundell, I; Denver, R J; Larhammar, D

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y and its related peptides PYY and PP (pancreatic polypeptide) are involved in feeding behavior, regulation of the pituitary and the gastrointestinal tract, and numerous other functions. The peptides act on a family of G-protein coupled receptors with 4-7 members in jawed vertebrates. We describe here the NPY system of the Western clawed frog Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. Three peptides, NPY, PYY and PP, were identified together with six receptors, namely subtypes Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5, Y7 and Y8. Thus, this frog has all but one of the ancestral seven gnathostome NPY-family receptors, in contrast to mammals which have lost 2-3 of the receptors. Expression levels of mRNA for the peptide and receptor genes were analyzed in a panel of 19 frog tissues using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR. The peptide mRNAs had broad distribution with highest expression in skin, blood and small intestine. NPY mRNA was present in the three brain regions investigated, but PYY and PP mRNAs were not detectable in any of these. All receptor mRNAs had similar expression profiles with high expression in skin, blood, muscle and heart. Three of the receptors, Y5, Y7 and Y8, could be functionally expressed in HEK-293 cells and characterized with binding studies using the three frog peptides. PYY had the highest affinity for all three receptors (K(i) 0.042-0.34 nM). Also NPY and PP bound to the Y8 receptor with high affinity (0.14 and 0.50 nM). The low affinity of NPY for the Y5 receptor (100-fold lower than PYY) differs from mammals and chicken. This may suggest a less important role of NPY on Y5 in appetite stimulation in the frog compared with amniotes. In conclusion, our characterization of the NPY system in S. tropicalis with its six receptors demonstrates not only greater complexity than in mammals but also some interesting differences in ligand-receptor preferences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Triclosan exposure alters postembryonic development in a Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (TREEMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlatt, Vicki L. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Veldhoen, Nik [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada); Lo, Bonnie P. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Bakker, Dannika; Rehaume, Vicki; Vallee, Kurtis [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada); Haberl, Maxine; Shang, Dayue; Aggelen, Graham C. van; Skirrow, Rachel C. [Pacific and Yukon Laboratory for Environmental Testing, Emergencies Operational Analytical Laboratories and Research Support Division, Environment Canada, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, B.C. V7H 1B1 (Canada); Elphick, James R. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Helbing, Caren C., E-mail: chelbing@uvic.ca [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA), developed for Xenopus laevis, is designed to identify chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated biological processes. We adapted the AMA for use on an ecologically-relevant North American species, the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), and applied molecular endpoints to evaluate the effects of the antibacterial agent, triclosan (TCS). Premetamorphic (Gosner stage 26-28) tadpoles were immersed for 21 days in solvent control, 1.5 {mu}g/L thyroxine (T{sub 4}), 0.3, 3 and 30 {mu}g/L (nominal) TCS, or combined T{sub 4}/TCS treatments. Exposure effects were scored by morphometric (developmental stage, wet weight, and body, snout-vent and hindlimb lengths) and molecular (mRNA abundance using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction) criteria. T{sub 4} treatment alone accelerated development concomitant with altered levels of TH receptors {alpha} and {beta}, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and gelatinase B mRNAs in the brain and tail. We observed TCS-induced perturbations in all of the molecular and morphological endpoints indicating that TCS exposure disrupts coordination of postembryonic tadpole development. Clear alterations in molecular endpoints were evident at day 2 whereas the earliest morphological effects appeared at day 4 and were most evident at day 21. Although TCS alone (3 and 30 {mu}g/L) was protective against tadpole mortality, this protection was lost in the presence of T{sub 4}. The Pacific tree frog is the most sensitive species examined to date displaying disruption of TH-mediated development by a common antimicrobial agent.

  5. Triclosan exposure alters postembryonic development in a Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (TREEMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlatt, Vicki L; Veldhoen, Nik; Lo, Bonnie P; Bakker, Dannika; Rehaume, Vicki; Vallée, Kurtis; Haberl, Maxine; Shang, Dayue; van Aggelen, Graham C; Skirrow, Rachel C; Elphick, James R; Helbing, Caren C

    2013-01-15

    The Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA), developed for Xenopus laevis, is designed to identify chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated biological processes. We adapted the AMA for use on an ecologically-relevant North American species, the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), and applied molecular endpoints to evaluate the effects of the antibacterial agent, triclosan (TCS). Premetamorphic (Gosner stage 26-28) tadpoles were immersed for 21 days in solvent control, 1.5 μg/L thyroxine (T(4)), 0.3, 3 and 30 μg/L (nominal) TCS, or combined T(4)/TCS treatments. Exposure effects were scored by morphometric (developmental stage, wet weight, and body, snout-vent and hindlimb lengths) and molecular (mRNA abundance using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction) criteria. T(4) treatment alone accelerated development concomitant with altered levels of TH receptors α and β, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and gelatinase B mRNAs in the brain and tail. We observed TCS-induced perturbations in all of the molecular and morphological endpoints indicating that TCS exposure disrupts coordination of postembryonic tadpole development. Clear alterations in molecular endpoints were evident at day 2 whereas the earliest morphological effects appeared at day 4 and were most evident at day 21. Although TCS alone (3 and 30 μg/L) was protective against tadpole mortality, this protection was lost in the presence of T(4). The Pacific tree frog is the most sensitive species examined to date displaying disruption of TH-mediated development by a common antimicrobial agent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fibre-selective recording from the peripheral nerves of frogs using a multi-electrode cuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettler, Martin; Donaldson, Nick; Seetohul, Vipin; Taylor, John

    2013-06-01

    Objective. We investigate the ability of the method of velocity selective recording (VSR) to determine the fibre types that contribute to a compound action potential (CAP) propagating along a peripheral nerve. Real-time identification of the active fibre types by determining the direction of action potential propagation (afferent or efferent) and velocity might allow future neural prostheses to make better use of biological sensor signals and provide a new and simple tool for use in fundamental neuroscience. Approach. Fibre activity was recorded from explanted Xenopus Laevis frog sciatic nerve using a single multi-electrode cuff that records whole nerve activity with 11 equidistant ring-shaped electrodes. The recorded signals were amplified, delayed against each other with variable delay times, added and band-pass filtered. Finally, the resulting amplitudes were measured. Main Result. Our experiments showed that electrically evoked frog CAP was dominated by two fibre populations, propagating at around 20 and 40 m/s, respectively. The velocity selectivity, i.e. the ability of the system to discriminate between individual populations was increased by applying band-pass filtering. The method extracted an entire velocity spectrum from a 10 ms CAP recording sample in real time. Significance. Unlike the techniques introduced in the 1970s and subsequently, VSR requires only a single nerve cuff and does not require averaging to provide velocity spectral information. This makes it potentially suitable for the generation of highly-selective real-time control-signals for future neural prostheses. In our study, electrically evoked CAPs were analysed and it remains to be proven whether the method can reliably classify physiological nerve traffic. The work presented here was carried out at the laboratories of the Implanted Devices Group, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, UK.

  7. Abundant and dynamically expressed miRNAs, piRNAs, and other small RNAs in the vertebrate Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armisen, Javier; Gilchrist, Michael J; Wilczynska, Anna; Standart, Nancy; Miska, Eric A

    2009-10-01

    Small regulatory RNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. Here we used high-throughput sequencing to determine small RNA populations in the germline and soma of the African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis. We identified a number of miRNAs that were expressed in the female germline. miRNA expression profiling revealed that miR-202-5p is an oocyte-enriched miRNA. We identified two novel miRNAs that were expressed in the soma. In addition, we sequenced large numbers of Piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs) and other endogenous small RNAs, likely representing endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs). Of these, only piRNAs were restricted to the germline, suggesting that endo-siRNAs are an abundant class of small RNAs in the vertebrate soma. In the germline, both endogenous small RNAs and piRNAs mapped to many high copy number loci. Furthermore, endogenous small RNAs mapped to the same specific subsets of repetitive elements in both the soma and the germline, suggesting that these RNAs might act to silence repetitive elements in both compartments. Data presented here suggest a conserved role for miRNAs in the vertebrate germline. Furthermore, this study provides a basis for the functional analysis of small regulatory RNAs in an important vertebrate model system.

  8. Synergistic interaction of glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine on developmental toxicity in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, J R; Friedman, M; Bantle, J A

    1995-12-01

    The embryo toxicities of two major potato glycoalkaloids, alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine, were examined individually and in mixtures using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus. Calculations of toxic units (TUs) were used to assess possible antagonism, synergism or response addition of several mixtures ranging from approximately 3:1 to 1:20 TUs of alpha-chaconine to alpha-solanine. Some combinations exhibited strong synergism in the following measures of developmental toxicity: (a) 96-hr LC50, defined as the median concentration causing 50% embryo lethality; (b) 96-hr EC50 (malformation), defined as the concentration causing 50% malformation of the surviving embryos; and (c) teratogenic index which is equal to LC50/EC50 (malformation). The results indicated that each of the mixtures caused synergistic mortality or malformation. Furthermore, these studies suggested that the synergism observed for a specific mixture cannot be used to predict possible synergism of other mixtures with different ratios of the two glycoalkaloids; toxicities observed for individual glycoalkaloids may not be able to predict toxicities of mixtures; and specific combinations found in different potato varieties need to be tested to assess the safety of a particular cultivar.

  9. Do Nanoparticle Physico-Chemical Properties and Developmental Exposure Window Influence Nano ZnO Embryotoxicity in Xenopus laevis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Bonfanti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing global production of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs suggests a realistic increase in the environmental exposure to such a nanomaterial, making the knowledge of its biological reactivity and its safe-by-design synthesis mandatory. In this study, the embryotoxicity of ZnONPs (1–100 mg/L specifically synthesized for industrial purposes with different sizes, shapes (round, rod and surface coatings (PEG, PVP was tested using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX to identify potential target tissues and the most sensitive developmental stages. The ZnONPs did not cause embryolethality, but induced a high incidence of malformations, in particular misfolded gut and abdominal edema. Smaller, round NPs were more effective than the bigger, rod ones, and PEGylation determined a reduction in embryotoxicity. Ingestion appeared to be the most relevant exposure route. Only the embryos exposed from the stomodeum opening showed anatomical and histological lesions to the intestine, mainly referable to a swelling of paracellular spaces among enterocytes. In conclusion, ZnONPs differing in shape and surface coating displayed similar toxicity in X. laevis embryos and shared the same target organ. Nevertheless, we cannot exclude that the physico-chemical characteristics may influence the severity of such effects. Further research efforts are mandatory to ensure the synthesis of safer nano-ZnO-containing products.

  10. Highly efficient gene knockout by injection of TALEN mRNAs into oocytes and host transfer in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nakajima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins system are potentially powerful tools for producing tailor-made knockout animals. However, their mutagenic activity is not high enough to induce mutations at all loci of a target gene throughout an entire tadpole. In this study, we present a highly efficient method for introducing gene modifications at almost all target sequences in randomly selected embryos. The gene modification activity of TALEN is enhanced by adopting the host-transfer technique. In our method, the efficiency is further improved by injecting TALEN mRNAs fused to the 3′UTR of the Xenopus DEADSouth gene into oocytes, which are then transferred into a host female frog, where they are ovulated and fertilized. The addition of the 3′UTR of the DEADSouth gene promotes mRNA translation in the oocytes and increases the expression of TALEN proteins to near-maximal levels three hours post fertilization (hpf. In contrast, TALEN mRNAs without this 3′UTR are translated infrequently in oocytes. Our data suggest that genomic DNA is more sensitive to TALEN proteins from fertilization to the midblastula (MBT stage. Our method works by increasing the levels of TALEN proteins during the pre-MBT stages.

  11. Combining different mRNA capture methods to analyze the transcriptome: analysis of the Xenopus laevis transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Blower

    Full Text Available mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq is a commonly used technique to survey gene expression from organisms with fully sequenced genomes. Successful mRNA-seq requires purification of mRNA away from the much more abundant ribosomal RNA, which is typically accomplished by oligo-dT selection. However, mRNAs with short poly-A tails are captured poorly by oligo-dT based methods. We demonstrate that combining mRNA capture via oligo-dT with mRNA capture by the 5' 7-methyl guanosine cap provides a more complete view of the transcriptome and can be used to assay changes in mRNA poly-A tail length on a genome-wide scale. We also show that using mRNA-seq reads from both capture methods as input for de novo assemblers provides a more complete reconstruction of the transcriptome than either method used alone. We apply these methods of mRNA capture and de novo assembly to the transcriptome of Xenopus laevis, a well-studied frog that currently lacks a finished sequenced genome, to discover transcript sequences for thousands of mRNAs that are currently absent from public databases. The methods we describe here will be broadly applicable to many organisms and will provide insight into the transcriptomes of organisms with sequenced and unsequenced genomes.

  12. High variability of expression profiles of homeologous genes for Wnt, Hh, Notch, and Hippo signaling pathways in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiue, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Yasuoka, Yuuri; Goto, Toshiyasu; Ikeda, Takafumi; Nagura, Kei; Nakayama, Takuya; Taira, Masanori; Kinoshita, Tsutomu

    2017-06-15

    Cell signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh), Notch, and Hippo, are essential for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and tissue homeostasis. In this study, we analyzed 415 genes involved in these pathways in the allotetraploid frog, Xenopus laevis. Most genes are retained in two subgenomes called L and S (193 homeologous gene pairs and 29 singletons). This conservation rate of homeologs is much higher than that of all genes in the X. laevis genome (86.9% vs 60.2%). Among singletons, 24 genes are retained in the L subgenome, a rate similar to the average for all genes (82.8% vs 74.6%). In addition, as general components of signal transduction, we also analyzed 32 heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-related genes and eight TLE/Groucho transcriptional corepressors-related genes. In these gene sets, all homeologous pairs have been retained. Transcriptome analysis using RNA-seq data from developmental stages and adult tissues demonstrated that most homeologous pairs of signaling components have variable expression patterns, in contrast to the conservative expression profiles of homeologs for transcription factors. Our results indicate that homeologous gene pairs for cell signaling regulation have tended to become subfunctionalized after allotetraploidization. Diversification of signaling pathways by subfunctionalization of homeologs may enhance environmental adaptability. These results provide insights into the evolution of signaling pathways after polyploidization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cranial neural crest contributes to the bony skull vault in adult Xenopus laevis: insights from cell labeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Joshua B; Hanken, James

    2005-03-15

    As a step toward resolving the developmental origin of the ossified skull in adult anurans, we performed a series of cell labeling and grafting studies of the cranial neural crest (CNC) in the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We employ an indelible, fixative-stable fluorescent dextran as a cell marker to follow migration of the three embryonic streams of cranial neural crest and to directly assess their contributions to the bony skull vault, which forms weeks after hatching. The three streams maintain distinct boundaries in the developing embryo. Their cells proliferate widely through subsequent larval (tadpole) development, albeit in regionally distinct portions of the head. At metamorphosis, each stream contributes to the large frontoparietal bone, which is the primary constituent of the skull vault in adult anurans. The streams give rise to regionally distinct portions of the bone, thereby preserving their earlier relative position anteroposteriorly within the embryonic neural ridge. These data, when combined with comparable experimental observations from other model species, provide insights into the ancestral pattern of cranial development in tetrapod vertebrates as well as the origin of differences reported between birds and mammals. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Do Nanoparticle Physico-Chemical Properties and Developmental Exposure Window Influence Nano ZnO Embryotoxicity in Xenopus laevis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Patrizia; Moschini, Elisa; Saibene, Melissa; Bacchetta, Renato; Rettighieri, Leonardo; Calabri, Lorenzo; Colombo, Anita; Mantecca, Paride

    2015-01-01

    The growing global production of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) suggests a realistic increase in the environmental exposure to such a nanomaterial, making the knowledge of its biological reactivity and its safe-by-design synthesis mandatory. In this study, the embryotoxicity of ZnONPs (1–100 mg/L) specifically synthesized for industrial purposes with different sizes, shapes (round, rod) and surface coatings (PEG, PVP) was tested using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX) to identify potential target tissues and the most sensitive developmental stages. The ZnONPs did not cause embryolethality, but induced a high incidence of malformations, in particular misfolded gut and abdominal edema. Smaller, round NPs were more effective than the bigger, rod ones, and PEGylation determined a reduction in embryotoxicity. Ingestion appeared to be the most relevant exposure route. Only the embryos exposed from the stomodeum opening showed anatomical and histological lesions to the intestine, mainly referable to a swelling of paracellular spaces among enterocytes. In conclusion, ZnONPs differing in shape and surface coating displayed similar toxicity in X. laevis embryos and shared the same target organ. Nevertheless, we cannot exclude that the physico-chemical characteristics may influence the severity of such effects. Further research efforts are mandatory to ensure the synthesis of safer nano-ZnO-containing products. PMID:26225989

  15. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Griffin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival.

  16. Of volcanoes, saints, trash, and frogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    , at the same time as political elections and economic hardship. During one year of ethnographic fieldwork volcanoes, saints, trash and frogs were among the nonhuman entities referred to in conversations and engaged with when responding to the changes that trouble the world and everyday life of Arequipans...

  17. Return of the Tarahumara frog to Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    James C. Rorabaugh; Stephen F. Hale; Michael J. Sredl; Craig Ivanyi

    2005-01-01

    The last wild Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae) in Arizona was found dead in Big Casa Blanca Canyon, Santa Rita Mountains, in May 1983. However, the species is still well represented in the majority of its range in the northern Sierra Madre Occidental and adjacent Sky Islands of Sonora and Chihuahua. Plans to re-establish R. tarahumarae...

  18. Water Frogs, Aquariums, and Salmonella -- Oh My!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-09

    This CDC Kidtastics podcast discusses how people can get Salmonella from water frogs and aquariums.  Created: 12/9/2009 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 12/9/2009.

  19. Development of the retinotectal system in the direct-developing frog Eleutherodactylus coqui in comparison with other anurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlosser Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frogs primitively have a biphasic life history with an aquatic larva (tadpole and a usually terrestrial adult. However, direct developing frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus have lost a free living larval stage. Many larval structures never form during development of Eleutherodactylus, while limbs, spinal cord, and an adult-like cranial musculoskeletal system develop precociously. Results Here, I compare growth and differentiation of the retina and tectum and development of early axon tracts in the brain between Eleutherodactylus coqui and the biphasically developing frogs Discoglossus pictus, Physalaemus pustulosus, and Xenopus laevis using morphometry, immunohistochemical detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and acetylated tubulin, biocytin tracing, and in situ hybridization for NeuroD. Findings of the present study indicate that retinotectal development was greatly altered during evolution of Eleutherodactlyus mostly due to acceleration of cell proliferation and growth in retina and tectum. However, differentiation of retina, tectum, and fiber tracts in the embryonic brain proceed along a conserved slower schedule and remain temporally coordinated with each other in E. coqui. Conclusion These findings reveal a mosaic pattern of changes in the development of the central nervous system (CNS during evolution of the direct developing genus Eleutherodactylus. Whereas differentiation events in directly interconnected parts of the CNS such as retina, tectum, and brain tracts remained coordinated presumably due to their interdependent development, they were dissociated from proliferation control and from differentiation events in other parts of the CNS such as the spinal cord. This suggests that mosaic evolutionary changes reflect the modular character of CNS development.

  20. Frog Swarms: Earthquake Precursors or False Alarms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Grant

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In short-term earthquake risk forecasting, the avoidance of false alarms is of utmost importance to preclude the possibility of unnecessary panic among populations in seismic hazard areas. Unusual animal behaviour prior to earthquakes has been reported for millennia but has rarely been scientifically documented. Recently large migrations or unusual behaviour of amphibians have been linked to large earthquakes, and media reports of large frog and toad migrations in areas of high seismic risk such as Greece and China have led to fears of a subsequent large earthquake. However, at certain times of year large migrations are part of the normal behavioural repertoire of amphibians. News reports of “frog swarms” from 1850 to the present day were examined for evidence that this behaviour is a precursor to large earthquakes. It was found that only two of 28 reported frog swarms preceded large earthquakes (Sichuan province, China in 2008 and 2010. All of the reported mass migrations of amphibians occurred in late spring, summer and autumn and appeared to relate to small juvenile anurans (frogs and toads. It was concluded that most reported “frog swarms” are actually normal behaviour, probably caused by juvenile animals migrating away from their breeding pond, after a fruitful reproductive season. As amphibian populations undergo large fluctuations in numbers from year to year, this phenomenon will not occur on a yearly basis but will depend on successful reproduction, which is related to numerous climatic and geophysical factors. Hence, most large swarms of amphibians, particularly those involving very small frogs and occurring in late spring or summer, are not unusual and should not be considered earthquake precursors. In addition, it is likely that reports of several mass migration of small toads prior to the Great Sichuan Earthquake in 2008 were not linked to the subsequent M = 7.9 event (some occurred at a great distance from the epicentre

  1. Xenopus iaevis (Anura: Pipidae) Mating systems - A preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activity in males. The hormone doses required for stimulation of full sexual activity differed in summer and winter, frogs requiring a larger dose during the latter period. In summer a single dose of 400 LU. Pregnyl was sufficient to induce sexual behaviour in males. Females with the abdomen distended with eggs and with ...

  2. Dispatches from the DMZ: Bottle Cell Formation During Xenopus Gastrulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jen-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Bottle cell-driven blastopore lip formation externally marks the initiation of gastrulation in amphibian embryos. The blastopore groove is formed when bottle cells undergo apical constriction and transform from cuboidal to flask-shaped. Apical constriction is sufficient to cause invagination and is a highly conserved mechanism for sheet bending and folding during morphogenesis; therefore, studying apical constriction in Xenopus bottle cells could provide valuable insight into this fundamental...

  3. HDAC Activity Is Required during Xenopus Tail Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ai-Sun Tseng; Kátia Carneiro; Lemire, Joan M.; Michael Levin

    2011-01-01

    The ability to fully restore damaged or lost organs is present in only a subset of animals. The Xenopus tadpole tail is a complex appendage, containing epidermis, muscle, nerves, spinal cord, and vasculature, which regenerates after amputation. Understanding the mechanisms of tail regeneration may lead to new insights to promote biomedical regeneration in non-regenerative tissues. Although chromatin remodeling is known to be critical for stem cell pluripotency, its role in complex organ regen...

  4. Developmental role of plk4 in Xenopus laevis and Danio rerio: implications for Seckel Syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hudson, John; Patel, Neeraj; Rapchak, Candace Elaine; Crawford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    .... Recently characterized human mutations lead to Seckel Syndrome. Riboprobe in situ hybridization revealed that plk4 is ubiquitously expressed during early stages of development of Xenopus and Danio...

  5. BMP regulates vegetal pole induction centres in early xenopus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachaliel, N; Re'Em-Kalma, Y; Eshed, O; Elias, S; Frank, D

    1998-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) plays an important role in mesoderm patterning in Xenopus. The ectopic expression of BMP-4 protein hyperventralizes embryos, whereas embryos expressing a BMP-2/4 dominant-negative receptor (DNR) are hyperdorsalized. Mesoderm is initially induced in the marginal zone by cells in the underlying vegetal pole. While much is known about BMP's expression and role in patterning the marginal zone, little is known about its early role in regulating vegetal mesoderm induction centre formation. The role of BMP in regulating formation of vegetal mesoderm inducing centres during early Xenopus development was examined. Ectopic BMP-4 expression in vegetal pole cells inhibited dorsal mesoderm induction but increased ventral mesoderm induction when recombined with animal cap ectoderm in Nieuwkoop explants. 32-cell embryos injected with BMP-4 RNA in the most vegetal blastomere tier were not hyperdorsalized by LiCl treatment. The ectopic expression of Smad or Mix.1 proteins in the vegetal pole also inhibited dorsal mesoderm induction in explants and embryos. Expression of the BMP 2/4 DNR in the vegetal pole increased dorsal mesoderm induction and inhibited ventral mesoderm induction in explants and embryos. These results support a role for BMP signalling in regulating ventral vegetal and dorsal vegetal mesoderm induction centre formation during early Xenopus development.

  6. Generation of Transgenic Xenopus laevis: III. Sperm Nuclear Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Shoko; Kroll, Kristin L; Amaya, Enrique

    2007-09-01

    INTRODUCTIONManipulating genes specifically during later stages of amphibian embryonic development requires fine control over the time and place of expression. These protocols describe an efficient nuclear-transplantation-based method of transgenesis developed for Xenopus laevis. The approach enables stable expression of cloned gene products in Xenopus embryos. The procedure is based on restriction-enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) and can be divided into three parts: (I) high-speed preparation of egg extracts, (II) sperm nuclei preparation, and (III) nuclear transplantation. This protocol describes a method for the nuclear transplantation in Xenopus laevis. Permeabilized sperm nuclei are incubated briefly with linearized plasmid DNA, after which egg extract and a small amount of restriction enzyme are added. The egg extract partially decondenses the chromosomes, and the restriction enzyme stimulates recombination by creating double-strand breaks, facilitating integration of DNA into the genome. Diluted nuclei are transplanted into unfertilized eggs. Because the transgene integrates into the genome prior to fertilization, the resulting transgenic embryos are not chimeric and there is no need to breed to the next generation in order to obtain nonmosaic transgenic animals.

  7. From frog integument to human skin: dermatological perspectives from frog skin biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Iain S; Roubos, Eric W; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Vaudry, Hubert; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Pattwell, David M; Maderson, Paul F A; Paus, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    For over a century, frogs have been studied across various scientific fields, including physiology, embryology, neuroscience, (neuro)endocrinology, ecology, genetics, behavioural science, evolution, drug development, and conservation biology. In some cases, frog skin has proven very successful as a research model, for example aiding in the study of ion transport through tight epithelia, where it has served as a model for the vertebrate distal renal tubule and mammalian epithelia. However, it has rarely been considered in comparative studies involving human skin. Yet, despite certain notable adaptations that have enabled frogs to survive in both aquatic and terrestrial environments, frog skin has many features in common with human skin. Here we present a comprehensive overview of frog (and toad) skin ontogeny, anatomy, cytology, neuroendocrinology and immunology, with special attention to its unique adaptations as well as to its similarities with the mammalian integument, including human skin. We hope to provide a valuable reference point and a source of inspiration for both amphibian investigators and mammalian researchers studying the structural and functional properties of the largest organ of the vertebrate body. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  8. The use of Xenopus oocytes and embryos as a route towards cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-01-07

    Jan 7, 2005 ... When nuclei of somatic cells are transplanted to enucleated eggs of Xenopus, a complete reprogramming of nuclear function can take place. To identify mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming, somatic nuclei can be transplanted to growing meiotic oocytes of Xenopus, and stem cell genes activated without ...

  9. 49 CFR 213.139 - Spring rail frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rail frogs. 213.139 Section 213.139..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.139 Spring rail frogs. (a) The outer edge of a wheel tread shall not contact the gage side of a spring wing rail. (b) The toe of each...

  10. Neuroendocrine regulation of frog adrenocortical cells by neurotensin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicard, F.; D, D.E.G.; Gras, M.; Leprince, J.; Conlon, J.M.; Roubos, E.W.; Vaudry, H.; Delarue, C.

    2005-01-01

    We previously characterized the primary structure of neurotensin (NT) from an extract of the intestine of the frog Rana esculenta. In this study, we provide evidence for the involvement of NT in the neurocrine regulation of the secretory activity of frog adrenocortical cells. Immunohistochemical

  11. Coleman Revisited: School Segregation, Peers, and Frog Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Pat Rubio

    2011-01-01

    Students from minority segregated schools tend to achieve and attain less than similar students from White segregated schools. This study examines whether peer effects can explain this relationship using normative models and frog-pond models. Normative models (where peers become alike) suggest that minority schoolmates are a liability. Frog-pond…

  12. Infrared reflectance in leaf-sitting neotropical frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalm, P A; Starrett, P H; McDiarmid, R W

    1977-06-10

    Two members of the glass-frog family Centrolenidae (Centrolenella fleischmanni, C. prosoblepon) and the hylid subfamily Phyllomedusinae (Agalychnis moreletii, Pachymedusa dacnicolor) reflect near-infrared light (700 to 900 nanometers) when examined by infrared color photography. Infrared reflectance may confer adaptive advantage to these arboreal frogs both in thermoregulation and infrared cryptic coloration.

  13. Using a Phototransduction System to Monitor the Isolated Frog Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method of monitoring the movement of an isolated frog heart provides comparable results to those obtained with a force transducer. A commercially available photoresistor is integrated into a Wheatstone bridge circuit, and the output signal is interfaced directly with a recording device. An excised, beating frog heart is…

  14. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355... Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs... distance between the gage line of a frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured...

  15. Optimization of gene delivery methods in Xenopus laevis kidney (A6) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines for heterologous expression of Xenopus inner ear genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez-Gordillo, Daniel; Trujillo-Provencio, Casilda; Knight, V. Bleu; Serrano, Elba E.

    2011-01-01

    The Xenopus inner ear provides a useful model for studies of hearing and balance because it shares features with the mammalian inner ear, and because amphibians are capable of regenerating damaged mechanosensory hair cells. The structure and function of many proteins necessary for inner ear function have yet to be elucidated and require methods for analysis. To this end, we seek to characterize Xenopus inner ear genes outside of the animal model through heterologous expression in cell lines. ...

  16. A transgenic Xenopus laevis reporter model to study lymphangiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelii Ny

    2013-07-01

    The importance of the blood- and lymph vessels in the transport of essential fluids, gases, macromolecules and cells in vertebrates warrants optimal insight into the regulatory mechanisms underlying their development. Mouse and zebrafish models of lymphatic development are instrumental for gene discovery and gene characterization but are challenging for certain aspects, e.g. no direct accessibility of embryonic stages, or non-straightforward visualization of early lymphatic sprouting, respectively. We previously demonstrated that the Xenopus tadpole is a valuable model to study the processes of lymphatic development. However, a fluorescent Xenopus reporter directly visualizing the lymph vessels was lacking. Here, we created transgenic Tg(Flk1:eGFP Xenopus laevis reporter lines expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP in blood- and lymph vessels driven by the Flk1 (VEGFR-2 promoter. We also established a high-resolution fluorescent dye labeling technique selectively and persistently visualizing lymphatic endothelial cells, even in conditions of impaired lymph vessel formation or drainage function upon silencing of lymphangiogenic factors. Next, we applied the model to dynamically document blood and lymphatic sprouting and patterning of the initially avascular tadpole fin. Furthermore, quantifiable models of spontaneous or induced lymphatic sprouting into the tadpole fin were developed for dynamic analysis of loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes using pharmacologic or genetic manipulation. Together with angiography and lymphangiography to assess functionality, Tg(Flk1:eGFP reporter tadpoles readily allowed detailed lymphatic phenotyping of live tadpoles by fluorescence microscopy. The Tg(Flk1:eGFP tadpoles represent a versatile model for functional lymph/angiogenomics and drug screening.

  17. Generation of endo-siRNAs in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnumeir, Sammer; Werner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) are well documented and characterized in C. elegans and Drosophila. Endo-siRNAs can also be found in vertebrates; however, their biology is much less clear. They are thought to be produced by Dicer and to contribute to transposon silencing. Because of their generally low abundance and their similarity with miRNAs and products of physiological RNA turn-over, endo-siRNAs are difficult to investigate. Here, we report a system, oocytes from Xenopus laevis, that allows for the generation and analysis of endo-siRNAs from double-stranded RNA precursors.

  18. A dissociation factor from embryos of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, M; Goldfinger, M

    1975-04-16

    A dissociating factor has been extracted from the ribosomal KCl wash and from the cytosol of developing embryos of Xenopus laevis. No dissociating activity could be detected in the KCl wash of ribosomes from full grown oocytes and unfertilized eggs. As in bacteria, the acitivity of the dissociation factor seems to be correlated with the rate of protein synthesis suggesting a physiological role of the dissociation factor. The possibility that the dissociation factor might be one of the components which limits the rate of protein synthesis in the oocytes is discussed.

  19. Efficient genome editing of genes involved in neural crest development using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongzhen; Cheng, Tina Tsz Kwan; Shi, Zhaoying; Liu, Ziran; Lei, Yong; Wang, Chengdong; Shi, Weili; Chen, Xiongfeng; Qi, Xufeng; Cai, Dongqing; Feng, Bo; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The RNA guided CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases have been proven to be effective for gene disruption in various animal models including Xenopus tropicalis. The neural crest (NC) is a transient cell population during embryonic development and contributes to a large variety of tissues. Currently, loss-of-function studies on NC development in X. tropicalis are largely based on morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. It is worthwhile establishing targeted gene knockout X. tropicails line using CRISPR/Cas9 system to study NC development. We utilized CRISPR/Cas9 to disrupt genes that are involved in NC formation in X. tropicalis embryos. A single sgRNA and Cas9 mRNA synthesized in vitro, were co-injected into X. tropicalis embryos at one-cell stage to induce single gene disruption. We also induced duplex mutations, large segmental deletions and inversions in X. tropicalis by injecting Cas9 and a pair of sgRNAs. The specificity of CRISPR/Cas9 was assessed in X. tropicalis embryos and the Cas9 nickase was used to reduce the off-target cleavages. Finally, we crossed the G0 mosaic frogs with targeted mutations to wild type frogs and obtained the germline transmission. Total 16 target sites in 15 genes were targeted by CRISPR/Cas9 and resulted in successful indel mutations at 14 loci with disruption efficiencies in a range from 9.3 to 57.8 %. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of generation of duplex mutations, large segmental deletions and inversions by using Cas9 and a pair of sgRNAs. We observed that CRISPR/Cas9 displays obvious off-target effects at some loci in X. tropicalis embryos. Such off-target cleavages was reduced by using the D10A Cas9 nickase. Finally, the Cas9 induced indel mutations were efficiently passed to G1 offspring. Our study proved that CRISPR/Cas9 could mediate targeted gene mutation in X. tropicalis with high efficiency. This study expands the application of CRISPR/Cas9 platform in X. tropicalis and set a basis for studying NC development using genetic

  20. The Observation of Frog Species at State University of Malang as a Preliminary Effort on Frog Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Ratri Wulandari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Frog is an amphibian which is widely spread around the world. Indonesia houses 450 species which represent 11% of frog species in the world. In Java Island alone, there live 42 species of frogs and toads. Frogs can be used as an environment indicator in that the presence of frog in a particular place indicates that the place stays natural and unpolluted. The 1st Campus of State University of Malang, which is located in the heart of Malang District, has been developing rapidly currently. Thus, it requires the construction of new various facilities to support its huge activities. Extensive construction can be destructive even damaging to the habitat of frog, which potentially threats the frog’s life, if it does not take the environmental impact into careful consideration. This study is aimed to identify the species of frog which survives at State University of Malang with, particularly the frog species found in 1995. Species identification was conducted by observing the morphological character. This study found that there were four species with three species remained survived in 1995; those were Duttaphrynus melanostictus, Polypedates leucomystax, and Kaloula baleta; and one new species called Rana chalconota. This study also revealed that there were four species which were extinct; those were Fejervarya cancrivora, Fejervarya limnocharis, Ingerophrynus biporcatus, and Occidoziga lima. This situation shows the decreasing amount of species from 7 to 4 within the last 17 years. This result indicates that there is a serious environmental degradation which causes the losing of frog habitats. Further research is needed to study the ecological condition changing in order to save the frog species.

  1. Further Hopping with Toads and Frogs

    OpenAIRE

    Thanatipanonda, Thotsaporn "Aek"

    2008-01-01

    We show the value of positions of the combinatorial game ``Toads and Frogs''. We present new values of starting positions. Moreover, we discuss the values of all positions with exactly one $\\Box, \\regT^{a}\\Box\\Box \\regF^{a}, \\regT^{a} \\Box \\Box \\Box \\regF \\regF \\regF,\\regT^{a}\\Box\\Box \\regF^{b}$, $\\regT^{a}\\Box\\Box\\Box \\regF^{b}$. At the end, we post five new conjectures and discuss the possible future work.

  2. The antiestrogens tamoxifen and fulvestrant abolish estrogenic impacts of 17α-ethinylestradiol on male calling behavior of Xenopus laevis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Various synthetic chemicals released to the environment can interfere with the endocrine system of vertebrates. Many of these endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs exhibit estrogenic activity and can interfere with sexual development and reproductive physiology. More recently, also chemicals with different modes of action (MOAs, such as antiestrogenic, androgenic and antiandrogenic EDCs, have been shown to be present in the environment. However, to date EDC-research primarily focuses on exposure to EDCs with just one MOA, while studies examining the effects of simultaneous exposure to EDCs with different MOAs are rare, although they would reflect more real, natural exposure situations. In the present study the combined effects of estrogenic and antiestrogenic EDCs were assessed by analyzing the calling behavior of short-term exposed male Xenopus laevis. The estrogenic 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2, and the antiestrogenic EDCs tamoxifen (TAM and fulvestrant (ICI were used as model substances. As previously demonstrated, sole EE2 exposure (10-10 M resulted in significant alterations of the male calling behavior, including altered temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls. Sole TAM (10-7 M, 10-8 M, 10-10 M or ICI (10-7 M exposure, on the other hand, did not affect any of the measured parameters. If frogs were co-exposed to EE2 (10-10 M and TAM (10-7 M the effects of EE2 on some parameters were abolished, but co-exposure to EE2 and ICI (10-7 M neutralized all estrogenic effects. Thus, although EDCs with antiestrogenic MOA might not exhibit any effects per se, they can alter the estrogenic effects of EE2. Our observations demonstrate that there is need to further investigate the combined effects of EDCs with various, not only opposing, MOAs as this would reflect realistic wildlife situations.

  3. The Antiestrogens Tamoxifen and Fulvestrant Abolish Estrogenic Impacts of 17α-ethinylestradiol on Male Calling Behavior of Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Frauke; Kloas, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Various synthetic chemicals released to the environment can interfere with the endocrine system of vertebrates. Many of these endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) exhibit estrogenic activity and can interfere with sexual development and reproductive physiology. More recently, also chemicals with different modes of action (MOAs), such as antiestrogenic, androgenic and antiandrogenic EDCs, have been shown to be present in the environment. However, to date EDC-research primarily focuses on exposure to EDCs with just one MOA, while studies examining the effects of simultaneous exposure to EDCs with different MOAs are rare, although they would reflect more real, natural exposure situations. In the present study the combined effects of estrogenic and antiestrogenic EDCs were assessed by analyzing the calling behavior of short-term exposed male Xenopus laevis. The estrogenic 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and the antiestrogenic EDCs tamoxifen (TAM) and fulvestrant (ICI) were used as model substances. As previously demonstrated, sole EE2 exposure (10−10 M) resulted in significant alterations of the male calling behavior, including altered temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls. Sole TAM (10−7 M, 10−8 M, 10−10 M) or ICI (10−7 M) exposure, on the other hand, did not affect any of the measured parameters. If frogs were co-exposed to EE2 (10−10 M) and TAM (10−7 M) the effects of EE2 on some parameters were abolished, but co-exposure to EE2 and ICI (10−7 M) neutralized all estrogenic effects. Thus, although EDCs with antiestrogenic MOA might not exhibit any effects per se, they can alter the estrogenic effects of EE2. Our observations demonstrate that there is need to further investigate the combined effects of EDCs with various, not only opposing, MOAs as this would reflect realistic wildlife situations. PMID:23028589

  4. Facilitated Lactate Transport by MCT1 when Coexpressed with the Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporter (NBC) in Xenopus Oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Holger M.; Bröer, Stefan; Deitmer, Joachim W.

    2004-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) and sodium-bicarbonate cotransporters (NBC) transport acid/base equivalents and coexist in many epithelial and glial cells. In nervous systems, the electroneutral MCT1 isoform cotransports lactate and other monocarboxylates with H+, and is believed to be involved in the shuttling of energy-rich substrates between astrocytes and neurons. The NBC cotransports bicarbonate with sodium and generates a membrane current. We have expressed these transporter proteins, cloned from rat brain (MCT1) and human kidney (NBC), alone and together, by injecting the cRNA into oocytes of the frog Xenopus laevis, and measured intracellular pH changes and membrane currents under voltage-clamp with intracellular microelectrodes, and radiolabeled lactate uptake into the oocytes. We determined the cytosolic buffer capacity, the H+ and lactate fluxes as induced by 3 and 10 mM lactate in oocytes expressing MCT1 and/or NBC, and in water-injected oocytes, in salines buffered with 5 mM HEPES alone or with 5% CO2/10 mM HCO3− (pH 7.0). In MCT1 + NBC- but not in MCT1- or NBC-expressing oocytes, lactate activated a Na+- and HCO3−-dependent membrane current, indicating that lactate/H+ cotransport via MCT1, due to the induced pH change, stimulates NBC activity. Lactate/H+ cotransport by MCT1 was increased about twofold when MCT1 was expressed together with NBC. Our results suggest that the facilitation of MCT1 transport activity is mainly due to the increase in apparent buffer capacity contributed by the NBC, and thereby suppresses the build-up of intracellular H+ during the influx of lactate/H+, which would reduce MCT1 activity. Hence these membrane transporters functionally cooperate and are able to increase ion/metabolite transport activity. PMID:14695265

  5. Xenopus p63 expression in early ectoderm and neurectoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P; Barad, M; Vize, P D

    2001-04-01

    The tumor-suppressor protein p53 belongs to a small gene family that includes p63 and p73. While p53 and p73 regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis, the major role of p63 appears to be in promoting ectodermal proliferation and differentiation. In this report we describe the cloning of a Xenopus orthologue of mammalian p63 that is extraordinarily conserved in sequence. The major sites of expression of Xenopus p63 mRNA are the epidermis and some neural crest and crest derivatives such as the branchial arches and tail fin. Expression is also observed in the neural plate and in the stomodeal-hypophyseal anlage. Antibodies against p63 detect a nuclear protein that is distributed in a manner similar to that of Xp63 mRNA. Both mRNA and protein are conspicuously absent from regions of the epidermal sensorial layer that are induced to form a number of (but not all) ectodermal placodes and Xp63 protein levels are particularly dynamic in the epidermis of the eye as the lens forms.

  6. PACSIN2 regulates cell adhesion during gastrulation in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Hélène; Desimone, Douglas W; Alfandari, Dominique

    2008-07-01

    We previously identified the adaptor protein PACSIN2 as a negative regulator of ADAM13 proteolytic function. In Xenopus embryos, PACSIN2 is ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that PACSIN2 may control other proteins during development. To investigate this possibility, we studied PACSIN2 function during Xenopus gastrulation and in XTC cells. Our results show that PACSIN2 is localized to the plasma membrane via its coiled-coil domain. We also show that increased levels of PACSIN2 in embryos inhibit gastrulation, fibronectin (FN) fibrillogenesis and the ability of ectodermal cells to spread on a FN substrate. These effects require PACSIN2 coiled-coil domain and are not due to a reduction of FN or integrin expression and/or trafficking. The expression of a Mitochondria Anchored PACSIN2 (PACSIN2-MA) sequesters wild type PACSIN2 to mitochondria, and blocks gastrulation without interfering with cell spreading or FN fibrillogenesis but perturbs both epiboly and convergence/extension. In XTC cells, the over-expression of PACSIN2 but not PACSIN2-MA prevents the localization of integrin beta1 to focal adhesions (FA) and filamin to stress fiber. PACSIN2-MA prevents filamin localization to membrane ruffles but not to stress fiber. We propose that PACSIN2 may regulate gastrulation by controlling the population of activated alpha5beta1 integrin and cytoskeleton strength during cell movement.

  7. The wood frog (Rana sylvatica): a technical conservation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, E.; Rittmann, S.; Irwin, J.; Keinath, D.; Scherer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Overall, the wood frog (Rana sylvatica) is ranked G5, secure through most of its range (NatureServe Explorer 2002). However, it is more vulnerable in some states within the USDA Forest Service Region 2: S3 (vulnerable) in Colorado, S2 (imperiled) in Wyoming, and S1 (critically imperiled in South Dakota (NatureServe Explorer 2002); there are no records for wood frogs in Kansas or Nebraska. Primary threats to wood frog populations are habitat fragmentation (loss of area, edge effects, and isolation) and habitat loss due to anthropogenic causes (e.g., wetland draining, grazing) and natural changes as habitat succession occurs. Wood frogs are most conspicuous at breeding sites early in the spring, when snow and ice are often still present at pond margins. They tolerate frezzing and hibernate terrestrially in shallow depressions, under leaf litter, grasses, logs, or rocks (Bagdonas 1968, Bellis 1961a); there are no reports of aquatic hibernation for this species (Licht 1991, Pinder et al. 1992). Wood frogs require semi-permanent and temporary pools of natural origin and adjacent wet meadows, and landscape alterations that shorten the hydroperiod of ponds can result in catastrophic tadpole mortality. Plant communities utilized by wood frogs in the Rocky Mountains are hydric to mesic and include sedge and grass meadows, willow hummocks, aspen groves, lodgepole pine forests, and woodlands with leaf litter and/or herbaceous understory (Maslin 1947, Bellis 1961a, Roberts and Lewin 1979, Haynes and Aird 1981). Wood frogs are likely to disperse into surrounding marsh and woodlands soon after oviposition (Heatwole 1961, Haynes and Aird 1981). In the arly fall, wood frogs begin to seek hibernacula at or just below the ground surface, generally in upland forest habitat (Regosin et al. 2003). Licht (1991) demonstrated shelter-seeking behavior at 1.5 [degrees] C. Once they have concealed themselves for hibernation, wood frogs are very difficult to detecta?|

  8. A New Nomenclature of Xenopus laevis Chromosomes Based on the Phylogenetic Relationship to Silurana/Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Kondo, Mariko; Gilchrist, Michael J; Zorn, Aaron M; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Schmid, Michael; Taira, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Xenopus laevis (XLA) is an allotetraploid species which appears to have undergone whole-genome duplication after the interspecific hybridization of 2 diploid species closely related to Silurana/Xenopus tropicalis (XTR). Previous cDNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments have identified 9 sets of homoeologous chromosomes in X. laevis, in which 8 sets correspond to chromosomes 1-8 of X. tropicalis (XTR1-XTR8), and the last set corresponds to a fusion of XTR9 and XTR10. In addition, recent X. laevis genome sequencing and BAC-FISH experiments support this physiological relationship and show no gross chromosome translocation in the X. laevis karyotype. Therefore, for the benefit of both comparative cytogenetics and genome research, we here propose a new chromosome nomenclature for X. laevis based on the phylogenetic relationship and chromosome length, i.e. XLA1L, XLA1S, XLA2L, XLA2S, and so on, in which the numbering of XLA chromosomes corresponds to that in X. tropicalis and the postfixes 'L' and 'S' stand for 'long' and 'short' chromosomes in the homoeologous pairs, which can be distinguished cytologically by their relative size. The last chromosome set is named XLA9L and XLA9S, in which XLA9 corresponds to both XTR9 and XTR10, and hence, to emphasize the phylogenetic relationship to X. tropicalis, XLA9_10L and XLA9_10S are also used as synonyms.

  9. Evidence of auditory insensitivity to vocalization frequencies in two frogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Sandra; Mason, Matthew J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and maintenance of animal communication systems requires the co-evolution of signal and receiver. Frogs and toads rely heavily on acoustic communication for coordinating reproduction and typically have ears tuned to the dominant frequency of their vocalizations, allowing discriminat......The emergence and maintenance of animal communication systems requires the co-evolution of signal and receiver. Frogs and toads rely heavily on acoustic communication for coordinating reproduction and typically have ears tuned to the dominant frequency of their vocalizations, allowing...... by their high toxicity might help to explain why calling has not yet disappeared, and that visual communication may have replaced auditory in these colourful, diurnal frogs....

  10. Complete genome sequence of frog virus 3, isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from nicaragua into the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saucedo, Bernardo; Hughes, Joseph; Beurden, van Steven J.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Haenen, Olga L.M.; Voorbergen-Laarman, Michal; Gröne, Andrea; Kika, Marja J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Frog virus 3 was isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from Nicaragua via Germany to the Netherlands, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Frog virus 3 isolate Op/2015/Netherlands/UU3150324001 is 107,183 bp long and has a nucleotide similarity of 98.26% to the

  11. The Homing Frog: High Homing Performance in a Territorial Dendrobatid Frog Allobates femoralis (Dendrobatidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašukonis, Andrius; Ringler, Max; Brandl, Hanja B; Mangione, Rosanna; Ringler, Eva; Hödl, Walter; Tregenza, T

    2013-01-01

    Dendrobatidae (dart-poison frogs) exhibit some of the most complex spatial behaviors among amphibians, such as territoriality and tadpole transport from terrestrial clutches to widely distributed deposition sites. In species that exhibit long-term territoriality, high homing performance after tadpole transport can be assumed, but experimental evidence is lacking, and the underlying orientation mechanisms are unknown. We conducted a field translocation experiment to test whether male Allobates femoralis, a dendrobatid frog with paternal extra-territorial tadpole transport, are capable of homing after experimental removal, as well as to quantify homing success and speed. Translocated individuals showed a very high homing success for distances up to 200 m and successfully returned from up to 400 m. We discuss the potential orientation mechanisms involved and selective forces that could have shaped this strong homing ability. PMID:25104869

  12. Ontogenetic polychromatism in marsupial frogs (Anura: Hylidae) Ontogenetic polychromatism in marsupial frogs (Anura: Hylidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Duellman William E.; Ruiz C. Pedro M.

    1986-01-01

    Color polymorphism is common in many species of marsupial frogs.  Extreme cases of pattern polymorphism are documented in four species. In Amphignathodon guentheri, Castrotheca aureomaculata, G. qriswoldi, and G. helenae juveniles are known to have only one color morph, where as two or more patterns exist in adults. In these species, polymorphism apparently develops ontogenetically. El polimorfismo cromático es común a algunas especies de sapos marsupiales. Casos extremos del modelo de polimo...

  13. Frogs host faecal bacteria typically associated with humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Karen; Schobben, Xavier; Christian, Keith

    2017-07-01

    Tree frogs commonly access drinking water tanks; this may have human health implications. Although amphibians might not be expected to host mammalian faecal indicator bacteria (FIB), it is possible that they may have human FIB on their skin after exposure to human waste. We collected faeces and skin wash from green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) from a natural environment, a suburban site, and a suburban site near a creek occasionally contaminated with sewage effluent. We used molecular techniques to test for FIB that are routinely used to indicate human faecal contamination. Enterococci colonies were isolated from both faecal and skin wash samples, and specific markers (Enterococcus faecium and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron) were found in frog faeces, demonstrating that these markers are not human- or mammalian-specific. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was detected in frogs from both natural and urban sites, but E. faecium was only associated with the sewage impacted site.

  14. Modeling synchronized calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu

    2009-07-01

    We experimentally observed synchronized calling behavior of male Japanese tree frogs Hyla japonica; namely, while isolated single frogs called nearly periodically, a pair of interacting frogs called synchronously almost in antiphase or inphase. In this study, we propose two types of phase-oscillator models on different degrees of approximations, which can quantitatively explain the phase and frequency properties in the experiment. Moreover, it should be noted that, although the second model is obtained by fitting to the experimental data of the two synchronized states, the model can also explain the transitory dynamics in the interactive calling behavior, namely, the shift from a transient inphase state to a stable antiphase state. We also discuss the biological relevance of the estimated parameter values to calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs and the possible biological meanings of the synchronized calling behavior.

  15. Final Critical Habitat for Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify, in general, the areas of FINAL critical habitat for Rana pretiosa (Oregon Spotted Frog). Maps published in the Federal Register 2016.

  16. Frog: The fast & realistic OpenGL event displayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quertenmont, Loïc

    2010-04-01

    FROG [1] [2] is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy physics experiment. It is suitable to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light (cross-platform OpenGL[3] and Glut [4] libraries. Moreover, Frog does not require installation of heavy third party libraries for the visualisation. This documents describes the features and principles of Frog version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisation, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally the application of FROG for physic experiment/environement, such as Gastof, CMS, ILD, Delphes will be presented for illustration.

  17. Chromosome analysis of five Brazilian species of poison frogs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Dendrobatid frogs have undergone an extensive systematic reorganization based on recent molecular findings. The present work describes karyotypes of the Brazilian species Adelphobates castaneoticus, A. quinquevittatus, Ameerega picta, A. galactonotus and Dendrobates tinctorius which were compared to ...

  18. FROG: The Fast And Realistic OpenGL Event Displayer

    CERN Document Server

    Quertenmont, Loic

    2009-01-01

    FROG [1] [2] is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy experiment. It is suitable to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light (< 3 MB) and fast (browsing time 20 events per second for a large High Energy Physics experiment) and can run on various operating systems, as its object-oriented structure (C++) relies on the cross-platform OPENGL [3] and GLUT [4] libraries. Moreover, FROG does not require installation of third party libraries for the visualisation. This documents describes the features and principles of FROG version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisation, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally the application of FROG for physic experiment/environement, such as Gastof, CMS, ILD, Delphes will be presented for illustration.

  19. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring at Jack Creek 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from mark-recapture surveys conducted in 2015 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring effort...

  20. California Red-Legged Frogs in coastal dune drainages (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — California Red-legged Frogs (Rana draytonii) are typically regarded as inhabitants of permanent ponds, marshes, and slow-moving streams, but their ecology in other...

  1. Validation of the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test in the amphibian Xenopus laevis using in situ nick translation and comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, K; Gosálvez, J; Arroyo, F; López-Fernández, C; Guille, M; Noble, A; Johnston, S D

    2015-11-01

    The integrity of sperm DNA is becoming increasingly recognised as an important parameter of semen quality, but there are no published reports of this procedure for any amphibian. The primary aim of this study was to apply a modified sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test (Halomax) to an amphibian sperm model (African clawed frog; Xenopus laevis) and to validate the assay against in situ nick translation (ISNT) and the double-comet assay procedure. Inactivated spermatozoa were collected from fresh testes (n=3). Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) for each sperm sample was conducted immediately following activation (T0) and again after 1h (T1) and 24h (T24) of incubation at room temperature in order to produce a range of spermatozoa with differing levels of DNA damage. The SCD procedure resulted in the production of three nuclear morphotypes; amphibian sperm morphotype 1 (ASM-1) and ASM-2 showed no evidence of DNA damage, whereas ASM-3 spermatozoa were highly fragmented with large halos of dispersed DNA fragments and a reduced nuclear core. ISNT confirmed that ASM-3 nuclei contained damaged DNA. There was a significant correlation (r=0.9613) between the levels of ASM-3 detected by the SCD test and SDF revealed by the double-comet assay.

  2. Analysis of neural progenitors from embryogenesis to juvenile adult in Xenopus laevis reveals biphasic neurogenesis and continuous lengthening of the cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Thuret

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xenopus laevis is a prominent model system for studying neural development, but our understanding of the long-term temporal dynamics of neurogenesis remains incomplete. Here, we present the first continuous description of neurogenesis in X. laevis, covering the entire period of development from the specification of neural ectoderm during gastrulation to juvenile frog. We have used molecular markers to identify progenitors and neurons, short-term bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation to map the generation of newborn neurons and dual pulse S-phase labelling to characterise changes in their cell cycle length. Our study revealed the persistence of Sox3-positive progenitor cells from the earliest stages of neural development through to the juvenile adult. Two periods of intense neuronal generation were observed, confirming the existence of primary and secondary waves of neurogenesis, punctuated by a period of quiescence before metamorphosis and culminating in another period of quiescence in the young adult. Analysis of multiple parameters indicates that neural progenitors alternate between global phases of differentiation and amplification and that, regardless of their behaviour, their cell cycle lengthens monotonically during development, at least at the population level.

  3. The need of MMP-2 on the sperm surface for Xenopus fertilization: its role in a fast electrical block to polyspermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Yasuhiro; Shiga, Keiko; Shiroshita, Ayumi; Yoshikawa, Tomoyasu; Sakiie, Maho; Ueno, Tomoyo; Ueno, Shuichi; Ijiri, Takashi W; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Monospermic fertilization in the frog, Xenopus laevis, is ensured by a fast-rising, positive fertilization potential to prevent polyspermy on the fertilized egg, followed by a slow block with the formation of a fertilization envelope over the egg surface. In this paper, we found that not only the enzymatic activity of sperm matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was necessary for a sperm to bind and/or pass through the extracellular coat of vitelline envelope, but also the hemopexin (HPX) domain of MMP-2 on the sperm surface was involved in binding and membrane fusion between the sperm and eggs. A peptide with a partial amino acid sequence of the HPX domain caused egg activation accompanied by an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in a voltage-dependent manner, similar to that in fertilization. The membrane microdomain (MD) of unfertilized eggs bound the HPX peptide, and this was inhibited by ganglioside GM1 distributed in the MD. The treatment of sperm with GM1 or anti-MMP-2 HPX antibody allows the sperm to fertilize an egg clamped at 0 mV, which untreated sperm cannot achieve. We propose a model accounting for the mechanism of voltage-dependent fertilization based on an interaction between the positively charged HPX domain in the sperm membrane and negatively-charged GM1 in the egg plasma membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of cupric ion activity by pH and fulvic acid as determinants of toxicity in Xenopus laevis embryos and larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchwalter, D.B. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Toxicology Program]|[ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Linder, G. [ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Curtis, L.R. [East Tennessee State Univ., Johnson City, TN (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health

    1996-04-01

    An ion-specific electrode measured cupric ion activity modulated by fulvic acid (FA) and pH in a series of modified Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay--Xenopus (FETAX) toxicity assays. Hydrogen ion concentration was the primary determinant of cupric ion activity, while FA played a smaller but significant role. Fulvic acid was a weak copper complexing agent at pH 5.50. At pH 5.50 there was slight reduction of ionic activity and a subsequent attenuation of copper toxicity with 5.0 mg/L FA. At pH 7.50, FA also had a mild attenuating effect on copper toxicity. At pH 6.50, copper was strongly complexed by FA at total copper (TCu) concentrations below its pH-dependent solubility limit. At TCu concentrations above the solubility limit FA enhanced toxicity. There was more cupric ion activity measured in the presence of 0.5 and 5.0 mg/L FA than without it at TCu concentrations above the solubility limit. The proposed mechanism for this behavior was FA action as a nucleation inhibitor. Under the chemical conditions of the pH 6.50 experiments, a stable supersaturation of copper was formed, resulting in a more toxic aqueous matrix.

  5. Left-Right Asymmetric Morphogenesis in the Xenopus Digestive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jennifer K.; Prather, D.R.; Nascone-Yoder, N. M.

    2003-01-01

    The morphogenetic mechanisms by which developing organs become left-right asymmetric entities are unknown. To investigate this issue, we compared the roles of the left and right sides of the Xenopus embryo during the development of anatomic asymmetries in the digestive system. Although both sides contribute equivalently to each of the individual digestive organs, during the initial looping of the primitive gut tube, the left side assumes concave topologies where the right side becomes convex. Of interest, the concave surfaces of the gut tube correlate with expression of the LR gene, Pitx2, and ectopic Pitx2 mRNA induces ectopic concavities in a localized manner. A morphometric comparison of the prospective concave and convex surfaces of the gut tube reveals striking disparities in their rate of elongation but no significant differences in cell proliferation. These results provide insight into the nature of symmetry-breaking morphogenetic events during left-right asymmetric organ development. ?? 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Endocytosis is required for efficient apical constriction during Xenopus gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jen-Yi; Harland, Richard M

    2010-02-09

    Coordinated apical constriction (AC) in epithelial sheets drives tissue invagination [1, 2] and is required for diverse morphogenetic movements such as gastrulation [3], neurulation [4, 5], and organogenesis [6]. We showed previously that actomyosin contractility drives AC in Xenopus laevis bottle cells [7]; however, it remained unclear whether it does so in concert with other processes. Here we report that endocytosis-driven membrane remodeling is required for efficient AC. We found endosomes exclusively in bottle cells in the early gastrula. Disrupting endocytosis with dominant-negative dynamin or rab5 perturbed AC, with a significant decrease in constriction rate late in the process, suggesting that endocytosis operates downstream of actomyosin contractility to remove excess membrane. Additionally, disrupting endocytosis during neurulation inhibits AC in hingepoint cells, resulting in neural tube closure defects. Thus, membrane remodeling during AC could be a general mechanism to achieve efficient invagination in embryos.

  7. Deficient induction response in a Xenopus nucleocytoplasmic hybrid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Narbonne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Incompatibilities between the nucleus and the cytoplasm of sufficiently distant species result in developmental arrest of hybrid and nucleocytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid embryos. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain their lethality, including problems in embryonic genome activation (EGA and/or nucleo-mitochondrial interactions. However, conclusive identification of the causes underlying developmental defects of cybrid embryos is still lacking. We show here that while over 80% of both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus (Silurana tropicalis same-species androgenetic haploids develop to the swimming tadpole stage, the androgenetic cybrids formed by the combination of X. laevis egg cytoplasm and X. tropicalis sperm nucleus invariably fail to gastrulate properly and never reach the swimming tadpole stage. In spite of this arrest, these cybrids show quantitatively normal EGA and energy levels at the stage where their initial gastrulation defects are manifested. The nucleocytoplasmic incompatibility between these two species instead results from a combination of factors, including a reduced emission of induction signal from the vegetal half, a decreased sensitivity of animal cells to induction signals, and differences in a key embryonic protein (Xbra concentration between the two species, together leading to inefficient induction and defective convergence-extension during gastrulation. Indeed, increased exposure to induction signals and/or Xbra signalling partially rescues the induction response in animal explants and whole cybrid embryos. Altogether, our study demonstrates that the egg cytoplasm of one species may not support the development promoted by the nucleus of another species, even if this nucleus does not interfere with the cytoplasmic/maternal functions of the egg, while the egg cytoplasm is also capable of activating the genome of that nucleus. Instead, our results provide evidence that inefficient signalling and differences in the

  8. Mapping neurogenesis onset in the optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrgen, Leah; Akerman, Colin J

    2016-12-01

    Neural progenitor cells have a central role in the development and evolution of the vertebrate brain. During early brain development, neural progenitors first expand their numbers through repeated proliferative divisions and then begin to exhibit neurogenic divisions. The transparent and experimentally accessible optic tectum of Xenopus laevis is an excellent model system for the study of the cell biology of neurogenesis, but the precise spatial and temporal relationship between proliferative and neurogenic progenitors has not been explored in this system. Here we construct a spatial map of proliferative and neurogenic divisions through lineage tracing of individual progenitors and their progeny. We find a clear spatial separation of proliferative and neurogenic progenitors along the anterior-posterior axis of the optic tectum, with proliferative progenitors located more posteriorly and neurogenic progenitors located more anteriorly. Since individual progenitors are repositioned toward more anterior locations as they mature, this spatial separation likely reflects an increasing restriction in the proliferative potential of individual progenitors. We then examined whether the transition from proliferative to neurogenic behavior correlates with cellular properties that have previously been implicated in regulating neurogenesis onset. Our data reveal that the transition from proliferation to neurogenesis is associated with a small change in cleavage plane orientation and a more pronounced change in cell cycle kinetics in a manner reminiscent of observations from mammalian systems. Our findings highlight the potential to use the optic tectum of Xenopus laevis as an accessible system for the study of the cell biology of neurogenesis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 1328-1341, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. FMRP regulates neurogenesis in vivo in Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Regina L; Wishard, Tyler J; Thompson, Christopher K; Liu, Han-Hsuan; Cline, Hollis T

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the leading known monogenic form of autism and the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. FXS results from silencing the FMR1 gene during embryonic development, leading to loss of Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA transport, stability, and translation. FXS is commonly thought of as a disease of synaptic dysfunction, however, FMRP expression is lost early in embryonic development, well before most synaptogenesis occurs. Recent studies suggest that loss of FMRP results in aberrant neurogenesis, but neurogenic defects have been variable. We investigated whether FMRP affects neurogenesis in Xenopus laevis tadpoles which express a homolog of FMR1. We used in vivo time-lapse imaging of neural progenitor cells and their neuronal progeny to evaluate the effect of acute loss or over-expression of FMRP on neurogenesis in the developing optic tectum. We complimented the time-lapse studies with SYTOX labeling to quantify apoptosis and CldU labeling to measure cell proliferation. Animals with increased or decreased levels of FMRP have significantly decreased neuronal proliferation and survival. They also have increased neuronal differentiation, but deficient dendritic arbor elaboration. The presence and severity of these defects was highly sensitive to FMRP levels. These data demonstrate that FMRP plays an important role in neurogenesis and suggest that endogenous FMRP levels are carefully regulated. These studies show promise in using Xenopus as an experimental system to study fundamental deficits in brain development with loss of FMRP and give new insight into the pathophysiology of FXS.

  10. Electroporation in the Regenerating Tail of the Xenopus Tadpole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochii, Makoto; Taniguchi, Yuka

    Xenopus laevis is a model system widely used to investigate embryogenesis, metamorphosis, and regeneration. The tail of the Xenopus tadpole is very useful in analyzing the molecular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration (Slack et al., 2004; Mochii et al., 2007; Slack et al., 2008). It is transparent and suitable for whole-mount observation at the cellular level. The tail regenerates within 2 weeks of amputation. The conventional injection of blastomeres with mRNA, DNA, or antisense oligonucleotides is a powerful tool with which to study genetic mechanisms in early embryos, but it is not effective in late embryos or larvae. A transgenic approach has been used to analyze tail regeneration (Beck et al., 2003, 2006), but its success is largely dependent on the activity of the promoter used. There are limited numbers of promoters available that precisely regulate gene expression spatially and/or temporally. In vivo electroporation is an alternative method that can be used to manipulate gene expression in late embryos and larvae. The introduction of DNA or RNA into the cells of neurula and tailbud embryos has been reported (Eide et al., 2000; Sasagawa et al., 2002; Falk et al., 2007). Targeting larval tissues with in vivo electroporation also has been used to investigate neural networks, metamorphosis, and regeneration (Haas et al., 2001, 2002; Nakajima and Yaoita, 2003; Javaherian and Cline, 2005; Bestman et al., 2006; Boorse et al., 2006; Lin et al., 2007; Mochii et al., 2007). In this chapter, we report a procedure to introduce DNA into the tissues of the tadpole tail.

  11. Selective carboxyl methylation of structurally altered calmodulins in Xenopus oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrosiers, R.R.; Romanik, E.A.; O' Connor, C.M. (Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Shrewsbury, MA (USA))

    1990-12-05

    The eucaryotic protein carboxyl methyltransferase specifically modifies atypical D-aspartyl and L-isoaspartyl residues which are generated spontaneously as proteins age. The selectivity of the enzyme for altered proteins in intact cells was explored by co-injecting Xenopus laevis oocytes with S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-3H)methionine and structurally altered calmodulins generated during a 14-day preincubation in vitro. Control experiments indicated that the oocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase was not saturated with endogenous substrates, since protein carboxyl methylation rates could be stimulated up to 8-fold by increasing concentrations of injected calmodulin. The oocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase showed strong selectivities for bovine brain and bacterially synthesized calmodulins which had been preincubated in the presence of 1 mM EDTA relative to calmodulins which had been preincubated with 1 mM CaCl2. Radioactive methyl groups were incorporated into base-stable linkages with recombinant calmodulin as well as into carboxyl methyl esters following its microinjection into oocytes. This base-stable radioactivity most likely represents the trimethylation of lysine 115, a highly conserved post-translational modification which is present in bovine and Xenopus but not in bacterially synthesized calmodulin. Endogenous oocyte calmodulin incorporates radioactivity into both carboxyl methyl esters and into base-stable linkages following microinjection of oocytes with S-adenosyl-(methyl-3H)methionine alone. The rate of oocyte calmodulin carboxyl methylation in injected oocytes is calculated to be similar to that of lysine 115 trimethylation, suggesting that the rate of calmodulin carboxyl methylation is similar to that of calmodulin synthesis. At steady state, oocyte calmodulin contains approximately 0.0002 esters/mol of protein, which turn over rapidly.

  12. DNA is a co-factor for its own replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebofsky, Ronald; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    Soluble Xenopus egg extracts efficiently replicate added plasmids using a physiological mechanism, and thus represent a powerful system to understand vertebrate DNA replication. Surprisingly, DNA replication in this system is highly sensitive to plasmid concentration, being undetectable below

  13. Frog tongue surface microstructures: functional and evolutionary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Frogs (Lissamphibia: Anura) use adhesive tongues to capture fast moving, elusive prey. For this, the tongues are moved quickly and adhere instantaneously to various prey surfaces. Recently, the functional morphology of frog tongues was discussed in context of their adhesive performance. It was suggested that the interaction between the tongue surface and the mucus coating is important for generating strong pull-off forces. However, despite the general notions about its importance for a successful contact with the prey, little is known about the surface structure of frog tongues. Previous studies focused almost exclusively on species within the Ranidae and Bufonidae, neglecting the wide diversity of frogs. Here we examined the tongue surface in nine different frog species, comprising eight different taxa, i.e., the Alytidae, Bombinatoridae, Megophryidae, Hylidae, Ceratophryidae, Ranidae, Bufonidae, and Dendrobatidae. In all species examined herein, we found fungiform and filiform papillae on the tongue surface. Further, we observed a high degree of variation among tongues in different frogs. These differences can be seen in the size and shape of the papillae, in the fine-structures on the papillae, as well as in the three-dimensional organization of subsurface tissues. Notably, the fine-structures on the filiform papillae in frogs comprise hair-like protrusions (Megophryidae and Ranidae), microridges (Bufonidae and Dendrobatidae), or can be irregularly shaped or absent as observed in the remaining taxa examined herein. Some of this variation might be related to different degrees of adhesive performance and may point to differences in the spectra of prey items between frog taxa. PMID:27547606

  14. Pure ultrasonic communication in an endemic Bornean frog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria S Arch

    Full Text Available Huia cavitympanum, an endemic Bornean frog, is the first amphibian species known to emit exclusively ultrasonic (i.e., >20 kHz vocal signals. To test the hypothesis that these frogs use purely ultrasonic vocalizations for intraspecific communication, we performed playback experiments with male frogs in their natural calling sites. We found that the frogs respond with increased calling to broadcasts of conspecific calls containing only ultrasound. The field study was complemented by electrophysiological recordings from the auditory midbrain and by laser Doppler vibrometer measurements of the tympanic membrane's response to acoustic stimulation. These measurements revealed that the frog's auditory system is broadly tuned over high frequencies, with peak sensitivity occurring within the ultrasonic frequency range. Our results demonstrate that H. cavitympanum is the first non-mammalian vertebrate described to communicate with purely ultrasonic acoustic signals. These data suggest that further examination of the similarities and differences in the high-frequency/ultrasonic communication systems of H. cavitympanum and Odorrana tormota, an unrelated frog species that produces and detects ultrasound but does not emit exclusively ultrasonic calls, will afford new insights into the mechanisms underlying vertebrate high-frequency communication.

  15. Plasticity of peripheral auditory frequency sensitivity in Emei music frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dian; Cui, Jianguo; Tang, Yezhong

    2012-01-01

    In anurans reproductive behavior is strongly seasonal. During the spring, frogs emerge from hibernation and males vocalize for mating or advertising territories. Female frogs have the ability to evaluate the quality of the males' resources on the basis of these vocalizations. Although studies revealed that central single torus semicircularis neurons in frogs exhibit season plasticity, the plasticity of peripheral auditory sensitivity in frog is unknown. In this study the seasonally plasticity of peripheral auditory sensitivity was test in the Emei music frog Babina daunchina, by comparing thresholds and latencies of auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) evoked by tone pips and clicks in the reproductive and non-reproductive seasons. The results show that both ABR thresholds and latency differ significantly between the reproductive and non-reproductive seasons. The thresholds of tone pip evoked ABRs in the non-reproductive season increased significantly about 10 dB than those in the reproductive season for frequencies from 1 KHz to 6 KHz. ABR latencies to waveform valley values for tone pips for the same frequencies using appropriate threshold stimulus levels are longer than those in the reproductive season for frequencies from 1.5 to 6 KHz range, although from 0.2 to 1.5 KHz range it is shorter in the non-reproductive season. These results demonstrated that peripheral auditory frequency sensitivity exhibits seasonal plasticity changes which may be adaptive to seasonal reproductive behavior in frogs.

  16. Plasticity of peripheral auditory frequency sensitivity in Emei music frog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Zhang

    Full Text Available In anurans reproductive behavior is strongly seasonal. During the spring, frogs emerge from hibernation and males vocalize for mating or advertising territories. Female frogs have the ability to evaluate the quality of the males' resources on the basis of these vocalizations. Although studies revealed that central single torus semicircularis neurons in frogs exhibit season plasticity, the plasticity of peripheral auditory sensitivity in frog is unknown. In this study the seasonally plasticity of peripheral auditory sensitivity was test in the Emei music frog Babina daunchina, by comparing thresholds and latencies of auditory brainstem responses (ABRs evoked by tone pips and clicks in the reproductive and non-reproductive seasons. The results show that both ABR thresholds and latency differ significantly between the reproductive and non-reproductive seasons. The thresholds of tone pip evoked ABRs in the non-reproductive season increased significantly about 10 dB than those in the reproductive season for frequencies from 1 KHz to 6 KHz. ABR latencies to waveform valley values for tone pips for the same frequencies using appropriate threshold stimulus levels are longer than those in the reproductive season for frequencies from 1.5 to 6 KHz range, although from 0.2 to 1.5 KHz range it is shorter in the non-reproductive season. These results demonstrated that peripheral auditory frequency sensitivity exhibits seasonal plasticity changes which may be adaptive to seasonal reproductive behavior in frogs.

  17. Identification of CUG-BP1/EDEN-BP target mRNAs in Xenopus tropicalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Graindorge, Antoine; Le Tonquèze, Olivier; Thuret, Raphaël; Pollet, Nicolas; Osborne, Howard Beverley; Audic, Yann

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The early development of many animals relies on the posttranscriptional regulations of maternally stored mRNAs. In particular, the translation of maternal mRNAs is tightly controlled during oocyte maturation and early mitotic cycles in Xenopus. The Embryonic Deadenylation ElemeNt (EDEN) and its associated protein EDEN-BP are known to trigger deadenylation and translational silencing to several mRNAs bearing an EDEN. This Xenopus RNA-binding protein is an ortholog of th...

  18. Dermaseptins and Magainins: Antimicrobial Peptides from Frogs' Skin—New Sources for a Promising Spermicides Microbicides—A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Zairi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STIs and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the causative agents of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, are two great concerns in the reproductive health of women. Thus, the challenge is to find products with a double activity, on the one hand having antimicrobial/antiviral properties with a role in the reduction of STI, and on the other hand having spermicidal action to be used as a contraceptive. In the absence of an effective microbicide along with the disadvantages of the most commonly used spermicidal contraceptive worldwide, nonoxynol-9, new emphasis has been focused on the development of more potential intravaginal microbicidal agents. Topical microbicides spermicides would ideally provide a female-controlled method of self-protection against HIV as well as preventing pregnancies. Nonoxynol-9, the only recommended microbicide spermicide, damages cervicovaginal epithelium because of its membrane-disruptive properties. Clearly, there is an urgent need to identify new compounds with dual potential microbicidal properties; antimicrobial peptides should be candidates for such investigations. Dermaseptins and magainins are two classes of cationic, amphipathic α-helical peptides that have been identified in the skin extracts of frogs Phyllomedusa sauvagei and Xenopus laevis. Regarding their contraceptive activities and their effect against various STI-causing pathogens, we believe that these two peptides are appropriate candidates in the evaluation of newer and safer microbicides spermicides in the future.

  19. Is chytridiomycosis driving Darwin's frogs to extinction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Soto-Azat

    Full Text Available Darwin's frogs (Rhinoderma darwinii and R. rufum are two species of mouth brooding frogs from Chile and Argentina that have experienced marked population declines. Rhinoderma rufum has not been found in the wild since 1980. We investigated historical and current evidence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd infection in Rhinoderma spp. to determine whether chytridiomycosis is implicated in the population declines of these species. Archived and live specimens of Rhinoderma spp., sympatric amphibians and amphibians at sites where Rhinoderma sp. had recently gone extinct were examined for Bd infection using quantitative real-time PCR. Six (0.9% of 662 archived anurans tested positive for Bd (4/289 R. darwinii; 1/266 R. rufum and 1/107 other anurans, all of which had been collected between 1970 and 1978. An overall Bd-infection prevalence of 12.5% was obtained from 797 swabs taken from 369 extant individuals of R. darwinii and 428 individuals representing 18 other species of anurans found at sites with current and recent presence of the two Rhinoderma species. In extant R. darwinii, Bd-infection prevalence (1.9% was significantly lower than that found in other anurans (7.3%. The prevalence of infection (30% in other amphibian species was significantly higher in sites where either Rhinoderma spp. had become extinct or was experiencing severe population declines than in sites where there had been no apparent decline (3.0%; x(2 = 106.407, P<0.001. This is the first report of widespread Bd presence in Chile and our results are consistent with Rhinoderma spp. declines being due to Bd infection, although additional field and laboratory investigations are required to investigate this further.

  20. Identification of Xenopus Cortactin : Two Isoforms of the Transcript and Multiple Forms of the Protein(Cell Biology)

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi, Yamashita; Takanori, KATSUBE; Naoko, Hashimoto; Kimiko, Tomita; Manabu, Takahisa; Ryu, Ueda; Shin, TOGASHI; Neurogenetics Research Project, Mitsubishi Kasei Institute of Life Sciences:(Present addresses)School of Science, Kitasato University; Neurogenetics Research Project, Mitsubishi Kasei Institute of Life Sciences(Present addresses)National Institute of Radiological Sciences; Neurogenetics Research Project, Mitsubishi Kasei Institute of Life Sciences; Neurogenetics Research Project, Mitsubishi Kasei Institute of Life Sciences(Present addresses)Laboratory of Molecular Embryology, Department of Bioscience, Kitasato University

    2001-01-01

    Cortactin was initially identified as a substrate for Src tyrosine kinase. It interacts with the filamentous actin in the cell cortex through the tandem repeats of 37-amino acid. In this report, we describe the identification of a Xenopus homolog of cortactin. The deduced amino acid sequence shares over 70% identity with human, mouse, and chicken cortactin. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that Xenopus cortactin is widely expressed in Xenopus tissues. Analysis of the transcripts us...

  1. THE MOCHE BOTANICAL FROG (La rana botánica mochica)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donna McClelland

    2011-01-01

    .... Fine line painted vessels and ones with low relief decoration show the Botanical Frog performing as part of a ritual involving other animals and cultivated crops, suggesting that the Botanical Frog...

  2. The first see-through frog created by breeding: description, inheritance patterns, and dermal chromatophore structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sumida, Masayuki; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Igawa, Takeshi; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Furukawa, Yukari; Sano, Naomi; Fujii, Tamotsu; Yoshizaki, Norio

    2016-01-01

    .... We crossed two kinds of recessive color mutant (black-eyed and gray-eyed) frogs through artificial insemination, and F2 offspring produced frogs whose skin is translucent throughout the life cycle...

  3. Prostaglandin E2 release from dermis regulates sodium permeability of frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytved, Klaus A.; Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Arachidonic acid, cAMP, epithelium, frog skin, intracellular calcium, prostaglandin E*U2, sodium transport, tight epithelium.......Arachidonic acid, cAMP, epithelium, frog skin, intracellular calcium, prostaglandin E*U2, sodium transport, tight epithelium....

  4. Population estimation of the Green and golden bell frog Litoria aurea at Port Kembla

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldingay, Ross L; Newell, David A

    2005-01-01

    Population estimates of the endangered Green and gold bell frog (Litoria aurea) at Port Kembla NSW, based on mark and recapture techniques suggest that two breeding sites contain more than 300 adult frogs...

  5. Panamanian frog species host unique skin bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Belden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrates, including amphibians, host diverse symbiotic microbes that contribute to host disease resistance. Globally, and especially in montane tropical systems, many amphibian species are threatened by a chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, that causes a lethal skin disease. Bd therefore may be a strong selective agent on the diversity and function of the microbial communities inhabiting amphibian skin. In Panamá, amphibian population declines and the spread of Bd have been tracked. In 2012, we completed a field survey in Panamá to examine frog skin microbiota in the context of Bd infection. We focused on three frog species and collected two skin swabs per frog from a total of 136 frogs across four sites that varied from west to east in the time since Bd arrival. One swab was used to assess bacterial community structure using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and to determine Bd infection status, and one was used to assess metabolite diversity, as the bacterial production of anti-fungal metabolites is an important disease resistance function. The skin microbiota of the three Panamanian frog species differed in OTU (operational taxonomic unit, ~bacterial species community composition and metabolite profiles, although the pattern was less strong for the metabolites. Comparisons between frog skin bacterial communities from Panamá and the US suggest broad similarities at the phylum level, but key differences at lower taxonomic levels. In our field survey in Panamá, across all four sites, only 35 individuals (~26% were Bd infected. There was no clustering of OTUs or metabolite profiles based on Bd infection status and no clear pattern of west-east changes in OTUs or metabolite profiles across the four sites. Overall, our field survey data suggest that different bacterial communities might be producing broadly similar sets of metabolites across frog hosts and sites. Community structure and function may not be as tightly coupled in

  6. Frog community responses to recent American bullfrog invasions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming LI, Zhunwei KE, Yihua WANG, Tim M. BLACKBURN

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Native species may decline quickly when confronted with an exotic species to which they are not adapted. The extent of decline may depend on the abundance of an invader and the length of time since it first arrived in the community (residence time, and the interaction between these two variables. We tested these effects using data on the effects of American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus invasion on native frog communities in 65 permanent lentic waters on islands in the Zhoushan Archipelago, China. We examined variation in native frog abundance and species richness in relation to features of the American bullfrog invasion, habitat disturbance, characteristics of the water body and fish communities and the presence of red swamp crayfish. Bullfrog invaded sites had lower native frog density and species richness, higher submerged vegetation cover and greater frequency of repairs to the water body than did non-invaded sites. The minimum adequate general linear mixed models showed that both native frog density and species richness were negatively related to post-metamorphosis bullfrog density, and that native frog species richness was also positively related to the vegetation cover. There was no effect on either native frog density or species richness of residence time or its interaction with bullfrog density, or of the abundance of bullfrog tadpoles. The results suggested that post-metamorphosis bullfrogs had impacts on native frog communities in the islands, and that the extents of these impacts are proportional to post-metamorphosis bullfrog density [Current Zoology 57 (1: 83–92, 2011].

  7. Frogs Call at a Higher Pitch in Traffic Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten M. Parris

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Male frogs call to attract females for mating and to defend territories from rival males. Female frogs of some species prefer lower-pitched calls, which indicate larger, more experienced males. Acoustic interference occurs when background noise reduces the active distance or the distance over which an acoustic signal can be detected. Birds are known to call at a higher pitch or frequency in urban noise, decreasing acoustic interference from low-frequency noise. Using Bayesian linear regression, we investigated the effect of traffic noise on the pitch of advertisement calls in two species of frogs, the southern brown tree frog (Litoria ewingii and the common eastern froglet (Crinia signifera. We found evidence that L. ewingii calls at a higher pitch in traffic noise, with an average increase in dominant frequency of 4.1 Hz/dB of traffic noise, and a total effect size of 123 Hz. This frequency shift is smaller than that observed in birds, but is still large enough to be detected by conspecific frogs and confer a significant benefit to the caller. Mathematical modelling predicted a 24% increase in the active distance of a L. ewingii call in traffic noise with a frequency shift of this size. Crinia signifera may also call at a higher pitch in traffic noise, but more data are required to be confident of this effect. Because frog calls are innate rather than learned, the frequency shift demonstrated by L. ewingii may represent an evolutionary adaptation to noisy conditions. The phenomenon of frogs calling at a higher pitch in traffic noise could therefore constitute an intriguing trade-off between audibility and attractiveness to potential mates.

  8. Convergent evolution of chemical defense in poison frogs and arthropod prey between Madagascar and the Neotropics

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Valerie C.; Christopher J Raxworthy; Rakotomalala, Valérie; Sierwald, Petra; Fisher, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    With few exceptions, aposematically colored poison frogs sequester defensive alkaloids, unchanged, from dietary arthropods. In the Neotropics, myrmicine and formicine ants and the siphonotid millipede Rhinotus purpureus are dietary sources for alkaloids in dendrobatid poison frogs, yet the arthropod sources for Mantella poison frogs in Madagascar remained unknown. We report GC-MS analyses of extracts of arthropods and microsympatric Malagasy poison frogs (Mantella) collected from Ranomafana, ...

  9. Ecology and distribution of the Florida bog frog and flatwoods salamander on Eglin Air Force Base

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, David Christopher

    2005-01-01

    I studied the ecology and distribution of the Florida bog frog (Rana okaloosae) and flatwoods salamander (Ambystoma cingulatum) on Eglin Air Force Base in northwest Florida. I report data on the breeding ecology, population dynamics, home ranges, microhabitat, and distribution of the endemic bog frog and make comparisons to its closest relative, the bronze frog (Rana clamitans clamitans). Bog and bronze frogs occur in the same habitats and are suspected to hybridize. I investigated th...

  10. [FRancilian Oncogeriatric Group (FROG)'s focus on management of elderly patients with bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebriou, Djamel; Avenin, Danièle; Caillet, Philippe; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Durdux, Catherine; Massard, Christophe; Culine, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    Bladder cancer is diagnosed more often in the elderly. The most effective treatment strategies are mostly very aggressive and are not applicable to all patients in a very heterogeneous population. However, effective options exist to treat the most vulnerable subjects. A multidisciplinary approach including a geriatric assessment is essential for optimal adaptation of treatment. The FRancilian Oncogeriatric Group (FROG) conducted a comprehensive literature search in order to review the applicable therapeutic options according to oncological and geriatric settings. International recommendations are essential to harmonize the management of elderly patients with bladder cancer.

  11. Determination of age, longevity and age at reproduction of the frog ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    to study the reproductive status of the individual frogs. (the femurs of all these frogs were also processed for skeletochronology). The remaining frogs were released. Clipped toes and limb bones were cleaned, deminera- lized in 5% nitric acid and processed for histology. Paraffin sections (8 µm) of the distal phalanx were.

  12. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143... and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits... frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across the track at right angles...

  13. Acute and chronic effects of acidic pH on four subtropical frog species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We conducted acute (LC50) and chronic acid tolerance bioassays on embryos and tadpoles of four frog species found in the park, i.e., Chiromantis xerampelina (Southern Foam Nest Frog), Pyxicephalus edulis (African Bullfrog), Amietophrynus maculatus (Flat-backed Toad) and Hildebrandtia ornata (Ornate Frog), using ...

  14. 49 CFR 236.327 - Switch, movable-point frog or split-point derail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, movable-point frog or split-point derail..., AND APPLIANCES Interlocking Rules and Instructions § 236.327 Switch, movable-point frog or split-point derail. Switch, movable-point frog, or split-point derail equipped with lock rod shall be maintained so...

  15. Speculations on colonizing success of the African clawed frog ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-12-12

    Dec 12, 1991 ... snakes. Pharm. Biochem. Behav. 30: 957-959. BUXTON, D.R. 1936. A natural history of the Turkana fauna. J. E. Afr. Uganda Nal. Hisl. Soc. 13: 85-104. DUMONT, J.N. 1972. Oogenesis in Xenopus laevis (Daudin) 1. Stages of oocyte development in laboratory maintained animals. J. Morphol. 136: 153-180.

  16. Tourism and the Conservation of Critically Endangered Frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Clare; Simpkins, Clay; Castley, J. Guy; Buckley, Ralf C.

    2012-01-01

    Protected areas are critical for the conservation of many threatened species. Despite this, many protected areas are acutely underfunded, which reduces their effectiveness significantly. Tourism is one mechanism to promote and fund conservation in protected areas, but there are few studies analyzing its tangible conservation outcomes for threatened species. This study uses the 415 IUCN critically endangered frog species to evaluate the contribution of protected area tourism revenue to conservation. Contributions were calculated for each species as the proportion of geographic range inside protected areas multiplied by the proportion of protected area revenues derived from tourism. Geographic ranges were determined from IUCN Extent of Occurrence maps. Almost 60% (239) of critically endangered frog species occur in protected areas. Higher proportions of total range are protected in Nearctic, Australasian and Afrotopical regions. Tourism contributions to protected area budgets ranged from 5–100%. These financial contributions are highest for developing countries in the Afrotropical, Indomalayan and Neotropical regions. Data for both geographic range and budget are available for 201 critically endangered frog species with proportional contributions from tourism to species protection ranging from 0.8–99%. Tourism's financial contributions to critically endangered frog species protection are highest in the Afrotropical region. This study uses a coarse measure but at the global scale it demonstrates that tourism has significant potential to contribute to global frog conservation efforts. PMID:22984440

  17. Sophisticated Communication in the Brazilian Torrent Frog Hylodes japi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Fábio P; Zina, Juliana; Haddad, Célio F B

    2016-01-01

    Intraspecific communication in frogs plays an important role in the recognition of conspecifics in general and of potential rivals or mates in particular and therefore with relevant consequences for pre-zygotic reproductive isolation. We investigate intraspecific communication in Hylodes japi, an endemic Brazilian torrent frog with territorial males and an elaborate courtship behavior. We describe its repertoire of acoustic signals as well as one of the most complex repertoires of visual displays known in anurans, including five new visual displays. Previously unknown in frogs, we also describe a bimodal inter-sexual communication system where the female stimulates the male to emit a courtship call. As another novelty for frogs, we show that in addition to choosing which limb to signal with, males choose which of their two vocal sacs will be used for visual signaling. We explain how and why this is accomplished. Control of inflation also provides additional evidence that vocal sac movement and color must be important for visual communication, even while producing sound. Through the current knowledge on visual signaling in Neotropical torrent frogs (i.e. hylodids), we discuss and highlight the behavioral diversity in the family Hylodidae. Our findings indicate that communication in species of Hylodes is undoubtedly more sophisticated than we expected and that visual communication in anurans is more widespread than previously thought. This is especially true in tropical regions, most likely due to the higher number of species and phylogenetic groups and/or to ecological factors, such as higher microhabitat diversity.

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasma accelerates tail regeneration in tadpoles Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivie, A.; Martus, K.; Menon, J.

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma is a partially ionized gas composed of neutral and charged particles, including electrons and ions, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, it is utilized as possible therapy in oncology, sterilization, skin diseases, wound healing and tissue regeneration. In this study we focused on effect of plasma exposure on tail regeneration of tadpoles, Xenopus leavis with special emphasis on role of ROS, antioxidant defenses and morphological features of the regenerate. When amputated region of the tail was exposed to the helium plasma it resulted in a faster rate of growth, elevated ROS and increase in antioxidant enzymes in the regenerate compared to that of untreated control. An increase in nitric oxide (free radical) as well as activity of nitric oxide synthase(s) were observed once the cells of the regeneration blastema - a mass of proliferating cells are ready for differentiation. Microscopically the cells of the regenerate of plasma treated tadpoles show altered morphology and characteristics of cellular hypoxia and oxidative stress. We summarize that plasma exposure accelerates the dynamics of wound healing and tail regeneration through its effects on cell proliferation and differentiation as well as angiogenesis mediated through ROS signaling.

  19. Ca2+ Homeostasis Regulates Xenopus Oocyte Maturation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lu; Hodeify, Rawad; Haun, Shirley; Charlesworth, Amanda; MacNicol, Angus M.; Ponnappan, Subramaniam; Ponnappan, Usha; Prigent, Claude; Machaca, Khaled

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the well-defined role of Ca2+ signals during mitosis, the contribution of Ca2+ signaling to meiosis progression is controversial, despite several decades of investigating the role of Ca2+ and its effectors in vertebrate oocyte maturation. We have previously shown that during Xenopus oocyte maturation, Ca2+ signals are dispensable for entry into meiosis and for germinal vesicle breakdown. However, normal Ca2+ homeostasis is essential for completion of meiosis I and extrusion of the first polar body. In this study, we test the contribution of several downstream effectors in mediating the Ca2+ effects during oocyte maturation. We show that calmodulin and calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMK2) are not critical downstream Ca2+ effectors during meiotic maturation. In contrast, accumulation of Aurora kinase A (AURKA) protein is disrupted in cells deprived of Ca2+ signals. Since AURKA is required for bipolar spindle formation, failure to accumulate AURKA may contribute to the defective spindle phenotype following Ca2+ deprivation. These findings argue that Ca2+ homeostasis is important in establishing the oocyte’s competence to undergo maturation in preparation for fertilization and embryonic development. PMID:18094360

  20. Primordial Germ Cell Isolation from Xenopus laevis Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Amanda M; Aguero, Tristan; Newman, Karen M; King, Mary Lou

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the precursors to the gametes and have the unique ability to retain full developmental potential. However, the mechanism(s) and gene-network(s) necessary for their proper specification and development are poorly understood. This is due, in part, to the challenges that must be overcome in order to identify and isolate PGCs during critical stages of development. Two distinct mechanisms have been characterized to specify the germ cell lineage in vertebrates: induction and inheritance. Regardless of mechanism, there are common developmental features shared among all vertebrates in forming the germ cell lineage. Xenopus offers several advantages for understanding the molecular mechanisms necessary to establish the germ line. Here, we provide detailed methods for isolating live PGCs at different time points: 1) just after they have segregated from the endodermal lineage, and 2) while they are migrating towards the presumptive gonad. Isolation of PGCs at these critical developmental stages will allow for the investigation of the mechanism(s) and gene-network(s) necessary for their proper specification and development.

  1. Regeneration of neural crest derivatives in the Xenopus tadpole tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slack Jonathan MW

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After amputation of the Xenopus tadpole tail, a functionally competent new tail is regenerated. It contains spinal cord, notochord and muscle, each of which has previously been shown to derive from the corresponding tissue in the stump. The regeneration of the neural crest derivatives has not previously been examined and is described in this paper. Results Labelling of the spinal cord by electroporation, or by orthotopic grafting of transgenic tissue expressing GFP, shows that no cells emigrate from the spinal cord in the course of regeneration. There is very limited regeneration of the spinal ganglia, but new neurons as well as fibre tracts do appear in the regenerated spinal cord and the regenerated tail also contains abundant peripheral innervation. The regenerated tail contains a normal density of melanophores. Cell labelling experiments show that melanophores do not arise from the spinal cord during regeneration, nor from the mesenchymal tissues of the skin, but they do arise by activation and proliferation of pre-existing melanophore precursors. If tails are prepared lacking melanophores, then the regenerates also lack them. Conclusion On regeneration there is no induction of a new neural crest similar to that seen in embryonic development. However there is some regeneration of neural crest derivatives. Abundant melanophores are regenerated from unpigmented precursors, and, although spinal ganglia are not regenerated, sufficient sensory systems are produced to enable essential functions to continue.

  2. Statistics of active transport in Xenopus melanophores cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezhko, A.; Barlan, K.; Aranson, I. S.; Gelfand, V. I.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-11-01

    The transport of cell cargo, such as organelles and protein complexes in the cytoplasm, is determined by cooperative action of molecular motors stepping along polar cytoskeletal elements. Analysis of transport of individual organelles generated useful information about the properties of the motor proteins and underlying cytoskeletal elements. In this work, for the first time (to our knowledge), we study collective movement of multiple organelles using Xenopus melanophores, pigment cells that translocate several thousand of pigment granules (melanosomes), spherical organelles of a diameter of {approx} 1 {micro}m. These cells disperse melanosomes in the cytoplasm in response to high cytoplasmic cAMP, while at low cAMP melanosomes cluster at the cell center. Obtained results suggest spatial and temporal organization, characterized by strong correlations between movement of neighboring organelles, with correlation length of {approx} 4 {micro}m and pair lifetime {approx} 5 s. Furthermore, velocity statistics revealed strongly non-Gaussian velocity distribution with high velocity tails demonstrating exponential behavior suggestive of strong velocity correlations. Depolymerization of vimentin intermediate filaments using a dominant-negative vimentin mutant or actin with cytochalasin B reduced correlation of behavior of individual particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that steric repulsion is dominant, but both intermediate filaments and actin microfilaments are involved in dynamic cross-linking organelles in the cytoplasm.

  3. Calcium dependent current recordings in Xenopus laevis oocytes in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Simon L.; Roesch, Christian; Ille, Fabian; Egli, Marcel

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical unloading by microgravity (or weightlessness) conditions triggers profound adaptation processes at the cellular and organ levels. Among other mechanisms, mechanosensitive ion channels are thought to play a key role in allowing cells to transduce mechanical forces. Previous experiments performed under microgravity have shown that gravity affects the gating properties of ion channels. Here, a method is described to record a calcium-dependent current in native Xenopus laevis oocytes under microgravity conditions during a parabolic flight. A 3-voltage-step protocol was applied to provoke a calcium-dependent current. This current increased with extracellular calcium concentration and could be reduced by applying extracellular gadolinium. The custom-made ;OoClamp; hardware was validated by comparing the results of the 3-voltage-step protocol to results obtained with a well-established two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). In the context of the 2nd Swiss Parabolic Flight Campaign, we tested the OoClamp and the method. The setup and experiment protocol worked well in parabolic flight. A tendency that the calcium-dependent current was smaller under microgravity than under 1 g condition could be observed. However, a conclusive statement was not possible due to the small size of the data base that could be gathered.

  4. Acoustic detection of melanosome transport in Xenopus laevis melanophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Rickard; Norström, Elisabeth; Bodin, Lovisa; Langhammer, Christoph; Sturve, Joachim; Wallin, Margareta; Svedhem, Sofia

    2013-04-01

    Organelle transport studies are often performed using melanophores from lower vertebrates due to the ease of inducing movements of pigment granules (melanosomes) and visualizing them by optical microscopy. Here, we present a novel methodology to monitor melanosome translocation (which is a light-sensitive process) in the dark using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique. This acoustic sensing method was used to study dispersion and aggregation of melanosomes in Xenopus laevis melanophores. Reversible sensor responses, correlated to optical reflectance measurements, were obtained by alternating addition and removal of melatonin (leading to melanosome aggregation) and melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) (leading to melanosome dispersion). By confocal microscopy, it was shown that a vertical redistribution of melanosomes occurred during the dispersion/aggregation processes. Furthermore, the transport process was studied in the presence of cytoskeleton-perturbing agents disrupting either actin filaments (latrunculin) or microtubules (nocodazole). Taken together, these experiments suggest that the acoustic responses mainly originate from melanosome transport along actin filaments (located close to the cell membrane), as expected based on the penetration depth of the QCM-D technique. The results clearly indicate the potential of QCM-D for studies of intracellular transport processes in melanophores. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transient effects of microgravity on early embryos of Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mazière, A.; Gonzalez-Jurado, J.; Reijnen, M.; Narraway, J.; Ubbels, G. A.

    In order to study the role of gravity on the early development of the clawed toad Xenopus laevis, we performed an experiment on the Maser-6 sounding rocket launched from Kiruna (Sweden) on 4 Nov 1993. The aim was to find out whether a short period of microgravity (mug) during fertilization and the first few minutes of development does indeed result in abnormal axis formation as was suggested by a pilot experiment on the Maser 3 in 1989. On the Maser 6 we used two new technical additions in the Fokker CIS unit, viz. a 1-g control centrifuge and a video recording unit which both worked successfully. The 1-g control centrifuge was used to discriminate between the influences of flight perturbations and mug. After fertilization shortly before launch, one of the first indications of successful egg activation, the cortical contraction, was registered in mug and on earth. Analysis of the video tapes revealed that the cortical contraction in mug starts earlier than at 1 g on earth. After recovery of the eggs fertilized in mug and culture of the embryos on earth, the morphology of the blastocoel has some consistent differences from blastulae from eggs fertilized in the 1-g centrifuge of the rocket. However from the gastrula stage onward, the mug embryos apparently recover and resume normal development: the XBra gene is normally expressed, and histological examination shows normal axis formation.

  6. Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in three species of wild frogs on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzán, M J; Vanderstichel, R; Hogan, N S; Teather, K; Wood, J

    2010-09-02

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has resulted in the decline or extinction of approximately 200 frog species worldwide. It has been reported throughout much of North America, but its presence on Prince Edward Island (PEI), on the eastern coast of Canada, was unknown. To determine the presence and prevalence of Bd on PEI, skin swabs were collected from 115 frogs from 18 separate sites across the province during the summer of 2009. The swabs were tested through single round end-point PCR for the presence of Bd DNA. Thirty-one frogs were positive, including 25/93 (27%) green frogs Lithobates (Rana) clamitans, 5/20 (25%) northern leopard frogs L. (R.) pipiens, and 1/2 (50%) wood frogs L. sylvaticus (formerly R. sylvatica); 12 of the 18 (67%) sites had at least 1 positive frog. The overall prevalence of Bd infection was estimated at 26.9% (7.2-46.7%, 95% CI). Prevalence amongst green frogs and leopard frogs was similar, but green frogs had a stronger PCR signal when compared to leopard frogs, regardless of age (p < 0.001) and body length (p = 0.476). Amongst green frogs, juveniles were more frequently positive than adults (p = 0.001). Green frogs may be the most reliable species to sample when looking for Bd in eastern North America. The 1 wood frog positive for Bd was found dead from chytridiomycosis; none of the other frogs that were positive for Bd by PCR showed any obvious signs of illness. Further monitoring will be required to determine what effect Bd infection has on amphibian population health on PEI.

  7. Sticking under wet conditions: the remarkable attachment abilities of the torrent frog, Staurois guttatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endlein, Thomas; Barnes, W Jon P; Samuel, Diana S; Crawford, Niall A; Biaw, Ang Bee; Grafe, Ulmar

    2013-01-01

    Tree frogs climb smooth surfaces utilising capillary forces arising from an air-fluid interface around their toe pads, whereas torrent frogs are able to climb in wet environments near waterfalls where the integrity of the meniscus is at risk. This study compares the adhesive capabilities of a torrent frog to a tree frog, investigating possible adaptations for adhesion under wet conditions. We challenged both frog species to cling to a platform which could be tilted from the horizontal to an upside-down orientation, testing the frogs on different levels of roughness and water flow. On dry, smooth surfaces, both frog species stayed attached to overhanging slopes equally well. In contrast, under both low and high flow rate conditions, the torrent frogs performed significantly better, even adhering under conditions where their toe pads were submerged in water, abolishing the meniscus that underlies capillarity. Using a transparent platform where areas of contact are illuminated, we measured the contact area of frogs during platform rotation under dry conditions. Both frog species not only used the contact area of their pads to adhere, but also large parts of their belly and thigh skin. In the tree frogs, the belly and thighs often detached on steeper slopes, whereas the torrent frogs increased the use of these areas as the slope angle increased. Probing small areas of the different skin parts with a force transducer revealed that forces declined significantly in wet conditions, with only minor differences between the frog species. The superior abilities of the torrent frogs were thus due to the large contact area they used on steep, overhanging surfaces. SEM images revealed slightly elongated cells in the periphery of the toe pads in the torrent frogs, with straightened channels in between them which could facilitate drainage of excess fluid underneath the pad.

  8. Sticking under wet conditions: the remarkable attachment abilities of the torrent frog, Staurois guttatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Endlein

    Full Text Available Tree frogs climb smooth surfaces utilising capillary forces arising from an air-fluid interface around their toe pads, whereas torrent frogs are able to climb in wet environments near waterfalls where the integrity of the meniscus is at risk. This study compares the adhesive capabilities of a torrent frog to a tree frog, investigating possible adaptations for adhesion under wet conditions. We challenged both frog species to cling to a platform which could be tilted from the horizontal to an upside-down orientation, testing the frogs on different levels of roughness and water flow. On dry, smooth surfaces, both frog species stayed attached to overhanging slopes equally well. In contrast, under both low and high flow rate conditions, the torrent frogs performed significantly better, even adhering under conditions where their toe pads were submerged in water, abolishing the meniscus that underlies capillarity. Using a transparent platform where areas of contact are illuminated, we measured the contact area of frogs during platform rotation under dry conditions. Both frog species not only used the contact area of their pads to adhere, but also large parts of their belly and thigh skin. In the tree frogs, the belly and thighs often detached on steeper slopes, whereas the torrent frogs increased the use of these areas as the slope angle increased. Probing small areas of the different skin parts with a force transducer revealed that forces declined significantly in wet conditions, with only minor differences between the frog species. The superior abilities of the torrent frogs were thus due to the large contact area they used on steep, overhanging surfaces. SEM images revealed slightly elongated cells in the periphery of the toe pads in the torrent frogs, with straightened channels in between them which could facilitate drainage of excess fluid underneath the pad.

  9. Apoptosis-Specific Protein (ASP) Identified in Apoptotic Xenopus Thymus Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Anne; Horton, Trudy; Ritchie, Pamela; Gascoyne, Duncan; Hewson, Tim; Hammond, Ester; Gregory, Christopher; Grand, Roger

    1998-01-01

    A novel apoptosis-specific protein (ASP) has recently been identified in the cytoplasm of apoptotic mammalian cells. This paper investigates whether ASP is found in Xenopus thymus tumor-derived lymphoid cell lines undergoing apoptosis and also in apoptotic, nontransformed splenocytes. Cultured Xenopus tumor lymphoid cells induced to undergo, apoptosis by serum deprivation or treatment with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, displayed altered morphology typical of apoptotic cells, as judged by flow cytometric light-scatter characteristics and by fluorescence microscopy of acridine-orange-stained cells. Flow cytometry of permeabilized cells and fluorescence microscopy of acetone-fixed cytospins revealed that apoptotic Xenopus tumor cells, especially those displaying loss or condensation of DNA, displayed increased expression of epitopes recognized by a rabbit polyclonal antibody against ASP. Flow cytometry confirmed that ASP is also expressed in splenocytes induced to apoptose by culture in ionomycin or following concanavalin A stimulation. No increased expression of ASP was seen when lymphoid tumor cells or splenocytes were induced into necrosis by overdose with the antifungal agent amphotericin B. Western blotting with antibody against ASP identified the emergence of several protein bands in cell lysates from apoptotic, but not necrotic, Xenopus tumor cells. The new and simple methodology for identifying apoptotic cells described here is likely to be of value to those studying immune system development and associated programmed cell death in Xenopus. PMID:9814588

  10. interleukin-11 induces and maintains progenitors of different cell lineages during Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Katou, Yuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Fukazawa, Taro; Kubo, Takeo

    2017-09-08

    Unlike mammals, Xenopus laevis tadpoles possess high ability to regenerate their lost organs. In amphibians, the main source of regenerated tissues is lineage-restricted tissue stem cells, but the mechanisms underlying induction, maintenance and differentiation of these stem/progenitor cells in the regenerating organs are poorly understood. We previously reported that interleukin-11 (il-11) is highly expressed in the proliferating cells of regenerating Xenopus tadpole tails. Here, we show that il-11 knockdown (KD) shortens the regenerated tail length, and the phenotype is rescued by forced-il-11-expression in the KD tadpoles. Moreover, marker genes for undifferentiated notochord, muscle, and sensory neurons are downregulated in the KD tadpoles, and the forced-il-11-expression in intact tadpole tails induces expression of these marker genes. Our findings demonstrate that il-11 is necessary for organ regeneration, and suggest that IL-11 plays a key role in the induction and maintenance of undifferentiated progenitors across cell lineages during Xenopus tail regeneration. Xenopus laevis tadpoles have maintained their ability to regenerate various organs. Here, the authors show that interleukin-11 is necessary for organ regeneration, by inducing and maintaining undifferentiated progenitors across cell lineages during Xenopus tail regeneration.

  11. Xenopus laevis Kif18A is a highly processive kinesin required for meiotic spindle integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M. Möckel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The assembly and functionality of the mitotic spindle depends on the coordinated activities of microtubule-associated motor proteins of the dynein and kinesin superfamily. Our current understanding of the function of motor proteins is significantly shaped by studies using Xenopus laevis egg extract as its open structure allows complex experimental manipulations hardly feasible in other model systems. Yet, the Kinesin-8 orthologue of human Kif18A has not been described in Xenopus laevis so far. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of Xenopus laevis (Xl Kif18A. Xenopus Kif18A is expressed during oocyte maturation and its depletion from meiotic egg extract results in severe spindle defects. These defects can be rescued by wild-type Kif18A, but not Kif18A lacking motor activity or the C-terminus. Single-molecule microscopy assays revealed that Xl_Kif18A possesses high processivity, which depends on an additional C-terminal microtubule-binding site. Human tissue culture cells depleted of endogenous Kif18A display mitotic defects, which can be rescued by wild-type, but not tail-less Xl_Kif18A. Thus, Xl_Kif18A is the functional orthologue of human Kif18A whose activity is essential for the correct function of meiotic spindles in Xenopus oocytes.

  12. Assessment of Protocol Designed to Detect Endocine Disrupting Effects of Flutamide in Xenopus Tropicalis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kenchtges, Paul L; Sprando, Robert L; Bremman, Linda M; Miller, Mark F; Kumsher, David M; Dennis, William E; Brown, Charles C; Clegg, Eric D

    2006-01-01

    .... Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Program. The frogs were exposed to the model anti-androgenic compound flutamine under flow-through conditions for a period of 30 weeks, beginning at 48 hours post-hatch...

  13. Sensory afferent segregation in three-eared frogs resemble the dominance columns observed in three-eyed frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Karen L; Houston, Douglas W; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-02-09

    The formation of proper sensory afferent connections during development is essential for brain function. Activity-based competition is believed to drive ocular dominance columns (ODC) in mammals and in experimentally-generated three-eyed frogs. ODC formation is thus a compromise of activity differences between two eyes and similar molecular cues. To gauge the generality of graphical map formation in the brain, we investigated the inner ear projection, known for its well-defined and early segregation of afferents from vestibular and auditory endorgans. In analogy to three eyed-frogs, we generated three-eared frogs to assess to what extent vestibular afferents from two adjacent ears could segregate. Donor ears were transplanted either in the native orientation or rotated by 90 degrees. These manipulations should result in either similar or different induced activity between both ears, respectively. Three-eared frogs with normal orientation showed normal swimming whereas those with a rotated third ear showed aberrant behaviors. Projection studies revealed that only afferents from the rotated ears segregated from those from the native ear within the vestibular nucleus, resembling the ocular dominance columns formed in three-eyed frogs. Vestibular segregation suggests that mechanisms comparable to those operating in the ODC formation of the visual system may act on vestibular projection refinements.

  14. Frog: The Fast & Realistic OpenGL Event Displayer

    CERN Document Server

    Quertenmont, Loic

    2009-01-01

    FROG [1] is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy experiment. It is suitable for any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light ($<3~\\textrm{MB}$) and fast (browsing time $\\sim20$ events per second for a large High Energy Physics experiment) and can run on various operating systems, as its object-oriented structure (C++) relies on the cross-platform OpenGL[2] and GLUT [3] libraries. Moreover, \\textsc{Frog} does not require installation of third party libraries for the visualisation. This documents describes the features and principles of FROG version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisation, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally, several examples of its current applications are presented for illustration.

  15. Distribution, structure and projections of the frog intracardiac neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batulevicius, Darius; Skripkiene, Gertruda; Batuleviciene, Vaida; Skripka, Valdas; Dabuzinskiene, Anita; Pauza, Dainius H

    2012-05-21

    Histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase was used to determine the distribution of intracardiac neurons in the frog Rana temporaria. Seventy-nine intracardiac neurons from 13 frogs were labelled iontophoretically by the intracellular markers Alexa Fluor 568 and Lucifer Yellow CH to determine their structure and projections. Total neuronal number per frog heart was (Mean ± SE) 1374 ± 56. Largest collections of neurons were found in the interatrial septum (46%), atrioventricular junction (25%) and venal sinus (12%). Among the intracellularly labelled neurons, we found the cells of unipolar (71%), multipolar (20%) and bipolar (9%) types. Multiple processes originated from the neuron soma, hillock and proximal axon. These processes projected onto adjacent neuron somata and cardiac muscle fibers within the interatrial septum. Average total length of the processes from proximal axon was 348 ± 50 μm. Average total length of processes from soma and hillock was less, 118 ± 27 μm and 109 ± 24 μm, respectively. The somata of 59% of neurons had bubble- or flake-shaped extensions. Most neurons from the major nerves in the interatrial septum sent their axons towards the ventricle. In contrast, most neurons from the ventral part of the interatrial septum sent their axons towards the atria. Our findings contradict to a view that the frog intracardiac ganglia contain only non-dendritic neurons of the unipolar type. We conclude that the frog intracardiac neurons are structurally complex and diverse. This diversity may account for the complicated integrative functions of the frog intrinsic cardiac ganglia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lizard and frog prestin: evolutionary insight into functional changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tang

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane of mammalian cochlear outer hair cells contains prestin, a unique motor protein. Prestin is the fifth member of the solute carrier protein 26A family. Orthologs of prestin are also found in the ear of non-mammalian vertebrates such as zebrafish and chicken. However, these orthologs are electrogenic anion exchangers/transporters with no motor function. Amphibian and reptilian lineages represent phylogenic branches in the evolution of tetrapods and subsequent amniotes. Comparison of the peptide sequences and functional properties of these prestin orthologs offer new insights into prestin evolution. With the recent availability of the lizard and frog genome sequences, we examined amino acid sequence and function of lizard and frog prestins to determine how they are functionally and structurally different from prestins of mammals and other non-mammals. Somatic motility, voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (NLC, the two hallmarks of prestin function, and transport capability were measured in transfected human embryonic kidney cells using voltage-clamp and radioisotope techniques. We demonstrated that while the transport capability of lizard and frog prestin was compatible to that of chicken prestin, the NLC of lizard prestin was more robust than that of chicken's and was close to that of platypus. However, unlike platypus prestin which has acquired motor capability, lizard or frog prestin did not demonstrate motor capability. Lizard and frog prestins do not possess the same 11-amino-acid motif that is likely the structural adaptation for motor function in mammals. Thus, lizard and frog prestins appear to be functionally more advanced than that of chicken prestin, although motor capability is not yet acquired.

  17. Relationship between intracellular ice formation in oocytes of the mouse and Xenopus and the physical state of the external medium--a revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Peter; Kleinhans, F W

    2008-02-01

    ) 401-416] on IIF in oocytes of the frog Xenopus. It too examined whether the temperatures of IIF were related to the unfrozen fractions at those temperatures. It also used the Woods et al. ternary phase data to calculate the unfrozen fractions for EG solutions. As reported here, once again the values of these unfrozen fractions are substantially different from those calculated using synthesized phase diagrams. With the latter, the unfrozen fractions at IIF become very similar for EG and glycerol.

  18. Host Defense Peptides from Asian Frogs as Potential Clinical Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeth T.V. Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Host defense peptides (HDPs are currently major focal points of medical research as infectious microbes are gaining resistance to existing drugs. They are effective against multi-drug resistant pathogens due to their unique primary target, biological membranes, and their peculiar mode of action. Even though HDPs from 60 Asian frog species belonging to 15 genera have been characterized, research into these peptides is at a very early stage. The purpose of this review is to showcase the status of peptide research in Asia. Here we provide a summary of HDPs from Asian frogs.

  19. Neutralization of bacterial endotoxins by frog antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadich, Ermin; Mason, Drusilla; Cole, Anthony L

    2013-02-01

    The ability of skin antimicrobial peptides of the southern bell frog, Litoria raniformis, to neutralize in vitro the endotoxin, proinflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS) complex, from two different gram-negative bacterial pathogens, human pathogen Escherichia coli (0111:B4) and frog pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae, was investigated. The LPS neutralization activity of the natural mixture of skin antimicrobial peptides was measured using chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assays. These skin antimicrobial peptides neutralized the LPSs from both pathogens at physiologically relevant concentrations (IC(50)  endotoxin agents. © 2012 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Time Series Analysis of Sound Data on Interactive Calling Behavior of Japanese Tree Frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, Shunsuke; Aihara, Ikkyu; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    We have analyzed time series data of sound on interactive calling behavior of two male Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica Nihon-Ama-Gaeru). First, we have extracted two time series data mainly corresponding to respective frogs from the single time series data of calls of two frogs by the free and cross-platform sound editor Audacity. Then, we have quantitatively analyzed timing and inter-call intervals of respective frogs. Finally, we have characterized nonstationarily temporal change of the interactive calling behavior of two frogs by analysis of the cross recurrence plot. The results have shown that a pair of male frogs called in almost anti-phase synchronization after a short-term period of nearly in-phase synchronization, which implies existence of complex interactive calling behavior of two male frogs.

  1. Behavior of Japanese tree frogs under microgravity on MIR and in parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi-Kurotani, A.; Yamashita, M.; Kawasaki, Y.; Kurotani, T.; Mogami, Y.; Okuno, M.; Oketa, A.; Shiraishi, A.; Ueda, K.; Wassersug, R. J.; Naitoh, T.

    1994-08-01

    Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) were flown to the space station MIR and spent eight days in orbit during December, 1990/1/. Under microgravity, their postures and behaviors were observed and recorded. On the MIR, floating frogs stretched four legs out, bent their bodies backward and expanded their abdomens. Frogs on a surface often bent their neck backward and walked backwards. This behavior was observed on parabolic flights and resembles the retching behavior of sick frogs on land- a possible indicator of motion sickness. Observations on MIR were carried out twice to investigate the frog's adaptation to space. The frequency of failure in landing after a jump decreased in the second observation period. After the frogs returned to earth, readaptation processes were observed. The frogs behaved normally as early as 2.5 hours after landing.

  2. Take time to smell the frogs: vocal sac glands of reed frogs (Anura: Hyperoliidae) contain species-specific chemical cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnberger, Iris; Poth, Dennis; Peram, Pardha Saradhi; Schulz, Stefan; Vences, Miguel; Knudsen, Jette; Barej, Michael F; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Walzl, Manfred; Hödl, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Males of all reed frog species (Anura: Hyperoliidae) have a prominent, often colourful, gular patch on their vocal sac, which is particularly conspicuous once the vocal sac is inflated. Although the presence, shape, and form of the gular patch are well-known diagnostic characters for these frogs, its function remains unknown. By integrating biochemical and histological methods, we found strong evidence that the gular patch is a gland producing volatile compounds, which might be emitted while calling. Volatile compounds were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the gular glands in 11 species of the hyperoliid genera Afrixalus, Heterixalus, Hyperolius, and Phlyctimantis. Comparing the gular gland contents of 17 specimens of four sympatric Hyperolius species yielded a large variety of 65 compounds in species-specific combinations. We suggest that reed frogs might use a complex combination of at least acoustic and chemical signals in species recognition and mate choice.

  3. Global analysis of asymmetric RNA enrichment in oocytes reveals low conservation between closely related Xenopus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claußen, Maike; Lingner, Thomas; Pommerenke, Claudia; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas, Gabriela; Pieler, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    RNAs that localize to the vegetal cortex during Xenopus laevis oogenesis have been reported to function in germ layer patterning, axis determination, and development of the primordial germ cells. Here we report on the genome-wide, comparative analysis of differentially localizing RNAs in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis oocytes, revealing a surprisingly weak degree of conservation in respect to the identity of animally as well as vegetally enriched transcripts in these closely related species. Heterologous RNA injections and protein binding studies indicate that the different RNA localization patterns in these two species are due to gain/loss of cis-acting localization signals rather than to differences in the RNA-localizing machinery. PMID:26337391

  4. Skeletal muscle regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles and zebrafish larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammals are not able to restore lost appendages, while many amphibians are. One important question about epimorphic regeneration is related to the origin of the new tissues and whether they come from mature cells via dedifferentiation and/or from stem cells. Several studies in urodele amphibians (salamanders indicate that, after limb or tail amputation, the multinucleated muscle fibres do dedifferentiate by fragmentation and proliferation, thereby contributing to the regenerate. In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, however, it was shown that muscle fibres do not contribute directly to the tail regenerate. We set out to study whether dedifferentiation was present during muscle regeneration of the tadpole limb and zebrafish larval tail, mainly by cell tracing and histological observations. Results Cell tracing and histological observations indicate that zebrafish tail muscle do not dedifferentiate during regeneration. Technical limitations did not allow us to trace tadpole limb cells, nevertheless we observed no signs of dedifferentiation histologically. However, ultrastructural and gene expression analysis of regenerating muscle in tadpole tail revealed an unexpected dedifferentiation phenotype. Further histological studies showed that dedifferentiating tail fibres did not enter the cell cycle and in vivo cell tracing revealed no evidences of muscle fibre fragmentation. In addition, our results indicate that this incomplete dedifferentiation was initiated by the retraction of muscle fibres. Conclusions Our results show that complete skeletal muscle dedifferentiation is less common than expected in lower vertebrates. In addition, the discovery of incomplete dedifferentiation in muscle fibres of the tadpole tail stresses the importance of coupling histological studies with in vivo cell tracing experiments to better understand the regenerative mechanisms.

  5. Skeletal muscle regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles and zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre Miguel Cavaco; Christen, Bea; Martí, Mercé; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-02-27

    Mammals are not able to restore lost appendages, while many amphibians are. One important question about epimorphic regeneration is related to the origin of the new tissues and whether they come from mature cells via dedifferentiation and/or from stem cells. Several studies in urodele amphibians (salamanders) indicate that, after limb or tail amputation, the multinucleated muscle fibres do dedifferentiate by fragmentation and proliferation, thereby contributing to the regenerate. In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, however, it was shown that muscle fibres do not contribute directly to the tail regenerate. We set out to study whether dedifferentiation was present during muscle regeneration of the tadpole limb and zebrafish larval tail, mainly by cell tracing and histological observations. Cell tracing and histological observations indicate that zebrafish tail muscle do not dedifferentiate during regeneration. Technical limitations did not allow us to trace tadpole limb cells, nevertheless we observed no signs of dedifferentiation histologically. However, ultrastructural and gene expression analysis of regenerating muscle in tadpole tail revealed an unexpected dedifferentiation phenotype. Further histological studies showed that dedifferentiating tail fibres did not enter the cell cycle and in vivo cell tracing revealed no evidences of muscle fibre fragmentation. In addition, our results indicate that this incomplete dedifferentiation was initiated by the retraction of muscle fibres. Our results show that complete skeletal muscle dedifferentiation is less common than expected in lower vertebrates. In addition, the discovery of incomplete dedifferentiation in muscle fibres of the tadpole tail stresses the importance of coupling histological studies with in vivo cell tracing experiments to better understand the regenerative mechanisms.

  6. Skeletal muscle regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles and zebrafish larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammals are not able to restore lost appendages, while many amphibians are. One important question about epimorphic regeneration is related to the origin of the new tissues and whether they come from mature cells via dedifferentiation and/or from stem cells. Several studies in urodele amphibians (salamanders) indicate that, after limb or tail amputation, the multinucleated muscle fibres do dedifferentiate by fragmentation and proliferation, thereby contributing to the regenerate. In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, however, it was shown that muscle fibres do not contribute directly to the tail regenerate. We set out to study whether dedifferentiation was present during muscle regeneration of the tadpole limb and zebrafish larval tail, mainly by cell tracing and histological observations. Results Cell tracing and histological observations indicate that zebrafish tail muscle do not dedifferentiate during regeneration. Technical limitations did not allow us to trace tadpole limb cells, nevertheless we observed no signs of dedifferentiation histologically. However, ultrastructural and gene expression analysis of regenerating muscle in tadpole tail revealed an unexpected dedifferentiation phenotype. Further histological studies showed that dedifferentiating tail fibres did not enter the cell cycle and in vivo cell tracing revealed no evidences of muscle fibre fragmentation. In addition, our results indicate that this incomplete dedifferentiation was initiated by the retraction of muscle fibres. Conclusions Our results show that complete skeletal muscle dedifferentiation is less common than expected in lower vertebrates. In addition, the discovery of incomplete dedifferentiation in muscle fibres of the tadpole tail stresses the importance of coupling histological studies with in vivo cell tracing experiments to better understand the regenerative mechanisms. PMID:22369050

  7. Histochemical identification of sialylated glycans in Xenopus laevis testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Galder; Alonso, Edurne; Ubago, María Martínez; Madrid, Juan Francisco; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Sáez, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate chains of glycoprotein and glycosphingolipids are highly diverse molecules involved in many cell functions, including cell recognition, adhesion and signalling. Sialylated glycans are of special interest because the terminal position of sialic acid (NeuAc) in glycans linked by different ways to subterminal monosaccharides has been shown to be involved in several biological processes, as occurs with gangliosides, which have been reported as being essential in spermatogenesis in mammals. Some glycan-binding proteins, the lectins, which specifically recognize glycan sequences, have been extensively used to characterize tissue and cell carbohydrates by means of cytochemical techniques. The aim of the present work was to determine the presence of NeuAc by means of histochemical techniques in the testis of Xenopus laevis, an animal model widely used in cell and molecular biology research. However, considering that some NeuAc-binding lectins are capable of binding to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), other GlcNAc-binding lectins were also assayed. The results showed that NeuAc is mainly expressed in the interstitium, and only a weak labelling in the male germ cells was observed. Most NeuAc was located in O-linked oligosaccharides, but some masked NeuAc in N-glycans were identified in primary and secondary spermatogonia and spermatocytes. By contrast, GlcNAc was widely expressed in all germ cell types. Deglycosylative pre-treatments suggest that both N- and O-glycans and/or glycolipids could be responsible for this labelling. In addition, GlcNAc in O-linked oligosaccharides has been identified in spermatogonial cells. The acrosome of spermatids was always negative. Variations of glycan expression have been found in different cell types, suggesting that glycosylation is modified during spermatogenetic development. PMID:22881213

  8. Frog skin peptides (tigerinin-1R, magainin-AM1, -AM2, CPF-AM1, and PGla-AM1) stimulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) by GLUTag cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, O O; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2013-02-01

    Skin secretions of several frog species contain host-defense peptides with multiple biological activities including in vitro and in vivo insulin-releasing actions. This study investigates the effects of tigerinin-1R from Hoplobatrachus rugulosus (Dicroglossidae) and magainin-AM1, magainin-AM2, caerulein precursor fragment (CPF-AM1) and peptide glycine leucine amide (PGLa-AM1) from Xenopus amieti (Pipidae) on GLP-1 secretion from GLUTag cells. Tigerinin-1R showed the highest potency producing a significant (Ppeptide and 0.3nM for the reduced form. All peptides from X. amieti significantly (Ppeptide stimulated release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase from GLUTag cells at concentrations up to 3μM indicating that the integrity of the plasma membrane had been preserved. The data indicate that frog skin peptides, by stimulating GLP-1 release as well as direct effects on insulin secretion, show therapeutic potential as agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms underlying the noradrenergic modulation of longitudinal coordination during swimming in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrywest, Simon D; McDearmid, Jonathan R; Kjaerulff, Ole

    2003-01-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) is a potent modulator of locomotion in many vertebrate nervous systems. When Xenopus tadpoles swim, waves of motor neuron activity alternate across the body and propagate along it with a brief rostro-caudal delay (RC-delay) between segments. We have now investigated the mechani......Noradrenaline (NA) is a potent modulator of locomotion in many vertebrate nervous systems. When Xenopus tadpoles swim, waves of motor neuron activity alternate across the body and propagate along it with a brief rostro-caudal delay (RC-delay) between segments. We have now investigated...

  10. Ontogenetic polychromatism in marsupial frogs (Anura: Hylidae Ontogenetic polychromatism in marsupial frogs (Anura: Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duellman William E.

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Color polymorphism is common in many species of marsupial frogs.  Extreme cases of pattern polymorphism are documented in four species. In Amphignathodon guentheri, Castrotheca aureomaculata, G. qriswoldi, and G. helenae juveniles are known to have only one color morph, where as two or more patterns exist in adults. In these species, polymorphism apparently develops ontogenetically. El polimorfismo cromático es común a algunas especies de sapos marsupiales. Casos extremos del modelo de polimorfismo son evidentes en cuatro especies Amphignathodon guentheri, Gastrotheca aureomaculata, G. griswoldi, y G. helenae. En estas especies, se sabe que los juveniles tienen sólo un morfo de color; el polimorfismo, al parecer, se desarrolla ontogenéticamente.

  11. Measurement and Evaluation of Wear Frogs Switches ŽSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urda Ján

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the measurement and evaluation of wear frogs switches ZSR. One of the main problems is the oversize wear. The possibilities analysis of this problem is offered through a set of switches and monitoring of selected parameters. One of these parameters is also monitoring the vertical wear

  12. Taxonomic variation in oviposition by tailed frogs (Aschaphus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy E. Karraker; David S. Pilliod; Michael J. Adams; Evelyn L. Bull; Paul Stephen Corn; Lowell V. Diller; Linda A. Dupuis; Marc P. Hayes; Blake R. Hossack; Garth R. Hodgson; Erin J. Hyde; Kirk Lohman; Bradford R. Norman; Lisa M. Ollivier; Christopher A. Pearl; Charles R. Peterson

    2006-01-01

    Tailed frogs (Ascaphus spp.) oviposit in cryptic locations in streams of the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountains. This aspect of their life history has restricted our understanding of their reproductive ecology. The recent split of A. montanus in the Rocky Mountains from A. truei was based on molecular...

  13. Strategies of water conservation in southern African frogs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    do not normally have a water conservation problem except when the water in or near which they are living dries up. Burrowing frogs (e.g. Bulo, Pyxicephalus, T017Wpterna and Brel/keps) are able to select microhabitats in the soil which reduce evaporative water loss. Burrowing may, in particular cases, be associated with ...

  14. Research on moving object detection based on frog's eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongwei; Li, Dongguang; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of object's information processing mechanism with frog's eyes, this paper discussed a bionic detection technology which suitable for object's information processing based on frog's vision. First, the bionics detection theory by imitating frog vision is established, it is an parallel processing mechanism which including pick-up and pretreatment of object's information, parallel separating of digital image, parallel processing, and information synthesis. The computer vision detection system is described to detect moving objects which has special color, special shape, the experiment indicates that it can scheme out the detecting result in the certain interfered background can be detected. A moving objects detection electro-model by imitating biologic vision based on frog's eyes is established, the video simulative signal is digital firstly in this system, then the digital signal is parallel separated by FPGA. IN the parallel processing, the video information can be caught, processed and displayed in the same time, the information fusion is taken by DSP HPI ports, in order to transmit the data which processed by DSP. This system can watch the bigger visual field and get higher image resolution than ordinary monitor systems. In summary, simulative experiments for edge detection of moving object with canny algorithm based on this system indicate that this system can detect the edge of moving objects in real time, the feasibility of bionic model was fully demonstrated in the engineering system, and it laid a solid foundation for the future study of detection technology by imitating biologic vision.

  15. Colour patterning in the skin of the reed-frog

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1985-12-08

    Dec 8, 1985 ... A collec1ion 01 37 Natal reed·frogs, HyperoJius marmoratus, from a single locality was studied for their dorsal colour pattems. Data were assembled on the spectrophotometry, the structure and distribution of ttie chromato· phores by means of light and electron microscopy, and the features of colour ...

  16. Elastic modulus of tree frog adhesive toe pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, W Jon P; Goodwyn, Pablo J Perez; Nokhbatolfoghahai, Mohsen; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2011-10-01

    Previous work using an atomic force microscope in nanoindenter mode indicated that the outer, 10- to 15-μm thick, keratinised layer of tree frog toe pads has a modulus of elasticity equivalent to silicone rubber (5-15 MPa) (Scholz et al. 2009), but gave no information on the physical properties of deeper structures. In this study, micro-indentation is used to measure the stiffness of whole toe pads of the tree frog, Litoria caerulea. We show here that tree frog toe pads are amongst the softest of biological structures (effective elastic modulus 4-25 kPa), and that they exhibit a gradient of stiffness, being stiffest on the outside. This stiffness gradient results from the presence of a dense network of capillaries lying beneath the pad epidermis, which probably has a shock absorbing function. Additionally, we compare the physical properties (elastic modulus, work of adhesion, pull-off force) of the toe pads of immature and adult frogs.

  17. Foraging behaviour in tadpoles of the bronze frog Rana temporalis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of bronze frog Rana temporalis tadpoles (pure or mixed parental lines) to assess the profitability of food habitats and distribute themselves accordingly was tested experimentally using a rectangular choice tank with a non-continuous input design. Food (boiled spinach) was placed at two opposite ends of the ...

  18. Life Histories of Frogs in the Namib Desert | Channing | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large runoff surfaces collect the low rainfall (25 mm per year) in depressions in which the frogs breed. Phrynomerus is only active at night; males are aggressive towards one another; oviposition takes place in deep pools and development takes at least eight weeks. Bufo is active during the heat of the day; oviposition takes ...

  19. Ranavirus in wild edible frogs Pelophylax kl. esculentus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Kielgast, Jos; Svart, Hans Erik

    2009-01-01

    interviewed by phone and 10 cases were examined on suspicion of diseaseinduced mortality. All samples were negative for Bd. Ranavirus was isolated from 2 samples of recently dead frogs collected during a mass mortality event in an artificial pond near Slagelse, Denmark. The identity of the virus was confirmed...

  20. Genomic Sequencing of Ranaviruses Isolated from Edible Frogs (Pelophylax esculentus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Imnoi, Kamonchai

    2017-01-01

    Ranaviruses were isolated from wild edible frogs (Pelophylax esculentus) during epizootics in Denmark and Italy. Phylogenomic analyses revealed that these isolates are closely related and belong to a clade of ranaviruses that includes the Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV), common midwife toad...

  1. Drying kinetics of pre-osmosed fresh water frog ( Dicroglossus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The drying kinetics of frog (Dicroglossus occipitalis) was conducted using convective oven dryer. The results were fitted into three thin-layer models; Lewis, Henderson and Page models. The constants and coefficients of the various models used were evaluated using non-linear regression methods, and the results show that ...

  2. Role of cutaneous surface fluid in frog osmoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Ramløv, Hans

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated whether evaporative water loss (EWL) in frogs stems from water diffusing through the skin or fluid secreted by mucous glands. Osmolality of cutaneous surface fluid (CSF) of Rana esculenta (Pelophylax kl. esculentus) subjected to isoproterenol or 30 °C–34 °C was 191 ± 9...

  3. One-tone suppression in the frog auditory nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1996-01-01

    frequencies ranged from 700 to 1200 Hz. Spontaneous activities for the fibers showing one-tone suppression ranged from 3 to 75 spikes/s. Spontaneous activities above 40 spikes/s and the phenomenon of one-tone suppression itself has not been reported previously for frogs. The population of fibers showing one...

  4. Phylogenetic relationships of the North American chorus frogs (Pseudacris: Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Emily C; Cannatella, David C

    2004-02-01

    We examined phylogenetic relationships of the North American chorus frogs (Pseudacris: Hylidae) from 38 populations using 2.4 kb of 12S and 16S mtDNA to elucidate species relationships and examine congruence of previous phylogenetic hypotheses. Parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenies are consistent and reveal four strongly supported clades within Pseudacris: (1). A West Coast Clade containing regilla and cadaverina, (2). a Fat Frog Clade including ornata, streckeri, and illinoensis, (3). a Crucifer Clade consisting of crucifer and ocularis, and (4). a Trilling Frog Clade containing all other Pseudacris. Explicit hypothesis testing using parametric bootstrapping indicates that previous phylogenetic hypotheses are rejected by our sequence dataset. Within the Trilling Frog Clade, brimleyi and brachyphona form the sister group to the Nigrita Clade: nigrita, feriarum, triseriata, kalmi, clarkii, and maculata. The Nigrita Clade shows geographic division into three clades: (1). populations of maculata and triseriata west of the Mississippi River and Canadian populations, (2). southeastern US populations of feriarum and nigrita, and (3). northeastern US populations of feriarum, kalmi, and triseriata. We find that subspecific epithets for crucifer (crucifer and bartramiana) and nigrita (nigrita and verrucosa) are uninformative, therefore we discourage recognition of these subspecies. Pseudacris regilla, cadaverina, ocularis, and crucifer are maintained in Pseudacris.

  5. Evidence of auditory insensitivity to vocalization frequencies in two frogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Sandra; Mason, Matthew J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and maintenance of animal communication systems requires the co-evolution of signal and receiver. Frogs and toads rely heavily on acoustic communication for coordinating reproduction and typically have ears tuned to the dominant frequency of their vocalizations, allowing discriminat...

  6. Rhythm generation, coordination, and initiation in the vocal pathways of male African clawed frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavin Barnes, Jessica; Appleby, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) in the brain stem are considered to underlie vocalizations in many vertebrate species, but the detailed mechanisms underlying how motor rhythms are generated, coordinated, and initiated remain unclear. We addressed these issues using isolated brain preparations of Xenopus laevis from which fictive vocalizations can be elicited. Advertisement calls of male X. laevis that consist of fast and slow trills are generated by vocal CPGs contained in the brain stem. Brain stem central vocal pathways consist of a premotor nucleus [dorsal tegmental area of medulla (DTAM)] and a laryngeal motor nucleus [a homologue of nucleus ambiguus (n.IX-X)] with extensive reciprocal connections between the nuclei. In addition, DTAM receives descending inputs from the extended amygdala. We found that unilateral transection of the projections between DTAM and n.IX-X eliminated premotor fictive fast trill patterns but did not affect fictive slow trills, suggesting that the fast and slow trill CPGs are distinct; the slow trill CPG is contained in n.IX-X, and the fast trill CPG spans DTAM and n.IX-X. Midline transections that eliminated the anterior, posterior, or both commissures caused no change in the temporal structure of fictive calls, but bilateral synchrony was lost, indicating that the vocal CPGs are contained in the lateral halves of the brain stem and that the commissures synchronize the two oscillators. Furthermore, the elimination of the inputs from extended amygdala to DTAM, in addition to the anterior commissure, resulted in autonomous initiation of fictive fast but not slow trills by each hemibrain stem, indicating that the extended amygdala provides a bilateral signal to initiate fast trills. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Central pattern generators (CPGs) are considered to underlie vocalizations in many vertebrate species, but the detailed mechanisms underlying their functions remain unclear. We addressed this question using an isolated brain preparation of

  7. Optimization of gene delivery methods in Xenopus laevis kidney (A6) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines for heterologous expression of Xenopus inner ear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Gordillo, Daniel; Trujillo-Provencio, Casilda; Knight, V Bleu; Serrano, Elba E

    2011-10-01

    The Xenopus inner ear provides a useful model for studies of hearing and balance because it shares features with the mammalian inner ear, and because amphibians are capable of regenerating damaged mechanosensory hair cells. The structure and function of many proteins necessary for inner ear function have yet to be elucidated and require methods for analysis. To this end, we seek to characterize Xenopus inner ear genes outside of the animal model through heterologous expression in cell lines. As part of this effort, we aimed to optimize physical (electroporation), chemical (lipid-mediated; Lipofectamine™ 2000, Metafectene® Pro), and biological (viral-mediated; BacMam virus Cellular Lights™ Tubulin-RFP) gene delivery methods in amphibian (Xenopus; A6) cells and mammalian (Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)) cells. We successfully introduced the commercially available pEGFP-N3, pmCherry-N1, pEYFP-Tubulin, and Cellular Lights™ Tubulin-RFP fluorescent constructs to cells and evaluated their transfection or transduction efficiencies using the three gene delivery methods. In addition, we analyzed the transfection efficiency of a novel construct synthesized in our laboratory by cloning the Xenopus inner ear calcium-activated potassium channel β1 subunit, then subcloning the subunit into the pmCherry-N1 vector. Every gene delivery method was significantly more effective in CHO cells. Although results for the A6 cell line were not statistically significant, both cell lines illustrate a trend towards more efficient gene delivery using viral-mediated methods; however the cost of viral transduction is also much higher. Our findings demonstrate the need to improve gene delivery methods for amphibian cells and underscore the necessity for a greater understanding of amphibian cell biology.

  8. Relationship between intracellular ice formation in oocytes of the mouse and Xenopus and the physical state of the external medium—a revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Peter; Kleinhans, F.W.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that intracellular ice formation (IIF) in mouse oocytes suspended in glycerol/PBS solutions or ethylene glycol (EG)/PBS solutions and rapidly cooled to −50°C or below occurs at temperatures where a critical fraction of the external water remains unfrozen (Cryobiology 51, 2005, 29-53; 54, 2007, 223-233). For mouse oocytes in PBS or glycerol/PBS that fraction is 0.06; for oocytes in EG that fraction was calculated to be 0.13, more than double. The fractions unfrozen are computed from ternary phase diagrams. In the previous publication, we used the EG data of Woods et al. (Cryobiology 38,1999, 403-407). Since then, we have determined that ternary phase diagrams for EG/NaCl/water synthesized by summing binary phase data for EG/water NaCl/water gives substantially different curves, which seem more realistic (Cryobiology 54, 2007, 212-222). Unfrozen fractions at the temperatures of IIF computed from these synthesized phase diagrams are about half of those calculated from the Woods et al. data, and are in close agreement with the computations for glycerol; i.e., IIF occurs when about 92-94% of the external water is frozen. A parallel paper was published by Guenther et al. (Cryobiology 52, 2006, 401-416) on IIF in oocytes of the frog Xenopus. It too examined whether the temperatures of IIF were related to the unfrozen fractions at those temperatures. It also used the Woods et al. ternary phase data to calculate the unfrozen fractions for EG solutions. As reported here, once again the values of these unfrozen fractions are substantially different from those calculated using synthesized phase diagrams. With the latter, the unfrozen fractions at IIF become very similar for EG and glycerol. PMID:18045584

  9. Left-right lineage analysis of the embryonic Xenopus heart reveals a novel framework linking congenital cardiac defects and laterality disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsdell, Ann F; Bernanke, Jayne M; Trusk, Thomas C

    2006-04-01

    The significant morbidity and mortality associated with laterality disease almost always are attributed to complex congenital heart defects (CHDs), reflecting the extreme susceptibility of the developing heart to disturbances in the left-right (LR) body plan. To determine how LR positional information becomes ;translated' into anatomical asymmetry, left versus right side cardiomyocyte cell lineages were traced in normal and laterality defective embryos of the frog, Xenopus laevis. In normal embryos, myocytes in some regions of the heart were derived consistently from a unilateral lineage, whereas other regions were derived consistently from both left and right side lineages. However, in heterotaxic embryos experimentally induced by ectopic activation or attenuation of ALK4 signaling, hearts contained variable LR cell composition, not only compared with controls but also compared with hearts from other heterotaxic embryos. In most cases, LR cell lineage defects were associated with abnormal cardiac morphology and were preceded by abnormal Pitx2c expression in the lateral plate mesoderm. In situs inversus embryos there was a mirror image reversal in Pitx2c expression and LR lineage composition. Surprisingly, most of the embryos that failed to develop heterotaxy or situs inversus in response to misregulated ALK4 signaling nevertheless had altered Pitx2c expression, abnormal cardiomyocyte LR lineage composition and abnormal heart structure, demonstrating that cardiac laterality defects can occur even in instances of otherwise normal body situs. These results indicate that: (1) different regions of the heart contain distinct LR myocyte compositions; (2) LR cardiomyocyte lineages and Pitx2c expression are altered in laterality defective embryos; and (3) abnormal LR cardiac lineage composition frequently is associated with cardiac malformations. We propose that proper LR cell composition is necessary for normal morphogenesis, and that misallocated LR cell lineages may be

  10. Body wiping behaviors associated with cutaneous lipids in hylid tree frogs of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Tamatha R; Lillywhite, Harvey B

    2005-06-01

    Body wiping behavior, integumentary secretions and rates of evaporative water loss (EWL) were examined in six species of Florida tree frogs (Anura: Hylidae). Additionally, morphology of the integument and dermal glands were compared among these and one other Florida tree frog (Hyla andersonii), an arid-adapted tree frog (Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis), and a highly aquatic frog (Rana utricularia). An extra-epidermal layer of lipid and mucus, presumably secreted from dermal granular glands, was detected on the skin of all Florida hylid frogs examined. Distinct body wiping behaviors were observed in the hylid frogs, but these were less complex than those described previously in phyllomedusine frogs, which occupy arid habitats, secrete lipids onto their skin, and are regarded as relatively 'waterproof'. Florida hylids occupy seasonally arid habitats and appear to have reduced rates of EWL. The suite of traits we observed in these frogs have been previously documented in a rhacophorid tree frog from seasonally arid regions of India and likely represent an evolutionary convergent response to periodic dehydration stress. The presence of lipids that are spread by simple wiping behaviors to form an extra-epidermal water barrier may represent an early stage of the more advanced adaptations described in more waterproof arboreal frogs.

  11. Cryoprotectant Production in Freeze-Tolerant Wood Frogs Is Augmented by Multiple Freeze-Thaw Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Don J; Barnes, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation across the skin of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) rapidly induces endogenous production of glucose, a cryoprotectant necessary for freeze tolerance. In laboratory studies of freeze tolerance, wood frogs are cooled slowly, often at -0.05°C h(-1), to facilitate high cryoprotectant production and survival. Under natural conditions in Alaska, however, wood frogs accumulate maximal tissue glucose concentrations while cooling at much faster rates, -0.35° to -1.6°C h(-1), and in addition undergo multiple successive freeze-thaw cycles before remaining frozen for the winter. We examined whether simulating these ecologically relevant cooling rates and repeated freeze-thaw events in captive wood frogs results in the high glucose concentrations found in naturally frozen wood frogs. We found that over successive freezing and thawing events, glucose concentrations increased stepwise in all measured tissues. Short thawing periods did not result in a statistically significant decline of glucose concentrations. Wood frogs that experienced three freeze-thaw events had fresh weight glucose concentrations that approached values found in tissues of wood frogs frozen in natural conditions. Laboratory wood frogs survive frozen for 2 mo, while wood frogs frozen under natural conditions survive frozen for up to 7 mo at temperatures below -18°C. We hypothesize that repeated freeze-thaw cycles with rapid cooling and warming rates allow for greater survival in Alaskan wood frogs through enhanced cryoprotectant production.

  12. The population decline and extinction of Darwin's frogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Soto-Azat

    Full Text Available Darwin's frogs (Rhinoderma darwinii and R. rufum are two species of mouth-brooding frogs from Chile and Argentina. Here, we present evidence on the extent of declines, current distribution and conservation status of Rhinoderma spp.; including information on abundance, habitat and threats to extant Darwin's frog populations. All known archived Rhinoderma specimens were examined in museums in North America, Europe and South America. Extensive surveys were carried out throughout the historical ranges of R. rufum and R. darwinii from 2008 to 2012. Literature review and location data of 2,244 archived specimens were used to develop historical distribution maps for Rhinoderma spp. Based on records of sightings, optimal linear estimation was used to estimate whether R. rufum can be considered extinct. No extant R. rufum was found and our modelling inferred that this species became extinct in 1982 (95% CI, 1980-2000. Rhinoderma darwinii was found in 36 sites. All populations were within native forest and abundance was highest in Chiloé Island, when compared with Coast, Andes and South populations. Estimated population size and density (five populations averaged 33.2 frogs/population (range, 10.2-56.3 and 14.9 frogs/100 m(2 (range, 5.3-74.1, respectively. Our results provide further evidence that R. rufum is extinct and indicate that R. darwinii has declined to a much greater degree than previously recognised. Although this species can still be found across a large part of its historical range, remaining populations are small and severely fragmented. Conservation efforts for R. darwinii should be stepped up and the species re-classified as Endangered.

  13. The establishment of polarized membrane traffic in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S J; Leaf, D S; Moore, H P; Gerhart, J C

    1992-09-01

    Delineation of apical and basolateral membrane domains is a critical step in the epithelialization of the outer layer of cells in the embryo. We have examined the initiation of polarized membrane traffic in Xenopus and show that membrane traffic is not polarized in oocytes but polarized membrane domains appear at first cleavage. The following proteins encoded by injected RNA transcripts were used as markers to monitor membrane traffic: (a) VSV G, a transmembrane glycoprotein preferentially inserted into the basolateral surface of polarized epithelial cells; (b) GThy-1, a fusion protein of VSV G and Thy-1 that is localized to the apical domains of polarized epithelial cells; and (c) prolactin, a peptide hormone that is not polarly secreted. In immature oocytes, there is no polarity in the expression of VSV G or GThy-1, as shown by the constitutive expression of both proteins at the surface in the animal and vegetal hemispheres. At meiotic maturation, membrane traffic to the surface is blocked; the plasma membrane no longer accepts the vesicles synthesized by the oocyte (Leaf, D. L., S. J. Roberts, J. C. Gerhart, and H.-P. Moore. 1990. Dev. Biol. 141:1-12). When RNA transcripts are injected after fertilization, VSV G is expressed only in the internal cleavage membranes (basolateral orientation) and is excluded from the outer surface (apical orientation, original oocyte membrane). In contrast, GThy-1 and prolactin, when expressed in embryos, are inserted or released at both the outer membrane derived from the oocyte and the inner cleavage membranes. Furthermore, not all of the cleavage membrane comes from an embryonic pool of vesicles--some of the cleavage membrane comes from vesicles synthesized during oogenesis. Using prolactin as a marker, we found that a subset of vesicles synthesized during oogenesis was only released after fertilization. However, while embryonic prolactin was secreted from both apical and basolateral surfaces, the secretion of oogenic prolactin

  14. Comparative effects of DDT, allethrin, dieldrin and aldrin-transdiol on sense organs of Xenopus laevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, L.M.A.; Bercken, J. van den; Versluijs-Helder, M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of DDT, allethrin, dieldrin and aldrin-transdiol were studied in two different sense organs of Xenopus laevis; the lateral-line organ and the cutaneous touch receptors. DDT and allethrin produced pronounced repetitive firing in both preparations. Dieldrin and aldrin-transdiol, on the

  15. The organization of the histone genes in the genome of Xenopus laevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, W.; de Laaf, L.; Zaal, R.; Moorman, A.; Destrée, O.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied the organization of the histone genes in the DNA from several individuals of Xenopus laevis. For that purpose, Southern blots of genomic DNA, that was digested with several restriction enzymes, were hybridized with radioactively labeled DNA fragments from clone X1-hi-1 (14),

  16. Twitch and Tetanic Tension during Culture of Mature Xenopus laevis Single Muscle Fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, R.T.; Feenstra, Hiske; Lee-de Groot, M.B.E.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; van der Laarse, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanisms of muscle adaptation requires independent control of the regulating factors. The aim of the present study was to develop a serum-free medium to culture mature single muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis. As an example, we used the culture system to study adaptation of

  17. Expression and physiological regulation of BDNF receptors in the neuroendocrine melanotrope cell of Xenopus laevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kidane, A.H.; Dooren, S.H. van; Roubos, E.W.; Jenks, B.G.

    2007-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and alpha-melanophore-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) are co-sequestered in secretory granules in melanotrope cells of the pituitary pars intermedia of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. alpha-MSH is responsible for pigment dispersion in dermal melanophores during

  18. Boundaries and functional domains in the animal/vegetal axis of Xenopus gastrula mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, G; Ezal, C; Smith, W C

    2001-08-15

    Patterning of the Xenopus gastrula marginal zone in the axis running equatorially from the Spemann organizer-the so--called "dorsal/ventral axis"--has been extensively studied. It is now evident that patterning in the animal/vegetal axis also needs to be taken into consideration. We have shown that an animal/vegetal pattern is apparent in the marginal zone by midgastrulation in the polarized expression domains of Xenopus brachyury (Xbra) and Xenopus nodal-related factor 2 (Xnr2). In this report, we have followed cells expressing Xbra in the presumptive trunk and tail at the gastrula stage, and find that they fate to presumptive somite, but not to ventrolateral mesoderm of the tailbud embryo. From this, we speculate that the boundary between the Xbra- and Xnr2-expressing cells at gastrula corresponds to a future tissue boundary. In further experiments, we show that the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation is polarized along the animal/vegetal axis, with the Xnr2-expressing cells in the vegetal marginal zone having no detectable activated MAPK. We show that inhibition of MAPK activation in Xenopus animal caps results in the conversion of Xnr2 from a dorsal mesoderm inducer to a ventral mesoderm inducer, supporting a role for Xnr2 in induction of ventral mesoderm. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. The use of Xenopus oocytes and embryos as a route towards cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    when this is done, substantial changes in gene expression take place in the complete absence of DNA replication. Such changes were first observed by 2D protein analysis when nuclei from amphibian or mammalian species were transplanted to Xenopus oocytes (De Robertis and Gurdon. 1977). More recently, this type of ...

  20. Absence of somatic histone H1 in oocytes and preblastula embryos of Xenopus laevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hock, R.; Moorman, A.; Fischer, D.; Scheer, U.

    1993-01-01

    Available data on the occurrence and expression of somatic histone H1 during oogenesis and early embryogenesis of Xenopus laevis are contradictory. In particular the reported presence of a large storage pool of histone H1A in oocytes is difficult to reconcile with the high transcriptional activity

  1. The accumulation of the maternal pool of histone H1A during oogenesis in Xenopus laevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, W. M.; Moorman, A. F.; Destrée, O. H.

    1983-01-01

    The accumulation of the maternal pool of histone H1A in Xenopus laevis oocytes was measured by the use of a semi-quantitative immunoradiographic method. This method implies the size-fractionation of total basic protein extracts from oocytes on a polyacrylamide gel, blotting of the proteins to

  2. Cloning of noggin gene from hydra and analysis of its functional conservation using Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramore, Kalpana; Ito, Yuzuro; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    Hydra, a member of phylum Cnidaria that arose early in evolution, is endowed with a defined axis, organized nervous system, and active behavior. It is a powerful model system for the elucidation of evolution of developmental mechanisms in animals. Here, we describe the identification and cloning of noggin-like gene from hydra. Noggin is a secreted protein involved at multiple stages of vertebrate embryonic development including neural induction and is known to exert its effects by inhibiting the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-signaling pathway. Sequence analysis revealed that hydra Noggin shows considerable similarity with its orthologs at the amino acid level. When microinjected in the early Xenopus embryos, hydra noggin mRNA induced a secondary axis in 100% of the injected embryos, demonstrating functional conservation of hydra noggin in vertebrates. This was further confirmed by the partial rescue of Xenopus embryos by hydra noggin mRNA from UV-induced ventralization. By using animal cap assay in Xenopus embryos, we demonstrate that these effects of hydra noggin in Xenopus embryos are because of inhibition of BMP signaling by Noggin. Our data indicate that BMP/Noggin antagonism predates the bilaterian divergence and is conserved during the evolution.

  3. Programming Pluripotent Precursor Cells Derived from Xenopus Embryos to Generate Specific Tissues and Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Borchers

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Xenopus embryos provide a rich source of pluripotent cells that can be differentiated into functional organs. Since the molecular principles of vertebrate organogenesis appear to be conserved between Xenopus and mammals, this system can provide useful guidelines for the directional manipulation of human embryonic stem cells. Pluripotent Xenopus cells can be easily isolated from the animal pole of blastula stage Xenopus embryos. These so called “animal cap” cells represent prospective ectodermal cells, but give rise to endodermal, mesodermal and neuro-ectodermal derivatives if treated with the appropriate factors. These factors include evolutionary conserved modulators of the key developmental signal transduction pathways that can be supplied either by mRNA microinjection or direct application of recombinant proteins. This relatively simple system has added to our understanding of pancreas, liver, kidney, eye and heart development. In particular, recent studies have used animal cap cells to generate ectopic eyes and hearts, setting the stage for future work aimed at programming pluripotent cells for regenerative medicine.

  4. Insight from Frogs: Sonic Hedgehog Gene Expression and a Re-evaluation of the Vertebrate Odontogenic Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Theresa M; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2016-08-01

    While the identification of conserved processes across multiple taxa leads to an understanding of fundamental developmental mechanisms, the ways in which different animals fail to conform to common developmental processes can elucidate how evolution modifies development to result in the vast array of morphologies seen today-the developmental mechanisms that lead to anatomical variation. Odontogenesis-how teeth are initiated and formed-is well suited to the examination of both developmental conservation and phenotypic diversity. We suggest here that the study of early tooth development, the period of odontogenic band development, reveals departures from conserved mechanisms that question the role of players in the developmental process. In the earliest stages of odontogenesis, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene expression is interpreted as critical evidence of tooth initiation prior to any histological indication. However, a detailed examination of studies of tooth development across a wide range of taxa reveals that several vertebrate species fail to conform to the expectations of the Shh Consensus Model, calling for a reconsideration of the assumed causality of epithelial Shh in tooth initiation. We present new Shh gene expression data for an amphibian, the frog Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. In these animals, craniofacial and odontogenic developmental processes are more disjunct, and thereby provide a natural test of the hypothesis that Shh is immediately required for subsequent tooth development. Our results suggest that Shh expression may actually be related to the formation of the mouth rather than a required precursor to subsequent tooth formation. Anat Rec, 299:1099-1109, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of the relict frog Leiopelma archeyi: insights into the root of the frog Tree of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisarri, Iker; San Mauro, Diego; Green, David M; Zardoya, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Determining the root of the anuran Tree of Life is still a contentious and open question in frog systematics. Two genera with disjunct distributions have been traditionally considered the most basal among extant frogs: Leiopelma, which is endemic to New Zealand, and Ascaphus, which lives in North America. However, their specific phylogenetic position is rather elusive because each genus shows many autapomorphies, and together they retain many symplesiomorphic characters. Therefore, several alternative hypotheses have been proposed regarding the relative phylogenetic position of both Leiopelma and Ascaphus. In order to distinguish among these competing phylogenetic hypotheses, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of Leiopelma archeyi and used it along with previously reported frog mt genomes (including that of Ascaphus truei) to infer a robust phylogeny of major anuran lineages. The reconstructed maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenies recovered identical topology, which supports the sister group relationship of Ascaphus and Leiopelma, and the placement of this clade at the base of the anuran tree. Interestingly, the mt genome of L. archeyi displays a novel gene arrangement in frog mt genomes affecting the relative position of cytochrome b, trnT, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6, trnE, and trnP genes. The tandem duplication-random loss model of gene order change explains the origin of this novel frog mt genome arrangement, which is convergent with others reported in some fishes and salamanders. These results, together with comparative data for other available vertebrate mt genomes, provide evidence that the 5' end of the control region is a hot spot for gene order rearrangement.

  6. Pathogenicity of Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis to brown tree frogs (Litoria ewingii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadich, Ermin; Cole, Anthony L J

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial dermatosepticemia, a systemic infectious bacterial disease of frogs, can be caused by several opportunistic gram-negative bacterial species including Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium indologenes, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia liquifaciens. Here we determined the pathogenicity of 3 bacterial species (Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis) associated with an outbreak of fatal dermatosepticemia in New Zealand Litoria ewingii frogs. A bath challenge method was used to expose test frogs to individual bacterial species (2 x 10(7) cfu/mL in pond water); control frogs were exposed to uninfected pond water. None of the control frogs or those exposed to A. hydrophila or P. mirabilis showed any morbidity or mortality. Morbidity and mortality was 40% among frogs exposed to K. pneumonia, and the organism was reisolated from the hearts, spleens, and livers of affected animals.

  7. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  8. Glycation of wood frog (Rana sylvatica) hemoglobin and blood proteins: in vivo and in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Justin A.; Degenhardt, Thorsten; Baynes, John W.; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of in vivo freezing and glucose cryoprotectant on protein glycation were investigated in the wood frog, Rana sylvatica. Our studies revealed no difference in the fructoselysine content of blood plasma sampled from control, 27 h frozen and 18 h thawed wood frogs. Glycated hemoglobin (GHb) decreased slightly with 48 h freezing exposure and was below control levels after 7 d recovery, while glycated serum albumin was unchanged by 48 h freezing but did increase after 7 d of recovery. In vitro exposure of blood lysates to glucose revealed that the GHb production in wood frogs was similar to that of the rat but was lower than in leopard frogs. We conclude that wood frog hemoglobin was glycated in vitro; however, GHb production was not apparent during freezing and recovery when in vivo glucose is highly elevated. It is possible that wood frog blood proteins have different in vivo susceptibilities to glycation. PMID:19540217

  9. L-cysteine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, and glutathione protect xenopus laevis embryos against acrylamide-induced malformations and mortality in the frog embryo teratogenesis assay (FETAX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary acrylamide is largely derived from heat-induced reactions between the amino group of the free amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose during heat processing (baking, frying) of plant-derived foods such as potato fries and cereals. After consumption, acrylamide is a...

  10. High-density sex-specific linkage maps of a European tree frog (Hyla arborea) identify the sex chromosome without information on offspring sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelsford, A; Dufresnes, C; Perrin, N

    2016-02-01

    Identifying homology between sex chromosomes of different species is essential to understanding the evolution of sex determination. Here, we show that the identity of a homomorphic sex chromosome pair can be established using a linkage map, without information on offspring sex. By comparing sex-specific maps of the European tree frog Hyla arborea, we find that the sex chromosome (linkage group 1) shows a threefold difference in marker number between the male and female maps. In contrast, the number of markers on each autosome is similar between the two maps. We also find strongly conserved synteny between H. arborea and Xenopus tropicalis across 200 million years of evolution, suggesting that the rate of chromosomal rearrangement in anurans is low. Finally, we show that recombination in males is greatly reduced at the centers of large chromosomes, consistent with previous cytogenetic findings. Our research shows the importance of high-density linkage maps for studies of recombination, chromosomal rearrangement and the genetic architecture of ecologically or economically important traits.

  11. Genetic diversity of MHC class I loci in six non-model frogs is shaped by positive selection and gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, K M; Richmond, J Q; Savage, A E; Lips, K R; Zamudio, K R

    2012-09-01

    Comparative studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes across vertebrate species can reveal the evolutionary processes that shape the structure and function of immune regulatory proteins. In this study, we characterized MHC class I sequences from six frog species representing three anuran families (Hylidae, Centrolenidae and Ranidae). Using cDNA from our focal species, we amplified a total of 79 unique sequences spanning exons 2-4 that encode the extracellular domains of the functional alpha chain protein. We compared intra- and interspecific nucleotide and amino-acid divergence, tested for recombination, and identified codon sites under selection by estimating the rate of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions with multiple codon-based maximum likelihood methods. We determined that positive (diversifying) selection was acting on specific amino-acid sites located within the domains that bind pathogen-derived peptides. We also found significant signals of recombination across the physical distance of the genes. Finally, we determined that all the six species expressed two or three putative classical class I loci, in contrast to the single locus condition of Xenopus laevis. Our results suggest that MHC evolution in anurans is a dynamic process and that variation in numbers of loci and genetic diversity can exist among taxa. Thus, the accumulation of genetic data for more species will be useful in further characterizing the relative importance of processes such as selection, recombination and gene duplication in shaping MHC loci among amphibian lineages.

  12. Frog: Asynchronous Graph Processing on GPU with Hybrid Coloring Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xuanhua; Luo, Xuan; Liang, Junling; Zhao, Peng; Di, Sheng; He, Bingsheng; Jin, Hai

    2018-01-01

    GPUs have been increasingly used to accelerate graph processing for complicated computational problems regarding graph theory. Many parallel graph algorithms adopt the asynchronous computing model to accelerate the iterative convergence. Unfortunately, the consistent asynchronous computing requires locking or atomic operations, leading to significant penalties/overheads when implemented on GPUs. As such, coloring algorithm is adopted to separate the vertices with potential updating conflicts, guaranteeing the consistency/correctness of the parallel processing. Common coloring algorithms, however, may suffer from low parallelism because of a large number of colors generally required for processing a large-scale graph with billions of vertices. We propose a light-weight asynchronous processing framework called Frog with a preprocessing/hybrid coloring model. The fundamental idea is based on Pareto principle (or 80-20 rule) about coloring algorithms as we observed through masses of realworld graph coloring cases. We find that a majority of vertices (about 80%) are colored with only a few colors, such that they can be read and updated in a very high degree of parallelism without violating the sequential consistency. Accordingly, our solution separates the processing of the vertices based on the distribution of colors. In this work, we mainly answer three questions: (1) how to partition the vertices in a sparse graph with maximized parallelism, (2) how to process large-scale graphs that cannot fit into GPU memory, and (3) how to reduce the overhead of data transfers on PCIe while processing each partition. We conduct experiments on real-world data (Amazon, DBLP, YouTube, RoadNet-CA, WikiTalk and Twitter) to evaluate our approach and make comparisons with well-known non-preprocessed (such as Totem, Medusa, MapGraph and Gunrock) and preprocessed (Cusha) approaches, by testing four classical algorithms (BFS, PageRank, SSSP and CC). On all the tested applications and

  13. Surveys for presence of Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa): background information and field methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Clayton, David; Turner, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    The Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) is the most aquatic of the native frogs in the Pacific Northwest. The common name derives from the pattern of black, ragged-edged spots set against a brown or red ground color on the dorsum of adult frogs. Oregon spotted frogs are generally associated with wetland complexes that have several aquatic habitat types and sizeable coverage of emergent vegetation. Like other ranid frogs native to the Northwest, Oregon spotted frogs breed in spring, larvae transform in summer of their breeding year, and adults tend to be relatively short lived (3-5 yrs). Each life stage (egg, tadpole, juvenile and adult) has characteristics that present challenges for detection. Breeding can be explosive and completed within 1-2 weeks. Egg masses are laid in aggregations, often in a few locations in large areas of potential habitat. Egg masses can develop, hatch, and disintegrate in difficult to identify, have low survival, and spend most of their 3-4 months hidden in vegetation or flocculant substrates. Juveniles and adults are often difficult to capture and can spend summers away from breeding areas. Moreover, a substantial portion of extant populations are of limited size (Management (BLM) personnel tasked with surveying for the presence of Oregon spotted frogs. Our objective was to summarize information to improve the efficiency of field surveys and increase chances of detection if frogs are present. We include overviews of historical and extant ranges of Oregon spotted frog. We briefly summarize what is known of Oregon spotted frog habitat associations and review aspects of behavior and ecology that are likely to affect detectability in the field. We summarize characteristics that can help differentiate Oregon spotted frog life stages from other northwestern ranid frogs encountered during surveys. Appendices include examples of data collection formats and a protocol for disinfecting field gear.

  14. Frankixalus, a New Rhacophorid Genus of Tree Hole Breeding Frogs with Oophagous Tadpoles

    OpenAIRE

    Biju, S. D.; Gayani Senevirathne; Sonali Garg; Stephen Mahony; Kamei, Rachunliu G.; Ashish Thomas; Yogesh Shouche; Christopher J Raxworthy; Madhava Meegaskumbura; Ines Van Bocxlaer

    2016-01-01

    Despite renewed interest in the biogeography and evolutionary history of Old World tree frogs (Rhacophoridae), this family still includes enigmatic frogs with ambiguous phylogenetic placement. During fieldwork in four northeastern states of India, we discovered several populations of tree hole breeding frogs with oophagous tadpoles. We used molecular data, consisting of two nuclear and three mitochondrial gene fragments for all known rhacophorid genera, to investigate the phylogenetic positio...

  15. Complex and Transitive Synchronization in a Frustrated System of Calling Frogs

    OpenAIRE

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Takeda, Ryu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Takahashi, Toru; Hiroshi G. Okuno; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    This letter reports synchronization phenomena and mathematical modeling on a frustrated system of living beings, or Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica). While an isolated male Japanese tree frog calls nearly periodically, he can hear sounds including calls of other males. Therefore, the spontaneous calling behavior of interacting males can be understood as a system of coupled oscillators. We construct a simple but biologically reasonable model based on the experimental results of two frogs, e...

  16. The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis disturbs the frog skin microbiome during a natural epidemic and experimental infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrea J. Jani; Cheryl J. Briggs

    2014-01-01

    ... [the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd)] on the skin-associated bacterial microbiome of the endangered frog, Rana sierrae, using a combination of population surveys and laboratory experiments...

  17. Abundance of Green Tree Frogs and Insects in Artificial Canopy Gaps in a Bottomland Hardwood Forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.; Kilgo, John, C.

    2005-04-01

    ABSTRACT - We found more green tree frogs ( Hyla cinerea) n canopv gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopv gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat Flies were the most commonlv collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.

  18. Effect of cattle exclosures on Columbia Spotted Frog abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Pearl, Christopher; Chambert, Thierry; Mccreary, Brome; Galvan, Stephanie; Rowe, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Livestock grazing is an important land use in the western USA and can have positive or negative effects on amphibians. Columbia Spotted Frog (Rana luteiventris) often use ponds that provide water for cattle. We conducted a long-term manipulative study on US Forest Service land in northeastern Oregon to determine the effects of full and partial exclosures that limited cattle access to ponds used by frogs. We found weak evidence of a short-term increase in abundance that did not differ between full and partial exclosures and that diminished with continuing exclusion of cattle. The benefit of exclosures was small relative to the overall decline in breeding numbers that we documented. This suggests that some protection can provide a short-term boost to populations.

  19. Nanoscale friction and adhesion of tree frog toe pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappl, Michael; Kaveh, Farzaneh; Barnes, W Jon P

    2016-05-11

    Tree frogs have become an object of interest in biomimetics due to their ability to cling to wet and slippery surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adhesion and friction behavior of toe pads of White's tree frog (Litoria caerulea) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in an aqueous medium. Facilitating special types of AFM probes with radii of ∼400 nm and ∼13 μm, we were able to sense the frictional response without damaging the delicate nanopillar structures of the epithelial cells. While we observed no significant adhesion between both types of probes and toe pads in wet conditions, frictional forces under such conditions were very pronounced and friction coefficients amounted between 0.3 and 1.1 for the sliding friction between probes and the epithelial cell surfaces.

  20. Corneal curvatures and refractions of central American frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, H C; Howland, M; Giunta, A; Cronin, T W

    1997-01-01

    We employed neutralizing infrared videophotorefraction and photokeratometry to examine the manifest refractions and corneal curvatures of 21 species of anurans (frogs and toads) in five families (Dendrobatidae, Bufonidae, Centrolenidae, Leptodactylidae, and Hylidae) resident in Central America. We found that all of the anurans exhibited hyperopic refractions in air, but that the observed hyperopia was not totally explained by the small eye artefact (Glickstein & Millodot, 1970). An allometric comparison of the corneal radii of these small anurans with those of a large number of other vertebrates, inferred from ocular axial lengths, showed that their corneal radii increased significantly more rapidly with increasing body size than that of other vertebrates generally (allometric slope constants: anurans: 0.270 +/- 0.032; other vertebrates: 0.151 +/- 0.004). Among the anurans examined, nocturnal Hylids had significantly larger eyes than diurnal Dendrobatid frogs and Bufonid toads.

  1. Screening for plant transporter function by expressing a normalized Arabidopsis full-length cDNA library in Xenopus oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halkier Barbara A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a functional genomics approach based on expression cloning in Xenopus oocytes to identify plant transporter function. We utilized the full-length cDNA databases to generate a normalized library consisting of 239 full-length Arabidopsis thaliana transporter cDNAs. The genes were arranged into a 96-well format and optimized for expression in Xenopus oocytes by cloning each coding sequence into a Xenopus expression vector. Results Injection of 96 in vitro transcribed cRNAs from the library in pools of columns and rows into oocytes and subsequent screening for glucose uptake activity identified three glucose transporters. One of these, AtSTP13, had not previously been experimentally characterized. Conclusion Expression of the library in Xenopus oocytes, combined with uptake assays, has great potential in assignment of plant transporter function and for identifying membrane transporters for the many plant metabolites where a transporter has not yet been identified.

  2. Xp38gamma/SAPK3 promotes meiotic G(2)/M transition in Xenopus oocytes and activates Cdc25C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perdiguero, Eusebio; Pillaire, Marie-Jeanne; Bodart, Jean-Francois

    2003-01-01

    /SAPK3 is the major p38 activated by MKK6 in the oocytes. We have cloned Xenopus p38gamma (Xp38gamma) and show that co-expression of active MKK6 with Xp38gamma induces oocyte maturation in the absence of progesterone. The maturation induced by Xp38gamma requires neither protein synthesis nor activation...... for the meiotic G(2)/M progression of Xenopus oocytes....

  3. Develop Inventory Protocols for frogs within the Region 1 Great Northern and Great Basin LCC, Protocol Development & Remote Audial Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Many refuges lack basic information on distribution of frogs, but conducting inventory surveys for frogs can be problematic. Different species breed at different...

  4. Electrophysiological evidence for an ATP-gated ion channel in the principal cells of the frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Robert

    2000-01-01

    P2X receptor, Na+ absorption, Short circuit current, Cell potential, Microelectrodes, Frog skin, Cytosolic Ca2+......P2X receptor, Na+ absorption, Short circuit current, Cell potential, Microelectrodes, Frog skin, Cytosolic Ca2+...

  5. Correlation between chloride flux via the mitochondria-rich cells and transepithelial water movement in isolated frog skin (Rana esculenta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone; chloride transport; electroosmosis; Frog skin; Intercalated cells; Local osmosis; Mitochondria-rich cells.......Antidiuretic hormone; chloride transport; electroosmosis; Frog skin; Intercalated cells; Local osmosis; Mitochondria-rich cells....

  6. Internal pigment cells respond to external UV radiation in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Nilsson Sköld, Helen; de Oliveira, Classius

    2016-05-01

    Fish and amphibians have pigment cells that generate colorful skins important for signaling, camouflage, thermoregulation and protection against ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, many animals also have pigment cells inside their bodies, on their internal organs and membranes. In contrast to external pigmentation, internal pigmentation is remarkably little studied and its function is not well known. Here, we tested genotoxic effects of UVR and its effects on internal pigmentation in a neotropical frog, Physalaemus nattereri We found increases in body darkness and internal melanin pigmentation in testes and heart surfaces and in the mesenterium and lumbar region after just a few hours of UVR exposure. The melanin dispersion in melanomacrophages in the liver and melanocytes in testes increased after UV exposure. In addition, the amount of melanin inside melanomacrophages cells also increased. Although mast cells were quickly activated by UVR, only longer UVR exposure resulted in genotoxic effects inside frogs, by increasing the frequency of micronuclei in red blood cells. This is the first study to describe systemic responses of external UVR on internal melanin pigmentation, melanomacrophages and melanocytes in frogs and thus provides a functional explanation to the presence of internal pigmentation. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Nitric oxide modulates the frog heart ventricle morphodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acierno, Raffaele; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Guerrieri, Antonio; Mannarino, Cinzia; Amelio, Daniela; Tota, Bruno

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate in the avascular heart of the frog Rana esculenta the influence of nitric oxide (NO) on ventricular systolic and diastolic functions by using a novel image analysis technique. The external volume variations of the whole ventricle were monitored during the heart cycle by video acquisition(visible light) and analysed by an appropriately developed software with a specific formula for irregular convex solids. The system, which measures the rate of volume changes and the ejection fraction, directly determined the volumetric behaviour of the working frog heart after stimulation or inhibition of NOS-NOcGMP pathway. End-diastolic volume (EDVext), end-systolic volume (ESVext), contraction and relaxation velocities (dV/dtsys and dV/dtdia, respectively), stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (EF), were measured before and after perfusion with NOS substrate (L-arginine), NO donor (SIN-1), cGMP analogue (8-Br-cGMP),NOS inhibitors (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, L-NMMA; L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-ornithine, L-NIO; 7-Nitroindazole,7-NI) and guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ). The results showed that NO reduces ventricular systolicfunction improving diastolic filling, while NOS inhibition increases contractility impairing ventricular filling capacity. The presence of activated eNOS (p-eNOS) was morphologically documented, further supporting that the mechanical activity of the ventricular pump in frog is influenced by a tonic release of NOS-generated NO.

  8. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahnke, Amy E; Grue, Christian E; Hayes, Marc P; Troiano, Alexandra T

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  9. Frog meat microbiota (Lithobates catesbeianus used in infant food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Rodrigues

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Captive breeding of bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus is of great economic potential, mainly for its thighs and leather. The nutritional quality of frog meat includes properly balanced amino acids with a protein profile of high biological value, low fat and low cholesterol, and high digestibility due to its short chain molecule structure. It is recommended by doctors and nutritionists, especially for protein restricted children or malnourished children. Aiming to aggregate value to the segment and offer a product with nutritional properties that meet the need of children aged six months and above, a meat product based on the composition of frog meat was developed experimentally. To ensure raw material quality after bleaching and deboning, the microbiota present in the frog meat was determined. The analyses were performed according to Brazilian laws. It was observed that the resident and transient microbiota met the standards set by regulations. The results found were: mesophyll 4.5 x 10(4 CFU/g; Staphylococcus coagulase positive 2.0 x 10² CFU/g; negative for Salmonella sp. and Aeromonas spp. The findings indicate that the raw material showed satisfactory sanitation even in terms of family industry.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of the Xenopus hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (xHIF1alpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beaucourt, Arnaud; Coumailleau, Pascal

    2007-12-15

    We report the molecular cloning and the characterization of the Xenopus homolog of mammalian hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha), a member of the bHLH/PAS transcription factor family. Searches in Xenopus genome sequences and phylogenetic analysis reveal the existence of HIF1alpha and HIF2alpha paralogs in the Xenopus laevis species. Sequence data analyses indicate that the organization of protein domains in Xenopus HIF1alpha (xHIF1alpha) is strongly conserved. We also show that xHIF1alpha heterodimerizes with the Xenopus Arnt1 protein (xArnt1) with the proteic complex being mediated by the HLH and PAS domains. Subcellular analysis in a Xenopus XTC cell line using chimeric GFP constructs show that over-expression of xHIF1alpha and xArnt1 allows us to detect the xHIF1alpha/xArnt1 complex in the nucleus, but only in the presence of both partners. Further analyses in XTC cell line show that over-producing xHIF1alpha and xArnt1 mediates trans-activation of the hypoxia response element (HRE) reporter. The trans-activation level can be increased in hypoxia conditions. Interestingly such trans-activation properties can be also observed when human Arnt1 is used together with the xHIF1alpha. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Environmental occurrence and toxicity of bentazone on embryos of the amphibian Xenopus laevis; Ritrovamento ambientale e tossicita` del bentazone sull`embrione dell`anfibio Xenopus laevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchetta, Renato; Compagnoni, Enrico; Giarei, Cristina; Vailati, Giovanni [Milan, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia

    1997-03-01

    In this work concentrations of bentazone at the closing section of the River Po (Pontelagoscuro, FE) are reported together with the results of toxicity test performed on embryos of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. The environmental analyses show value higher than the U E limit of 100 ng l{sup -1} for drinking water with a peak in June of 311 ng l{sup -1}. The toxicity and teratogenicity test show no significant mortality up to 10 mg l{sup -1} and developmental malformations concerning corporal axis, eyes, neural tube and coelom starting from 5 mg l{sup -1}.

  12. An addition to the diversity of dendrobatid frogs in Venezuela: description of three new collared frogs (Anura: Dendrobatidae: Mannophryne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Luis Barrio-Amorós

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of collared frogs of the genus Mannophryne are described from Venezuela. Two are newly discovered taxa from the Venezuelan Andes, whereas the third species, previously confused with M. trinitatis, is from the Caracas area in the Cordillera de la Costa. The call of the three new species and that of Mannophryne collaris are described. Taxonomic, zoogeographic, and conservation issues are discussed.

  13. Tissue-specific expression of the Ets gene Xsap-1 during Xenopus laevis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nentwich, O; Münchberg, F E; Frommer, G; Nordheim, A

    2001-12-01

    We report the cloning of Xenopus laevis Xsap-1 cDNA, encoding a member of the ternary complex factor subfamily of ETS transcription factors. The expression pattern of Xsap-1 was examined during Xenopus embryogenesis using whole-mount in situ hybridization. Spatial expression of Xsap-1 mRNA is first detected at the animal pole at the mid-blastula stage. During neurulation Xsap-1 is expressed in cells participating in neural tube formation, in the sensorial layer of the epidermal ectoderm, and in an anterior region of the ventral mesoderm. Later, Xsap-1 expression is observed in the eye, ear vesicle, branchial arches, heart, pronephros, in the somites, and the developing nervous system, such as fore-, mid-, and hindbrain as well as in the cranial ganglion X.

  14. Xenopus Vasa Homolog XVLG1 is Essential for Migration and Survival of Primordial Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaoka, Kazumi; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Tanigawa, Yoko; Komiya, Tohru

    2017-04-01

    Xenopus vasa-like gene 1 (XVLG1), a DEAD-Box Helicase 4 (DDX4) gene identified as a vertebrate vasa homologue, is required for the formation of primordial germ cells (PGCs). However, it remains to be clarified when and how XVLG1 functions in the formation of the germ cells. To gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying XVLG1 during PGC development, we injected XVLG1 morpholino oligos into germ-plasm containing blastomeres of 32-cell stage of Xenopus embryos, and traced cell fates of the injected blastomere-derived PGCs. As a result of this procedure, migration of the PGCs was impaired and the number of PGCs derived from the blastomeres was significantly decreased. In addition, TUNEL staining in combination with in situ hybridization revealed that the loss of PGCs peaked at stage 27 was caused by apoptosis. This data strongly suggests an essential role for XVLG1 in migration and survival of the germ cells.

  15. Simple and inexpensive hardware and software method to measure volume changes in Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Ricardo; Ozu, Marcelo; Parisi, Mario

    2007-04-15

    Water channels (aquaporins) family members have been identified in central nervous system cells. A classic method to measure membrane water permeability and its regulation is to capture and analyse images of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing them. Laboratories dedicated to the analysis of motion images usually have powerful equipment valued in thousands of dollars. However, some scientists consider that new approaches are needed to reduce costs in scientific labs, especially in developing countries. The objective of this work is to share a very low-cost hardware and software setup based on a well-selected webcam, a hand-made adapter to a microscope and the use of free software to measure membrane water permeability in Xenopus oocytes. One of the main purposes of this setup is to maintain a high level of quality in images obtained at brief intervals (shorter than 70 ms). The presented setup helps to economize without sacrificing image analysis requirements.

  16. Quantitative proteomics of Xenopus laevis embryos: expression kinetics of nearly 4000 proteins during early development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liangliang; Bertke, Michelle M.; Champion, Matthew M.; Zhu, Guijie; Huber, Paul W.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2014-03-01

    While there is a rich literature on transcription dynamics during the development of many organisms, protein data is limited. We used iTRAQ isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry to generate the largest developmental proteomic dataset for any animal. Expression dynamics of nearly 4,000 proteins of Xenopus laevis was generated from fertilized egg to neurula embryo. Expression clusters into groups. The cluster profiles accurately reflect the major events that mark changes in gene expression patterns during early Xenopus development. We observed decline in the expression of ten DNA replication factors after the midblastula transition (MBT), including a marked decline of the licensing factor XCdc6. Ectopic expression of XCdc6 leads to apoptosis; temporal changes in this protein are critical for proper development. Measurement of expression in single embryos provided no evidence for significant protein heterogeneity between embryos at the same stage of development.

  17. Elr-type proteins protect Xenopus Dead end mRNA from miR-18-mediated clearance in the soma

    OpenAIRE

    Koebernick, Katja; Loeber, Jana; Arthur, Patrick Kobina; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Pieler, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Segregation of the future germ line defines a crucial cell fate decision during animal development. In Xenopus, germ cells are specified by inheritance of vegetally localized maternal determinants, including a group of specific mRNAs. Here, we show that the vegetal localization elements (LE) of Xenopus Dead end (XDE) and of several other germ-line-specific, vegetally localized transcripts mediate germ cell-specific stabilization and somatic clearance of microinjected reporter mRNA in Xenopus ...

  18. Vegetally localized Xenopus trim36 regulates cortical rotation and dorsal axis formation

    OpenAIRE

    Cuykendall, Tawny N.; Houston, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Specification of the dorsoventral axis in Xenopus depends on rearrangements of the egg vegetal cortex following fertilization, concomitant with activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. How these processes are tied together is not clear, but RNAs localized to the vegetal cortex during oogenesis are known to be essential. Despite their importance, few vegetally localized RNAs have been examined in detail. In this study, we describe the identification of a novel localized m...

  19. Actomyosin Contractility and Microtubules Drive Apical Constriction in Xenopus Bottle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jen-Yi; Harland, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Cell shape changes are critical for morphogenetic events such as gastrulation, neurulation, and organogenesis. However, the cell biology driving cell shape changes is poorly understood, especially in vertebrates. The beginning of Xenopus laevis gastrulation is marked by the apical constriction of bottle cells in the dorsal marginal zone, which bends the tissue and creates a crevice at the blastopore lip. We found that bottle cells contribute significantly to gastrulation, as their shape chang...

  20. Defining a large set of full-length clones from a Xenopus tropicalis EST project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Michael J; Zorn, Aaron M; Voigt, Jana; Smith, James C; Papalopulu, Nancy; Amaya, Enrique

    2004-07-15

    Amphibian embryos from the genus Xenopus are among the best species for understanding early vertebrate development and for studying basic cell biological processes. Xenopus, and in particular the diploid Xenopus tropicalis, is also ideal for functional genomics. Understanding the behavior of genes in this accessible model system will have a significant and beneficial impact on the understanding of similar genes in other vertebrate systems. Here we describe the analysis of 219,270 X. tropicalis expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from four early developmental stages. From these, we have deduced a set of unique expressed sequences comprising approximately 20,000 clusters and 16,000 singletons. Furthermore, we developed a computational method to identify clones that contain the complete coding sequence and describe the creation for the first time of a set of approximately 7000 such clones, the full-length (FL) clone set. The entire EST set is cloned in a eukaryotic expression vector and is flanked by bacteriophage promoters for in vitro transcription, allowing functional experiments to be carried out without further subcloning. We have created a publicly available database containing the FL clone set and related clustering data (http://www.gurdon.cam.ac.uk/informatics/Xenopus.html) and we make the FL clone set publicly available as a resource to accelerate the process of gene discovery and function in this model organism. The creation of the unique set of expressed sequences and the FL clone set pave the way toward a large-scale systematic analysis of gene sequence, gene expression, and gene function in this vertebrate species.

  1. Bipolarization and Poleward Flux Correlate during Xenopus Extract Spindle AssemblyV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchison, T.J.; Maddox, P.; Groen, A.; Cameron, L.; Perlman, Z.; Ohi, R.; Desai, A.; Salmon, E.D.; Kapoor, T.M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which meiotic spindles become bipolar and the correlation between bipolarity and poleward flux, using Xenopus egg extracts. By speckle microscopy and computational alignment, we find that monopolar sperm asters do not show evidence for flux, partially contradicting previous work. We account for the discrepancy by describing spontaneous bipolarization of sperm asters that was missed previously. During spontaneous bipolarization, onset of flux correlated with on...

  2. Cranial Osteogenesis and Suture Morphology in Xenopus laevis: A Unique Model System for Studying Craniofacial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Bethany J.; Liu, Karen J.; Kwan, Matthew D.; Quarto, Natalina; Longaker, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Background The tremendous diversity in vertebrate skull formation illustrates the range of forms and functions generated by varying genetic programs. Understanding the molecular basis for this variety may provide us with insights into mechanisms underlying human craniofacial anomalies. In this study, we provide evidence that the anuran Xenopus laevis can be developed as a simplified model system for the study of cranial ossification and suture patterning. The head structures of Xenopus undergo dramatic remodelling during metamorphosis; as a result, tadpole morphology differs greatly from the adult bony skull. Because of the extended larval period in Xenopus, the molecular basis of these alterations has not been well studied. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined late larval, metamorphosing, and post-metamorphosis froglet stages in intact and sectioned animals. Using micro-computed tomography (μCT) and tissue staining of the frontoparietal bone and surrounding cartilage, we observed that bone formation initiates from lateral ossification centers, proceeding from posterior-to-anterior. Histological analyses revealed midline abutting and posterior overlapping sutures. To determine the mechanisms underlying the large-scale cranial changes, we examined proliferation, apoptosis, and proteinase activity during remodelling of the skull roof. We found that tissue turnover during metamorphosis could be accounted for by abundant matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, at least in part by MMP-1 and -13. Conclusion A better understanding of the dramatic transformation from cartilaginous head structures to bony skull during Xenopus metamorphosis may provide insights into tissue remodelling and regeneration in other systems. Our studies provide some new molecular insights into this process. PMID:19156194

  3. Caldesmon regulates actin dynamics to influence cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Shuyi; Kee, Yun; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Caldesmon (CaD) is an important actin modulator that associates with actin filaments to regulate cell morphology and motility. Although extensively studied in cultured cells, there is little functional information regarding the role of CaD in migrating cells in vivo. Here we show that nonmuscle CaD is highly expressed in both premigratory and migrating cranial neural crest cells of Xenopus embryos. Depletion of CaD with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides causes cranial neural crest cells t...

  4. Remodeling of ribosomal genes in somatic cells by Xenopus egg extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrup, Olga, E-mail: osvarcova@gmail.com [Institute of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Stem Cell Epigenetics Laboratory, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Norwegian Center for Stem Cell Research, Oslo (Norway); Hyttel, Poul; Klaerke, Dan A. [Institute of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Collas, Philippe, E-mail: philc@medisin.uio.no [Stem Cell Epigenetics Laboratory, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Norwegian Center for Stem Cell Research, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} Xenopus egg extract remodels nuclei and alter cell growth characteristics. {yields} Ribosomal genes are reprogrammed within 6 h after extract exposure. {yields} rDNA reprogramming involves promoter targeting of SNF2H remodeling complex. {yields} Xenopus egg extract does not initiate stress-related response in somatic cells. {yields} Aza-cytidine elicits a stress-induced response in reprogrammed cells. -- Abstract: Extracts from Xenopus eggs can reprogram gene expression in somatic nuclei, however little is known about the earliest processes associated with the switch in the transcriptional program. We show here that an early reprogramming event is the remodeling of ribosomal chromatin and gene expression. This occurs within hours of extract treatment and is distinct from a stress response. Egg extract elicits remodeling of the nuclear envelope, chromatin and nucleolus. Nucleolar remodeling involves a rapid and stable decrease in ribosomal gene transcription, and promoter targeting of the nucleolar remodeling complex component SNF2H without affecting occupancy of the transcription factor UBF and the stress silencers SUV39H1 and SIRT1. During this process, nucleolar localization of UBF and SIRT1 is not altered. On contrary, azacytidine pre-treatment has an adverse effect on rDNA remodeling induced by extract and elicits a stress-type nuclear response. Thus, an early event of Xenopus egg extract-mediated nuclear reprogramming is the remodeling of ribosomal genes involving nucleolar remodeling complex. Condition-specific and rapid silencing of ribosomal genes may serve as a sensitive marker for evaluation of various reprogramming methods.

  5. Bacterial flora on Cascades frogs in the Klamath Mountains of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Pope

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians are experiencing global declines due in part to the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Some symbiotic bacteria residents on frog skin have been shown to inhibit the growth of Batrachochytrium dendrobatitis (Bd) but few studies have attempted to fully describe the resident bacterial flora of frog skin. We cultured and sequenced 130...

  6. Phylogeography of Declining Relict and Lowland Leopard Frogs in the Desert Southwest of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the phylogeography of the closely related relict leopard frog (Rana onca) and lowland leopard frog (R. yavapaiensis) – two declining anurans from the warm-desert regions of southwestern North America. We used sequence data from two mitochondrial DNA genes to asses...

  7. A frog's-eye view of the landscape : quantifying connectivity for fragmented amphibian populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, C.C.

    1999-01-01

    The spatial habitat requirements are studied for two amphibian species: the tree frog ( Hyla arborea ) and the moor frog ( Rana arvalis ). Fragmentation, the destruction of suitable habitat, results in small fragments that are separated by

  8. An erythrocytic virus of the brazilian tree-frog, Phrynohyas venulosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Alves de Matos

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood erythrocytes of Brazilian tree-frogs, Phrynohyas venulosa were found to frequently contain single, small, densely staining inclusions. Electron microscopy showed these to be icosahedral viral particles which measured from 250-280 nm in diameter; they were devoid of an envelope, and thus differed from previously described viruses of frog erythrocytes. The infected erythrocytes lacked a crystalline body.

  9. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Horn; James L. Hanula; Michael D. Ulyshen; John C. Kilgo

    2005-01-01

    We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinera) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 gree ntree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data...

  10. The critical density for the frog model is the degree of the tree

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Tobias; Junge, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The frog model on the rooted $d$-ary tree changes from transient to recurrent as the number of frogs per site is increased. We prove that the location of this transition is on the same order as the degree of the tree.

  11. Complex and transitive synchronization in a frustrated system of calling frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Takeda, Ryu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Takahashi, Toru; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-03-01

    This letter reports synchronization phenomena and mathematical modeling on a frustrated system of living beings, or Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica). While an isolated male Japanese tree frog calls nearly periodically, he can hear sounds including calls of other males. Therefore, the spontaneous calling behavior of interacting males can be understood as a system of coupled oscillators. We construct a simple but biologically reasonable model based on the experimental results of two frogs, extend the model to a system of three frogs, and theoretically predict the occurrence of rich synchronization phenomena, such as triphase synchronization and 1:2 antiphase synchronization. In addition, we experimentally verify the theoretical prediction by ethological experiments on the calling behavior of three frogs and time series analysis on recorded sound data. Note that the calling behavior of three male Japanese tree frogs is frustrated because almost perfect antiphase synchronization is robustly observed in a system of two male frogs. Thus, nonlinear dynamics of the three-frogs system should be far from trivial.

  12. Propulsive force calculations in swimming frogs II. Application of a vortex ring model to DPIV data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, E.J.; Nauwelaerts, S.

    Frogs propel themselves by kicking water backwards using a synchronised extension of their hind limbs and webbed feet. To understand this propulsion process, we quantified the water movements and displacements resulting from swimming in the green frog Rana esculenta, applying digital particle image

  13. Population estimates for the Toiyabe population of the Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), 2004–10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Mellison, Chad; Galvan, Stephanie K.

    2013-01-01

    The Toiyabe population of Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris, hereafter "Toiyabe frogs") is a geographically isolated population located in central Nevada (fig. 1). The Toiyabe population is part of the Great Basin Distinct Population Segment of Columbia spotted frogs, and is a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2011). The cluster of breeding sites in central Nevada represents the southernmost extremity of the Columbia spotted frogs' known range (Funk and others, 2008). Toiyabe frogs are known to occur in seven drainages in Nye County, Nevada: Reese River, Cow Canyon Creek, Ledbetter Canyon Creek, Cloverdale Creek, Stewart Creek, Illinois Creek, and Indian Valley Creek. Most of the Toiyabe frog population resides in the Reese River, Indian Valley Creek, and Cloverdale Creek drainages (fig. 1; Nevada Department of Wildlife, 2003). Approximately 90 percent of the Toiyabe frogs' habitat is on public land. Most of the public land habitat (95 percent) is managed by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), while the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) manages the remainder. Additional Toiyabe frog habitat is under Yomba Shoshone Tribal management and in private ownership (Nevada Department of Wildlife, 2003). The BLM, USFS, Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW), Nevada Natural Heritage Program (NNHP), Nye County, and U.S Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) have monitored the Toiyabe population since 2004 using mark and recapture surveys (Nevada Department of Wildlife, 2004). The USFWS contracted with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to produce population estimates using these data.

  14. Propulsive force calculations in swimming frogs I. A momentum-impulse approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauwelaerts, S; Stamhuis, EJ; Aerts, P

    Frogs are animals that are capable of locomotion in two physically different media, aquatic and terrestrial. A comparison of the kinematics of swimming frogs in a previous study revealed a difference in propulsive impulse between jumping and swimming. To explore this difference further, we

  15. 78 FR 53581 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Status for Oregon Spotted Frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... faint mask, and a light jaw stripe extends to the shoulder. Small bumps and tubercles usually cover the... the area used during the rest of the year. During the dry season (June-August), frogs moved to deeper... and the limited dispersal ability of Oregon spotted frog. For the rest of the document, we will...

  16. Molecular cloning of the bullfrog kisspeptin receptor GPR54 with high sensitivity to Xenopus kisspeptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jung Sun; Lee, Yeo Reum; Oh, Da Young; Hwang, Jong Ik; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jae Il; Vaudry, Hubert; Kwon, Hyuk Bang; Seong, Jae Young

    2009-01-01

    Kisspeptin and its receptor, GPR54, play important roles in mammalian reproduction and cancer development. However, little is known about their function in nonmammalian species. In the present study, we have isolated the cDNA encoding the kisspeptin receptor, GPR54, from the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. The bullfrog GPR54 (bfGPR54) cDNA encodes a 379-amino acid heptahelical G protein-coupled receptor. bfGPR54 exhibits 45-46% amino acid identity with mammalian GPR54s and 70-74% identity with fish GPR54s. RT-PCR analysis showed that bfGPR54 mRNA is highly expressed in the forebrain, hypothalamus and pituitary. Upon stimulation by synthetic human kisspeptin-10 with Phe-amide residue at the C-terminus (h-Kiss-10F), bfGPR54 induces SRE-luc activity, a PKC-specific reporter, evidencing the PKC-linked signaling pathway of bfGPR54. Using a blast search, we found a gene encoding a kisspeptin-like peptide in Xenopus. The C-terminal decapeptide of Xenopus kisspeptin shows higher amino acid sequence identity to fish Kiss-10s than mammalian Kiss-10s. A synthetic Xenopus kisspeptin peptide (x-Kiss-12Y) showed a higher potency than mammalian Kiss-10s in the activation of bfGPR54. This study expands our understanding of the physiological roles and molecular evolution of kisspeptins and their receptors.

  17. Subcellular Localization of Class I Histone Deacetylases in the Developing Xenopus tectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Ruan, Hangze; Li, Xia; Qin, Liming; Tao, Yi; Qi, Xianjie; Gao, Juanmei; Gan, Lin; Duan, Shumin; Shen, Wanhua

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis, and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus, and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus, and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12) remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA) or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  18. Nucleosome assembly protein-1 is a linker histone chaperone in Xenopus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintomi, Keishi; Iwabuchi, Mari; Saeki, Hideaki; Ura, Kiyoe; Kishimoto, Takeo; Ohsumi, Keita

    2005-06-07

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is primarily packaged into nucleosomes through sequential ordered binding of the core and linker histone proteins. The acidic proteins termed histone chaperones are known to bind to core histones to neutralize their positive charges, thereby facilitating their proper deposition onto DNA to assemble the core of nucleosomes. For linker histones, however, little has been known about the regulatory mechanism for deposition of linker histones onto the linker DNA. Here we report that, in Xenopus eggs, the linker histone is associated with the Xenopus homologue of nucleosome assembly protein-1 (NAP-1), which is known to be a chaperone for the core histones H2A and H2B in Drosophila and mammalian cells [Ito, T., Bulger, M., Kobayashi, R. & Kadonaga, J. T. (1996) Mol. Cell Biol. 16, 3112-3124; Chang, L., Loranger, S. S., Mizzen, C., Ernst, S. G., Allis, C. D. & Annunziato, A. T. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 469-480]. We show that NAP-1 acts as the chaperone for the linker histone in both sperm chromatin remodeling into nucleosomes and linker histone binding to nucleosome core dimers. In the presence of NAP-1, the linker histone is properly deposited onto linker DNA at physiological ionic strength, without formation of nonspecific aggregates. These results strongly suggest that NAP-1 functions as a chaperone for the linker histone in Xenopus eggs.

  19. Targeted gene expression in transgenic Xenopus using the binary Gal4-UAS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Katharine O; Nutt, Stephen L; Amaya, Enrique

    2002-02-05

    The transgenic technique in Xenopus allows one to misexpress genes in a temporally and spatially controlled manner. However, this system suffers from two experimental limitations. First, the restriction enzyme-mediated integration procedure relies on chromosomal damage, resulting in a percentage of embryos failing to develop normally. Second, every transgenic embryo has unique sites of integration and unique transgene copy number, resulting in variable transgene expression levels and variable phenotypes. For these reasons, we have adapted the Gal4-UAS method for targeted gene expression to Xenopus. This technique relies on the generation of transgenic lines that carry "activator" or "effector" constructs. Activator lines express the yeast transcription factor, Gal4, under the control of a desired promoter, whereas effector lines contain DNA-binding motifs for Gal4-(UAS) linked to the gene of interest. We show that on intercrossing of these lines, the effector gene is transcribed in the temporal and spatial manner of the activator's promoter. Furthermore, we use the Gal4-UAS system to misexpress Xvent-2, a transcriptional target of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) signaling during early embryogenesis. Embryos inheriting both the Gal4 activator and Xvent-2 effector transgenes display a consistent microcephalic phenotype. Finally, we exploit this system to characterize the neural and mesodermal defects obtained from early misexpression of Xvent-2. These results emphasize the potential of this system for the controlled analyses of gene function in Xenopus.

  20. BDNF promotes target innervation of Xenopus mandibular trigeminal axons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Dorey, Karel; Ishibashi, Shoko; Amaya, Enrique

    2007-05-31

    Trigeminal nerves consist of ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular branches that project to distinct regions of the facial epidermis. In Xenopus embryos, the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve extends toward and innervates the cement gland in the anterior facial epithelium. The cement gland has previously been proposed to provide a short-range chemoattractive signal to promote target innervation by mandibular trigeminal axons. Brain derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF is known to stimulate axon outgrowth and branching. The goal of this study is to determine whether BDNF functions as the proposed target recognition signal in the Xenopus cement gland. We found that the cement gland is enriched in BDNF mRNA transcripts compared to the other neurotrophins NT3 and NT4 during mandibular trigeminal nerve innervation. BDNF knockdown in Xenopus embryos or specifically in cement glands resulted in the failure of mandibular trigeminal axons to arborise or grow into the cement gland. BDNF expressed ectodermal grafts, when positioned in place of the cement gland, promoted local trigeminal axon arborisation in vivo. BDNF is necessary locally to promote end stage target innervation of trigeminal axons in vivo, suggesting that BDNF functions as a short-range signal that stimulates mandibular trigeminal axon arborisation and growth into the cement gland.

  1. Design and use of transgenic reporter strains for detecting activity of signaling pathways in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hong Thi; Vleminckx, Kris

    2014-04-01

    Embryos and larvae of vertebrate species with external development are ideal subjects for investigating the dynamic spatiotemporal activity of developmental signaling pathways. The availability of efficient transgene technologies in Xenopus and zebrafish and the translucency and/or transparency of their embryos and larvae make these two species attractive for direct in vivo imaging of reporter gene expression. In this article we describe the design of efficient signaling reporters, using the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as a representative example. We define methods for validating the reporter constructs and describe how they can be used to generate stable transgenic lines in Xenopus. We provide efficient methods used in our laboratory for raising the tadpoles and froglets rapidly to sexual maturity. We further discuss how the reporter lines can be used for delineating the dynamic activity of a signaling pathway and how modulators of the pathway can be scrutinized via chemical intervention and the micro-injection of synthetic RNAs or morpholinos. The strategic outline discussed in this paper provides a template for studying other developmental signaling pathways in Xenopus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Amputation-induced reactive oxygen species are required for successful Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Nick R; Chen, Yaoyao; Ishibashi, Shoko; Kritsiligkou, Paraskevi; Lea, Robert; Koh, Yvette; Gallop, Jennifer L; Dorey, Karel; Amaya, Enrique

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that promote successful tissue regeneration is critical for continued advancements in regenerative medicine. Vertebrate amphibian tadpoles of the species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis have remarkable abilities to regenerate their tails following amputation, through the coordinated activity of numerous growth factor signalling pathways, including the Wnt, Fgf, Bmp, Notch and TGF-β pathways. Little is known, however, about the events that act upstream of these signalling pathways following injury. Here, we show that Xenopus tadpole tail amputation induces a sustained production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during tail regeneration. Lowering ROS levels, using pharmacological or genetic approaches, reduces the level of cell proliferation and impairs tail regeneration. Genetic rescue experiments restored both ROS production and the initiation of the regenerative response. Sustained increased ROS levels are required for Wnt/β-catenin signalling and the activation of one of its main downstream targets, fgf20 (ref. 7), which, in turn, is essential for proper tail regeneration. These findings demonstrate that injury-induced ROS production is an important regulator of tissue regeneration.

  3. Development of a New Decision Tree to Rapidly Screen Chemical Estrogenic Activities of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Weiying; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Lin, Zhifen; Kong, Deyang

    2014-02-01

    During the last past decades, there is an increasing number of studies about estrogenic activities of the environmental pollutants on amphibians and many determination methods have been proposed. However, these determination methods are time-consuming and expensive, and a rapid and simple method to screen and test the chemicals for estrogenic activities to amphibians is therefore imperative. Herein is proposed a new decision tree formulated not only with physicochemical parameters but also a biological parameter that was successfully used to screen estrogenic activities of the chemicals on amphibians. The biological parameter, CDOCKER interaction energy (Ebinding ) between chemicals and the target proteins was calculated based on the method of molecular docking, and it was used to revise the decision tree formulated by Hong only with physicochemical parameters for screening estrogenic activity of chemicals in rat. According to the correlation between Ebinding of rat and Xenopus laevis, a new decision tree for estrogenic activities in Xenopus laevis is finally proposed. Then it was validated by using the randomly 8 chemicals which can be frequently exposed to Xenopus laevis, and the agreement between the results from the new decision tree and the ones from experiments is generally satisfactory. Consequently, the new decision tree can be used to screen the estrogenic activities of the chemicals, and combinational use of the Ebinding and classical physicochemical parameters can greatly improves Hong's decision tree. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Role of maternal Xenopus syntabulin in germ plasm aggregation and primordial germ cell specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Denise; Houston, Douglas W

    2017-12-15

    The localization and organization of mitochondria- and ribonucleoprotein granule-rich germ plasm is essential for many aspects of germ cell development. In Xenopus, germ plasm is maternally inherited and is required for the specification of primordial germ cells (PGCs). Germ plasm is aggregated into larger patches during egg activation and cleavage and is ultimately translocated perinuclearly during gastrulation. Although microtubule dynamics and a kinesin (Kif4a) have been implicated in Xenopus germ plasm localization, little is known about how germ plasm distribution is regulated. Here, we identify a role for maternal Xenopus Syntabulin in the aggregation of germ plasm following fertilization. We show that depletion of sybu mRNA using antisense oligonucleotides injected into oocytes results in defects in the aggregation and perinuclear transport of germ plasm and subsequently in reduced PGC numbers. Using live imaging analysis, we also characterize a novel role for Sybu in the collection of germ plasm in vegetal cleavage furrows by surface contraction waves. Additionally, we show that a localized kinesin-like protein, Kif3b, is also required for germ plasm aggregation and that Sybu functionally interacts with Kif3b and Kif4a in germ plasm aggregation. Overall, these data suggest multiple coordinate roles for kinesins and adaptor proteins in controlling the localization and distribution of a cytoplasmic determinant in early development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Purification and partial characterization of Xenopus laevis tenascin from the XTC cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, J F; Alfandari, D; Eppe, M; Tacchetti, C; Chiquet, M; Boucaut, J C; Thiery, J P; Levi, G

    1991-02-25

    We report here the purification of tenascin, an extracellular matrix molecule involved in the control of morphogenesis, from the conditioned medium of the Xenopus XTC cell line. Tenascin was purified by affinity chromatography on a column of the monoclonal antibody mAb TnM1; the molecule eluted from this column has a relative molecular mass of 210 kDa after reduction. Electrophoretic analysis under non-reducing conditions shows that the purified components are oligomeric disulfide-linked complexes which barely enter a 4% polyacrylamide gel. Upon rotary shadowing these molecules appear to possess a central globular domain to which pairs or triplets of arms are attached. Polyclonal antibodies have been raised against purified Xenopus tenascin. They recognise specifically the antigen on Western blots of XTC conditioned medium and adult brain, by immunofluorescence, these antibodies reveal large amounts of tenascin in the secretory vesicles as well as in the extracellular matrix of XTC cells. In the Xenopus tadpole, they stain the developing cartilage, the basal lamina of skin epidermis, myotendinous ligaments and restricted regions of the central nervous system.

  6. Subcellular localization of class I histone deacetylases in the developing Xenopus tectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eGuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12 remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  7. Isolation of Brucella inopinata-Like Bacteria from White's and Denny's Tree Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masanobu; Une, Yumi; Suzuki, Michio; Park, Eun-Sil; Imaoka, Koichi; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2017-05-01

    Brucella inopinata strain BO1 and B. sp. strain BO2 isolated from human patients, respectively, are genetically different from classical Brucella species. We isolated bacteria of the genus Brucella from two species of wild-caught tropical frogs kept in the facilities in Japan: White's tree frog, which inhabits Oceania, and Denny's tree frog, which inhabits Southeast Asia. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences and multilocus sequence analysis showed that two isolates of Brucella spp. showed significant similarity to BO1, BO2, and the isolates from other wild-caught frogs. These results suggest that a variety of frog species are susceptible to a novel clade of Brucella bacteria, including B. inopinata.

  8. The brain tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the sleep-like states in frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, A V; Karmanova, I G; Kozlachkova, E Y; Voronova, I P; Popova, N K

    1994-10-01

    The activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase, was determined in the brain stem in active awake frogs, and frogs in three sleep-like states: with plastic muscle tone (SLS-1), with rigid muscle tone (SLS-2), and with relaxed muscle tone (SLS-3). Significant decrease in the enzyme activity has been found in frogs in SLS-1 and SLS-2 compared to awake animals. The development in frogs a cataleptic-like immobility after treating the animals with rhythmic lighting was accompanied with a decrease in the brain tryptophan hydroxylase activity. These results provide strong evidence for the involvement of the brain serotonin in frogs in the control of evolutionary ancient sleep-like states, probably by the regulation of muscle tone.

  9. Frankixalus, a New Rhacophorid Genus of Tree Hole Breeding Frogs with Oophagous Tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, S D; Senevirathne, Gayani; Garg, Sonali; Mahony, Stephen; Kamei, Rachunliu G; Thomas, Ashish; Shouche, Yogesh; Raxworthy, Christopher J; Meegaskumbura, Madhava; Van Bocxlaer, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Despite renewed interest in the biogeography and evolutionary history of Old World tree frogs (Rhacophoridae), this family still includes enigmatic frogs with ambiguous phylogenetic placement. During fieldwork in four northeastern states of India, we discovered several populations of tree hole breeding frogs with oophagous tadpoles. We used molecular data, consisting of two nuclear and three mitochondrial gene fragments for all known rhacophorid genera, to investigate the phylogenetic position of these new frogs. Our analyses identify a previously overlooked, yet distinct evolutionary lineage of frogs that warrants recognition as a new genus and is here described as Frankixalus gen. nov. This genus, which contains the enigmatic 'Polypedates' jerdonii described by Günther in 1876, forms the sister group of a clade containing Kurixalus, Pseudophilautus, Raorchestes, Mercurana and Beddomixalus. The distinctiveness of this evolutionary lineage is also corroborated by the external morphology of adults and tadpoles, adult osteology, breeding ecology, and life history features.

  10. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.; Kilgo, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Horn, Scott, James L. Hanula, Michael D. Ulyshen, and John C. Kilgo. 2005. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Am. Midl. Nat. 153:321-326. Abstract: We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.

  11. Frankixalus, a New Rhacophorid Genus of Tree Hole Breeding Frogs with Oophagous Tadpoles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Biju

    Full Text Available Despite renewed interest in the biogeography and evolutionary history of Old World tree frogs (Rhacophoridae, this family still includes enigmatic frogs with ambiguous phylogenetic placement. During fieldwork in four northeastern states of India, we discovered several populations of tree hole breeding frogs with oophagous tadpoles. We used molecular data, consisting of two nuclear and three mitochondrial gene fragments for all known rhacophorid genera, to investigate the phylogenetic position of these new frogs. Our analyses identify a previously overlooked, yet distinct evolutionary lineage of frogs that warrants recognition as a new genus and is here described as Frankixalus gen. nov. This genus, which contains the enigmatic 'Polypedates' jerdonii described by Günther in 1876, forms the sister group of a clade containing Kurixalus, Pseudophilautus, Raorchestes, Mercurana and Beddomixalus. The distinctiveness of this evolutionary lineage is also corroborated by the external morphology of adults and tadpoles, adult osteology, breeding ecology, and life history features.

  12. Inventory of frog species in the South Carolina Sandhills with a focus on the pine barrens treefrog and the gopher frog

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tabular data consists of site specific locations of sampling points on Carolina Sandhills NWR for determination of frog species and more specifically sites with Pine...

  13. Wood frog adaptations to overwintering in Alaska: new limits to freezing tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Don J; Middle, Luke; Vu, Henry; Zhang, Wenhui; Serianni, Anthony S; Duman, John; Barnes, Brian M

    2014-06-15

    We investigated the ecological physiology and behavior of free-living wood frogs [Lithobates (Rana) sylvaticus] overwintering in Interior Alaska by tracking animals into natural hibernacula, recording microclimate, and determining frog survival in spring. We measured cryoprotectant (glucose) concentrations and identified the presence of antifreeze glycolipids in tissues from subsamples of naturally freezing frogs. We also recorded the behavior of wood frogs preparing to freeze in artificial hibernacula, and tissue glucose concentrations in captive wood frogs frozen in the laboratory to -2.5°C. Wood frogs in natural hibernacula remained frozen for 193 ± 11 consecutive days and experienced average (October-May) temperatures of -6.3°C and average minimum temperatures of -14.6 ± 2.8°C (range -8.9 to -18.1°C) with 100% survival (N=18). Mean glucose concentrations were 13-fold higher in muscle, 10-fold higher in heart and 3.3-fold higher in liver in naturally freezing compared with laboratory frozen frogs. Antifreeze glycolipid was present in extracts from muscle and internal organs, but not skin, of frozen frogs. Wood frogs in Interior Alaska survive freezing to extreme limits and durations compared with those described in animals collected in southern Canada or the Midwestern United States. We hypothesize that this enhancement of freeze tolerance in Alaskan wood frogs is due to higher cryoprotectant levels that are produced by repeated freezing and thawing cycles experienced under natural conditions during early autumn. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Subcellular distribution of the Xenopus p58/lamin B receptor in oocytes and eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, A; Krohne, G

    1999-08-01

    The p58/lamin B receptor of vertebrates is localized in the inner nuclear membrane. Antibodies raised against the bacterially expressed amino-terminal half of Xenopus p58 (Xp58) revealed that in Xenopus oocytes the vast majority of this membrane protein is localized in cytoplasmic membranes. Only very small amounts of p58 not detectable by immunofluorescence microscopy were contained in the oocyte nuclear envelope. In contrast, nuclear membranes of 2-cell stage embryos were successfully stained with p58 antibodies, nuclei reconstituted in vitro in Xenopus egg extracts contained p58, and the nucleoplasmic domain of Xp58 could be specifically bound to sperm chromatin in vitro. One major difference between oocytes and early embryonic cells is that no chromatin is associated with the oocyte inner nuclear membrane whereas the complement of lamins is identical in both cell types. To gain insight into the properties of oocyte p58 we microinjected isolated nuclei of cultured rat cells into the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes. The oocyte p58 was detectable by immunofluorescence microscopy within 16-20 hours in the nuclear membrane of rat nuclei. Our data indicate that the peripheral chromatin but not lamins are required for the retention of p58 in the inner nuclear membrane. Sucrose step gradient centrifugation of total oocyte membranes revealed that the oocyte p58 was predominantly recovered in membrane fractions that did not contain lamins whereas membrane associated lamins and p58 of unfertilized eggs were found in the same fractions. By electron microscopical immunolocalizations one major population of meiotic p58 vesicles was identified that contained exclusively p58 and a second minor population (ca. 11% of p58 vesicles) contained in addition to p58 membrane bound B-type lamins. Egg vesicles containing pore membrane proteins were predominantly recovered in gradient fractions that did not contain p58 and B-type lamins. Our data indicate that the targeting of p58 to

  15. Which frog's legs do froggies eat? The use of DNA barcoding for identification of deep frozen frog legs (Dicroglossidae, Amphibia commercialized in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Ohler

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Several millions frogs captured in the wild in Indonesia are sold for food yearly in French supermarkets, as deep frozen frog legs. They are commercialized as Rana macrodon, but up to 15 look-alike species might also be concerned by this trade. From December 2012 to May 2013, we bought 209 specimens of deep frozen frog legs, and identified them through a barcoding approach based on the 16S gene. Our results show that 206 out of the 209 specimens belong to Fejervarya cancrivora, two to Limnonectes macrodon and one to F. moodiei. Thus only 0.96 % of the frogs were correctly identified. Unless misclassification was intentional, it seems that Indonesian frog leg exporters are not able to discriminate between the species. The quasi absence of L. macrodon in our samples might be an indication of its rarity, confirming that its natural populations are declining rapidly, in agreement with its “vulnerable” status according to the IUCN Red List. Our results show that the genetic and morphological diversity of the frogs in trade is much higher than the genetic and morphological diversity measured so far by scientific studies. These results underline the need for large scale studies to assess the status of wild populations.

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese tree frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Hyla_japonica_L.png Hyla_japon...ica_NL.png Hyla_japonica_S.png Hyla_japonica_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japon...ica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japon

  17. Tactical reproductive parasitism via larval cannibalism in Peruvian poison frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason L.; Morales, Victor; Summers, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    We report an unusual example of reproductive parasitism in amphibians. Dendrobates variabilis, an Amazonian poison frog, oviposits at the surface of the water in small pools in plants and deposits tadpoles within the pools. Tadpoles are highly cannibalistic and consume young tadpoles if they are accessible. Deposition of embryos and tadpoles in the same pool is common. Genetic analyses indicate that tadpoles are frequently unrelated to embryos in the same pool. A pool choice experiment in the field demonstrated that males carrying tadpoles prefer to place them in pools with embryos, facilitating reproductive parasitism via cannibalism. PMID:19042178

  18. Membrane interactions of antimicrobial peptides from Australian frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David I; Gehman, John D; Separovic, Frances

    2009-08-01

    The membrane interactions of four antimicrobial peptides, aurein 1.2, citropin 1.1, maculatin 1.1 and caerin 1.1, isolated from Australian tree frogs, are reviewed. All four peptides are amphipathic alpha-helices with a net positive charge and range in length from 13 to 25 residues. Despite several similar sequence characteristics, these peptides compromise the integrity of model membrane bilayers via different mechanisms; the shorter peptides exhibit a surface interaction mechanism while the longer peptides may form pores in membranes.

  19. From transience to recurrence with Poisson tree frogs

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Christopher; Johnson, Tobias; Junge, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Consider the following interacting particle system on the $d$-ary tree, known as the frog model: Initially, one particle is awake at the root and i.i.d. Poisson many particles are sleeping at every other vertex. Particles that are awake perform simple random walks, awakening any sleeping particles they encounter. We prove that there is a phase transition between transience and recurrence as the initial density of particles increases, and we give the order of the transition up to a logarithmic...

  20. PLD1 regulates Xenopus convergent extension movements by mediating Frizzled7 endocytosis for Wnt/PCP signal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoon; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Yeo, Inchul; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in the regulation of receptor-associated signaling, cell movement, cell adhesion and endocytosis. However, its physiological role in vertebrate development remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that PLD1 is required for the convergent extension (CE) movements during Xenopus gastrulation by activating Wnt/PCP signaling. Xenopus PLD1 protein is specifically enriched in the dorsal region of Xenopus gastrula embryo and loss or gain-of-function of PLD1 induce defects in gastrulation and CE movements. These defective phenotypes are due to impaired regulation of Wnt/PCP signaling pathway. Biochemical and imaging analysis using Xenopus tissues reveal that PLD1 is required for Fz7 receptor endocytosis upon Wnt11 stimulation. Moreover, we show that Fz7 endocytosis depends on dynamin and regulation of GAP activity of dynamin by PLD1 via its PX domain is crucial for this process. Taken together, our results suggest that PLD1 acts as a new positive mediator of Wnt/PCP signaling by promoting Wnt11-induced Fz7 endocytosis for precise regulation of Xenopus CE movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evolutionary and natural history of the turtle frog, Myobatrachus gouldii, a bizarre myobatrachid frog in the southwestern Australian biodiversity hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Vertucci

    Full Text Available Southwest Australia (SWA is a global biodiversity hotspot and a centre of diversity and endemism for the Australo-Papuan myobatrachid frogs. Myobatrachus gouldii (the turtle frog has a highly derived morphology associated with its forward burrowing behaviour, largely subterranean habit, and unusual mode of reproduction. Its sister genera Metacrinia and Arenophryne have restricted distributions in Western Australia with significant phylogeographic structure, leading to the recent description of a new species in the latter. In contrast, Myobatrachus is distributed widely throughout SWA over multiple climatic zones, but little is known of its population structure, geographic variation in morphology, or reproduction. We generated molecular and morphological data to test for genetic and morphological variation, and to assess whether substrate specialisation in this species may have led to phylogeographic structuring similar to that of other plant and animal taxa in SWA. We assembled sequence data for one mitochondrial and four nuclear DNA loci (3628 base pairs for 42 turtle frogs sampled throughout their range. Likelihood phylogenetic analyses revealed shallow phylogeographic structure in the mtDNA locus (up to 3.3% genetic distance and little variation in three of the four nDNA loci. The mtDNA haplotype network suggests five geographically allopatric groups, with no shared haplotypes between regions. These geographic patterns are congruent with several other SWA species, with genetic groups restricted to major hydrological divisions, the Swan Coastal Plain, and the Darling Scarp. The geographically structured genetic groups showed no evidence of significant morphological differentiation (242 individuals, and there was little sexual size dimorphism, but subtle differences in reproductive traits suggest more opportunistic breeding in lower rainfall zones. Call data were compared to sister genera Metacrinia and Arenophryne and found to be highly

  2. Seasonality of Freeze Tolerance in a Subarctic Population of the Wood Frog, Rana sylvatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon P. Costanzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared physiological characteristics and responses to experimental freezing and thawing in winter and spring samples of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica, indigenous to Interior Alaska, USA. Whereas winter frogs can survive freezing at temperatures at least as low as −16°C, the lower limit of tolerance for spring frogs was between −2.5°C and −5°C. Spring frogs had comparatively low levels of the urea in blood plasma, liver, heart, brain, and skeletal muscle, as well as a smaller hepatic reserve of glycogen, which is converted to glucose after freezing begins. Consequently, following freezing (−2.5°C, 48 h tissue concentrations of these cryoprotective osmolytes were 44–88% lower than those measured in winter frogs. Spring frogs formed much more ice and incurred extensive cryohemolysis and lactate accrual, indicating that they had suffered marked cell damage and hypoxic stress during freezing. Multiple, interactive stresses, in addition to diminished cryoprotectant levels, contribute to the reduced capacity for freeze tolerance in posthibernal frogs.

  3. The effects of experimentally infecting Australian tree frogs with lungworms (Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala) from invasive cane toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzatto, Lígia; Shine, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Invasive species may transmit novel pathogens to native taxa, and lacking a history of coevolutionary interactions with the pathogen, the new hosts may be severely affected. Cane toads (Rhinella marina) were introduced to Australia in 1935, bringing with them a lungworm (Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala) not found in Australian frogs. Previous studies suggest that most frog species are unaffected by this parasite, but one tree-frog (Litoria caerulea) can harbour high numbers of lungworm. More detailed laboratory studies confirm and extend the earlier results on L. caerulea and show that Rhabdias infection severely depresses the viability of metamorphs of an allied tree-frog species, Litoria splendida. Parasitic larvae infected both of these two closely related tree-frog species, but the two anurans differed in the consequences of infection. Parasitism reduced the survivorship of L. splendida and the stamina of both species. Lungworms did not consistently reduce growth rates or affect heart rates in either tree-frog species. Although L. splendida is potentially vulnerable to the arrival of toad-transported lungworms, rates of host-switching may be reduced by low levels of habitat overlap between the frogs (which are rock-dwelling and arboreal) and the toads (which are terrestrial and most abundant in disturbed habitats). Copyright © 2011 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mycobacterium marinum infection in Japanese forest green tree frogs (Rhacophorus arboreus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridy, M; Tachikawa, Y; Yoshida, S; Tsuyuguchi, K; Tomita, M; Maeda, S; Wada, T; Ibi, K; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2014-01-01

    Four Japanese forest green tree frogs (Rhacophorus arboreus) were presented with emaciation, abdominal distention and ulcerative and nodular cutaneous lesions affecting the brisket, limbs, digits and ventral abdomen. Another three frogs had been found dead in the same tank 1 year previously. Necropsy examination of these seven frogs revealed splenomegaly and hepatomegaly, with multiple tan-yellow nodular foci present in the liver, spleen, heart, lungs, ovaries and kidneys. Microscopically, five frogs had necrosis and surrounding granulomatous inflammation in the liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, intestine and ovaries, with numerous acid-fast bacilli in the areas of necrosis. Two frogs had granulomatous lesions in the lungs, liver, spleen, heart, coelomic membrane, stomach and intestinal wall. These lesions had no or minimal necrosis and few acid-fast bacilli. Mycobacterium spp. was cultured from three frogs and identified as Mycobacterium marinum by colony growth rate and photochromogenicity and DNA sequencing. This is the first report of M. marinum infection in Japanese forest green tree frogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Landing in basal frogs: evidence of saltational patterns in the evolution of anuran locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essner, Richard L.; Suffian, Daniel J.; Bishop, Phillip J.; Reilly, Stephen M.

    2010-10-01

    All frogs are assumed to jump in a similar manner by rapidly extending hindlimbs during the propulsive phase and rotating the limbs forward during flight in order to land forelimbs first. However, studies of jumping behavior are lacking in the most primitive living frogs of the family Leiopelmatidae. These semi-aquatic or terrestrial anurans retain a suite of plesiomorphic morphological features and are unique in using an asynchronous (trot-like) rather than synchronous “frog-kick” swimming gait of other frogs. We compared jumping behavior in leiopelmatids to more derived frogs and found that leiopelmatids maintain extended hindlimbs throughout flight and landing phases and do not land on adducted forelimbs. These “belly-flop” landings limit the ability for repeated jumps and are consistent with a riparian origin of jumping in frogs. The unique behavior of leiopelmatids shows that frogs evolved jumping before they perfected landing. Moreover, an inability to rapidly cycle the limbs may provide a functional explanation for the absence of synchronous swimming in leiopelmatids.

  6. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D; Cobb, George P; Maul, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides increased transcript abundance of CSA and MUTL. In addition, mRNA abundance of HSP70 and GADD45α were increased by endosulfan and mRNA abundance of XPG was increased by α-cypermethrin. XPC, HR23B, XPG, and GADD45α exhibited elevated mRNA concentrations whereas there was a reduction in MUTL transcript concentrations in UVB-alone treatments. It appeared that even

  7. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuangying, E-mail: shuangying.yu@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Tang, Song, E-mail: song.tang@usask.ca [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Cobb, George P., E-mail: george_cobb@baylor.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97266, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Maul, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonathan.maul@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  8. Embryo Development of Tree Frog Polypedates leucomystax at Campus of State University of Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearlindah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tree frogs live in natural places which are unpolluted. Regarding their role as an ecological indicator, the decrease of frogs population in a particular habitat indicates the danger of environment quality decrease. Moreover, this condition can harm the frogs themselves. All kinds of frogs breed in aqueous environment such as ponds, marshes, and farming fields. One of the tree frogs, Polypedates leucomystax, which belongs to Familia Rachophoridae, is widely spread in Indonesia. This frog has yellowish brown skin with black spots or six lines extending from head to the posterior tip of body. A breeding couple of the frog produces foam nests on the water or plants around water body, where they will nest their fertilized eggs. This species produces over a hundred embryos in one spawning season. These embryos require appropriate conditions to develop normally in the nature. Frog embryo development may becomes a reference to understand how the frog population survives. This study focused on P. leucomystax with regards to its decrease in number due to the drying up of the environment and a lot lost of trees in Campus of State University of Malang. The development of P. leucomystax embryos in the reproduction foam was observed until it reached a tadpole stage. The result showed that the embryos developed in the foam until they hatched then they move out of the foam into the water under which they would continue their development. Considering that water body is a critical requirement for the development of P. leucomystax embryos, it is our responsibility to make any efforts to conserve not only the trees but also any type of water bodies including ponds, marshes, and farming fields as well.

  9. New genus of diminutive microhylid frogs from Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Kraus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A new genus of diminutive (10.1-11.3 mm microhylid frogs is described from New Guinea that is unique in its combination ofonly seven presacral vertebrae, a reduced phalangeal formula that leaves the first fingers and first toes as vestigial nubs, and reduction of the prepollex and prehallux to single elements. Relationships to other genera are unknown, but overall similarity suggests some relationship to Cophixalus, although that genus also differs in some muscle characters and likely remains paraphyletic. The new genus contains two species, which are among the smallest known frogs in the world. Their miniaturization may be related to their inhabiting leaf litter, exploitation of which may for small size. The new genus is currently known only from one mountaintop in the southeasternmost portion of New Guinea and another on a nearby island. This region is part of the East Papuan Composite Terrane and, should this lineage prove endemic to that region, it may suggest that it originated prior to that geological unit’s docking with mainland New Guinea at 23–29 MY.

  10. Ever-young sex chromosomes in European tree frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöck, Matthias; Horn, Agnès; Grossen, Christine; Lindtke, Dorothea; Sermier, Roberto; Betto-Colliard, Caroline; Dufresnes, Christophe; Bonjour, Emmanuel; Dumas, Zoé; Luquet, Emilien; Maddalena, Tiziano; Sousa, Helena Clavero; Martinez-Solano, Iñigo; Perrin, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    Non-recombining sex chromosomes are expected to undergo evolutionary decay, ending up genetically degenerated, as has happened in birds and mammals. Why are then sex chromosomes so often homomorphic in cold-blooded vertebrates? One possible explanation is a high rate of turnover events, replacing master sex-determining genes by new ones on other chromosomes. An alternative is that X-Y similarity is maintained by occasional recombination events, occurring in sex-reversed XY females. Based on mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences, we estimated the divergence times between European tree frogs (Hyla arborea, H. intermedia, and H. molleri) to the upper Miocene, about 5.4-7.1 million years ago. Sibship analyses of microsatellite polymorphisms revealed that all three species have the same pair of sex chromosomes, with complete absence of X-Y recombination in males. Despite this, sequences of sex-linked loci show no divergence between the X and Y chromosomes. In the phylogeny, the X and Y alleles cluster according to species, not in groups of gametologs. We conclude that sex-chromosome homomorphy in these tree frogs does not result from a recent turnover but is maintained over evolutionary timescales by occasional X-Y recombination. Seemingly young sex chromosomes may thus carry old-established sex-determining genes, a result at odds with the view that sex chromosomes necessarily decay until they are replaced. This raises intriguing perspectives regarding the evolutionary dynamics of sexually antagonistic genes and the mechanisms that control X-Y recombination.

  11. The digital pads of rhacophorid tree-frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhira, Vinci

    2004-01-01

    The digital pads of rhacophorid tree-frogs were studied by light and electron microscopy using a tannic acid-containing fixative. The digital pads are concave mucous epithelial structures surrounded by a soft raised epithelial border. The cells in the first epithelial layer are separated by deep intercellular fissures and the epithelial cell surface is densely covered with thousands of setaceous keratinized microvilli. These are estimated to be 0.1-0.5 microm in width and have flattened tips. A longitudinal section view of the pad's first epithelial cell layer shows a rugose pattern. Deep intercellular fissures in between the cells are formed by the enzymatic activity of invading mononuclear leukocytes in the interepithelial cell junctions. The 'rugose' surface epithelial cell layer is peeled off from the underlying second epithelial layer by the epithelial metabolism that occurs when the leukocytes invade the second interepithelial cell spaces. Thus, the second epithelial cell layer becomes the new 'rugose' epithelial cell layer. The ultrastructures of the frog digital pads are compared with those of other biological suction cups, such as those of octopuses and geckos. Further discussed are their interatomic or intermolecular mechanofunctional aspects, such as hanging upside down and moving easily over smooth surfaces with the aid of interatomic or intermolecular forces, the so-called 'van der Waals forces', without any energy expenditure.

  12. [Meiotic chromosomes of the tree frog Smilisca baudinii (Anura: Hylidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guzmán, Javier; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeane Rimber

    2011-03-01

    The Mexican tree frog Smilisca baudinii, is a very common frog in Central America. In spite their importance to keep the ecological equilibrium of the rainforest, its biology and genetics are poorly known. In order to contribute with its biological knowledge, we described the typical meiotic karyotype based in standard cytogenetic protocols to specimens collected in Tabasco, Mexico. The study was centered in the analysis of 131 chromosome spreads at meiotic stage from two adults of the species (one female and one male). The metaphase analysis allowed the establishment of the modal haploid number of 1n = 12 bivalent chromosomes. The chromosomic formulae from the haploid bivalent karyotype was integrated by 12 biarmed chromosomes characterized by twelve pairs of metacentric-submetacentric (msm) chromosomes. The meiotic counting gives the idea that diploid chromosome number is integrated by a complement of 2n = 24 biarmed chromosomes. The presence of sex chromosomes from female and male meiotic spreads was not observed. Current results suggest that S. baudinii chromosome structure is well shared among Hylidae family and "B" chromosomes are particular structures that have very important evolutionary consequences in species diversification.

  13. The genetic structure of a relict population of wood frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Rick; Muths, Erin; Noon, Barry; Oyler-McCance, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and the associated reduction in connectivity between habitat patches are commonly cited causes of genetic differentiation and reduced genetic variation in animal populations. We used eight microsatellite markers to investigate genetic structure and levels of genetic diversity in a relict population of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvatica) in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, where recent disturbances have altered hydrologic processes and fragmented amphibian habitat. We also estimated migration rates among subpopulations, tested for a pattern of isolation-by-distance, and looked for evidence of a recent population bottleneck. The results from the clustering algorithm in Program STRUCTURE indicated the population is partitioned into two genetic clusters (subpopulations), and this result was further supported by factorial component analysis. In addition, an estimate of FST (FST = 0.0675, P value \\0.0001) supported the genetic differentiation of the two clusters. Estimates of migration rates among the two subpopulations were low, as were estimates of genetic variability. Conservation of the population of wood frogs may be improved by increasing the spatial distribution of the population and improving gene flow between the subpopulations. Construction or restoration of wetlands in the landscape between the clusters has the potential to address each of these objectives.

  14. Negative chronotropic effect of proton pump inhibitors on frog-heart preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Chander Shekhar; Utreja, Amita; Goel, Divya; Sandhu, Gurpreet; Gogia, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been known to cause bradycardia. We evaluated the effect of three PPIs, i.e. omeprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole on the heart rate of frog. The in situ frog heart preparation was set up. Heart rate and amplitude of contraction were studied following administration of different doses of the three PPIs. Statistical analysis was done by using Graphpad statistical software system. After 1 mg of omeprazole and rabeprazole, and 2 mg pantoprazole, the heart rate was similar as compared to baseline (p >0.05). After 2 mg of omeprazole and rabeprazole, and 4 mg pantoprazole, the reduction in heart rate was significant (p frog heart prepration.

  15. Superficial and deep blood vessel distribution in the frog telencephalon. Reference to morphological brain asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemali, M; Sada, E; Fiorino, L

    1990-01-01

    Nine frogs of the species "Rana esculenta" were heart perfused with Microfile Silicone Rubber. The frogs were examined both after dissection (cut with a razor blade) to study the superficial blood vessel pattern, and histologically (the Nissl staining method) to study the distribution of the deep blood capillaries. While the superficial blood vary in pattern, the deep capillaries are distributed symmetrically. This finding does not support a correlation between blood vessel pattern and morphological brain asymmetry, at least in the frog, and thus other explanations must be sought to explain brain asymmetry.

  16. Role of TAK1 and TAB1 in BMP signaling in early Xenopus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, H; Iwata, H; Masuyama, N; Gotoh, Y; Yamaguchi, K; Irie, K; Matsumoto, K; Nishida, E; Ueno, N

    1998-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily members elicit signals through stimulation of serine/threonine kinase receptors. Recent studies of this signaling pathway have identified two types of novel mediating molecules, the Smads and TGF-beta activated kinase 1 (TAK1). Smads were shown to mimic the effects of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), activin and TGF-beta. TAK1 and TAB1 were identified as a MAPKKK and its activator, respectively, which might be involved in the up-regulation of TGF-beta superfamily-induced gene expression, but their biological role is poorly understood. Here, we have examined the role of TAK1 and TAB1 in the dorsoventral patterning of early Xenopus embryos. Ectopic expression of Xenopus TAK1 (xTAK1) in early embryos induced cell death. Interestingly, however, concomitant overexpression of bcl-2 with the activated form of xTAK1 or both xTAK1 and xTAB1 in dorsal blastomeres not only rescued the cells but also caused the ventralization of the embryos. In addition, a kinase-negative form of xTAK1 (xTAK1KN) which is known to inhibit endogenous signaling could partially rescue phenotypes generated by the expression of a constitutively active BMP-2/4 type IA receptor (BMPR-IA). Moreover, xTAK1KN could block the expression of ventral mesoderm marker genes induced by Smad1 or 5. These results thus suggest that xTAK1 and xTAB1 function in the BMP signal transduction pathway in Xenopus embryos in a cooperative manner. PMID:9463380

  17. A distinct mechanism of vascular lumen formation in Xenopus requires EGFL7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta S Charpentier

    Full Text Available During vertebrate blood vessel development, lumen formation is the critical process by which cords of endothelial cells transition into functional tubular vessels. Here, we use Xenopus embryos to explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying lumen formation of the dorsal aorta and the posterior cardinal veins, the primary major vessels that arise via vasculogenesis within the first 48 hours of life. We demonstrate that endothelial cells are initially found in close association with one another through the formation of tight junctions expressing ZO-1. The emergence of vascular lumens is characterized by elongation of endothelial cell shape, reorganization of junctions away from the cord center to the periphery of the vessel, and onset of Claudin-5 expression within tight junctions. Furthermore, unlike most vertebrate vessels that exhibit specialized apical and basal domains, we show that early Xenopus vessels are not polarized. Moreover, we demonstrate that in embryos depleted of the extracellular matrix factor Epidermal Growth Factor-Like Domain 7 (EGFL7, an evolutionarily conserved factor associated with vertebrate vessel development, vascular lumens fail to form. While Claudin-5 localizes to endothelial tight junctions of EGFL7-depleted embryos in a timely manner, endothelial cells of the aorta and veins fail to undergo appropriate cell shape changes or clear junctions from the cell-cell contact. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time the mechanisms by which lumens are generated within the major vessels in Xenopus and implicate EGFL7 in modulating cell shape and cell-cell junctions to drive proper lumen morphogenesis.

  18. The protocadherin PAPC establishes segmental boundaries during somitogenesis in xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S H; Jen, W C; De Robertis, E M; Kintner, C

    2000-07-13

    One prominent example of segmentation in vertebrate embryos is the subdivision of the paraxial mesoderm into repeating, metameric structures called somites. During this process, cells in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) are first patterned into segments leading secondarily to differences required for somite morphogenesis such as the formation of segmental boundaries. Recent studies have shown that a segmental pattern is generated in the PSM of Xenopus embryos by genes encoding a Mesp-like bHLH protein called Thylacine 1 and components of the Notch signaling pathway. These genes establish a repeating pattern of gene expression that subdivides cells in the PSM into anterior and posterior half segments, but how this pattern of gene expression leads to segmental boundaries is unknown. Recently, a member of the protocadherin family of cell adhesion molecules, called PAPC, has been shown to be expressed in the PSM of Xenopus embryos in a half segment pattern, suggesting that it could play a role in restricting cell mixing at the anterior segmental boundary. Here, we examine the expression and function of PAPC during segmentation of the paraxial mesoderm in Xenopus embryos. We show that Thylacine 1 and the Notch pathway establish segment identity one segment prior to the segmental expression of PAPC. Altering segmental identity in embryos by perturbing the activity of Thylacine 1 and the Notch pathway, or by treatment with a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, leads to the predicted changes in the segmental expression of PAPC. By disrupting PAPC function in embryos using a putative dominant-negative or an activated form of PAPC, we show that segmental PAPC activity is required for proper somite formation as well as for maintaining segmental gene expression within the PSM. Segmental expression of PAPC is established in the PSM as a downstream consequence of segmental patterning by Thylacine 1 and the Notch pathway. We propose that PAPC is part of the mechanism that

  19. Growth-arrest-specific protein 2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported.To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures.Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest.

  20. RNA sequencing reveals a diverse and dynamic repertoire of the Xenopus tropicalis transcriptome over development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Meng How; Au, Kin Fai; Yablonovitch, Arielle L; Wills, Andrea E; Chuang, Jason; Baker, Julie C; Wong, Wing Hung; Li, Jin Billy

    2013-01-01

    The Xenopus embryo has provided key insights into fate specification, the cell cycle, and other fundamental developmental and cellular processes, yet a comprehensive understanding of its transcriptome is lacking. Here, we used paired end RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to explore the transcriptome of Xenopus tropicalis in 23 distinct developmental stages. We determined expression levels of all genes annotated in RefSeq and Ensembl and showed for the first time on a genome-wide scale that, despite a general state of transcriptional silence in the earliest stages of development, approximately 150 genes are transcribed prior to the midblastula transition. In addition, our splicing analysis uncovered more than 10,000 novel splice junctions at each stage and revealed that many known genes have additional unannotated isoforms. Furthermore, we used Cufflinks to reconstruct transcripts from our RNA-seq data and found that ∼13.5% of the final contigs are derived from novel transcribed regions, both within introns and in intergenic regions. We then developed a filtering pipeline to separate protein-coding transcripts from noncoding RNAs and identified a confident set of 6686 noncoding transcripts in 3859 genomic loci. Since the current reference genome, XenTro3, consists of hundreds of scaffolds instead of full chromosomes, we also performed de novo reconstruction of the transcriptome using Trinity and uncovered hundreds of transcripts that are missing from the genome. Collectively, our data will not only aid in completing the assembly of the Xenopus tropicalis genome but will also serve as a valuable resource for gene discovery and for unraveling the fundamental mechanisms of vertebrate embryogenesis.

  1. Migratory and adhesive properties of Xenopus laevis primordial germ cells in vitro

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    Aliaksandr Dzementsei

    2013-11-01

    The directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs to the site of gonad formation is an advantageous model system to study cell motility. The embryonic development of PGCs has been investigated in different animal species, including mice, zebrafish, Xenopus and Drosophila. In this study we focus on the physical properties of Xenopus laevis PGCs during their transition from the passive to the active migratory state. Pre-migratory PGCs from Xenopus laevis embryos at developmental stages 17–19 to be compared with migratory PGCs from stages 28–30 were isolated and characterized in respect to motility and adhesive properties. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we observed a decline in adhesiveness of PGCs upon reaching the migratory state, as defined by decreased attachment to extracellular matrix components like fibronectin, and a reduced adhesion to somatic endodermal cells. Data obtained from qPCR analysis with isolated PGCs reveal that down-regulation of E-cadherin might contribute to this weakening of cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, however, using an in vitro migration assay, we found that movement of X. laevis PGCs can also occur independently of specific interactions with their neighboring cells. The reduction of cellular adhesion during PGC development is accompanied by enhanced cellular motility, as reflected in increased formation of bleb-like protrusions and inferred from electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS as well as time-lapse image analysis. Temporal alterations in cell shape, including contraction and expansion of the cellular body, reveal a higher degree of cellular dynamics for the migratory PGCs in vitro.

  2. Migratory and adhesive properties of Xenopus laevis primordial germ cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzementsei, Aliaksandr; Schneider, David; Janshoff, Andreas; Pieler, Tomas

    2013-12-15

    The directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) to the site of gonad formation is an advantageous model system to study cell motility. The embryonic development of PGCs has been investigated in different animal species, including mice, zebrafish, Xenopus and Drosophila. In this study we focus on the physical properties of Xenopus laevis PGCs during their transition from the passive to the active migratory state. Pre-migratory PGCs from Xenopus laevis embryos at developmental stages 17-19 to be compared with migratory PGCs from stages 28-30 were isolated and characterized in respect to motility and adhesive properties. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we observed a decline in adhesiveness of PGCs upon reaching the migratory state, as defined by decreased attachment to extracellular matrix components like fibronectin, and a reduced adhesion to somatic endodermal cells. Data obtained from qPCR analysis with isolated PGCs reveal that down-regulation of E-cadherin might contribute to this weakening of cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, however, using an in vitro migration assay, we found that movement of X. laevis PGCs can also occur independently of specific interactions with their neighboring cells. The reduction of cellular adhesion during PGC development is accompanied by enhanced cellular motility, as reflected in increased formation of bleb-like protrusions and inferred from electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) as well as time-lapse image analysis. Temporal alterations in cell shape, including contraction and expansion of the cellular body, reveal a higher degree of cellular dynamics for the migratory PGCs in vitro.

  3. Single blastomere expression profiling of Xenopus laevis embryos of 8 to 32-cells reveals developmental asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Flachsova, Monika; Sindelka, Radek; Kubista, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the expression of 41 maternal mRNAs in individual blastomeres collected from the 8 to 32-cell Xenopus laevis embryos to determine when and how asymmetry in the body plan is introduced. We demonstrate that the asymmetry along the animal-vegetal axis in the oocyte is transferred to the daughter cells during early cell divisions. All studied mRNAs are distributed evenly among the set of animal as well as vegetal blastomeres. We find no asymmetry in mRNA levels that might be ascr...

  4. Stability and movement of mRNAs and their encoded proteins in Xenopus oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    The stability and movement of several polyadenylated (poly A+) and nonpolyadenylated (poly A-) mRNAs in Xenopus oocytes have been examined. At least 50% of the poly A+ mRNA molecules (9S rabbit globin mRNA, chicken ovalbumin, and lysozyme) were stable in oocytes over a 48- h period, irrespective of the amount injected. About 50% of injected poly A- reovirus mRNAs was degraded within the first 24 h of injection, irrespective of the amount injected, although no further degradation was observed ...

  5. Relocation of mitochondria to the prospective dorsal marginal zone during Xenopus embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, H. J.; Phillips, C. R.; Boore, J. L.; Bertman, J.; Whalon, B.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1995-01-01

    Dorsal-ventral axis formation in Xenopus laevis begins with a cytoplasmic rotation during the first cell cycle and culminates in a series of cell interactions and movements during gastrulation and neurulation that lead to the formation of dorsal-anterior structures. Evidence reported here indicates that mitochondria are differentially redistributed along the prospective dorsal-ventral axis as a consequence of the cortical-cytoplasmic rotation during the first cell cycle. This finding reinvigorates a possibility that has been considered for many years: asymmetries in cytoplasmic components and metabolic activities contribute to the development of morphological asymmetries.

  6. The biological effects of XTC-MIF: quantitative comparison with Xenopus bFGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J B; Howes, G; Symes, K; Cooke, J; Smith, J C

    1990-01-01

    Mesoderm in Xenopus and other amphibian embryos is induced by signals from the vegetal hemisphere acting on equatorial or animal hemisphere cells. These signals are diffusible and two classes of candidate signal molecule have been identified: the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) types. In this paper, we compare the effects of cloned Xenopus basic FGF (XbFGF) and electophoretically homogeneous XTC-MIF (a TGF-beta-like factor obtained from a Xenopus cell line) on animal pole explants. We find that they have a similar minimum active concentration (0.1-0.2 ng ml-1) but that, nonetheless, XTC-MIF is at least 40 times more active in inducing muscle. In general, we find that the two factors cause inductions of significantly different characters in terms of tissue type, morphology, gene expression and timing. At low concentrations (0.1-1.0 ng ml-1) both factors induce the differentiation of 'mesenchyme' and 'mesothelium' as well as blood-like cells. These latter cells do not, however, react with an antibody to Xenopus globin. This raised the possibility that the identification of red blood cells in other studies on mesoderm induction might have been mistaken, but combinations of animal pole regions with ventral vegetal pole regions confirmed that genuine erythrocytes are formed. The identity of the blood-like cells formed in response to the inducing factors remains unknown. At higher concentrations XTC-MIF induces neural tissue, notochord, pronephros and substantial and often segmented muscle. By contrast, XbFGF only induces significant amounts of muscle above 24 ng ml-1 and even then this is much less than that induced by XTC-MIF. For both factors an exposure of less than 30 min is effective. Competence of animal pole cells to respond to XbFGF is completely lost by the beginning of gastrulation (stage 10) while competence to XTC-MIF is detectable until somewhat later (stage 11). Since animal pole tissue is known to be able to

  7. SOX7 and SOX18 are essential for cardiogenesis in Xenopus1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chi; Basta, Tamara; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    Early in vertebrate development, endodermal signals act on mesoderm to induce cardiogenesis. The F-type SOXs SOX7 and SOX18β are expressed in the cardiogenic region of the early Xenopus embryo. Injection of RNAs encoding SOX7 or SOX18β, but not the related F-type SOX, SOX17, leads to the nodal-dependent expression of markers of cardiogenesis in animal cap explants. Injection of morpholinos directed against either SOX7 or SOX18 mRNAs lead to a partial inhibition of cardiogenesis in vivo, while...

  8. sox4 And sox11 Function during Xenopus laevis Eye Development

    OpenAIRE

    Wiebke Cizelsky; Annemarie Hempel; Marlen Metzig; Si Tao; Thomas Hollemann; Michael Kühl; Kühl, Susanne J.

    2013-01-01

    SoxC genes are involved in many developmental processes such as cardiac, lymphoid, and bone development. The SoxC gene family is represented by Sox4, Sox11, and Sox12. Loss of either Sox4 or Sox11 function is lethal during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that sox4 and sox11 are strongly expressed in the developing eye, heart as well as brain in Xenopus laevis. Morpholino oligonucleotide mediated knock-down approaches in anterior neural tissue revealed that interference with either S...

  9. Feedback from luminosity horizontal cells mediates depolarizing responses of chromaticity horizontal cells in the Xenopus retina.

    OpenAIRE

    Witkovsky, P; Gabriel, R; Krizaj, D; Akopian, A.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the depolarizing responses of chromaticity horizontal cells (C-HCs) to red light depend on a feedback signal from luminosity horizontal cells (L-HCs) to short-wavelength-sensitive cones in the retinas of lower vertebrates. In this regard we studied the C-HCs of the Xenopus retina. C-HCs and L-HCs were identified by physiological criteria and then injected with neurobiotin. The retina then was incubated with peanut agglutinin, which stains red-but not blue-sensitive c...

  10. Demonstration of thymus-independent immune system in Xenopus laevis. Response to polyvinylpyrrolidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochinai, S

    1976-01-01

    Larvae of Xenopus laevis were thymectomized at stage 45 (4 days old), and raised beyond metamorphosis. Thymectomized toads, when injected with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), produced the same titres of antibodies as non-thymectomized animals, providing strong evidence that the thymus-independent immune response is present in this anuran. Antibodies were of exclusively high molecular weight, heat-stable, and 2-mercaptoethanol sensitive. After immunization, lymphoid accumulations were evident in the splenic white pulp of both thymectomized and non-thymectomized toads, but in the red pulp the accumulations were prominent only in non-thymectomized toads. Images Figure 3 PMID:1027717

  11. Visualisation of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns in albino Xenopus larvae in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background It has long been known that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), its composition and flow, play an important part in normal brain development, and ependymal cell ciliary beating as a possible driver of CSF flow has previously been studied in mammalian fetuses in vitro. Lower vertebrate animals are potential models for analysis of CSF flow during development because they are oviparous. Albino Xenopus laevis larvae are nearly transparent and have a straight, translucent brain that facilitates the observation of fluid flow within the ventricles. The aim of these experiments was to study CSF flow and circulation in vivo in the developing brain of living embryos, larvae and tadpoles of Xenopus laevis using a microinjection technique. Methods The development of Xenopus larval brain ventricles and the patterns of CSF flow were visualised after injection of quantum dot nanocrystals and polystyrene beads (3.1 or 5.8 μm in diameter) into the fourth cerebral ventricle at embryonic/larval stages 30-53. Results The fluorescent nanocrystals showed the normal development of the cerebral ventricles from embryonic/larval stages 38 to 53. The polystyrene beads injected into stage 47-49 larvae revealed three CSF flow patterns, left-handed, right-handed and non-biased, in movement of the beads into the third ventricle from the cerebral aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius). In the lateral ventricles, anterior to the third ventricle, CSF flow moved anteriorly along the outer wall of the ventricle to the inner wall and then posteriorly, creating a semicircle. In the cerebral aqueduct, connecting the third and fourth cerebral ventricles, CSF flow moved rostrally in the dorsal region and caudally in the ventral region. Also in the fourth ventricle, clear dorso-ventral differences in fluid flow pattern were observed. Conclusions This is the first visualisation of the orchestrated CSF flow pattern in developing vertebrates using a live animal imaging approach. CSF flow in Xenopus albino larvae

  12. Visualizing and Analyzing Branching Microtubule Nucleation Using Meiotic Xenopus Egg Extracts and TIRF Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew; Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic and meiotic spindles consist primarily of microtubules, which originate from centrosomes and within the vicinity of chromatin. Indirect evidence suggested that microtubules also originate throughout the spindle, but the high microtubule density within the spindle precludes the direct observation of this phenomenon. By using meiotic Xenopus laevis egg extract and employing total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, microtubule nucleation from preexisting microtubules could be demonstrated and analyzed. Branching microtubule nucleation is an ideal mechanism to assemble and maintain a mitotic spindle, because microtubule numbers are amplified while preserving their polarity. Here, we describe the assays that made these findings possible and the experiments that helped identify the key molecular players involved.

  13. Controlling the Messenger: Regulated Translation of Maternal mRNAs in Xenopus laevis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Michael D; Fox, Catherine A; Dowdle, Megan E; Blaser, Susanne Imboden; Chung, Andy; Park, Sookhee

    2017-01-01

    The selective translation of maternal mRNAs encoding cell-fate determinants drives the earliest decisions of embryogenesis that establish the vertebrate body plan. This chapter will discuss studies in Xenopus laevis that provide insights into mechanisms underlying this translational control. Xenopus has been a powerful model organism for many discoveries relevant to the translational control of maternal mRNAs because of the large size of its oocytes and eggs that allow for microinjection of molecules and the relative ease of manipulating the oocyte to egg transition (maturation) and fertilization in culture. Consequently, many key studies have focused on the expression of maternal mRNAs during the oocyte to egg transition (the meiotic cell cycle) and the rapid cell divisions immediately following fertilization. This research has made seminal contributions to our understanding of translational regulatory mechanisms, but while some of the mRNAs under consideration at these stages encode cell-fate determinants, many encode cell cycle regulatory proteins that drive these early cell cycles. In contrast, while maternal mRNAs encoding key developmental (i.e., cell-fate) regulators that function after the first cleavage stages may exploit aspects of these foundational mechanisms, studies reveal that these mRNAs must also rely on distinct and, as of yet, incompletely understood mechanisms. These findings are logical because the functions of such developmental regulatory proteins have requirements distinct from cell cycle regulators, including becoming relevant only after fertilization and then only in specific cells of the embryo. Indeed, key maternal cell-fate determinants must be made available in exquisitely precise amounts (usually low), only at specific times and in specific cells during embryogenesis. To provide an appreciation for the regulation of maternal cell-fate determinant expression, an overview of the maternal phase of Xenopus embryogenesis will be presented

  14. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa)...

  15. Exploratory evaluation of nutrient enrichment and frog response at Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We sampled nutrient and water quality parameters and surveyed Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) life stages (eggs, larvae and recently metamorphosed juveniles) to...

  16. Effects of ACTH4–10 on synaptic transmission in frog sympathetic ganglion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, W.; Bercken, J. van den

    1979-01-01

    The influenced of ACHT4−10, a behaviourally active fragment of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) devoid of endocrine activity, on synaptic transmission in the paravertebral sympathetic ganglion of the frog was investigated. Postsynaptic potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of preganglionic

  17. Effects of oxymorphazone in frogs: long lasting antinociception in vivo, and apparently irreversible binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyhe, S.; Hoffman, G.; Varga, E.; Hosztafi, S.; Toth, G.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Oxymorphazone was found to be a relatively weak antinociceptive drug in intact frog (Rana esculenta) when acetic acid was used as pain stimulus. Frogs remained analgesic for at least 48 hrs following oxymorphazone administration. The ligand increased the latency of wiping reflex in spinal frogs too. There effects were blocked by naloxone. In equilibrium binding studies (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone had high affinity to the opioid receptors of frog brain and spinal cord as well. Kinetic experiments show that only 25% of the bound (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone is readily dissociable. Preincubation of the membranes with labeled oxymorphazone results in a washing resistant inhibition of the opioid binding sites. At least 70% of the (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone specific binding is apparently irreversible after reaction at 5 nM ligand concentration, and this can be enhanced by a higher concentration of tritiated ligand.

  18. Recovery plan for the California Red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this plan is to reduce threats and improve the population status of the California red-legged frog sufficiently to warrant delisting. Actions...

  19. Gramicidin-perforated patch revealed depolarizing effect of GABA in cultured frog melanotrophs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frank Le Foll; Hélène Castel; Olivier Soriani; Hubert Vaudry; Lionel Cazin

    1998-01-01

    ...ˆ’ ] i ) in cultured frog melanotrophs. In the gramicidin-perforated patch configuration, 1 μM GABA caused a depolarization associated with an action potential discharge and a slight fall of membrane resistance...

  20. Report on Oregon Spotted Frog Egg Mass Surveys 2013-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) were once common across wetlands throughout western Washington and Oregon and were found in northern California and southern...

  1. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2015 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa)...

  2. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring at Jack Creek 2015-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from mark-recapture and egg mass surveys conducted 2015-2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa)...

  3. Oregon Spotted Frog Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa)...

  4. Balancing a cline by influx of migrants: a genetic transition in water frogs of eastern Greece

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hotz, Hansjürg; Beerli, Peter; Uzzell, Thomas; Guex, Gaston-Denis; Pruvost, Nicolas B M; Schreiber, Robert; Plötner, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Variation patterns of allozymes and of ND3 haplotypes of mitochondrial DNA reveal a zone of genetic transition among western Palearctic water frogs extending across northeastern Greece and European Turkey...

  5. Okefenokee and Banks Lake National Wildlife Refuge 2009 Frog Abnormality Survey Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of frog observations for abnormal conditions at select sites on both Okefenokee and Banks Lake NWRs. During the 2009 summer, STEP students Zach Carter along...

  6. Interacting amino acid replacements allow poison frogs to evolve epibatidine resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvin, Rebecca D; Borghese, Cecilia M; Sachs, Wiebke; Santos, Juan C; Lu, Ying; O'Connell, Lauren A; Cannatella, David C; Harris, R Adron; Zakon, Harold H

    2017-09-22

    Animals that wield toxins face self-intoxication. Poison frogs have a diverse arsenal of defensive alkaloids that target the nervous system. Among them is epibatidine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist that is lethal at microgram doses. Epibatidine shares a highly conserved binding site with acetylcholine, making it difficult to evolve resistance yet maintain nAChR function. Electrophysiological assays of human and frog nAChR revealed that one amino acid replacement, which evolved three times in poison frogs, decreased epibatidine sensitivity but at a cost of acetylcholine sensitivity. However, receptor functionality was rescued by additional amino acid replacements that differed among poison frog lineages. Our results demonstrate how resistance to agonist toxins can evolve and that such genetic changes propel organisms toward an adaptive peak of chemical defense. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Stormwater wetlands can function as ecological traps for urban frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Michael; Parris, Kirsten M; Swearer, Stephen E; Hale, Robin

    2018-03-01

    Around cities, natural wetlands are rapidly being destroyed and replaced with wetlands constructed to treat stormwater. Although the intended purpose of these wetlands is to manage urban stormwater, they are inhabited by wildlife that might be exposed to contaminants. These effects will be exacerbated if animals are unable to differentiate between stormwater treatment wetlands of varying quality and some function as 'ecological traps' (i.e. habitats that animals prefer despite fitness being lower than in other habitats). To examine if urban stormwater wetlands can be ecological traps for frogs, we tested if survival, metamorphosis-related measures and predator avoidance behaviours of frogs differed within mesocosms that simulated stormwater wetlands with different contaminant levels, and paired this with a natural oviposition experiment to assess breeding-site preferences. We provide the first empirical evidence that these wetlands can function as ecological traps for frogs. Tadpoles had lower survival and were less responsive to predator olfactory cues when raised in more polluted stormwater wetlands, but also reached metamorphosis earlier and at a larger size. A greater size at metamorphosis was likely a result of increased per capita food availability due to higher mortality combined with eutrophication, although other compensatory effects such as selective-mortality removing smaller individuals from low-quality mesocosms may also explain these results. Breeding adults laid comparable numbers of eggs across wetlands with high and low contaminant levels, indicating no avoidance of the former. Since stormwater treatment wetlands are often the only available aquatic habitat in urban landscapes we need to better understand how they perform as habitats to guide management decisions that mitigate their potential ecological costs. This may include improving wetland quality so that fitness is no longer compromised, preventing colonisation by animals, altering the cues

  8. Museum material reveals a frog parasite emergence after the invasion of the cane toad in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phalen David N

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A parasite morphologically indistinguishable from Myxidium immersum (Myxozoa: Myxosporea found in gallbladders of the invasive cane toad (Bufo marinus was identified in Australian frogs. Because no written record exists for such a parasite in Australian endemic frogs in 19th and early 20th century, it was assumed that the cane toad introduced this parasite. While we cannot go back in time ourselves, we investigated whether material at the museum of natural history could be used to retrieve parasites, and whether they were infected at the time of their collection (specifically prior to and after the cane toad translocation to Australia in 1935. Results Using the herpetological collection at the Australian Museum we showed that no myxospores were found in any animals (n = 115 prior to the cane toad invasion (1879-1935. The green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea, the Peron's tree frog (Litoria peronii, the green tree frog (Litoria caerulea and the striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii were all negative for the presence of the parasite using microscopy of the gallbladder content and its histology. These results were sufficient to conclude that the population was free from this disease (at the expected minimum prevalence of 5% at 99.7% confidence level using the 115 voucher specimens in the Australian Museum. Similarly, museum specimens (n = 29 of the green and golden bell frog from New Caledonia, where it was introduced in 19th century, did not show the presence of myxospores. The earliest specimen positive for myxospores in a gallbladder was a green tree frog from 1966. Myxospores were found in eight (7.1%, n = 112 frogs in the post cane toad introduction period. Conclusion Australian wildlife is increasingly under threat, and amphibian decline is one of the most dramatic examples. The museum material proved essential to directly support the evidence of parasite emergence in Australian native frogs. This parasite can be

  9. Museum material reveals a frog parasite emergence after the invasion of the cane toad in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, Ashlie; Phalen, David N; Slapeta, Jan

    2010-06-10

    A parasite morphologically indistinguishable from Myxidium immersum (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) found in gallbladders of the invasive cane toad (Bufo marinus) was identified in Australian frogs. Because no written record exists for such a parasite in Australian endemic frogs in 19th and early 20th century, it was assumed that the cane toad introduced this parasite. While we cannot go back in time ourselves, we investigated whether material at the museum of natural history could be used to retrieve parasites, and whether they were infected at the time of their collection (specifically prior to and after the cane toad translocation to Australia in 1935). Using the herpetological collection at the Australian Museum we showed that no myxospores were found in any animals (n = 115) prior to the cane toad invasion (1879-1935). The green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea), the Peron's tree frog (Litoria peronii), the green tree frog (Litoria caerulea) and the striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii) were all negative for the presence of the parasite using microscopy of the gallbladder content and its histology. These results were sufficient to conclude that the population was free from this disease (at the expected minimum prevalence of 5%) at 99.7% confidence level using the 115 voucher specimens in the Australian Museum. Similarly, museum specimens (n = 29) of the green and golden bell frog from New Caledonia, where it was introduced in 19th century, did not show the presence of myxospores. The earliest specimen positive for myxospores in a gallbladder was a green tree frog from 1966. Myxospores were found in eight (7.1%, n = 112) frogs in the post cane toad introduction period. Australian wildlife is increasingly under threat, and amphibian decline is one of the most dramatic examples. The museum material proved essential to directly support the evidence of parasite emergence in Australian native frogs. This parasite can be considered one of the luckiest parasites

  10. Glycogen synthase kinase-3: cryoprotection and glycogen metabolism in the freeze-tolerant wood frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieni, Christopher A; Bouffard, Melanie C; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-02-01

    The terrestrial anuran Rana sylvatica tolerates extended periods of whole-body freezing during the winter. Freezing survival is facilitated by extensive glycogen hydrolysis and distribution of high concentrations of the cryoprotectant glucose into blood and all tissues. As glycogenesis is both an energy-expensive process and counter-productive to maintaining sustained high cryoprotectant levels, we proposed that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) would be activated when wood frogs froze and would phosphorylate its downstream substrates to inactivate glycogen synthesis. Western blot analysis determined that the amount of phosphorylated (inactive) GSK-3 decreased in all five tissues tested in 24 h frozen frogs compared with unfrozen controls. Total GSK-3 protein levels did not change, with the exception of heart GSK-3, indicating that post-translational modification was the primary regulatory mechanism for this kinase. Kinetic properties of skeletal muscle GSK-3 from control and frozen frogs displayed differential responses to a temperature change (22 versus 4°C) and high glucose. For example, when assayed at 4°C, the K(m) for the GSK-3 substrate peptide was ∼44% lower for frozen frogs than the corresponding value in control frogs, indicating greater GSK-3 affinity for its substrates in the frozen state. This indicates that at temperatures similar to the environment encountered by frogs, GSK-3 in frozen frogs will phosphorylate its downstream targets more readily than in unfrozen controls. GSK-3 from skeletal muscle of control frogs was also allosterically regulated. AMP and phosphoenolpyruvate activated GSK-3 whereas inhibitors included glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate, ATP, glutamate, glutamine, glycerol, NH(4)Cl, NaCl and KCl. The combination of phosphorylation and allosteric control argues for a regulatory role of GSK-3 in inactivating glycogenesis to preserve high glucose cryoprotectant levels throughout each freezing bout.

  11. Reproduction and hybrid load in all-hybrid populations of Rana esculenta water frogs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ditte Guldager; Fog, Kåre; Pedersen, Bo Vest

    2005-01-01

    All-hybrid populations of the water frog, Rana esculenta, are exceptional in consisting of independently and to some extent sexually reproducing interspecific hybrids. In most of its range R. esculenta reproduces hemiclonally with one of the parental species, R. lessonae or R. ridibunda, but viable...... gametogenesis and mating between frogs with incompatible gametes induce a significant hybrid load in all-hybrid populations of R. esculenta, and we discuss compensating advantages and potential evolutionary trajectories to reduce this hybrid load....

  12. Interference of a short-chain phospholipid with ion transport pathways in frog skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unmack, M A; Frederiksen, O; Willumsen, N J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of mucosal application of the short-chain phospholipid didecanoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DDPC; with two saturated 10-carbon acyl chains) on active Na+ transport and transepithelial conductance (G) in the frog skin (Rana temporaria) were investigated. Active Na+ transport...... of the frog skin epithelium and opens a paracellular tight junction pathway. Both effects may be caused by incorporation of DDPC in the apical cell membrane....

  13. Nuclear Abnormalities in Erythrocytes of Frogs From Wetlands and Croplands of Western Ghats Indicate Environmental Contaminations

    OpenAIRE

    Raghunath, Shreyas; Veerabhadrappa, Chethankumar Masaruru; Krishnamurthy, Sannanegunda Venkatarama Bhatta

    2017-01-01

    Anuran amphibians are the biological models to assess the influence of environmental contamination. We conducted nuclear abnormality assessment and micronuclei test in erythrocytes of frogs to identify an early influence of environmental contaminations. In Western Ghats of India, farmers use different agrochemicals and obviously, the amphibian habitat is contaminated with combinations of many residues. Many frog species use these agro-ecosystem for breeding and to complete early life stage. I...

  14. Pecular Features of Hematopoiesis in the Liver of Mature and Immature Green Frogs (Pelophylax Esculentus Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akulenko N. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes characteristic features of the hematopoiesis in mature and immature green frogs (Pelophylax esculentus complex. Quantitative differences in liver myelograms were insignificant. However, in a sample of mature animals numerous significant correlations between the number of pigment inclusions in the liver and indicators of erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis were observed. Those correlations were absent in the immature frogs. We concluded that aft er the frogs’ breeding a lack of plastic resources, in particular, hemosiderin remains up to the hibernation.

  15. Opposite roles of DMRT1 and its W-linked paralogue, DM-W, in sexual dimorphism of Xenopus laevis: implications of a ZZ/ZW-type sex-determining system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Shin; Ikeda, Nozomi; Izutsu, Yumi; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Ito, Michihiko

    2010-08-01

    A Y-linked gene, DMY/dmrt1bY, in teleost fish medka and a Z-linked gene, DMRT1, in chicken are both required for male sex determination. We recently isolated a W-linked gene, DM-W, as a paralogue of DMRT1 in Xenopus laevis, which has a ZZ/ZW-type sex-determining system. The DNA-binding domain of DM-W shows high sequence identity with that of DMRT1, but DM-W has no significant sequence similarity with the transactivation domain of DMRT1. Here, we first show colocalization of DM-W and DMRT1 in the somatic cells surrounding primordial germ cells in ZW gonad during sex determination. We next examined characteristics of DM-W and DMRT1 as a transcription factor in vitro. DM-W and DMRT1 shared a DNA-binding sequence. Importantly, DM-W dose-dependently antagonized the transcriptional activity of DMRT1 on a DMRT1-driven luciferase reporter system in 293 cells. We also examined roles of DM-W or DMRT1 in gonadal formation. Some transgenic ZW tadpoles bearing a DM-W knockdown vector had gonads with a testicular structure, and two developed into frogs with testicular gonads. Ectopic DMRT1 induced primary testicular development in some ZW individuals. These observations indicated that DM-W and DMRT1 could have opposite functions in the sex determination. Our findings support a novel model for a ZZ/ZW-type system in which DM-W directs female sex as a sex-determining gene, by antagonizing DMRT1. Additionally, they suggest that DM-W diverged from DMRT1 as a dominant-negative type gene, i.e. as a ;neofunctionalization' gene for the ZZ/ZW-type system. Finally, we discuss a conserved role of DMRT1 in testis formation during vertebrate evolution.

  16. High efficiency TALENs enable F0 functional analysis by targeted gene disruption in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi T. Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Recently, gene editing with transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs has been used in the life sciences. TALENs can be easily customized to recognize a specific DNA sequence and efficiently introduce double-strand breaks at the targeted genomic locus. Subsequent non-homologous end-joining repair leads to targeted gene disruption by base insertion, deletion, or both. Here, to readily evaluate the efficacy of TALENs in Xenopus laevis embryos, we performed the targeted gene disruption of tyrosinase (tyr and pax6 genes that are involved in pigmentation and eye formation, respectively. We constructed TALENs targeting tyr and pax6 and injected their mRNAs into fertilized eggs at the one-cell stage. Expectedly, introduction of tyr TALEN mRNA resulted in drastic loss of pigmentation with high efficiency. Similarly, for pax6, TALENs led to deformed eyes in the injected embryos. We confirmed mutations of the target alleles by restriction enzyme digestion and sequence analyses of genomic PCR products. Surprisingly, not only biallelic but also paralogous, gene disruption was observed. Our results demonstrate that targeted gene disruption by TALENs provides a method comparable to antisense morpholinos in analyzing gene function in Xenopus F0 embryos, but also applies beyond embryogenesis to any life stage.

  17. Two Piwi proteins, Xiwi and Xili, are expressed in the Xenopus female germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynska, Anna; Minshall, Nicola; Armisen, Javier; Miska, Eric A; Standart, Nancy

    2009-02-01

    The Argonaute superfamily is a large family of RNA-binding proteins involved in gene regulation mediated by small noncoding RNA and characterized by the presence of PAZ and PIWI domains. The family consists of two branches, the Ago and the Piwi clade. Piwi proteins bind to 21-30-nucleotide-long Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), which map primarily to transposons and repeated sequence elements. Piwi/piRNAs are important regulators of gametogenesis and have been proposed to play roles in transposon silencing, DNA methylation, transcriptional silencing, and/or post-transcriptional control of translation and RNA stability. Most reports to date have concentrated on the Piwi family members in the male germline. We have identified four Piwi proteins in Xenopus and demonstrate that two, namely, Xiwi1b and Xili, are expressed in the oocyte and early embryo. Xiwi1 and Xili are predominantly found in small, separate complexes, and we do not detect significant interaction of Piwi proteins with the cap-binding complex. Putative nuclear localization and export signals were identified in Xiwi1 and Xili, supporting our observation that Xiwi1, but not Xili, is a nucleo-cytoplasmic protein. Furthermore, by immunoprecipitation of small RNAs, we establish Xiwi1 as a bona fide Piwi protein. These results suggest that the Piwi/piRNA pathway is active in translationally repressed oocytes. This is a significant finding as the Xenopus model provides an excellent tool to study post-transcriptional mechanisms.

  18. Xenopus embryos lacking specific isoforms of the corepressor SMRT develop abnormal heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malartre, Marianne; Short, Stephen; Sharpe, Colin

    2006-04-15

    The corepressor SMRT acts on a range of transcription factors, including the retinoid and thyroid hormone nuclear receptors. The carboxy-terminal region of SMRT contains CoRNR box motifs that mediate these interactions. We have shown, in Xenopus, that SMRT can exist as isoforms containing either two or three CoRNR boxes depending on the alternative splicing of exon 37b. The number of SMRT transcript isoforms expressed increases during development until all sixteen possible isoforms are identified in the swimming tadpole. To eliminate specific SMRT isoforms, we have developed a process that uses an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide in Xenopus to dictate the outcome of alternative splicing at a defined exon and used this to inhibit the formation of transcripts containing exon 37b. These embryos are therefore limited to the expression of SMRT isoforms that contain two rather than three CoRNR boxes. Analysis of responsive genes in these embryos shows that targets of thyroid hormone, but not retinoid signaling are affected by the elimination of exon 37b. Morpholino-injected embryos have swimming abnormalities and develop altered head morphology, an expanded olfactory epithelium and disorganized peripheral axons. These experiments indicate a critical role for the alternative splicing of SMRT in development.

  19. Spatially restricted translation of the xCR1 mRNA in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Forinash, Kara D; McGivern, Jered; Fritz, Brian; Dorey, Karel; Sheets, Michael D

    2009-07-01

    The xCR1 protein is a maternal determinant and cofactor for nodal signaling in vertebrate embryos. The xCR1 protein accumulates specifically in the animal cells of Xenopus embryos, but maternal xCR1 mRNA is distributed equally throughout all embryonic cells. Here, we show that vegetal cell-specific translational repression of xCR1 mRNA contributes to this spatially restricted accumulation of the xCR1 protein in Xenopus embryos. xCR1 mRNA was associated with polyribosomes in animal cells but not vegetal cells. A 351-nucleotide region of xCR1 mRNA's 3' untranslated region was sufficient to confer a spatially restricted pattern of translation to a luciferase reporter mRNA by repressing translation in vegetal cells. Repression depended upon the mRNA's 5' cap but not its 3' poly(A) tail. Furthermore, the region of xCR1 mRNA sufficient to confer vegetal cell-specific repression contained both Pumilio binding elements (PBEs) and binding sites for the CUG-BP1 protein. The PBEs and the CUG-BP1 sites were necessary but not sufficient for translation repression. Our studies of xCR1 mRNA document the first example of spatially regulated translation in controlling the asymmetric distribution of a maternal determinant in vertebrates.

  20. EphA7 modulates apical constriction of hindbrain neuroepithelium during neurulation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Sun, Jian; Li, Chaocui; Mao, Bingyu

    2016-10-28

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and their ephrin ligands play multiple roles in the developing nervous system, including cell segregation, axon guidance and synaptic plasticity. Here we report the expression and function of EphA7 in Xenopus hindbrain development. EphA7 is specifically expressed in the hindbrain throughout neurulation in Xenopus embryos. Knockdown of EphA7 by specific morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) disrupted cranial neural tube closure and disturbed apical constriction of hindbrain neuroepithelial cells, indicating weakened cell surface tension. In neural plate explants, EphA7 knockdown inhibited apical filamentous actin (F-actin) accumulation. We further showed that EphA7 is involved in the phosphorylation and activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in vivo and in vitro, a key regulator of actin assembly. Our findings reveal that EphA7 functions as a critical regulator of apical constriction of hindbrain neuroepithelial cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.