WorldWideScience

Sample records for theory tunneling splittings

  1. Communication: Tunnelling splitting in the phosphine molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergey N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-07

    Splitting due to tunnelling via the potential energy barrier has played a significant role in the study of molecular spectra since the early days of spectroscopy. The observation of the ammonia doublet led to attempts to find a phosphine analogous, but these have so far failed due to its considerably higher barrier. Full dimensional, variational nuclear motion calculations are used to predict splittings as a function of excitation energy. Simulated spectra suggest that such splittings should be observable in the near infrared via overtones of the ν{sub 2} bending mode starting with 4ν{sub 2}.

  2. Quadratic String Method for Locating Instantons in Tunneling Splitting Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitaš, Marko T

    2018-03-13

    The ring-polymer instanton (RPI) method is an efficient technique for calculating approximate tunneling splittings in high-dimensional molecular systems. In the RPI method, tunneling splitting is evaluated from the properties of the minimum action path (MAP) connecting the symmetric wells, whereby the extensive sampling of the full potential energy surface of the exact quantum-dynamics methods is avoided. Nevertheless, the search for the MAP is usually the most time-consuming step in the standard numerical procedures. Recently, nudged elastic band (NEB) and string methods, originaly developed for locating minimum energy paths (MEPs), were adapted for the purpose of MAP finding with great efficiency gains [ J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2016 , 12 , 787 ]. In this work, we develop a new quadratic string method for locating instantons. The Euclidean action is minimized by propagating the initial guess (a path connecting two wells) over the quadratic potential energy surface approximated by means of updated Hessians. This allows the algorithm to take many minimization steps between the potential/gradient calls with further reductions in the computational effort, exploiting the smoothness of potential energy surface. The approach is general, as it uses Cartesian coordinates, and widely applicable, with computational effort of finding the instanton usually lower than that of determining the MEP. It can be combined with expensive potential energy surfaces or on-the-fly electronic-structure methods to explore a wide variety of molecular systems.

  3. Quantum theory of tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Razavy, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    In this revised and expanded edition, in addition to a comprehensible introduction to the theoretical foundations of quantum tunneling based on different methods of formulating and solving tunneling problems, different semiclassical approximations for multidimensional systems are presented. Particular attention is given to the tunneling of composite systems, with examples taken from molecular tunneling and also from nuclear reactions. The interesting and puzzling features of tunneling times are given extensive coverage, and the possibility of measurement of these times with quantum clocks are critically examined. In addition by considering the analogy between evanescent waves in waveguides and in quantum tunneling, the times related to electromagnetic wave propagation have been used to explain certain aspects of quantum tunneling times. These topics are treated in both non-relativistic as well as relativistic regimes. Finally, a large number of examples of tunneling in atomic, molecular, condensed matter and ...

  4. Effect of superconducting electrons on the energy splitting of tunneling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.C.; Granato, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    We consider the effect of superconducting electrons on the magnitude of the energy splitting of a tunneling system. A specific example is a hydrogen atom tunneling in niobium. We find that in this case the splitting is roughly 20% smaller in the normal state than in the superconducting state. This difference in the splitting should be observable in neutron scattering and ultrasonic measurements

  5. Theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    When a tunneling barrier is nearly transparent, the standard tunneling (or transfer) Hamiltonian approximation fails. The author describes the theory which is necessary for calculating the tunneling current in these cases, and illustrate it by comparing theory and experiment on superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) junctions have ultra-thin tunnel barriers. This theory accurately explains the subgap structure which appears in the dynamical resistance of such SIS junctions, including many observed details which no previous theory has reproduced. The expression for the current through an SIS junction with an ultrathin barrier is given by I(t) = Re{Sigma/sub n/ J/sub n/ (omega/sub o/)e/sup in omega/o/sup t/} where omega/sub o/ = 2eV/h is the Josephson frequency, V is the bias voltage, and the J/sub n/ are voltage dependent coefficients, one for each positive or negative integer, n, and n=0. The relative sign of the terms involving cos(n omega/sub o/t) and sin(n omega/sub o/t) agrees with experiment, in contrast to previous theories of Josephson tunneling

  6. Quantum tunneling and field electron emission theories

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is an essential issue in quantum physics. Especially, the rapid development of nanotechnology in recent years promises a lot of applications in condensed matter physics, surface science and nanodevices, which are growing interests in fundamental issues, computational techniques and potential applications of quantum tunneling. The book involves two relevant topics. One is quantum tunneling theory in condensed matter physics, including the basic concepts and methods, especially for recent developments in mesoscopic physics and computational formulation. The second part is the f

  7. Tunnel splitting in biaxial spin models investigated with spin-coherent-state path integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhide; Liang, J.-Q.; Pu, F.-C.

    2003-01-01

    Tunnel splitting in biaxial spin models is investigated with a full evaluation of the fluctuation functional integrals of the Euclidean kernel in the framework of spin-coherent-state path integrals which leads to a magnitude of tunnel splitting quantitatively comparable with the numerical results in terms of diagonalization of the Hamilton operator. An additional factor resulted from a global time transformation converting the position-dependent mass to a constant one seems to be equivalent to the semiclassical correction of the Lagrangian proposed by Enz and Schilling. A long standing question whether the spin-coherent-state representation of path integrals can result in an accurate tunnel splitting is therefore resolved

  8. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect the presence of sub-wavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the point scatterer is in the near-field region; if the sub-wavelength scatterer is a spherical impedance discontinuity then the resolution will also be limited by the radius of the sphere. Therefore, superresolution imaging can be achieved as the scatterer approaches the source. This is analogous to an optical scanning tunneling microscope that has sub-wavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  9. Microscopic tunneling theory of long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Hattel, Søren A.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1992-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate that the detai......We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate...... that the detailed behavior of a solitonic mode (fluxon dynamics) in the junction is different from the results of the conventional perturbed sine-Gordon model....

  10. Tunnel splitting for a high-spin molecule in an in-plane field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Lin

    2000-08-01

    Direction and strength effects of a magnetic field on the ground-state tunnel splitting for a biaxial spin molecule with the model Hamiltonian H = k1Sz2 + k2Sy2- gµBHzSz- gµBHySy have been investigated within a continuous-spin approach including the Wess-Zumino-Berry term. The topological oscillation and the non-Kramers freezing indicated in the approach are in agreement with those observed in a recent experiment on Fe8 molecular nanomagnets. The behaviour of tunnel splitting with multiple orbits induced by strong fields has been revealed clearly.

  11. Riemann surfaces of complex classical trajectories and tunnelling splitting in one-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hiromitsu; Mouchet, Amaury; Shudo, Akira

    2017-10-01

    The topology of complex classical paths is investigated to discuss quantum tunnelling splittings in one-dimensional systems. Here the Hamiltonian is assumed to be given as polynomial functions, so the fundamental group for the Riemann surface provides complete information on the topology of complex paths, which allows us to enumerate all the possible candidates contributing to the semiclassical sum formula for tunnelling splittings. This naturally leads to action relations among classically disjoined regions, revealing entirely non-local nature in the quantization condition. The importance of the proper treatment of Stokes phenomena is also discussed in Hamiltonians in the normal form.

  12. Many-spin calculation of tunneling splittings in Mn12 magnetic molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H.A. De; Hams, A.H.; Dobrovitski, V.V.; Al-Saqer, M.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Harmon, B.N.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the tunneling splittings in a Mn12 magnetic molecule taking into account its internal many-spin structure. We discuss the precision and reliability of these calculations and show that restricting the basis (limiting the number of excitations taken into account) may lead to significant

  13. Many-spin effects and tunneling splittings in Mn12 magnetic molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H.A. De; Hams, A.H.; Dobrovitski, V.V.; Al-Saqer, M.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Harmon, B.N.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the tunneling splittings in a Mn12 magnetic molecule taking into account its internal many-spin structure. We discuss the precision and reliability of these calculations and show that restricting the basis (limiting the number of excitations taken into account) may lead to significant

  14. Hindered rotor tunneling splittings: an application of the two-dimensional non-separable method to benzyl alcohol and two of its fluorine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tiago Vinicius; Simón-Carballido, Luis; Ornellas, Fernando Rei; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2016-04-07

    In this work we present a novel application of the two-dimensional non-separable (2D-NS) method to the calculation of torsional tunneling splittings in systems with two hindered internal rotors. This method could be considered an extension of one-dimensional methods for the case of compounds with two tops. The 2D-NS method includes coupling between torsions in the kinetic and potential energy. Specifically, it has been applied to benzyl alcohol (BA) and two of its fluorine derivatives: 3-fluorobenzyl alcohol (3FBA) and 4-fluorobenzyl alcohol (4FBA). These molecules present two torsions, i.e., about the -CH2OH (ϕ1) and -OH (ϕ2) groups. The electronic structure calculations to build the two-dimensional torsional potential energy surface were performed at the DF-LMP2-F12//DF-LMP2/cc-pVQZ level of theory. For BA and 4FBA the calculated ground-state vibrational level splittings are 429 and 453 MHz, respectively, in good agreement with the experimental values of 337.10 and 492.82 MHz, respectively. In these two cases there are four equivalent wells and the tunneling splitting is the result of transitions between the two closer minima along ϕ1. The analysis of the wavefunctions, as well as the previous experimental work on the system, supports this conclusion. For 3FBA the observed ground-state splitting is 0.82 MHz, whereas in this case the calculated value amounts only to 0.02 MHz. The 2D-NS method, through the analysis of the wavefunctions, shows that this tiny tunneling splitting occurs between the two most stable minima of the potential energy surface. Additionally, we predict that the first vibrationally excited tunneling splitting will also be small and exclusively due to the interconversion between the second lowest minima.

  15. Point splitting regularization of classical string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1987-01-01

    We regulate Witten's star algebra using point splitting and conformal field theory techniques. Certain products of nonassociative operators and states are defined. This involves a refinement of star that exists in cases where Witten's star is ill-defined. A simple derivation of a recently discovered associativity anomaly is given. It is shown that there is no anomaly obstructing the equivalence of Witten's string theory action and the cubic action for string fields in the open string Fock space. (orig.)

  16. Tunneling splitting of magnetic levels in Fe8 detected by 1H NMR cross relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Y.; Aizawa, K.; Kumagai, K.; Ullu, R.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.

    2003-05-01

    Measurements of proton NMR and the spin lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the octanuclear iron (III) cluster [Fe8(N3C6H15)6O2(OH)12]ṡ[Br8ṡ9H2O], in short Fe8, have been performed at 1.5 K in a powder sample aligned along the main anisotropy z axis, as a function of a transverse magnetic field (i.e., perpendicular to the main easy axis z). A big enhancement of 1/T1 is observed over a wide range of fields (2.5-5 T), which can be attributed to the tunneling dynamics; in fact, when the tunneling splitting of the pairwise degenerate m=±10 states of the Fe8 molecule becomes equal to the proton Larmor frequency a very effective spin lattice relaxation channel for the nuclei is opened. The experimental results are explained satisfactorily by considering the distribution of tunneling splitting resulting from the distribution of the angles in the hard xy plane for the aligned powder, and the results of the direct diagonalization of the model Hamiltonian.

  17. Scaling of magnetic relaxation in Mn-12: a distribution of tunnel splittings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2002-03-01

    In magnetic fields applied parallel to the anisotropy axis, the relaxation of the magnetization of Mn_12-acetate measured for different sweep rates collapses onto a single scaled curve.(K. M. Mertes, Y. Suzuki, M. P. Sarachik, Y. Paltiel, H. Shtrikman, E. Zeldov, E. M. Rumberger, and G. Christou, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87), 227205 (2001). The form of the scaling(E. M. Chudnovsky and D. A. Garanin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 187203 (2001).) implies that the dominant symmetry-breaking process responsible for tunneling is a locally varying second-order transverse anisotropy, forbidden by tetragonal symmetry in the perfect crystal, which gives rise to a broad distribution of tunnel splittings in a real crystal of Mn_12-acetate. Different forms applied to even and odd-numbered steps provide a clear distinction between even resonances (associated with crystal anisotropy) and odd resonances (which require a transverse magnetic field).

  18. Gravitational energy in the framework of embedding and splitting theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, D. A.; Ilin, R. V.; Paston, S. A.; Sheykin, A. A.

    We study various definitions of the gravitational field energy based on the usage of isometric embeddings in the Regge-Teitelboim approach. For the embedding theory, we consider the coordinate translations on the surface as well as the coordinate translations in the flat bulk. In the latter case, the independent definition of gravitational energy-momentum tensor appears as a Noether current corresponding to global inner symmetry. In the field-theoretic form of this approach (splitting theory), we consider Noether procedure and the alternative method of energy-momentum tensor defining by varying the action of the theory with respect to flat bulk metric. As a result, we obtain energy definition in field-theoretic form of embedding theory which, among the other features, gives a nontrivial result for the solutions of embedding theory which are also solutions of Einstein equations. The question of energy localization is also discussed.

  19. Yangian and SUSY symmetry of high spin parton splitting amplitudes in generalised Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Roland; Savvidy, George

    2017-07-01

    We have calculated the high spin parton splitting amplitudes postulating the Yangian symmetry of the scattering amplitudes for tensor gluons. The resulting splitting amplitudes coincide with the earlier calculations, which were based on the BCFW recursion relations. The resulting formula unifies all known splitting probabilities found earlier in gauge field theories. It describes splitting probabilities for integer and half-integer spin particles. We also checked that the splitting probabilities fulfil the generalised Kounnas-Ross 𝒩 = 1 supersymmetry relations hinting to the fact that the underlying theory can be formulated in an explicit supersymmetric manner.

  20. Vibrational nonadiabaticity and tunneling effects in transition state theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The usual quantum mechanical derivation of transition state theory is a statistical one (a quasi-equilibrium is assumed) or dynamical. The typical dynamical one defines a set of internal states and assumes vibrational adiabaticity. Effects of nonadiabaticity before and after the transition state are included in the present derivation, assuming a classical treatment of the reaction coordinate. The relation to a dynamical derivation of classical mechanical transition state theory is described, and tunneling effects are considered

  1. Ab-initio theory of scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Ventra, M.; Pantelides, S. T.

    1998-03-01

    An ab-initio theory of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) has been developed by treating the sample and the tip as a single system. The theory combines density functional theory with the Kubo-Greenwood linear-response formalism for the conductivity( See, e.g., N.F. Mott in Conduction in Non-Crystalline Materials), (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1987).. The current is computed by taking into account the atomic relaxations that occur on both the surface and the tip due to their mutal interactions. Illustrative examples will be presented for the case of a clean Al(110) surface and the same surface with a vacancy.

  2. Analysis of a Split-Plot Experimental Design Applied to a Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A procedure to analyze a split-plot experimental design featuring two input factors, two levels of randomization, and two error structures in a low-speed wind tunnel investigation of a small-scale model of a fighter airplane configuration is described in this report. Standard commercially-available statistical software was used to analyze the test results obtained in a randomization-restricted environment often encountered in wind tunnel testing. The input factors were differential horizontal stabilizer incidence and the angle of attack. The response variables were the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment. Using split-plot terminology, the whole plot, or difficult-to-change, factor was the differential horizontal stabilizer incidence, and the subplot, or easy-to-change, factor was the angle of attack. The whole plot and subplot factors were both tested at three levels. Degrees of freedom for the whole plot error were provided by replication in the form of three blocks, or replicates, which were intended to simulate three consecutive days of wind tunnel facility operation. The analysis was conducted in three stages, which yielded the estimated mean squares, multiple regression function coefficients, and corresponding tests of significance for all individual terms at the whole plot and subplot levels for the three aerodynamic response variables. The estimated regression functions included main effects and two-factor interaction for the lift coefficient, main effects, two-factor interaction, and quadratic effects for the drag coefficient, and only main effects for the pitching moment coefficient.

  3. Proceedings of the meeting on tunneling reaction and low temperature chemistry, 98 August. Tunneling reaction and its theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Shiotani, Masaru

    1998-10-01

    Present report is the proceedings of the 4th Meeting on Tunneling Reaction and Low Temperature Chemistry held in August 3 and 4, 1998. The main subject of the meeting is 'Tunneling Reaction and Its Theory'. In the present meeting the theoretical aspects of tunneling phenomena in the chemical reaction were discussed intensively as the main topics. Ten reports were presented on the quantum diffusion of muon and proton in the metal and H 2 - anion in the solid para-hydrogen, the theory of tunnel effect in the nuclear reaction and the tunneling reaction in the organic compounds. One special lecture was presented by Prof. J. Kondo on 'Proton Tunneling in Solids'. The 11 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Band electron spectrum and thermodynamic properties of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ya.Farenyuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels is considered. Generalization of dynamic mean-field method for systems with correlated hopping was applied to the investigation of the model. Electron spectra, electron concentrations, average values of pseudospins and grand canonical potential were calculated within the alloy-analogy approximation. Electron spectrum and dependencies of the electron concentrations on chemical potential were obtained. It was shown that in the alloy-analogy approximation, the model possesses the first order phase transition to ferromagnetic state with the change of chemical potential and the second order phase transition with the change of temperature.

  5. Asymmetric transmission in planar chiral split-ring metamaterials: Microscopic Lorentz-theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Galynsky, Vladimir M.; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    The electronic Lorentz theory is employed to explain the optical properties of planar split-ring metamaterials. Starting from the dynamics of individual free carriers, the electromagnetic response of an individual split-ring meta-atom is determined, and the effective permittivity tensor of the me......The electronic Lorentz theory is employed to explain the optical properties of planar split-ring metamaterials. Starting from the dynamics of individual free carriers, the electromagnetic response of an individual split-ring meta-atom is determined, and the effective permittivity tensor...... of the metamaterial is calculated for normal incidence of light. Whenever the split ring lacks in-plane mirror symmetry, the corresponding permittivity tensor has a crystallographic structure of an elliptically dichroic medium, and the metamaterial exhibits optical properties of planar chiral structures. Its...

  6. Energy relaxation between low lying tunnel split spin-states of the single molecule magnet Ni4

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Loubens, G.; Chaves-O'Flynn, G. D.; Kent, A. D.; Ramsey, C.; Del Barco, E.; Beedle, C.; Hendrickson, D. N.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed integrated magnetic sensors to study quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) in single molecule magnet (SMMs) single crystals. These sensors incorporate a microstrip resonator (30 GHz) and a micro-Hall effect magnetometer. They have been used to investigate the relaxation rates between the 2 lowest lying tunnel split spin-states of the SMM Ni4 (S=4). EPR spectroscopy at 30 GHz and 0.4 K and concurrent magnetization measurements of several Ni4 single crystals are presented. EPR enables measurement of the energy splitting between the 2 lowest lying superposition states as a function of the longitudinal and transverse fields. The energy relaxation rate is determined in two ways. First, in cw microwave experiments the change in spin-population together with the microwave absorption directly gives the relaxation time from energy conservation in steady-state. Second, direct time-resolved measurements of the magnetization with pulsed microwave radiation have been performed. The relaxation time is found to vary by several orders of magnitude in different crystals, from a few seconds down to smaller than 100 μs. We discuss this and the form of the relaxation found for different crystals and pulse conditions.

  7. Quantum theory of strong-field frustrated tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popruzhenko, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    We show how the strong-field approximation, widely used for description of multiphoton and tunneling ionization, can be extended to analyse the excitation of bound states in intense low-frequency laser pulses. The proposed theory is based on the formalism of quantum trajectories and fills the gap between the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and classical simulations. In particular, it allows identifying non-adiabatic and interference effects in strong-field excitation of Rydberg states.

  8. Ions confined in spherical dielectric cavities modeled by a splitting field-theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Leo; Linse, Per

    2015-04-14

    The properties of ions confined within spherical dielectric cavities are examined by a splitting field-theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Three types of cavities are considered: one possessing a uniform surface charge density, one with a uniform volume charge density, and one containing mobile ions. In all cases, mobile counterions are present within the dielectric sphere. The splitting theory is based on dividing the electrostatic interaction into long- and short-wavelength contributions and applying different approximations on the two contributions. The splitting theory works well for the case where the dielectric constant of the confining sphere is equal to or less than that of the medium external to the sphere. Nevertheless, by extending the theory with a virial expansion, the predictions are improved. However, when the dielectric constant of the confining sphere is greater than that of the medium outside the sphere, the splitting theory performs poorly, only qualitatively agreeing with the simulation data. In this case, the strong-coupling expansion does not seem to work well, and a modified mean-field theory where the counterions interact directly with only their own image charge gives improved predictions. The splitting theory works best for the system with a uniform surface charge density and worst for the system with a uniform volume charge density. Increasing the number of ions within the sphere, at a fixed radius, tends to increase the ion density near the surface of the sphere and leads to a depletion region in the sphere interior; however, varying the ion number does not lead to any qualitative changes in the performance of the splitting theory.

  9. First-principles theory of inelastic currents in a scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Thirstrup, C.

    1998-01-01

    A first-principles theory of inelastic tunneling between a model probe tip and an atom adsorbed on a surface is presented, extending the elastic tunneling theory of Tersoff and Hamann. The inelastic current is proportional to the change in the local density of states at the center of the tip due...... to the addition of the adsorbate. We use the theory to investigate the vibrational heating of an adsorbate below a scanning tunneling microscopy tip. We calculate the desorption rate of PI from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) as a function of the sample bias and tunnel current, and find excellent a,agreement with recent...

  10. Tunneling splitting of magnetic levels in Fe8 detected by 1H NMR cross relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, Y.; Aizawa, K.; Kumagai, K.; Ullu, R.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of proton NMR and the spin lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the octanuclear iron (III) cluster [Fe8(N3C6H15)6O2(OH)12][Br8 9H2O], in short Fe8, have been performed at 1.5 K in a powder sample aligned along the main anisotropy z axis, as a function of a transverse magnetic field (i.e., perpendicular to the main easy axis z). A big enhancement of 1/T1 is observed over a wide range of fields (2.5-5 T), which can be attributed to the tunneling dynamics; in fact, when the tunneling spl...

  11. The tunneling universe in scalar-tensor theory with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sunggeun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the wavefunction of the universe with a tunneling boundary condition is considered in the context of the Brans-Dicke-type scalar-tensor theory with matter. The matter may be interpreted as a D-particle (or D0-brane) in string theory when the Brans-Dicke parameter ω is -1. We study two simple examples. The first example, the γ=0 (matter) case, has a scale factor duality even if the low energy string action is coupled to matter. The universe undergoes quantum transition from super-inflationary (pre-big-bang) to deflationary (post-big-bang) phase. We calculate the transition rate by solving the Wheeler-DeWitt equation and find that it is non-vanishing. The two phases are disconnected classically. The second example is the γ=1/3(radiation) case. With the help of earlier work this matter can be identified with a D0-brane in string theory. In this case, due to the absence of the scale factor duality and the complicated relations between scale factor and dilaton, it is hard to interpret the wavefunction as a pre- and post-big-bang phase

  12. Algebraic K-theory of crystallographic groups the three-dimensional splitting case

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Daniel Scott

    2014-01-01

    The Farrell-Jones isomorphism conjecture in algebraic K-theory offers a description of the algebraic K-theory of a group using a generalized homology theory. In cases where the conjecture is known to be a theorem, it gives a powerful method for computing the lower algebraic K-theory of a group. This book contains a computation of the lower algebraic K-theory of the split three-dimensional crystallographic groups, a geometrically important class of three-dimensional crystallographic group, representing a third of the total number. The book leads the reader through all aspects of the calculation. The first chapters describe the split crystallographic groups and their classifying spaces. Later chapters assemble the techniques that are needed to apply the isomorphism theorem. The result is a useful starting point for researchers who are interested in the computational side of the Farrell-Jones isomorphism conjecture, and a contribution to the growing literature in the field.

  13. Quantum mechanical tunneling in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanical tunneling plays important roles in a wide range of natural sciences, from nuclear and solid-state physics to proton transfer and chemical reactions in chemistry and biology. Responding to the need for further understanding of multidimensional tunneling, the authors have recently developed practical methods that can be applied to multidimensional systems. Quantum Mechanical Tunneling in Chemical Physics presents basic theories, as well as original ones developed by the authors. It also provides methodologies and numerical applications to real molecular systems. The book offers information so readers can understand the basic concepts and dynamics of multidimensional tunneling phenomena and use the described methods for various molecular spectroscopy and chemical dynamics problems. The text focuses on three tunneling phenomena: (1) energy splitting, or tunneling splitting, in symmetric double well potential, (2) decay of metastable state through tunneling, and (3) tunneling effects in chemical...

  14. Interfacial spin-orbit splitting and current-driven spin torque in anisotropic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2011-05-17

    Spin transport in magnetic tunnel junctions comprising a single magnetic layer in the presence of interfacial spin-orbit interaction (SOI) is investigated theoretically. Due to the presence of interfacial SOI, a current-driven spin torque can be generated at the second order in SOI, even in the absence of an external spin polarizer. This torque possesses two components, one in plane and one perpendicular to the plane of rotation, that can induce either current-driven magnetization switching from an in-plane to out-of-plane configuration or magnetization precessions, similar to spin transfer torque in spin valves. Consequently, it appears that it is possible to control the magnetization steady state and dynamics by either varying the bias voltage or electrically modifying the SOI at the interface.

  15. Non-splitting in Kirchberg's Ideal-related KK-Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilers, Søren; Restorff, Gunnar; Ruiz, Efren

    2011-01-01

    A. Bonkat obtained a universal coefficient theorem in the setting of Kirchberg's ideal-related KK-theory in the fundamental case of a C*-algebra with one specified ideal. The universal coefficient sequence was shown to split, unnaturally, under certain conditions. Employing certain K-theoretical ...

  16. What can density functional theory tell us about artificial catalytic water splitting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavros, Michael G; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Kowalczyk, Tim; McIsaac, Alexandra; Wang, Lee-Ping; Voorhis, Troy Van

    2014-07-07

    Water splitting by artificial catalysts is a critical process in the production of hydrogen gas as an alternative fuel. In this paper, we examine the essential role of theoretical calculations, with particular focus on density functional theory (DFT), in understanding the water-splitting reaction on these catalysts. First, we present an overview of DFT thermochemical calculations on water-splitting catalysts, addressing how these calculations are adapted to condensed phases and room temperature. We show how DFT-derived chemical descriptors of reactivity can be surprisingly good estimators for reactive trends in water-splitting catalysts. Using this concept, we recover trends for bulk catalysts using simple model complexes for at least the first-row transition-metal oxides. Then, using the CoPi cobalt oxide catalyst as a case study, we examine the usefulness of simulation for predicting the kinetics of water splitting. We demonstrate that the appropriate treatment of solvent effects is critical for computing accurate redox potentials with DFT, which, in turn, determine the rate-limiting steps and electrochemical overpotentials. Finally, we examine the ability of DFT to predict mechanism, using ruthenium complexes as a focal point for discussion. Our discussion is intended to provide an overview of the current strengths and weaknesses of the state-of-the-art DFT methodologies for condensed-phase molecular simulation involving transition metals and also to guide future experiments and computations toward the understanding and development of novel water-splitting catalysts.

  17. Gas-Kinetic Theory Based Flux Splitting Method for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    1998-01-01

    A gas-kinetic solver is developed for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. The new scheme is based on the direct splitting of the flux function of the MHD equations with the inclusion of "particle" collisions in the transport process. Consequently, the artificial dissipation in the new scheme is much reduced in comparison with the MHD Flux Vector Splitting Scheme. At the same time, the new scheme is compared with the well-developed Roe-type MHD solver. It is concluded that the kinetic MHD scheme is more robust and efficient than the Roe- type method, and the accuracy is competitive. In this paper the general principle of splitting the macroscopic flux function based on the gas-kinetic theory is presented. The flux construction strategy may shed some light on the possible modification of AUSM- and CUSP-type schemes for the compressible Euler equations, as well as to the development of new schemes for a non-strictly hyperbolic system.

  18. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  19. Collapsed Shape of Shallow Unlined Tunnels Based on Functional Catastrophe Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the collapse mechanisms and possible collapsing block shapes of shallow unlined tunnels under conditions of plane strain. The analysis is performed following the framework from a branch of catastrophe theory, functional catastrophe theory. First, the basic principles of functional catastrophe theory are introduced. Then, an analytical solution for the shape curve of the collapsing block of a shallow unlined tunnel is derived using functional catastrophe theory based on the nonlinear Hoek-Brown failure criterion. The effects of the rock mass parameters of the proposed method on the shape and weight of the collapsing block are examined. Moreover, a critical cover depth expression to classify deep and shallow tunnels is proposed. The analytical results are consistent with those obtained by numerical simulation using the particle flow code, demonstrating the validity of the proposed analytical method. The obtained formulas can be used to predict the height and width of the collapsing block of a shallow unlined tunnel and to provide a direct estimate of the overburden on the tunnel lining. The obtained formulas can be easily used by tunnel engineers and researchers due to their simplicity.

  20. Theory of single-spin inelastic tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rossier, J

    2009-06-26

    I show that recent experiments of inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy of single and a few magnetic atoms are modeled with a phenomenological spin-assisted tunneling Hamiltonian so that the inelastic dI/dV line shape is related to the spin spectral weight of the magnetic atom. This accounts for the spin selection rules and dI/dV spectra observed experimentally for single Fe and Mn atoms deposited on Cu2N. In the case of chains of Mn atoms it is found necessary to include both first and second-neighbor exchange interactions as well as single-ion anisotropy.

  1. The Research on Tunnel Surrounding Rock Classification Based on Geological Radar and Probability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao Yong, Zhao; Xin, Ji Yong; Shuang Ying, Zuo

    2018-03-01

    In order to effectively classify the surrounding rock types of tunnels, a multi-factor tunnel surrounding rock classification method based on GPR and probability theory is proposed. Geological radar was used to identify the geology of the surrounding rock in front of the face and to evaluate the quality of the rock face. According to the previous survey data, the rock uniaxial compressive strength, integrity index, fissure and groundwater were selected for classification. The related theories combine them into a multi-factor classification method, and divide the surrounding rocks according to the great probability. Using this method to classify the surrounding rock of the Ma’anshan tunnel, the surrounding rock types obtained are basically the same as those of the actual surrounding rock, which proves that this method is a simple, efficient and practical rock classification method, which can be used for tunnel construction.

  2. Quantum field theory of material properties. Its application to models of Rashba spin splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, Giulio Albert Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we argue that microscopic field theories - which as such are already scientifically established - have emerged as a new paradigm in materials physics. We hence seek to elaborate on such field theories which underlie modern ab initio calculations, and we apply them to the bismuth tellurohalides (BiTeX with X=I,Br,Cl) as a prototypical class of spin-based materials. For this purpose, we begin by constructing tight-binding models which approximately describe the spin-split conduction bands of BiTeI. Following this, we derive the theory of temperature Green functions systematically from their fundamental equations of motion. This in turn enables us to develop a combined functional renormalization and mean-field approach which is suitable for application to multiband models. For the Rashba model including an attractive, local interaction, this approach yields an unconventional superconducting phase with a singlet gap function and a mixed singlet-triplet order parameter. We further investigate the unusual electromagnetic response of BiTeI, which is caused by the Rashba spin splitting and which includes, in particular, an orbital paramagnetism. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the Functional Approach to electrodynamics of media as a microscopic field theory of electromagnetic material properties which sits in accordance with ab initio physics.

  3. Scaling theory of electric-field-assisted tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Cabrera, H.; Zanin, D. A.; De Pietro, L.; Ramsperger, U.; Vindigni, A.; Pescia, D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments report the current (I) versus voltage (V) characteristics of a tunnel junction consisting of a metallic tip placed at a distance d from a planar electrode, d varying over six orders of magnitude, from few nanometres to few millimetres. In the ‘electric-field-assisted’ (or ‘field emission’) regime, as opposed to the direct tunnelling regime used in conventional scanning tunnelling microscopy, all I–V curves are found to collapse onto one single graph when d is suitably rescaled, suggesting that the current I=I(V,d) is in reality a generalized homogeneous function of one single variable, i.e. I=I(V⋅d−λ), where λ being some characteristic exponent and I(x) being a scaling function. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive explanation—based on analytical arguments, numerical simulations and further experimental results—for the scaling behaviour that we show to emerge for a variety of tip–plane geometries and thus seems to be a general feature of electric-field-assisted tunnelling. PMID:25002824

  4. Quasi-Classical Theory of Tunneling Spectroscopy in Superconducting Topological Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Shota; Yada, Keiji; Yamakage, Ai; Sato, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Yukio

    2014-06-01

    We develop a theory of tunneling spectroscopy in superconducting topological insulator (STI), i.e., superconducting state of a carrier-doped topological insulator. Based on the quasi-classical approximation, we obtain an analytical expression of the energy dispersion of surface Andreev bound states (ABSs) and a compact formula for tunneling conductance of normal metal/STI junctions. The obtained compact formula of tunneling conductance makes the analysis of experimental data easy. As an application of our theory, we study tunneling conductance in CuxBi2Se3. We reveal that our theory reproduces the previous results by Yamakage et al. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.85.180509, Phys. Rev. B 85, 180509(R) (2012)]. We further study magneto-tunneling spectroscopy in the presence of external magnetic fields, where the energy of quasiparticles is shifted by the Doppler effect. By rotating magnetic fields in the basal plane, we can distinguish between two different topological superconducting states with and without point nodes, in their magneto-tunneling spectra.

  5. Bias dependence of tunnel magnetoresistance in spin filtering tunnel junctions: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüders, U.; Bibes, M.; Fusil, S.; Bouzehouane, K.; Jacquet, E.; Sommers, C. B.; Contour, J.-P.; Bobo, J.-F.; Barthélémy, A.; Fert, A.; Levy, P. M.

    2007-10-01

    A spin filter is a type of magnetic tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic and the insulating barrier is ferro- or ferrimagnetic. We report on spin-dependent transport measurements and their theoretical analysis in epitaxial spin filters integrating a tunnel barrier of the high-Curie-temperature ferrimagnetic spinel NiFe2O4 , with half-metallic La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 and Au electrodes. A positive tunnel magnetoresonance of up to ˜50% is obtained at low temperature, which we find decreases with bias voltage. In view of these experimental results, we propose a theoretical treatment of the transport properties of spin filters with epitaxial magnetic barriers, based on an elliptical variation of the decay rates within the spin-dependent gaps in analogy with what was calculated for nonmagnetic barrier materials such as MgO or SrTiO3 . Whereas the spin filtering efficiency for zero bias is of one sign, we show that this can easily change with bias; the degree of change hinges on the energy variation of the majority and minority spin decay rates of the transmission across the barrier. We point out some shortcomings of approaches based on models in which the transmission is related to spin-dependent barrier heights, and some implications for future experimental and theoretical research on spin filters.

  6. Theory of long-range interactions for Rydberg states attached to hyperfine-split cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robicheaux, F.; Booth, D. W.; Saffman, M.

    2018-02-01

    The theory is developed for one- and two-atom interactions when the atom has a Rydberg electron attached to a hyperfine-split core state. This situation is relevant for some of the rare-earth and alkaline-earth atoms that have been proposed for experiments on Rydberg-Rydberg interactions. For the rare-earth atoms, the core electrons can have a very substantial total angular momentum J and a nonzero nuclear spin I . In the alkaline-earth atoms there is a single (s ) core electron whose spin can couple to a nonzero nuclear spin for odd isotopes. The resulting hyperfine splitting of the core state can lead to substantial mixing between the Rydberg series attached to different thresholds. Compared to the unperturbed Rydberg series of the alkali-metal atoms, the series perturbations and near degeneracies from the different parity states could lead to qualitatively different behavior for single-atom Rydberg properties (polarizability, Zeeman mixing and splitting, etc.) as well as Rydberg-Rydberg interactions (C5 and C6 matrices).

  7. Theory and feasibility tests for a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect subwavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the scatterer is in the near-field region. This means that, as the scatterer approaches the source, imaging of the scatterer with super-resolution can be achieved. Acoustic and elastic simulations support this concept, and a seismic experiment in an Arizona tunnel shows a TRM profile with super-resolution adjacent to the fault location. The SSTM is analogous to the optical scanning tunnelling microscopes having subwavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by the imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  8. Quasi-chemical theory of F-(aq): The "no split occupancies rule" revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Rempe, Susan B.; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2017-10-01

    We use ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) calculations and quasi-chemical theory (QCT) to study the inner-shell structure of F-(aq) and to evaluate that single-ion free energy under standard conditions. Following the "no split occupancies" rule, QCT calculations yield a free energy value of -101 kcal/mol under these conditions, in encouraging agreement with tabulated values (-111 kcal/mol). The AIMD calculations served only to guide the definition of an effective inner-shell constraint. QCT naturally includes quantum mechanical effects that can be concerning in more primitive calculations, including electronic polarizability and induction, electron density transfer, electron correlation, molecular/atomic cooperative interactions generally, molecular flexibility, and zero-point motion. No direct assessment of the contribution of dispersion contributions to the internal energies has been attempted here, however. We anticipate that other aqueous halide ions might be treated successfully with QCT, provided that the structure of the underlying statistical mechanical theory is absorbed, i.e., that the "no split occupancies" rule is recognized.

  9. Theory of spin inelastic tunneling spectroscopy for superconductor-superconductor and superconductor-metal junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, P.; Fransson, J.

    2015-05-01

    We address the tunneling conductance and spin inelastic tunneling spectroscopy of localized paramagnetic moments in a superconducting environment, pertaining to recent measurements on Fe-octaethylporphyrin-chloride using superconducting scanning tunneling microscopy. We demonstrate that the Cooper pair correlations in the tip and substrate generate a finite uniaxial anisotropy field acting on the local spin moment, and we argue that this field may be a source for the observed changes in the conductance spectrum for decreasing distance between the scanning tunneling tip and the local magnetic moment. We make a side-by-side comparison between the superconductor-superconductor junction and normal-metal-superconductor junction, and find qualitative agreement between the two setups while quantitative differences become explicit. When simulating the effects of electron pumping, we obtain additional peaks in the conductance spectrum that can be attributed to excitations between higher-energy spin states. The transverse anisotropy field couples basis states of the local spin which opens for transitions between spin states that are otherwise forbidden by conservation of angular momentum. Finally, we explore the influences of temperature, which tend to enable in-gap transitions, and an external magnetic field, which enables deeper studies of the spin excitation spectrum. We especially notice the appearance of a low and high excitation peak on each side of the main coherence peak as an imprint of transitions between the Zeeman split ground states.

  10. First-order correction terms in the weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Vinh H.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    of the WFAT at the quantitative level toward stronger fields, practically up to the boundary between tunneling and over-the-barrier regimes of ionization. The results apply to any atom or molecule treated in the single-active-electron and frozen-nuclei approximations. The theory is illustrated by calculations...... for hydrogen and noble-gas atoms....

  11. Dissipative tunneling through a potential barrier in the Lindblad theory of open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isar, A.

    2000-01-01

    In the Lindblad theory for open quantum systems, and analytical expression of the tunneling probability through an inverted parabola is obtained. This probability depends on the environment coefficient and increase with the dissipation and the temperature of the thermal bath. (author)

  12. Quantum mean-field theory of collective dynamics and tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negele, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    A fundamental problem in quantum many-body theory is formulation of a microscopic theory of collective motion. For self-bound, saturating systems like finite nuclei described in the context of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with static interactions, the essential problem is how to formulate a systematic quantal theory in which the relevant collective variables and their dynamics arise directly and naturally from the Hamiltonian and the system under consideration. Significant progress has been made recently in formulating the quantum many-body problem in terms of an expansion about solutions to time-dependent mean-field equations. The essential ideas, principal results, and illustrative examples are summarized. An exact expression for an observable of interest is written using a functional integral representation for the evolution operator, and tractable time-dependent mean field equations are obtained by application of the stationary-phase approximation (SPA) to the functional integral. Corrections to the lowest-order theory may be systematically enumerated. 6 figures. (RWR)

  13. Split Fovea Theory and the Role of the Two Cerebral Hemispheres in Reading: A Review of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Andrew W.; Brysbaert, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Split fovea theory proposes that when the eyes are fixated within a written word, visual information about the letters falling to the left of fixation is projected initially to the right cerebral hemisphere while visual information about the letters falling to the right of fixation is projected to the left cerebral hemisphere. The two parts of the…

  14. Numerical analysis of tunneling paths in constant field SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Bruening, O.; Raabe, B.

    1991-03-01

    We present results of a computer analysis of euclidean solutions of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory Hamiltonian for constant fields. The accumulation of tunneling solutions in a certain region of phase space is investigated because it is expected to give a strong contribution to the path integral. Our analysis shows, that an infinite set of classical trajectories with finite action exists, and describes how they cluster. (orig.)

  15. Numerical analysis of tunneling paths in constant field SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Bruening, O.; Raabe, B.

    1992-01-01

    We present results of a computer analysis of euclidean solutions of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory Hamiltonian for constant fields. The accumulation of tunneling solutions in a certain region of phase space is investigated because it is expected to give a strong contribution to the path integral. Our analysis shows, that an infinite set of classical trajectories with finite action exists, and describes how they cluster. (orig.)

  16. Tunneling in quantum cosmology and holographic SYM theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoroku, Kazuo; Nakano, Yoshimasa; Tachibana, Motoi; Toyoda, Fumihiko

    2018-03-01

    We study the time evolution of the early Universe, which is developed by a cosmological constant Λ4 and supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) fields in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-time. The renormalized vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor of the SYM theory is obtained in a holographic way. It includes a radiation of the SYM field, parametrized as C . The evolution is controlled by this radiation C and the cosmological constant Λ4. For positive Λ4, an inflationary solution is obtained at late time. When C is added, the quantum mechanical situation at early time is fairly changed. Here we perform the early time analysis in terms of two different approaches, (i) the Wheeler-DeWitt equation and (ii) Lorentzian path integral with the Picard-Lefschetz method by introducing an effective action. The results of two methods are compared.

  17. Nearest-neighbor distributions and tunneling splittings in interacting many-body two-level boson systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Quiroz, Saul; Benet, Luis

    2010-01-01

    We study the nearest-neighbor distributions of the k-body embedded ensembles of random matrices for n bosons distributed over two-degenerate single-particle states. This ensemble, as a function of k, displays a transition from harmonic-oscillator behavior (k=1) to random-matrix-type behavior (k=n). We show that a large and robust quasidegeneracy is present for a wide interval of values of k when the ensemble is time-reversal invariant. These quasidegenerate levels are Shnirelman doublets which appear due to the integrability and time-reversal invariance of the underlying classical systems. We present results related to the frequency in the spectrum of these degenerate levels in terms of k and discuss the statistical properties of the splittings of these doublets.

  18. Correlation of theory to wind-tunnel data at Reynolds numbers below 500,000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Raquel; Mcghee, Robert J.; Walker, Betty S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained from two airfoil analysis methods compared with previously published wind tunnel test data at chord Reynolds numbers below 500,000. The analysis methods are from the Eppler-Somers airfoil design/analysis code and from ISES, the Drela-Giles Airfoil design/analysis code. The experimental data are from recent tests of the Eppler 387 airfoil in the NASA Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. For R not less than 200,000, lift and pitching moment predictions from both theories compare well with experiment. Drag predictions from both theories also agree with experiment, although to different degrees. However, most of the drag predictions from the Eppler-Somers code are accompanied with separation bubble warnings which indicate that the drag predictions are too low. With the Drela-Giles code, there is a large discrepancy between the computed and experimental pressure distributions in cases with laminar separation bubbles, although the drag polar predictions are similar in trend to experiment.

  19. Theory of Faraday rotation beatings in quantum wells with great value of spin splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Gridnev, V N

    2001-01-01

    The conductivity electrons spin dynamics in the semiconducting heterostructures when the spin splitting value exceeds the energy levels widening due to collisions is theoretically studied. It is shown that the spin density component normal to the quantum well planes may oscillate with time even by absence of the external magnetic field. These oscillations might be excited and registered through the method of the nonlinear two-pulse spectroscopy. In contrast to the small spin splitting the external cross-sectional magnetic field strongly effects the spin dynamics in this mode

  20. Study and Application on Stability Classification of Tunnel Surrounding Rock Based on Uncertainty Measure Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hujun He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on uncertainty measure theory, a stability classification and order-arranging model of surrounding rock was established. Considering the practical engineering geologic condition, 5 factors that influence surrounding rock stability were taken into account and uncertainty measure function was obtained based on the in situ data. In this model, uncertainty influence factors were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively based on the real situation; the weight of index was given based on information entropy theory; surrounding rock stability level was judged based on credible degree recognition criterion; and surrounding rock was ordered based on order-arranging criterion. Furthermore, this model was employed to evaluate 5 sections surrounding rock in Dongshan tunnel of Huainan. The results show that uncertainty measure method is reasonable and can have significance for surrounding rock stability evaluation in the future.

  1. Quantum variational transition state theory for hydrogen tunneling in enzyme catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Eli

    2012-11-01

    Experiments in recent years have shown that there is a large kinetic isotope effect in the rate of transfer of hydrogen or deuterium in enzymatic reactions of soybean lipoxygenase-1. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is only weakly temperature dependent but varies significantly in the presence of mutants whose functional groups are located rather far from the reaction center. In this paper we suggest that variational transition state theory as applied to dissipative systems, above the crossover temperature between deep tunneling and thermal activation, may be used as a paradigm for understanding the dynamics of these reactions. We find that the theory fits the experimental data rather well. The effects of different mutants are readily interpreted in terms of the friction they exert on the reaction center. Increasing the distal functional group increases the friction and thus lowers the kinetic isotope effect.

  2. Tunneling molecular dynamics in the light of the corpuscular-wave dualism theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latanowicz, L; Filipek, P

    2007-08-16

    This paper presents the experimental demonstration of the corpuscular-wave dualism theory. The correlation between the de Broglie wavelength related to the thermal motion and the potential barrier width and height is reported. The stochastic jumps of light atoms (hydrogen, deuterium) between two equilibrium sites A and B (identical geometry) occur via different pathways; one pathway is over the barrier (classical dynamics), and the other one is through the barrier (tunneling). On the over-the-barrier pathway, there are no obstacles for the de Broglie waves, and this pathway exists from high to low temperatures up to 0 K because the thermal energy is subjected to the Maxwell distribution and a certain number of particles owns enough energy for the hopping over the barrier. On the tunneling pathway, the particles pass through the barrier, or they are reflected from the barrier. Only particles with the energy lower than barrier heights are able to perform a tunneling hopping. The de Broglie waves related to these energies are longer than the barrier width. The Schrödinger equation is applied to calculate the rate constant of tunneling dynamics. The Maxwell distribution of the thermal energy has been taken into account to calculate the tunneling rate constant. The equations for the total spectral density of complex motion derived earlier by us together with the expression for the tunneling rate constant, derived in the present paper, are used in analysis of the temperature dependence of deuteron spin-lattice relaxation of the ammonium ion in the deuterated analogue of ammonium hexachloroplumbate ((ND4)2PbCl6). It has been established that the equation CpTtun = EH (thermal energy equals activation energy), where Cp is the molar heat capacity (temperature-dependent, known from literature), determines directly the low temperature Ttun at which the de Broglie wavelength, lambdadeBroglie, related to the thermal energy, CpT, is equal to the potential barrier width, L. Above

  3. Theory of macroscopic quantum tunneling in high-T c cuprate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Tanaka, Yukio; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    To reveal macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in high-T c superconductor Josephson junctions is an important issue since there is a possibility to fabricate a superconducting quantum bit by use of high T c junctions. Using the functional integral and the instanton theory, we analytically obtain the MQT rate (the inverse lifetime of the metastable state) for the c-axis twist Josephson junctions. In the case of the zero twist angle, the system shows the super-Ohmic dissipation due to the presence of the nodal quasiparticle tunneling. Therefore, the MQT rate is suppressed compared with the finite twist angle cases. Furthermore, the effect of the zero energy bound states (ZES) on the MQT in the in-plane junctions is theoretically investigated. We obtained the analytical formula of the MQT rate and showed that the presence of the ZES at the normal/superconductor interface leads to a strong Ohmic quasiparticle dissipation. Therefore, the MQT rate is noticeably inhibited compared with the c-axis junctions in which the ZES are completely absent

  4. Splitting Descartes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilhab, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    Kognition og Pædagogik vol. 48:10-18. 2003 Short description : The cognitivistic paradigm and Descartes' view of embodied knowledge. Abstract: That the philosopher Descartes separated the mind from the body is hardly news: He did it so effectively that his name is forever tied to that division....... But what exactly is Descartes' point? How does the Kartesian split hold up to recent biologically based learning theories?...

  5. Theory of inelastic electron tunneling from a localized spin in the impulsive approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mats

    2009-07-31

    A simple expression for the conductance steps in inelastic electron tunneling from spin excitations in a single magnetic atom adsorbed on a nonmagnetic metal surface is derived. The inelastic coupling between the tunneling electron and the spin is via the exchange coupling and is treated in an impulsive approximation using the Tersoff-Hamann approximation for the tunneling between the tip and the sample.

  6. Communication: spin-orbit splittings in degenerate open-shell states via Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster theory: a measure for the coupling contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-03-21

    We propose a generally applicable scheme for the computation of spin-orbit (SO) splittings in degenerate open-shell systems using multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) theory. As a specific method, Mukherjee's version of MRCC (Mk-MRCC) in conjunction with an effective mean-field SO operator is adapted for this purpose. An expression for the SO splittings is derived and implemented using Mk-MRCC analytic derivative techniques. The computed SO splittings are found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Due to the symmetry properties of the SO operator, SO splittings can be considered a quality measure for the coupling between reference determinants in Jeziorski-Monkhorst based MRCC methods. We thus provide numerical insights into the coupling problem of Mk-MRCC theory. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  7. Hawking radiation as tunneling from charged black holes in 0A string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongbin

    2011-09-01

    There has been much work on explaining Hawking radiation as a quantum tunneling process through horizons. Basically, this intuitive picture requires the calculation of the imaginary part of the action for outgoing particle. And two ways are known for achieving this goal: the null-geodesic method and the Hamilton-Jacobi method. We apply these methods to the charged black holes in 2D dilaton gravity which is originated from the low energy effective theory of type 0A string theory. We derive the correct Hawking temperature of the black holes including the effect of the back reaction of the radiation, and obtain the entropy by using the 1st law of black hole thermodynamics. For fixed-charge ensemble, the 0A black holes are free of phase transition and thermodynamically stable regardless of mass-charge ratio. We show this by interpreting the back reaction term as the inverse of the heat capacity of the black holes. Finally, the possibility of the phase transition in the fixed-potential ensemble is discussed.

  8. HSCT Ref-H Transonic Flap Data Base: Wind-Tunnel Test and Comparison with Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijgen, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    In cooperation with personnel from the Boeing ANP Laboratory and NASA Langley, a performance test was conducted using the Reference-H 1.675% model ("NASA Modular Model") without nacelles at the NASA Langley 16-Ft Transonic Tunnel. The main objective of the test was to determine the drag reduction achievable with leading-edge and trailing-edge flaps deflected along the outboard wing span at transonic Mach numbers (M = 0.9 to 1.2) for purpose of preliminary design and for comparison with computational predictions. The obtained drag data with flap deflections for Mach numbers of 1.07 to 1.20 are unique for the Reference H wing. Four leading-edge and two trailing-edge flap deflection angles were tested at a mean-wing chord-Reynolds number of about 5.7 million. An outboard-wing leading-edge flap deflection of 81 provides a 4.5 percent drag reduction at M = 1.2 A = 0.2), and much larger values at lower Mach numbers with larger flap deflections. The present results for the baseline (no flaps deflected) compare reasonably well with previous Boeing and NASA Ref-H tunnel tests, including high-Reynolds number NTF results. Viscous CFD simulations using the OVERFLOW thin-layer N.S. method properly predict the observed trend in drag reduction at M = 1.2 as function of leading-edge flap deflection. Modified linear theory properly predicts the flap effects on drag at subsonic conditions (Aero2S code), and properly predicts the absolute drag for the 40 and 80 leading-edge deflection at M = 1.2 (A389 code).

  9. Spin-Multiplet Components and Energy Splittings by Multistate Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grofe, Adam; Chen, Xin; Liu, Wenjian; Gao, Jiali

    2017-10-05

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory has been tremendously successful in chemistry and physics. Yet, it is unable to describe the energy degeneracy of spin-multiplet components with any approximate functional. This work features two contributions. (1) We present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) to represent spin-multiplet components and to determine multiplet energies. MSDFT is a hybrid approach, taking advantage of both wave function theory and density functional theory. Thus, the wave functions, electron densities and energy density-functionals for ground and excited states and for different components are treated on the same footing. The method is illustrated on valence excitations of atoms and molecules. (2) Importantly, a key result is that for cases in which the high-spin components can be determined separately by Kohn-Sham density functional theory, the transition density functional in MSDFT (which describes electronic coupling) can be defined rigorously. The numerical results may be explored to design and optimize transition density functionals for configuration coupling in multiconfigurational DFT.

  10. Theory of high-resolution tunneling spin transport on a magnetic skyrmion

    OpenAIRE

    Palotás, Krisztián; Rózsa, Levente; Szunyogh, László

    2018-01-01

    Tunneling spin transport characteristics of a magnetic skyrmion are described theoretically in magnetic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The spin-polarized charge current in STM (SP-STM) and tunneling spin transport vector quantities, the longitudinal spin current and the spin transfer torque are calculated in high spatial resolution within the same theoretical framework. A connection between the conventional charge current SP-STM image contrasts and the magnitudes of the spin transport v...

  11. Real-time Feynman path integral with Picard–Lefschetz theory and its applications to quantum tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanizaki, Yuya, E-mail: yuya.tanizaki@riken.jp [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Theoretical Research Division, Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Koike, Takayuki, E-mail: tkoike@ms.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8914 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Picard–Lefschetz theory is applied to path integrals of quantum mechanics, in order to compute real-time dynamics directly. After discussing basic properties of real-time path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles, we demonstrate its computational method in a concrete way by solving three simple examples of quantum mechanics. It is applied to quantum mechanics of a double-well potential, and quantum tunneling is discussed. We identify all of the complex saddle points of the classical action, and their properties are discussed in detail. However a big theoretical difficulty turns out to appear in rewriting the original path integral into a sum of path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles. We discuss generality of that problem and mention its importance. Real-time tunneling processes are shown to be described by those complex saddle points, and thus semi-classical description of real-time quantum tunneling becomes possible on solid ground if we could solve that problem. - Highlights: • Real-time path integral is studied based on Picard–Lefschetz theory. • Lucid demonstration is given through simple examples of quantum mechanics. • This technique is applied to quantum mechanics of the double-well potential. • Difficulty for practical applications is revealed, and we discuss its generality. • Quantum tunneling is shown to be closely related to complex classical solutions.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    While the first two volumes on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and its related scanning probe (SXM) methods have mainly concentrated on intro­ ducing the experimental techniques, as well as their various applications in different research fields, this third volume is exclusively devoted to the theory of STM and related SXM methods. As the experimental techniques including the reproducibility of the experimental results have advanced, more and more theorists have become attracted to focus on issues related to STM and SXM. The increasing effort in the development of theoretical concepts for STM/SXM has led to considerable improvements in understanding the contrast mechanism as well as the experimental conditions necessary to obtain reliable data. Therefore, this third volume on STM/SXM is not written by theorists for theorists, but rather for every scientist who is not satisfied by just obtaining real­ space images of surface structures by STM/SXM. After a brief introduction (Chap. 1), N. D. Lang first co...

  13. Embryo splitting

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Illmensee; Mike Levanduski

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian embryo splitting has successfully been established in farm animals. Embryo splitting is safely and efficiently used for assisted reproduction in several livestock species. In the mouse, efficient embryo splitting as well as single blastomere cloning have been developed in this animal system. In nonhuman primates embryo splitting has resulted in several pregnancies. Human embryo splitting has been reported recently. Microsurgical embryo splitting under Institutional Review Board appr...

  14. Modelling and Analysis of the Excavation Phase by the Theory of Blocks Method of Tunnel 4 Kherrata Gorge, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukarm, Riadh; Houam, Abdelkader; Fredj, Mohammed; Boucif, Rima

    2017-12-01

    The aim of our work is to check the stability during excavation tunnel work in the rock mass of Kherrata, connecting the cities of Bejaia to Setif. The characterization methods through the Q system (method of Barton), RMR (Bieniawski classification) allowed us to conclude that the quality of rock mass is average in limestone, and poor in fractured limestone. Then modelling of excavation phase using the theory of blocks method (Software UNWEDGE) with the parameters from the recommendations of classification allowed us to check stability and to finally conclude that the use of geomechanical classification and the theory of blocks can be considered reliable in preliminary design.

  15. Embryo splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Illmensee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian embryo splitting has successfully been established in farm animals. Embryo splitting is safely and efficiently used for assisted reproduction in several livestock species. In the mouse, efficient embryo splitting as well as single blastomere cloning have been developed in this animal system. In nonhuman primates embryo splitting has resulted in several pregnancies. Human embryo splitting has been reported recently. Microsurgical embryo splitting under Institutional Review Board approval has been carried out to determine its efficiency for blastocyst development. Embryo splitting at the 6–8 cell stage provided a much higher developmental efficiency compared to splitting at the 2–5 cell stage. Embryo splitting may be advantageous for providing additional embryos to be cryopreserved and for patients with low response to hormonal stimulation in assisted reproduction programs. Social and ethical issues concerning embryo splitting are included regarding ethics committee guidelines. Prognostic perspectives are presented for human embryo splitting in reproductive medicine.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1996-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy III provides a unique introduction to the theoretical foundations of scanning tunneling microscopy and related scanning probe methods. The different theoretical concepts developed in the past are outlined, and the implications of the theoretical results for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed in detail. Therefore, this book serves as a most useful guide for experimentalists as well as for theoreticians working in the filed of local probe methods. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  17. Theory of magnetoresistance of organic molecular tunnel junctions with nonmagnetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sha; Xie, Zuoti; Liu, Feilong; Smith, Darryl L.; Frisbie, C. Daniel; Ruden, P. Paul

    2017-04-01

    Large room-temperature magnetoresistance observed for devices composed of self-assembled monolayers of different oligophenylene thiols sandwiched between gold contacts has recently been reported [Z. Xie, S. Shi, F. Liu, D. L. Smith, P. P. Ruden, and C. D. Frisbie, ACS Nano 10, 8571 (2016), 10.1021/acsnano.6b03853]. The transport mechanism through the organic molecules was determined to be nonresonant tunneling. To explain this kind of magnetoresistance, we develop an analytical model based on the interaction of the tunneling charge carrier with an unpaired charge carrier populating a contact-molecule interface state. The Coulomb interaction between carriers causes the transmission coefficients to depend on their relative spin orientation. Singlet and triplet pairing of the tunneling and the interface carriers thus correspond to separate conduction channels with different transmission probabilities. Spin relaxation enabling transitions between the different channels, and therefore tending to maximize the tunneling current for a given applied bias, can be suppressed by relatively small magnetic fields, leading to large magnetoresistance. Our model elucidates how the Coulomb interaction gives rise to transmission probabilities that depend on spin and how an applied magnetic field can inhibit transitions between different spin configurations.

  18. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of the HIAD TPS Coupon in the NASA 8' High Temperature Tunnel: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Scott, Robert C,; Dowell, Earl H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a set of theoretical and experimental techniques to characterize the aeroelasticity of the thermal protection system (TPS) on the NASA Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). A square TPS coupon experiences trailing edge oscillatory behavior during experimental testing in the 8' High Temperature Tunnel (HTT), which may indicate the presence of aeroelastic flutter. Several theoretical aeroelastic models have been developed, each corresponding to a different experimental test configuration. Von Karman large deflection theory is used for the plate-like components of the TPS, along with piston theory for the aerodynamics. The constraints between the individual TPS layers and the presence of a unidirectional foundation at the back of the coupon are included by developing the necessary energy expressions and using the Rayleigh Ritz method to derive the nonlinear equations of motion. Free vibrations and limit cycle oscillations are computed and the frequencies and amplitudes are compared with accelerometer and photogrammetry data from the experiments.

  19. Semiempirical theory of level spacing distribution beyond the Berry-Robnik regime: modeling the localization and the tunneling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistic, Benjamin; Robnik, Marko

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the level spacing distribution in the classically mixed-type quantum systems (which are generic), exhibiting regular motion on invariant tori for some initial conditions and chaotic motion for the complementary initial conditions. In the asymptotic regime of the sufficiently deep semiclassical limit (sufficiently small effective Planck constant) the Berry and Robnik (1984 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 17 2413) picture applies, which is very well established. We present a new quasi-universal semiempirical theory of the level spacing distribution in a regime away from the Berry-Robnik regime (the near semiclassical limit), by describing both the dynamical localization effects of chaotic eigenstates, and the tunneling effects which couple regular and chaotic eigenstates. The theory works extremely well in the 2D mixed-type billiard system introduced by Robnik (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 3971) and is also tested in other systems (mushroom billiard and Prosen billiard).

  20. Predicting the aeroelastic behavior of a wind-tunnel model using transonic small disturbance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code, developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center, is applied to the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model for prediction of the model's transonic aeroelastic behavior. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic (flutter) analyses are then performed as perturbations about the static aeroelastic deformations of the AFW. The accuracy of the static aeroelastic procedure is investigated by comparing analytical results to those from AFW wind-tunnel experiments. Dynamic results are presented in the form of root loci at different Mach numbers for a heavy gas and for air test mediums. The resultant flutter boundaries for both gases, and the effects of viscous damping and angle of attack on the flutter boundary in air, are also presented.

  1. Theory of large tunneling magnetoresistance in a gapped graphene-based ferromagnetic superconductor F/(FS) junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soodchomshom, Bumned; Tang, I-Ming; Hoonsawat, Rassmidara

    2010-01-01

    Coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in a gapped graphene-based system (FS) is theoretically investigated. The center-of-mass momentum, P, of a Cooper pair in FS is found to be P∼2E ex /(hv F √(1-(m/E FS ) 2 )), where m, E ex , E FS are the rest mass energy of the Dirac electron, exchange energy and the Fermi energy in the superconductor FS, respectively. It is unlike the nature in a conventional FFLO state where P∼2E ex /hv F . This work studies the magneto effect on the transport property of a F/(FS) junction where F is a ferromagnetic gapless graphene. In this work, FS is achieved by depositing a conventional ferromagnetic s-wave superconductor on the top of gapped graphene sheet. The Zeeman splitting in FS induces spin-dependent Andreev resonance. The conductances effected by both spin-dependent specular Andreev reflections and spin-dependent Andreev resonances are investigated. The interplay between the spin-dependent specular Andreev reflection in the F region and the spin-dependent Andreev resonance in the FS region causes a very large tunneling magnetoresistance |TMR| ∼ 3000% for m → E FS , possibly valuable in the graphene-based spintronic devices. This is because of the coexistence of the superconductivity and ferromagnetism in FS and the relativistic nature of electrons in graphene.

  2. Perturbation treatment of doublet splittings in rotational spectra of molecules with two equivalent conformations separated by nonequivalent energy barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijck, B.P. van

    A method is described for analyzing doublet splittings in rotational spectracaused by tunneling between two equivalent conformations, under the restriction that the tunneling motion be effectively aperiodic. The splittings can mainly be fitted with three parameters: the purely torsional doublet

  3. Non-perturbative renormalization of the chromo-magnetic operator in heavy quark effective theory and the B{sup *} - B mass splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guazzini, D.; Sommer, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Meyer, H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics

    2007-05-15

    We carry out the non-perturbative renormalization of the chromo-magnetic operator in Heavy Quark Effective Theory. At order 1/m of the expansion, the operator is responsible for the mass splitting between the pseudoscalar and vector B mesons. We obtain its two-loop anomalous dimension in a Schroedinger functional scheme by successive oneloop conversions to the lattice MS scheme and the MS scheme. We then compute the scale evolution of the operator non-perturbatively in the N{sub f}=0 theory between {mu} {approx}0.3 GeV and {mu} {approx}100 GeV, where contact is made with perturbation theory. The overall renormalization factor that converts the bare lattice operator to its renormalization group invariant form is given for the Wilson gauge action and two standard discretizations of the heavy-quark action. As an application, we find that this factor brings the previous quenched predictions of the B{sup *}-B mass splitting closer to the experimental value than found with a perturbative renormalization. The same renormalization factor is applicable to the spin-dependent potentials of Eichten and Feinberg. (orig.)

  4. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the ...

  5. An evaluation of iced bridge hanger vibrations through wind tunnel testing and quasi-steady theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstrup, Henrik; Georgakis, Christos T.; Larsen, A.

    2012-01-01

    roughness is also examined. The static force coefficients are used to predict parameter regions where aerodynamic instability of the iced bridge hanger might be expected to occur, through use of an adapted theoretical 3- DOF quasi-steady galloping instability model, which accounts for sectional axial......Bridge hanger vibrations have been reported under icy conditions. In this paper, the results from a series of static and dynamic wind tunnel tests on a circular cylinder representing a bridge hanger with simulated thin ice accretions are presented. The experiments focus on ice accretions produced...... for wind perpendicular to the cylinder at velocities below 30 m/s and for temperatures between -5C and -1C. Aerodynamic drag, lift and moment coefficients are obtained from the static tests, whilst mean and fluctuating responses are obtained from the dynamic tests. The influence of varying surface...

  6. The effect of density-of-state tails on band-to-band tunneling: Theory and application to tunnel field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, S.; Schenk, A.

    2017-10-01

    It is demonstrated how band tail states in the semiconductor influence the performance of a Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (TFET). As a consequence of the smoothened density of states (DOS) around the band edges, the energetic overlap of conduction and valence band states occurs gradually at the onset of band-to-band tunneling (BTBT), thus degrading the sub-threshold swing (SS) of the TFET. The effect of the band tail states on the current-voltage characteristics is modelled quantum-mechanically based on the idea of zero-phonon trap-assisted tunneling between band and tail states. The latter are assumed to arise from a 3-dimensional pseudo-delta potential proposed by Vinogradov [1]. This model potential allows the derivation of analytical expressions for the generation rate covering the whole range from very strong to very weak localization of the tail states. Comparison with direct BTBT in the one-band effective mass approximation reveals the essential features of tail-to-band tunneling. Furthermore, an analytical solution for the problem of tunneling from continuum states of the disturbed DOS to states in the opposite band is found, and the differences to direct BTBT are worked out. Based on the analytical expressions, a semi-classical model is implemented in a commercial device simulator which involves numerical integration along the tunnel paths. The impact of the tail states on the device performance is analyzed for a nanowire Gate-All-Around TFET. The simulations show that tail states notably impact the transfer characteristics of a TFET. It is found that exponentially decaying band tails result in a stronger degradation of the SS than tail states with a Gaussian decay of their density. The developed model allows more realistic simulations of TFETs including their non-idealities.

  7. Aspects of Split Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Arkani-Hamed, N; Giudice, Gian Francesco; Romanino, A

    2005-01-01

    We explore some fundamental differences in the phenomenology, cosmology and model building of Split Supersymmetry compared with traditional low-scale supersymmetry. We show how the mass spectrum of Split Supersymmetry naturally emerges from theories where the dominant source of supersymmetry breaking preserves an $R$ symmetry, characterize the class of theories where the unavoidable $R$-breaking by gravity can be neglected, and point out a new possibility, where supersymmetry breaking is directly communicated at tree level to the visible sector via renormalizable interactions. Next, we discuss possible low-energy signals for Split Supersymmetry. The absence of new light scalars removes all the phenomenological difficulties of low-energy supersymmetry, associated with one-loop flavor and CP violating effects. However, the electric dipole moments of leptons and quarks do arise at two loops, and are automatically at the level of present limits with no need for small phases, making them accessible to several ongo...

  8. Density-Gradient Theory: A Macroscopic Approach to Quantum Confinement and Tunneling in Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    as a phenom- enology (see Sects. 3.4 and 4.5) the coefficient bn is used as 7The formula (2.5.7b)2 does not apply to this case because the expan...3.3, it turns out that the multi-dimensional theory can often serve as the basis for a remarkably accurate phenom- enology simply by using rn or...DGC theory with rn = 3 or rn = 1, and by a DGC phenom- enology in which rn is taken to have a best-fit value of 1.1 inside the QD. The asymmetry in all

  9. In silico simulations of tunneling barrier measurements for molecular orbital-mediated junctions: A molecular orbital theory approach to scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terryn, Raymond J.; Sriraman, Krishnan; Olson, Joel A., E-mail: jolson@fit.edu; Baum, J. Clayton, E-mail: cbaum@fit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, Florida 32901 (United States); Novak, Mark J. [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biological Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph Street, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A new simulator for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approximation for the effective tunneling Hamiltonian, which leads to the convolution integral when applied to the tip interaction with the sample. This approach intrinsically includes the structure of the STM tip. Through this mechanical emulation and the tip-inclusive convolution model, dI/dz images for molecular orbitals (which are closely associated with apparent barrier height, ϕ{sub ap}) are reported for the first time. For molecular adsorbates whose experimental topographic images correspond well to isolated-molecule quantum chemistry calculations, the simulator makes accurate predictions, as illustrated by various cases. Distortions in these images due to the tip are shown to be in accord with those observed experimentally and predicted by other ab initio considerations of tip structure. Simulations of the tunneling current dI/dz images are in strong agreement with experiment. The theoretical framework provides a solid foundation which may be applied to LCAO cluster models of adsorbate–substrate systems, and is extendable to emulate several aspects of functional STM operation.

  10. Roll Damping Derivatives from Generalized Lifting-Surface Theory and Wind Tunnel Forced-Oscillation Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototzky, Anthony S; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Improving aerodynamic models for adverse loss-of-control conditions in flight is an area being researched under the NASA Aviation Safety Program. Aerodynamic models appropriate for loss of control conditions require a more general mathematical representation to predict nonlinear unsteady behaviors. As more general aerodynamic models are studied that include nonlinear higher order effects, the possibility of measurements that confound aerodynamic and structural responses are probable. In this study an initial step is taken to look at including structural flexibility in analysis of rigid-body forced-oscillation testing that accounts for dynamic rig, sting and balance flexibility. Because of the significant testing required and associated costs in a general study, it makes sense to capitalize on low cost analytical methods where possible, especially where structural flexibility can be accounted for by a low cost method. This paper provides an initial look at using linear lifting surface theory applied to rigid-body aircraft roll forced-oscillation tests.

  11. DNMR theory for ND+4ion. Pt. 1. Tunneling effects and first order approximations in quadrupole interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blicharski, J.S.; Lalowicz, Z.T.; Sobol, W.

    1978-01-01

    This work presents results of the calculations of shape of deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance for ND + 4 ion. Tunneling effect and quadrupole interaction influence considerably the line shape. (S.B.)

  12. The application of cryogenics to high Reynolds number testing in wind tunnels. I - Evolution, theory, and advantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Dress, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    During the time which has passed since the construction of the first wind tunnel in 1870, wind tunnels have been developed to a high degree of sophistication. However, their development has consistently failed to keep pace with the demands placed on them. One of the more serious problems to be found with existing transonic wind tunnels is their inability to test subscale aircraft models at Reynolds numbers sufficiently near full-scale values to ensure the validity of using the wind tunnel data to predict flight characteristics. The Reynolds number capability of a wind tunnel may be increased by a number of different approaches. However, the best solution in terms of model, balance, and model support loads, as well as in terms of capital and operating cost appears to be related to the reduction of the temperature of the test gas to cryogenic temperatures. The present paper has the objective to review the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel concept and to describe its more important advantages.

  13. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  14. Theory for Spin Selective Andreev Re ection in Vortex Core of Topological Superconductor: Majorana Zero Modes on Spherical Surface and Application to Spin Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fu-Chun; Hu, Lun-Hui; Li, Chuang; Xu, Dong-Hui; Zhou, Yi

    Majorana zero modes (MZMs) have been predicted to exist in the topological insulator (TI)/superconductor (SC) heterostructure. Recent spin polarized scanning tunneling microscope(STM) experiment has observed spin-polarization dependence of the zero bias differential tunneling conductance at the center of vortex core. Here we consider a helical electron system described by a Rashba spin orbit coupling Hamiltonian on a spherical surface with a s-wave superconducting pairing due to proximity effect. We examine in-gap excitations of a pair of vortices with one at the north pole and the other at the south pole. While the MZM is not a spin eigenstate, the spin wavefunction of the MZM at the center of the vortex core, r = 0, is parallel to the magnetic field, and the local Andreev reflection of the MZM is spin selective, namely occurs only when the STM tip has the spin polarization parallel to the magnetic field, similar to the case in 1-dimensional nanowire. The total local differential tunneling conductance consists of the normal term proportional to the local density of states and an additional term arising from the Andreev reflection. We apply our theory to examine the recently reported spin-polarized STM experiments and show good agreement with the experiments

  15. Tunneling features in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseev, P. I.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Maslova, N. S.; Panov, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    The most telling scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) data available on the influence of nonequilibrium tunneling effects and electronic spectra reconstruction are reviewed and theoretically explained by self-consistently accounting for nonequilibrium electron distribution and the change (due to the tunneling current) in the electron density of states near the tunneling junction. The paper discusses the basic ideas of the self-consistent tunneling theory, which forms the basis for experimental research and which allows many effects observed in STM/STS experiments to be explained and new phenomena to be predicted.

  16. Investigation of the structural anisotropy in a self-assembling glycinate layer on Cu(100) by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, Mikhail [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Sánchez-de-Armas, Rocío [Materials Theory Division, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, S75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Hirsimäki, Mika, E-mail: mikahirsi@gmail.com [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Valden, Mika [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Deprotonation reaction of glycine and self-assembly of glycinate is observed on Cu. • Bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy indicates two glycinate geometries. • Density functional theory calculations confirm the two non-identical configurations. • Non-identical adsorption explains the anisotropy in adlayer’s electronic structure. - Abstract: Self-assembling organic molecule-metal interfaces exhibiting free-electron like (FEL) states offers an attractive bottom-up approach to fabricating materials for molecular electronics. Accomplishing this, however, requires detailed understanding of the fundamental driving mechanisms behind the self-assembly process. For instance, it is still unresolved as to why the adsorption of glycine ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2})COOH]) on isotropic Cu(100) single crystal surface leads, via deprotonation and self-assembly, to a glycinate ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2})COO–]) layer that exhibits anisotropic FEL behavior. Here, we report on bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for glycine adsorption on Cu(100) single crystal surface. We find that after physical vapor deposition (PVD) of glycine on Cu(100), glycinate self-assembles into an overlayer exhibiting c(2 × 4) and p(2 × 4) symmetries with non-identical adsorption sites. Our findings underscore the intricacy of electrical conductivity in nanomolecular organic overlayers and the critical role the structural anisotropy at molecule-metal interface plays in the fabrication of materials for molecular electronics.

  17. A comparison of two methods for direct tunneling dynamics: Hydrogen exchange in the glycolate anion as a test case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedarchina, Zorka; Fernandez-Ramos, Antonio; Rios, Miguel A.

    1997-03-01

    Two methods for studying tunneling dynamics are compared, namely the instanton model and the approach of Truhlar and co-workers, which are based on the direct output of electronic structure calculations and thus are parameter free. They are employed to evaluate the zero-level tunneling splitting due to intramolecular hydrogen exchange in the glycolate anion. The first method was developed in a series of recent studies and presents a combination of the instanton theory with quantum-chemically computed potentials and force fields. For the compound at hand, which has 21 internal degrees of freedom, a complete potential-energy surface is generated in terms of the normal modes of the transition-state configuration. It is made up of the potential-energy curve along the tunneling coordinate and harmonic force fields at the stationary points. The level of theory used is HF/6-31++G**. All modes that are displaced between the equilibrium configuration and the transition state are linearly coupled to the tunneling mode, the couplings being proportional to the displacements in dimensionless units. These couplings affect the instanton trajectory profoundly and, depending on the symmetry of the skeletal modes, can enhance or suppress the tunneling. In the glycolate anion all modes have such displacements and thus are included in the calculation. Based on the similarity with malonaldehyde, it is argued that tunneling prevails in the studied process, and the zero-level tunneling splitting is predicted. The latter is found within the computational scheme developed earlier, which avoids explicit evaluation of the instanton path and thus greatly simpli-fies the tunneling dynamics. These results are tested by the method of large-curvature tunneling of Truhlar and co-workers implemented in a dual-level scheme. The potential energy surface needed for the dynamics calculations is generated at the semiempirical PM3 level of theory and then corrected by interpolation with high-level HF/6

  18. Measuring fire size in tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qihui

    2013-01-01

    A new measure of fire size Q′ has been introduced in longitudinally ventilated tunnel as the ratio of flame height to the height of tunnel. The analysis in this article has shown that Q′ controls both the critical velocity and the maximum ceiling temperature in the tunnel. Before the fire flame reaches tunnel ceiling (Q′ 1.0), Fr approaches a constant value. This is also a well-known phenomenon in large tunnel fires. Tunnel ceiling temperature shows the opposite trend. Before the fire flame reaches the ceiling, it increases very slowly with the fire size. Once the flame has hit the ceiling of tunnel, temperature rises rapidly with Q′. The good agreement between the current prediction and three different sets of experimental data has demonstrated that the theory has correctly modelled the relation among the heat release rate of fire, ventilation flow and the height of tunnel. From design point of view, the theoretical maximum of critical velocity for a given tunnel can help to prevent oversized ventilation system. -- Highlights: • Fire sizing is an important safety measure in tunnel design. • New measure of fire size a function of HRR of fire, tunnel height and ventilation. • The measure can identify large and small fires. • The characteristics of different fire are consistent with observation in real fires

  19. Split supersymmetry in brane models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Type-I string theory in the presence of internal magnetic fields provides a concrete realization of split supersymmetry. To lowest order, gauginos are massless while squarks and sleptons are superheavy. For weak magnetic fields, the correct Standard Model spectrum guarantees gauge coupling unification with sin2 W ...

  20. Split supersymmetry in brane models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. November 2006 physics pp. 793–802. Split supersymmetry in brane models. IGNATIOS ANTONIADIS∗. Department of Physics, CERN-Theory Division, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland. E-mail: Ignatios. ... that LEP data favor the unification of the three SM gauge couplings are smoking guns for the presence of new ...

  1. On split Lie triple systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lie triple system; system of roots; root space; split Lie algebra; structure theory. 1. Introduction and previous definitions. Throughout this paper, Lie triple systems T are considered of arbitrary dimension and over an arbitrary field K. It is worth to mention that, unless otherwise stated, there is not any restriction on dim Tα or {k ...

  2. Further investigations of the aeroelastic behavior of the AFW wind-tunnel model using transonic small disturbance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The Computational Aeroelasticity Program-Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD) code, developed at LaRC, is applied to the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model for prediction of transonic aeroelastic behavior. A semi-span computational model is used for evaluation of symmetric motions, and a full-span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions, and a full-span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic deformations are presented as flutter boundaries in terms of Mach number and dynamic pressure. Flutter boundaries that take into account modal refinements, vorticity and entropy corrections, antisymmetric motion, and sensitivity to the modeling of the wing tip ballast stores are also presented with experimental flutter results.

  3. Tunneling Flight Time, Chemistry, and Special Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Pollak, Eli

    2017-09-07

    Attosecond ionization experiments have not resolved the question "What is the tunneling time?". Different definitions of tunneling time lead to different results. Second, a zero tunneling time for a material particle suggests that the nonrelativistic theory includes speeds greater than the speed of light. Chemical reactions, occurring via tunneling, should then not be considered in terms of a nonrelativistic quantum theory calling into question quantum dynamics computations on tunneling reactions. To answer these questions, we define a new experimentally measurable paradigm, the tunneling flight time, and show that it vanishes for scattering through an Eckart or a square barrier, irrespective of barrier length or height, generalizing the Hartman effect. We explain why this result does not lead to experimental measurement of speeds greater than the speed of light. We show that this tunneling is an incoherent process by comparing a classical Wigner theory with exact quantum mechanical computations.

  4. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    2001-02-01

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the space of magnetic fields, known as diabolical points. This phenomena is explained in terms of two approaches, one based on spin-coherent-state path integrals, and the other on a generalization of the phase integral (or WKB) method to difference equations. Explicit formulas for the diabolical points are obtained for a model Hamiltonian.

  5. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert's Variational Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2008-09-09

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H(3) reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H(2), HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property

  6. Deformed transition-state theory: Deviation from Arrhenius behavior and application to bimolecular hydrogen transfer reaction rates in the tunneling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Silva, Valter H; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Mundim, Kleber C

    2017-01-30

    A formulation is presented for the application of tools from quantum chemistry and transition-state theory to phenomenologically cover cases where reaction rates deviate from Arrhenius law at low temperatures. A parameter d is introduced to describe the deviation for the systems from reaching the thermodynamic limit and is identified as the linearizing coefficient in the dependence of the inverse activation energy with inverse temperature. Its physical meaning is given and when deviation can be ascribed to quantum mechanical tunneling its value is calculated explicitly. Here, a new derivation is given of the previously established relationship of the parameter d with features of the barrier in the potential energy surface. The proposed variant of transition state theory permits comparison with experiments and tests against alternative formulations. Prescriptions are provided and implemented to three hydrogen transfer reactions: CH 4  + OH → CH 3  + H 2 O, CH 3 Cl + OH → CH 2 Cl + H 2 O and H 2  + CN → H + HCN, widely investigated both experimentally and theoretically. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Stokes shift and fine structure splitting in composition-tunable Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1−x}Se nanocrystals: Atomistic tight-binding theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukkabot, Worasak, E-mail: w.sukkabot@gmail.com

    2017-02-01

    I report on the atomistic correlation of the structural properties and excitonic splitting of ternary alloy Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1−x}Se wurtzite nanocrystals using the sp{sup 3}s* empirical tight-binding method with the description of the first nearest neighbouring interaction and bowing effect. Based on a successful model, the computations are presented under various Zn compositions (x) and diameters of alloy Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1−x}Se nanocrystals with the experimentally synthesized compositions and sizes. With increasing Zn contents (x), the optical band gaps and electron-hole coulomb energies are improved, while ground electron-hole wave function overlaps, electron-hole exchange energies, stokes shift and fine structure splitting are reduced. A composition-tunable emission from blue to yellow wavelength is obviously demonstrated. The optical band gaps, ground electron-hole wave function overlaps, electron-hole interactions, stokes shift and fine structure splitting are progressively decreased with the increasing diameters. Alloy Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1−x}Se nanocrystal with Zn rich and large diameter is the best candidate to optimistically be used as a source of entangled photon pairs. The agreement with the experimental data is remarkable. Finally, the present systematic study on the structural properties and excitonic splitting predominantly opens a new perspective to understand the size- and composition-dependent properties of Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1−x}Se nanocrystals with a comprehensive strategy to design the optoelectronic devices.

  8. Spin Tunneling in a Rotating Nanomagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Michael; Chudnovsky, Eugene; Lehman College Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Team

    2011-03-01

    We study spin tunneling in a magnetic nanoparticle with biaxial anisotropy that is free to rotate about its anisotropy axis. Exact instanton of the coupled equations of motion is found that connects degenerate classical energy minima. We show that mechanical freedom of the particle renormalizes magnetic anisotropy and increases the tunnel splitting. M. F. O'Keeffe and E. M. Chudnovsky, cond-mat, arXiv:1011.3134.

  9. Attempts to test an alternative electrodynamic theory of superconductors by low-temperature scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronio, Angelo; Giessibl, Franz J.

    2016-09-01

    We perform an experiment to test between two theories of the electrodynamics of superconductors: the standard London theory and an alternative proposed by J. E. Hirsch [Phys. Rev. B 69, 214515 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevB.69.214515]. The two alternatives give different predictions with respect to the screening of an electric field by a superconductor, and we try to detect this effect using atomic force microscopy on a niobium sample. We also perform the reverse experiment, where we demonstrate a superconductive tip mounted on a qPlus force sensor. Due to limited accuracy, we are able neither to prove nor to disprove Hirsch's hypothesis. Within our accuracy of 0.17 N/m, the superconductive transition does not alter the atomic-scale interaction between tip and sample.

  10. Tunneling in thin MOS structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserjian, J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results on tunneling in thin MOS structures are described. Thermally grown SiO2 films in the thickness range of 22-40 A have been shown to be effectively uniform on an atomic scale and exhibit an extremely abrupt oxide-silicon interface. Resonant reflections are observed at this interface for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and are shown to agree with the exact theory for a trapezoidal barrier. Tunneling at lower fields is consistent with elastic tunneling into the silicon direct conduction band and, at still lower fields, inelastic tunneling into the indirect conduction band. Approximate dispersion relations are obtained over portions of the silicon-dioxide energy gap and conduction band.

  11. Recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  12. Recognition tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Sankey, Otto [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 1862 53, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-02

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  13. How rivers split

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, H. F.; Yi, R.; Devauchelle, O.; Petroff, A.; Rothman, D.

    2012-12-01

    River networks have fascinated mankind for centuries. They exhibit a striking geometry with similar shapes repeating on all scales. Yet, how these networks form and create these geometries remains elusive. Recently we have shown that channels fed by subsurface flow split at a characteristic angle of 2π/5 unambiguously consistent with our field measurements in a seepage network on the Florida Panhandle (Fig.1). Our theory is based only on the simple hypothesis that the channels grow in the direction at which the ground water enters the spring and classical solutions of subsurface hydrology. Here we apply our analysis to the ramification of large drainage basins and extend our theory to include slope effects. Using high resolution stream networks from the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), we scrutinize our hypothesis in arbitrary channel networks and investigate the branching angle dependence on Horton-Strahler order and the maturity of the streams.; High-resolution topographic map of valley networks incised by groundwater flow, located on the Florida Panhandle near Bristol, FL.

  14. Risk analysis to optimise safety during basic tunnel design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molag, M.; Jansen, C.M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The risk analysis to select the preferred basic tunnel design for the tunnels in the High Speed Train Link South from Amsterdam to Antwerp is described. The risk analysis has been split up in two stages: a broad qualitative risk analysis and a quantitative risk analysis. The results of the

  15. Thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, C.H.; Kohlhepp, J.T.; Paluskar, P.V.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Jonge, W.J.M. de

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the thermal stability of tunneling spin polarization in Al/AlOx/ferromagnet junctions based on the spin-polarized tunneling technique, in which the Zeeman-split superconducting density of states in the Al electrode is used as a detector for the spin polarization. Thermal robustness of the polarization, which is of key importance for the performance of magnetic tunnel junction devices, is demonstrated for post-deposition anneal temperatures up to 500 o C with Co and Co 90 Fe 10 top electrodes, independent of the presence of an FeMn layer on top of the ferromagnet

  16. Investigation of the structural anisotropy in a self-assembling glycinate layer on Cu(100) by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Mikhail; Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena; Sánchez-de-Armas, Rocío; Hirsimäki, Mika; Valden, Mika

    2017-07-01

    Self-assembling organic molecule-metal interfaces exhibiting free-electron like (FEL) states offers an attractive bottom-up approach to fabricating materials for molecular electronics. Accomplishing this, however, requires detailed understanding of the fundamental driving mechanisms behind the self-assembly process. For instance, it is still unresolved as to why the adsorption of glycine ([NH2(CH2)COOH]) on isotropic Cu(100) single crystal surface leads, via deprotonation and self-assembly, to a glycinate ([NH2(CH2)COO-]) layer that exhibits anisotropic FEL behavior. Here, we report on bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for glycine adsorption on Cu(100) single crystal surface. We find that after physical vapor deposition (PVD) of glycine on Cu(100), glycinate self-assembles into an overlayer exhibiting c(2 × 4) and p(2 × 4) symmetries with non-identical adsorption sites. Our findings underscore the intricacy of electrical conductivity in nanomolecular organic overlayers and the critical role the structural anisotropy at molecule-metal interface plays in the fabrication of materials for molecular electronics.

  17. Simulations of Resonant Intraband and Interband Tunneling Spin Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David; Cartoixa-Soler, Xavier; McGill, T. C.; Smith, Darryl L.; Schulman, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews resonant intraband and interband tunneling spin filters It explores the possibility of building a zero-magnetic-field spin polarizer using nonmagnetic III-V semiconductor heterostructures. It reviews the extensive simulations of quantum transport in asymmetric InAs/GaSb/AlSb resonant tunneling structures with Rashba spin splitting and proposes a. new device concept: side-gated asymmetric Resonant Interband Tunneling Diode (a-RITD).

  18. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  19. Toward an Integrated Optical Data System for Wind Tunnel Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruyten, Wim

    1999-01-01

    ...) of the test article in a wind tunnel test. The theory for such P&A determinations is developed and applied to data from a recent pressure sensitive paint test in AEDC's 16 ft transonic wind tunnel...

  20. Mort Rainey's Split Personality in Secret Window

    OpenAIRE

    Sandjaya, Cynthya; Limanta, Liem Satya

    2013-01-01

    Psychological issue is the main issue discussed in David Koepp's Secret Window through its main character, Mort Rainey. Rainey's psychological struggle will be the main theme in this research. This thesis examines Rainey's split personality. Furthermore, in this study, we want to analyze the process of how Mort Rainey's personality splits into two different personalities. To meet the answer of this study, we will use the theory of Dissociative Identity Disorder with a support from Sigmund Fre...

  1. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  2. Split SUSY Radiates Flavor

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgart, Matthew; Zorawski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Radiative flavor models where the hierarchies of Standard Model (SM) fermion masses and mixings are explained via loop corrections are elegant ways to solve the SM flavor puzzle. Here we build such a model in the context of Mini-Split Supersymmetry (SUSY) where both flavor and SUSY breaking occur at a scale of 1000 TeV. This model is consistent with the observed Higgs mass, unification, and WIMP dark matter. The high scale allows large flavor mixing among the sfermions, which provides part of the mechanism for radiative flavor generation. In the deep UV, all flavors are treated democratically, but at the SUSY breaking scale, the third, second, and first generation Yukawa couplings are generated at tree level, one loop, and two loops, respectively. Save for one, all the dimensionless parameters in the theory are O(1), with the exception being a modest and technically natural tuning that explains both the smallness of the bottom Yukawa coupling and the largeness of the Cabibbo angle.

  3. Split supersymmetry radiates flavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Matthew; Stolarski, Daniel; Zorawski, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Radiative flavor models where the hierarchies of Standard Model (SM) fermion masses and mixings are explained via loop corrections are elegant ways to solve the SM flavor puzzle. Here we build such a model in the context of mini-split supersymmetry (SUSY) where both flavor and SUSY breaking occur at a scale of 1000 TeV. This model is consistent with the observed Higgs mass, unification, and dark matter as a weakly interacting massive particle. The high scale allows large flavor mixing among the sfermions, which provides part of the mechanism for radiative flavor generation. In the deep UV, all flavors are treated democratically, but at the SUSY-breaking scale, the third, second, and first generation Yukawa couplings are generated at tree level, one loop, and two loops, respectively. Save for one, all the dimensionless parameters in the theory are O(1), with the exception being a modest and technically natural tuning that explains both the smallness of the bottom Yukawa coupling and the largeness of the Cabibbo angle.

  4. Adsorption of selenium atoms at the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface: A combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.Q.; Zhou Yinghui; Wu Qihui; Pakes, C.I.; Zhu Zizhong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A selenium atom, which adsorbs at site close to a Si adatom and bonds with this Si adatom and one of its backbonding Si atoms on the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface, will break the Si-Si bond and consequently disorder the Si reconstruction surface. Research highlights: → STM and DFT are used to study the adsorption properties of Se atoms on a Si surface. → The adsorption site of Se atom on the Si surface has been identified. → The electronic effect of Se atom on the adsorbed Si surface has been ivestigaed. → The Se atom weakens the bond between two Si atom bonding with the Se atom. - Abstract: The adsorption of selenium (Se) atoms at the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface has been investigated using both scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. A single Se atom prefers to adsorb at sites close to a Si adatom and bonds with this Si adatom and one of its backbonding Si atoms. The adsorption sites are referred to as A*-type sites in this article. The density of the conduction band (empty states) of the Si adatom increases as a result of the adsorption of a Se atom, which causes the Si adatom to become brighter in the empty state STM images. At the same time, the adsorption of the Se atom weakens the bonding between the Si adatom and its backbonding Si atom due to the charge transfer from them to the Se atom, and consequently destructs the ordered Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface with increasing Se coverage.

  5. Electron refrigeration in hybrid structures with spin-split superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouco, M.; Heikkilä, T. T.; Bergeret, F. S.

    2018-01-01

    Electron tunneling between superconductors and normal metals has been used for an efficient refrigeration of electrons in the latter. Such cooling is a nonlinear effect and usually requires a large voltage. Here we study the electron cooling in heterostructures based on superconductors with a spin-splitting field coupled to normal metals via spin-filtering barriers. The cooling power shows a linear term in the applied voltage. This improves the coefficient of performance of electron refrigeration in the normal metal by shifting its optimum cooling to lower voltage, and also allows for cooling the spin-split superconductor by reverting the sign of the voltage. We also show how tunnel coupling spin-split superconductors with regular ones allows for a highly efficient refrigeration of the latter.

  6. Odd-even parity splittings and octupole correlations in neutron-rich Ba isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, L.-J.; Yao, J. M.

    2018-02-01

    The odd-even parity splittings in low-lying parity-doublet states of atomic nuclei with octupole correlations have usually been interpreted as rotational excitations on top of octupole vibration in the language of collective models. In this paper, we report a deep analysis of the odd-even parity splittings in the parity-doublet states of neutron-rich Ba isotopes around neutron number N =88 within a full microscopic framework of beyond-mean-field multireference covariant energy density functional theory. The dynamical correlations related to symmetry restoration and quadrupole-octupole shape fluctuation are taken into account with a generator coordinate method combined with parity, particle-number, and angular-momentum projections. We show that the behavior of odd-even parity splittings is governed by the interplay of rotation, quantum tunneling, and shape evolution. Similar to 224Ra, a picture of rotation-induced octupole shape stabilization in the positive-parity states is exhibited in the neutron-rich Ba isotopes.

  7. Coded Splitting Tree Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to multiple access control called coded splitting tree protocol. The approach builds on the known tree splitting protocols, code structure and successive interference cancellation (SIC). Several instances of the tree splitting protocol are initiated, each...... instance is terminated prematurely and subsequently iterated. The combined set of leaves from all the tree instances can then be viewed as a graph code, which is decodable using belief propagation. The main design problem is determining the order of splitting, which enables successful decoding as early...... as possible. Evaluations show that the proposed protocol provides considerable gains over the standard tree splitting protocol applying SIC. The improvement comes at the expense of an increased feedback and receiver complexity....

  8. Split Cord Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdal Gezercan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Split cord malformations are rare form of occult spinal dysraphism in children. Split cord malformations are characterized by septum that cleaves the spinal canal in sagittal plane within the single or duplicated thecal sac. Although their precise incidence is unknown, split cord malformations are exceedingly rare and represent %3.8-5 of all congenital spinal anomalies. Characteristic neurological, urological, orthopedic clinical manifestations are variable and asymptomatic course is possible. Earlier diagnosis and surgical intervention for split cord malformations is associated with better long-term fuctional outcome. For this reason, diagnostic imaging is indicated for children with associated cutaneous and orthopedic signs. Additional congenital anomalies usually to accompany the split cord malformations. Earlier diagnosis, meticuolus surgical therapy and interdisciplinary careful evaluation and follow-up should be made for good prognosis. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 199-207

  9. Biofuel combustion. Energetics and kinetics of hydrogen abstraction from carbon-1 in n-butanol by the hydroperoxyl radical calculated by coupled cluster and density functional theories and multistructural variational transition-state theory with multidimensional tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alecu, I M; Zheng, Jingjing; Papajak, Ewa; Yu, Tao; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-12-20

    Multistructural canonical variational transition-state theory with small-curvature multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) is employed to calculate thermal rate constants for hydrogen-atom abstraction from carbon-1 of n-butanol by the hydroperoxyl radical over the temperature range 250-2000 K. The M08-SO hybrid meta-GGA density functional was validated against CCSD(T)-F12a explicitly correlated wave function calculations with the jul-cc-pVTZ basis set. It was then used to compute the properties of all stationary points and the energies and Hessians of a few nonstationary points along the reaction path, which were then used to generate a potential energy surface by the multiconfiguration Shepard interpolation (MCSI) method. The internal rotations in the transition state for this reaction (like those in the reactant alcohol) are strongly coupled to each other and generate multiple stable conformations, which make important contributions to the partition functions. It is shown that neglecting to account for the multiple-structure effects and torsional potential anharmonicity effects that arise from the torsional modes would lead to order-of-magnitude errors in the calculated rate constants at temperatures of interest in combustion.

  10. Geometrical Applications of Split Octonions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merab Gogberashvili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that physical signals and space-time intervals modeled on split-octonion geometry naturally exhibit properties from conventional (3 + 1-theory (e.g., number of dimensions, existence of maximal velocities, Heisenberg uncertainty, and particle generations. This paper demonstrates these properties using an explicit representation of the automorphisms on split-octonions, the noncompact form of the exceptional Lie group G2. This group generates specific rotations of (3 + 4-vector parts of split octonions with three extra time-like coordinates and in infinitesimal limit imitates standard Poincare transformations. In this picture translations are represented by noncompact Lorentz-type rotations towards the extra time-like coordinates. It is shown how the G2 algebra’s chirality yields an intrinsic left-right asymmetry of a certain 3-vector (spin, as well as a parity violating effect on light emitted by a moving quantum system. Elementary particles are connected with the special elements of the algebra which nullify octonionic intervals. Then the zero-norm conditions lead to free particle Lagrangians, which allow virtual trajectories also and exhibit the appearance of spatial horizons governing by mass parameters.

  11. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration. Volume 1: Experimental data report, base configuration and effects of wing twist and leading-edge configuration. [wind tunnel tests, aircraft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manro, M. E.; Manning, K. J. R.; Hallstaff, T. H.; Rogers, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.1 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art attached and separated flow methods. The purpose of these comparisons was to delineate conditions under which these theories are valid for both flat and twisted wings and to explore the use of empirical methods to correct the theoretical methods where theory is deficient.

  12. Chaos regularization of quantum tunneling rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecora, Louis M.; Wu Dongho; Lee, Hoshik; Antonsen, Thomas; Lee, Ming-Jer; Ott, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Quantum tunneling rates through a barrier separating two-dimensional, symmetric, double-well potentials are shown to depend on the classical dynamics of the billiard trajectories in each well and, hence, on the shape of the wells. For shapes that lead to regular (integrable) classical dynamics the tunneling rates fluctuate greatly with eigenenergies of the states sometimes by over two orders of magnitude. Contrarily, shapes that lead to completely chaotic trajectories lead to tunneling rates whose fluctuations are greatly reduced, a phenomenon we call regularization of tunneling rates. We show that a random-plane-wave theory of tunneling accounts for the mean tunneling rates and the small fluctuation variances for the chaotic systems.

  13. Split Malcev algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    project of the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia MTM2007-60333. References. [1] Calderón A J, On split Lie algebras with symmetric root systems, Proc. Indian. Acad. Sci (Math. Sci.) 118(2008) 351–356. [2] Calderón A J, On split Lie triple systems, Proc. Indian. Acad. Sci (Math. Sci.) 119(2009). 165–177.

  14. Comparing Electrochemical and Biological Water Splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Dimitrievski, Kristian; Siegbahn, P.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of density functional theory calculations, we compare the free energies of key intermediates in the water splitting reaction over transition metal oxide surfaces to those of the Mn cluster in photo system II. In spite of the very different environments in the enzyme system...

  15. Band-to-Band Tunneling Transistors: Scalability and Circuit Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    55* MEDICI ...3.2.1 Tunneling Theory 3.3 Simulation Methods 3.3.1 MEDICI 3.3.2 Sentaurus Local Tunneling 3.3.3 Sentaurus Nonlocal Tunneling 3.4 Sentaurus...tunneling current. 3.3.1 MEDICI MEDICI is a one and two-dimensional simulator created by Synopsys, Inc. [18]. It contains a band-to-band

  16. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  17. Influence of the large-small split effect on strategy choice in complex subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yan Hui; Wu, Hao; Shang, Rui Hong; Chao, Xiaomei; Ren, Ting Ting; Zheng, Li Ling; Mo, Lei

    2018-04-01

    Two main theories have been used to explain the arithmetic split effect: decision-making process theory and strategy choice theory. Using the inequality paradigm, previous studies have confirmed that individuals tend to adopt a plausibility-checking strategy and a whole-calculation strategy to solve large and small split problems in complex addition arithmetic, respectively. This supports strategy choice theory, but it is unknown whether this theory also explains performance in solving different split problems in complex subtraction arithmetic. This study used small, intermediate and large split sizes, with each split condition being further divided into problems requiring and not requiring borrowing. The reaction times (RTs) for large and intermediate splits were significantly shorter than those for small splits, while accuracy was significantly higher for large and middle splits than for small splits, reflecting no speed-accuracy trade-off. Further, RTs and accuracy differed significantly between the borrow and no-borrow conditions only for small splits. This study indicates that strategy choice theory is suitable to explain the split effect in complex subtraction arithmetic. That is, individuals tend to choose the plausibility-checking strategy or the whole-calculation strategy according to the split size. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  18. Decoherence of superconducting qubits caused by quasiparticle tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelani, G.; Nigg, S. E.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Glazman, L. I.

    2012-11-01

    In superconducting qubits, the interaction of the qubit degree of freedom with quasiparticles defines a fundamental limitation for the qubit coherence. We develop a theory of the pure dephasing rate Γϕ caused by quasiparticles tunneling through a Josephson junction and of the inhomogeneous broadening due to changes in the occupations of Andreev states in the junction. To estimate Γϕ, we derive a master equation for the qubit dynamics. The tunneling rate of free quasiparticles is enhanced by their large density of states at energies close to the superconducting gap. Nevertheless, we find that Γϕ is small compared to the rates determined by extrinsic factors in most of the current qubit designs (phase and flux qubits, transmon, fluxonium). The split transmon, in which a single junction is replaced by a SQUID loop, represents an exception that could make possible the measurement of Γϕ. Fluctuations of the qubit frequency leading to inhomogeneous broadening may be caused by the fluctuations in the occupation numbers of the Andreev states associated with a phase-biased Josephson junction. This mechanism may be revealed in qubits with small-area junctions, since the smallest relative change in frequency it causes is of the order of the inverse number of transmission channels in the junction.

  19. Two-level tunneling systems in amorphous alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Irina V.; Paz, Alejandro P.; Tokatly, Ilya V.; Rubio, Angel

    2014-03-01

    The decades of research on thermal properties of amorphous solids at temperatures below 1 K suggest that their anomalous behaviour can be related to quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms between two nearly equivalent states that can be described as a two-level system (TLS). This theory is also supported by recent studies on microwave spectroscopy of superconducting qubits. However, the microscopic nature of the TLS remains unknown. To identify structural motifs for TLSs in amorphous alumina we have performed extensive classical molecular dynamics simulations. Several bistable motifs with only one or two atoms jumping by considerable distance ~ 0.5 Å were found at T=25 K. Accounting for the surrounding environment relaxation was shown to be important up to distances ~ 7 Å. The energy asymmetry and barrier for the detected motifs lied in the ranges 0.5 - 2 meV and 4 - 15 meV, respectively, while their density was about 1 motif per 10 000 atoms. Tuning of motif asymmetry by strain was demonstrated with the coupling coefficient below 1 eV. The tunnel splitting for the symmetrized motifs was estimated on the order of 0.1 meV. The discovered motifs are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The financial support from the Marie Curie Fellowship PIIF-GA-2012-326435 (RespSpatDisp) is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Spin-dependent tunneling recombination in heterostructures with a magnetic layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, K. S., E-mail: denisokonstantin@gmail.com; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Lähderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)

    2017-01-15

    We propose a mechanism for the generation of spin polarization in semiconductor heterostructures with a quantum well and a magnetic impurity layer spatially separated from it. The spin polarization of carriers in a quantum well originates from spin-dependent tunneling recombination at impurity states in the magnetic layer, which is accompanied by a fast linear increase in the degree of circular polarization of photoluminescence from the quantum well. Two situations are theoretically considered. In the first case, resonant tunneling to the spin-split sublevels of the impurity center occurs and spin polarization is caused by different populations of resonance levels in the quantum well for opposite spin projections. In the second, nonresonant case, the spin-split impurity level lies above the occupied states of electrons in the quantum well and plays the role of an intermediate state in the two-stage coherent spin-dependent recombination of an electron from the quantum well and a hole in the impurity layer. The developed theory allows us to explain both qualitatively and quantitatively the kinetics of photoexcited electrons in experiments with photoluminescence with time resolution in Mn-doped InGaAs heterostructures.

  1. Split Malcev algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the structure of split Malcev algebras of arbitrary dimension over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero. We show that any such algebras is of the form M = U + ∑ j I j with U a subspace of the abelian Malcev subalgebra and any I j a well described ideal of satisfying [ I j , I k ] = 0 if ≠ .

  2. Splitting of Comets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 1. Splitting of Comets. Utpal Mukhopadhyay. General Article Volume 7 Issue 1 January 2002 pp 11-22. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/01/0011-0022. Keywords. Cometary ...

  3. Light Makes a Surface Banana-Bond Split: Photodesorption of Molecular Hydrogen from RuO 2 (110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Mu, Rentao; Dahal, Arjun; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Dohnálek, Zdenek; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger

    2016-07-20

    The coordination of H2 to a metal center via polarization of its bond electron density, known as a Kubas complex, is the means by which H2 chemisorbs at Ru4+ sites on the rutile RuO2(110) surface. This distortion of electron density off an interatomic axis is often described as a ‘banana-bond.’ We show that the Ru-H2 banana-bond can be destabilized, and split, using visible light. Photodesorption of H2 (or D2) is evident by mass spectrometry and scanning tunneling microscopy. From time-dependent density functional theory, the key optical excitation splitting the Ru-H2 banana-bond involves an interband transition in RuO2 which effectively diminishes its Lewis acidity, and thereby weakening the Kubas complex. Such excitations are not expected to affect adsorbates on RuO2 given its metallic properties. Therefore, this common thermal co-catalyst employed in promoting water splitting is, itself, photo-active in the visible.

  4. High Surface Area Tunnels in Hexagonal WO₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wanmei; Yeung, Michael T; Lech, Andrew T; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chain; Li, Tianqi; Duan, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Jun; Kaner, Richard B

    2015-07-08

    High surface area in h-WO3 has been verified from the intracrystalline tunnels. This bottom-up approach differs from conventional templating-type methods. The 3.67 Å diameter tunnels are characterized by low-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherms with nonlocal density functional theory fitting, transmission electron microscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. These open and rigid tunnels absorb H(+) and Li(+), but not Na(+) in aqueous electrolytes without inducing a phase transformation, accessing both internal and external active sites. Moreover, these tunnel structures demonstrate high specific pseudocapacitance and good stability in an H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the high surface area created from 3.67 Å diameter tunnels in h-WO3 shows potential applications in electrochemical energy storage, selective ion transfer, and selective gas adsorption.

  5. Zurek-Kibble mechanism for the spontaneous vortex formation in Nb-Al/Al-ox/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions: New theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Aarøe, Morten

    2006-01-01

    New scaling behavior has been both predicted and observed in the spontaneous production of fluxons in quenched Nb-Al/Al-ox/Nb annular Josephson tunnel junctions (JTJs) as a function of the quench time, tau(Q). The probability f(1) to trap a single defect during the normal-metal-superconductor phase...... transition clearly follows an allometric dependence on tau(Q) with a scaling exponent sigma=0.5, as predicted from the Zurek-Kibble mechanism for realistic JTJs formed by strongly coupled superconductors. This definitive experiment replaces one reported by us earlier, in which an idealized model was used...

  6. Analytical calculation of spin tunneling effect in single molecule magnet Fe8 with considering quadrupole excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Y Yousefi; H Fakhari; K Muminov; M R Benam

    2018-01-01

    Spin tunneling effect in Single Molecule Magnet Fe8 is studied by instanton calculation technique using SU(3) generalized spin coherent state in real parameter as a trial function. For this SMM, tunnel splitting arises due to the presence of a Berry like phase in action, which causes interference between tunneling trajectories (instantons). For this SMM, it is established that the use of quadrupole excitation (g dependence) changes not only the location of the quenching points, but also the n...

  7. Quantum Entanglement of a Tunneling Spin with Mechanical Modes of a Torsional Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Garanin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We solve the Schrödinger equation for various quantum regimes describing a tunneling macrospin coupled to a torsional oscillator. The energy spectrum and freezing of spin tunneling are studied. Magnetic susceptibility, noise spectrum, and decoherence due to entanglement of spin and mechanical modes are computed. We show that the presence of a tunneling spin can be detected via splitting of the mechanical mode at the resonance. Our results apply to experiments with magnetic molecules coupled to nanoresonators.

  8. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  9. Split warhead simultaneous impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Singh Dhari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A projectile system is proposed to improve efficiency and effectiveness of damage done by anti-tank weapon system on its target by designing a ballistic projectile that can split into multiple warheads and engage a target at the same time. This idea has been developed in interest of saving time consumed from the process of reloading and additional number of rounds wasted on target during an attack. The proposed system is achieved in three steps: Firstly, a mathematical model is prepared using the basic equations of motion. Second, An Ejection Mechanism of proposed warhead is explained with the help of schematics. Third, a part of numerical simulation which is done using the MATLAB software. The final result shows various ranges and times when split can be effectively achieved. With the new system, impact points are increased and hence it has a better probability of hitting a target.

  10. Tunneling spin injection into single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Pi, K; McCreary, K M; Li, Yan; Wong, Jared J I; Swartz, A G; Kawakami, R K

    2010-10-15

    We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO₂ seeded MgO barriers. A nonlocal magnetoresistance (ΔR(NL)) of 130  Ω is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating ΔR(NL) vs SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.

  11. Tunneling decay of self-gravitating vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, Manu B.; Yajnik, Urjit A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2018-01-01

    We investigate tunneling decay of false vortices in the presence of gravity, in which vortices are trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in three dimensions. The core of the vortex contains magnetic flux in the true vacuum, while outside the vortex is the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum. We numerically obtain vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they could decay via tunneling. To show this phenomenon, we construct the proper junction conditions in curved spacetime. We find that the tunneling exponent for the vortices is half that for Coleman-de Luccia bubbles and discuss possible future applications.

  12. On split Lie triple systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We also introduced in [1] techniques of connection of roots in the framework of split Lie algebras. In the present paper we extend these techniques to the framework of split Lie triple systems so as to obtain a generalization of the results in [1]. We consider the wide class of split Lie triple systems (which contains the class of.

  13. Spin-dependent thermoelectric effects in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolenda, Stefan; Beckmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Suergers, Christoph [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Recently, large thermoelectric effects were predicted to occur in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions with a spin-splitting of the density of states. We have reported on the observation of these effects in samples where the spin splitting was induced by an applied magnetic field. Here, we show results on samples where the spin splitting is enhanced by exchange coupling to the ferromagnetic insulator europium sulfide.

  14. 12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

  15. Iron on GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ) investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Smith, Arthur R., E-mail: smitha2@ohio.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Takeuchi, Noboru [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Apartado Postal 14, Ensenada Baja California, Codigo Postal 22800 (Mexico); Al-Brithen, Hamad A. H. [Physics and Astronomy Department, King Abdulah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and National Center for Nano Technology, KACST, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-04-28

    We have investigated sub-monolayer iron deposition on atomically smooth GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ). The iron is deposited at a substrate temperature of 360 °C, upon which reflection high energy electron diffraction shows a transformation to a √(3)×√(3)-R30° pattern. After cooling to room temperature, the pattern transforms to a 6 × 6, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals 6 × 6 reconstructed regions decorating the GaN step edges. First-principles theoretical calculations have been carried out for a range of possible structural models, one of the best being a Ga dimer model consisting of 2/9 monolayer of Fe incorporated into 7/3 monolayer of Ga in a relaxed but distorted structure.

  16. Iron on GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ) investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Smith, Arthur R.; Takeuchi, Noboru; Al-Brithen, Hamad A. H.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated sub-monolayer iron deposition on atomically smooth GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ). The iron is deposited at a substrate temperature of 360 °C, upon which reflection high energy electron diffraction shows a transformation to a √(3)×√(3)-R30° pattern. After cooling to room temperature, the pattern transforms to a 6 × 6, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals 6 × 6 reconstructed regions decorating the GaN step edges. First-principles theoretical calculations have been carried out for a range of possible structural models, one of the best being a Ga dimer model consisting of 2/9 monolayer of Fe incorporated into 7/3 monolayer of Ga in a relaxed but distorted structure

  17. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  18. Road and Railroad Tunnels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Tunnels in the United States According to the HSIP Tiger Team Report, a tunnel is defined as a linear underground passageway open at both ends. This dataset is based...

  19. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  20. Major SSC tunneling begins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    In Texas, work has been completed on the first on the Superconducting Supercollider's major shafts. Now a boring machine has started driving the fifty-four mile elliptical accelerator tunnel. To date, contracts let for the tunnel have come in far below preliminary estimates. Five of the main fourteen foot diameter tunnel contracts have been awarded for a total of 107.4 million dollars, about forty million dollars below estimates. These contracts represent %60 percent of the total tunneling project

  1. Endoscopic classification of representations of quasi-split unitary groups

    CERN Document Server

    Mok, Chung Pang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the author establishes the endoscopic classification of tempered representations of quasi-split unitary groups over local fields, and the endoscopic classification of the discrete automorphic spectrum of quasi-split unitary groups over global number fields. The method is analogous to the work of Arthur on orthogonal and symplectic groups, based on the theory of endoscopy and the comparison of trace formulas on unitary groups and general linear groups.

  2. Split Octonion electrodynamics and unified fields of dyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisht, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    Split octonion electrodynamics has been developed in terms of Zorn's vector matrix realization by reformulating electromagnetic potential, current, field tensor and other dynamical quantities. Corresponding field equation (Unified Maxwell's equations) and equation of motion have been reformulated by means of split octonion and its Zorn vector realization in unique, simpler and consistent manner. It has been shown that this theory reproduces the dyon field equations in the absence of gravito-dyons and vice versa

  3. Trajectories and traversal times in quantum tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhi Hong.

    1989-01-01

    The classical concepts of trajectories and traversal times applied to quantum tunneling are discussed. By using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, it is found that in a forbidden region of a multidimensional space the wave function can be described by two sets of trajectories, or equivalently by two sets of wave fronts. The trajectories belonging to different sets are mutually orthogonal. An extended Huygens construction is proposed to determine these wave fronts and trajectories. In contrast to the classical results in the allowed region, these trajectories couple to each other. However, if the incident wave is normal to the turning surface, the trajectories are found to be independent and can be determined by Newton's equations of motion with inverted potential and energy. The multidimensional tunneling theory is then applied to the scanning tunneling microscope to calculate the current density distribution and to derive the expressions for the lateral resolution and the surface corrugation amplitude. The traversal time in quantum tunneling, i.e. tunneling time, is found to depend on model calculations and simulations. Computer simulation of a wave packet tunneling through a square barrier is performed. Several approaches, including the phase method, Larmor clock, and time-dependent barrier model, are investigated. For a square barrier, two characteristic times are found: One is equal to the barrier width divided by the magnitude of the imaginary velocity; the other is equal to the decay length divided by the incident velocity. It is believed that the tunneling time can only be defined operationally

  4. Physical model for recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstić, Predrag; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recognition tunneling (RT) identifies target molecules trapped between tunneling electrodes functionalized with recognition molecules that serve as specific chemical linkages between the metal electrodes and the trapped target molecule. Possible applications include single molecule DNA and protein sequencing. This paper addresses several fundamental aspects of RT by multiscale theory, applying both all-atom and coarse-grained DNA models: (1) we show that the magnitude of the observed currents are consistent with the results of non-equilibrium Green’s function calculations carried out on a solvated all-atom model. (2) Brownian fluctuations in hydrogen bond-lengths lead to current spikes that are similar to what is observed experimentally. (3) The frequency characteristics of these fluctuations can be used to identify the trapped molecules with a machine-learning algorithm, giving a theoretical underpinning to this new method of identifying single molecule signals. (paper)

  5. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  6. A split accumulation gate architecture for silicon MOS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Sophie; Rudolph, Martin; Roy, Anne-Marie; Curry, Matthew; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Dominguez, Jason; Manginell, Ronald; Pluym, Tammy; King Gamble, John; Lilly, Michael; Bureau-Oxton, Chloé; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    We investigate tunnel barrier modulation without barrier electrodes in a split accumulation gate architecture for silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dots (QD). The layout consists of two independent accumulation gates, one gate forming a reservoir and the other the QD. The devices are fabricated with a foundry-compatible, etched, poly-silicon gate stack. We demonstrate 4 orders of magnitude of tunnel-rate control between the QD and the reservoir by modulating the reservoir gate voltage. Last electron charging energies of app. 10 meV and tuning of the ST splitting in the range 100-200 ueV are observed in two different split gate layouts and labs. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Signatures of electron-magnon interaction in charge and spin currents through magnetic tunnel junctions: A nonequilibrium many-body perturbation theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2014-07-01

    We develop a numerically exact scheme for resumming certain classes of Feynman diagrams in the self-consistent perturbative expansion for the electron and magnon self-energies in the nonequilibrium Green function formalism applied to a coupled electron-magnon (e-m) system driven out of equilibrium by the applied finite bias voltage. Our scheme operates with the electronic and magnonic GFs and the corresponding self-energies viewed as matrices in the Keldysh space, rather than conventionally extracting their retarded and lesser components, which greatly simplifies translation of diagrams into compact mathematical expressions and their computational implementation. This is employed to understand the effect of inelastic e-m scattering on charge and spin current vs bias voltage Vb in F/I/F (F-ferromagnet; I-insulating barrier) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), which are modeled on a quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) tight-binding lattice for the electronic subsystem and quasi-1D Heisenberg model for the magnonic subsystem. For this purpose, we evaluate the Fock diagram for the electronic self-energy and the electron-hole polarization bubble diagram for the magnonic self-energy. The respective electronic and magnonic GF lines within these diagrams are the fully interacting ones, thereby requiring to solve the ensuing coupled system of nonlinear integral equations self-consistently. Despite using the quasi-1D model and treating e-m interaction in many-body fashion only within a small active region consisting of few lattice sites around the F/I interface, our analysis captures essential features of the so-called zero-bias anomaly observed [V. Drewello, J. Schmalhorst, A. Thomas, and G. Reiss, Phys. Rev. B 77, 014440 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevB.77.014440] in both MgO- and AlOx-based realistic 3D MTJs where the second derivative d2I /dVb2 (i.e., inelastic electron tunneling spectrum) of charge current exhibits sharp peaks of opposite sign on either side Vb=0. We show that this

  8. Heusler compounds with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and large tunneling magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleev, Sergey V.; Ferrante, Yari; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Jones, Barbara; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work we suggest a recipe for finding tetragonal Heusler compounds with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) that also exhibit large tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) when used as electrodes in magnetic tunnel junction devices with suitable tunneling barrier materials. We performed density-functional theory calculations for 286 Heusler compounds and identified 116 stable tetragonal compounds. Ten of these compounds are predicted to have strong PMA and, simultaneously, exponentially increasing TMR with increasing tunneling barrier thickness due to the so-called Brillouin zone spin filtering effect. Experimental measurements performed for 25 Heusler compounds theoretically identified as tetragonal show that ten of these compounds indeed have tetragonal structure with PMA.

  9. The tunneling theory of the electronic stopping power of the planar channeling of ions in the range of some ten kilo-electronvolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haymann, P.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of the electronic stopping power in planar channeling recently presented in the case of the high energy range of the ion is now applied in the low energy case. Due to the different possible approximations in this case, it is shown that the localised density of charge induced on the walls of the channel during the passage of the ion is constant in width and the localised density function must oscillate with Z 1 and Z 2 . (Auth.)

  10. An innovative band-to-band tunneling analytical model and implications in compact modeling of tunneling-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Michielis, L.; Daǧtekin, N.; Biswas, A.; Lattanzio, L.; Selmi, L.; Luisier, M.; Riel, H.; Ionescu, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an analytical band-to-band tunneling model is proposed, validated by means of drift-diffusion simulation and comparison with experimental data, implemented in Verilog-A, and finally proven with SPICE simulator through simulation of circuits featuring tunneling diodes. The p-n junction current calculation starts from a non-local Band-to-Band tunneling theory including the electron-phonon interaction and therefore it is particularly suited for indirect semiconductor materials such as silicon- or germanium-based interband tunneling devices.

  11. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  12. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  13. Spin-valley splitting of electron beam in graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We study spatial separation of the four degenerate spin-valley components of an electron beam in a EuO-induced and top-gated ferromagnetic/pristine/strained graphene structure. We show that, in a full resonant tunneling regime for all beam components, the formation of standing waves can lead sudden phase jumps ∼−π and giant lateral Goos-Hänchen shifts as large as the transverse beam width, while the interplay of the spin and valley imaginary wave vectors in the modulated regions can lead differences of resonant angles for the four spin-valley flavors, manifesting a spin-valley beam splitting effect. The splitting effect is found to be controllable by the gating and strain.

  14. Global Locator, Local Locator, and Identifier Split (GLI-Split

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Menth

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The locator/identifier split is an approach for a new addressing and routing architecture to make routing in the core of the Internet more scalable. Based on this principle, we developed the GLI-Split framework, which separates the functionality of current IP addresses into a stable identifier and two independent locators, one for routing in the Internet core and one for edge networks. This makes routing in the Internet more stable and provides more flexibility for edge networks. GLI-Split can be incrementally deployed and it is backward-compatible with the IPv6 Internet. We describe its architecture, compare it to other approaches, present its benefits, and finally present a proof-of-concept implementation of GLI-Split.

  15. Wall Correction Model for Wind Tunnels with Open Test Section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2004-01-01

    In th paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, that is based on a onedimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. Generally......, the corrections from the model are in very good agreement with the CFD computaions, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections. Keywords: Wind tunnel correction, momentum theory...

  16. Split-illumination electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Park, Hyun Soon; Inada, Yoshikatsu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Akira; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We developed a split-illumination electron holography that uses an electron biprism in the illuminating system and two biprisms (applicable to one biprism) in the imaging system, enabling holographic interference micrographs of regions far from the sample edge to be obtained. Using a condenser biprism, we split an electron wave into two coherent electron waves: one wave is to illuminate an observation area far from the sample edge in the sample plane and the other wave to pass through a vacuum space outside the sample. The split-illumination holography has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of applications of electron holography.

  17. Resonant transitions between split energy levels triple-barrier nanostructures and their application perspectives in submillimeter-wave devices

    CERN Document Server

    Golant, E I

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for electronic coherent tunneling through the triple-barrier quantum-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures in the terahertz electric field. Using this model the frequency dependences of the negative dynamic conductivity for triple-barrier structures with coherent electron tunneling through the split energy levels are investigated. It has been shown that these structures can be employed in far-infrared coherent quantum lasers, the wave length being 600 mu m (5 THz)

  18. Variational Transition State Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truhlar, Donald G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-09-29

    This is the final report on a project involving the development and applications of variational transition state theory. This project involved the development of variational transition state theory for gas-phase reactions, including optimized multidimensional tunneling contributions and the application of this theory to gas-phase reactions with a special emphasis on developing reaction rate theory in directions that are important for applications to combustion. The development of variational transition state theory with optimized multidimensional tunneling as a useful computational tool for combustion kinetics involved eight objectives.

  19. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  20. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  1. ISR split-field magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used at intersection 4 around the Split-Field Magnet by the CERN-Bologna Collaboration (experiment R406). The plastic scintillator telescopes are used for precise pulse-height and time-of-flight measurements.

  2. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  3. Observation of spin Hall effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinxing; Ling, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyou; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-12-09

    Photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) manifesting itself as spin-dependent splitting escapes detection in previous photon tunneling experiments due to the fact that the induced beam centroid shift is restricted to a fraction of wavelength. In this work, we report on the first observation of this tiny effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements based on preselection and postselection technique on the spin states. We find that the spin-dependent splitting is even larger than the potential barrier thickness when spin-polarized photons tunneling through a potential barrier. This photonic SHE is attributed to spin-redirection Berry phase which can be described as a consequence of the spin-orbit coupling. These findings provide new insight into photon tunneling effect and thereby offer the possibility of developing spin-based nanophotonic applications.

  4. Deconstruction, G_2 Holonomy, and Doublet-Triplet Splitting

    OpenAIRE

    Witten, Edward

    2002-01-01

    We describe a mechanism for using discrete symmetries to solve the doublet-triplet splitting problem of four-dimensional supersymmetric GUT's. We present two versions of the mechanism, one via ``deconstruction,'' and one in terms of M-theory compactification to four dimensions on a manifold of G_2 holonomy.

  5. The Case of Missing Solar Neutrinos with their Split Personalities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Case of Missing Solar Neutrinos with their Split Personalities. ~~~'<,. ~. The Case of Missing Solar Neutrinos ... general theory of relativity and the observed precession of the perihelion of Mercury was a great triumph ..... neutrino counting rate, by nearly a factor of 3 over the. SSM prediction, constitutes the solar neutrino ...

  6. Voltage-controlled spin selection in a magnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodskyy, A; Gould, C; Slobodskyy, T; Becker, C R; Schmidt, G; Molenkamp, L W

    2003-06-20

    We have fabricated all II-VI semiconductor resonant tunneling diodes based on the (Zn,Mn,Be)Se material system, containing dilute magnetic material in the quantum well, and studied their current-voltage characteristics. When subjected to an external magnetic field the resulting spin splitting of the levels in the quantum well leads to a splitting of the transmission resonance into two separate peaks. This is interpreted as evidence of tunneling transport through spin polarized levels, and could be the first step towards a voltage controlled spin filter.

  7. Entropy Analysis of Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting Schemes for the Compressible Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiuhong, Lui; Xu, Jun

    1999-01-01

    Flux Vector Splitting (FVS) scheme is one group of approximate Riemann solvers for the compressible Euler equations. In this paper, the discretized entropy condition of the Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS) scheme based on the gas-kinetic theory is proved. The proof of the entropy condition involves the entropy definition difference between the distinguishable and indistinguishable particles.

  8. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  9. New vision of magnetic tunnelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Jonathan R. [Amherst College, Amhurst, MA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments support the idea that crystal defects may be responsible for the quantum tunnelling of magnetic moments in molecular magnets at low temperatures. The magnetic moment of a typical bar magnet will never spontaneously reverse direction. However, thermal fluctuations can flip the moment of a magnetic particle just a few nanometres across. The particle can be cooled to nearly absolute zero to suppress this process, but the moment may still find a way to reverse via quantum tunnelling. Quantum tunnelling of magnetization has been the subject of decades of research. Until a few years ago, however, there had only been circumstantial evidence for the phenomenon. This is because most systems of small magnetic particles are hard to characterize - the particles have a variety of shapes, sizes and other properties, making it difficult to compare data with theory. Some real progress was made a few years ago through research into high-spin single-molecule magnets. With dimensions of about a nanometre, these magnets are usually composed of a magnetic core that is surrounded by organic complexes. When they crystallize into a regular lattice, the organic ions keep neighbouring magnets well separated so that they interact only weakly. Ideally all the molecules are identical because they have been built chemically, which means that they can be characterized precisely and that any data can be analysed quantitatively. The most studied of these molecules is manganese-12 acetate (Mn{sub 12}). Within each molecule, the spins of the eight Mn{sup 3+} ions (each with S=2) are antiparallel to the spins of the four Mn{sup 4+} ions (each with S=3/2), giving Mn{sub 12} a total spin of S=10. Or, to put it another way, the magnetic moment of Mn{sub 12} is 20 times larger than that of the electron. Now Eugene Chudnovsky of Lehman College in New York and Dmitry Garanin of the University of Mainz in Germany have suggested a new mechanism for producing tunnelling in Mn{sub 12

  10. Diffraction-dependent spin splitting in spin Hall effect of light on reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaodong; Xie, Linguo; Qiu, Jiangdong; Zhang, Zhiyou; Du, Jinglei; Gao, Fuhua

    2015-07-27

    We report on a diffraction-dependent spin splitting of the paraxial Gaussian light beams on reflection theoretically and experimentally. In the case of horizontal incident polarization, the spin splitting is proportional to the diffraction length of light beams near the Brewster angle. However, the spin splitting is nearly independent with the diffraction length for the vertical incident polarization. By means of the angular spectrum theory, we find that the diffraction-dependent spin splitting is attributed to the first order expansion term of the reflection coefficients with respect to the transverse wave-vector which is closely related to the diffraction length.

  11. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N.; Rossi, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  12. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N. [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Rossi, Ignacio [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Diagnostico Dr. Enrique Rossi, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  13. Wind Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This ARDEC facility consists of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic wind tunnels to acquire aerodynamic data. Full-scale and sub-scale models of munitions are fitted...

  14. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  15. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  16. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  17. The lighting of traffic tunnels. A paper presented at a meeting of the Shanghai Association for Science and Technology SAST, October 9 and October 12, 1987.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The major problems for the lighting of tunnels concentrate in the daytime lighting for the first part of the tunnel directly following the entrance. The steady state theory of tunnel lighting as developed by Schreuder and Narisada, and the straylight- theory, developed by Adrian, are discussed.

  18. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  19. Splitting strings on integrable backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicedo, Benoit

    2011-05-01

    We use integrability to construct the general classical splitting string solution on R x S 3 . Namely, given any incoming string solution satisfying a necessary self-intersection property at some given instant in time, we use the integrability of the worldsheet σ-model to construct the pair of outgoing strings resulting from a split. The solution for each outgoing string is expressed recursively through a sequence of dressing transformations, the parameters of which are determined by the solutions to Birkhoff factorization problems in an appropriate real form of the loop group of SL 2 (C). (orig.)

  20. Planar tunneling and Andreev bound state spectroscopy of yttrium barium copper oxide thin films using solution-deposited zirconia insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentges, Patrick Jay

    2004-12-01

    Planar tunnel spectroscopic measurements are performed on YBa2Cu3O7-delta (YBCO) thin films at four different crystallographic orientations. Since tunneling is a highly surface-sensitive probe on YBCO, films have been optimized for high surface quality. To fabricate the tunneling insulator, a novel fabrication technique has been developed through solution condensation and hydrolysis of zirconia, which has proven to be gentler to the surface than previous techniques. The result is a clean tunneling interface as shown in scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, that allows us to detect several new features in the tunneling conductance. In addition, we have fabricated tunnel junctions with three different counter-electrode deposition techniques. In doing so, various behaviors of the tunneling conductance and its dependence on magnetic field, temperature, and injected current as a function of these counter-electrode deposition techniques has been observed. Modeling of the tunneling conductance has provided insight into the various behaviors. It has been shown that by varying the value of the tunneling cone, surface faceting and quasiparticle lifetime, in agreement with the observations, splitting vs. non-splitting of the zero-bias conductance peak can be understood.

  1. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA 23012 Airfoil with Various Arrangements of Slotted Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Harris , Thomas A

    1939-01-01

    An investigation was made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel and in the variable-density wind tunnel of the NACA 23012 airfoil with various slotted-flap arrangements. The purpose of the investigation in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel was to determine the airfoil section aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap shape, slot shape, and flap location. The flap position for maximum lift; polars for arrangements favorable for take-off and climb; and complete lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics for selected optimum arrangements were determined. The best arrangements were tested in the variable-density tunnel at an effective Reynolds number of 8,000,000. In addition, data from both wind tunnels are included for plain, split, external-airfoil, and Fowler flaps for purposes of comparison.

  2. Point splitting in a curved space-time background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liggatt, P.A.J.; Macfarlane, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    A prescription is given for point splitting in a curved space-time background which is a natural generalization of that familiar in quantum electrodynamics and Yang-Mills theory. It is applied (to establish its validity) to the verification of the gravitational anomaly in the divergence of a fermion axial current. Notable features of the prescription are that it defines a point-split current that can be differentiated straightforwardly, and that it involves a natural way of averaging (four-dimensionally) over the directions of point splitting. The method can extend directly from the spin-1/2 fermion case treated to other cases, e.g., to spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fermions. (author)

  3. Instantons and magnetization tunneling: Beyond the giant-spin approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florez, J.M.; Vargas, P.; Nunez, Alvaro S.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we show that commonly neglected fluctuations of the net total spin of a molecular nanomagnet strongly modified its tunneling properties and provide a scenario to explain some discrepancies between theory and experiment. Starting off from an effective spin Hamiltonian, we study the quantum tunneling of the magnetization of molecular nanomagnets in the regime where the giant-spin approximation is breaking down. This study is done using an instanton description of the tunneling path. The instanton is calculated considering its coupling to quantum fluctuations.

  4. Setting up tunneling conditions by means of Bohmian mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, A S; Miret-Artes, S, E-mail: asanz@iff.csic.es, E-mail: s.miret@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental-CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-02

    Usually tunneling is established after imposing some matching conditions on the (time-independent) wavefunction and its first derivative at the boundaries of a barrier. Here an alternative scheme is proposed to determine tunneling and estimate transmission probabilities in time-dependent problems, which takes advantage of the trajectory picture provided by Bohmian mechanics. From this theory, a general functional expression for the transmission probability in terms of the system initial state can be reached. This expression is used here to analyze tunneling properties and estimate transmissions in the case of initial Gaussian wave packets colliding with ramp-like barriers. (paper)

  5. Tunneling spectroscopy in NbN based Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicault, R.; Villegier, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    Tunneling spectroscopy in high quality NbN-oxide-Pb(In) diodes offers a direct observation of various NbN and Pb phonon frequences as other vibrating modes existing near the tunnel barrier. The large number of peaks attribuated to dips in the transverses and longitudinal acoustic branches of NbN dispersion curves are found to confirm the previous theory developing the contribution of these modes to the strong coupling and high Tc behavior of NbN

  6. Effects of quantum discreetness and flicker fluctuations of tunnel conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzovlev, Yu.E.; Medvedev, Yu.V.; Grishin, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Using a tunnel contact as an example one shows that interaction of single-electron processes in multielectron system may serve as a source of non-scale flicker low-frequency fluctuations of its conductivity. Interaction implies that quantum probability of electron transition depends on spontaneous changes of situation during the transition. Theory relates flicker fluctuations of tunnel conductivity with discreteness of spectrum of electron states and explains nonlinearity of noise-ampere characteristic observed in nanocomposite [ru

  7. VBSCan Split 2017 Workshop Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Christoph Falk; et al.

    2018-01-12

    This document summarises the talks and discussions happened during the VBSCan Split17 workshop, the first general meeting of the VBSCan COST Action network. This collaboration is aiming at a consistent and coordinated study of vector-boson scattering from the phenomenological and experimental point of view, for the best exploitation of the data that will be delivered by existing and future particle colliders.

  8. Water splitting by cooperative catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetterscheid, D.G.H.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2009-01-01

    A mononuclear Ru complex is shown to efficiently split water into H2 and O2 in consecutive steps through a heat- and light-driven process (see picture). Thermally driven H2 formation involves the aid of a non-innocent ligand scaffold, while dioxygen is generated by initial photochemically induced

  9. On split Lie triple systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The key tool in this job is the notion of connection of roots in the framework of split Lie triple systems. Author Affiliations. Antonio J Calderón Martín1. Departamento de Matemáticas, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain. Dates. Manuscript received: 25 January 2008. Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences.

  10. Heavy-Atom Tunneling Calculations in Thirteen Organic Reactions: Tunneling Contributions are Substantial, and Bell's Formula Closely Approximates Multidimensional Tunneling at ≥250 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Charles; Armas, Randy; Walker, Dana; Cosgriff, Christopher V; Greer, Edyta M

    2017-10-09

    Multidimensional tunneling calculations are carried out for 13 reactions, to test the scope of heavy-atom tunneling in organic chemistry, and to check the accuracy of one-dimensional tunneling models. The reactions include pericyclic, cycloaromatization, radical cyclization and ring opening, and S N 2. When compared at the temperatures that give the same effective rate constant of 3×10 -5  s -1 , tunneling accounts for 25-95 % of the rate in 8 of the 13 reactions. Values of transmission coefficients predicted by Bell's formula, κ Bell  , agree well with multidimensional tunneling (canonical variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling), κ SCT . Mean unsigned deviations of κ Bell vs. κ SCT are 0.08, 0.04, 0.02 at 250, 300 and 400 K. This suggests that κ Bell is a useful first choice for predicting transmission coefficients in heavy-atom tunnelling. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  12. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc biased...... at different points in the current-voltage characteristic. Both numerical calculations based on the Tien-Gordon theory and 70-GHz microwave experiments have confirmed the wide dynamic range (more than 15-dB attenuation for one stage) and the low insertion loss in the ''open'' state. The performance of a fully...... integrated submillimeter receiver circuit which comprises a flux-flow oscillator (FFO) as local oscillator, a superconducting variable attenuator, and a microwave SIS detector with tuned-out capacitance is also reported....

  13. A comparison between kinetic flux vector splitting and flux difference splitting methods in solution of Euler equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaei, M.; Shahverdi, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is proposed to compare the performances of deferent inviscid flux approximation methods in solution of two-dimensional Euler equations. The methods belong to two different group of flux splitting methods: flux difference splitting (FDS) methods and kinetic flux vector splitting (KFVS) method. Here Roe method and Osher method belonging to flux difference splitting (FDS) group have been employed and their performances are compared with that of kinetic flux vector splitting method (KFVS). Roe and Osher methods are based on approximate solution of Riemann problem over computational cell surfaces while the KFVS has a quit different base. In KFVS inviscid fluxes are approximated based on the kinetic theory and correlation between Boltzmann equation and Euler equations. For comparison the performances of the above mentioned methods three different problems have been solved. The first problem is flow over a 10 degree compression-expansion ramp with Mach number of 2.0, the second one is a transonic flow with Mach number of 0.85 over a 4.2% circular bump in a duct and the third is supersonic flow with Mach number of 3.0 over a circular blunt slab. (author)

  14. Interaction between groundwater and TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) excavated tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Font Capó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    A number of problems, e.g. sudden inflows are encountered during tunneling under the piezometric level, especially when the excavation crosses high transmissivity areas. These inflows may drag materials when the tunnel crosses low competent layers, resulting in subsidence, chimney formation and collapses. Moreover, inflows can lead to a decrease in head level because of aquifer drainage. Tunnels can be drilled by a tunnel boring machine (TBM) to minimize inflows and groundwater impacts, restr...

  15. Seepage into PEP tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, H.

    1990-01-01

    The current rate of seepage into the PEP tunnel in the vicinity of IR-10 is very low compared to previous years. Adequate means of handling this low flow are in place. It is not clear whether the reduction in the flow is temporary, perhaps due to three consecutive dry years, or permanent due to drainage of a perched water table. During PEP construction a large amount of effort was expended in attempts to seal the tunnel, with no immediate effect. The efforts to ''manage'' the water flow are deemed to be successful. By covering equipment to protect it from dripping water and channeling seepage into the drainage gutters, the seepage has been reduced to a tolerable nuisance. There is no sure, safe procedure for sealing a leaky shotcreted tunnel

  16. Microwave spectra of 2-phenylethyl methyl ether and 2-phenylethyl methyl ether-argon: Conformation-dependent tunneling and complexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusinghe, Ranil M.; Tubergen, Michael J.

    2018-04-01

    High-resolution rotational spectra were recorded for 2-phenylethyl methyl ether and the 2-phenylethyl methyl ether - argon complex using a cavity-based Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The spectra were assigned to the aao and g-ao monomer conformations and the g-ao - argon complex. Small tunneling splittings arising from more than one internal motion were resolved for eight transitions of the aao conformer; no tunneling splittings were observed in the spectra of the g-ao conformer or the argon complex. The calculated barriers (ωB97XD/6-311++G(d,p)) for methyl and phenyl internal rotations were found to be very similar for both conformers. The observation of tunneling splittings is limited to the aao conformer by relatively large barriers for the internal motions and sensitivity to the rotor axis angles within the two conformers.

  17. Tunneling effect in superconductors with magnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    1985-07-01

    We investigate the influence of transition metal impurities on the amplitude of the Josephson tunneling current. We consider a junction made up of two identical superconductors containing transition metal impurities and define a parameter K which is the normalised difference of the derivative of Josephson currents for superconducting pairs with and without magnetic impurities. We find K=0 for U/πGAMMA >1 in the Abrikosov-Gorkov theory, as well as large deviations of K from this value for 1< U/πGAMMA<3, where U/πGAMMA is the parameter of the Anderson theory. (author)

  18. LEP tunnel monorail

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    A monorail from CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP, for short). It ran around the 27km tunnel, transporting equipment and personnel. With its 27-kilometre circumference, LEP was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built and ran from 1989 to 2000. During 11 years of research, LEP's experiments provided a detailed study of the electroweak interaction. Measurements performed at LEP also proved that there are three – and only three – generations of particles of matter. LEP was closed down on 2 November 2000 to make way for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider in the same tunnel.

  19. Excavating a transfer tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The transfer tunnel being dug here will take the 450 GeV beam from the SPS and inject it into the LHC where the beam energies will be increased to 7 TeV. In order to transfer this beam from the SPS to the LHC, two transfer tunnels are used to circulate the beams in opposite directions. When excavated, the accelerator components, including magnets, beam pipes and cryogenics will be installed and connected to both the SPS and LHC ready for operation to begin in 2008.

  20. Stability of split Stirling refrigerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waele, A T A M de; Liang, W

    2009-01-01

    In many thermal systems spontaneous mechanical oscillations are generated under the influence of large temperature gradients. Well-known examples are Taconis oscillations in liquid-helium cryostats and oscillations in thermoacoustic systems. In split Stirling refrigerators the compressor and the cold finger are connected by a flexible tube. The displacer in the cold head is suspended by a spring. Its motion is pneumatically driven by the pressure oscillations generated by the compressor. In this paper we give the basic dynamic equations of split Stirling refrigerators and investigate the possibility of spontaneous mechanical oscillations if a large temperature gradient develops in the cold finger, e.g. during or after cool down. These oscillations would be superimposed on the pressure oscillations of the compressor and could ruin the cooler performance.

  1. Breaking through the tranfer tunnel

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the tunnel boring machine breaking through the transfer tunnel into the LHC tunnel. Proton beams will be transferred from the SPS pre-accelerator to the LHC at 450 GeV through two specially constructed transfer tunnels. From left to right: LHC Project Director, Lyn Evans; CERN Director-General (at the time), Luciano Maiani, and Director for Accelerators, Kurt Hubner.

  2. New Tunneling Features in Polar III-Nitride Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimy Encomendero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For the past two decades, repeatable resonant tunneling transport of electrons in III-nitride double barrier heterostructures has remained elusive at room temperature. In this work we theoretically and experimentally study III-nitride double-barrier resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs, the quantum transport characteristics of which exhibit new features that are unexplainable using existing semiconductor theory. The repeatable and robust resonant transport in our devices enables us to track the origin of these features to the broken inversion symmetry in the uniaxial crystal structure, which generates built-in spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields. Resonant tunneling transport enabled by the ground state as well as by the first excited state is demonstrated for the first time over a wide temperature window in planar III-nitride RTDs. An analytical transport model for polar resonant tunneling heterostructures is introduced for the first time, showing a good quantitative agreement with experimental data. From this model we realize that tunneling transport is an extremely sensitive measure of the built-in polarization fields. Since such electric fields play a crucial role in the design of electronic and photonic devices, but are difficult to measure, our work provides a completely new method to accurately determine their magnitude for the entire class of polar heterostructures.

  3. Gap anisotropy and tunneling currents. [MPS3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarides, N.; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to......The tunneling Hamiltonian formalism is applied to calculate the tunnelingcurrents through a small superconducting tunnel junction. The formalism isextended to nonconstant tunneling matrix elements. The electrodes of thejunction are assumed to...

  4. 7 CFR 51.2002 - Split shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Split shell. 51.2002 Section 51.2002 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.2002 Split shell. Split shell means a shell... of the shell, measured in the direction of the crack. ...

  5. Unstable Semiclassical Trajectories in Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Levkov, D G; Sibiryakov, S M

    2007-01-01

    Some tunneling phenomena are described, in the semiclassical approximation, by unstable complex trajectories. We develop a systematic procedure to stabilize the trajectories and to calculate the tunneling probability, including both the suppression exponent and prefactor. We find that the instability of tunneling solutions modifies the power-law dependence of the prefactor on h as compared to the case of stable solutions.

  6. Ultrafast reduction of exchange splitting in ferromagnetic nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G P; Bai, Y H; George, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    A decade ago Rhie et al (2003 Phys. Rev. Lett . 90 247201) reported that when ferromagnetic nickel is subject to an intense ultrashort laser pulse, its exchange splitting is reduced quickly. But to simulate such reduction remains a big challenge. The popular rigid band approximation (RBA), where both the band structure and the exchange splitting are held fixed before and after laser excitation, is unsuitable for this purpose, while the time-dependent density functional theory could be time-consuming. To overcome these difficulties, we propose a time-dependent Liouville and density functional theory (TDLDFT) that integrates the time-dependent Liouville equation into the density functional theory. As a result, the excited charge density is reiterated back into the Kohn–Sham equation, and the band structure is allowed to change dynamically. Even with the ground-state density functional, a larger demagnetization than RBA is found; after we expand Ortenzi’s spin scaling method into an excited-state (laser) density functional, we find that the exchange splitting is indeed strongly reduced, as seen in the experiment. Both the majority and minority bands are shifted toward the Fermi level, but the majority shifts a lot more. The ultrafast reduction in exchange splitting occurs concomitantly with demagnetization. While our current theory is still unable to yield the same percentage loss in the spin moment as observed in the experiment, it predicts a correct trend that agrees with the experiments. With a better functional, we believe that our results can be further improved. (paper)

  7. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansoldi, S. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) (Italy); Tanaka, T., E-mail: tanaka@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  8. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    OpenAIRE

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. Here we discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in literature.

  9. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 2. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry: Molecules in the Strange Quantum World. Sharmistha Karmakar Deepthi Jose Ayan Datta. General Article Volume 19 Issue 2 February 2014 pp 160-174 ...

  10. INCAS SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu STOICA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The INCAS Subsonic Wind Tunnel is a closed circuit, continuous, atmospheric pressure facility with a maximum speed of 110 m/s. The test section is octagonal ,of 2.5 m wide, 2.0 m high and 4 m long. The tunnel is powered by a 1200 kW, air cooled variable speed DC motor which drives a 12 blade, 3.5 m diameter fan and is equipped with a six component pyramidal type external mechanical balance with a 700 Kgf maximum lift capacity.The angle of attack range is between -45º and +45º while the yaw angle range is between -140º and +216º .The data acquisition system has been modified recently to allow the recording of all test data on a PC - type computer using LABVIEW and a PXI – type chassis containing specialized data acquisition modules.The tunnel is equipped with a variable frequency electrical supply system for powered models and a 10 bar compressed air supply for pneumatic flow control applications.In the recent years the subsonic wind tunnel has been intensively used for tests within several European projects (AVERT, CESAR and others.

  11. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ⎜ ARTICLE. Tunnelling Effects in Chemistry. Molecules in the Strange Quantum World. Sharmistha Karmakar, Deepthi Jose and Ayan Datta. (left) Sharmistha Karmakar is doing her PhD in the group of. Ayan Datta, IACS,. Kolkata. Her research interests are modelling molecules with strong optical absorbtion and.

  12. Nonequilibrium spin transport in Zeeman-split superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishtop, Tatiana; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia S.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the nonlocal conductance through a superconducting wire in tunnel contact with normal and ferromagnetic leads. In the presence of an in-plane magnetic field, the superconducting density of states is spin split, and the current injected from the normal lead is spin polarized. A nonlocal conductance that is antisymmetric with the applied voltage can be measured with a ferromagnetic lead. It persists for a distance between the contacts that is larger than both the charge-imbalance relaxation length and the normal-state spin relaxation length. We determine its amplitude by considering two extreme models of weak and strong internal equilibration of the superconducting quasiparticles due to electron-electron interactions. We find that the nonlocal signal, which was measured in recent experiments and discussed as a spin-imbalance effect, can be interpreted alternatively as the signature of a thermoelectric effect.

  13. The Channel Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The

  14. A hierarchical network modeling method for railway tunnels safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Xu, Weixiang; Guo, Xin; Liu, Xumin

    2017-02-01

    Using network theory to model risk-related knowledge on accidents is regarded as potential very helpful in risk management. A large amount of defects detection data for railway tunnels is collected in autumn every year in China. It is extremely important to discover the regularities knowledge in database. In this paper, based on network theories and by using data mining techniques, a new method is proposed for mining risk-related regularities to support risk management in railway tunnel projects. A hierarchical network (HN) model which takes into account the tunnel structures, tunnel defects, potential failures and accidents is established. An improved Apriori algorithm is designed to rapidly and effectively mine correlations between tunnel structures and tunnel defects. Then an algorithm is presented in order to mine the risk-related regularities table (RRT) from the frequent patterns. At last, a safety assessment method is proposed by consideration of actual defects and possible risks of defects gained from the RRT. This method cannot only generate the quantitative risk results but also reveal the key defects and critical risks of defects. This paper is further development on accident causation network modeling methods which can provide guidance for specific maintenance measure.

  15. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Elastic simulations and Arizona mine test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic seismic simulations and field data tests are used to validate the theory of a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM). For nearfield elastic simulation, the SSTM results show superresolution to be better than λ/8 if the only scattered data are used as input data. If the direct P and S waves are muted then the resolution of the scatterer locations are within about λ/5. Seismic data collected in an Arizona tunnel showed a superresolution limit of at least λ/19. These test results are consistent with the theory of the SSTM and suggest that the SSTM can be a tool used by geophysicists as a probe for near-field scatterers.

  16. Electron-spin polarization in tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic EuS barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, X.; Moodera, J.S.; Meservey, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report here spin-polarized tunneling experiments using non-ferromagnetic electrodes and ferromagnetic EuS barriers. Because of the conduction band in EuS splits into spin-up and spin-down subbands when the temperature is below 16.7 K, the Curie temperature of EuS, the tunnel barrier for electrons with different spin directions is different, therefore giving rise to tunnel current polarization. The spin-filter effect, as it may be called, was observed earlier, directly or indirectly, by several groups: Esaki et al. made a tunneling study on junctions having EuS and EuSe barriers; Thompson et al. studied Schottky barrier tunneling between In and doped EuS; Muller et al. and Kisker et al. performed electron field emission experiments on EuS-coated tungsten tips. The field emission experiments gave a maximum polarization of (89 + 7)% for the emitted electrons. Although the previous tunneling studies did not directly show electron polarization, their results were explained by the same spin- filter effect. This work uses the spin-polarized tunneling technique to show directly that tunnel current is indeed polarized and polarization can be as high as 85%

  17. Monitoring pilot projects on bored tunnelling : The Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.; De Boer, F.; Admiraal, J.B.M.; Van Jaarsveld, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    Two pilot projects for bored tunnelling in soft soil have been undertaken in the Netherlands. The monitoring was commissioned under the authority of the Centre for Underground Construction (COB). A description of the research related to the Second Heinenoord Tunnel and the Botlek Rail Tunnel will be

  18. Tunneling decay in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpee, T.; Dykman, M.I.; Platzman, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    We provide a semiclassical theory of tunneling decay in a magnetic field and a three-dimensional potential of a general form. Because of broken time-reversal symmetry, the standard WKB technique has to be modified. The decay rate is found from the analysis of the Hamilton trajectories of the particle in complex phase space and time. In a magnetic field, the tunneling particle comes from beneath the barrier with a nonzero velocity. The exit location in the classically allowed region is obtained by matching the decaying and outgoing branches of the WKB wave function on a caustic of the set of the complex trajectories. The slope of the logarithm of the wave function sharply changes on the anti-Stokes surface where there occurs switching between different WKB branches. For potential wells that are parabolic near the minimum, we also provide a bounce-type formulation. The theory is applied to the models that are relevant to tunneling from correlated two-dimensional electron systems in a magnetic field parallel to the electron layer

  19. Graphene quantum dots probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenstern, Markus; Freitag, Nils; Nent, Alexander; Nemes-Incze, Peter; Liebmann, Marcus [II. Institute of Physics B and JARA-FIT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy results probing the electronic properties of graphene quantum dots are reviewed. After a short summary of the study of squared wave functions of graphene quantum dots on metal substrates, we firstly present data where the Landau level gaps caused by a perpendicular magnetic field are used to electrostatically confine electrons in monolayer graphene, which are probed by the Coulomb staircase revealing the consecutive charging of a quantum dot. It turns out that these quantum dots exhibit much more regular charging sequences than lithographically confined ones. Namely, the consistent grouping of charging peaks into quadruplets, both, in the electron and hole branch, portrays a regular orbital splitting of about 10meV. At low hole occupation numbers, the charging peaks are, partly, additionally grouped into doublets. The spatially varying energy separation of the doublets indicates a modulation of the valley splitting by the underlying BN substrate. We outline that this property might be used to eventually tune the valley splitting coherently. Afterwards, we describe graphene quantum dots with multiple contacts produced without lithographic resist, namely by local anodic oxidation. Such quantum dots target the goal to probe magnetotransport properties during the imaging of the corresponding wave functions by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Research on he Classification of Life-Cycle Safety Monitoring Levels of Subsea Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Junfu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As a traffic engineering project across straits or gulfs, subsea tunnel is one of the oceaneering with great construction difficulties, and the key to the success of subsea tunnel engineering lies in timely and accurate assessment of the structure safety of subsea tunnel engineering construction and life-cycle. Xiang’an Xiamen subsea tunnel is China’s first subsea tunnel which crosses complex formation conditions, engineering accidents such as collapse, sudden inflow of water or mud might occur during tunnel construction and operation. Therefore, the concept of subsea tunnel life-cycle monitoring is proposed aiming at the particularity of subsea tunnels. The variation forms of subsea tunnel mainly include large deformation, collapse, primary support cracking, water leakage, water pressure increase, steel arch corrosion, concrete corrosion, longitudinal differential settlement, etc., and classification of the life-cycle safety monitoring levels of the subsea tunnel is conducted based on risk assessment theory and risk level management benchmark to determine the possible variation forms in the monitoring level segments. The research results will provide reference for the subsea tunnel life-cycle monitoring, disaster warning as well as risk management under construction or to be built at home and abroad.

  1. Innovative wedge axe in making split firewood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutikainen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Interteam Oy, a company located in Espoo, has developed a new method for making split firewood. The tools on which the patented System Logmatic are based are wedge axe and cylindrical splitting-carrying frame. The equipment costs about 495 FIM. The block of wood to be split is placed inside the upright carrying frame and split in a series of splitting actions using the innovative wedge axe. The finished split firewood remains in the carrying frame, which (as its name indicates) also serves as the means for carrying the firewood. This innovative wedge-axe method was compared with the conventional splitting of wood using an axe (Fiskars -handy 1400 splitting axe costing about 200 FIM) in a study conducted at TTS-Institute. There were eight test subjects involved in the study. In the case of the wedge-axe method, handling of the blocks to be split and of the finished firewood was a little quicker, but in actual splitting it was a little slower than the conventional axe method. The average productivity of splitting the wood and of the work stages related to it was about 0.4 m 3 per effective hour in both methods. The methods were also equivalent of one another in terms of the load imposed by the work when measured in terms of the heart rate. As regards work safety, the wedge-axe method was superior to the conventional method, but the continuous striking action and jolting transmitted to the arms were unpleasant (orig.)

  2. A universal explanation of tunneling conductance in exotic superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongbae; Abergel, D S L

    2016-08-11

    A longstanding mystery in understanding cuprate superconductors is the inconsistency between the experimental data measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In particular, the gap between prominent side peaks observed in STS is much bigger than the superconducting gap observed by ARPES measurements. Here, we reconcile the two experimental techniques by generalising a theory which was previously applied to zero-dimensional mesoscopic Kondo systems to strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) exotic superconductors. We show that the side peaks observed in tunneling conductance measurements in all these materials have a universal origin: They are formed by coherence-mediated tunneling under bias and do not directly reflect the underlying density of states (DOS) of the sample. We obtain theoretical predictions of the tunneling conductance and the density of states of the sample simultaneously and show that for cuprate and pnictide superconductors, the extracted sample DOS is consistent with the superconducting gap measured by ARPES.

  3. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  4. Parallel BLAST on split databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathog, David R

    2003-09-22

    BLAST programs often run on large SMP machines where multiple threads can work simultaneously and there is enough memory to cache the databases between program runs. A group of programs is described which allows comparable performance to be achieved with a Beowulf configuration in which no node has enough memory to cache a database but the cluster as an aggregate does. To achieve this result, databases are split into equal sized pieces and stored locally on each node. Each query is run on all nodes in parallel and the resultant BLAST output files from all nodes merged to yield the final output. Source code is available from ftp://saf.bio.caltech.edu/

  5. Polymer-mediated tunneling transport between carbon nanotubes in nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, Pedro A; Michalak, Tyler

    2014-05-01

    Electron transport in nanocomposites has attracted a good deal of attention for some time now; furthermore, the ability to control its characteristics is a necessary step in the design of multifunctional materials. When conductive nanostructures (for example carbon nanotubes) are inserted in a non-conductive matrix, electron transport below the percolation threshold is dominated by tunneling and thus the conductive characteristics of the composite depends heavily on the characteristics of the tunneling currents between nanoinserts. A parameter-free approach to study tunneling transport between carbon nanotubes across a polymer matrix is presented. The calculation is done with a combination of Density Functional Theory and Green functions (an approach heavily used in molecular electronics) which is shown here to be effective in this non-resonant transport condition. The results show that the method can effectively capture the effect of a dielectric layer in tunneling transport. The current is found to exponentially decrease with the size of the gap for both vacuum and polymer, and that the polymer layer lowers the tunneling barrier enhancing tunneling conduction. For a polyacrylonitrile matrix, a four-fold decrease in the tunneling constant, compared to tunneling in vacuum, is observed, a result that is consistent with available information. The method is very versatile as any DFT functional (or any other quantum mechanics method) can be used and thus the most accurate method for each particular system can be chosen. Furthermore as more methods become available, the calculations can be revised and improved. This approach can be used to design functional materials for fine-tunning the tunneling transport, for instance, the effect of modifying the nanoinsert-matrix interface (for example, by adding functional groups to carbon nanotubes) can be captured and the comparative performance of each interface predicted by simulation.

  6. Phenomenology of the soft gap, zero-bias peak, and zero-mode splitting in ideal Majorana nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Setiawan, F.; Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-08-01

    We theoretically consider the observed soft gap in the proximity-induced superconducting state of semiconductor nanowires in the presence of spin-orbit coupling, Zeeman spin splitting, and tunneling leads, but in the absence of any extrinsic disorder (i.e., an ideal system). We critically consider the effects of three distinct intrinsic physical mechanisms (tunnel barrier to normal leads, temperature, and dissipation) on the phenomenology of the gap softness in the differential conductance spectroscopy of the normal-superconductor junction as a function of spin splitting and chemical potential. We find that all three mechanisms individually can produce a soft gap, leading to calculated conductance spectra qualitatively mimicking experimental results. We also show through extensive numerical simulations that the phenomenology of the soft gap is intrinsically tied to the broadening and the height of the Majorana zero-mode-induced differential conductance peak above the topological quantum phase transition point with both the soft gap and the quality of the Majorana zero mode being simultaneously affected by tunnel barrier, temperature, and dissipation. We establish that the Majorana zero-mode splitting oscillations can be suppressed by temperature or dissipation (in a similar manner) but not by the tunnel barrier. Since all three mechanisms (plus disorder, not considered in the current work) are likely to be present in any realistic nanowires, discerning the effects of various mechanisms is difficult, necessitating detailed experimental data as a function of all the system parameters, some of which (e.g., dissipation, chemical potential, tunnel barrier) may not be known experimentally. While the tunneling-induced soft-gap behavior is benign with no direct adverse effect on the Majorana topological properties with the zero-bias peak remaining quantized at 2 e2/h , the soft gap induced by finite temperature and/or finite dissipation is detrimental to topological

  7. Spin- and energy-dependent tunneling through a single molecule with intramolecular spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, Jens; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Kuck, Stefan; Lazić, Predrag; Caciuc, Vasile; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Hoffmann, Germar; Blügel, Stefan; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2010-07-23

    We investigate the spin- and energy-dependent tunneling through a single organic molecule (CoPc) adsorbed on a ferromagnetic Fe thin film, spatially resolved by low-temperature spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. Interestingly, the metal ion as well as the organic ligand show a significant spin dependence of tunneling current flow. State-of-the-art ab initio calculations including also van der Waals interactions reveal a strong hybridization of molecular orbitals and substrate 3d states. The molecule is anionic due to a transfer of one electron, resulting in a nonmagnetic (S=0) state. Nevertheless, tunneling through the molecule exhibits a pronounced spin dependence due to spin-split molecule-surface hybrid states.

  8. Effects of periodic modulation on the nonlinear Landau–Zener tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Hua, Wu; Wen-Shan, Duan

    2009-01-01

    We study the Landau–Zener tunneling of a nonlinear two-level system by applying a periodic modulation on its energy bias. We find that the two levels are splitting at the zero points of the zero order Bessel function for high-frequency modulation. Moreover, we obtain the effective coupling constant between two levels at the zero points of the zero order Bessel function by calculating the final tunneling probability at these points. It seems that the effective coupling constant can be regarded as the approximation of the higher order Bessel function at these points. For the low-frequency modulation, we find that the final tunneling probability is a function of the interaction strength. For the weak inter-level coupling case, we find that the final tunneling probability is more disordered as the interaction strength becomes larger. (general)

  9. Nanowire resonant tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, M. T.; Ohlsson, B. J.; Thelander, C.; Persson, A. I.; Deppert, K.; Wallenberg, L. R.; Samuelson, L.

    2002-12-01

    Semiconductor heterostructures and their implementation into electronic and photonic devices have had tremendous impact on science and technology. In the development of quantum nanoelectronics, one-dimensional (1D) heterostructure devices are receiving a lot of interest. We report here functional 1D resonant tunneling diodes obtained via bottom-up assembly of designed segments of different semiconductor materials in III/V nanowires. The emitter, collector, and the central quantum dot are made from InAs and the barrier material from InP. Ideal resonant tunneling behavior, with peak-to-valley ratios of up to 50:1 and current densities of 1 nA/μm2 was observed at low temperatures.

  10. Hawking Radiation As Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, Maulik K.; Wilczek, Frank

    2000-01-01

    We present a short and direct derivation of Hawking radiation as a tunneling process, based on particles in a dynamical geometry. The imaginary part of the action for the classically forbidden process is related to the Boltzmann factor for emission at the Hawking temperature. Because the derivation respects conservation laws, the exact spectrum is not precisely thermal. We compare and contrast the problem of spontaneous emission of charged particles from a charged conductor

  11. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  12. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopi...... incision could be found. There were no serious complications in either group. The results indicate that the endoscopic procedure is safe and has the benefit of faster rehabilitation and return to work....

  13. Tunnel blasting - recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.E.

    1999-05-01

    While tunnelling machines are more efficient than previously, there are still areas where blasting is a more efficient method of advance. Drilling and design methods are increasingly sophisticated, as is choice of explosive. Explosive deployment must be carefully calculated so as to avoid desensitisation. Nitroglycerine may be used as slurries; bulk mixing on site of ANFO is also practised in mining in the UK. Electric detonators, Nonel tubes, and electronic detonators are also increasingly employed.

  14. Tunneling corrections to unimolecular rate constants, with application to formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    Tunneling corrections to the rate constant for unimolecular reactions in an isolated molecule are treated within the standard transition state (i.e., RRKM) theory of such processes. The microcanonical distribution relevant to the unimolecular case causes tunneling effects to enter in a somewhat more complicated fashion than in the analogous transition-state theory for thermally averaged bimolecular rate constants; e.g., even within the separable approximation they do not enter as simply a multiplicative correction factor. Application of the theoretical expressions to some unimolecular processes (H 2 CO → H 2 + CO, trans-HCOH → H 2 CO) of interest in the collisionless photochemistry of formaldehyde indicates that tunneling effects are quite significant for rates of 10 9 s -1 or slower. Isotope effects are also considered and seen to be quite interesting. 4 figures, 1 table

  15. Resonant Tunneling in Gated Vertical One- dimensional Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolagunta, V. R.; Janes, D. B.; Melloch, M. R.; Webb, K. J.

    1997-03-01

    Vertical sub-micron transistors incorporating resonant tunneling multiple quantum well heterostructures are interesting in applications for both multi-valued logic devices and the study of quantization effects in vertical quasi- one-, zero- dimensional structures. Earlier we have demonstrated room temperature pinch-off of the resonant peak in sub-micron vertical resonant tunneling transistors structures using a self-aligned sidewall gating technique ( V.R. Kolagunta et. al., Applied Physics Lett., 69), 374(1996). In this paper we present the study of gating effects in vertical multiple quantum well resonant tunneling transistors. Multiple well quasi-1-D sidewall gated transistors with mesa dimensions of L_x=0.5-0.9μm and L_y=10-40μm were fabricated. The quantum heterostructure in these devices consists of two non-symmetric (180 ÅÅi-GaAs wells separated from each other and from the top and bottom n^+ GaAs/contacts region using Al_0.3Ga_0.7As tunneling barriers. Room temperature pinch-off of the multiple resonant peaks similar to that reported in the case of single well devices is observed in these devices^1. Current-voltage characteristics at liquid nitrogen temperatures show splitting of the resonant peaks into sub-bands with increasing negative gate bias indicative of quasi- 1-D confinement. Room-temperature and low-temperature current-voltage measurements shall be presented and discussed.

  16. Algebraic techniques for diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix in split quaternionic mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Tongsong, E-mail: jiangtongsong@sina.com [Department of Mathematics, Linyi University, Linyi, Shandong 276005 (China); Department of Mathematics, Heze University, Heze, Shandong 274015 (China); Jiang, Ziwu; Zhang, Zhaozhong [Department of Mathematics, Linyi University, Linyi, Shandong 276005 (China)

    2015-08-15

    In the study of the relation between complexified classical and non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, physicists found that there are links to quaternionic and split quaternionic mechanics, and this leads to the possibility of employing algebraic techniques of split quaternions to tackle some problems in complexified classical and quantum mechanics. This paper, by means of real representation of a split quaternion matrix, studies the problem of diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix and gives algebraic techniques for diagonalization of split quaternion matrices in split quaternionic mechanics.

  17. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise. [NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise was refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy. This theory was then verified by carrying out extensive data/theory comparisons. The resulting model computer program was then employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line on rotor/turbulence noise for outdoor test stand. NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  18. Wind Tunnel Management and Resource Optimization: A Systems Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Derya, A.; Aasen, Curtis A.

    2000-01-01

    complexity of developing a model that can be used for successfully implementing a standardized management planning tool. The objective of this study was to implement an Integrated Wind Tunnel Planning System to improve the operations within the aeronautics testing and research group, in particular Wind Tunnel Enterprise. The study included following steps: Conducted literature search and expert discussions (NASA and Old Dominion University faculty), Performed environmental scan of NASA Langley wind tunnel operations as foundation for problem definition. Established operation requirements and evaluation methodologies. Examined windtunnel operations to map out the common characteristics, critical components, and system structure. Reviewed and evaluated various project scheduling and management systems for implementation, Evaluated and implemented "Theory of Constraints (TOC)" project scheduling methodology at NASA Langley wind tunnel operations together with NASA staff.

  19. Nanowire Tunnel Field Effect Transistors: Prospects and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Somaia Sarwat

    The tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) has the potential to operate at lower voltages and lower power than the field effect transistor (FET). The TFET can circumvent the fundamental thermal limit of the inverse subthreshold slope (S) by exploiting interband tunneling of non-equilibrium "cold" carriers. The conduction mechanism in the TFET is governed by band-to-band tunneling which limits the drive current. TFETs built with III-V materials like InAs and InSb can produce enough tunneling current because of their small direct bandgap. Our simulation results show that although they require highly degenerate source doping to support the high electric fields in the tunnel region, the devices achieve minimum inverse subthreshold slopes of 30 mV/dec. In subthreshold, these devices experience both regimes of voltage-controlled tunneling and cold-carrier injection. Numerical results based on a discretized 8-band k.p model are compared to analytical WKB theory. For both regular FETs and TFETs, direct channel tunneling dominates the leakage current when the physical gate length is reduced to 5 nm. Therefore, a survey of materials is performed to determine their ability to suppress the direct tunnel current through a 5 nm barrier. The tunneling effective mass gives the best indication of the relative size of the tunnel currents. Si gives the lowest overall tunnel current for both the conduction and valence band and, therefore, it is the optimum choice for suppressing tunnel current at the 5 nm scale. Our numerical simulation shows that the finite number, random placement, and discrete nature of the dopants in the source of an InAs nanowire (NW) TFET affect both the mean value and the variance of the drive current and the inverse subthreshold slope. The discrete doping model gives an average drive current and an inverse subthreshold slope that are less than those predicted from the homogeneous doping model. The doping density required to achieve a target drive current is

  20. Testing PVLAS axions with resonant photon splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, E; Gabrielli, Emidio; Giovannini, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    The photon splitting gamma -> gamma gamma in a time-independent and inhomogeneous magnetized background is considered when neutral and ultralight spin-0 particles are coupled to two-photons. Depending on the inhomogeneity scale of the external field, resonant photon splitting can occur. If an optical laser crosses a magnetic field of few Tesla with typical inhomogeneity scale of the order of the meter, a potentially observable rate of photon splittings is expected for the PVLAS range of couplings and masses.

  1. Additive operator-difference schemes splitting schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Vabishchevich, Petr N

    2013-01-01

    Applied mathematical modeling isconcerned with solving unsteady problems. This bookshows how toconstruct additive difference schemes to solve approximately unsteady multi-dimensional problems for PDEs. Two classes of schemes are highlighted: methods of splitting with respect to spatial variables (alternating direction methods) and schemes of splitting into physical processes. Also regionally additive schemes (domain decomposition methods)and unconditionally stable additive schemes of multi-component splitting are considered for evolutionary equations of first and second order as well as for sy

  2. Iterative Splitting Methods for Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Geiser, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Iterative Splitting Methods for Differential Equations explains how to solve evolution equations via novel iterative-based splitting methods that efficiently use computational and memory resources. It focuses on systems of parabolic and hyperbolic equations, including convection-diffusion-reaction equations, heat equations, and wave equations. In the theoretical part of the book, the author discusses the main theorems and results of the stability and consistency analysis for ordinary differential equations. He then presents extensions of the iterative splitting methods to partial differential

  3. Zeeman effects on the coherent tunnelling conductance in normal-metal/superconductor/normal-metal double tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zheng-Chao

    2005-06-01

    The coherent quantum transport is investigated in normal-metal/superconductor/normal-metal (N/S/N) double tunnel junctions under a Zeeman magnetic field on the S. Taking simultaneously into account the electron-injected current from one N electrode and the hole-injected current from the other N electrode, we derive a general formula for the differential conductance in the N/S/N system. It is shown that the conductance spectrum exhibits oscillatory behaviour with the bias voltage and the oscillation amplitude is reduced with increasing temperature and Zeeman magnetic field, the Zeeman energy can lead to the Zeeman splitting of conductance peaks. In the tunnel limit, a series of bound states of quasiparticles will form in the S.

  4. Spin Splitting in Different Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yafei

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin splitting in four undoped asymmetric quantum wells in the absence of external electric field and magnetic field. The quantum well geometry dependence of spin splitting is studied with the Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling included. The results show that the structure of quantum well plays an important role in spin splitting. The Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin splitting in four asymmetric quantum wells are quite different. The origin of the distinction is discussed in this work. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  5. Dark matter from split seesaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusenko, Alexander; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2010-01-01

    The seesaw mechanism in models with extra dimensions is shown to be generically consistent with a broad range of Majorana masses. The resulting democracy of scales implies that the seesaw mechanism can naturally explain the smallness of neutrino masses for an arbitrarily small right-handed neutrino mass. If the scales of the seesaw parameters are split, with two right-handed neutrinos at a high scale and one at a keV scale, one can explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe, as well as dark matter. The dark matter candidate, a sterile right-handed neutrino with mass of several keV, can account for the observed pulsar velocities and for the recent data from Chandra X-ray Observatory, which suggest the existence of a 5 keV sterile right-handed neutrino.

  6. Emittance compensation in split photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Floettmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The compensation of correlated emittance contributions is of primary importance to optimize the performance of high brightness photoinjectors. While only extended numerical simulations can capture the complex beam dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in sufficient detail to optimize a specific injector layout, simplified models are required to gain a deeper understanding of the involved dynamics, to guide the optimization procedure, and to interpret experimental results. In this paper, a slice envelope model for the emittance compensation process in a split photoinjector is presented. The emittance term is included in the analytical solution of the beam envelope in a drift, which is essential to take the emittance contribution due to a beam size mismatch into account. The appearance of two emittance minima in the drift is explained, and the matching into the booster cavity is discussed. A comparison with simulation results points out effects which are not treated in the envelope model, such as overfocusing and field nonlinearities.

  7. Gauge mediated mini-split

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Knapen, Simon

    2016-03-01

    We propose a simple model of split supersymmetry from gauge mediation. This model features gauginos that are parametrically a loop factor lighter than scalars, accommodates a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, and incorporates a simple solution to the μ- b μ problem. The gaugino mass suppression can be understood as resulting from collective symmetry breaking. Imposing collider bounds on μ and requiring viable electroweak symmetry breaking implies small a-terms and small tan β — the stop mass ranges from 105 to 108 GeV. In contrast with models with anomaly + gravity mediation (which also predict a one-loop loop suppression for gaugino masses), our gauge mediated scenario predicts aligned squark masses and a gravitino LSP. Gluinos, electroweakinos and Higgsinos can be accessible at the LHC and/or future colliders for a wide region of the allowed parameter space.

  8. Minimal Doubling and Point Splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creutz, M.

    2010-06-14

    Minimally-doubled chiral fermions have the unusual property of a single local field creating two fermionic species. Spreading the field over hypercubes allows construction of combinations that isolate specific modes. Combining these fields into bilinears produces meson fields of specific quantum numbers. Minimally-doubled fermion actions present the possibility of fast simulations while maintaining one exact chiral symmetry. They do, however, introduce some peculiar aspects. An explicit breaking of hyper-cubic symmetry allows additional counter-terms to appear in the renormalization. While a single field creates two different species, spreading this field over nearby sites allows isolation of specific states and the construction of physical meson operators. Finally, lattice artifacts break isospin and give two of the three pseudoscalar mesons an additional contribution to their mass. Depending on the sign of this mass splitting, one can either have a traditional Goldstone pseudoscalar meson or a parity breaking Aoki-like phase.

  9. Gauge mediated mini-split

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Timothy [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon,Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Craig, Nathaniel [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Knapen, Simon [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics,University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We propose a simple model of split supersymmetry from gauge mediation. This model features gauginos that are parametrically a loop factor lighter than scalars, accommodates a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, and incorporates a simple solution to the μ−b{sub μ} problem. The gaugino mass suppression can be understood as resulting from collective symmetry breaking. Imposing collider bounds on μ and requiring viable electroweak symmetry breaking implies small a-terms and small tan β — the stop mass ranges from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 8} GeV. In contrast with models with anomaly + gravity mediation (which also predict a one-loop loop suppression for gaugino masses), our gauge mediated scenario predicts aligned squark masses and a gravitino LSP. Gluinos, electroweakinos and Higgsinos can be accessible at the LHC and/or future colliders for a wide region of the allowed parameter space.

  10. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in a current biased Josephson junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinis, J.M.; Devoret, M.H.; Clarke, J.; Urbina, C.

    1984-11-01

    We discuss in this work an attempt to answer experimentally the question: do macroscopic variables obey quantum mechanics. More precisely, this experiment deals with the question of quantum-mechanical tunnelling of a macroscopic variable, a subject related to the famous Schrodinger's cat problem in the theory of measurement

  11. Tunnel junction dc SQUID: fabrication, operation, and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Ketchen, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    The theory, fabrication, operation, and performance of a dc SQUID that makes use of two shunted Nb-NbO/sub x/-Pb tunnel junctions are described. The junctions have predictable characteristics, can be stored for long periods at room temperature, and can be cycled between room and liquid helium temperatures repeatedly

  12. Structure factors for tunneling ionization rates of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, L.B.; Jensen, F.; Tolstikhin, O.I.

    2013-01-01

    Within the weak-field asymptotic theory, the dependence of the tunneling ionization rate of a molecule in a static electric field on its orientation with respect to the field is determined by the structure factor for the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). An accurate determination of this...

  13. Efficient evaluation of atom tunneling combined with electronic structure calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ásgeirsson, Vilhjálmur; Arnaldsson, Andri; Jónsson, Hannes

    2018-03-14

    Methodology for finding optimal tunneling paths and evaluating tunneling rates for atomic rearrangements is described. First, an optimal JWKB tunneling path for a system with fixed energy is obtained using a line integral extension of the nudged elastic band method. Then, a calculation of the dynamics along the path is used to determine the temperature at which it corresponds to an optimal Feynman path for thermally activated tunneling (instanton) and a harmonic approximation is used to estimate the transition rate. The method is illustrated with calculations for a modified two-dimensional Müller-Brown surface but is efficient enough to be used in combination with electronic structure calculations of the energy and atomic forces in systems containing many atoms. An example is presented where tunneling is the dominant mechanism well above room temperature as an H 3 BNH 3 molecule dissociates to form H 2 . Also, a solid-state example is presented where density functional theory calculations of H atom tunneling in a Ta crystal give close agreement with experimental measurements on hydrogen diffusion over a wide range in temperature.

  14. Dynamical tunneling in systems with a mixed phase space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeck, Steffen

    2010-04-22

    Tunneling is one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics. While the tunneling process in one-dimensional integrable systems is well understood, its quantitative prediction for systems with a mixed phase space is a long-standing open challenge. In such systems regions of regular and chaotic dynamics coexist in phase space, which are classically separated but quantum mechanically coupled by the process of dynamical tunneling. We derive a prediction of dynamical tunneling rates which describe the decay of states localized inside the regular region towards the so-called chaotic sea. This approach uses a fictitious integrable system which mimics the dynamics inside the regular domain and extends it into the chaotic region. Excellent agreement with numerical data is found for kicked systems, billiards, and optical microcavities, if nonlinear resonances are negligible. Semiclassically, however, such nonlinear resonance chains dominate the tunneling process. Hence, we combine our approach with an improved resonance-assisted tunneling theory and derive a unified prediction which is valid from the quantum to the semiclassical regime. We obtain results which show a drastically improved accuracy of several orders of magnitude compared to previous studies. (orig.)

  15. Efficient evaluation of atom tunneling combined with electronic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ásgeirsson, Vilhjálmur; Arnaldsson, Andri; Jónsson, Hannes

    2018-03-01

    Methodology for finding optimal tunneling paths and evaluating tunneling rates for atomic rearrangements is described. First, an optimal JWKB tunneling path for a system with fixed energy is obtained using a line integral extension of the nudged elastic band method. Then, a calculation of the dynamics along the path is used to determine the temperature at which it corresponds to an optimal Feynman path for thermally activated tunneling (instanton) and a harmonic approximation is used to estimate the transition rate. The method is illustrated with calculations for a modified two-dimensional Müller-Brown surface but is efficient enough to be used in combination with electronic structure calculations of the energy and atomic forces in systems containing many atoms. An example is presented where tunneling is the dominant mechanism well above room temperature as an H3BNH3 molecule dissociates to form H2. Also, a solid-state example is presented where density functional theory calculations of H atom tunneling in a Ta crystal give close agreement with experimental measurements on hydrogen diffusion over a wide range in temperature.

  16. Quantum dissipation, scattering and tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleuterio, S.M.; Vilela Mendes, R.

    1984-01-01

    A quantization technique for dissipative systems is used to discuss one dimensional problems including tunneling with dissipation, capture in dissipative potential wells and quantum coherence. (orig.)

  17. Field-Split Preconditioned Inexact Newton Algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lulu

    2015-06-02

    The multiplicative Schwarz preconditioned inexact Newton (MSPIN) algorithm is presented as a complement to additive Schwarz preconditioned inexact Newton (ASPIN). At an algebraic level, ASPIN and MSPIN are variants of the same strategy to improve the convergence of systems with unbalanced nonlinearities; however, they have natural complementarity in practice. MSPIN is naturally based on partitioning of degrees of freedom in a nonlinear PDE system by field type rather than by subdomain, where a modest factor of concurrency can be sacrificed for physically motivated convergence robustness. ASPIN, originally introduced for decompositions into subdomains, is natural for high concurrency and reduction of global synchronization. We consider both types of inexact Newton algorithms in the field-split context, and we augment the classical convergence theory of ASPIN for the multiplicative case. Numerical experiments show that MSPIN can be significantly more robust than Newton methods based on global linearizations, and that MSPIN can be more robust than ASPIN and maintain fast convergence even for challenging problems, such as high Reynolds number Navier--Stokes equations.

  18. Efficient spin transitions in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Nicolás; Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre

    2009-10-23

    The excitation of the spin degrees of freedom of an adsorbed atom by tunneling electrons is computed using strong coupling theory. Recent measurements [Heinrich, Science 306, 466 (2004)] reveal that electron currents in a magnetic system efficiently excite its magnetic moments. Our theory shows that the incoming electron spin strongly couples with that of the adsorbate so that memory of the initial spin state is lost, leading to large excitation efficiencies. First-principles transmissions are evaluated in quantitative agreement with the experiment.

  19. SplitDist—Calculating Split-Distances for Sets of Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund, T

    2004-01-01

    We present a tool for comparing a set of input trees, calculating for each pair of trees the split-distances, i.e., the number of splits in one tree not present in the other.......We present a tool for comparing a set of input trees, calculating for each pair of trees the split-distances, i.e., the number of splits in one tree not present in the other....

  20. Magnetic reconstruction induced magnetoelectric coupling and spin-dependent tunneling in Ni/KNbO3/Ni multiferroic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hu; Dai, Jian-Qing; Song, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetoelectric coupling and spin-polarized tunneling in Ni/KNbO 3 /Ni multiferroic tunnel junctions with asymmetric interfaces based on density functional theory. The junctions have two stable polarization states. We predict a peculiar magnetoelectric effect in such junctions originating from the magnetic reconstruction of Ni near the KO-terminated interface. This reconstruction is induced by the reversal of the ferroelectric polarization of KNbO 3 . Furthermore, the change in the magnetic ordering filters the spin-dependent current. This effect leads to a change in conductance by about two orders of magnitude. As a result we obtain a giant tunneling electroresistance effect. In addition, there exist sizable tunneling magnetoresistance effects for two polarization states. - Highlights: • We study the ME coupling and electron tunneling in Ni/KNbO 3 /Ni junctions. • There is magnetic reconstruction of Ni atoms near the KO-terminated interface. • A peculiar magnetoelectric coupling effect is obtained. • Predicted giant tunneling electroresistance effects.

  1. Thermovoltages in vacuum tunneling investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D. H.; Rettenberger, Armin; Grand, Jean Yves; Läuger, K.; Leiderer, Paul; Dransfeld, Klaus; Möller, Rolf

    1995-01-01

    By heating the tunneling tip of a scanning tunneling microscope the thermoelectric properties of a variable vacuum barrier have been investigated. The lateral variation of the observed thermovoltage will be discussed for polycrystalline gold, stepped surfaces of silver, as well as for copper islands on silver.

  2. Reduced resistance drift in tunnel junctions using confined tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcikowski, Z. S.; Pomeroy, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions with the aluminum oxide tunnel barriers confined between cobalt electrodes exhibit less resistance drift over time than junctions that utilize a thick, unconfined aluminum electrode. The improved long time stability is attributed to better initial oxide quality achieved through confinement (use of a potential energy well for the oxygen) and plasma oxidation. In this work, Co/AlOx/Co and Co/Al/AlOx/Co tunnel junction aging is compared over a period of approximately 9 months using transport measurements and Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) based modelling. The Co/AlOx/Co (confined) tunnel junction resistance increased by (32 ± 6) % over 5400 h, while Co/Al/AlOx/Co (unconfined) tunnel junction resistance increased by (85 ± 23) % over 5200 h. Fit parameters for the tunnel barrier width and potential energy barriers were extracted using WKB transport modelling. These values change only a small amount in the confined Co/AlOx/Co tunnel junction but show a significant drift in the unconfined Co/AlOx/Co tunnel junction.

  3. Fundamental visual problems in tunnels : sumposium on tunnel lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    2018-01-01

    Tunnels and underpasses are likely to play a greater part in our future road network. Daytime lighting for tunnel entrances represents a considerable proportion of their total running costs and it is important that the right solution should be found. Guidance is given in CIE Publication No. 26

  4. Engineers win award for Swiss tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A Derby engineering consultancy has won the Tunnelling Industry Award 2003 for Excellence in Tunnel Design, offered by the British Tunnelling Society, for its work on the LHC in Geneva, Switzerland (1/2 page).

  5. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules: Quantitative estimates for Fe8 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetti, D.; Silva, Evandro C.

    2007-12-01

    Spin tunneling in the particular case of the magnetic molecular cluster octanuclear iron(III), Fe8, is treated by an effective Hamiltonian that allows for an angle-based description of the process. The presence of an external magnetic field along the easy axis is also taken into account in this description. Analytic expressions for the energy levels and barriers are obtained from a harmonic approximation of the potential function which give results in good agreement with the experimental results. The energy splittings due to spin tunneling is treated in an adapted WKB approach and it is shown that the present description can give results to a reliable degree of accuracy.

  6. Counter Tunnel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    DSP-3000 fiber - optic gyro , MicroStrain 3DM-GX2 IMU, with USB and Ethernet connec- tors. Small enough to fit into all the tunnels that were explored...frame arms were sufficient for de- ployment of the RDC. Gigabit multi-mode fiber - optic communication and 48 VDC power were passed to the RDC through...with AcuAMP ACT050 current sensors. The control box monitoring all of the information, as well as the source of the 48 VDC and fiber - optic cable to

  7. Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennault, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel in Building 11 at the NASA Glenn Research Center is committed to researching the effects of in flight icing on aircraft and testing ways to stop the formation of hazardous icing conditions on planes. During this summer, I worked here with Richard DelRosa, the lead engineer for this area. address one of the major concerns of aviation: icing conditions. During the war, many planes crashed (especially supply planes going over the.Himalayas) because ice built up in their wings and clogged the engines. To this day, it remains the largest ice tunnel in the world, with a test section that measures 6 feet high, 9 feet long, and 20 feet wide. It can simulate airspeeds from 50 to 300 miles per hour at temperatures as low as -50 Fahrenheit. Using these capabilities, IRT can simulate actual conditions at high altitudes. The first thing I did was creating a cross reference in Microsoft Excel. It lists commands for the DPU units that control the pressure and temperature variations in the tunnel, as well as the type of command (keyboard, multiplier, divide, etc). The cross reference also contains the algorithm for every command, and which page it is listed in on the control sheet (visual Auto-CAD graphs, which I helped to make). I actually spent most of the time on the computer using Auto-CAD. I drew a diagram of the entire icing tunnel and then drew diagrams of its various parts. Between my mentor and me, we have drawings of every part of it, from the spray bars to the thermocouples, power cabinets, input-output connectors for power systems, and layouts of various other machines. I was also responsible for drawing schematics for the Escort system (which controls the spray bars), the power system, DPUs, and other electrical systems. In my spare time, I am attempting to build and program the "toddler". Toddler is a walking robot that I have to program in PBASIC language. When complete, it should be able to walk on level terrain while avoiding obstacles in

  8. Split Questionnaire Design for Massive Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adiguzel, F.; Wedel, M.

    2008-01-01

    Companies are conducting more and longer surveys than ever before. Massive questionnaires are pervasive in marketing practice. As an alternative to the heuristic methods that are currently used to split questionnaires, this study develops a methodology to design the split questionnaire in a way that

  9. Cheating More when the Spoils Are Split

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltermuth, Scott S.

    2011-01-01

    Four experiments demonstrated that people are more likely to cheat when the benefits of doing so are split with another person, even an anonymous stranger, than when the actor alone captures all of the benefits. In three of the studies, splitting the benefits of over-reporting one's performance on a task made such over-reporting seem less…

  10. Standard Model Particles from Split Octonions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogberashvili M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We model physical signals using elements of the algebra of split octonions over the field of real numbers. Elementary particles are corresponded to the special elements of the algebra that nullify octonionic norms (zero divisors. It is shown that the standard model particle spectrum naturally follows from the classification of the independent primitive zero divisors of split octonions.

  11. Split Scheduling with Uniform Setup Times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalekamp, F.; Sitters, R.A.; van der Ster, S.L.; Stougie, L.; Verdugo, V.; van Zuylen, A.

    2015-01-01

    We study a scheduling problem in which jobs may be split into parts, where the parts of a split job may be processed simultaneously on more than one machine. Each part of a job requires a setup time, however, on the machine where the job part is processed. During setup, a machine cannot process or

  12. Split scheduling with uniform setup times.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Schalekamp; R.A. Sitters (René); S.L. van der Ster; L. Stougie (Leen); V. Verdugo; A. van Zuylen

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study a scheduling problem in which jobs may be split into parts, where the parts of a split job may be processed simultaneously on more than one machine. Each part of a job requires a setup time, however, on the machine where the job part is processed. During setup, a

  13. On split Lie triple systems II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lie triple system with a coherent 0-root space is the direct sum of the family of its minimal ideals, each one being a simple split Lie triple system, and the simplicity of T is characterized. In the present paper we extend these results to arbitrary split Lie triple systems with no restrictions on their 0-root spaces. Keywords.

  14. Particulate photocatalysts for overall water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Takata, Tsuyoshi; Domen, Kazunari

    2017-10-01

    The conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is a promising way of generating renewable energy. Hydrogen production by means of water splitting over semiconductor photocatalysts is a simple, cost-effective approach to large-scale solar hydrogen synthesis. Since the discovery of the Honda-Fujishima effect, considerable progress has been made in this field, and numerous photocatalytic materials and water-splitting systems have been developed. In this Review, we summarize existing water-splitting systems based on particulate photocatalysts, focusing on the main components: light-harvesting semiconductors and co-catalysts. The essential design principles of the materials employed for overall water-splitting systems based on one-step and two-step photoexcitation are also discussed, concentrating on three elementary processes: photoabsorption, charge transfer and surface catalytic reactions. Finally, we outline challenges and potential advances associated with solar water splitting by particulate photocatalysts for future commercial applications.

  15. Hawking temperature from tunnelling formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, P.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the attempt to understand Hawking radiation as tunnelling across black hole horizons produces a Hawking temperature double the standard value. It is explained here how one can obtain the standard value in the same tunnelling approach.

  16. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Search English Español Carpal Tunnel Syndrome KidsHealth / For Kids / Carpal Tunnel Syndrome What's in this article? Where ...

  17. Variational transition state theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truhlar, D.G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  18. Relativistic and perturbational calculations of fine structure splittings in F2 and F2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, F.; Marian, C.; Schwarz, W. H. E.

    Dirac-Fock calculations near the SCF limit using the recently developed basis set expansion technique of Mark and Schwarz have been performed on the F2 ground state with particular consideration of the relativistic splitting of the πg and πu orbitals. The magnetic contribution to the Breit interaction has been included by first-order perturbation theory. Fine structure splittings of the ionic states F2+(X 2Πg) and F2+(A 2Πu) have been calculated by first-order perturbation theory within the Breit-Pauli framework at three levels of approximation for the zero-order wavefunction. The results of the Dirac-Breit and the Breit-Pauli approaches are compared with experimental data. The calculated splittings are analysed by partitioning them into physically meaningful contributions. Aided by results of numerical Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms the general conclusion is drawn that ionic reorganization of the wavefunction increases the fine structure splitting at the Breit-Pauli level, whereas it decreases the splitting at the Dirac-Breit level. Using a model of Ishiguro and Kobori the ratios of Πg and Πu spin-orbit splittings of halogen molecular ions X2+ are discussed.

  19. Spin-polarized inelastic tunneling through insulating barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Tran, M; Jaffrès, H; Seneor, P; Deranlot, C; Petroff, F; George, J-M; Lépine, B; Ababou, S; Jézéquel, G

    2009-05-01

    Spin-conserving hopping transport through chains of localized states has been evidenced by taking benefit of the high degree of spin-polarization of CoFeB-MgO-CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions. In particular, our data show that relatively thick MgO barriers doped with boron favor the activation of spin-conserving inelastic channels through a chain of three localized states and leading to reduced magnetoresistance effects. We propose an extension of the Glazman-Matveev theory to the case of ferromagnetic reservoirs to account for spin-polarized inelastic tunneling through nonmagnetic localized states embedded in an insulating barrier.

  20. Selection rules for splitting strings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achucarro, A; Gregory, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been pointed out that Nielsen-Olesen vortices may be able to decay by pair production of black holes. We show that when the Abelian-Higgs model is embedded in a larger theory, the additional fields mau lead to selection rules for this process-even in the absence of fermions-due to the failure

  1. Pressure distribution over NACA 23012 airfoil with a slotted and a split flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Thomas A; Lowry, John G

    1941-01-01

    A pressure-distribution investigation has been conducted in the NACA 4 by 6-foot vertical wind tunnel to determine the air loads on an NACA 23012 airfoil in combination with a 25.66-percent-chord slotted flap and a 20-percent-chord split flap. Pressures were measured on both the upper and the lower surfaces of the main airfoil and the flaps for several angles of attack and at several flap settings. The data, presented as pressure diagrams and as graphs of the section coefficients for the flap alone and for the airfoil-flap combinations, are applicable to rib and flap design for a combination of a thick airfoil and a slotted or a split flap. The results of previous tests of a NACA 23012 airfoil with a slotted flap are compared with the present results.

  2. The quantum Zeno effect in double well tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, L.

    2018-05-01

    Measurement lies at the heart of quantum theory, and introductory textbooks in quantum mechanics cover the measurement problem in topics such as the Schrödinger’s cat thought experiment, the EPR problem, and the quantum Zeno effect (QZE). In this article we present a new treatment of the QZE suitable for undergraduate students, for the case of a particle tunnelling between two wells while being observed in one of the wells. The analysis shows that as the observation rate increases, the tunnelling rate tends towards zero, in accordance with Zeno’s maxim ‘a watched pot never boils’. The method relies on decoherence theory, which replaces aspects of quantum collapse by the Schrödinger evolution of an open system, and its recently simplified treatment for undergraduates. Our presentation uses concepts familiar to undergraduate students, so that calculations involving many-body theory and the formal properties of the density matrix are avoided.

  3. Near quantum limited amplification from inelastic Cooper-pair tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, Max; Jebari, Salha; Blanchet, Florian; Grimm, Alexander; Hazra, Dibyendu; Albert, Romain; Portier, Fabien

    Josephson parametric amplifiers approach quantum-limited noise performance but require strong external microwave pump tones which make them more difficult to use than DC powered amplifiers: The pump tone can affect the device under test and requires expensive room-temperature equipment. Inelastic Cooper pair tunneling processes through a small DC voltage-biased Josephson junction, where a tunneling Cooper pair dissipates its energy 2 eV in the form of two photons are reminiscent of parametric down conversion. We show that these processes can be used to provide amplification near the quantum limit without external microwave pump tone. We explain the measured gain and noise based on the P (E) theory of inelastic Cooper pair tunneling and general fluctuation-dissipation relations.

  4. Wall correction model for wind tunnels with open test section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2006-01-01

    In the paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, which is based on a one-dimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. In the model...... the exchange of axial momentum between the tunnel and the ambient room is represented by a simple formula, derived from actuator disc computations. The correction model is validated against Navier-Stokes computations of the flow about a wind turbine rotor. Generally, the corrections from the model are in very...... good agreement with the CFD computations, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections....

  5. Split-coil-system SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecsey, G.

    1992-08-01

    The high field superconductor test facility SULTAN started operation successfully in May 1992. Originally designed for testing full scale conductors for the large magnets of the next generation fusion reactors, the SULTAN facility installed at PSI (Switzerland) was designed as a common venture of three European Laboratories: ENEA (Italy), ECN (Netherlands) and PSI, and built by ENEA and PSI in the framework of the Euratom Fusion Technology Program. Presently the largest facility in the world, with its superconducting split coil system generating 11 Tesla in a 0.6 m bore, it is ready now for testing superconductor samples with currents up to 50 kA at variable cooling conditions. Similar tests can be arranged also for other applications. SULTAN is offered by the European Community as a contribution to the worldwide cooperation for the next step of fusion reactor development ITER. First measurements on conductor developed by CEA (Cadarache) are now in progress. Others like those of ENEA and CERN will follow. For 1993, a test of an Italian 12 TZ model coil for fusion application is planned. SULTAN is a worldwide unique facility marking the competitive presence of Swiss technology in the field of applied superconductivity research. Based on development and design of PSI, the high field Nb 3 Sn superconductors and coils were fabricated at the works of Kabelwerke Brugg and ABB, numerous Swiss companies contributed to the success of this international effort. Financing of the Swiss contribution of SULTAN was made available by NEFF, BEW, BBW, PSI and EURATOM. (author) figs., tabs., 20 refs

  6. 2-Photon tandem device for water splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2014-01-01

    Within the field Of photocatalytic water splitting there are several strategies to achieve the goal of efficient and cheap photocatalytic water splitting. This work examines one particular strategy by focusing on monolithically stacked, two-photon photoelectrochemical cells. The overall aim...... absorption, this is the more difficult side to optimize. Nevertheless, by using TiO2 as a transparent cathode protection layer in conjunction with known H-2 evolution catalysts, protection is clearly feasible for a large bandgap photocathode. This suggests that there may be promising strategies...... for photocatalytic water splitting by using a large bandgap photocathode and a low bandgap photoanode with attached protection layers....

  7. Splitting Functions at High Transverse Momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Moutafis, Rhea Penelope; CERN. Geneva. TH Department

    2017-01-01

    Among the production channels of the Higgs boson one contribution could become significant at high transverse momentum which is the radiation of a Higgs boson from another particle. This note focuses on the calculation of splitting functions and cross sections of such processes. The calculation is first carried out on the example $e\\rightarrow e\\gamma$ to illustrate the way splitting functions are calculated. Then the splitting function of $e\\rightarrow eh$ is calculated in similar fashion. This procedure can easily be generalized to processes such as $q\\rightarrow qh$ or $g\\rightarrow gh$.

  8. Tunnel fire testing and modeling the Morgex North tunnel experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borghetti, Fabio; Gandini, Paolo; Frassoldati, Alessio; Tavelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to cast light on all aspects of tunnel fires, based on experimental activities and theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. In particular, the authors describe a transient full-scale fire test (~15 MW), explaining how they designed and performed the experimental activity inside the Morgex North tunnel in Italy. The entire organization of the experiment is described, from preliminary evaluations to the solutions found for management of operational difficulties and safety issues. This fire test allowed the collection of different measurements (temperature, air velocity, smoke composition, pollutant species) useful for validating and improving CFD codes and for testing the real behavior of the tunnel and its safety systems during a diesel oil fire with a significant heat release rate. Finally, the fire dynamics are compared with empirical correlations, CFD simulations, and literature measurements obtained in other similar tunnel fire tests. This book will be of interest to all ...

  9. KAERI underground research tunnel (KURT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won Jin; Kwon, Sang Ki; Park, Jeong Hwa; Choi, Jong Won

    2007-01-01

    An underground research tunnel is essential to validate the integrity of a high-level waste disposal system, and the safety of geological disposal. In this study, KAERI underground research tunnel (KURT) was constructed in the site of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI). The results of the site investigation and the design of underground tunnel were presented. The procedure for the construction permits and the construction of KURT were described briefly. The in-situ experiments being carried out at KURT were also introduced

  10. Role of Wind Tunnels in Aircraft Design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large wind tunnels simulating the actual flight conditions as nearly as possible. Often, several wind tunnels ... wind tunnel tests can be 'scaled' to the actual velocity and actual body size using suitable scaling laws. A typical wind tunnel consists ofa test section ... tion and control positions. Some of this instrumentation like six.

  11. 78 FR 46117 - National Tunnel Inspection Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... busiest vehicular tunnel in the world. The Fort McHenry Tunnel handles a daily traffic volume of more than... vehicular, transit, and rail tunnels in the New York City metropolitan area. Although it is still too early... congestion along alternative routes, and save users both dollars and fuel. If these tunnels were closed due...

  12. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation

  13. Splitting Strip Detector Clusters in Dense Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Tracking in high density environments, particularly in high energy jets, plays an important role in many physics analyses at the LHC. In such environments, there is significant degradation of track reconstruction performance. Between runs 1 and 2, ATLAS implemented an algorithm that splits pixel clusters originating from multiple charged particles, using charge information, resulting in the recovery of much of the lost efficiency. However, no attempt was made in prior work to split merged clusters in the Semi Conductor Tracker (SCT), which does not measure charge information. In spite of the lack of charge information in SCT, a cluster-splitting algorithm has been developed in this work. It is based primarily on the difference between the observed cluster width and the expected cluster width, which is derived from track incidence angle. The performance of this algorithm is found to be competitive with the existing pixel cluster splitting based on track information.

  14. Structural basis of photosynthetic water-splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photosynthetic water-splitting takes place in photosystem II (PSII), a membrane protein complex consisting of 20 subunits with an overall molecular mass of 350 kDa. The light-induced water-splitting reaction catalyzed by PSII not only converts light energy into biologically useful chemical energy, but also provides us with oxygen indispensible for sustaining oxygenic life on the earth. We have solved the structure of PSII at a 1.9 Å resolution, from which, the detailed structure of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster, the catalytic center for water-splitting, became clear. Based on the structure of PSII at the atomic resolution, possible mechanism of light-induced water-splitting was discussed

  15. Irrational beliefs, attitudes about competition, and splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P J; Morris, R J; Miller, L

    2001-03-01

    Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) theoretically promotes actualization of both individualistic and social-oriented potentials. In a test of this assumption, the Belief Scale and subscales from the Survey of Personal Beliefs served as measures of what REBT presumes to be pathogenic irrationalities. These measures were correlated with the Hypercompetitive Attitude Scale (HCAS), the Personal Development Competitive Attitude Scale (PDCAS), factors from the Splitting Index, and self-esteem. Results for the HCAS and Self-Splitting supported the REBT claim about individualistic self-actualization. Mostly nonsignificant and a few counterintuitive linkages were observed for irrational beliefs with the PDCAS, Family-Splitting, and Other-Splitting, and these data suggested that REBT may be less successful in capturing the "rationality" of a social-oriented self-actualization. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. A split SUSY model from SUSY GUT

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, FeiDepartment of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, 450000, P.R. China; Wang, Wenyu(Institute of Theoretical Physics, College of Applied Science, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, 100124, P.R. China); Yang, Jin(State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, P.R. China)

    2015-01-01

    We propose to split the sparticle spectrum from the hierarchy between the GUT scale and the Planck scale. A split supersymmetric model, which gives non-universal gaugino masses, is built with proper high dimensional operators in the framework of SO(10) GUT. Based on a calculation of two-loop beta functions for gauge couplings (taking into account all weak scale threshold corrections), we check the gauge coupling unification and dark matter constraints (relic density and direct detections). We...

  17. Split School of High Energy Physics 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Split School of High Energy Physics 2015 (SSHEP 2015) was held at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FESB), University of Split, from September 14 to September 18, 2015. SSHEP 2015 aimed at master and PhD students who were interested in topics pertaining to High Energy Physics. SSHEP 2015 is the sixth edition of the High Energy Physics School. Previous five editions were held at the Department of Physics, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  18. Are Ducted Mini-Splits Worth It?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Jonathan M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maguire, Jeffrey B [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Metzger, Cheryn E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Zhang, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2018-02-01

    Ducted mini-split heat pumps are gaining popularity in some regions of the country due to their energy-efficient specifications and their ability to be hidden from sight. Although product and install costs are typically higher than the ductless mini-split heat pumps, this technology is well worth the premium for some homeowners who do not like to see an indoor unit in their living area. Due to the interest in this technology by local utilities and homeowners, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has funded the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop capabilities within the Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) tool to model ducted mini-split heat pumps. After the fundamental capabilities were added, energy-use results could be compared to other technologies that were already in BEopt, such as zonal electric resistance heat, central air source heat pumps, and ductless mini-split heat pumps. Each of these technologies was then compared using five prototype configurations in three different BPA heating zones to determine how the ducted mini-split technology would perform under different scenarios. The result of this project was a set of EnergyPlus models representing the various prototype configurations in each climate zone. Overall, the ducted mini-split heat pumps saved about 33-60% compared to zonal electric resistance heat (with window AC systems modeled in the summer). The results also showed that the ducted mini-split systems used about 4% more energy than the ductless mini-split systems, which saved about 37-64% compared to electric zonal heat (depending on the prototype and climate).

  19. Antenna Splitting Functions for Massive Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    An antenna shower is a parton shower in which the basic move is a color-coherent 2 {yields} 3 parton splitting process. In this paper, we give compact forms for the spin-dependent antenna splitting functions involving massive partons of spin 0 and spin 1/2. We hope that this formalism we have presented will be useful in describing the QCD dynamics of the top quark and other heavy particles at LHC.

  20. Tip-induced local strain on Mo S2/graphite detected by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wonhee; Hus, Saban M.; Li, Xufan; Berlijn, Tom; Nguyen, Giang D.; Xiao, Kai; Li, An-Ping

    2018-03-01

    We report the detection of tip-induced local strain applied to the monolayer Mo S2 grown on a graphite substrate by scanning tunneling microscope. Monolayer Mo S2 behaves as both mechanical and tunneling barriers that prevent the tip from contacting the graphite while maintaining the tunneling current. Inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy (IETS) is utilized to probe the phonon modes in graphite. As the tip pushes the sample, IETS reveals a continuous phonon softening in graphite, corroborated by a downward shift of the phonon energy as calculated by density-functional theory. Our results demonstrate a way to apply local mechanical strain and simultaneously detect the induced change in phonon modes by unitizing IETS with two-dimensional materials as a tunneling barrier.

  1. Modeling Open-Loop MEMS Tunneling Accelerometer Based on Circular Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jodat Kordlar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper open-loop MEMS tunneling accelerometer was modeled based on a clamped micro circular plate with a tip tunneling at its centre. Mechanical behavior of the micro plate was studied deriving governing equation based on classic Kirchhoff thin plate theory and it was discretized using Galerkin method. Dynamic response of the proposed accelerometer due to step and harmonic external excitation was studied and the magnitude of the applied acceleration was identified by measuring of the changing of tunneling current. Obtained results show that the proposed tunneling accelerometer very sensitive and it can be measure acceleration with very high resolution but very small gap of tip tunneling limit the range of measurable acceleration.

  2. Analytical calculation of spin tunneling effect in single molecule magnet Fe8 with considering quadrupole excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yousefi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Spin tunneling effect in Single Molecule Magnet Fe8 is studied by instanton calculation technique using SU(3 generalized spin coherent state in real parameter as a trial function. For this SMM, tunnel splitting arises due to the presence of a Berry like phase in action, which causes interference between tunneling trajectories (instantons. For this SMM, it is established that the use of quadrupole excitation (g dependence changes not only the location of the quenching points, but also the number of these points. Also, these quenching points are the steps in hysteresis loops of this SMM. If dipole and quadrupole excitations in classical energy considered, the number of these steps equals to the number that obtained from experimental data.

  3. Destructive quantum interference in spin tunneling problems

    OpenAIRE

    von Delft, Jan; Henley, Christopher L.

    1992-01-01

    In some spin tunneling problems, there are several different but symmetry-related tunneling paths that connect the same initial and final configurations. The topological phase factors of the corresponding tunneling amplitudes can lead to destructive interference between the different paths, so that the total tunneling amplitude is zero. In the study of tunneling between different ground state configurations of the Kagom\\'{e}-lattice quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, this occurs when the spi...

  4. Variational transition state theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    This project is concerned with the development and applications of generalized transition state theory and multidimensional tunneling approximations to chemical reaction rates. They have developed and implemented several practical versions of variational transition state theory (VTST), namely canonical variational theory (CVT), improved canonical variational theory (ICVT), and microcanonical variational theory (μVT). They have also developed and implemented several accurate multidimensional semiclassical tunneling approximations, the most accurate of which are the small-curvature semiclassical adiabatic (SCSA), large-curvature version-3 (LC3), and least-action (LA) approximations. They have applied the methods to thermal rate constants, using transmission coefficients based on ground-state tunneling, and they have also presented and applied adiabatic and diabatic extensions to calculated rate constants for vibrationally excited reactants. Their general goal is to develop accurate methods for calculating chemical reaction rate constants that remain practical even for reasonably complicated molecules. The approximations mentioned above yield rate constants for systems whose potential energy surface is known or assumed. Thus a second, equally important aspect of their work is the determination or modeling, semi-empirically and/or from electronic structure calculations, of potential energy surfaces

  5. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  6. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  7. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  8. Calculated Pourbaix Diagrams of Cubic Perovskites for Water Splitting: Stability Against Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2014-01-01

    We use density functional theory calculations to investigate the stability of cubic perovskites for photo-electrochemical water splitting taking both materials in their bulk crystal structure and dissolved phases into account. The method is validated through a detailed comparison of the calculated...

  9. Effects of tensor forces in nuclear spin–orbit splittings from ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihang Shen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A systematic and specific pattern due to the effects of the tensor forces is found in the evolution of spin–orbit splittings in neutron drops. This result is obtained from relativistic Brueckner–Hartree–Fock theory using the bare nucleon–nucleon interaction. It forms an important guide for future microscopic derivations of relativistic and nonrelativistic nuclear energy density functionals.

  10. Effects of tensor forces in nuclear spin-orbit splittings from ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shihang; Liang, Haozhao; Meng, Jie; Ring, Peter; Zhang, Shuangquan

    2018-03-01

    A systematic and specific pattern due to the effects of the tensor forces is found in the evolution of spin-orbit splittings in neutron drops. This result is obtained from relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory using the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction. It forms an important guide for future microscopic derivations of relativistic and nonrelativistic nuclear energy density functionals.

  11. Analysis of Generalized Mach–Zehnder Interferometers for Variable-Ratio Power Splitting and Optimized Switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagali, N.S.; Paiam, Mohammad R.; MacDonald, Robert I.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Driessen, A.

    1999-01-01

    The nonideal integrated optical N x N generalized Mach–Zehnder interferometer (GMZI) employing multimode interference (MMI) couplers is analyzed using transfer matrix techniques. Deviations in the phase relations and the power splitting ratio of the MMI couplers are included in the theory, along

  12. CEBAF: Injector tunnel in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    On 28 October, a 100 kV DC electron beam was generated in the injector tunnel at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) being constructed at Newport News, Virginia. In this first tunnel operation, the beam was transported from the electron gun via the room-temperature section to the injector's first superconducting section (5 MeV). The gun and beam steering subsystems behaved as designed, under control from the main control centre

  13. Quantum resonances in physical tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.M.; Truax, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    It has recently been emphasized that the probability of quantum tunneling is a critical function of the shape of the potential. Applying this observation to physical systems, we point out that in principal information on potential surfaces can be obtained by studying tunneling rates. This is especially true in cases where only spectral data is known, since many potentials yield the same spectrum. 13 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  14. Resonant tunneling spectroscopy of valley eigenstates on a donor-quantum dot coupled system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, T., E-mail: t.kobayashi@unsw.edu.au; Heijden, J. van der; House, M. G.; Hile, S. J.; Asshoff, P.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 New South Wales (Australia); Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F. [Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Vinet, M. [Université Grenoble-Alpes and CEA, LETI, MINATEC, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-04-11

    We report on electronic transport measurements through a silicon double quantum dot consisting of a donor and a quantum dot. Transport spectra show resonant tunneling peaks involving different valley states, which illustrate the valley splitting in a quantum dot on a Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. The detailed gate bias dependence of double dot transport allows a first direct observation of the valley splitting in the quantum dot, which is controllable between 160 and 240 μeV with an electric field dependence 1.2 ± 0.2 meV/(MV/m). A large valley splitting is an essential requirement for implementing a physical electron spin qubit in a silicon quantum dot.

  15. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Water Splitting over Edge-Modified Phosphorene Nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Ruiqi; Yang, Chao; Yang, Jinlong

    2017-11-01

    Two-dimensional phosphorene with desirable optoelectronic properties (ideal band gap, high carrier mobility, and strong visible light absorption) is a promising metal-free photocatalyst for water splitting. However, the band edge positions of the valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band maximum (CBM) of phosphorene are higher than the redox potentials in photocatalytic water splitting reactions. Thus, phosphorene can only be used as the photocathode for hydrogen evolution reaction as a low-efficiency visible-light-driven photocatalyst for hydrogen production in solar water splitting cells. Here, we propose a new mechanism to improve the photocatalytic efficiency of phosphorene nanoribbons (PNRs) by modifying their edges for full reactions in photocatalytic water splitting. By employing first-principles density functional theory calculations, we find that pseudohalogen (CN and OCN) passivated PNRs not only show desired VBM and CBM band edge positions induced by edge electric dipole layer, but also possess intrinsic optoelectronic properties of phosphorene, for both water oxidation and hydrogen reduction in photocatalytic water splitting without using extra energy. Furthermore, our calculations also predict that the maximum energy conversion efficiency of heterojunction solar cells consisting of different edge-modified PNRs can be as high as 20% for photocatalytic water splitting.

  16. Resonant Magnetization Tunneling in Molecular Magnets: Where is the Inhomogeneous Broadening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, M. P.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery(J. R. Friedman, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 3830 (1996) of resonant magnetization tunneling in the molecular magnet Mn_12 there has been intense research into the underlying mechanism of tunneling. Most current theories( V. Dobrovitski and A. Zvezdin, Europhys. Lett. 38), 377 (1997); L. Gunther, Europhys. Lett. 39, 1 (1997); D Garanin and E. Chudnovsky, Phys. Rev. B 56, 11102 (1997). suggest that a local internal (hyperfine or dipole) field transverse to the easy magnetization axis induces tunneling. These theories predict a resonance width orders of magnitude smaller than that actually observed. This discrepancy is attributed to inhomogeneous broadening of the resonance by the random internal fields. We present a detailed study of the tunnel resonance lineshape and show that it is Lorentzian, suggesting it has a deeper physical origin. Since the hyperfine fields are believed to be comparable to the observed width, it is surprising that there is no Gaussian broadening.

  17. The self-splitting atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenn, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The book describes the collaboration between Ernest Rutherford and Frederick Soddy at McGill University on the study of radioactivity. Their hypothesis of spontaneous atomic disintegration, which represented the first case of an atomic process completely specified in its time relationships by a probability constant, was extremely fruitful. This concept became the paradigm of a host of other quantized processes in high-energy or elementary particle physics involving a single system in isolation. This achievement did not emerge in a single moment of inspiration but passed dialectically through several, not always coherent, stages of experiment and theory. Hitherto unpublished material has been incorporated in the account, including evidence from the original laboratory notebooks. (U.K.)

  18. Quantum tunneling from rotating black holes with scalar hair in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakalli, I.; Gursel, H. [Eastern Mediterranean University, Department of Physics, Mersin-10 (Turkey)

    2016-06-15

    We study the Hawking radiation of scalar and Dirac particles (fermions) emitted from a rotating scalar hair black hole (RSHBH) within the context of three dimensional (3D) Einstein gravity using non-minimally coupled scalar field theory. Amalgamating the quantum tunneling approach with the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, we obtain the tunneling rates of the outgoing particles across the event horizon. Inserting the resultant tunneling rates into the Boltzmann formula, we then obtain the Hawking temperature (T{sub H}) of the 3D RSHBH. (orig.)

  19. Tunneling-induced shift of the cutoff law for high-order above-threshold ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Quan, W.; Liu, X.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the cutoff law for high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) within a semiclassical framework. By explicitly adopting the tunneling effect and considering the initial position shift of the tunneled electron from the origin in the model, the cutoff energy position in HATI spectrum exhibits a well-defined upshift from the simple-man model prediction. The comparison between numerical results from our improved semiclassical model and the quantum-orbit theory shows a good agreement for small values of the Keldysh parameter γ, implying the important role of the inherent quantum tunneling effect in HATI dynamics.

  20. Experimentally attainable example of chaotic tunneling: The hydrogen atom in parallel static electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2003-01-01

    Statistics of tunneling rates in the presence of chaotic classical dynamics is discussed on a realistic example: a hydrogen atom placed in parallel, uniform, static electric, and magnetic fields, where tunneling is followed by ionization along the fields direction. Depending on the magnetic quantum number, one may observe either a standard Porter-Thomas distribution of tunneling rates or, for strong scarring by a periodic orbit parallel to the external fields, strong deviations from it. For the latter case, a simple model based on random matrix theory gives the correct distribution

  1. Electronic noise of superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Kraus, H.; Gutsche, M.; Kemmather, B.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Moessbauer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal signal to noise ratio for detectors based on superconducting tunnel junctions is calculated and compared for the cases of a detector consisting of one single tunnel junction, as well as of series and of parallel connections of such tunnel junctions. The influence of 1 / f noise and its dependence on the dynamical resistance of tunnel junctions is discussed quantitatively. A single tunnel junction yields the minimum equivalent noise charge. Such a tunnel junction exhibits the best signal to noise ratio if the signal charge is independent of detector size. In case, signal charge increases with detector size, a parallel or a series connection of tunnel junctions would provide the optimum signal to noise ratio. The equivalent noise charge and the respective signal to noise ratio are deduced as functions of tunnel junction parameters such as tunneling time, quasiparticle lifetime, etc. (orig.)

  2. Quantum tunneling radiation from self-dual black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C.A.S., E-mail: calex@fisica.ufc.br [Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia da Paraíba (IFPB), Campus Campina Grande, Rua Tranquilino Coelho Lemos, 671, Jardim Dinamérica I (Brazil); Brito, F.A., E-mail: fabrito@df.ufcg.edu.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    Black holes are considered as objects that can reveal quantum aspects of spacetime. Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) is a theory that propose a way to model the quantum spacetime behavior revealed by a black hole. One recent prediction of this theory is the existence of sub-Planckian black holes, which have the interesting property of self-duality. This property removes the black hole singularity and replaces it with another asymptotically flat region. In this work, we obtain the thermodynamical properties of this kind of black holes, called self-dual black holes, using the Hamilton–Jacobi version of the tunneling formalism. Moreover, using the tools of the tunneling approach, we investigate the emission spectrum of self-dual black holes, and investigate if some information about the black hole initial state can be recovered during the evaporation process. Back-reaction effects are included.

  3. Backfilling of deposition tunnels, in situ alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, P.

    2007-04-01

    The backfilling process described in this report is based on in situ compaction of a mixture of bentonite and ballast (30:70) into the deposition tunnel. This method has been tested in practice in various field tests by SKB, most recently in the Prototype repository test performed at Aespoe HRL. The backfill mixture is prepared above ground and transported to the repository level with a tank truck. The material is compacted into layers with an inclination of 35 deg C and a thickness of approximately 20 cm. The compaction is performed with a vibratory plate attached to a boom of an excavator. In order to keep up with the required canister installation rate determined for the Finnish repository, at least 13 layers need to be compacted daily. This means working in 2-3 shifts on the working days that are available for backfilling operations. The dry densities achieved in field tests for the wall/roof section of the backfill have been insufficient compared with the dry density criteria set for the backfill. In theory, it may be possible to reach dry densities that fulfil the criteria, although with a relatively small safety margin. Another open issue is whether the mixture of bentonite and ballast has sufficient self-healing ability to seal-off erosion channels after the tunnels have been closed and the backfill has reached full saturation. (orig.)

  4. Tunneling-percolation model of multicomponent nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Sohan; Karimi, Pouyan; Sabet, Fereshteh A.; Jasiuk, Iwona; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Using a mixture of different types of fillers has been experimentally shown to improve the electrical conductivity of polymer nanocomposites beyond the weighted average due to synergistic effects. In this study, we develop a critical path analysis-based tunneling-percolation model for multicomponent systems of nanocomposites with ellipsoidal fillers. The nature of the interaction between different filler components is controlled by a key modeling parameter capturing the tunneling interactions between fillers. This generalization allows us to examine scenarios where the nature of a given type of filler can be varied continuously from an insulating-type to a conductive-type. The percolation behavior of two-component systems with a combination of prolate, oblate, and spherical fillers is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations for different relative volume fractions and nature of interactions while keeping the total volume fraction fixed. The simulation results are shown to be in semi-quantitative agreement with predictions made by the second-virial-approximation-based theories. Our results suggest that for multicomponent systems with well-dispersed fillers, the synergistic effects are linked directly with the nature of interactions between different filler types. Moreover, addition of prolate fillers to oblate or spherical fillers should generally improve the electrical conductivity of multicomponent nanocomposites.

  5. 12 CFR 7.2023 - Reverse stock splits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reverse stock splits. 7.2023 Section 7.2023... Corporate Practices § 7.2023 Reverse stock splits. (a) Authority to engage in reverse stock splits. A national bank may engage in a reverse stock split if the transaction serves a legitimate corporate purpose...

  6. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobara H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hideki Kobara,1 Hirohito Mori,1 Kazi Rafiq,2 Shintaro Fujihara,1 Noriko Nishiyama,1 Maki Ayaki,1 Tatsuo Yachida,1 Tae Matsunaga,1 Johji Tani,1 Hisaaki Miyoshi,1 Hirohito Yoneyama,1 Asahiro Morishita,1 Makoto Oryu,1 Hisakazu Iwama,3 Tsutomu Masaki1 1Department of Gastroenterology and Neurology, 2Department of Pharmacology, 3Life Science Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Miki-cho, Kita-Gun, Kagawa, Japan Abstract: Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments. Keywords: submucosal endoscopy, submucosal tunneling method, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, peroral endoscopic myotomy, gastrointestinal subepithelial tumor, functional and motility disorders

  7. Fano resonance Rabi splitting of surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguang; Li, Jiafang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2017-08-14

    Rabi splitting and Fano resonance are well-known physical phenomena in conventional quantum systems as atoms and quantum dots, arising from strong interaction between two quantum states. In recent years similar features have been observed in various nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic systems. Yet, realization of strong interaction between two or more Fano resonance states has not been accomplished either in quantum or in optical systems. Here we report the observation of Rabi splitting of two strongly coupled surface plasmon Fano resonance states in a three-dimensional plasmonic nanostructure consisting of vertical asymmetric split-ring resonators. The plasmonic system stably supports triple Fano resonance states and double Rabi splittings can occur between lower and upper pairs of the Fano resonance states. The experimental discovery agrees excellently with rigorous numerical simulations, and is well explained by an analytical three-oscillator model. The discovery of Fano resonance Rabi splitting could provide a stimulating insight to explore new fundamental physics in analogous atomic systems and could be used to significantly enhance light-matter interaction for optical sensing and detecting applications.

  8. Photochemical Water-Splitting with Organomanganese Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadassery, Karthika J; Dey, Suman Kr; Cannella, Anthony F; Surendhran, Roshaan; Lacy, David C

    2017-08-21

    Certain organometallic chromophores with water-derived ligands, such as the known [Mn(CO) 3 (μ 3 -OH)] 4 (1) tetramer, drew our attention as possible platforms to study water-splitting reactions. Herein, we investigate the UV irradiation of various tricarbonyl organomanganese complexes, including 1, and demonstrate that dihydrogen, CO, and hydrogen peroxide form as products in a photochemical water-splitting decomposition reaction. The organic and manganese-containing side products are also characterized. Labeling studies with 18 O-1 suggest that the source of oxygen atoms in H 2 O 2 originates from free water that interacts with 1 after photochemical dissociation of CO (1-CO) constituting the oxidative half-reaction of water splitting mediated by 1. Hydrogen production from 1 is the result of several different processes, one of which involves the protons derived from the hydroxido ligands in 1 constituting the reductive half-reaction of water splitting mediated by 1. Other processes that generate H 2 are also operative and are described. Collectively the results from the photochemical decomposition of 1 provide an opportunity to propose a mechanism, and it is discussed within the context of developing new strategies for water-splitting reactions with organomanganese complexes.

  9. Split-hand/split-foot malformation with paternal mutation in the p63 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witters, I.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Goossens, A.; Assche, F.A. van; Fryns, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    We report the prenatal diagnosis at 16 weeks' gestation of bilateral split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHSFM) with severe lobster claw deformity of hands and feet in a male fetus without associated malformations. A minor manifestation of SHSFM was present in the father with only mild bilateral

  10. Urban pattern: Layout design by hierarchical domain splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yongliang

    2013-11-06

    We present a framework for generating street networks and parcel layouts. Our goal is the generation of high-quality layouts that can be used for urban planning and virtual environments. We propose a solution based on hierarchical domain splitting using two splitting types: streamline-based splitting, which splits a region along one or multiple streamlines of a cross field, and template-based splitting, which warps pre-designed templates to a region and uses the interior geometry of the template as the splitting lines. We combine these two splitting approaches into a hierarchical framework, providing automatic and interactive tools to explore the design space.

  11. Extension of Seismic Scanning Tunneling Macroscope to Elastic Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Tarhini, Ahmad

    2017-11-06

    The theory for the seismic scanning tunneling macroscope is extended from acoustic body waves to elastic body-wave propagation. We show that, similar to the acoustic case, near-field superresolution imaging from elastic body waves results from the O(1/R) term, where R is the distance between the source and near-field scatterer. The higher-order contributions R−n for n>1 are cancelled in the near-field region for a point source with normal stress.

  12. Risk identification and allocation of the utility tunnel PPP project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yihua; Zhang, Yaoyao

    2017-05-01

    Based on the literature study of utility tunnel, 60 project risk factors are identified through expert interviews and classified into macro level risks, meso level risks and micro level risks according to the risk level. At the same time, we study the risk-sharing mechanism, then adopt the control force principle, the cognition principle and the profit principle to allocate risk, and put forward the pertinent risk countermeasure in order to provide the reference for the future practice and theory research.

  13. Double-Barrier Resonant Tunneling in Three and Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, Alexander

    Double-barrier resonant tunneling devices have attracted great scientific interest, both as novel physical systems based on strong size quantization that exhibit unusual transport behavior and also as a promising class of semiconductor structures for high-speed electronic devices. This thesis describes the physics of transport in double-barrier structures fabricated by conventional planar growth, where the fundamental process involves tunneling from three-dimensional (3D) into two-dimensional (2D) densities of electronic states, as well as in novel 2D double-barrier structures fabricated by regrowth, where 2D electrons tunnel into well-separated ID quantum wire subbands. A brief introduction to the basic theory of resonant tunneling and the results of low-temperature I(V) transport measurements on high -quality planar double-barrier devices is presented in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 examines the bistable I(V) characteristic observed in specially designed asymmetric devices, with the intrinsic nature of this effect confirmed by parallel field magnetotunneling measurements. In Chapter 3 transverse field magnetotunneling is employed to experimentally verify the energy and transverse momentum selection rules that govern transport in resonant tunneling devices. Chapter 4 focuses on the fabrication of 2D resonant tunneling devices by liquid phase epitaxial regrowth on patterned substrates. A brief overview of liquid phase epitaxy and two different in-situ patterning techniques--selective meltback and cleaving inside the chamber--are presented. The measurements of the 2D device fabricated by regrowth on cleaved substrates are presented and analyzed in Chapter 5. The new possibilities opened up by the cleaved substrate regrowth techniques are also discussed, including the realization of an edge -regrown superlattice with novel high-field transport characteristics.

  14. On Sagnac frequency splitting in a solid-state ring Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Griffith, Robert; De Cuir, Edwin; Kim, Steven; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute

    2017-11-15

    We report on an accurate measurement of the frequency splitting of an optical rotating ring microcavity made out of calcium fluoride. By measuring the frequencies of the clockwise and counter-clockwise coherent Raman emissions confined in the cavity modes, we show that the frequency splitting is inversely proportional to the refractive index of the cavity host material. The measurement has an accuracy of 1% and unambiguously confirms the classical theoretical prediction based on special theory of relativity. This Letter also demonstrates the usefulness of the ring Raman microlaser for rotation measurements.

  15. Typical Underwater Tunnels in the Mainland of China and Related Tunneling Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairong Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many underwater tunnels have been constructed in the mainland of China, and great progress has been made in related tunneling technologies. This paper presents the history and state of the art of underwater tunnels in the mainland of China in terms of shield-bored tunnels, drill-and-blast tunnels, and immersed tunnels. Typical underwater tunnels of these types in the mainland of China are described, along with innovative technologies regarding comprehensive geological prediction, grouting-based consolidation, the design and construction of large cross-sectional tunnels with shallow cover in weak strata, cutting tool replacement under limited drainage and reduced pressure conditions, the detection and treatment of boulders, the construction of underwater tunnels in areas with high seismic intensity, and the treatment of serious sedimentation in a foundation channel of immersed tunnels. Some suggestions are made regarding the three potential great strait-crossing tunnels—the Qiongzhou Strait-Crossing Tunnel, Bohai Strait-Crossing Tunnel, and Taiwan Strait-Crossing Tunnel—and issues related to these great strait-crossing tunnels that need further study are proposed. Keywords: Underwater tunnel, Strait-crossing tunnel, Shield-bored tunnel, Immersed tunnel, Drill and blast

  16. Superconducting tunnel-junction refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, R.G.; Paterson, J.L.; Kaplan, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The dc current through an S 1 -S 2 tunnel junction, with Δ 2 greater than Δ 1 , when biased with eV 1 +Δ 2 , will lower the energy in S 1 . This energy reduction will be shared by the phonons and electrons. This device is shown to be analogous to a thermoelectric refrigerator with an effective Peltier coefficient π* approx. Δ 1 /e. Tunneling calculations yield the cooling power P/sub c/, the electrical power P/sub e/ supplied by the bias supply, and the cooling efficiency eta=P/sub c//P/sub e/. The maximum cooling power is obtained for eV= +- (Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) and t 1 =T 1 /T/sub c/1 approx. 0.9. Estimates are made of the temperature difference T 2 -T 1 achievable in Al-Pb and Sn-Pb junctions with an Al 2 O 3 tunneling barrier. The performance of this device is shown to yield a maximum cooling efficiency eta approx. = Δ 1 /(Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) which can be compared with that available in an ideal Carnot refrigerator of eta=T 1 /(T 2 -T 1 ). The development of a useful tunnel-junction refrigerator requires a tunneling barrier with an effective thermal conductance per unit area several orders of magnitude less than that provided by the A1 2 O 3 barrier in the Al-Pb and Sn-Pb systems

  17. Large Bandgap Semiconductors for Solar Water Splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malizia, Mauro

    Photoelectrochemical water splitting represents an eco-friendly technology that could enable the production of hydrogen using water as reactant and solar energy as primary energy source. The exploitation of solar energy for the production of hydrogen would help modern society to reduce the reliance...... (bismuth vanadate) was investigated in view of combining this 2.4 eV large bandgap semiconductor with a Si back-illuminated photocathode. A device obtained by mechanical stacking of BiVO4 photoanode and standard Si photocathode performs non-assisted water splitting under illumination with Solar......-to-Hydrogen efficiency lower than 0.5%. In addition, BiVO4 was synthesized on the back-side of a Si back-illuminated photocathode to produce a preliminary monolithic solar water splitting device.The Faradaic efficiency of different types of catalysts for the electrochemical production of hydrogen or oxygen was evaluated...

  18. Multiple spectral splits of supernova neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Raffelt, Georg G; Smirnov, Alexei Yu

    2009-07-31

    Collective oscillations of supernova neutrinos swap the spectra f(nu(e))(E) and f(nu[over ](e))(E) with those of another flavor in certain energy intervals bounded by sharp spectral splits. This phenomenon is far more general than previously appreciated: typically one finds one or more swaps and accompanying splits in the nu and nu[over ] channels for both inverted and normal neutrino mass hierarchies. Depending on an instability condition, swaps develop around spectral crossings (energies where f(nu(e))=f(nu(x)), f(nu[over ](e))=f(nu[over ](x)) as well as E-->infinity where all fluxes vanish), and the widths of swaps are determined by the spectra and fluxes. Washout by multiangle decoherence varies across the spectrum and splits can survive as sharp spectral features.

  19. Split Notochord Syndrome: A Rare Variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Vidhu; Kapoor, Kanchan; Singh, Balbir; Kochhar, Suman; Sehgal, Alka; Dada, Rima

    2017-01-01

    Split notochord syndrome represents an extremely rare and pleomorphic form of spinal dysraphism characterized by a persistent communication between the endoderm and the ectoderm, resulting in splitting or deviation of the notochord. It manifests as a cleft in the dorsal midline of the body through which intestinal loops are exteriorized and even myelomeningoceles or teratomas may occur at the site. A rare variant was diagnosed on autopsy of a 23+4-week-old fetus showing a similar dorsal enteric fistula and midline protruding intestinal loops in thoracolumbar region. The anteroposterior radiograph showed a complete midline cleft in the vertebral bodies from T11 to L5 region, and a split in the spinal cord was further confirmed by ultrasonography. Myelomeningocele was erroneously reported on antenatal ultrasound. Thus, awareness of this rare anomaly is necessary to thoroughly evaluate the cases of such spinal defects or suspected myelomeningoceles. PMID:28904581

  20. Fuzzy split and merge for shadow detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remya K. Sasi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Presence of shadow in an image often causes problems in computer vision applications such as object recognition and image segmentation. This paper proposes a method to detect the shadow from a single image using fuzzy split and merge approach. Split and merge is a classical algorithm used in image segmentation. Predicate function in the classical approach is replaced by a Fuzzy predicate in the proposed approach. The method follows a top down approach of recursively splitting an image into homogeneous quadtree blocks, followed by a bottom up approach by merging adjacent unique regions. The method has been compared with previous approaches and found to be better in performance in terms of accuracy.

  1. TunnelVision: LHC Tunnel Photogrammetry System for Structural Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Fallas, William

    2014-01-01

    In this document an algorithm to detect deformations in the LHC Tunnel of CERN is presented. It is based on two images, one represents the ideal state of the tunnel and the other one the actual state. To find the differences between both, the algorithm is divided in three steps. First, an image enhancement is applied to make easier the detection. Second, two different approaches to reduce noise are applied to one or both images. And third, it is defined a group of characteristics about the type of deformation desired to detect. Finally, the conclusions show the effectiveness of the algorithm in the experimental results.

  2. [Anatomical study on the femoral tunnel anatomy reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi-Long; Cai, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Wen-Hui; Jiang, Gang-Yi; Qian, Yue-Nan; Zhao, Zhang-Wei; Yang, Guo-Jing

    2013-09-01

    To measure anatomical data of the femoral tunnel anatomy reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), so provide anatomical basis for clinical anatomy reconstruction of ACL. There were 30 adults' cadaveric knee specimens. The ACL femoral tunnel was reconstructed through anterior medial approach (AMP) in genuflex position of 120 degree, and was marked by Kirschner. The soft tissue of the specimen was removed and the femoral condyle was split at the middle side. The index including length of the femoral tunnel, the distance from internal opening of tunnel to cortical edge of femoral condyle and vertical distance to the top of femoral intercondylar notch were measured. Then the time position of internal opening of tunnel in the intercondylar notch was recorded, and the location of outside opening of tunnel to the femoral condyle was detected. The mean length of the femoral tunnel was (36.35 +/- 3.14) mm (ranged, 30.65 to 42.35 mm). The distance from internal opening of tunnel to cortical edge of femoral condyle was (17.84 +/- 3.35) mm (ranged, 14.02 to 23.49 mm), vertical distance to the top of femoral intercondylar notch was (14.05 +/- 2.32) mm (ranged, 9.17 to 20.08 mm). According to the way of circular dial,internal opening of tunnel located at 02:30 +/- 00:10 (ranged, 01:50 to 02:50) in the left knee,and 09:30 +/- 0:15 (ranged, 08:30 to 10:40) in the right knee. The outside opening of femoral tunnel located at (3.16 +/- 2.51) mm (ranged, 1.61 to 6.30 mm) to the proximal end of external epicondyle of femur, and (4.25 +/- 2.16) mm (ranged, 1.73 to 8.52 mm) to the posterior of external epicondyle of femur. The anatomical features of femoral tunnel for reconstruction of ACL is revealed,which will provide anatomical basis for clinical practice.

  3. Faster multiple emulsification with drop splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Adam R; Weitz, David A

    2011-06-07

    Microfluidic devices can form emulsions in which the drops have an intricate, controlled structure; however, a challenge is that the droplets are produced slowly, typically only a few millilitres per hour. Here, we present a simple technique to increase the production rate. Using a large drop maker, we produce large drops at a fast volumetric rate; by splitting these drops several times in a splitting array, we create drops of the desired small size. The advantage of this over forming the small drops directly using a small drop maker is that the drops can be formed at much faster rates. This can be applied to the production of single and multiple emulsions.

  4. Splitting Strategy for Simulating Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The splitting approach is developed for the numerical simulation of genetic regulatory networks with a stable steady-state structure. The numerical results of the simulation of a one-gene network, a two-gene network, and a p53-mdm2 network show that the new splitting methods constructed in this paper are remarkably more effective and more suitable for long-term computation with large steps than the traditional general-purpose Runge-Kutta methods. The new methods have no restriction on the choice of stepsize due to their infinitely large stability regions.

  5. Hyperfine splitting in lithium-like bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochmann, Matthias; Froemmgen, Nadja; Hammen, Michael; Will, Elisa [Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Andelkovic, Zoran; Kuehl, Thomas; Litvinov, Yuri; Winters, Danyal; Sanchez, Rodolfo [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Botermann, Benjamin; Noertershaeuser, Wilfried [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Bussmann, Michael [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Dax, Andreas [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Hannen, Volker; Joehren, Raphael; Vollbrecht, Jonas; Weinheimer, Christian [Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Geppert, Christopher [Universitaet Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Stoehlker, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Thompson, Richard [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Volotka, Andrey [Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Wen, Weiqiang [IMP Lanzhou (China)

    2013-07-01

    High-precision measurements of the hyperfine splitting values on Li- and H-like bismuth ions, combined with precise atomic structure calculations allow us to test QED-effects in the regime of the strongest magnetic fields that are available in the laboratory. Performing laser spectroscopy at the experimental storage ring (ESR) at GSI Darmstadt, we have now succeeded in measuring the hyperfine splitting in Li-like bismuth. Probing this transition has not been easy because of its extremely low fluorescence rate. Details about this challenging experiment will be given and the achieved experimental accuracy are presented.

  6. Probing electronic interactions using electron tunneling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pratap

    The scanning tunneling microscope: Principle d. eI. Tunneling Current. Topography by tracking current: Constant height mode. Tracking the height: Constant current mode. NbSe. 2 single crystal. (Grown by P. Shirage and A. Thamizhavel) ...

  7. Proposal for Marshmallow Tunnel Stemming Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-01-01

    Discussion of findings after the shot in the tunnel and instructions for a deeper drilling below the tunnel using radiation probes to help define the cavity shape and documentary photography of the findings.

  8. Lorentz Invariance Violation and Modified Hawking Fermions Tunneling Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Zheng Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently the modified Dirac equation with Lorentz invariance violation has been proposed, which would be helpful to resolve some issues in quantum gravity theory and high energy physics. In this paper, the modified Dirac equation has been generalized in curved spacetime, and then fermion tunneling of black holes is researched under this correctional Dirac field theory. We also use semiclassical approximation method to get correctional Hamilton-Jacobi equation, so that the correctional Hawking temperature and correctional black hole’s entropy are derived.

  9. Tunneling and reflection in unimolecular reaction kinetic energy release distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.

    2018-02-01

    The kinetic energy release distributions in unimolecular reactions is calculated with detailed balance theory, taking into account the tunneling and the reflection coefficient in three different types of transition states; (i) a saddle point corresponding to a standard RRKM-type theory, (ii) an attachment Langevin cross section, and (iii) an absorbing sphere potential at short range, without long range interactions. Corrections are significant in the one dimensional saddle point states. Very light and lightly bound absorbing systems will show measurable effects in decays from the absorbing sphere, whereas the Langevin cross section is essentially unchanged.

  10. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  11. Watertightness of concrete tunnel structures

    OpenAIRE

    Glerum, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Netherlands are situated in the delta. of the rivers Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt. Therefore the ground mainly consists.of sediments, such as sand, clay and silt. In certain regions peat layers of varying thickness are found. The high permeability of some of these materials and the fact that the groundwater table is generally only 1 m below ground level, make an adequate watertightness one of the main features of tunnel engineering in the Netherlands. Tunnels in Holland are both of the immers...

  12. Giant spin-orbit-induced spin splitting in two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2011-10-14

    Fully relativistic first-principles calculations based on density functional theory are performed to study the spin-orbit-induced spin splitting in monolayer systems of the transition-metal dichalcogenides MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2. All these systems are identified as direct-band-gap semiconductors. Giant spin splittings of 148–456 meV result from missing inversion symmetry. Full out-of-plane spin polarization is due to the two-dimensional nature of the electron motion and the potential gradient asymmetry. By suppression of the Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation, spin lifetimes are expected to be very long. Because of the giant spin splittings, the studied materials have great potential in spintronics applications.

  13. The splitted laser beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xiongping; Yi Lin; Xu Bin; Lu Jianduo

    2011-01-01

    The splitted beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma is investigated. Based on Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and paraxial/nonparaxial ray theory, simulation results show that the steady beam width and single beam filamentation along the propagation distance in paraxial case is due to the influence of ponderomotive nonlinearity. In nonparaxial case, the influence of the off-axial of α 00 and α 02 (the departure of the beam from the Gaussian nature) and S 02 (the departure from the spherical nature) results in more complicated ponderomotive nonlinearity and changing of the channel density and refractive index, which led to the formation of two/three splitted beam filamentation and the self-distortion of beam width. In addition, influence of several parameters on two/three splitted beam filamentation is discussed.

  14. Ab initio calculations of torsionally mediated hyperfine splittings in E states of acetaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Reid, E. M.; Guislain, B.; Hougen, J. T.; Alekseev, E. A.; Krapivin, I.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum chemistry packages can be used to predict with reasonable accuracy spin-rotation hyperfine interaction constants for methanol, which contains one methyl-top internal rotor. In this work we use one of these packages to calculate components of the spin-rotation interaction tensor for acetaldehyde. We then use torsion-rotation wavefunctions obtained from a fit to the acetaldehyde torsion-rotation spectrum to calculate the expected magnitude of hyperfine splittings analogous to those observed at relatively high J values in the E symmetry states of methanol. We find that theory does indeed predict doublet splittings at moderate J values in the acetaldehyde torsion-rotation spectrum, which closely resemble those seen in methanol, but that the factor of three decrease in hyperfine spin-rotation constants compared to methanol puts the largest of the acetaldehyde splittings a factor of two below presently available Lamb-dip resolution.

  15. Split Attractor Flow in N=2 Minimally Coupled Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio; Orazi, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    We classify the stability region, marginal stability walls (MS) and split attractor flows for two-center extremal black holes in four-dimensional N=2 supergravity minimally coupled to n vector multiplets. It is found that two-center (continuous) charge orbits, classified by four duality invariants, either support a stability region ending on a MS wall or on an anti-marginal stability (AMS) wall, but not both. Therefore, the scalar manifold never contains both walls. Moreover, the BPS mass of the black hole composite (in its stability region) never vanishes in the scalar manifold. For these reasons, the "bound state transformation walls" phenomenon does not necessarily occur in these theories. The entropy of the flow trees also satisfies an inequality which forbids "entropy enigma" decays in these models. Finally, the non-BPS case, due to the existence of a "fake" superpotential satisfying a triangle inequality, can be treated as well, and it can be shown to exhibit a split attractor flow dynamics which, at le...

  16. Heavy Atom Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect on H-Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, André K; Gerbig, Dennis; Schreiner, Peter R

    2018-02-08

    Although frequently employed, heavy atom kinetic isotope effects (KIE) have not been reported for quantum mechanical tunneling reactions. Here we examine the secondary KIE through 13 C-substitution of the carbene atom in methylhydroxycarbene (H 3 C-C̈-OH) in its [1,2]H-tunneling shift reaction to acetaldehyde (H 3 C-CHO). Our study employs matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy in various inert gases and quantum chemical computations. Depending on the choice of the matrix host gas, the KIE varies within a range of 1.0 in xenon to 1.4 in neon. A KIE of 1.1 was computed using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) CVT/SCT, and instanton approaches for the gas phase at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Computations with explicit consideration of the noble gas environment indicate that the surrounding atoms influence the tunneling reaction barrier height and width. The tunneling half-lives computed with the WKB approach are in good agreement with the experimental results in the different noble gases.

  17. Simulation of Quantum Tunnelling in an Open System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Julio F.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic clusters, such as Fe8 and Mn12, within large organic molecules, behave at low temperature T as large single spins S, that is, as single molecule magnets (SMM's). In crystals, magnetic anisotropy gives rise to energy barriers U, and quantum tunnelling is then the only available path for magnetic relaxation at vanishingly small temperatures. Even this path, however, would seem to be nearly closed by energy conservation requirements, given the existence of magnetic dipolar interactions among all SMM's in the crystal. Nevertheless, magnetic relaxation that is temperature independent has lately been observed for temperatures under 0.1 U/kBS for Fe8 and Mn12 (U ≈ 30 K and U ≈ 60 K, for Fe8 and Mn12, respectively, and S = 10 for both of them). Prokof'ev and Stamp (PS) were able to explain it by taking into account hyperfine interactions between the tunnelling electronic spins and nuclear spins. In the PS theory, the system of nuclear spins acts much as a heat bath providing a somewhat random magnetic field h(t) that acts on the otherwise closed system of interacting magnetic dipoles. Thus, the open nature of these systems plays an essential role in bringing tunnelling about. Their numerical simulations are explained, results that follow from the simulations are discussed, and a simple derivation of the tunnelling rate is given.

  18. Quantum mechanical tunneling in the automerization of cyclobutadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonmaker, R.; Lancaster, T.; Clark, S. J.

    2018-03-01

    Cyclobutadiene has a four-membered carbon ring with two double bonds, but this highly strained molecular configuration is almost square and, via a coordinated motion, the nuclei quantum mechanically tunnels through the high-energy square state to a configuration equivalent to the initial configuration under a 90° rotation. This results in a square ground state, comprising a superposition of two molecular configurations, that is driven by quantum tunneling. Using a quantum mechanical model, and an effective nuclear potential from density functional theory, we calculate the vibrational energy spectrum and the accompanying wavefunctions. We use the wavefunctions to identify the motions of the molecule and detail how different motions can enhance or suppress the tunneling rate. This is relevant for kinematics of tunneling-driven reactions, and we discuss these implications. We are also able to provide a qualitative account of how the molecule will respond to an external perturbation and how this may enhance or suppress infra-red-active vibrational transitions.

  19. Quantum mechanical tunneling in the automerization of cyclobutadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonmaker, R; Lancaster, T; Clark, S J

    2018-03-14

    Cyclobutadiene has a four-membered carbon ring with two double bonds, but this highly strained molecular configuration is almost square and, via a coordinated motion, the nuclei quantum mechanically tunnels through the high-energy square state to a configuration equivalent to the initial configuration under a 90° rotation. This results in a square ground state, comprising a superposition of two molecular configurations, that is driven by quantum tunneling. Using a quantum mechanical model, and an effective nuclear potential from density functional theory, we calculate the vibrational energy spectrum and the accompanying wavefunctions. We use the wavefunctions to identify the motions of the molecule and detail how different motions can enhance or suppress the tunneling rate. This is relevant for kinematics of tunneling-driven reactions, and we discuss these implications. We are also able to provide a qualitative account of how the molecule will respond to an external perturbation and how this may enhance or suppress infra-red-active vibrational transitions.

  20. Spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Mryasov, Oleg N; LeClair, Patrick R

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of electron tunnelling has been known since the advent of quantum mechanics, but continues to enrich our understanding of many fields of physics, as well as creating sub-fields on its own. Spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) has recently aroused enormous interest and has developed in a vigorous field of research. The large tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) observed in MTJs garnered much attention due to possible applications in non-volatile random-access memories and next-generation magnetic field sensors. This led to a number of fundamental questions regarding the phenomenon of SDT. In this review article we present an overview of this field of research. We discuss various factors that control the spin polarization and magnetoresistance in MTJs. Starting from early experiments on SDT and their interpretation, we consider thereafter recent experiments and models which highlight the role of the electronic structure of the ferromagnets, the insulating layer, and the ferromagnet/insulator interfaces. We also discuss the role of disorder in the barrier and in the ferromagnetic electrodes and their influence on TMR. (topical review)

  1. Quasi-bound states, resonance tunnelling, and tunnelling times ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scattering and decay of unstable nuclei via alpha decay, proton emission etc. as evident from refs [14–19]. A detailed procedure exists for the study of such states in ...... for the case of transmission across equispaced multiple barriers generating well-separated QB states. 3. The variation of total tunnelling time Tq shows ...

  2. Tunneling in high-K isomeric decays

    CERN Document Server

    Shizuma, T; Shimizu, Y R

    2002-01-01

    We have systematically investigated highly-K-forbidden transitions observed in the Hf, W and Os region, using the gamma-tunneling model in which low-K and high-k states interact through a process of quantum tunneling. The measured hindrance factors are compared with the values calculated using the gamma-tunneling model. Isotope dependences of gamma-tunneling probabilities particularly for neutron-rich nuclei and the relation to stimulated decays of isomers are discussed. (author)

  3. Discrete objects, splitting closure and connectedness | Castellini ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Notions of discrete and indiscrete classes with respect to a closure operator are introduced and studied. These notions are strongly related to splitting and cosplitting closure operators. By linking the above concepts, two Galois connections arise whose composition provides a third Galois connection that can be used as a ...

  4. Miniaturized Planar Split-Ring Resonator Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized planar antenna based on a broadside-coupled split ring resonator excited by an arc-shaped dipole is presented. The excitation dipole acts as a small tuning capacitor in series with a parallel RLC circuit represented by the SRR. The antenna resonance frequency and dimensions...

  5. Split Coil Forms for Rotary Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Split cores for rotor and stator windings of rotary transformer mounted around their respective coils (which are in bobbins) and cemented together. This arrangement simplifies winding of stator coil to go in a slot in inner diameter of stator coil. One practical application of rotary transformers fabricated according to this technique is for centrifuges, in which conventional sliprings are of uncertain reliability.

  6. Split Beta-Lactamase Complementation Assay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Concept of split beta. -lactamase protein fragment complementation assay. (A) and (B) are vector systems involved in the assay. As an example, a vector system for bacterial host is described here. (C) Co-transformation of complementation vectors in appropriate bacterial host. (D) and (E) are types of inter- actions expected ...

  7. Molecular catalytic system for efficient water splitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joya, Khurram Saleem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to construct and explore artificial oxygen evolving complexes that are synthetically accessible, stable, functionally robust and efficient. To achieve this, a class of mono metal water splitting catalysts is introduced in this manuscript and exploitation of these

  8. Splitting up Beta’s change

    OpenAIRE

    Suarez, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we estimated IBM beta from 2000 to 2013, then using differential equation mathematical formula we split up the annual beta’s change attributed to the volatility market effect, the stock volatility effect, the correlation effect and the jointly effect of these variables.

  9. Shear-wave splitting and moonquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimech, J. L.; Weber, R. C.; Savage, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting is a powerful tool for measuring anisotropy in the Earth's crust and mantle, and is sensitive to geological features such as fluid filled cracks, thin alternating layers of rock with different elastic properties, and preferred mineral orientations caused by strain. Since a shear wave splitting measurement requires only a single 3-component seismic station, it has potential applications for future single-station planetary seismic missions, such as the InSight geophysical mission to Mars, as well as possible future missions to Europa and the Moon. Here we present a preliminary shear-wave splitting analysis of moonquakes detected by the Apollo Passive Seismic Experiment. Lunar seismic data suffers from several drawbacks compared to modern terrestrial data, including severe seismic scattering, low intrinsic attenuation, 10-bit data resolution, thermal spikes, and timing errors. Despite these drawbacks, we show that it is in principle possible to make a shear wave splitting measurement using the S-phase arrival of a relatively high-quality moonquake, as determined by several agreeing measurement criteria. Encouraged by this finding, we further extend our analysis to clusters of "deep moonquake" events by stacking multiple events from the same cluster together to further enhance the quality of the S-phase arrivals that the measurement is based on.

  10. Split brain: divided perception but undivided consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Yair; Neville, David A; Otten, Marte; Corballis, Paul M; Lamme, Victor A F; de Haan, Edward H F; Foschi, Nicoletta; Fabri, Mara

    2017-05-01

    In extensive studies with two split-brain patients we replicate the standard finding that stimuli cannot be compared across visual half-fields, indicating that each hemisphere processes information independently of the other. Yet, crucially, we show that the canonical textbook findings that a split-brain patient can only respond to stimuli in the left visual half-field with the left hand, and to stimuli in the right visual half-field with the right hand and verbally, are not universally true. Across a wide variety of tasks, split-brain patients with a complete and radiologically confirmed transection of the corpus callosum showed full awareness of presence, and well above chance-level recognition of location, orientation and identity of stimuli throughout the entire visual field, irrespective of response type (left hand, right hand, or verbally). Crucially, we used confidence ratings to assess conscious awareness. This revealed that also on high confidence trials, indicative of conscious perception, response type did not affect performance. These findings suggest that severing the cortical connections between hemispheres splits visual perception, but does not create two independent conscious perceivers within one brain. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Helioseismic Solar Cycle Changes and Splitting Coefficients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. Using the GONG data for a period over four years, we have studied the variation of frequencies and splitting coefficients with solar cycle. Frequencies and even-order coefficients are found to change signi- ficantly with rising phase of the solar cycle. We also find temporal varia- tions in the rotation rate near the solar ...

  12. Czech, Slovak science ten years after split

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Ten years after the split of Czechoslovakia Czech and Slovak science are facing the same difficulties: shortage of money for research, poor salaries, obsolete equipment and brain drain, especially of the young, according to a feature in the Daily Lidove Noviny (1 page).

  13. Materials Handling for Urban Tunneling in Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    An examination of prior forecasts of tunnel construction provides an estimate of 2.4 million feet of rock tunnel to be constructed during the 1976-2000 period. Tunnel projects for the near term (1980+) and far term (1990+) periods are defined for stu...

  14. 75 FR 42643 - National Tunnel Inspection Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... title 23 Federal funds that are located on public roads and tunnels on Federal-aid highways. The agency... the fatal July 2006 suspended ceiling collapse in the Central Artery Tunnel in Boston, [[Page 42644... located on public roads and tunnels on Federal-aid highways. The NTIS are needed to ensure that all...

  15. Splitting the BLOSUM Score into Numbers of Biological Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tossi Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical tools developed in the context of Shannon information theory were used to analyze the meaning of the BLOSUM score, which was split into three components termed as the BLOSUM spectrum (or BLOSpectrum. These relate respectively to the sequence convergence (the stochastic similarity of the two protein sequences, to the background frequency divergence (typicality of the amino acid probability distribution in each sequence, and to the target frequency divergence (compliance of the amino acid variations between the two sequences to the protein model implicit in the BLOCKS database. This treatment sharpens the protein sequence comparison, providing a rationale for the biological significance of the obtained score, and helps to identify weakly related sequences. Moreover, the BLOSpectrum can guide the choice of the most appropriate scoring matrix, tailoring it to the evolutionary divergence associated with the two sequences, or indicate if a compositionally adjusted matrix could perform better.

  16. Structural Dynamics of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II in Water-Splitting Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J; Jain, Prashant K

    2018-04-17

    Oxygenic photosynthesis in nature occurs via water splitting catalyzed by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. To split water, the OEC cycles through a sequence of oxidation states (S i , i = 0-4), the structural mechanism of which is not fully understood under physiological conditions. We monitored the OEC in visible-light-driven water-splitting action by using in situ, aqueous-environment surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In the unexplored low-frequency region of SERS, we found dynamic vibrational signatures of water binding and splitting. Specific snapshots in the dynamic SERS correspond to intermediate states in the catalytic cycle, as determined by density functional theory and isotopologue comparisons. We assign the previously ambiguous protonation configuration of the S 0 -S 3 states and propose a structural mechanism of the OEC's catalytic cycle. The findings address unresolved questions about photosynthetic water splitting and introduce spatially resolved, low-frequency SERS as a chemically sensitive tool for interrogating homogeneous catalysis in operando.

  17. Iron-Doped BaMnO3for Hybrid Water Splitting and Syngas Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haribal, Vasudev Pralhad; He, Feng; Mishra, Amit; Li, Fanxing

    2017-09-11

    A rationalized strategy to optimize transition-metal-oxide-based redox catalysts for water splitting and syngas generation through a hybrid solar-redox process is proposed and validated. Monometallic transition metal oxides do not possess desirable properties for water splitting; however, density functional theory calculations indicate that the redox properties of perovskite-structured BaMn x Fe 1-x O 3-δ can be varied by changing the B-site cation compositions. Specifically, BaMn 0.5 Fe 0.5 O 3-δ is projected to be suitable for the hybrid solar-redox process. Experimental studies confirm such predictions, demonstrating 90 % steam-to-hydrogen conversion in water splitting and over 90 % syngas yield in the methane partial-oxidation step after repeated redox cycles. Compared to state-of-the-art solar-thermal water-splitting catalysts, the rationally designed redox catalyst reported is capable of splitting water at a significantly lower temperature and with ten-fold increase in steam-to-hydrogen conversion. Process simulations indicate the potential to operate the hybrid solar-redox process at a higher efficiency than state-of-the-art hydrogen and liquid-fuel production processes with 70 % lower CO 2 emissions for hydrogen production. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Experimental study of Rabi-type oscillation induced by tunneling modes in effective near-zero-index metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Zhang, Yewen; Yang, Yaping; Chen, Hong

    2011-04-01

    A special cavity based on effective near-zero-index paired structures containing ɛ-negative and μ-negative materials is realized by using composite right- or left-handed transmission lines. When an artificial magnetic "atom" is put into the cavity, unusual Rabi-type splitting appears because of the strong coupling between the artificial atom and the localized tunneling mode. The direct time domain energy exchanges between the cavity and the "atom" are experimentally observed after excited by a short pulse signal. Within the "atom" field attenuation time, more than one oscillations appear. Rabi-type splitting and the Rabi-type oscillation period are invariant with the scaling changes of the length but vary with the positions where the "atom" is put with different field intensity. Moreover, the decay time of Rabi-type oscillation becomes longer when the tunneling mode possesses smaller linewidth, which is in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  19. Contrastwaarnemingen in tunnels : een meetmethode.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The entrance to a long road tunnel can present itself to an approaching driver as a 'black hole' during the daytime, with no possibility for observing any details. In contrast to traditional symmetrical lighting, counter beam lighting aims the light in the opposite direction to incoming traffic.

  20. Travelling inside the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The golf cart proved to be a very useful form of transport around the 7 km circumference of the machine. It could carry four passengers and pull light equipment in its trailer. Here Peter Zettwoch is the driver along a mock-up tunnel for installation tests. (see photo 7401011X and Photo Archive 7401018)

  1. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however...

  2. A Seamless Ubiquitous Telehealthcare Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sao-Jie Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields.

  3. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spin tunnelling; spin path integrals; discrete phase integral method; diabolical points. ... technologies. Our purpose in this article is rather different. The molecular systems have total spin of the order of 10, and magnetocrystalline anisotropies of few tens of Kelvin ...... The point С' is of this new type, and here it may be said to.

  4. Rotational tunnelling spectroscopy with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Prager, M.

    1993-04-01

    Neutron tunnelling spectroscopy has been a very fruitful field for almost two decades and is still expanding into new areas, both experimentally and theoretically. The development of the topic is reviewed from the theoretical point of view, highlighting new approaches, and selected examples of more recent experimental work are presented. A brief discussion of instrument performance and experimental requirements is given. (author)

  5. Installation in the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The SPS tunnel is 6910 m in circumference and has a cross section of 4 m inner diameter. It is situated at an elevation of 400 m above sea level at a depth below the surface varying between 23 and 65 m. Its walls are lined with a concrete shell of about 30 cm thickness. See also 7410043X

  6. Time tunnels meet warped passages

    CERN Multimedia

    Kushner, David

    2006-01-01

    "Just in time for its 40th anniversary, the classic sci-fi television show "The time tunnel" is out on DVD. The conceit is something every engineer can relate to: a pulled plug. Scientists in an underground lab are working on a secret government experiment in time travel. (1 page)

  7. Earth Pressure on Tunnel Crown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    Two different analyses have been carried out in order to find the vertical earth pressure, or overburden pressure, at the crown of a tunnel going through a dike. Firstly, a hand calculation is performed using a simple dispersion of the stresses over depth. Secondly, the finite‐element program...

  8. Theoretical Analysis on the Effect of Tunnel Excavation on Building strip foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoyan; Gu, Shuancheng; Huang, Rongbin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, according to the characteristics of the ground settlement troughs curves, the influence of tunnel excavation on the effect of strip foundation was studied by inverse analysis firstly. The differential equation of the synergistic effect of the strip foundation and foundation under the tunnel excavation was established by using the equilibrium condition of the micro-element physical force. Then, the conceptual definite initial parameter method was used to solve the corresponding homogeneous equation. According to the plane section assumption, combined with the basic theory of material mechanics, considering the differential characteristic of hyperbolic trigonometric function, and using matlabmathmatica software, the theoretical calculation expression of displacement and internal force which is about the tunnel passes through the strip foundation was obtained. Finally, combined with engineering case analysis, changes of the relative position between the tunnel and the foundation, the influences of the main parameters on the foundation effect were studied. The results show that: The influence scope of the tunnel on the foundation is [-0.5 ~ 1.5] times of the foundation length, and when the tunnel center at the end of the foundation, there exists the maximum settlement. The parameters about the soil loss rate, the excavation section and the buried depth of the tunnel have great influence on the foundation effect. The change of foundation height has a great influence on its internal force.

  9. Tuning the tunneling probability by mechanical stress in Schottky barrier based reconfigurable nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Tim; Heinzig, André; Trommer, Jens; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter Michael

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical stress is an established and important tool of the semiconductor industry to improve the performance of modern transistors. It is well understood for the enhancement of carrier mobility but rather unexplored for the control of the tunneling probability for injection dominated research devices based on tunneling phenomena, such as tunnel FETs, resonant tunnel FETs and reconfigurable Schottky FETs. In this work, the effect of stress on the tunneling probability and overall transistor characteristics is studied by three-dimensional device simulations in the example of reconfigurable silicon nanowire Schottky barrier transistors using two independently gated Schottky junctions. To this end, four different stress sources are investigated. The effects of mechanical stress on the average effective tunneling mass and on the multi-valley band structure applying the deformation potential theory are being considered. The transfer characteristics of strained transistors in n- and p-configuration and corresponding charge carrier tunneling are analyzed with respect to the current ratio between electron and hole conduction. For the implementation of these devices into complementary circuits, the mandatory current ratio of unity can be achieved by appropriate mechanical stress either by nanowire oxidation or the application of a stressed top layer.

  10. Cosmological singularity theorems and splitting theorems for N-Bakry-Émery spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolgar, Eric, E-mail: ewoolgar@ualberta.ca [Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G1 (Canada); Wylie, William, E-mail: wwylie@syr.edu [215 Carnegie Building, Department of Mathematics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We study Lorentzian manifolds with a weight function such that the N-Bakry-Émery tensor is bounded below. Such spacetimes arise in the physics of scalar-tensor gravitation theories, including Brans-Dicke theory, theories with Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction, and low-energy approximations to string theory. In the “pure Bakry-Émery” N = ∞ case with f uniformly bounded above and initial data suitably bounded, cosmological-type singularity theorems are known, as are splitting theorems which determine the geometry of timelike geodesically complete spacetimes for which the bound on the initial data is borderline violated. We extend these results in a number of ways. We are able to extend the singularity theorems to finite N-values N ∈ (n, ∞) and N ∈ (−∞, 1]. In the N ∈ (n, ∞) case, no bound on f is required, while for N ∈ (−∞, 1] and N = ∞, we are able to replace the boundedness of f by a weaker condition on the integral of f along future-inextendible timelike geodesics. The splitting theorems extend similarly, but when N = 1, the splitting is only that of a warped product for all cases considered. A similar limited loss of rigidity has been observed in a prior work on the N-Bakry-Émery curvature in Riemannian signature when N = 1 and appears to be a general feature.

  11. Tunneling decay of false domain walls: The silence of the lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberichter, Mareike, E-mail: M.Haberichter@kent.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NF (United Kingdom); MacKenzie, Richard, E-mail: richard.mackenzie@umontreal.ca; Ung, Yvan, E-mail: klingon-ecology@hotmail.com [Groupe de Physique des Particules, Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Paranjape, M. B., E-mail: paranj@lps.umontreal.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Groupe de Physique des Particules, Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); St. John’s College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TP (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    We study the decay of “false” domain walls, that is, metastable states of the quantum theory where the true vacuum is trapped inside the wall with the false vacuum outside. We consider a theory with two scalar fields, a shepherd field and a field of sheep. The shepherd field serves to herd the solitons of the sheep field so that they are nicely bunched together. However, quantum tunnelling of the shepherd field releases the sheep to spread out uncontrollably. We show how to calculate the tunnelling amplitude for such a disintegration.

  12. Tunneling decay of false domain walls: The silence of the lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberichter, Mareike; MacKenzie, Richard; Ung, Yvan; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    We study the decay of “false” domain walls, that is, metastable states of the quantum theory where the true vacuum is trapped inside the wall with the false vacuum outside. We consider a theory with two scalar fields, a shepherd field and a field of sheep. The shepherd field serves to herd the solitons of the sheep field so that they are nicely bunched together. However, quantum tunnelling of the shepherd field releases the sheep to spread out uncontrollably. We show how to calculate the tunnelling amplitude for such a disintegration.

  13. Landau-Zener tunneling in the presence of weak intermolecular interactions in a crystal of Mn4 single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Bhaduri, S.; Vinslava, A.; Christou, G.

    2005-12-01

    A Mn4 single-molecule magnet (SMM), with a well-isolated spin ground state of S=9/2 , is used as a model system to study Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling in the presence of weak intermolecular dipolar and exchange interactions. The anisotropy constants D and B are measured with minor hysteresis loops. A transverse field is used to tune the tunnel splitting over a large range. Using the LZ and inverse LZ method, it is shown that these interactions play an important role in the tunnel rates. Three regions are identified: (i) at small transverse fields, tunneling is dominated by single tunnel transitions, (ii) at intermediate transverse fields, the measured tunnel rates are governed by reshuffling of internal fields, and (iii) at larger transverse fields, the magnetization reversal starts to be influenced by the direct relaxation process, and many-body tunnel events may occur. The hole digging method is used to study the next-nearest-neighbor interactions. At small external fields, it is shown that magnetic ordering occurs which does not quench tunneling. An applied transverse field can increase the ordering rate. Spin-spin cross-relaxations, mediated by dipolar and weak exchange interactions, are proposed to explain additional quantum steps.

  14. Non-Mendelian transmission in a human developmental disorder: split hand/split foot.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvik, G. P.; Patton, M. A.; Homfray, T.; Evans, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The study of Mendelian disorders that do not meet some Mendelian expectations has led to an increased understanding of such previously obscure genetic phenomena as anticipation. Split hand/split foot (SHSF), a human developmental malformation, demonstrates such distinctive genetic features as reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. In this study, new pedigrees with defined ascertainment confirm the existence of non-Mendelian transmission characterized by the overtransmission of SHSF fro...

  15. Splitting, splitting and splitting again: A brief history of the development of regional government in Indonesia since independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Booth

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the changes in the structure and role of provincial and sub-provincial governments in Indonesia since independence. Particular attention is paid to the process of splitting both provinces and districts (kabupaten and kota into smaller units. The paper points out that this process has been going on since the 1950s, but has accelerated in the post-Soeharto era. The paper examines why the splitting of government units has occurred in some parts of the Outer Islands to a much greater extent than in Java, and also examines the implications of developments since 1999 for the capacity of local government units to deliver basic services such as health and education.

  16. Fiber coupled ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We report on a scanning tunneling microscope with a photoconductive gate in the tunneling current circuit. The tunneling tip is attached to a coplanar transmission line with an integrated photoconductive switch. The switch is illuminated through a fiber which is rigidly attached to the switch...... waveguide. The measurements show that the probe works as a transient voltage detector in contact and a capacitively coupled transient field detector in tunneling mode. We do not measure the transient voltage change in the ohmic tunneling current. In this sense, the spatial resolution for propagating...

  17. Tunnel widening in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clatworthy, M G; Annear, P; Bulow, J U

    1999-01-01

    We report a prospective series evaluating the incidence and degree of tunnel widening in a well-matched series of patients receiving a hamstring or patella tendon graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. We correlated tunnel widening with clinical factors, knee scores, KT-1000...... in the degree of tunnel widening between the two groups. The mean increase in femoral tunnel area in the hamstring group was 100.4% compared with a decrease of 25% in the patella tendon group (P = hamstring group was 73.9% compared with a decrease of 2.......1% in the patella tendon group (P = hamstring group. Tunnel widening does not correlate with instability...

  18. Quenched spin tunneling and diabolical points in magnetic molecules. I. Symmetric configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    2001-09-01

    The perfect quenching of spin tunneling that has previously been discussed in terms of interfering instantons, and has recently been observed in the magnetic molecule Fe8, is treated using a discrete phase integral (or Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) method. The simplest model Hamiltonian for the phenomenon leads to a Schrödinger equation that is a five-term recursion relation. This recursion relation is reflection symmetric when the magnetic field applied to the molecule is along the hard magnetic axis. A completely general Herring formula for the tunnel splittings for all reflection-symmetric five-term recursion relations is obtained. Using connection formulas for a nonclassical turning point that may be described as lying ``under the barrier,'' and which underlies the oscillations in the splitting as a function of magnetic field, this Herring formula is transformed into two other formulas that express the splittings in terms of a small number of action and actionlike integrals. These latter formulas appear to be generally valid, even for problems where the recursion contains more than five terms. The results for the model Hamiltonian are compared with experiment, numerics, previous instanton based approaches, and the limiting case of no magnetic field.

  19. Split mandrel versus split sleeve coldworking: Dual methods for extending the fatigue life of metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, Geoffrey A.; Creager, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    It is common practice to use split sleeve coldworking of fastener holes as a means of extending the fatigue life of metal structures. In search of lower manufacturing costs, the aerospace industry is examining the split mandrel (sleeveless) coldworking process as an alternative method of coldworking fastener holes in metal structures. The split mandrel process (SpM) significantly extends the fatigue life of metal structures through the introduction of a residual compressive stress in a manner that is very similar to the split sleeve system (SpSl). Since the split mandrel process is significantly less expensive than the split sleeve process and more adaptable to robotic automation, it will have a notable influence upon other new manufacture of metal structures which require coldworking a significant number of holes, provided the aerospace community recognizes that the resulting residual stress distributions and fatigue life improvement are the same for both processes. Considerable testing has validated the correctness of that conclusion. The findings presented in this paper represent the results of an extensive research and development program, comprising data collected from over 400 specimens fabricated from 2024-T3 and 7075-T651 aluminum alloys in varied configurations, which quantify the benefits (fatigue enhancement and cost savings) of automating a sleeveless coldworking system.

  20. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80-foot wind tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise, refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy, was employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line for outdoor test stand, NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels, they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  1. Automated Boundary Conditions for Wind Tunnel Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2018-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of models tested in wind tunnels require a high level of fidelity and accuracy particularly for the purposes of CFD validation efforts. Considerable effort is required to ensure the proper characterization of both the physical geometry of the wind tunnel and recreating the correct flow conditions inside the wind tunnel. The typical trial-and-error effort used for determining the boundary condition values for a particular tunnel configuration are time and computer resource intensive. This paper describes a method for calculating and updating the back pressure boundary condition in wind tunnel simulations by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. The controller methodology and equations are discussed, and simulations using the controller to set a tunnel Mach number in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are demonstrated.

  2. Hot interstellar tunnels. I. Simulation of interacting supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    Reexamining a suggestion of Cox and Smith, we find that intersecting supernova remnants can indeed generate and maintain hot interstellar regions with napproximately-less-than10 -2 cm -3 and Tapprox.10 6 K. These regions are likely to occupy at least 30% of the volume of a spiral arm near the midplane of the gaseous disk if the local supernova rate there is greater than 1.5 x 10 -7 Myr -1 pc -3 . Their presence in the interstellar medium is supported by observations of the soft X-ray background. The theory required to build a numerical simulation of interacting supernova remnants is developed. The hot cavities within a population of remnants will become connected for a variety of assumed conditions in the outer shells of old remnants. Extensive hot cavity regions or tunnels are built and enlarged by supernovae occurring in relatively dense gas which produce connections, but tunnels are kept hot primarily by supernovae occurring within the tunnels. The latter supernovae initiate fast shock waves which apparently reheat tunnels faster than they are destroyed by thermal conduction in a galactic magnetic field or by radiative cooling. However, the dispersal of these rejuvenating shocks over a wide volume is inhibited by motions of cooler interstellar gas in the interval between shocks. These motions disrupt the contiguity of the component cavities of a tunnel and may cause its death.The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a quasi-equilibrium is reached within 10 7 years of the first supernova in a spiral arm. This equilibrium is characterized by a constant average filling fraction for cavities in the interstellar volume. Aspects of the equilibrium are discussed for a range of supernova rates. Two predictions of Cox and Smith are not confirmed within this range: critical growth of hot regions to encompass the entire medium, and the efficient quenching of a remnant's expansion by interaction with other cavities

  3. Photoelectrochemical water splitting: optimizing interfaces and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis several photoelectrochemical water splitting devices based on semiconductor materials were investigated. The aim was the design, characterization, and fabrication of solar-to-fuel devices which can absorb solar light and split water to produce hydrogen.

  4. A Regularized Algorithm for the Proximal Split Feasibility Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangsong Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal split feasibility problem has been studied. A regularized method has been presented for solving the proximal split feasibility problem. Strong convergence theorem is given.

  5. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-08-09

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the left FML and right FMR ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients for components of the spin-dependent current, and TMR are calculated as a function of the applied voltage. As a result, we found a high resonant TMR. Thus, DMTJ can serve as highly effective magnetic nanosensor for biological applications, or as magnetic memory cells by switching the magnetization of the inner ferromagnetic layer FMW.© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

  6. Low-temperature phonoemissive tunneling rates in single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Garg, Anupam

    2016-03-01

    Tunneling between the two lowest energy levels of single molecule magnets with Ising type anisotropy, accompanied by the emission or absorption of phonons, is considered. Quantitatively accurate calculations of the rates for such tunneling are performed for a model Hamiltonian especially relevant to the best studied example, Fe8. Two different methods are used: high-order perturbation theory in the spin-phonon interaction and the non-Ising-symmetric parts of the spin Hamiltonian, and a novel semiclassical approach based on spin-coherent-state-path-integral instantons. The methods are found to be in good quantitative agreement with other, and consistent with previous approaches to the problem. The implications of these results for magnetization of molecular solids of these molecules are discussed briefly.

  7. Tunneling magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic planar hetero-nanojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2010-05-03

    We present a theoretical study of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in nanojunctions between non-identical ferromagnetic metals in the framework of the quasiclassical approach. The lateral size of a dielectric oxide layer, which is considered as a tunneling barrier between the metallic electrodes, is comparable with the mean-free path of electrons. The dependence of the TMR on the bias voltage, physical parameters of the dielectric barrier, and spin polarization of the electrodes is studied. It is demonstrated that a simple enough theory can give high TMR magnitudes of several hundred percent at bias voltages below 0.5 V. A qualitative comparison with the available experimental data is given. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The Third Quantization: To Tunnel or Not to Tunnel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Bouhmadi-López

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the third quantization, we consider the possibility that an initially recollapsing baby universe can enter a stage of near de Sitter inflation by tunnelling through a Euclidean wormhole that connects the recollapsing and inflationary geometries. We present the solutions for the evolution of the scale factor in the Lorentzian and Euclidean regions as well as the probability that the baby universe indeed crosses the wormhole when it reaches its maximum size.

  9. Multiple Rabi Splittings under Ultrastrong Vibrational Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jino; Chervy, Thibault; Shalabney, Atef; Devaux, Eloïse; Hiura, Hidefumi; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-10-07

    From the high vibrational dipolar strength offered by molecular liquids, we demonstrate that a molecular vibration can be ultrastrongly coupled to multiple IR cavity modes, with Rabi splittings reaching 24% of the vibration frequencies. As a proof of the ultrastrong coupling regime, our experimental data unambiguously reveal the contributions to the polaritonic dynamics coming from the antiresonant terms in the interaction energy and from the dipolar self-energy of the molecular vibrations themselves. In particular, we measure the opening of a genuine vibrational polaritonic band gap of ca. 60 meV. We also demonstrate that the multimode splitting effect defines a whole vibrational ladder of heavy polaritonic states perfectly resolved. These findings reveal the broad possibilities in the vibrational ultrastrong coupling regime which impact both the optical and the molecular properties of such coupled systems, in particular, in the context of mode-selective chemistry.

  10. Splitting of high power, cw proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Facco

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for splitting a high power, continuous wave (cw proton beam in two or more branches with low losses has been developed in the framework of the EURISOL (European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility design study. The aim of the system is to deliver up to 4 MW of H^{-} beam to the main radioactive ion beam production target, and up to 100 kW of proton beams to three more targets, simultaneously. A three-step method is used, which includes magnetic neutralization of a fraction of the main H^{-} beam, magnetic splitting of H^{-} and H^{0}, and stripping of H^{0} to H^{+}. The method allows slow raising and individual fine adjustment of the beam intensity in each branch.

  11. Meshed split skin graft for extensive vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas C

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A 30 year old female presented with generalized stable vitiligo involving large areas of the body. Since large areas were to be treated it was decided to do meshed split skin graft. A phototoxic blister over recipient site was induced by applying 8 MOP solution followed by exposure to UVA. The split skin graft was harvested from donor area by Padgett dermatome which was meshed by an ampligreffe to increase the size of the graft by 4 times. Significant pigmentation of the depigmented skin was seen after 5 months. This procedure helps to cover large recipient areas, when pigmented donor skin is limited with minimal risk of scarring. Phototoxic blister enables easy separation of epidermis thus saving time required for dermabrasion from recipient site.

  12. Timelike single-logarithm-resummed splitting functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albino, S.; Bolzoni, P.; Kniehl, B.A.; Kotikov, A.V.; Joint Inst. of Nuclear Research, Moscow

    2011-08-01

    We calculate the single logarithmic contributions to the quark singlet and gluon matrix of timelike splitting functions at all orders in the modified minimal-subtraction (MS) scheme. We fix two of the degrees of freedom of this matrix from the analogous results in the massive-gluon regularization scheme by using the relation between that scheme and the MS scheme. We determine this scheme transformation from the double logarithmic contributions to the timelike splitting functions and the coefficient functions of inclusive particle production in e + e - annihilation now available in both schemes. The remaining two degrees of freedom are fixed by reasonable physical assumptions. The results agree with the fixed-order results at next-to-next-to-leading order in the literature. (orig.)

  13. Solar Water Splitting Using Semiconductor Photocatalyst Powders

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Solar energy conversion is essential to address the gap between energy production and increasing demand. Large scale energy generation from solar energy can only be achieved through equally large scale collection of the solar spectrum. Overall water splitting using heterogeneous photocatalysts with a single semiconductor enables the direct generation of H from photoreactors and is one of the most economical technologies for large-scale production of solar fuels. Efficient photocatalyst materials are essential to make this process feasible for future technologies. To achieve efficient photocatalysis for overall water splitting, all of the parameters involved at different time scales should be improved because the overall efficiency is obtained by the multiplication of all these fundamental efficiencies. Accumulation of knowledge ranging from solid-state physics to electrochemistry and a multidisciplinary approach to conduct various measurements are inevitable to be able to understand photocatalysis fully and to improve its efficiency.

  14. Q factor and resonance amplitude of Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broom, R.F.; Wolf, P.

    1977-01-01

    The surface impedance of the superconducting films comprising the electrodes of Josephson tunnel junctions has been derived from the BCS theory in the extreme London limit. Expressions have been obtained for (i) the dependence of the penetration depth lambda on frequency and temperature, and (ii) the quality factor Q of the junction cavity, attributable to surface absorption in the electrodes. The effect of thin electrodes (t 9 or approx. = lambda) is also included in the calculations. Comparison of the calculated frequency dependence of lambda with resonance measurements on Pb-alloy and all-Nb tunnel junctions yields quite good agreement, indicating that the assumptions made in the theory are reasonable. Measurements of the (current) amplitude of the resonance peaks of the junctions have been compared with the values obtained from inclusion of the calculated Q in the theory by Kulik. In common with observations on microwave cavities by other workers, we find that a small residual conductivity must be added to the real part of the BCS value. With its inclusion, good agreement is found between calculation and experiment, within the range determined by the simplifying assumptions of Kulik's theory. From the results, we believe the calculation of Q to be reasonably accurate for the materials investigated. It is shown that the resonance amplitude of Josephson junctions can be calculated directly from the material constants and a knowledge of the residual conductivity

  15. Effective action of a compressible quantum Hall state edge: Application to tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitov, L. S.; Shytov, A. V.; Halperin, B. I.

    2001-01-01

    The electrodynamical response of the edge of a compressible quantum Hall system affects tunneling into the edge. Using composite Fermi liquid theory, we derive an effective action for the edge modes interacting with tunneling charge. This action generalizes the chiral Luttinger liquid theory of the quantum Hall edge to compressible systems in which transport is characterized by a finite Hall angle. In addition to the standard terms, the action contains a dissipative term. The tunneling exponent is calculated as a function of the filling fraction for several models, including screened and unscreened long-range Coulomb interaction, as well as a short-range interaction. We find that tunneling exponents are robust and to a large extent insensitive to the particular model. We discuss recent tunneling measurements in overgrown cleaved edge systems, and demonstrate that the profile of charge density near the edge is very sensitive to the parameters of the system. In general, the density is nonmonotonic, and can deviate from the bulk value by up to 30%. Implications for the correspondence to chiral Luttinger edge theories are discussed

  16. Interband resonant transitions in two-dimensional hexagonal lattices: Rabi oscillations, Zener tunnelling, and tunnelling of phase dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchesnovich, Valery S; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-09-01

    We study, analytically and numerically, the dynamics of interband transitions in two-dimensional hexagonal periodic photonic lattices. We develop an analytical approach employing the Bragg resonances of different types and derive the effective multi-level models of the Landau-Zener-Majorana type. For two-dimensional periodic potentials without a tilt, we demonstrate the possibility of the Rabi oscillations between the resonant Fourier amplitudes. In a biased lattice, i.e., for a two-dimensional periodic potential with an additional linear tilt, we identify three basic types of the interband transitions or Zener tunnelling. First, this is a quasi-one-dimensional tunnelling that involves only two Bloch bands and occurs when the Bloch index crosses the Bragg planes away from one of the high-symmetry points. In contrast, at the high-symmetry points (i.e., at the M and Gamma points), the Zener tunnelling is essentially two-dimensional, and it involves either three or six Bloch bands being described by the corresponding multi-level Landau-Zener-Majorana systems. We verify our analytical results by numerical simulations and observe an excellent agreement. Finally, we show that phase dislocations, or optical vortices, can tunnel between the spectral bands preserving their topological charge. Our theory describes the propagation of light beams in fabricated or optically-induced two-dimensional photonic lattices, but it can also be applied to the physics of cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates tunnelling in tilted two-dimensional optical potentials and other types of resonant wave propagation in periodic media.

  17. Atom beams split by gentle persuasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, R.

    1994-01-01

    Two different research teams have taken a big step toward atom interferometry. They have succeeded in splitting atomic beams by using atoms in spin states that neither absorb nor reemit laser light. By proper adjustment of experimental conditions, atoms are changed from one spin state to another, without passing through the intermediary excited state. The atoms in essence absorb momentum from the laser photons, without absorption or emission of photons. The change in momentum deflects atoms in the proper spin state

  18. On split Lie triple systems II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we extend these results to arbitrary split Lie triple systems with no restrictions on their 0-root spaces. Author Affiliations. Antonio J Calderón Martín1 M Forero Piulestán1. Departamento de Matemáticas, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain. Dates. Manuscript received: 24 June 2009 ...

  19. Torsionally mediated spin-rotation hyperfine splittings at moderate to high J values in methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, S. P.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Lapinov, A. V.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Alekseev, E. A.; Mescheryakov, A. A.; Hougen, J. T.; Xu, Li-Hong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an explanation based on torsionally mediated proton-spin-overall-rotation interaction for the observation of doublet hyperfine splittings in some Lamb-dip sub-millimeter-wave transitions between ground-state torsion-rotation states of E symmetry in methanol. These unexpected doublet splittings, some as large as 70 kHz, were observed for rotational quantum numbers in the range of J = 13 to 34, and K = - 2 to +3. Because they increase nearly linearly with J for a given branch, we confined our search for an explanation to hyperfine operators containing one nuclear-spin angular momentum factor I and one overall-rotation angular momentum factor J (i.e., to spin-rotation operators) and ignored both spin-spin and spin-torsion operators, since they contain no rotational angular momentum operator. Furthermore, since traditional spin-rotation operators did not seem capable of explaining the observed splittings, we constructed totally symmetric "torsionally mediated spin-rotation operators" by multiplying the E-species spin-rotation operator by an E-species torsional-coordinate factor of the form e±niα. The resulting operator is capable of connecting the two components of a degenerate torsion-rotation E state. This has the effect of turning the hyperfine splitting pattern upside down for some nuclear-spin states, which leads to bottom-to-top and top-to-bottom hyperfine selection rules for some transitions, and thus to an explanation for the unexpectedly large observed hyperfine splittings. The constructed operator cannot contribute to hyperfine splittings in the A-species manifold because its matrix elements within the set of torsion-rotation A1 and A2 states are all zero. The theory developed here fits the observed large doublet splittings to a root-mean-square residual of less than 1 kHz and predicts unresolvable splittings for a number of transitions in which no doublet splitting was detected.

  20. Torsionally mediated spin-rotation hyperfine splittings at moderate to high J values in methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, S. P.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Lapinov, A. V.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Mescheryakov, A. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Hougen, J. T.; Xu, Li-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an explanation based on torsionally mediated proton-spin–overall-rotation interaction for the observation of doublet hyperfine splittings in some Lamb-dip sub-millimeter-wave transitions between ground-state torsion-rotation states of E symmetry in methanol. These unexpected doublet splittings, some as large as 70 kHz, were observed for rotational quantum numbers in the range of J = 13 to 34, and K = − 2 to +3. Because they increase nearly linearly with J for a given branch, we confined our search for an explanation to hyperfine operators containing one nuclear-spin angular momentum factor I and one overall-rotation angular momentum factor J (i.e., to spin-rotation operators) and ignored both spin-spin and spin-torsion operators, since they contain no rotational angular momentum operator. Furthermore, since traditional spin-rotation operators did not seem capable of explaining the observed splittings, we constructed totally symmetric “torsionally mediated spin-rotation operators” by multiplying the E-species spin-rotation operator by an E-species torsional-coordinate factor of the form e ±niα . The resulting operator is capable of connecting the two components of a degenerate torsion-rotation E state. This has the effect of turning the hyperfine splitting pattern upside down for some nuclear-spin states, which leads to bottom-to-top and top-to-bottom hyperfine selection rules for some transitions, and thus to an explanation for the unexpectedly large observed hyperfine splittings. The constructed operator cannot contribute to hyperfine splittings in the A-species manifold because its matrix elements within the set of torsion-rotation A 1 and A 2 states are all zero. The theory developed here fits the observed large doublet splittings to a root-mean-square residual of less than 1 kHz and predicts unresolvable splittings for a number of transitions in which no doublet splitting was detected.

  1. Transonymization as Revitalization: Old Toponyms of Split

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Lozić Knezović

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with ancient toponyms of Split, a city in the centre of the Croatian region of Dalmatia. Along with numerous monuments of spiritual and material culture, toponyms are part of the two-thousand-year-old city’s historical heritage. Split in particular abounds with sources that provide valuable information concerning ancient toponyms. In terms of the study and preservation of toponymy, three basic sources are crucial: the living oral tradition, written records, and old charts — mostly cadastral plans. In addition to researching, recording, documenting, and publishing Split’s ancient place names through toponomastic, geographical, and town planning studies, toponymic heritage preservation is also implemented through the direct use of the names in everyday life. One of the ways of such revitalization of Split’s ancient place names is their transonymization into the category of chrematonyms, i.e. their secondary use as names of institutions, shops, restaurants, schools, sports associations and facilities, bars and coffee shops, cemeteries, and so on. The present paper provides a classification and etymological analysis of detoponymic chrematonyms of Split. The authors propose measures to raise public awareness of the historical information conveyed by the names and raise some issues for consideration regarding further study of transonymization as a means of revitalizing local toponymic tradition.

  2. 26 CFR 1.7872-15 - Split-dollar loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) INCOME TAXES General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7872-15 Split-dollar loans. (a) General rules—(1... split-dollar loan depend upon the relationship between the parties and upon whether the loan is a demand...-dollar demand loan is any split-dollar loan that is payable in full at any time on the demand of the...

  3. 7 CFR 51.2731 - U.S. Spanish Splits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Spanish Splits. 51.2731 Section 51.2731... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Spanish Type Peanuts Grades § 51.2731 U.S. Spanish Splits. “U.S. Spanish Splits” consists of shelled Spanish type peanut kernels which are split or broken...

  4. The tunneling magnetoresistance and spin-polarized optoelectronic properties of graphyne-based molecular magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhi; Ouyang, Bin; Lan, Guoqing; Xu, Li-Chun; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Xuguang

    2017-01-01

    Using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green’s function method, we investigate the spin-dependent transport and optoelectronic properties of the graphyne-based molecular magnetic tunnel junctions (MMTJs). We find that these MMTJs exhibit an outstanding tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The TMR value is as high as 10 6 %. When the magnetization directions of two electrodes are antiparallel under positive or negative bias voltages, two kinds of pure spin currents can be obtained in the systems. Furthermore, under the irradiation of infrared, visible or ultraviolet light, spin-polarized photocurrents can be generated in the MMTJs, but the corresponding microscopic mechanisms are different. More importantly, if the magnetization directions of two electrodes are antiparallel, the photocurrents with different spins are spatially separated, appearing at different electrodes. This phenomenon provides a new way to simultaneously generate two spin currents. (paper)

  5. Underwater piercing of a tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvik, O.

    1984-11-01

    Norwegian consultants and contractors have been confronted with the task of blasting a final penetrating passage that will open the way for the water in a reservoir to flow through the hydropower turbines. Norway has almost certainly led in this area because of its special topographical and geological conditions. The glacial activities have created a number of natural and very deep lakes forming cheap reservoirs. Piercings at depths up to about 100 m have been performed. Problems tend to increase with depth, but unsuccessful penetration can occur at any depth. Secondary effects to consider include the danger of slides when the water level is lowered, wave erosion along the lowered new shoreline, erosion at all streams and rivers flowing into the lake and groundwater erosion in the newly exposed dry shoreline. Methods of penetration can be roughly divided into two categories: penetration against the open tunnel shaft (open system); and penetration against the closed tunnel shaft (closed system). 6 figures.

  6. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  7. Tunneling of a coupled system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishai, Y.

    1985-01-01

    We consider tunneling through a potential barrier V(x) in the presence of a coupling term W(x,y). Let H(y) be the internal Hamiltonian associated with the coordinate y and let E 0 (x) be the ground state energy of the operator H(x;y) = H(y) + W(x,y) in which x is a parameter. Our result for the tunneling probability (in the WKB approximation) is P = exp(2i ∫ k 0 (x)dx) where, at energy E, k 0 (x) = [E-E 0 (x)-V(x)]sup(1/2)/(h/2π) is the local wave number in the presence of coupling. (orig.)

  8. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  9. Digging the CNGS decay tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Products of the collision between a proton beam and a graphite target will pass through a horn containing an electric field that will produce a focused beam. These particles will decay into muon neutrinos within the tunnel that is being constructed in these images. The neutrinos will then travel 730 km to Gran Sasso in Italy where huge detectors will observe the beam to study a process called neutrino oscillation.

  10. Dissipative Effect and Tunneling Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samyadeb Bhattacharya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Langevin equation has been studied for dissipative system using the approach of Ford et al. Here, we have considered the inverted harmonic oscillator potential and calculated the effect of dissipation on tunneling time, group delay, and the self-interference term. A critical value of the friction coefficient has been determined for which the self-interference term vanishes. This approach sheds new light on understanding the ion transport at nanoscale.

  11. Tunnel Cost-Estimating Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Mayo, R. S., Barrett, J. E., and Jenny, R. J. 1976. "Tunneling: The State of the Industry ," Report No. DOT-TSC-OST-76-29, Department of Transporta...as a... C *YPAUS CHECK FOR HOTAL INPUT 1F(ELNJL.GT.-1s.Eag.AND.ELNPR.GT.-Ig.E29) GO TO St *OSS3@ *I00 WRITEILO,1031) NTSEG.NREACH 04540 MI ISTOP-i

  12. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Michael Warren; Masear, Victoria; Chung, Kevin; Maupin, Kent; Andary, Michael; Amadio, Peter C.; Barth, Richard W.; Watters, William C.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline was created to improve patient care by outlining the appropriate information-gathering and decision-making processes involved in managing the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The methods used to develop this clinical practice guideline were designed to combat bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility. The guideline’s recommendations are as follows: The physician should obtain an accurate patient history. The physician should perform a physica...

  13. Semiconductor Nanowires for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yun Jeong

    Photolysis of water with semiconductor materials has been investigated intensely as a clean and renewable energy resource by storing solar energy in chemical bonds such as hydrogen. One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures such as nanowires can provide several advantages for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting due to their high surface areas and excellent charge transport and collection efficiency. This dissertation discusses various nanowire photoelectrodes for single or dual semiconductor systems, and their linked PEC cells for self-driven water splitting. After an introduction of solar water splitting in the first chapter, the second chapter demonstrates water oxidative activities of hydrothermally grown TiO2 nanowire arrays depending on their length and surface properties. The photocurrents with TiO2 nanowire arrays approach saturation due to their poor charge collection efficiency with longer nanowires despite increased photon absorption efficiency. Epitaxial grains of rutile atomic layer deposition (ALD) shell on TiO2 nanowire increase the photocurrent density by 1.5 times due to improved charge collection efficiency especially in the short wavelength region. Chapter three compares the photocurrent density of the planar Si and Si nanowire arrays coated by anatase ALD TiO 2 thin film as a model system of a dual bandgap system. The electroless etched Si nanowire coated by ALD TiO2 (Si EENW/TiO2) shows 2.5 times higher photocurrent density due to lower reflectance and higher surface area. Also, this chapter illustrates that n-Si/n-TiO2 heterojunction is a promising structure for the photoanode application of a dual semiconductor system, since it can enhance the photocurrent density compared to p-Si/n-TiO 2 junction with the assistance of bend banding at the interface. Chapter four demonstrates the charge separation and transport of photogenerated electrons and holes within a single asymmetric Si/TiO2 nanowire. Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements show

  14. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  15. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Michael Warren; Masear, Victoria; Chung, Kevin; Maupin, Kent; Andary, Michael; Amadio, Peter C.; Barth, Richard W.; Watters, William C.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline was created to improve patient care by outlining the appropriate information-gathering and decision-making processes involved in managing the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The methods used to develop this clinical practice guideline were designed to combat bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility. The guideline’s recommendations are as follows: The physician should obtain an accurate patient history. The physician should perform a physical examination of the patient that may include personal characteristics as well as performing a sensory examination, manual muscle testing of the upper extremity, and provocative and/or discriminatory tests for alternative diagnoses. The physician may obtain electrodiagnostic tests to differentiate among diagnoses. This may be done in the presence of thenar atrophy and/or persistent numbness. The physician should obtain electrodiagnostic tests when clinical and/or provocative tests are positive and surgical management is being considered. If the physician orders electrodiagnostic tests, the testing protocol should follow the American Academy of Neurology/American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine/American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation guidelines for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, the physician should not routinely evaluate patients suspected of having carpal tunnel syndrome with new technology, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and pressure-specified sensorimotor devices in the wrist and hand. This decision was based on an additional nonsystematic literature review following the face-to-face meeting of the work group. PMID:19474448

  16. Tunneling beyond the Fermilab site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.; Elwyn, A.; Lach, J.; Read, A.

    1983-01-01

    An accelerator that crosses the Fermilab site boundary must have a minimum effect on the surrounding environment and the people residing in the area. Unobstructed public access should be allowed above the ring except in relatively few areas such as the injection, dump, and experimental regions. The accelerator should be a benign and unobtrusive neighbor not only when it is completed but also in the construction period. For these reasons underground tunneling for all or most of the ring seems attractive. In this note we look into some questions raised by tunneling beyond the Fermilab site. Most of our discussion is of general applicability. However, we will use as examples two specific ring configurations. The examples have not been optimized from the point of view of physics output or accelerator technology but are just specific examples which allow us to study questions of tunneling. One is a ring of 5 km radius (5 TeV) tangent to the Tevatron and entirely east of the Fox River and fed by a beam from the Tevatron which crosses under the river. We assume that each of these machines will have 100 beam fills per year and we scale the maximum intensities with the accelerator radii. Thus we assume that there will be 1.0 E14 protons in each beam of the 20 TeV machine and 2.5 E13 for the 5 TeV machine

  17. Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Sibendu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Magnotti, Gina M; Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Longman, Douglas E; Skodje, Rex T; Davis, Michael J

    2013-06-20

    We study the role of individual reaction rates on engine performance, with an emphasis on the contribution of quantum tunneling. It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. The three-dimensional model includes detailed descriptions of the chemistry of a surrogate for a biodiesel fuel, as well as all the features of the engine, such as the liquid fuel spray and turbulence. This study is part of a larger investigation of how the features of the dynamics and potential energy surfaces of key reactions, as well as their reaction rate uncertainties, affect engine performance, and results in these directions are also presented here.

  18. STRESS STATE OF TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC ROCKS NEAR PRESSURIZED HYDRAULIC TUNNEL OF HORSESHOE CROSS-SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bautdinov Damir Tahirovich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The parametric analysis of the stress state of a transversally isotropic rock mass near a pressurized hydraulic tunnel of a box-shaped form is carried out. Pressurized hydro-technical tunnels of box-shaped cross-section are widely used in the field of hydraulic engineering construction and are one of the complex, labor-intensive and expensive types of structures that make up the main structures of waterworks, melioration systems and water supply systems. As a culvert and water supply facilities they are built underground if the open excavation is impossible or not economical, or when the tunnel runs through a densely populated or densely built-up area, or when landslides, screes, rockfalls are possible. Violation of integrity of the rock mass, in particular, caused by tunneling, modifies the stress-strain state (SSS of the rock mass, which leads to appearance of tensile stresses in some places, and in some cases, to significant compressive stresses. If these stresses exceed the design strengths of rock to tension and compression, respectively, then the collapse of the working roof and buckling of the side walls and the bottom of the tunnel may occur. Subject: analysis of the stress state of transversally isotropic rocks near the pressurized hydraulic tunnel of horseshoe cross-section caused by the internal head of water. Research objectives: determination of real values of circumferential stresses along the development contour. Materials and methods: solution of the problem of plane deformation of the theory of elasticity for a transversely isotropic medium containing tunnel excavation cannot be obtained by analytical methods, and therefore the stress-strain analysis was carried out by the finite element method using the ANSYS software package, MCE. Results: determination of stresses along the development contour, construction of diagrams and graphs showing the effects of the anisotropy conditions and Poisson’s ratio. The tangential stresses

  19. Splitting methods for split feasibility problems with application to Dantzig selectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongjin; Xu, Hong-Kun

    2017-05-01

    The split feasibility problem (SFP), which refers to the task of finding a point that belongs to a given nonempty, closed and convex set, and whose image under a bounded linear operator belongs to another given nonempty, closed and convex set, has promising applicability in modeling a wide range of inverse problems. Motivated by the increasingly data-driven regularization in the areas of signal/image processing and statistical learning, in this paper, we study the regularized split feasibility problem (RSFP), which provides a unified model for treating many real-world problems. By exploiting the split nature of the RSFP, we shall gainfully employ several efficient splitting methods to solve the model under consideration. A remarkable advantage of our methods lies in their easier subproblems in the sense that the resulting subproblems have closed-form representations or can be efficiently solved up to a high precision. As an interesting application, we apply the proposed algorithms for finding Dantzig selectors, in addition to demonstrating the effectiveness of the splitting methods through some computational results on synthetic and real medical data sets.

  20. Variability in ACL tunnel placement: observational clinical study of surgeon ACL tunnel variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Wright, Rick W; Brophy, Robert H; McCarty, Eric C; Vidal, Armando R; Parker, Richard D; Andrish, Jack T; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-06-01

    Multicenter and multisurgeon cohort studies on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are becoming more common. Minimal information exists on intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to analyze intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement in a series of The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) ACL reconstruction patients and in a clinical cohort of ACL reconstruction patients. The hypothesis was that there would be minimal variability between surgeons in ACL tunnel placement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventy-eight patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by 8 surgeons had postoperative imaging with computed tomography, and ACL tunnel location and angulation were analyzed using 3-dimensional surface processing and measurement. Intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement was analyzed. For intersurgeon variability, the range in mean ACL femoral tunnel depth between surgeons was 22%. For femoral tunnel height, there was a 19% range. Tibial tunnel location from anterior to posterior on the plateau had a 16% range in mean results. There was only a small range of 4% for mean tibial tunnel location from the medial to lateral dimension. For intrasurgeon variability, femoral tunnel depth demonstrated the largest ranges, and tibial tunnel location from medial to lateral on the plateau demonstrated the least variability. Overall, surgeons were relatively consistent within their own cases. Using applied measurement criteria, 85% of femoral tunnels and 90% of tibial tunnels fell within applied literature-based guidelines. Ninety-one percent of the axes of the femoral tunnels fell within the boundaries of the femoral footprint. The data demonstrate that surgeons performing ACL reconstructions are relatively consistent between each other. There is, however, variability of average tunnel placement up to 22% of mean condylar depth

  1. Spin quantum tunneling via entangled states in a dimer of exchange coupled single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiron, R.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Aliaga-Alcalde, N.; Foguet-Albiol, D.; Christou, G.

    2004-03-01

    A new family of supramolecular, antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled dimers of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) has recently been reported [W. Wernsdorfer, N. Aliaga-Alcalde, D.N. Hendrickson, and G. Christou, Nature 416, 406 (2002)]. Each SMM acts as a bias on its neighbor, shifting the quantum tunneling resonances of the individual SMMs. Hysteresis loop measurements on a single crystal of SMM-dimers have now established quantum tunneling of the magnetization via entangled states of the dimer. This shows that the dimer really does behave as a quantum-mechanically coupled dimer. The transitions are well separated, suggesting long coherence times compared to the time scale of the energy splitting. This result is of great importance if such systems are to be used for quantum computing. It also allows the measurement of the longitudinal and transverse superexchange coupling constants [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 227203 (2003)].

  2. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules: Quasisingular perturbations and discontinuous SU(2) instantons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keçecioğlu, Ersin; Garg, Anupam

    2003-02-01

    Spin coherent state path integrals with discontinuous semiclassical paths are investigated with special reference to a realistic model for the magnetic degrees of freedom in the Fe8 molecular solid. It is shown that such paths are essential to a proper understanding of the phenomenon of quenched spin tunneling in these molecules. In the Fe8 problem, such paths are shown to arise as soon as a fourth-order anisotropy term in the energy is turned on, making this term a singular perturbation from the semiclassical point of view. The instanton approximation is shown to quantitatively explain the magnetic field dependence of the tunnel splitting, as well as agree with general rules for the number of quenching points allowed for a given value of spin. A fairly accurate approximate formula for the spacing between quenching points is derived.

  3. A reduced theoretical model for estimating condensation effects in combustion-heated hypersonic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Luo, X.; Qin, F.; Yang, J.

    2018-03-01

    As one of the combustion products of hydrocarbon fuels in a combustion-heated wind tunnel, water vapor may condense during the rapid expansion process, which will lead to a complex two-phase flow inside the wind tunnel and even change the design flow conditions at the nozzle exit. The coupling of the phase transition and the compressible flow makes the estimation of the condensation effects in such wind tunnels very difficult and time-consuming. In this work, a reduced theoretical model is developed to approximately compute the nozzle-exit conditions of a flow including real-gas and homogeneous condensation effects. Specifically, the conservation equations of the axisymmetric flow are first approximated in the quasi-one-dimensional way. Then, the complex process is split into two steps, i.e., a real-gas nozzle flow but excluding condensation, resulting in supersaturated nozzle-exit conditions, and a discontinuous jump at the end of the nozzle from the supersaturated state to a saturated state. Compared with two-dimensional numerical simulations implemented with a detailed condensation model, the reduced model predicts the flow parameters with good accuracy except for some deviations caused by the two-dimensional effect. Therefore, this reduced theoretical model can provide a fast, simple but also accurate estimation of the condensation effect in combustion-heated hypersonic tunnels.

  4. Flow Cytometric Bead Sandwich Assay Based on a Split Aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Luyao; Bing, Tao; Liu, Xiangjun; Wang, Junyan; Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Nan; Shangguan, Dihua

    2018-01-24

    A few aptamers still bind their targets after being split into two moieties. Split aptamers have shown great potential in the development of aptameric sensors. However, only a few split aptamers have been generated because of lack of knowledge on the binding structure of their parent aptamers. Here, we report the design of a new split aptamer and a flow cytometric bead sandwich assay using a split aptamer instead of double antibodies. Through DMS footprinting and mutation assay, we figured out the target-binding moiety and the structure-stabilizing moiety of the l-selectin aptamer, Sgc-3b. By separating the duplex strand in the structure-stabilizing moiety, we obtained a split aptamer that bound l-selectin. After optimization of one part of the split sequence to eliminate the nonspecific binding of the split sequence pair, we developed a split-aptamer-based cytometric bead assay (SACBA) for the detection of soluble l-selectin. SACBA showed good sensitivity and selectivity to l-selectin and was successfully applied for the detection of spiked l-selectin in the human serum. The strategies for generating split aptamers and designing the split-aptamer-based sandwich assay are simple and efficient and show good practicability in aptamer engineering.

  5. A supersymmetric phase transition in Josephson-tunnel-junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.

    1988-01-01

    The fully frustrated XY model in two dimensions exhibits a vortex-unbinding as well as an Ising transition. If the Ising transition overlaps with the critical line that ends on the vortex transition: T I ≤T V , then the model is equivalent, at the overlap temperature, to a free massless field theory of 1 boson and 1 Majorana fermion, which is a superconformal field theory, of central charge c=3/2. The model is experimentally realized in terms of an array of Josephson-tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field. The experiment reveals a phase transition consistent with T I =T V . Thus, at the critical temperature, the array provides a physical realization of a supersymmetric quantum field theory. (orig.)

  6. Supersymmetric phase transition in Josephson-tunnel-junction arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.

    1988-08-31

    The fully frustrated XY model in two dimensions exhibits a vortex-unbinding as well as an Ising transition. If the Ising transition overlaps with the critical line that ends on the vortex transition: T/sub I/less than or equal toT/sub V/, then the model is equivalent, at the overlap temperature, to a free massless field theory of 1 boson and 1 Majorana fermion, which is a superconformal field theory, of central charge c=3/2. The model is experimentally realized in terms of an array of Josephson-tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field. The experiment reveals a phase transition consistent with T/sub I/=T/sub V/. Thus, at the critical temperature, the array provides a physical realization of a supersymmetric quantum field theory.

  7. SplitRFLab: A MATLAB GUI toolbox for receiver function analysis based on SplitLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mijian; Huang, Hui; Huang, Zhouchuan; Wang, Liangshu

    2016-02-01

    We add new modules for receiver function (RF) analysis in SplitLab toolbox, which includes the manual RF analysis module, automatic RF analysis and related quality control modules, and H- k stacking module. The updated toolbox (named SplitRFLab toolbox), especially its automatic RF analysis module, could calculate the RFs quickly and efficiently, which is very useful in RF analysis with huge amount of seismic data. China is now conducting the ChinArray project that plans to deploy thousands of portable stations across Chinese mainland. Our SplitRFLab toolbox may obtain reliable RF results quickly at the first time, which provide essentially new constraint to the crustal and mantle structures.

  8. Insights Into Electrochemical and Photoelectrochemical Water-Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Barbosa, Nella M.

    The water-splitting reaction has been known for over a century, yet its efficient execution remains to be one of the "holy grails" for current researchers. Here, molecular water is converted to oxygen and hydrogen gas via multiple proton- and electron-transfer steps. Although the product of interest is high-purity hydrogen gas fuel, the thermodynamic and kinetic requirements of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are the main limiting factor. The goal of this dissertation was to develop and understand model electro- and photoelectro-catalytic systems that can address the kinetic limitations of the OER, as well as guidelines for the future development of water-splitting devices. Chapter 1 introduces the kinetic theory of heterogeneous electron-transfer reactions and how it is applied to the understanding of the watersplitting reaction. The chemical properties that make iridium oxide an ideal model electrocatalyst for the OER are discussed, as well as an overview of previous work on this material. Furthermore, the fundamentals of photo-electrochemical water-splitting are presented. Here, sunlight is used as the main driving force for producing oxygen and hydrogen. It has been previously demonstrated that the synthesis of IrOx˙nH 2O colloids by alkaline hydrolysis of Ir(III) or Ir(IV) salts proceeds through iridium hydroxide intermediates. Chapter 2 is a detailed spectro-electrochemical and DFT study of such intermediates and their effect in photoelectrochemical water-splitting cells. Primarily, we have identified the monomeric nature of this hydroxide intermediates as well as their most likely chemical composition and their relative ratio between Ir(III) and Ir(IV). The results from this study address a very important, current dilemma in IrOx˙nH2O-based photoelectrochemical water-splitting cells: how does the chemistry of the catalyst and its interface with the semiconductor influence the photoresponse of the cell? The careful preparation and characterization of

  9. RITD – Wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Schmidt, Walter; Heilimo, Jyri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Arruego, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric re-entry and descent and landing system (EDLS) concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques is highly promising for the Earth re-entry missions. We developed such EDLS for the Earth re-entry utilizing a concept that was originally developed for Mars. This EU-funded project is called RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development - and it was to assess the bene¬fits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develope a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. The RITD entry and descent system utilizes an inflatable hypersonic decelerator. Development of such system requires a combination of wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations. This included wind tunnel tests both in transsonic and subsonic regimes. The principal aim of the wind tunnel tests was the determination of the RITD damping factors in the Earth atmosphere and recalculation of the results for the case of the vehicle descent in the Mars atmosphere. The RITD mock-up model used in the tests was in scale of 1:15 of the real-size vehicle as the dimensions were (midsection) diameter of 74.2 mm and length of 42 mm. For wind tunnel testing purposes the frontal part of the mock-up model body was manufactured by using a PolyJet 3D printing technology based on the light curing of liquid resin. The tail part of the mock-up model body was manufactured of M1 grade copper. The structure of the mock-up model placed th center of gravity in the same position as that of the real-size RITD. The wind tunnel test program included the defining of the damping factor at seven values of Mach numbers 0.85; 0.95; 1.10; 1.20; 1.25; 1.30 and 1.55 with the angle of attack ranging from 0 degree to 40 degrees with the step of 5 degrees. The damping characteristics of

  10. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co/AIOx/Al tunnel junctions with fcc Co (111) electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai; Tran, T. Lan Ahn; Brinks, Peter; Brinks, P.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Bolhuis, Thijs; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; de Jong, Machiel Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) has been characterized in junctions comprised of face-centered cubic (fcc) Co (111) ferromagnetic electrodes grown epitaxially on sapphire substrates, amorphous AlOx tunnel barriers, and nonmagnetic Al counterelectrodes. Large TAMR ratios have been

  11. Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting in CdSe/CdTe invert type-II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the atomistic tight-binding (TB) theory and configuration interaction (CI) description, it is showed that the Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting (FSS) in semiconductor core/shell nanocrystals are predominantly affected by the shell thickness and band profiles. CdSe/CdTe invert type-II and CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell ...

  12. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report is part of a dangerous waste permit application for the storage of wastes from the Purex process at Hanford. Appendices are presented on the following: construction drawings; HSW-5638, specifications for disposal facility for failed equipment, Project CA-1513-A; HWS-8262, specification for Purex equipment disposal, Project CGC 964; storage tunnel checklist; classification of residual tank heels in Purex storage tunnels; emergency plan for Purex facility; training course descriptions; and the Purex storage tunnels engineering study

  13. Climatic wind tunnel for wind engineering tasks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuznetsov, Sergeii; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Král, Radomil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, 2-B (2015), s. 303-316 ISSN 1897-628X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12892S Keywords : climatic tunnel * wind tunnel * atmospheric boundary layer * flow resistance * wind tunnel contraction Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering https://suw.biblos.pk.edu.pl/resources/i5/i6/i6/i7/i6/r56676/KuznetsovS_ClimaticWind.pdf

  14. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...

  15. The Neutron Peak in the Interlayer Tunneling Model of High Temperature Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Chakravarty, S.; Anderson, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Recent neutron scattering experiments in optimally doped YBCO exhibit an unusual magnetic peak that appears only below the superconducting transition temperature. The experimental observations are explained within the context of the interlayer tunneling theory of high temperature superconductors. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. Method of orthogonally splitting imaging pose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Sun, Changku; Wang, Peng; Yang, Qian; Liu, Xintong

    2018-01-01

    In order to meet the aviation's and machinery manufacturing's pose measurement need of high precision, fast speed and wide measurement range, and to resolve the contradiction between measurement range and resolution of vision sensor, this paper proposes an orthogonally splitting imaging pose measurement method. This paper designs and realizes an orthogonally splitting imaging vision sensor and establishes a pose measurement system. The vision sensor consists of one imaging lens, a beam splitter prism, cylindrical lenses and dual linear CCD. Dual linear CCD respectively acquire one dimensional image coordinate data of the target point, and two data can restore the two dimensional image coordinates of the target point. According to the characteristics of imaging system, this paper establishes the nonlinear distortion model to correct distortion. Based on cross ratio invariability, polynomial equation is established and solved by the least square fitting method. After completing distortion correction, this paper establishes the measurement mathematical model of vision sensor, and determines intrinsic parameters to calibrate. An array of feature points for calibration is built by placing a planar target in any different positions for a few times. An terative optimization method is presented to solve the parameters of model. The experimental results show that the field angle is 52 °, the focus distance is 27.40 mm, image resolution is 5185×5117 pixels, displacement measurement error is less than 0.1mm, and rotation angle measurement error is less than 0.15°. The method of orthogonally splitting imaging pose measurement can satisfy the pose measurement requirement of high precision, fast speed and wide measurement range.

  17. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 ± 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs

  18. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Shuai; Sen Suman; Zhang Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng Hongbo

    2012-01-01

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. (paper)

  19. Resonant tunneling of electrons in quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Shekhter, R.I.; Jonson, M.; Krive, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    We considered resonant electron tunneling in various nanostructures including single wall carbon nanotubes, molecular transistors and quantum wires formed in two-dimensional electron gas. The review starts with a textbook description of resonant tunneling of noninteracting electrons through a double-barrier structure. The effects of electron-electron interaction in sequential and resonant electron tunneling are studied by using Luttinger liquid model of electron transport in quantum wires. The experimental aspects of the problem (fabrication of quantum wires and transport measurements) are also considered. The influence of vibrational and electromechanical effects on resonant electron tunneling in molecular transistors is discussed.

  20. Femtosecond tunneling response of surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Ha, Taekjip; Jensen, Jacob Riis

    1998-01-01

    We obtain femtosecond (200 fs) time resolution using a scanning tunneling microscope on surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) generated by two 100 fs laser beams in total internal reflection geometry. The tunneling gap dependence of the signal clearly indicates the tunneling origin of the signal...... and suggests that nanometer spatial resolution can be obtained together with femtosecond temporal resolution. This fast response, in contrast to the picosecond decay time of SPPs revealed by differential reflectivity measurements, can be attributed to a coherent superposition of SPPs rectified at the tunneling...... junction. (C) 1998 American Institute of Physics. [S0003-6951(98)02223-2]....

  1. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a mixed waste storage unit consisting of two underground railroad tunnels: Tunnel Number 1 designated 218-E-14 and Tunnel Number 2 designated 218-E-15. The two tunnels are connected by rail to the PUREX Plant and combine to provide storage space for 48 railroad cars (railcars). The PUREX Storage Tunnels provide a long-term storage location for equipment removed from the PUREX Plant. Transfers into the PUREX Storage Tunnels are made on an as-needed basis. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railcars and remotely transferred by rail into the PUREX Storage Tunnels. Railcars act as both a transport means and a storage platform for equipment placed into the tunnels. This report consists of part A and part B. Part A reports on amounts and locations of the mixed water. Part B permit application consists of the following: Facility Description and General Provisions; Waste Characteristics; Process Information; Groundwater Monitoring; Procedures to Prevent Hazards; Contingency Plan; Personnel Training; Exposure Information Report

  2. Injuries caused by firewood splitting machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellstrand, P H

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the types of injury caused by firewood splitting machines and also to elucidate the accident mechanism. The study is based on 15 cases. The machine has a rotating spiral cone, and usually the victims' gloved fingertips were caught by the point of the cone. This led to either amputations, usually of radial fingers and/or penetrating wounds through the middle of the hand. In most cases the accidents could not be blamed on bad working techniques. The study of the mechanisms of injury points to insufficient protective devices in a machine construction which has a potentially dangerous working principle.

  3. Probing spin-polarized tunneling at high bias and temperature with a magnetic tunnel transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Min, B.C.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) is a three terminal hybrid device that consists of a tunnel emitter, a ferromagnetic (FM) base, and a semiconductor collector. In the MTT with a FM emitter and a single FM base, spin-polarized hot electrons are injected into the base by tunneling. After

  4. Resonant tunneling via spin-polarized barrier states in a magnetic tunnel junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.; Lodder, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Resonant tunneling through states in the barrier of a magnetic tunnel junction has been analyzed theoretically for the case of a spin-polarized density of barrier states. It is shown that for highly spin-polarized barrier states, the magnetoresistance due to resonant tunneling is enhanced compared

  5. Analysis of Seismic Anisotropy Across Central Anatolia by Shear Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamir, Dilekcan; Abgarmi, Bizhan; Arda Özacar, A.

    2014-05-01

    Analysis of Seismic Anisotropy Across Central Anatolia by Shear Wave Splitting Dilekcan Pamir, Bizhan Abgarmi, A. Arda Özacar Department of Geological Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU), Dumlupinar Bulvari 1, 06800 Ankara, Turkey Central Anatolia holds the key to connect the theories about the ongoing tectonic escape, the African Plate subduction along Cyprus Arc and the indenter-style collision of Arabian Plate along Bitlis Suture. However, the shear wave splitting measurements which are needed to characterize seismic anisotropy are very sparse in the region. Recently, seismic data recorded by national seismic networks (KOERI, ERI-DAD) with dense coverage, provided a unique opportunity to analyze the effect of present slab geometry (slab tears, slab break-off) on mantle deformation and test different models of anisotropy forming mechanisms. In this study, the anisotropic structure beneath the Central Anatolia is investigated via splitting of SKS and SKKS phases recorded at 46 broadband seismic stations. Our measurements yielded 1171 well-constrained splitting and 433 null results. Overall, the region displays NE-SW trending fast splitting directions and delay times on the order of 1 sec. On the other hand, a large number of stations which are spatially correlated with Cyprus Slab, Neogene volcanism and major tectonic structures present significant back azimuthal variations on splitting parameters that cannot be explained by one-layered anisotropy with horizontal symmetry. Thus, we have modeled anisotropy for two-layered structures using a forward approach and identified NE-SW trending fast splitting directions with delay times close to 1 sec at the lower layer and N-S, NW-SE trending fast splitting with limited time delays (0.1 - 0.3 sec) at the upper layer. Fast directions and delay times of the lower layer are similar to one-layered anisotropy and parallel or sub-parallel to the absolute plate motions which favors asthenospheric flow model

  6. Chiral extrapolation of lattice data for the hyperfine splittings of heavy mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, X.; Thomas, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Hyperfine splittings between the heavy vector (D*, B*) and pseudoscalar (D, B) mesons have been calculated numerically in lattice QCD, where the pion mass (which is related to the light quark mass) is much larger than its physical value. Naive linear chiral extrapolations of the lattice data to the physical mass of the pion lead to hyperfine splittings which are smaller than experimental data. In order to extrapolate these lattice data to the physical mass of the pion more reasonably, we apply the effective chiral perturbation theory for heavy mesons, which is invariant under chiral symmetry when the light quark masses go to zero and heavy quark symmetry when the heavy quark masses go to infinity. This leads to a phenomenological functional form with three parameters to extrapolate the lattice data. It is found that the extrapolated hyperfine splittings are even smaller than those obtained using linear extrapolation. We conclude that the source of the discrepancy between lattice data for hyperfine splittings and experiment must lie in non-chiral physics

  7. Pseudospin-orbit splitting and its consequences for the central depression in nuclear density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia Jie; Long, Wen Hui; Song, Jun Ling; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of the bubble-like structure has been studied, in the light of pseudospin degeneracy, within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (RHFB) theory. It is concluded that the charge/neutron bubble-like structure is predicted to occur in the mirror system of {34Si,34Ca } commonly by the selected Lagrangians, due to the persistence of Z (N )=14 subshell gaps above which the π (ν ) 2 s1 /2 states are not occupied. However, for the popular candidate 46Ar, the RHFB Lagrangian PKA1 does not support the occurrence of the bubble-like structure in the charge (proton) density profiles, due to the almost degenerate pseudospin doublet {π 2 s1 /2,π 1 d3 /2} and coherent pairing effects. The formation of a semibubble in heavy nuclei is less possible as a result of small pseudospin-orbit (PSO) splitting, while it tends to appear at Z =120 superheavy systems which coincides with large PSO splitting of the doublet {π 3 p3 /2,π 2 f5 /2} and couples with significant shell effects. Pairing correlations, which can work against bubble formation, significantly affect the PSO splitting. Furthermore, we found that the influence on semibubble formation due to different types of pairing interactions is negligible. The quenching of the spin-orbit splitting in the p orbit has been also stressed, and it may be considered the hallmark for semibubble nuclei.

  8. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy: breakthroughs and highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The principle of scanning tunneling microscopy, an imaging method with atomic resolution capability invented by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982, can be adapted for surface magnetism studies by using magnetic probe tips. The contrast mechanism of this so-called spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy, or SP-STM, relies on the tunneling magneto-resistance effect, i.e. the tip-sample distance as well as the differential conductance depend on the relative magnetic orientation of tip and sample. To illustrate the working principle and the unique capabilities of SP-STM, this compilation presents some key experiments which have been performed on various magnetic surfaces, such as the topological antiferromagnet Cr(001), a double-layer of Fe which exhibits a stripe- domain pattern with about 50 nm periodicity, and the Mn monolayer on W(110), where the combination of experiment and theory reveal an antiferromagnetic spin cycloid. Recent experimental results also demonstrate the suitability of SP-STM for studies of dynamic properties, such as the spin relaxation time of single magnetic nanostructures.

  9. First Principles Study of Electron Tunneling through Ice

    KAUST Repository

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S.

    2012-10-25

    With the aim of understanding electrochemical scanning tunnel microscopy experiments in an aqueous environment, we investigate electron transport through ice in the coherent limit. This is done by using the nonequilibrium Greens functions method, implemented within density functional theory, in the self-interaction corrected local density approximation. In particular, we explore different ice structures and different Au electrode surface orientations. By comparing the decay coefficient for different thicknesses to the ice complex band structure, we find that the electron transport occurs via tunneling with almost one-dimensional character. The slow decay of the current with the ice thickness is largely due to the small effective mass of the conduction electrons. Furthermore, we find that the calculated tunneling decay coefficients at the Fermi energy are not sensitive to the structural details of the junctions and are at the upper end of the experimental range for liquid water. This suggests that linear response transport measurements are not capable of distinguishing between different ordered ice structures. However, we also demonstrate that a finite bias measurement may be capable of sorting polar from nonpolar interfaces due to the asymmetry of the current-voltage curves for polar interfaces. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Phonon-assisted decoherence and tunneling in quantum dot molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Foerstner, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of the phonon environment on the electron dynamics in a doped quantum dot molecule. A non-perturbative quantum kinetic theory based on correlation expansion is used in order to describe both diagonal and off-diagonal electron-phonon couplings representing real and virtual...... processes with relevant acoustic phonons. We show that the relaxation is dominated by phonon-assisted electron tunneling between constituent quantum dots and occurs on a picosecond time scale. The dependence of the time evolution of the quantum dot occupation probabilities on the energy mismatch between...

  11. Development and applications of the tunnel junction dc squid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchen, M.B.

    1977-05-01

    The thesis is divided into three principle areas. Chapters II through VII are concerned with the theory, fabrication, operation, and performance of thin-film tunnel junction dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device). Chapters VIII, IX, and X describe the development of a planar dc SQUID and the incorporation of this SQUID into thin-film magnetic field gradiometers. Chapters XI through XIII discusses the application of a cylindrical dc SQUID to the measurement of thermal fluctuations in freely-suspended tin fibers at the superconducting transition

  12. Electric field effects in scanning tunneling microscope imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Quaade, Ulrich; Grey, Francois

    1998-01-01

    We present a high-voltage extension of the Tersoff-Hamann theory of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images, which includes the effect of the electric field between the tip and the sample. The theoretical model is based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and has no adjustable...... parameters. We use the method to calculate theoretical STM images of the monohydrate Si(100)-H(2x1) surface with missing hydrogen defects at -2V and find an enhanced corrugation due to the electric field, in good agreement with experimental images....

  13. Electron tunneling in nanoscale electrodes for battery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hidenori; Narayanan, Rajaram; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that the electrical current that may be obtained from a nanoscale electrochemical system is sensitive to the dimensionality of the electrode and the density of states (DOS). Considering the DOS of lower dimensional systems, such as two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional nanotubes, or zero-dimensional quantum dots, yields a distinct variation of the current-voltage characteristics. Such aspects go beyond conventional Arrhenius theory based kinetics which are often used in experimental interpretation. The obtained insights may be adapted to other devices, such as solid-state batteries. It is also indicated that electron transport in such devices may be considered through electron tunneling.

  14. Randomized clinical trial comparing fixed-time split dosing and split dosing of oral Picosulfate regimen for bowel preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jae Hyuck; Han, Koon Hee; Park, Jong Kyu; Seo, Hyun Il; Kim, Young Don; Lee, Sang Jin; Jun, Baek Gyu; Hwang, Min Sik; Park, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, Myeong Jong; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2017-08-28

    To compare the efficacy of fixed-time split dose and split dose of an oral sodium picosulfate for bowel preparation. This is study was prospective, randomized controlled study performed at a single Institution (2013-058). A total of 204 subjects were assigned to receive one of two sodium picosulfate regimens ( i.e ., fixed-time split or split) prior to colonoscopy. Main outcome measurements were bowel preparation quality and subject tolerability. There was no statistical difference between the fixed-time split dose regimen group and the split dose regimen group (Ottawa score mean 2.57 ± 1.91 vs 2.80 ± 2.51, P = 0.457). Cecal intubation time and physician's satisfaction of inspection were not significantly different between the two groups ( P = 0.428, P = 0.489). On subgroup analysis, for afternoon procedures, the fixed-time split dose regimen was equally effective as compared with the split dose regimen (Ottawa score mean 2.56 ± 1.78 vs 2.59 ± 2.27, P = 0.932). There was no difference in tolerability or compliance between the two groups. Nausea was 21.2% in the fixed-time split dose group and 14.3% in the split dose group ( P = 0.136). Vomiting was 7.1% and 2.9% ( P = 0.164), abdominal discomfort 7.1% and 4.8% ( P = 0.484), dizziness 1% and 4.8% ( P = 0.113), cold sweating 1% and 0% ( P = 0.302) and palpitation 0% and 1% ( P = 0.330), respectively. Sleep disturbance was two (2%) patients in the fixed-time split dose group and zero (0%) patient in the split dose preparation ( P = 0.143) group. A fixed-time split dose regimen with sodium picosulfate is not inferior to a split dose regimen for bowel preparation and equally effective for afternoon colonoscopy.

  15. Proceedings - Workshop on Materials Handling for Tunnel Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    With the anticipated increases in tunnel construction in the next decade, greater demands will be made on transportation sytems to remove tunnel muck at rates consistent with tunnel excavation rates. This workshop discussed and noted that conventiona...

  16. The Regularity of Functions on Dual Split Quaternions in Clifford Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows some properties of dual split quaternion numbers and expressions of power series in dual split quaternions and provides differential operators in dual split quaternions and a dual split regular function on Ω⊂ℂ2×ℂ2 that has a dual split Cauchy-Riemann system in dual split quaternions.

  17. Splitting of the weak hypercharge quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Brene, N.

    1990-12-01

    The ratio between the weak hypercharge quantum for particles having no coupling to the gauge bosons corresponding to the semisimple component of the gauge group and the smallest hypercharge quantum for particles that do have such couplings is exceptionally large for the standard model, considering its rank. To compare groups with respect to this property we propose a quantity χ which depends on the rank of the group and the splitting ratio of the hypercharge(s) to be found in the group. The quantity χ has maximal value for the gauge group of the standard model. This suggest that the hypercharge splitting may play an important role either in the origin of the gauge symmetry at a fundamental scale or in some kind of selection mechanism at a scale perhaps nearer to the experimental scale. Such selection mechanism might be what we have called confusion which removes groups with many (so called generalized) automorphisms. The quantity χ tends to be large for groups with few generalized automorphisms. (orig.)

  18. Strong CP, flavor, and twisted split fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnik, Roni; Perez, Gilad; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shirman, Yuri

    2005-01-01

    We present a natural solution to the strong CP problem in the context of split fermions. By assuming CP is spontaneously broken in the bulk, a weak CKM phase is created in the standard model due to a twisting in flavor space of the bulk fermion wavefunctions. But the strong CP phase remains zero, being essentially protected by parity in the bulk and CP on the branes. As always in models of spontaneous CP breaking, radiative corrections to theta bar from the standard model are tiny, but even higher dimension operators are not that dangerous. The twisting phenomenon was recently shown to be generic, and not to interfere with the way that split fermions naturally weaves small numbers into the standard model. It follows that out approach to strong CP is compatible with flavor, and we sketch a comprehensive model. We also look at deconstructed version of this setup which provides a viable 4D model of spontaneous CP breaking which is not in the Nelson-Barr class. (author)

  19. Neuroreceptor activation by vibration-assisted tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Ross D; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-04-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction.

  20. Correlation of tunneling spectra with surface nano-morphology and doping in thin YBa2Cu3O7-delta films

    OpenAIRE

    Sharoni, A.; Koren, G.; Millo, O.

    2001-01-01

    Tunneling spectra measured on thin epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-delta films are found to exhibit strong spatial variations, showing U and V-shaped gaps as well as zero bias conductance peaks typical of a d-wave superconductor. A full correspondence is found between the tunneling spectra and the surface morphology down to a level of a unit-cell step. Splitting of the zero bias conductance peak is seen in optimally-doped and overdoped films, but not in the underdoped ones, suggesting that there is no tr...