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Sample records for theneutralized transport experiment

  1. Feasibility and Top Level Design of a Scalable Emergency Response System for Oceangoing Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-20

    1) Filters airborne agents while still allowing for verbal communication.127 d) Brightly colored hardhats with adjustable chinstraps e) Impermeable...flow.361 The maritime cluster industry includes five sectors: transportation, manufacturing and services, recreation, commercial fishing , and the...neutralization of warfare and chemical contaminates in water (fresh and aqueous) we studied two nanoparticles’ ( TiO2 and ZnO) effectiveness at

  2. Analysis of Proton Transport Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-05

    which can inhibit transport, may grow . The abrupt loss of transport at higher currents in the small channel suggests this possibility. Future experiments... Unicorn Park Drive Woburn, MA 01801 Attn: H. Linnerud 1 copy Lawrence Livermore Laboratory P. 0. Box 808 Livermore, CA 94550 Attn: R. J. Briggs 1 copy R

  3. Transport Task Force workshop: basic experiments highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, R.K. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Luckhardt, S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Lyon, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Navratil, G.A. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Schoenberg, K.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Selected topics are summarized from the Basic Experiments session of the Transport Task Force Workshop held August 21-24, 1989, in San Diego, California. This session included presentations on paradigm experiments, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and advanced tokamaks. Recent advances in all of these areas illustrate the importance of these experiments in advancing our understanding of toroidal transport. Progress has been made in measuring the details of particle diffusion, isolating specific modes, measuring fluctuation variations with field geometry and beta, and comparing all these with theoretical predictions. The development of experimental tools for determining which fluctuations dominate transport are also reported. Continued significant advances are anticipated in a number of areas highlighted. (author).

  4. Transport Task Force workshop: basic experiments highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Luckhardt, S.; Lyon, J.F.; Navratil, G.A.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1990-01-01

    Selected topics are summarized from the Basic Experiments session of the Transport Task Force Workshop held August 21-24, 1989, in San Diego, California. This session included presentations on paradigm experiments, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and advanced tokamaks. Recent advances in all of these areas illustrate the importance of these experiments in advancing our understanding of toroidal transport. Progress has been made in measuring the details of particle diffusion, isolating specific modes, measuring fluctuation variations with field geometry and beta, and comparing all these with theoretical predictions. The development of experimental tools for determining which fluctuations dominate transport are also reported. Continued significant advances are anticipated in a number of areas highlighted. (author)

  5. Self-pinched lithium beam transport experiments on SABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.L.; Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Shokir, I.; Cuneo, M.E.; Menge, P.R.; Johnston, R.R.; Welch, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Self-pinched transport of ion beams has many advantages for ion-driven ICF applications involving high yield and energy production. The authors are currently preparing for a self-pinched lithium beam transport experiment on the SABRE accelerator. There are three transport elements that must eventually be demonstrated: (1) efficient lithium beam generation and ballistic transport to a focus at the self-pinched transport channel entrance; (2) self-pinched transport in the channel, requiring optimized injection conditions and gas breakdown; and (3) self-pinched transport of the equilibrated beam from the channel into free space, with associated aiming and stability considerations. In the present experiment, a hollow annular lithium beam from an applied-B extraction ion diode will be focused to small radius (r ≤ 2 cm) in a 60 cm long ballistic focus section containing argon gas at a pressure of a few Torr. The self-pinched transport channel will contain a low pressure background gas of 10--40 mTorr argon to allow sufficient net current to confine the beam for long distance transport. IPROP simulations are in progress to optimize the design of the ballistic and self-pinched transport sections. Progress on preparation of this lithium self-pinched transport experiment, including a discussion of transport system design, important gas breakdown issues, and diagnostics, will be presented

  6. MOX fuel transport: the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis, H.; Verdier, A.; Sanchis, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the back-end of the fuel cycle, several leading countries have chosen the Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling (RCR) option. Plutonium recycling in the form of MOX fuel is a mature industry, with successful operational experience and large-scale fabrication plants an several European countries. The COGEMA Group has developed the industrialized products to master the RCR operation including transport COGEMA subsidiary, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has been operating MOX fuel transports on an industrial scale for more than 10 years. In 1998, around 200 transports of Plutonium materials have been organised by TRANSNUCLEAIRE. These transports have been carried out by road between various facilities in Europe: reprocessing plants, manufacturing plants and power plants. The materials transported are either: PuO 2 and MOX powder; BWR and PWR MOX fuel rods; BWR and PWR MOX fuel assemblies. Because MOX fuel transport is subject to specific safety, security and fuel integrity requirements, the MOX fuel transport system implemented by TRANSNUCLEAIRE is fully dedicated. Packaging have been developed, licensed and manufactured for each kind of MOX material in compliance with relevant regulations. A fleet of vehicles qualified according to existing physical protection regulations is operated by TRANSNUCLEAIRE. TRANSNUCLEAIRE has gained a broad experience in MOX transport in 10 years. Technical and operational know-how has been developed and improved for each step: vehicles and packaging design and qualification; vehicle and packaging maintenance; transport operations. Further developments are underway to increase the payload of the packaging and to improve the transport conditions, safety and security remaining of course top priority. (authors)

  7. United Kingdom experience in plutonium transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    Plutonium has already been transported within the UK over a period of 20 years and to destinations overseas since the early 60's. Experience is recounted with regard to the forms of plutonium transported, regulations, insurance, container design, mode of transport, volume of traffic, physical protection, safety analysis and costs. It is concluded that this traffic could be expanded in the future without danger to the community or the environment

  8. Transport of oxide spent fuel. Industrial experience of COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1985-01-01

    COGEMA, the world leading Company in the reprocessing industry who is also involved in the transport activity, is ruling all transports of spent fuel to La Hague reprocessing plant. The paper summarizes some aspects of the experience gained in this field (road, rail and sea transports) and describes the standards defined by COGEMA as regards transport casks. These standards are as follows: - casks of dry type, - casks of the maximum size compatible with rail transports, - capability to be unloaded with standardized equipment and following standard procedures. Considering: 1) the extremely large experience of COGEMA for all transport modes and, 2) the fact that all these transports are performed in full compliance with the IAEA recommendations, COGEMA is convinced that its experience could serve to help countries or utilities willing to undertake to establish a transport system within their own country COGEMA is prepared to contribute to this task on terms to be agreed [fr

  9. United Kingdom experience in plutonium transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This paper describes the extensive experience of the UKAEA and British Nuclear Fuels Limited in transporting plutonium within the UK over the last 20 years and to destinations overseas since the early 1960s. The aspects covered include: the form of plutonium transported (nitrate, oxide, mixed oxide etc.); UK and international regulations (e.g. covering safety and safeguards matters); insurance; container design; mode of transport; physical protection; and a safety analysis. Costs are estimated to be largely independent of quantity

  10. Field experiments on airborne moisture transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldengarm, J.; Gids, W.F. de

    1990-01-01

    Within the framework of the Dutch participation in the IEA Annex XIV “Condensation” field experiments have been carried out to study airbome moisture transport in realistic circumstances. The experiments were done in an unoccupied 3-story dwelling in Leidschendam in the Netherlands. Some of the

  11. Neutralized transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Shuman, D.B.; Vanecek, D.L.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Thoma, C.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Kaganovich, I.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental details on providing active neutralization of high brightness ion beam have been demonstrated for Heavy Ion Fusion program. A K + beam was extracted from a variable-perveance injector and transported through 2.4 m long quadrupole lattice for final focusing. Neutralization was provided by a localized cathode arc plasma plug and a RF volume plasma system. Effects of beam perveance, emittance, convergence focusing angle, and axial focusing position on neutralization have been investigated. Good agreement has been observed with theory and experiment throughout the study

  12. Plasma thermal energy transport: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppi, B.

    Experiments on the transport across the magnetic field of electron thermal energy are reviewed (Alcator, Frascati Torus). In order to explain the experimental results, a transport model is described that reconfirmed the need to have an expression for the local diffusion coefficient with a negative exponent of the electron temperature

  13. Ruthenium transport experiments in air ingress accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teemu, Karkele; Ulrika, Backman; Ari, Auvinen; Unto, Tapper; Jorma, Jokiniemi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Fine Particles (Finland); Riitta, Zilliacus; Maija, Lipponen; Tommi, Kekki [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Accident Management (Finland); Jorma, Jokiniemi [Kuopio Univ., Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Fine Particle and Aerosol Technology Lab. (Finland)

    2007-07-01

    In this study the release, transport and speciation of ruthenium in conditions simulating an air ingress accident was studied. Ruthenium dioxide was exposed to oxidising environment at high temperature (1100-1700 K) in a tubular flow furnace. At these conditions volatile ruthenium species were formed. A large fraction of the released ruthenium was deposited in the tube as RuO{sub 2}. Depending on the experimental conditions 1-26 wt% of the released ruthenium was trapped in the outlet filter as RuO{sub 2} particles. In stainless steel tube 0-8.8 wt% of the released ruthenium reached the trapping bottle as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. A few experiments were carried out, in which revaporization of ruthenium deposited on the tube walls was studied. In these experiments, oxidation of RuO{sub 2} took place at a lower temperature. During revaporization experiments 35-65 % of ruthenium was transported as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution 4 experiments were carried out using a radioactive tracer. In these experiments ruthenium profiles were measured. These experiments showed that the most important retention mechanism was decomposition of gaseous RuO{sub 3} into RuO{sub 2} as the temperature of the furnace was decreasing. In these experiments the transport rate of gaseous ruthenium was decreasing while the release rate was constant.

  14. Air medical transportation in India: Our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Himanshu; Mehta, Yatin; Dubey, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Long distance air travel for medical needs is on the increase worldwide. The condition of some patients necessitates specially modified aircraft, and monitoring and interventions during transport by trained medical personnel. This article presents our experience in domestic and international interhospital air medical transportation from January 2010 to January 2014. Hospital records of all air medical transportation undertaken to the institute during the period were analyzed for demographics, primary etiology, and events during transport. 586 patients, 453 (77.3%) males and 133 (22.6%) females of ages 46.7 ± 12.6 years and 53.4 ± 9.7 years were transported by us to the institute. It took 3030 flying hours with an average of 474 ± 72 min for each mission. The most common indication for transport was cardiovascular diseases in 210 (35.8%) and central nervous system disease in 120 (20.4%) cases. The overall complication rate was 5.3% There was no transport related mortality. Cardiac and central nervous system ailments are the most common indication for air medical transportation. These patients may need attention and interventions as any critical patient in the hospital but in a difficult environment lacking space and help. Air medical transport carries no more risk than ground transportation.

  15. Transport of oxide spent fuel. Industrial experience of COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1983-01-01

    COGEMA is ruling all transports of spent fuel to La Hague reprocessing plant. The paper summarizes some aspects of the experience gained in this field (road, rail and sea transports) and describes the standards defined by COGEMA as regards transport casks. These standards are as follows: - casks of dry type, - casks of the maximum size compatible with rail transports, - capability to be unloaded with standardized equipment and following standard procedures

  16. Experience feedback from the transportation of Framatome fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, M.E.; Gaillard, G.; Aubin, C.

    1998-01-01

    Framatome, the foremost world nuclear fuel manufacturer, has for 25 years been delivering fuel elements from its three factories (Dessel, Romans, Pierrelatte) to the various sites in France and abroad (Germany, Sweden, Belgium, China, Korea, South Africa, Switzerland). During this period, Framatome has built up experience and expertise in fuel element transportation by road, rail and sea. In this filed, the range of constraints is very wide: safety and environmental protection constraints; constraints arising from the control and protection of nuclear materials, contractual and financial constraints, media watchdogs. Through the experience feedback from the transportation of FRAMATOME assemblies, this paper addresses all the phases in the transportation of fresh fuel assemblies. (authors)

  17. FOREIGN EXPERIENCE OF MANAGEMENT AND NORMATIVELY-LEGAL ADJUSTING BY INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Grigorievna Kuftinova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article foreign experience of management is examined by international transportations and prospects of development of management information by bus transportations and transportations of loads. Normatively-legal adjusting, basic norms of domestic law as article of intergovernmental agreements on international transportations.

  18. DOE's foreign research reactor transportation services contract: Perspective and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, John

    1997-01-01

    DOE committed to low- and moderate-income countries participating in the foreign research reactor spent fuel returns program that the United States government would provide for the transportation of the spent fuel. In fulfillment of that commitment, DOE entered into transportation services contracts with qualified, private-sector firms. NAC will discuss its experience as a transportation services provider, including range of services available to the foreign reactors, advantages to DOE and to the foreign research reactors, access to contract services by high income countries and potential advantages, and experience with initial tasks performed under the contract. (author)

  19. Comparison of three labeled silica nanoparticles used as tracers in transport experiments in porous media. Part II: Transport experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M.-F.; Barthès, Véronique; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Three types of labeled silica nanoparticles were used in transport experiments in saturated sand. The goal of this study was to evaluate both the efficiency of labeling techniques (fluorescence (FITC), metal (Ag(0) core) and radioactivity ( 110m Ag(0) core)) in realistic transport conditions and the reactive transport of silica nanocolloids of variable size and concentration in porous media. Experimental results obtained under contrasted experimental conditions revealed that deposition in sand is controlled by nanoparticles size and ionic strength of the solution. A mathematical model is proposed to quantitatively describe colloid transport. Fluorescent labeling is widely used to study fate of colloids in soils but was the less sensitive one. Ag(0) labeling with ICP-MS detection was found to be very sensitive to measure deposition profiles. Radiolabeled ( 110m Ag(0)) nanoparticles permitted in situ detection. Results obtained with radiolabeled nanoparticles are wholly original and might be used for improving the modeling of deposition and release dynamics. -- Highlights: • Three kinds of labeled nanotracers were used in transport experiments in sand columns. • They were used as surrogates of silica nanoparticles or mineral colloid. • Deposition depending on colloid size and ionic strength was observed and modeled. • Fluorescence labeling had the worse detection limit but was the more convenient. • Radiolabeled nanotracers were detected in situ in a non destructive way. -- Follow the kinetics of transport, deposition and release of silica nanoparticles with suitably labeled nanoparticles

  20. Plans for longitudinal and transverse neutralized beam compression experiments, and initial results from solenoid transport experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Armijo, J.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Molvik, A.W.; Rose, D.V.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.; Vay, J.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents plans for neutralized drift compression experiments, precursors to future target heating experiments. The target-physics objective is to study warm dense matter (WDM) using short-duration (∼1 ns) ion beams that enter the targets at energies just above that at which dE/dx is maximal. High intensity on target is to be achieved by a combination of longitudinal compression and transverse focusing. This work will build upon recent success in longitudinal compression, where the ion beam was compressed lengthwise by a factor of more than 50 by first applying a linear head-to-tail velocity tilt to the beam, and then allowing the beam to drift through a dense, neutralizing background plasma. Studies on a novel pulse line ion accelerator were also carried out. It is planned to demonstrate simultaneous transverse focusing and longitudinal compression in a series of future experiments, thereby achieving conditions suitable for future WDM target experiments. Future experiments may use solenoids for transverse focusing of un-neutralized ion beams during acceleration. Recent results are reported in the transport of a high-perveance heavy ion beam in a solenoid transport channel. The principal objectives of this solenoid transport experiment are to match and transport a space-charge-dominated ion beam, and to study associated electron-cloud and gas effects that may limit the beam quality in a solenoid transport system. Ideally, the beam will establish a Brillouin-flow condition (rotation at one-half the cyclotron frequency). Other mechanisms that potentially degrade beam quality are being studied, such as focusing-field aberrations, beam halo, and separation of lattice focusing elements

  1. Perturbative Heat Transport Experiments on TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguilor, S.; Castejon, F.; Luna, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Likin, K.; Fernandez, A.; Tj-II, T.

    2002-01-01

    Heat wave experiments are performed on TJ-II stellarator plasmas to estimate both heat diffusivity and power deposition profiles. High frequency ECRH modulation experiments are used to obtain the power deposition profiles, which is observed to be wider and duller than estimated by tracing techniques. The causes of this difference are discussed in the paper. Fourier analysis techniques are used to estimate the heat diffusivity in low frequency ECRH modulation experiments. This include the power deposition profile as a new ingredient. ECHR switch on/off experiments are exploited to obtain power deposition and heat diffusivities profile. Those quantities are compared with the obtained by modulation experiments and transport analysis, showing a good agreement. (Author) 18 refs

  2. Perturbative Heat Transport Experiments on TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguilor, S.; Castejon, F.; Luna, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Likin, K.; Fernandez, A.; Tj-II, T.

    2002-07-01

    Heat wave experiments are performed on TJ-II stellarator plasmas to estimate both heat diffusivity and power deposition profiles. High frequency ECRH modulation experiments are used to obtain the power deposition profiles, which is observed to be wider and duller than estimated by tracing techniques. The causes of this difference are discussed in the paper. Fourier analysis techniques are used to estimate the heat diffusivity in low frequency ECRH modulation experiments. This include the power deposition profile as a new ingredient. ECHR switch on/off experiments are exploited to obtain power deposition and heat diffusivities profile. Those quantities are compared with the obtained by modulation experiments and transport analysis, showing a good agreement. (Author) 18 refs.

  3. Spent fuel and HLW transportation the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Charles, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    With 53 nuclear power plants in operation at EDF and a fuel cycle with recycling policy of the valuable materials, COGEMA is faced with the transport of a wide range of radioactive materials. In this framework, the transport activity is a key link in closing the fuel cycle. COGEMA has developed a comprehensive Transport Organization System dealing with all the sectors of the fuel cycle. The paper will describe the status of transportation of spent fuel and HLW in France and the experience gathered. The Transport Organization System clearly defines the role of all actors where COGEMA, acting as the general coordinator, specifies the tasks to be performed and brings technical and commercial support to its various subcontractors: TRANSNUCLEAIRE, specialized in casks engineering and transport operations, supplies packaging and performs transport operations, LEMARECHAL and CELESTIN operate transport by truck in the Vicinity of the nuclear sites while French Railways are in charge of spent fuel transport by train. HLW issued from the French nuclear program is stored for 30 years in an intermediate storage installation located at the La Hague reprocessing plant. Ultimately, these canisters will be transported to the disposal site. COGEMA has set up a comprehensive transport organization covering all operational aspects including adapted procedures, maintenance programs and personnel qualification

  4. Radon transport in fractured soil. Laboratory experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, A.

    1997-10-01

    Radon (Rn-222) transport in fractured soil has been investigated by laboratory experiments and by modelling. Radon transport experiments have been performed with two sand columns (homogeneous and inhomogeneous) and one undisturbed clayey till column containing a net of preferential flow paths (root holes). A numerical model (the finite-element model FRACTRAN) and an analytic model (a pinhole model) have been applied in simulations if soil gas and radon transport in fractured soil. Experiments and model calculations are included in a discussion of radon entry rates into houses placed on fractured soil. The main conclusion is, that fractures does not in general alter transport of internally generated radon out of soil, when the pressure and flow conditions in the soil is comparable to the conditions prevailing under a house. This indicates the important result, that fractures in soil have no impact on radon entry into a house beyond that of an increased gas permeability, but a more thorough investigation of this subject is needed. Only in the case where the soil is exposed to large pressure gradients, relative to gradients induced by a house, may it be possible to observe effects of radon exchange between fractures and matrix. (au) 52 tabs., 60 ill., 5 refs

  5. Radon transport in fractured soil. Laboratory experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, A

    1997-10-01

    Radon (Rn-222) transport in fractured soil has been investigated by laboratory experiments and by modelling. Radon transport experiments have been performed with two sand columns (homogeneous and inhomogeneous) and one undisturbed clayey till column containing a net of preferential flow paths (root holes). A numerical model (the finite-element model FRACTRAN) and an analytic model (a pinhole model) have been applied in simulations if soil gas and radon transport in fractured soil. Experiments and model calculations are included in a discussion of radon entry rates into houses placed on fractured soil. The main conclusion is, that fractures does not in general alter transport of internally generated radon out of soil, when the pressure and flow conditions in the soil is comparable to the conditions prevailing under a house. This indicates the important result, that fractures in soil have no impact on radon entry into a house beyond that of an increased gas permeability, but a more thorough investigation of this subject is needed. Only in the case where the soil is exposed to large pressure gradients, relative to gradients induced by a house, may it be possible to observe effects of radon exchange between fractures and matrix. (au) 52 tabs., 60 ill., 5 refs.

  6. Transport analysis of TFTR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.; McCune, D.; Zarnstorff, M.; Hammett, G.; Scott, S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to complete the analysis of TFTR data which was under progress. The main emphasis was to study the effects of heating profile and resulting density and temperature profiles on transport through the comparison between beam heated plasmas with hollow and centrally peaked heating profiles (edge vs. center heating). The analysis has been completed and a manuscript has been prepared for publication in Nuclear Fusion. A proposal to perform a similar experiment using ICRF heating to decouple heating profile effects from density profile effects was submitted and was approved by the TFTR. ICRF heating enables the heating profile and the power partition between ions and electrons to be controlled. The experiment was scheduled twice, but it had to be postponed both times

  7. Ben Macdhui High Altitude Trace Gas and Aerosol Transport Experiment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Piketh, SJ

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ben Macdhui High Altitude Aerosol and Trace Gas Transport Experiment (BHATTEX) was started to characterize the nature and magnitude of atmospheric, aerosol and trace gas transport paths recirculation over and exiting from southern Africa...

  8. High current beam transport experiments at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klabunde, J.; Schonlein, A.; Spadtke, P.

    1985-01-01

    The status of the high current ion beam transport experiment is reported. 190 keV Ar 1+ ions were injected into six periods of a magnetic quadrupole channel. Since the pulse length is > 0.5 ms partial space charge neutralization occurs. In our experiments, the behavior of unneutralized and partially space charge compensated beams is compared. With an unneutralized beam, emittance growth has been measured for high intensities even in case of the zero-current phase advance sigma 0 0 . This initial emittance growth at high tune depression we attribute to the homogenization effect of the space charge density. An analytical formula based on this assumption describes the emittance growth very well. Furthermore the predicted envelope instabilities for sigma 0 > 90 0 were observed even after 6 periods. In agreement with the theory, unstable beam transport was also experimentally found if a beam with different emittances in the two transverse phase planes was injected into the transport channel. Although the space charge force is reduced for a partially neutralized beam a deterioration of the beam quality was measured in a certain range of beam parameters. Only in the range where an unneutralized beam shows the initial emittance growth, the partial neutralization reduces this effect, otherwise the partially neutralized beam is more unstable

  9. Stochastic analysis of transport of conservative solutes in caisson experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagan, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted in the past a series of experiments of transport of conservative and reactive solutes. The experimental setup and the experimental results are presented in a series of reports. The main aim of the experiments was to validate models of transport of solutes in unsaturated flow at the caisson intermediate scale, which is much larger than the one pertaining to laboratory columns. First attempts to analyze the experimental results were by one-dimensional convective-dispersion models. These models could not explain the observed solute breakthrough curves and particularly the large solute dispersion in the caisson effluent Since there were some question marks about the uniformity of water distribution at the caisson top, the transport experiments were repeated under conditions of saturated flow. In these experiments constant heads were applied at the top and the bottom of the caisson and the number of concentration monitoring stations was quadrupled. The analysis of the measurements by the same one-dimensional model indicated clearly that the fitted dispersivity is much larger than the pore-sole dispersivity and that it grows with the distance in an approximately linear fashion. This led to the conclusion, raised before, that transport in the caisson is dominated by heterogeneity effects, i.e. by spatial variability of the material Such effects cannot be captured by traditional one-dimensional models. In order to account for the effect of heterogeneity, the saturated flow experiments have been analyzed by using stochastic transport modeling. The apparent linear growth of dispersivity with distance suggested that the system behaves like a stratified one. Consequently, the model of Dagan and Bresier has been adopted in order to interpret concentration measurements. In this simple model the caisson is viewed as a bundle of columns of different permeabilities, which are characterized by a p.d.f. (probability denasity function)

  10. Quadrupole transport experiment with space charge dominated cesium ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.; Rosenblum, S.; Tiefenback, M.; Warwick, A.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of the experiment is to investigate the beam current transport limit in a long quadrupole-focussed transport channel in the space charge dominated region where the space charge defocussing force is almost as large as the average focussing force of the channel

  11. Results from transient transport experiments in Rijnhuizen tokamak project: Heat convection, transport barriers and 'non-local' effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Kloe, J. de; Lopez Cardozo, N.J.; Schilham, A.M.R.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of experimental transport studies performed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) using transient transport techniques in both Ohmic and ECH dominated plasmas is presented. Modulated Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) and oblique pellet injection (OPI) have been used to induce electron temperature (T e ) perturbations at different radial locations. These were used to probe the electron transport barriers observed near low order rational magnetic surfaces in ECH dominated steady-state RTP plasmas. Layers of inward electron heat convection in off-axis ECH plasmas were detected with modulated ECH. This suggests that RTP electron transport barriers consist of heat pinch layers rather than layers of low thermal diffusivity. In a different set of experiments, OPI triggered a transient rise of the core T e due to an increase of the T e gradient in the 1< q<2 region. These transient transport barriers were probed with modulated ECH and found to be due to a transient drop of the electron heat diffusivity, except for off-axis ECH plasmas, where a transient inward pinch is also observed. Transient transport studies in RTP could not solve this puzzling interplay between heat diffusion and convection in determining an electron transport barrier. They nevertheless provided challenging experimental evidence both for theoretical modelling and for future experiments. (author)

  12. High current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Prost

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the U.S. program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density ∼0.2  μC/m over long pulse durations (4  μs in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo, and electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K^{+} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius for which the transverse phase space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor (≈80% is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss, even though the initial beam distribution is not ideal (but the emittance is low nor in thermal equilibrium. We achieved good envelope control, and rematching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  13. Perturbative transport experiments in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Sozzi, C. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Kinsey, J. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (United States); Budny, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, New Jersey (United States); Coffey, I.; Parail, V.; Walden, A. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Garzotti, L. [Istituto Gas Ionizzati, Padova (Italy); Ingesson, C. [FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kissick, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Perturbative transport experiments have been performed in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas either in conditions of fully developed Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) or during a phase where an ITB was not observed. Transient peripheral cooling was induced by either Laser Ablation or Shallow Pellet Injection and the ensuing travelling cold pulse was used to probe the plasma transport in the electron and, for the first time, also in the ion channel. Cold pulses travelling through ITBs are observed to erode the ITB outer part, but, if the inner ITB portion survives, it strongly damps the propagating wave. The result is discussed in the context of proposed possible pictures for ITB formation. In the absence of an ITB, the cold pulse shows a fast propagation in the outer plasma half, which is consistent with a region of stiff transport, while in the inner half it slows down but shows the peculiar feature of amplitude growing while propagating. The data are powerful tests for the validation of theoretical transport models. (author)

  14. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eylon, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States)]. E-mail: S_Eylon@lbl.gov; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States); Roy, P.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States); Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-05-21

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons.

  15. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons

  16. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P. K.; Yu, S. S.

    2005-05-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons.

  17. The TN-GEMINI: experience on a versatile alpha waste transport container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, V.; Chanzy, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper discusses experience gained in moving alpha wastes and its teachings regarding transport aspects of D and D. Alpha wastes are generated in fuel cycle facilities such as those involved in reprocessing, in manufacture of mixed oxide fuel, and by research laboratories. If a significant amount of wastes has to be transported, then a Type B packaging is required. Developed by Transnucleaire and COGEMA, the TN GEMINI container enables nuclear facilities operators to optimise their alpha waste transport management, and more generally contribute to their D and D projects. After describing succinctly the design of the TN GEMINI, the paper will explain how the packaging is being operated. Teachings from experience will be shared. (orig.)

  18. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  19. Field tracer transport experiments at the site of Canada's underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.H.; Davison, C.C.; Vandergraaf, T.T.; Scheier, N.W.; Kozak, E.T.

    1997-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the processes affecting solute transport in fractured crystalline rock, groundwater tracer experiments are being performed within natural fracture domains and excavation damage zones at various scales at the site of AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The main objective of these experiments is to develop and demonstrate methods for characterizing the solute transport properties within fractured crystalline rock. Estimates of these properties are in turn being used in AECL's conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport through the geosphere surrounding a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. (author)

  20. 30 years of experience in safe transportation of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, K.

    2004-01-01

    In April 2003, Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd. (NFT) marked the 30 th anniversary of its founding. NFT was established in 1973 and in 1978, commenced SF transport to the reprocessing plant in Tokai-mura. And then, after making preparations to transport nuclear materials to the various facilities at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Center in Rokkasho-mura, NFT successfully started transportation of LLW (low level waste) to Rokksho-mura's LLW disposal center in 1992, domestic land transportation of HLW returned from overseas to the HLW storage center in 1995, domestic land transportation of natural hexafluoride delivered from overseas to the uranium enrichment plant in 1996, and transportation of SF to the reprocessing plant in 2000. NFT has realized an annual SF transportation capacity of 300 MTU and is currently making great company wide efforts to meet the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant's future SF annual reprocessing capacity of 800MTU. At the end of FY2003, NFT had successfully transported 560 casks (about 1,730 MTU) of SF in more than 200 voyages in total, about 160,000 drums of LLW in around 100 voyages in total. This paper introduces the record of safe transport and its experience over the past 30 years and prospect for future transport business

  1. 30 years of experience in safe transportation of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, K. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    In April 2003, Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd. (NFT) marked the 30{sup th} anniversary of its founding. NFT was established in 1973 and in 1978, commenced SF transport to the reprocessing plant in Tokai-mura. And then, after making preparations to transport nuclear materials to the various facilities at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Center in Rokkasho-mura, NFT successfully started transportation of LLW (low level waste) to Rokksho-mura's LLW disposal center in 1992, domestic land transportation of HLW returned from overseas to the HLW storage center in 1995, domestic land transportation of natural hexafluoride delivered from overseas to the uranium enrichment plant in 1996, and transportation of SF to the reprocessing plant in 2000. NFT has realized an annual SF transportation capacity of 300 MTU and is currently making great company wide efforts to meet the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant's future SF annual reprocessing capacity of 800MTU. At the end of FY2003, NFT had successfully transported 560 casks (about 1,730 MTU) of SF in more than 200 voyages in total, about 160,000 drums of LLW in around 100 voyages in total. This paper introduces the record of safe transport and its experience over the past 30 years and prospect for future transport business.

  2. Bacterial transport in heterogeneous porous media: Observations from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, S. E.; Dunlap, R.; Fletcher, M.; Schneegurt, M. A.

    2001-11-01

    Transport of bacteria through heterogeneous porous media was investigated in small-scale columns packed with sand and in a tank designed to allow the hydraulic conductivity to vary as a two-dimensional, lognormally distributed, second-order stationary, exponentially correlated random field. The bacteria were Pseudomonas ftuorescens R8, a strain demonstrating appreciable attachment to surfaces, and strain Ml, a transposon mutant of strain R8 with reduced attachment ability. In bench top, sand-filled columns, transport was determined by measuring intensity of fluorescence of stained cells in the effluent or by measuring radiolabeled cells that were retained in the sand columns. Results demonstrated that strain Ml was transported more efficiently than strain R8 through columns packed with either a homogeneous silica sand or a more heterogeneous sand with iron oxide coatings. Two experiments conducted in the tank involved monitoring transport of bacteria to wells via sampling from wells and sample ports in the tank. Bacterial numbers were determined by direct plate count. At the end of the first experiment, the distribution of the bacteria in the sediment was determined by destructive sampling and plating. The two experiments produced bacterial breakthrough curves that were quite similar even though the similarity between the two porous media was limited to first- and second-order statistical moments. This result appears consistent with the concept of large-scale, average behavior such as has been observed for the transport of conservative chemical tracers. The transported bacteria arrived simultaneously with a conservative chemical tracer (although at significantly lower normalized concentration than the tracer). However, the bacterial breakthrough curves showed significant late time tailing. The concentrations of bacteria attached to the sediment surfaces showed considerably more spatial variation than did the concentrations of bacteria in the fluid phase. This

  3. IPROP simulations of the GAMBLE II proton transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The author has simulated the proton transport of the 6-kA, 1-MV GAMBLE II experiment using a modified version of the IPROP particle-in-cell code. IPROP now uses a hybrid model in which plasma electrons are divided into high-energy macro particle and thermal-fluid components. This model includes open-quotes knock-onclose quotes bound-electron collision and runaway sources for high-energy electrons. Using IPROP, the authors has calculated net currents in reasonable agreement with the experiment ranging from 5-11% of the total current in pressures from 0.25-4 torr helium. In the simulations, the pinch current sample by the 1.5-cm beam was 2-3 times larger than the net current at 4 cm radius. The attenuation of net current at larger radii was the result of a highly-conductive energetic component of plasma electrons surrounding the beam. Having benchmarked IPROP against experiment, the author has examined higher-current ion beams with respect to possible transport for inertial confinement fusion

  4. Transport of significant metals recovered in real sea experiment of adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Hayato; Tamada, Masao; Kasai, Noboru; Katakai, Akio; Hasegawa, Shin; Seko, Noriaki; Sugo, Takanobu; Kawabata, Yukiya

    2001-10-01

    Real sea experiment for the recovery of significant metals such as uranium and vanadium which dissolved in seawater with extremely low concentration has been carried out at the offing of Mutsu establishment to evaluate the adsorption performance of adsorbent synthesized by radiation-induced graft-polymerization. The significant metals of uranium and vanadium eluted from the adsorbent which was soaked in the real sea were adsorbed onto the conventional chelate resin. The chelate resin which adsorbed the metals was packed in a plastic (PVC) column and further put in a cylindrical stainless transport container. This container was transported to the facility for separation and purification by a truck for the exclusive loading. Then the recovers metals were purified there. The recovered metals contained the uranium of 150g (1.92 MBq) and less in one recovery experiment. The maximum concentration is 60 Bq/g when the uranium is adsorbed on the chelate resin. Transport of recovered metals can be treated as general substance since these amount and concentration are out of legal control. However, the recovered metals were transported in conformity to L type Transport as a voluntary regulation. Though there is no requirements of structural strength for L type package legally, the structural strength of container was designed on that of IP-2 type which is higher transport grade than L type to take its safety measure. Its strength analysis proved the safety under general transport process. The transport was based on the plan made in advance. (author)

  5. The French nuclear safety authority's experience with radioactive transport inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, E.; Aguilar, J.

    2004-01-01

    About 300,000 radioactive material packages are transported annually in France. Most consist of radioisotopes for medical, pharmaceutical or industrial use. On the other hand, the nuclear industry deals with the transport of fuel cycle materials (uranium, fuel assemblies, etc.) and waste from power plants, reprocessing plants and research centers. France is also a transit country for shipments such as spent fuel packages from Switzerland or Germany, which are bound for Sellafield in Great Britain. The French nuclear safety authority (DGSNR: Directorate General for Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection) has been responsible since 1997 for the safety of radioactive material transport. This paper presents DGNSR's experience with transport inspection: a feedback of key points based on 300 inspections achieved during the past five years is given

  6. Used Fuel Logistics: Decades of Experience with transportation and Interim storage solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orban, G.; Shelton, C.

    2015-07-01

    Used fuel inventories are growing worldwide. While some countries have opted for a closed cycle with recycling, numerous countries must expand their interim storage solutions as implementation of permanent repositories is taking more time than foreseen. In both cases transportation capabilities will have to be developed. AREVA TN has an unparalleled expertise with transportation of used fuel. For more than 50 years AREVA TN has safely shipped more than 7,000 used fuel transport casks. The transportation model that was initially developed in the 1970s has been adapted and enhanced over the years to meet more restrictive regulatory requirements and evolving customer needs, and to address public concerns. The numerous “lessons learned” have offered data and guidance that have allowed for also efficient and consistent improvement over the decades. AREVA TN has also an extensive experience with interim dry storage solutions in many countries on-site but also is working with partners to developed consolidated interim storage facility. Both expertise with storage and transportation contribute to safe, secure and smooth continuity of the operations. This paper will describe decades of experience with a very successful transportation program as well as interim storage solutions. (Author)

  7. Some UK experience and practice in the packaging and transport of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edney, C.J.; Rutter, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The origin and growth of irradiated fuel transport within and to the U.K. is described and the role of the organisations presently carrying out transport operations is explained. An explanation of the relevant U.K. regulations and laws affecting irradiated fuel transport and the role of the controlling body, the Department of the Environment is given. An explanation is given of the technical requirements for the transport of irradiated Magnox fuel and of the type of flask used, and the transport arrangements, both within the U.K. and to the U.K., from overseas is discussed. The technical requirements for the transport of C.A.G.R. fuel are outlined and the flask and transport arrangements are discussed. The transport requirements of oxide fuel from water reactors is outlined and the flask and shipping arrangements under which this fuel is brought to the U.K. from overseas is explained. The shipping arrangements are explained with particular reference to current international and national requirements. The requirements of the transport of M.T.R. fuel are discussed and the flask type explained. The expected future expansion of the transport of irradiated fuel within and to the U.K. is outlined and the proposed operating methods are briefly discussed. A summary is given of the U.K. experience and the lessons to be drawn from that experience

  8. Computer-assisted comparison of analysis and test results in transportation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.D.; Ammerman, D.J.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    As a part of its ongoing research efforts, Sandia National Laboratories' Transportation Surety Center investigates the integrity of various containment methods for hazardous materials transport, subject to anomalous structural and thermal events such as free-fall impacts, collisions, and fires in both open and confined areas. Since it is not possible to conduct field experiments for every set of possible conditions under which an actual transportation accident might occur, accurate modeling methods must be developed which will yield reliable simulations of the effects of accident events under various scenarios. This requires computer software which is capable of assimilating and processing data from experiments performed as benchmarks, as well as data obtained from numerical models that simulate the experiment. Software tools which can present all of these results in a meaningful and useful way to the analyst are a critical aspect of this process. The purpose of this work is to provide software resources on a long term basis, and to ensure that the data visualization capabilities of the Center keep pace with advancing technology. This will provide leverage for its modeling and analysis abilities in a rapidly evolving hardware/software environment

  9. Required momentum, heat, and mass transport experiments for liquid-metal blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Sze, D.K.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Through the effects on fluid flow, many aspects of blanket behavior are affected by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, including pressure drop, heat transfer, mass transfer, and structural behavior. In this paper, a set of experiments is examined that could be performed in order to reduce the uncertainties in the highly related set of issues dealing with momentum, heat, and mass transport under the influence of a strong magnetic field (i.e., magnetic transport phenomena). By improving our basic understanding and by providing direct experimental data on blanket behavior, these experiments will lead to improved designs and an accurate assessment of the attractiveness of liquid-metal blankets

  10. My Experience. My Perspective. Transportation to Work Presents Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegers, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Transportation challenges can often be one of the biggest stumbling blocks to having a successful vocational experience. The author presents a personal account of the difficulties people with disabilities encounter in trying to get themselves to their workplaces due to the limitations of various mobility services.

  11. Nevada commercial spent nuclear fuel transportation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an historic overview of commercial reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments that have occurred in the state of Nevada, and to review the accident and incident experience for this type of shipments. Results show that between 1964 and 1990, 309 truck shipments covering approximately 40,000 miles moved through Nevada; this level of activity places Nevada tenth among the states in the number of truck shipments of SNF. For the same period, 15 rail shipments moving through the State covered approximately 6,500 miles, making Nevada 20th among the states in terms of number of rail shipments. None of these shipments had an accident or an incident associated with them. Because the data for Nevada are so limited, national data on SNF transportation and the safety of truck and rail transportation in general were also assessed

  12. Two decades' experience with interfacility transport on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, Benjamin; Cooley, Elaine; Copenhaver, William; Brierley, Kristin; Teman, Nicholas; Landis, Denise; Rycus, Peter; Hemmila, Mark; Napolitano, Lena M; Haft, Jonathan; Park, Pauline K; Bartlett, Robert H

    2014-10-01

    Interfacility transport of patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been performed in large numbers at only a few programs. Limited data are available on outcomes after ECMO transport to justify expanding or discontinuing these programs. This was a retrospective review of a 20-year, single-institution experience with interhospital ECMO transport as well as a systematic review of reports of transfers of patients on ECMO. Results of both were compared with historical data from the international registry of the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO). Between 1990 and 2012, ECMO was used to facilitate transport of 221 patients to our institution, and 135 (62%) survived to discharge. Review of an additional 27 case series describing ECMO transport of 643 patients showed an overall survival of 61%. After stratifying by age and primary indication for ECMO, survival of transported patients was not significantly different compared with all ECMO patients in the ELSO registry, with the exception of pediatric patients treated for respiratory failure (transported patients in this category had higher survival than those in the ELSO registry). Interfacility transport on ECMO is feasible and can be accomplished safely in the critically ill. Survival of transported patients is comparable to age-matched and treatment-matched ECMO patients at large. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparisons of theoretically predicted transport from ion temperature gradient instabilities to L-mode tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Wong, H.V.; Lyster, P.L.; Berk, H.L.; Denton, R.; Miner, W.H.; Valanju, P.

    1991-12-01

    The theoretical transport from kinetic micro-instabilities driven by ion temperature gradients is a sheared slab is compared to experimentally inferred transport in L-mode tokamaks. Low noise gyrokinetic simulation techniques are used to obtain the ion thermal transport coefficient X. This X is much smaller than in experiments, and so cannot explain L-mode confinement. Previous predictions based on fluid models gave much greater X than experiments. Linear and nonlinear comparisons with the fluid model show that it greatly overestimates transport for experimental parameters. In addition, disagreements among previous analytic and simulation calculations of X in the fluid model are reconciled

  14. Design and characterization of a neutralized-transport experiment for heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Henestroza

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available In heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final-focus magnet system through the fusion chamber to hit spots on the target with radii of about 2 mm. For the heavy-ion-fusion power-plant scenarios presently favored in the U.S., a substantial fraction of the ion-beam space charge must be neutralized during this final transport. The most effective neutralization technique found in numerical simulations is to pass each beam through a low-density plasma after the final focusing. To provide quantitative comparisons of these theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the neutralized-transport experiment. The experiment consists of three main sections, each with its own physics issues. The injector is designed to generate a very high-brightness, space-charge-dominated potassium beam, while still allowing variable perveance by a beam aperturing technique. The magnetic-focusing section, consisting of four pulsed quadrupoles, permits the study of magnet tuning, as well as the effects of phase-space dilution due to higher-order nonlinear fields. In the final section, the converging ion beam exiting the magnetic section is transported through a drift region with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we discuss the design and characterization of the three sections in detail and present initial results from the experiment.

  15. Nonlocal neoclassical transport in tokamak and spherical torus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W. X.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.; Hinton, F. L.; Manickam, J.; Zakharov, L. E.; White, R. B.; Kaye, S.

    2006-01-01

    Large ion orbits can produce nonlocal neoclassical effects on ion heat transport, the ambipolar radial electric field, and the bootstrap current in realistic toroidal plasmas. Using a global δf particle simulation, it is found that the conventional local, linear gradient-flux relation is broken for the ion thermal transport near the magnetic axis. With regard to the transport level, it is found that details of the ion temperature profile determine whether the transport is higher or lower when compared with the predictions of standard neoclassical theory. Particularly, this nonlocal feature is suggested to exist in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)], being consistent with NSTX experimental evidence. It is also shown that a large ion temperature gradient can increase the bootstrap current. When the plasma rotation is taken into account, the toroidal rotation gradient can drive an additional parallel flow for the ions and then additional bootstrap current, either positive or negative, depending on the gradient direction. Compared with the carbon radial force balance estimate for the neoclassical poloidal flow, our nonlocal simulation predicts a significantly deeper radial electric field well at the location of an internal transport barrier of an NSTX discharge

  16. Layered-disk transport experiments at 1.064μm and 0.355μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.; Turner, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of electron transport experiments conducted at 1.064μm and 0.355μm with the Argus Laser will be presented. The experiments were conducted at a fixed absorbed intensity and pulse width of approximately 1-2x10 14 W/cm 2 and 600 psec (FWHM) respectively. Energy on target ranged from 30 to 90 joules. To explore axial transport a variable thickness beryllium layer is coated onto an aluminum substrate. The effectiveness of electron heat conduction is studied by measuring the fall-off in aluminum x-ray yield (line and continuum) as the beryllium thickness is increased. In addition to the axial transport studies, lateral conduction is examined by placing the axial transport target onto a titanium disk

  17. Experience of European irradiated fuel transport - the first four hundred tonnes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the successful integration of the experience of its three shareholders into an international company providing an irradiated fuel transport service throughout Europe. The experience of transporting more than 400 tonnes of irradiated uranium from fifteen power reactors is used to illustrate the flexibility which the transport organisation requires when the access and handling facilities are different at almost every reactor. Variations in fuel cross sections and lengths of fuel elements used in first generation reactors created the need for first generation flasks with sufficient variants to accommodate all reactor fuels but the trend now is towards standardisation of flasks to perhaps two basic types. Increases in fuel rating have raised the flask shielding and heat dissipation requirements and have influenced the design of later flasks. More stringent criticality acceptance criteria have tended to reduce the flask capacity below the maximum number of elements which could physically be contained. Reprocessing plant acceptance criteria initiated because of the presence of substantial quantities of loose crud released in the flask and the need to transport substantial numbers of failed elements have also reduced the flask capacity. Different modes of transport have been developed to cater for the various limitations on access to reactor sites arising from geographical and routing considerations. The safety record of irradiated fuel transport is examined with explanation of the means whereby this has been achieved. The problems of programming the movement of a pool of flasks for fifteen reactors in eight countries are discussed together with the steps taken to ensure that the service operates fairly to give priority to those reactors with the greatest problems. The transport of European irradiated fuel can be presented as an example of international collaboration which works

  18. Narrative transportation and product involvement : how narrativity factors are used to enchance transportive experience in advertising for high vs. low involvement products

    OpenAIRE

    Phusapan, Panida

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines and presents how narrativity factors are used to enhance consumers‟ transportive experience when advertising for high and low involvement products. It specifically looks at processing experiences among Thai online consumers when viewing TV commercials available on a YouTube channel. The paper brings the theory of product involvement into a field of narrative transportation. Results show that narrativity factors should be used with the right balance across all narrativity l...

  19. Transport in porous media containing residual hydrocarbon. 2: Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, K.; Ziegler, J.; Burris, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    When liquid hydrocarbons or nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) become entrapped below the water table, flowing ground waters carry soluble NAPL components away from the spill zone. Transport of these dissolved NAPL components is controlled by several processes including advection, dispersion, sorption to aquifer materials, and liquid-liquid partitioning. To better understand these processes, miscible displacement experiments were conducted to generate break-through curves (BTCs) of pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), benzene, and toluene on sand column with and without a fixed decane residual. A departure from equilibrium transport is observed in BTCs from the sand-decane system. These BTCs show characteristics of early breakthrough, asymmetry, and tailing. The cause of nonequilibrium is hypothesized to be rate-limited solute exchange between decane and water. A new transport model, capable of handling time-dependent exchange processes, is successfully applied to reproduce experimental BATCs. Results indicate that time-dependent partitioning becomes increasingly important as the solute decane-water partition coefficient and the aqueous-phase fluid velocity increase

  20. Tsunami-induced boulder transport - combining physical experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brueckner, Helmut; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva

    2016-04-01

    Coasts are crucial areas for living, economy, recreation, transportation, and various sectors of industry. Many of them are exposed to high-energy wave events. With regard to the ongoing population growth in low-elevation coastal areas, the urgent need for developing suitable management measures, especially for hazards like tsunamis, becomes obvious. These measures require supporting tools which allow an exact estimation of impact parameters like inundation height, inundation area, and wave energy. Focussing on tsunamis, geological archives can provide essential information on frequency and magnitude on a longer time scale in order to support coastal hazard management. While fine-grained deposits may quickly be altered after deposition, multi-ton coarse clasts (boulders) may represent an information source on past tsunami events with a much higher preservation potential. Applying numerical hydrodynamic coupled boulder transport models (BTM) is a commonly used approach to analyse characteristics (e.g. wave height, flow velocity) of the corresponding tsunami. Correct computations of tsunamis and the induced boulder transport can provide essential event-specific information, including wave heights, runup and direction. Although several valuable numerical models for tsunami-induced boulder transport exist (e. g. Goto et al., 2007; Imamura et al., 2008), some important basic aspects of both tsunami hydrodynamics and corresponding boulder transport have not yet been entirely understood. Therefore, our project aims at these questions in four crucial aspects of boulder transport by a tsunami: (i) influence of sediment load, (ii) influence of complex boulder shapes other than idealized rectangular shapes, (iii) momentum transfers between multiple boulders, and (iv) influence of non-uniform bathymetries and topographies both on tsunami and boulder. The investigation of these aspects in physical experiments and the correct implementation of an advanced model is an urgent need

  1. Experience of air transport of nuclear fuel material as type A package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Masashi; Kageyama, Tomio; Suzuki, Toru

    2004-01-01

    Special law on nuclear disaster countermeasures (hereafter called as to nuclear disaster countermeasures low) that is domestic law for dealing with measures for nuclear disaster, was enforced in June, 2000. Therefore, nuclear enterprise was obliged to report accidents as required by nuclear disaster countermeasures law, besides meeting the technical requirement of existent transport regulation. For overseas procurement of plutonium reference materials that are needed for material accountability, A Type package must be transported by air. Therefore, concept of air transport of nuclear fuel materials according to the nuclear disaster countermeasures law was discussed, and the manual including measures against accident in air transport was prepared for the oversea procurement. In this presentation, the concept of air transport of A Type package containing nuclear fuel materials according to the nuclear disaster countermeasures law, and the experience of a transportation of plutonium solution from France are shown. (author)

  2. Insights into organic carbon oxidation potential during fluvial transport from laboratory and field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Dellinger, M.; Eglinton, T. I.; Fuchs, M. C.; Golombek, N.; Hilton, R. G.; Hovius, N.; Lupker, M.; Repasch, M. N.; Sachse, D.; Turowski, J. M.; Vieth-Hillebrand, A.; Wittmann, H.

    2017-12-01

    Over geologic timescales, the exchange of organic carbon (OC) between the atmosphere, hydropshere, biosphere and geosphere can be a major control on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. The carbon fluxes from the oxidation of rock-derived OC (a CO2 source) and erosion, transport, and burial of biospheric OC (a potential CO2 sink) during fluvial transit are approximately the same order of magnitude or larger than those from silicate weathering. Despite field data showing increasing oxidation of OC moving downstream in lowland rivers, it is unclear if losses occur primarily during active fluvial transport, where OC is in continual motion within an aerated river, or during periods of temporary storage in river floodplains which may be anoxic. The unknown location of OC oxidation (i.e., river vs. floodplain) limits our ability to mechanistically link geochemical and geomorphic processes which are required to develop models capable of predicting OC losses, constrain carbon budgets, and unravel links between climate, tectonics, and erosion. To fill this knowledge gap, we investigated OC oxidation in controlled laboratory experiments and a simplified field setting. We performed experiments in annular flumes that simulate fluvial transport without floodplain storage, allowing mixtures of OC-rich and siliciclastic sediment to be transported for distances of 1000 km. Preliminary experiments exploring both rock-derived and biospheric OC sources show minimal OC oxidation during active river transport, consistent with the idea that the majority of OC loss occurs during transient floodplain storage. These results are also consistent with new field data collected in the Rio Bermejo, Argentina, a lowland river traversing 800 km with no tributary inputs, where aged floodplain deposits have 3 to 10 times lower OC concentrations compared to modern river sediments. Together our field data and experiments support the hypothesis that oxidation of OC occurs primarily during

  3. Transport studies for ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, A.; Schultz, G.

    1990-07-01

    The results of a predictive study of plasma energy confinement in IGNITOR, performed with a 1 1/2-D transport code and the Tang an Redi transport model, are reported. For comparison, performance predictions for NET adopting similar assumptions on plasma transport are also presented. (author) 16 figs., 5 tabs., 13 refs

  4. Bacterial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, M. E.

    2001-12-01

    A fully instrumented research site for examining field-scale bacterial transport has been established on the eastern shore of Virginia. Studies employing intact sediment cores from the South Oyster site have been performed to examine the effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity, to derive transport parameters, and to aid in the selection of bacterial strains for use in field experiments. A variety of innovative methods for tracking bacteria were developed and evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions, providing the tools to detect target cell concentrations in groundwater down to effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on field-scale bacterial transport. The results of this research not only contribute to the development of more effective bioremediation strategies, but also have implications for a better understanding of bacterial movement in the subsurface as it relates to public health microbiology and general microbial ecology.

  5. Planning for Integrated Transport in Indonesia: Some Lessons from the UK’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yos Sunitiyoso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic congestion has been a major problem in many cities in Indonesia, thus requiring abetter transport policy. Many developed countries, including the United Kingdom, has beenimplementing the integrated transport policy to replace traditional transport policy that focuson only building roads to anticipate traffic demand. This paper provides a highlight on theimplementation of integrated transport policy in the United Kingdom. Some key issues thatcan be learnt by the Indonesian government from their experience are discussed. This includesthe integration within and between all types of transport, integration with land use planning,integration with environment policy and integration with policies for education, health andwealth creations. In the implementation, the policy requires continuity and stability inorganization and politics, coordination in local transport plans, more devolution on powerand revenue funding from the government in addition to capital funding.Key words: traffic congestion, integrated transport policy

  6. Insights into organic carbon oxidation potential during fluvial transport from controlled laboratory and natural field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Dellinger, Mathieu; Golombek, Nina; Hilton, Robert G.; Hovius, Niels; Sachse, Dirk; Turowski, Jens M.; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wittmann, Hella

    2017-04-01

    Over geologic timescales, the exchange of organic carbon (OC) between the atmosphere, biosphere and geosphere is thought to be a major control on atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, and hence global climate. The carbon fluxes from the oxidation of rock-derived OC (a CO2 source) and erosion and transport of biospheric OC (a potential CO2 sink) during fluvial transit are approximately the same order of magnitude or larger than those from silicate weathering (France-Lanord and Derry, 1997; Bouchez et al., 2010). Despite field data showing oxidation of OC moving downstream in lowland rivers, it is unclear if losses occur primarily during active fluvial transport within the river, where OC is in continual motion within an aerated environment, or during longer periods when OC is temporarily stored in river floodplains which may be anoxic. This represents a major knowledge gap, as the unknown location of OC oxidation (i.e., river vs. floodplain) limits our ability to develop process-based models that can be employed to predict OC losses, constrain carbon budgets, and unravel links between climate, tectonics, and erosion. To fill this gap, we investigated the potential for OC oxidation in both controlled laboratory experiments and a simplified field setting. We consider both rock-derived and biospheric OC. Our experiments simulated fluvial transport without floodplain storage, allowing mixtures of OC-rich and siliciclastic sediment to be transported for distances of 1000 km in annular flumes while making time-series measurements of OC concentration in both the solid (POC) and dissolved (DOC) loads, as well as measurements of rhenium concentration, which serves as a proxy for the oxidation of rock-derived OC. These transport experiments were compared to static, control experiments where water and sediment in the same proportion were placed in still water. Initial results for transport of OC-rich soil show similar behavior between the transport and static

  7. European experience with spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, I.A.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Transport Ltd has transported 5000 tonnes of spent fuel from 35 reactors in 8 European countries since 1972. Transport management is governed by the Quality Plan for: transport administration, packaging and shipment procedures at the shipping plant, operations at the power plant, and packaging and shipment organization at the power plant. Selection of a suitable carrier device is made with regard to the shipping plant requirements, physical limitations of the reactor, fuel characteristics, and transport route constraints. The transport plan is set up taking into account exploitation of the casks, reactor shut-down requirements, fuel acceptance plans at the reprocessing plant, and cask maintenance periods. A transport cycle involving spent fuel shipment to La Hague or to Sellafield takes typically two or four weeks, respectively. Most transports through Europe are by rail. A special-design railway ferry boat serves transports to the United Kingdom. Both wet or dry casks are employed. Modern casks are designed for high burnups and for oxide fuels. (J.B.)

  8. Emotionally Excited Eyeblink-Rate Variability Predicts an Experience of Transportation into the Narrative World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota eNomura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Collective spectator communications such as oral presentations, movies, and storytelling performances are ubiquitous in human culture. This study investigated the effects of past viewing experiences and differences in expressive performance on an audience’s transportive experience into a created world of a storytelling performance. In the experiment, 60 participants (mean age = 34.12 yrs., SD = 13.18 yrs., range 18–63 yrs. were assigned to watch one of two videotaped performances that were played (1 in an orthodox way for frequent viewers and (2 in a modified way aimed at easier comprehension for first-time viewers. Eyeblink synchronization among participants was quantified by employing distance-based measurements of spike trains, Dspike and Dinterval (Victor & Purpura, 1997. The results indicated that even non-familiar participants’ eyeblinks were synchronized as the story progressed and that the effect of the viewing experience on transportation was weak. Rather, the results of a multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the degrees of transportation could be predicted by a retrospectively reported humor experience and higher real-time variability (i.e., logarithmic transformed standard deviation of inter blink intervals during a performance viewing. The results are discussed from the viewpoint in which the extent of eyeblink synchronization and eyeblink-rate variability acts as an index of the inner experience of audience members.

  9. Perturbative transport experiments in JET low or reverse magnetic shear plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantica, P. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); INFM, Department of Physics, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Imbeaux, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)] (and others)

    2002-10-01

    Perturbative transport experiments have been performed in JET low or reverse magnetic shear plasmas either in conditions of fully developed internal transport barrier (ITB) or during a phase where an ITB was not observed. Transient peripheral cooling was induced either by laser ablation or by shallow pellet injection, and the ensuing travelling cold pulse was used to probe the plasma transport in the electron and, for the first time, also in the ion channel. Cold pulses travelling through ITBs are observed to erode the ITB outer part, but, if the inner ITB portion survives, it strongly damps the propagating wave. The result is discussed in the context of proposed possible pictures for ITB formation. In the absence of an ITB, the cold pulse shows a fast propagation in the outer plasma half, which is consistent with a region of stiff transport, while in the inner half it slows down but shows the peculiar feature of amplitude growing while propagating. The data are powerful tests for the validation of theoretical transport models. (author)

  10. Neutron and gamma-ray transport experiments in liquid air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    Accurate estimates of neutron and gamma radiations from a nuclear explosion and their subsequent transport through the atmosphere are vital to nuclear-weapon employment studies: i.e., for determining safety radii for aircraft crews, casualty and collateral-damage risk radii for tactical weapons, and the kill range from a high-yield defensive burst for a maneuvering reentry vehicle. Radiation transport codes, such as the Laboratory's TARTNP, are used to calculate neutron and gamma fluences. Experiments have been performed to check and update these codes. Recently, a 1.3-m-radius liquid-air (21 percent oxygen) sphere, with a pulsed source of 14-MeV neutrons at its center, was used to measure the fluence and spectra of emerging neutrons and secondary gamma rays. Comparison of measured radiation dose with TARTNP showed agreement within 10 percent

  11. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed

  12. United States experience in the transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, A.M.; Rhoads, R.E.; Hall, R.J.; Williams, L.D.; Brobst, W.A.; Shappert, L.B.; Jefferson, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    The transport of radioactive material forms a vital link in the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States. Actual U.S. experience and practice with such systems for the packaging and transport of uranium ore concentrates, uranium hexafluoride, fresh fuel, irradiated fuel, non-high-level waste, and plutonium with low heat generation rates are described. Specific shipping systems in current use for these services are illustrated. A comparison will be made of shipping requirements for nuclear parks versus dispersed facilities. Shipping systems for other fuel cycle materials (e.g., high-level waste and cladding hulls) have not been developed because there has been no need to transport these materials commercially. However, conceptual designs for packaging and transport of such materials have been developed. Selected systems are reviewed and summarized. Transport safety in the U.S. is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Key regulations defining packaging requirements, allowable radiation dose rates, and handling procedures are reviewed. Although the radioactive material shipping industry has an outstanding safety record, opposition to nuclear fuel cycle shipments has surfaced in several areas. The U.S. congressional ban on the shipment of plutonium by air, the actions of New York City to prohibit certain shipments within the city limits, and the requirement of U.S. railroads to ship spent fuel casks only in dedicated trains are reviewed. In an attempt to provide information on the safety margins inherent in the design of radioactive materials packages, ERDA has undertaken a series of accident studies and full scale crash tests that stress the packages beyond the levels expected in severe accidents. In addition, the level of total risk associated with radioactive materials shipments is being evaluated. Current ERDA crash test and transportation risk assessment studies are reviewed. Concern about the possibility of

  13. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  14. Non-LTE considerations in spectral diagnostics of thermal transport and implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.; Skupsky, S.; Delettrez, J.; Yaakobi, B.

    1984-01-01

    Recent thermal-transport and target-implosion experiments have used the emission of radiation from highly-ionized ions to signal the advance of laser-driven heat fronts and to mark the trajectories and stagnation points of imploding shells. We examine the results of such experiments with particular attention given to non-LTE effects of non-Maxwellian electrons and of finite ionization times on the populations of signature-emitting atomic species and on the formation of signature spectra and x-ray images in these experiments

  15. Fluid Physical and Transport Phenomena Studies aboard the International Space Station: Planned Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments planned for the International Spare Station. NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications has established a world-class research program in fluid physics and transport phenomena. This program combines the vast expertise of the world research community with NASA's unique microgravity facilities with the objectives of gaining new insight into fluid phenomena by removing the confounding effect of gravity. Due to its criticality to many terrestrial and space-based processes and phenomena, fluid physics and transport phenomena play a central role in the NASA's Microgravity Program. Through widely publicized research announcement and well established peer-reviews, the program has been able to attract a number of world-class researchers and acquired a critical mass of investigations that is now adding rapidly to this field. Currently there arc a total of 106 ground-based and 20 candidate flight principal investigators conducting research in four major thrust areas in the program: complex flows, multiphase flow and phase change, interfacial phenomena, and dynamics and instabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) to be launched in 1998, provides the microgravity research community with a unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-duration microgravity experiments which can be controlled and operated from the Principal Investigators' own laboratory. Frequent planned shuttle flights to the Station will provide opportunities to conduct many more experiments than were previously possible. NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of designing a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) to be located in the Laboratory Module of the ISS that will not only accommodate multiple users but, allow a broad range of fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments to be conducted in a cost effective manner.

  16. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  17. First experiment on liquid hydrogen transportation by ship inside Osaka bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, K.; Takeda, M.; Hamaura, T.; Suzuki, K.; Miyake, Y.; Matsuno, Y.; Fujikawa, S.; Kumakura, H.

    2017-12-01

    A project to import a large amount of liquid hydrogen (LH2) from Australia by a cargo carrier, which is equipped with two 1250 m3 tanks, is underway in Japan. It is important to understand sloshing and boil-off characteristics inside the LH2 tank during marine transportation. However, the LH2 sloshing and boil-off characteristics on the sea have not yet been clarified. First experiment on the LH2 transportation of 20 liter with magnesium diboride (MgB2) level sensors by the training ship “Fukae-maru”, which has 50 m long and 449 ton gross weight, was carried out successfully inside Osaka bay on February 2, 2017. In the experiment, synchronous measurements of liquid level, temperature, pressure, ship motions, and accelerations as well as the rapid depressurization test were done. The increase rate of the temperature and the pressure inside the LH2 tank were discussed under the rolling and the pitching conditions.

  18. Lived experience of involuntary transport under mental health legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Joanne; Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Stasa, Helen

    2017-12-01

    Police have historically been responsible for transporting people during a mental health crisis in Australia. A major change to the New South Wales (NSW) Mental Health Act (MHA) in 2007 expanded the range of coercive transportation agencies to include NSW Ambulance (paramedics) and NSW Health (mental health nurses). Anecdotal reports, however, describe a lack of clarity around how these changes should be implemented in practice. This research aims to explore this lack of clarity through qualitative analysis of interviews with people with the lived experience of involuntary transport under the MHA. Sixteen interviews were conducted; most (n = 14) interviews in northern NSW regions: six with people who had been transported (consumers), four with carers, and six with service providers (two police, one paramedic, and three mental health nurses). For consumers and carers, the police response was often perceived as too intense, particularly if the person was not violent. Carers were often conflicted by having to call for emergency intervention. Service providers were frustrated by a lack of a coordinated interagency response, resourcing issues, delays at emergency departments, and lack of adequate training. A central theme across all groups was the importance of communication styles. As one participant (consumer) said: 'Everybody needs a lesson in kindness'. All groups agreed that high-risk situations necessitate police involvement. However, invocation of the MHA during a high-risk situation is fraught with stress and difficulties, leaving little room for empathetic communications. Effective and diverse, evidence-based, early intervention strategies - both consensual and non-consensual - are necessary to reduce the requirement for police involvement in mental health transports. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. European experience in transport/storage cask for vitrified residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otton, Camille; Sicard, Damien

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Because of the evolution of burnup of spent fuel to be reprocessed, the high activity vitrified residues would not be transported in the existing cask designs. Therefore, TN International has decided in the late nineties to develop a brand new design of casks with optimized capacity able to store and transport the most active and hottest canisters: the TN TM 81 casks currently in use in Switzerland and the TN TM 85 cask which shall permit in the near future in Germany the storage and the transport of the most active vitrified residues defining a thermal power of 56 kW (kilowatts). The challenges for the TN TM 81 and TN TM 85 cask designs were that the geometry entry data were very restrictive and were combined with a fairly wide range set by the AREVA NC Specification relative to vitrified residue canister. The TN TM 81 and the TN TM 85 casks have been designed to fully anticipate shipment constraints of the present vitrified residue production. It also used the feedback of current shipments and the operational constraints and experience of receiving and shipping facilities. The casks had to fit as much as possible in the existing procedures for the already existing flasks such as the TN TM 28 cask and TS 28 V cask, all along the logistics chain of loading, unloading, transport and maintenance. (authors)

  20. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes by activation experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Chetvertkova, Vera

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing energies and intensities of heavy-ion accelerator facilities, the problem of an excessive activation of the accelerator components caused by beam losses becomes more and more important. Numerical experiments using Monte Carlo transport codes are performed in order to assess the levels of activation. The heavy-ion versions of the codes were released approximately a decade ago, therefore the verification is needed to be sure that they give reasonable results. Present work is...

  1. Acceleration ion focusing (IFR) and transport experiments with the recirculating linear accelerator (RLA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Smith, D.L.; Puokey, J.W.; Bennett, L.F.; Wagner, J.S.; Olson, W.R.; George, M.; Turman, B.N.; Prestwich, K.R.; Struve, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    The focusing and transport of intense relativistic electron beams in the Sandia Laboratories Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) is accomplished with the aid of an ion focusing channel (IFR). We report here experiments evaluating the beam generation in the injector and its subsequent acceleration and transport through the first post-accelerating cavity. Two injectors and one type of post-accelerating cavity were studied. Beams of 6-20 kA current were injected and successfully transported and accelerated through the cavity. The transport efficiencies were 90% - 100%, and the beam Gaussian profile (4 MeV injector) and radius (5 mm) remained the same through acceleration. We describe the RLA, present the experimental results and compare them with numerical simulations. (Author) 3 refs., 7 figs

  2. Transnucleaire's experience in maritime transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallette-Fontaine, M.

    1998-01-01

    Since the INF code requirement has been implemented in early 1995 laying down stringent requirements for ships transporting irradiated nuclear fuel, plutonium and high level radioactive waste, Transnucleaire has upgraded and operates two sister ships belonging a CMN shipping company and is well involved in the maritime transportation of radioactive materials. This paper aims at analysing the various principles implemented by Transnucleaire: operate ships such as Bouguenais and Beaulieu in compliance will all existing regulations such as INF Code, Japanese KAISA...; keep the sea transportation of nuclear material at affordable price for all nuclear organizations especially those involved in research activities; avoid for non routine transports, the use of nuclear dedicated ships often precluded by its high costs; adapt the means to all possible evolutions, i.e. be prepared to offer improved ships to satisfy all the scale of requirements; find optimised technical solutions to comply with Japanese type B ship regulations at a reasonable cost. (authors)

  3. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes by activation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkova, Vera

    2012-12-18

    With the increasing energies and intensities of heavy-ion accelerator facilities, the problem of an excessive activation of the accelerator components caused by beam losses becomes more and more important. Numerical experiments using Monte Carlo transport codes are performed in order to assess the levels of activation. The heavy-ion versions of the codes were released approximately a decade ago, therefore the verification is needed to be sure that they give reasonable results. Present work is focused on obtaining the experimental data on activation of the targets by heavy-ion beams. Several experiments were performed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung. The interaction of nitrogen, argon and uranium beams with aluminum targets, as well as interaction of nitrogen and argon beams with copper targets was studied. After the irradiation of the targets by different ion beams from the SIS18 synchrotron at GSI, the γ-spectroscopy analysis was done: the γ-spectra of the residual activity were measured, the radioactive nuclides were identified, their amount and depth distribution were detected. The obtained experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD. The discrepancies and agreements between experiment and simulations are pointed out. The origin of discrepancies is discussed. Obtained results allow for a better verification of the Monte Carlo transport codes, and also provide information for their further development. The necessity of the activation studies for accelerator applications is discussed. The limits of applicability of the heavy-ion beam-loss criteria were studied using the FLUKA code. FLUKA-simulations were done to determine the most preferable from the radiation protection point of view materials for use in accelerator components.

  4. Recommended nuclear criticality safety experiments in support of the safe transportation of fissile material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollefson, D.A.; Elliott, E.P.; Dyer, H.R.; Thompson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Validation of computer codes and nuclear data (cross-section) libraries using benchmark quality critical (or certain subcritical) experiments is an essential part of a nuclear criticality safety evaluation. The validation results establish the credibility of the calculational tools for use in evaluating a particular application. Validation of the calculational tools is addressed in several American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) standards, with ANSI/ANS-8.1 being the most relevant. Documentation of the validation is a required part of all safety analyses involving significant quantities of fissile materials. In the case of transportation of fissile materials, the safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) must contain a thorough discussion of benchmark experiments, detailing how the experiments relate to the significant packaging and contents materials (fissile, moderating, neutron absorbing) within the package. The experiments recommended in this paper are needed to address certain areas related to transportation of unirradiated fissile materials in drum-type containers (packagings) for which current data are inadequate or are lacking

  5. Flow and transport at the Las Cruces trench site: Experiment IIb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, J.; Hills, R.G. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Soil and Water Science

    1997-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has been directed by Congress in the Low Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 to develop regulatory guidance and assist the individual states and compacts in siting and assessing future low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. Three water flow and solute transport experiments were performed as part of a comprehensive field trench study near Las Cruces, New Mexico to test deterministic and stochastic models of vadose zone flow and transport. This report presents partial results from the third experiment (experiment IIb). Experiments IIa and b were conducted on the North side of the trench, on a plot 1.22 m wide by 12 m long, perpendicular to the trench. The area was drip irrigated during two time periods with water containing a variety of tracers. The advance of the water front during the two irrigation episodes was measured with tensiometers and neutron probes. Solute front positions were determined from soil solution sampling through suction samplers and from disturbed sampling. The results from experiment IIb show predominantly downward water movement through the layered unsaturated soil, as evidenced from neutron probe data and gravimetric sampling. Tritium plumes were only half as deep and half as wide as the water plumes at 310 days after the beginning of experiment IIb. Chromium, applied as Cr(VI), moved a readily as, and similar to tritium, but there was a loss of mass due to reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chloride and nitrate, initially present at high concentrations in the soil solution, were displaced by the low concentration irrigation water, resulting in chloride and nitrate concentration distributions that looked like negative images of the tritium distributions. The extensive data presented should serve well as a data base for model testing.

  6. Flow and transport at the Las Cruces trench site: Experiment IIb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinson, J.; Hills, R.G.; Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H.

    1997-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has been directed by Congress in the Low Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 to develop regulatory guidance and assist the individual states and compacts in siting and assessing future low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. Three water flow and solute transport experiments were performed as part of a comprehensive field trench study near Las Cruces, New Mexico to test deterministic and stochastic models of vadose zone flow and transport. This report presents partial results from the third experiment (experiment IIb). Experiments IIa and b were conducted on the North side of the trench, on a plot 1.22 m wide by 12 m long, perpendicular to the trench. The area was drip irrigated during two time periods with water containing a variety of tracers. The advance of the water front during the two irrigation episodes was measured with tensiometers and neutron probes. Solute front positions were determined from soil solution sampling through suction samplers and from disturbed sampling. The results from experiment IIb show predominantly downward water movement through the layered unsaturated soil, as evidenced from neutron probe data and gravimetric sampling. Tritium plumes were only half as deep and half as wide as the water plumes at 310 days after the beginning of experiment IIb. Chromium, applied as Cr(VI), moved a readily as, and similar to tritium, but there was a loss of mass due to reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chloride and nitrate, initially present at high concentrations in the soil solution, were displaced by the low concentration irrigation water, resulting in chloride and nitrate concentration distributions that looked like negative images of the tritium distributions. The extensive data presented should serve well as a data base for model testing

  7. Australian Experience in Implementing Transport Safety Regulations and Transport Security Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Australian transport safety and security regulatory framework is governed by Commonwealth, State and Territory legislations. There are eleven competent authorities in Australia that includes three Commonwealth authorities, six states and two territory authorities. IAEA Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS-R-1, 2005 edition) is applied through Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) Code of Practice for Transport of Radioactive Material 2008 by road, rail and waterways not covered by marine legislations. All states and territories apply this Transport Code through their regulatory system. For air transport, the Civil Aviation Act 1988 adopts the requirements of the ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air DOC 9284, which also adopts TS-R-1. The security of radioactive material in air transport is achieved via the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004. For sea transport Australian Marine Order 41 applies the requirements of IMDG (International Maritime Dangerous Goods) Code which also adopts TS-R-1. The security of radioactive material (nuclear material) is governed by two Commonwealth Agencies namely, ARPANSA and ASNO (Australian Safeguards and Non-proliferation Office) . ARPANSA regulates the security of radioactive sources through ARPANSA Code of Practice for the Security of Radioactive Sources 2007 which is based on the IAEA Draft Security Series. ASNO regulates security of nuclear material including U, Th and Pu through the Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act, and the object of which is to give effect to certain obligations that Australia has as a party to the NPT, Australia’s safeguards agreement with the IAEA, and other bilateral safeguards agreements and certain obligations that Australia has as a party to the Convention for the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (CPPNM). This paper presents the effectiveness of regulatory approaches for safe and secure

  8. Review of US accident/incident experience involving the transportation of radioactive material (RAM) 1971-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.D.; Emerson, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper analyzes the transportation accidents and incidents which have occurred in the United States in the period 1971-1980 based upon the information in the Radioactive Material Transportation Accident/Incident Data Base developed by the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. The accident/incident data base incorporates the files of the Hazardous Material Incident Report (HMIR) system operated by the Material Transportation Bureau of the US Department of Transportation (DOT) with additional information obtained from the files of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A principal objective of this paper is to summarize US accident/incident experience for the past ten years, providing a concise statement of radioactive material (RAM) package failure description for the transport modes of truck, rail and air

  9. Database of full-scale laboratory experiments on wave-driven sand transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Schretlen, Johanna Lidwina Maria; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom

    2009-01-01

    A new database of laboratory experiments involving sand transport processes over horizontal, mobile sand beds under full-scale non-breaking wave and non-breaking wave-plus-current conditions is described. The database contains details of the flow and bed conditions, information on which quantities

  10. Evaluation of the MOCAGE Chemistry Transport Model during the ICARTT/ITOP Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousserez, N.; Attie, J. L.; Peuch, V. H.; Michou, M.; Pfister, G.; Edwards, D.; Emmons, L.; Arnold, S.; Heckel, A.; Richter, A.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the Meteo-France global chemistry transport 3D model MOCAGE (MOdele de Chimie Atmospherique a Grande Echelle) using the important set of aircraft measurements collected during the ICARRT/ITOP experiment. This experiment took place between US and Europe during summer 2004 (July 15-August 15). Four aircraft were involved in this experiment providing a wealth of chemical data in a large area including the North East of US and western Europe. The model outputs are compared to the following species of which concentration is measured by the aircraft: OH, H2O2, CO, NO, NO2, PAN, HNO3, isoprene, ethane, HCHO and O3. Moreover, to complete this evaluation at larger scale, we used also satellite data such as SCIAMACHY NO2 and MOPITT CO. Interestingly, the comprehensive dataset allowed us to evaluate separately the model representation of emissions, transport and chemical processes. Using a daily emission source of biomass burning, we obtain a very good agreement for CO while the evaluation of NO2 points out incertainties resulting from inaccurate ratio of emission factors of NOx/CO. Moreover, the chemical behavior of O3 is satisfactory as discussed in the paper.

  11. Preliminary characterization of materials for a reactive transport model validation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.D.; Ward, D.B.; Cheng, W.C.; Bryant, C.; Chocas, C.S.; Reynolds, C.G.

    1993-01-01

    The geochemical properties of a porous sand and several tracers (Ni, Br, and Li) have been characterized for use in a caisson experiment designed to validate sorption models used in models of inactive transport. The surfaces of the sand grains have been examined by a combination of techniques including potentiometric titration, acid leaching, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The surface studies indicate the presence of small amounts of carbonate, kaolinite and iron-oxyhydroxides. Adsorption of nickel, lithium and bromide by the sand was measured using batch techniques. Bromide was not sorbed by the sand. A linear (K d ) or an isotherm sorption model may adequately describe transport of Li; however, a model describing the changes of pH and the concentrations of other solution species as a function of time and position within the caisson and the concomitant effects on Ni sorption may be required for accurate predictions of nickel transport

  12. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part F - Reactive transport modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournassat, Christophe, E-mail: c.tournassat@brgm.fr [BRGM, French Geological Survey, Orleans (France); Alt-Epping, Peter [Rock-Water Interaction Group, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern (Switzerland); Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, French Geological Survey, Orleans (France); Gimmi, Thomas [Rock-Water Interaction Group, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern (Switzerland)] [Laboratory for Waste Management, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Leupin, Olivier X. [NAGRA, CH-5430 Wettingen (Switzerland); Wersin, Paul [Gruner Ltd., CH-4020 Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Reactive transport modelling was used to simulate simultaneously solute transport, thermodynamic reactions, ion exchange and biodegradation during an in-situ experiment in a clay-rock formation. > Opalinus clay formation has a high buffering capacity in terms of chemical perturbations caused by bacterial activity. > Buffering capacity is mainly attributed to the carbonate system and to the reactivity of clay surfaces (cation exchange, pH buffering). - Abstract: Reactive transport modelling was used to simulate solute transport, thermodynamic reactions, ion exchange and biodegradation in the Porewater Chemistry (PC) experiment at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. Simulations show that the most important chemical processes controlling the fluid composition within the borehole and the surrounding formation during the experiment are ion exchange, biodegradation and dissolution/precipitation reactions involving pyrite and carbonate minerals. In contrast, thermodynamic mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions involving alumo-silicate minerals have little impact on the fluid composition on the time-scale of the experiment. With the accurate description of the initial chemical condition in the formation in combination with kinetic formulations describing the different stages of bacterial activities, it has been possible to reproduce the evolution of important system parameters, such as the pH, redox potential, total organic C, dissolved inorganic C and SO{sub 4} concentration. Leaching of glycerol from the pH-electrode may be the primary source of organic material that initiated bacterial growth, which caused the chemical perturbation in the borehole. Results from these simulations are consistent with data from the over-coring and demonstrate that the Opalinus Clay has a high buffering capacity in terms of chemical perturbations caused by bacterial activity. This buffering capacity can be attributed to the carbonate system as well as to the reactivity of

  13. Experience of European LWR irradiated fuel transport: the first five hundred tonnes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the service provided by an international company specializing in the transport of LWR irradiated fuel throughout Europe. Methods of transport used to the reprocessing plants at La Hague and Windscale include road transport of 38 te flasks over the whole route; transport of flasks between 55 and 105 te by rail, with rail-head and the reprocessing plant, where required, performed by road using heavy trailers; roll-on, roll-off sea ferries; and charter ships. Different modes of transport have been developed to cater for the various limitations on access to reactor sites arising from geographical and routing considerations. The experience of transporting more than 500 tonnes of irradiated uranium from twenty-one power reactors is used to illustrate the flexibility which the transport organization requires when the access and handling facilities are different at almost every reactor. Variations in fuel cross sections and lengths of fuel elements used in first generation reactors created the need for first generation flasks with sufficient variants to accommodate all reactor fuels but the trend now is towards standardization of flasks to perhaps two basic types. The safety record of irradiated fuel transport is examined with explanation of the means whereby this has been achieved. The problems of programming the movement of a pool of eighteen flasks for twenty-one reactors in eight countries are discussed together with the steps taken to ensure that the service operates fairly to give priority to those reactors with the greatest problems. The transport of irradiated fuel across several national frontiers is an international task which requires an international company. The transport of European irradiated fuel can be presented as an example of international collaboration which works

  14. Performance of a shallow-focus applied-magnetic-field diode for ion-beam-transport experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, F.C.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Rose, D.V. [JAYCOR, Vienna (Vatican City State, Holy See); Jones, T.G.; Oliver, B.V.

    1997-12-31

    An applied-magnetic-field ion diode to study the transport of intense ion beams for light-ion inertial confinement fusion is being operated on the Gamble II generator at NRL. A Large-area (145-cm{sup 2}), shallow-focusing diode is used to provide the ion beam required for self-pinched transport (SPT) experiments. Experiments have demonstrated focusing at 70 cm for 1.2-MV, 40-kA protons. Beyond the focus, the beam hollows out consistent with 20--30 mrad microdivergence. The effect of the counter-pulse B-field on altering the ion-beam trajectories and improving the focus has been diagnosed with a multiple-pinhole-camera using radiachromic film. This diagnostic is also used to determine the radial and azimuthal uniformity of ion emission at the anode for different B-field conditions. Increasing the diode voltage to 1.5 MV and optimizing the ion current are planned before initiating SPT experiments. Experiments to measure the spatial beam profile at focus, i.e., the SPT channel entrance, are in progress. Results are presented.

  15. Coupling between particle and heat transport during power modulation experiments in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J.F.; Bouquey, F.; Bremond, S.; Clary, J.; Darbos, C.; Eury, S.P.; Lennholm, M.; Magne, R.; Segui, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Power modulations are a powerful tool often used to investigate heat transport processes in tokamaks. In some situations, this could also be an interesting method for the investigation of the particle transport due to the anomalous pinch. Low frequency (∼ 1 Hz) power modulation experiments, using both electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), have been performed in the Tore Supra tokamak. Strong coupling has been observed between the temperature and density modulations during the low frequency ECRH and ICRH modulation experiments. It has been shown that mechanisms as outgassing, Ware pinch effect, curvature driven pinch are not likely to be responsible for this density modulation. Because of its dependence on temperature or temperature gradient, the thermodiffusion is a serious candidate to be the driving source for this density modulation. This analysis shows that low frequency power modulation experiments have a great potential for the investigation of the anomalous particle pinch in tokamaks. Future plans will include the use of more precise density profile measurements using X-mode reflectometry

  16. Coupling between particle and heat transport during power modulation experiments in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J.F.; Bouquey, F.; Bremond, S.; Clary, J.; Darbos, C.; Eury, S.P.; Lennholm, M.; Magne, R.; Segui, J.L

    2004-07-01

    Power modulations are a powerful tool often used to investigate heat transport processes in tokamaks. In some situations, this could also be an interesting method for the investigation of the particle transport due to the anomalous pinch. Low frequency ({approx} 1 Hz) power modulation experiments, using both electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), have been performed in the Tore Supra tokamak. Strong coupling has been observed between the temperature and density modulations during the low frequency ECRH and ICRH modulation experiments. It has been shown that mechanisms as outgassing, Ware pinch effect, curvature driven pinch are not likely to be responsible for this density modulation. Because of its dependence on temperature or temperature gradient, the thermodiffusion is a serious candidate to be the driving source for this density modulation. This analysis shows that low frequency power modulation experiments have a great potential for the investigation of the anomalous particle pinch in tokamaks. Future plans will include the use of more precise density profile measurements using X-mode reflectometry.

  17. Involving Freight Transport Actors in Production of Knowledge - Experience with Future Workshop Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Per Homann; Drewes, Lise

    2005-01-01

    the experience and knowledge of actors in the freight transport sector are included directly in a scientific process in order to develop future and strategic studies. Future research is often produced as desktop research and presented as the results of scientists’ forecasting and scenario building...... in the format of a future workshop included freight transport stakeholders in the research process in order to produce knowledge meeting scientific quality criteria and at the same time in a form suitable for improving the problem solving capabilities of the participants....

  18. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of 137Cs in Fracture-Fill Material. Experiments and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-29

    In this study, we demonstrate how a combination of batch sorption/desorption experiments and column transport experiments were used to effectively parameterize a model describing the colloid-facilitated transport of Cs in the Grimsel granodiorite/FFM system. Cs partition coefficient estimates onto both the colloids and the stationary media obtained from the batch experiments were used as initial estimates of partition coefficients in the column experiments, and then the column experiment results were used to obtain refined estimates of the number of different sorption sites and the adsorption and desorption rate constants of the sites. The desorption portion of the column breakthrough curves highlighted the importance of accounting for adsorption-desorption hysteresis (or a very nonlinear adsorption isotherm) of the Cs on the FFM in the model, and this portion of the breakthrough curves also dictated that there be at least two different types of sorption sites on the FFM. In the end, the two-site model parameters estimated from the column experiments provided excellent matches to the batch adsorption/desorption data, which provided a measure of assurance in the validity of the model.

  19. Analysis and modelling of power modulation experiments in JET plasmas with internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinoni, A [Politecnico di Milano, dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Mantica, P [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Euratom-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Eester, D Van [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, TEC, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Imbeaux, F [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Mantsinen, M [Helsinki University of Technology, Association Euratom-Tekes, PO Box 2200 (Finland); Hawkes, N [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Kiptily, V [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Pinches, S D [Max Plank Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Garching (Germany); Salmi, A [Helsinki University of Technology, Association Euratom-Tekes, PO Box 2200 (Finland); Sharapov, S [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Voitsekhovitch, I [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Vries, P de [FOM Institut voor Plasmafysica, Association Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein, The (Netherlands); Zastrow, K D [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-15

    Understanding the physics of internal transport barriers (ITBs) is a crucial issue in developing ITER relevant advanced tokamak scenarios. To gain new information on ITBs, RF power modulation experiments, mainly devoted to the study of electron heat transport through ITBs, have been performed on the JET tokamak. The main physics results have been reported in [1]. The present paper describes in detail the data analysis and numerical modelling work carried out for the interpretation of the experiments. ITBs located in the negative shear region behave as localized insulating layers able to stop the heat wave propagation, thus implying that the ITB is a region of low diffusivity characterized by a loss of stiffness. Various sources of spurious effects affecting the interpretation of the results are analysed and discussed. First principle based models have so far failed to predict the temperature profile in the first place, which prevented their application to modulation results, while empirical transport models have been set up and reproduce the major part of the data.

  20. Design of an intermediate-scale experiment to validate unsaturated- zone transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.D.; Hopkins, P.L.; Glass, R.J.; Ward, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    An intermediate-scale experiment is being carried out to evaluate instrumentation and models that might be used for transport-model validation for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The experimental test bed is a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson filled with quartz sand with a sorbing layer at an intermediate depth. The experiment involves the detection and prediction of the migration of fluid and tracers through an unsaturated porous medium. Pre-test design requires estimation of physical properties of the porous medium such as the relative permeability, saturation/pressure relations, porosity, and saturated hydraulic conductivity as well as geochemical properties such as surface complexation constants and empircial K d 'S. The pre-test characterization data will be used as input to several computer codes to predict the fluid flow and tracer migration. These include a coupled chemical-reaction/transport model, a stochastic model, and a deterministic model using retardation factors. The calculations will be completed prior to elution of the tracers, providing a basis for validation by comparing the predictions to observed moisture and tracer behavior

  1. Feedback from operational experience in front-end transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondonel, J.L.; Parison, C.

    1998-01-01

    Transport forms an integral part of the nuclear fuel cycle, representing the strategic link between each stage of the cycle. In a way there is a transport cycle that parallels the nuclear fuel cycle. This concerns particularly the front-end of the cycle whose steps - mining conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication - require numerous transports. Back-end shipments involve a handful of countries, but front-end transports involve all five continents, and many exotic countries. All over Europe such transports are routinely performed with an excellent safety track record. Transnucleaire dominates the French nuclear transportation market and carries out both front and back-end transports. For instance in 1996 more than 28,400 front-end packages were transported as well as more than 3,600 back-end packages. However front-end transport is now a business undergoing much change. A nuclear transportation company must now cope with an evolving picture including new technical requirements, new transportation schemes and new business conditions. This paper describes the latest evolutions in terms of front-end transportation and the way this activity is carried out by Transnucleaire, and goes on to discuss future prospects. (authors)

  2. Three-Dimensional Neutral Transport Simulations of Gas Puff Imaging Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; DIppolito, D.A.; LeBlanc, B.; Maqueda, R.J.; Myra, J.R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Zweben, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) experiments are designed to isolate the structure of plasma turbulence in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Three-dimensional aspects of this diagnostic technique as used on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) are examined via Monte Carlo neutral transport simulations. The radial width of the simulated GPI images are in rough agreement with observations. However, the simulated emission clouds are angled approximately 15 degrees with respect to the experimental images. The simulations indicate that the finite extent of the gas puff along the viewing direction does not significantly degrade the radial resolution of the diagnostic. These simulations also yield effective neutral density data that can be used in an approximate attempt to infer two-dimensional electron density and temperature profiles from the experimental images

  3. Radioactive materials transport experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langhaar, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the kinds of packaging suitable for different types of waste, the roles of highway and rail transport, restrictions imposed by political entities and carriers, and safety. The U. S. accident record is described, with some statistics given

  4. Air medical transportation in India: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Khurana

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Cardiac and central nervous system ailments are the most common indication for air medical transportation. These patients may need attention and interventions as any critical patient in the hospital but in a difficult environment lacking space and help. Air medical transport carries no more risk than ground transportation.

  5. A TCP/IP transport layer for the DAQ of the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovszky, M.

    2004-01-01

    The CMS collaboration is currently investigating various networking technologies that may meet the requirements of the CMS Data Acquisition System (DAQ). During this study, a peer transport component based on TCP/IP has been developed using object-oriented techniques for the distributed DAQ framework named XDAQ. This framework has been designed to facilitate the development of distributed data acquisition systems within the CMS Experiment. The peer transport component has to meet 3 main requirements. Firstly, it had to provide fair access to the communication medium for competing applications. Secondly, it had to provide as much of the available bandwidth to the application layer as possible. Finally, it had to hide the complexity of using non-blocking TCP/IP connections from the application layer. This paper describes the development of the peer transport component and then presents and draws conclusions on the measurements made during tests. The major topics investigated include: blocking versus non-blocking communication, TCP/IP configuration options, multi-rail connections

  6. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  7. Effects of soil type on leaching and runoff transport of rare earth elements and phosphorous in laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao; Chong, Zhongyi; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2011-01-01

    Through leaching experiments and simulated rainfall experiments, characteristics of vertical leaching of exogenous rare earth elements (REEs) and phosphorus (P) and their losses with surface runoff during simulated rainfall in different types of soils (terra nera soil, cinnamon soil, red soil, loess soil, and purple soil) were investigated. Results of the leaching experiments showed that vertical transports of REEs and P were relatively low, with transport depths less than 6 cm. The vertical leaching rates of REEs and P in the different soils followed the order of purple soil > terra nera soil > red soil > cinnamon soil > loess soil. Results of the simulated rainfall experiments (83 mm h⁻¹) revealed that more than 92% of REEs and P transported with soil particles in runoff. The loss rates of REEs and P in surface runoff in the different soil types were in the order of loess soil > terra nera soil > cinnamon soil > red soil > purple soil. The total amounts of losses of REEs and P in runoff were significantly correlated.

  8. An array of low-background 3He proportional counters for theSudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsbaugh, J.F.; Anaya, J.M.; Banar, J.; Bowles, T.J.; Browne,M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Dai, X.; H.Deng,X.; Di Marco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Esch, E.-I.; Fergani, H.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Franklin, J.E.; Geissbuehler, P.; Germani, J.V.; Goldschmidt, A.; Guillian, E.; Hallin, A.L.; Harper, G.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heise, J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Kormos, L.L.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko,K.T.; Loach, J.C.; Majerus, S.; Manor, J.; McGee, S.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, G.G.; Morissette, B.; Myers, A.; Oblath, N.S.; O' Kee, H.M.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Reitzner,S.D.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Skensved, P.; Smith, A.R.; Smith,M.W.E.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill,L.C.; Thornewell, P.M.; Tolich, N.; VanDevender, B.A.; VanWechel, T.D.; Wall, B.L.; Tseung, H.W.C.; Wendland,J.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wouters, J.M.

    2007-02-01

    An array of Neutral-Current Detectors (NCDs) has been builtin order to make a unique measurement of the total active ux of solarneutrinos in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Data in the thirdphase of the SNO experiment were collected between November 2004 andNovember 2006, after the NCD array was added to improve theneutral-current sensitivity of the SNO detector. This array consisted of36 strings of proportional counters lled with a mixture of 3He and CF4gas capable of detecting the neutrons liberated by the neutrino-deuteronneutral current reaction in the D2O, and four strings lled with a mixtureof 4He and CF4 gas for background measurements. The proportional counterdiameter is 5 cm. The total deployed array length was 398 m. The SNO NCDarray is the lowest-radioactivity large array of proportional countersever produced. This article describes the design, construction,deployment, and characterization of the NCD array, discusses theelectronics and data acquisition system, and considers event signaturesand backgrounds.

  9. High Fill-Factor Transport Experiments on the HCX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prost, L R; Seidl, P A; Lund, S M

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion induction linacs have application as drivers for high energy density physics studies and ultimately as drivers for inertial fusion energy. Experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL explore heavy-ion beam transport at high fill factors (i.e., the ratio of the maximum transverse extent of the beam to the physical aperture). The fill factor has a large impact on the cost of multi-beam induction accelerators, the 80% fill factor compared with 60% would reduce the cost of an HIF driver by about 1/3. With a coasting low-emittance 1 MeV K + beam, transport through ten electrostatic quadrupoles was achieved at high beam fill factor (80%) without observed emittance growth and with little beam loss ((le) 1%), even though the initial beam distribution is neither ideal nor in thermal equilibrium, see Figure. While 10 quadrupoles are too few for settling questions of emittance evolution in a long system, they are very relevant for studying the rapid initial evolution of the emittance and beam profile that is expected in the front end of an accelerator. Studies at higher fill factors are planned, so that the failure mode can be established. Good envelope control was achieved, suggesting that, in a longer lattice of similar design, rematching only every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) will be sufficient. Agreement was reached between an improved envelope model and the data. Improvements to the model are: realistic quadrupole fringe fields based on 3D field calculations; quadrupole E z from the 3D lattice structure and corresponding radial focusing force; and corrections due to the grounded slit plates of the intercepting diagnostics that short out the self-field of the beam near those plates. We also find that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics

  10. Carbon dioxide storage in marine sediments - dissolution, transport and hydrate formation kinetics from high-pressure experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, N. K.; Savy, J. P.; Pansegrau, M.; Aloisi, G.; Kossel, E.; Haeckel, M.

    2009-12-01

    By satisfying thermodynamic framework conditions for CO2 hydrate formation, pressures and temperatures of the deep marine environment are unique assets for sequestering CO2 in clathrates below the seabed. However, feasibility and safety of this storage option require an accurate knowledge of the rate constants governing the speed of physicochemical reactions following the injection of the liquefied gas into the sediments. High-pressure experiments designed to simulate the deep marine environment open the possibility to obtain the required parameters for a wide range of oceanic conditions. In an effort to constrain mass transfer coefficients and transport rates of CO2 in(to) the pore water of marine sediments first experiments were targeted at quantifying the rate of CO2 uptake by de-ionized water and seawater across a two-phase interface. The nature of the interface was controlled by selecting p and T to conditions within and outside the hydrate stability field (HSF) while considering both liquid and gaseous CO2. Concentration increase and hydrate growth were monitored by Raman spectroscopy. The experiments revealed anomalously fast transport rates of dissolved CO2 at conditions both inside and outside the HSF. While future experiments will further elucidate kinetics of CO2 transport and hydrate formation, these first results could have major significance to safety-related issues in the discussion of carbon storage in the marine environment.

  11. A field experiment on the controls of sediment transport on bedrock erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A. R.; Turowski, J. M.; Fritschi, B.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; Campana, L.; Lavé, J.

    2012-12-01

    The earth`s surface is naturally shaped by interactions of physical and chemical processes. In mountainous regions with steep topography river incision fundamentally controls the geomorphic evolution of the whole landscape. There, erosion of exposed bedrock sections by fluvial sediment transport is an important mechanism forming mountain river channels. The links between bedload transport and bedrock erosion has been firmly established using laboratory experiments. However, there are only few field datasets linking discharge, sediment transport, impact energy and erosion that can be used for process understanding and model evaluation. To fill this gap, a new measuring setup has been commissioned to raise an appropriate simultaneous dataset of hydraulics, sediment transport and bedrock erosion at high temporal and spatial resolution. Two natural stone slabs were installed flush with the streambed of the Erlenbach, a gauged stream in the Swiss Pre-Alps. They are mounted upon force sensors recording vertical pressure und downstream shear caused by passing sediment particles. The sediment transport rates can be assessed using geophone plates and an automated moving basket system taking short-term sediment samples. These devices are located directly downstream of the stone slabs. Bedrock erosion rates are measured continuously with erosion sensors at sub-millimeter accuracy at three points on each slab. In addition, the whole slab topography is surveyed with photogrammetry and a structured-light 3D scanner after individual flood events. Since the installation in 2011, slab bedrock erosion has been observed during several transport events. We discuss the relation between hydraulics, bedload transport, resulting pressure forces on the stone slabs and erosion rates. The aim of the study is the derivation of an empirical process law for fluvial bedrock erosion driven by moving sediment particles.

  12. Application of the three-dimensional transport code to analysis of the neutron streaming experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, K.; Slater, C.O.

    1990-01-01

    The neutron streaming through an experimental mock-up of a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) prototypic coolant pipe chaseway was recalculated with a three-dimensional discrete ordinates code. The experiment was conducted at the Tower Shielding Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1976 and 1977. The measurement of the neutron flux, using Bonner ball detectors, indicated nine orders of attenuation in the empty pipeway, which contained two 90-deg bends and was surrounded by concrete walls. The measurement data were originally analyzed using the DOT3.5 two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code. However, the results did not agree with measurement data at the bend because of the difficulties in modeling the three-dimensional configurations using two-dimensional methods. The two-dimensional calculations used a three-step procedure in which each of the three legs making the two 90-deg bends was a separate calculation. The experiment was recently analyzed with the TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code, not only to compare the calculational results with the experimental results, but also to compare with results obtained from analyses in Japan using DOT3.5, MORSE, and ENSEMBLE, which is a three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code developed in Japan

  13. Confinement and Local Transport in the National Spherical Torus Experiment NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.M.; Levinton, F.M.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Yuh, H.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Domier, C.W.; Gates, D.; Horton, W.; Kim, J.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Maingi, T.; Mazzucato, E.; Menard, J.E.; Mikkelsen, D.; Mueller, D; Park, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Smith, D.R.; Wang, W.

    2007-01-01

    NSTX operates at low aspect ratio (R/a∼1.3) and high beta (up to 40%), allowing tests of global confinement and local transport properties that have been established from higher aspect ratio devices. NSTX plasmas are heated by up to 7 MW of deuterium neutral beams with preferential electron heating as expected for ITER. Confinement scaling studies indicate a strong B T dependence, with a current dependence that is weaker than that observed at higher aspect ratio. Dimensionless scaling experiments indicate a strong increase of confinement with decreasing collisionality and a weak degradation with beta. The increase of confinement with B T is due to reduced transport in the electron channel, while the improvement with plasma current is due to reduced transport in the ion channel related to the decrease in the neoclassical transport level. Improved electron confinement has been observed in plasmas with strong reversed magnetic shear, showing the existence of an electron internal transport barrier (eITB). The development of the eITB may be associated with a reduction in the growth of microtearing modes in the plasma core. Perturbative studies show that while L-mode plasmas with reversed magnetic shear and an eITB exhibit slow changes of L Te across the profile after the pellet injection, H-mode plasmas with a monotonic q-profile and no eITB show no change in this parameter after pellet injection, indicating the existence of a critical gradient that may be related to the q-profile. Both linear and non-linear simulations indicate the potential importance of ETG modes at the lowest B T . Localized measurements of high-k fluctuations exhibit a sharp decrease in signal amplitude levels across the L-H transition, associated with a decrease in both ion and electron transport, and a decrease in calculated linear microinstability growth rates across a wide k-range, from the ITG/TEM regime up to the ETG regime

  14. Large-scale Experiment for Water and Gas Transport in Cementitious Backfill Materials (Phase 1 ): COLEX I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, G.; Wittmann, F.H.; Moetsch, H.A.

    1998-05-01

    In the planned Swiss repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste, the voids between the waste containers will be backfilled with a highly permeable mortar (NAGRA designation: mortar M1 ). As well as providing mechanical stability through filling of voids and sorbing radionuclides, the mortar must divert gases formed in the repository as a result of corrosion into the neighbouring host rock. This will prevent damage which could be caused by excess pressure on the repository structures. Water transport, which is coupled to gas transport, is also of interest. The former is responsible for the migration of radionuclides. Up till now, numerical simulations for a repository situation were carried out using transport parameters determined for small samples in the laboratory. However, the numerical simulations still had to be validated by a large-scale experiment. The investigations presented here should close this gap. Investigations into gas and water transport were carried out using a column (up to 5.4 m high) filled with backfill mortar. The column has a modular construction and can be sealed at the top end with a material of defined permeability (plug or top plug). The possibility to vary the material of the plug allows the influence of the more impermeable cavern lining or possible gas escape vents in the cavern roof to be investigated. A gas supply is connected to the bottom end and is used to simulate different gas generation rates from the waste. A total of 5 experiments were carried out in which the gas generation rate, the column height and the permeability of the plug were varied. Before the start of the experiments, the mortar in the column and the plug were saturated with water to approx. 95 %. In all the experiments, an increase in pressure with time could be observed. The higher the gas generation rate and the lower the permeability of the plug, the more quickly this occurred. At the beginning, only water flow out of the top of the column

  15. French experience in research reactor fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, Daniele

    1996-01-01

    Since 1963 Transnucleaire has safely performed a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied suitable packaging for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive material from front-end and back-end products and for power or for research reactors. Transportation of spent fuel from power reactors are made on a regular and industrial basis, but this is not yet the case for the transport of spent fuel coming from research reactors. Each shipment is a permanent challenge and requires a reactive organization dealing with all the transportation issues. This presentation will explain the choices made by Transnucleaire and its associates to provide and optimize the corresponding services while remaining in full compliance with the applicable regulations and customer requirements. (author)

  16. Air medical transport personnel experiences with and opinions about research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jolene; Thomas, Frank; Carpenter, Judi; Handrahan, Diana

    2010-01-01

    This study examined air medical transport (AMT) personnel's experiences with and opinions about prehospital and AMT research. A Web-based questionnaire was sent to eight randomly selected AMT programs from each of six Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS) regions. Responders were defined by university association (UA) and AMT professional role. Forty-eight of 54 (89%) contacted programs and 536 of 1,282 (42%) individuals responded. Non-UA responders (74%) had significantly more work experience in emergency medical services (EMS) (13.5 +/- 8.5 vs. 10.8 +/- 8.3 years, P = .002) and AMT (8.3 +/- 6.3 vs. 6.8 +/- 5.7 years, P = .008), whereas UA responders (26%) had more research training (51% vs. 37%, P = .006), experience (79% vs. 59%, P < .001), and grants (7% vs. 2%, P = .006). By AMT role, administrators had the most work experience, and physicians had the most research experience. Research productivity of responders was low, with only 9% having presented and 10% having published research; and UA made no difference in productivity. A majority of responders advocated research: EMS (66%) and AMT (68%), program (53%). Willingness to participate in research was high for both EMS research (87%) and AMT research (92%). Although AMT personnel were strong advocates of and willing to participate in research, few had research knowledge. For AMT personnel, disparity exists between advocating for and producing research. Copyright 2010 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between manual handling performance and recent flying experience in air transport pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbatson, Matt; Harris, Don; Huddlestone, John; Sears, Rodney

    2010-02-01

    Modern jet transport aircraft are typically flown using the on-board automation by the pilot programming commands into the auto-flight systems. Anecdotal evidence exists suggesting that pilots of highly automated aircraft experience manual flying skills decay as a result of a lack of opportunity to practise hand-flying during line operations. The ability of a pilot to revert to basic manual control is essential, for example, in cases where the aircraft's automatic capability is diminished or when reconfiguring the automatics is an ineffective use of crew capacity. However, there is a paucity of objective data to substantiate this perceived threat to flight safety. Furthermore, traditional performance measurement techniques may lack the ability to identify subtle but significant differences in pilots' manual handling ability in large transport aircraft. This study examines the relationship between pilot manual handling performance and their recent flying experience using both traditional flight path tracking measures and frequency-based control strategy measures. Significant relationships are identified between pilots' very recent flying experience and their manual control strategy. Statement of Relevance: The study demonstrates a novel application of frequency analysis, which produces a broader and more sensitive analysis of pilot performance than has been offered in previous research. Additionally, the relationships that are found to exist between recent flying experience and manual flying performance will help to guide future pilot assessment and training.

  18. Laboratory experiments on solute transport in bimodal porous media under cyclic precipitation-evaporation boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface is strongly governed by atmospheric boundary conditions. Erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles lead to alternating upward and downward flow, as well as spatially and temporally varying water contents and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing materials. Thus presenting a highly complicated, dynamic system. Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to assess e.g. the entry of, potentially hazardous, solutes to the groundwater and nutrient uptake by plant roots and can be gained in many ways. Besides field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. With the aim to gain a better understanding and to quantify solute transport in the unsaturated shallow subsurface under natural precipitation conditions in heterogeneous media, we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell that is filled with two types of sand and apply cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases at the soil surface. Pressure at the bottom of the domain is kept constant. Following recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a), heterogeneity is introduced by a sharp vertical interface between coarse and fine sand. Fluorescent tracers are used to i) qualitatively visualize transport paths within the domain and ii) quantify solute leaching at the bottom of the domain. Temporal and spatial variations in water content during the experiment are derived from x-ray radiographic images. Monitored water contents between infiltration and evaporation considerably changed in the coarse sand while the fine sand remained saturated throughout the experiments. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both directions at different depths of the investigated soil columns were observed. This depended on the flow rate applied at the soil surface and

  19. Internal electron transport barrier due to neoclassical ambipolarity in the Helically Symmetric Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.; Briesemeister, A.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Zhai, K.; Guttenfelder, W.; Deng, C. B.; Spong, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) feature strongly peaked electron temperature profiles; central temperatures are 2.5 keV with 100 kW injected power. These measurements, coupled with neoclassical predictions of large 'electron root' radial electric fields with strong radial shear, are evidence of a neoclassically driven thermal transport barrier. Neoclassical transport quantities are calculated using the PENTA code [D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005)], in which momentum is conserved and parallel flow is included. Unlike a conventional stellarator, which exhibits strong flow damping in all directions on a flux surface, quasisymmetric stellarators are free to rotate in the direction of symmetry, and the effect of momentum conservation in neoclassical calculations may therefore be significant. Momentum conservation is shown to modify the neoclassical ion flux and ambipolar ion root radial electric fields in the quasisymmetric configuration. The effect is much smaller in a HSX configuration where the symmetry is spoiled. In addition to neoclassical transport, a model of trapped electron mode turbulence is used to calculate the turbulent-driven electron thermal diffusivity. Turbulent transport quenching due to the neoclassically predicted radial electric field profile is needed in predictive transport simulations to reproduce the peaking of the measured electron temperature profile [Guttenfelder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 215002 (2008)].

  20. NASA Experiment on Tropospheric-Stratospheric Water Vapor Transport in the Intertropical Convergence Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The following six papers report preliminary results obtained from a field experiment designed to study the role of tropical cumulo-nimbus clouds in the transfer of water vapor from the troposphere to the stratosphere over the region of Panama. The measurements were made utilizing special NOAA enhanced IR satellite images, radiosonde-ozonesondes and a NASA U-2 aircraft carrying. nine experiments. The experiments were provided by a group of NASA, NOAA, industry, and university scientists. Measurements included atmospheric humidity, air and cloud top temperatures, atmospheric tracer constituents, cloud particle characteristics and cloud morphology. The aircraft made a total of eleven flights from August 30 through September 18, 1980, from Howard Air Force Base, Panama; the pilots obtained horizontal and vertical profiles in and near convectively active regions and flew around and over cumulo-nimbus towers and through the extended anvils in the stratosphere. Cumulo-nimbus clouds in the tropics appear to play an important role in upward water vapor transport and may represent the principal source influencing the stratospheric water vapor budget. The clouds provide strong vertical circulation in the troposphere, mixing surface air and its trace materials (water vapor, CFM's sulfur compounds, etc.) quickly up to the tropopause. It is usually assumed that large scale mean motions or eddy scale motions transport the trace materials through the tropopause and into the stratosphere where they are further dispersed and react with other stratospheric constituents. The important step between the troposphere and stratosphere for water vapor appears to depend upon the processes occurring at or near the tropopause at the tops of the cumulo-nimbus towers. Several processes have been sugested: (1) The highest towers penetrate the tropopause and carry water in the form of small ice particles directly into the stratosphere. (2) Water vapor from the tops of the cumulonimbus clouds is

  1. Cyclic deformation-induced solute transport in tissue scaffolds with computer designed, interconnected, pore networks: experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Buijs, Jorn Op; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Ritman, Erik L

    2009-08-01

    Nutrient supply and waste removal in porous tissue engineering scaffolds decrease from the periphery to the center, leading to limited depth of ingrowth of new tissue into the scaffold. However, as many tissues experience cyclic physiological strains, this may provide a mechanism to enhance solute transport in vivo before vascularization of the scaffold. The hypothesis of this study was that pore cross-sectional geometry and interconnectivity are of major importance for the effectiveness of cyclic deformation-induced solute transport. Transparent elastic polyurethane scaffolds, with computer-programmed design of pore networks in the form of interconnected channels, were fabricated using a 3D printing and injection molding technique. The scaffold pores were loaded with a colored tracer for optical contrast, cyclically compressed with deformations of 10 and 15% of the original undeformed height at 1.0 Hz. Digital imaging was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the tracer concentration within the pores. Numerical simulations of a fluid-structure interaction model of deformation-induced solute transport were compared to the experimental data. The results of experiments and modeling agreed well and showed that pore interconnectivity heavily influences deformation-induced solute transport. Pore cross-sectional geometry appears to be of less relative importance in interconnected pore networks. Validated computer models of solute transport can be used to design optimal scaffold pore geometries that will enhance the convective transport of nutrients inside the scaffold and the removal of waste, thus improving the cell survivability deep inside the scaffold.

  2. BNFL's experience in the sea transport of irradiated research reactor fuel to the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, I.A.; Porter, I.

    2000-01-01

    BNFL provides worldwide transport for a wide range of nuclear materials. BNFL Transport manages an unique fleet of vessels, designed, built, and operated to the highest safety standards, including the highest rating within the INF Code recommended by the International Maritime Organisation. The company has some 20 years of experience of transporting irradiated research reactor fuel in support of the United States' programme for returning US obligated fuel from around the world. Between 1977 and 1988 BNFL performed 11 shipments of irradiated research reactor fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the US. Since 1997, a further 3 shipments have been performed as part of an ongoing programme for Japanese research reactor operators. Where possible, shipments of fuel from European countries such as Sweden and Spain have been combined with those from Japan for delivery to the US. (author)

  3. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  4. The operational and logistic experience on transportation of Brazilian spent fuel to USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose Rubens; Frajndlich, Roberto; Mandlae, Martin; Bensberg, Werner; Renger, August; Grabow, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    A shipment of 127 spent MTR fuel assemblies was made from IEA-R1 Research Reactor located at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, Brazil to Savannah River Site Laboratory in the United States. This paper describes the operational and logistic experience on this transportation made by IPEN staff and the Consortium NCS/GNS. (author)

  5. Evaluation of axial fission gas transport in power ramping experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Motoyasu

    1986-01-01

    The LINUS code calculates advective and diffusional transport of fission gas towards an upper plenum through the pellet-cladding gap. The basic equations were modified for analyzing a multi-component gas mixture in the gap and also for dealing with opening and/or closing of the gap, which induces additional axial gas flow. Analysis of the Petten ramp experiment shows that helium pressurization is effective in suppressing an ascending rate of fission gas concentration. After the maximum concentration is achieved through power ramping, the gas concentration could be described by a steady state analytical solution which does not depend on the filling gas pressure. (author)

  6. A new treatment of the heat transport equation with a transport barrier and applications to ECRH experiments in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, A.G.; Bouquey, F.; Clary, J.; Darbos, C.; Lennholm, M.; Magne, R.; Segui, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Clemencon, A. [MIT, Electrochemical Energy Laboratory, Cambridge, MA (United States); Guivarch, C. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, 77 - Marne-la-Vallee (France)

    2004-07-01

    An exact analytical solution of the electron heat diffusion equation in a cylinder has been found with a step-like diffusion coefficient, plus a monomial increase in the radial direction and a constant damping term. This model is sufficiently general to describe heat diffusion in the presence of a critical gradient threshold or a transport barrier, superimposed to the usual trend of increasing heat diffusivity from the plasma core to the edge. This type of representation allows us to see some well-known properties of heat transport phenomena in a different light. For instance, it has been shown that the contributions of the Eigenmodes to the time dependent solution grow at speeds that depend on the Eigenmode order i.e. at the beginning of the heating phase all the Eigenmodes are equally involved, whereas at the end only the lower order ones are left. This implies, e.g., that high frequency modulation experiments provide a characterization of transport phenomena that is intrinsically different with respect to power balance analysis of a stationary phase. It is particularly useful to analyse power switch on/off events and whenever high frequency modulations are not technically feasible. Low-frequency (1-2 Hz) ECRH modulation experiments have been performed on Tore Supra. A large jump (a factor of 8) in the heat diffusivity has been clearly identified at the ECRH power deposition layer. The amplitude and phase of several harmonics of the Fourier transform of the modulated temperature, as well as the time evolution of the modulated temperature have been reproduced by the analytical solution. The jump is found to be much weaker at lower ECRH power (one gyrotron)

  7. Carrier mediated transport through supported liquid membranes; determination of transport parameters from a single transport experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrisstoffels, L.A.J.; Struijk, Wilhelmina; de Jong, Feike; Reinhoudt, David

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a time-dependent transport model for carrier assisted cation transport through supported liquid membranes. The model describes the flux of salt as a function of time and two parameters viz. the diffusion coefficient of the cation complex (D), and the extraction constant (Kex).

  8. First experience in international air transportation of RR SFA in Russian-made TUK-19 casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashov, B.A.; Barinkov, O.P.; Dorofeev, A.N.; Komarov, S.V.; Smirnov, A.V.; Biro, L.; Budu, M.; Ciocanescu, M.

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, spent fuel assemblies (SFA) have been transported across the Russian Federation by rail in special railcars. New conditions required SFA shipments by other conveyance, i.e. road, sea and even air transport. The air shipment of the VVR-S research reactor SNF in TUK-19 casks from Magurele, Romania in June 2009 was the first experience after new Russian and international regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material came into effect. The preparatory stage of the shipment focused on the issues associated with radiation and nuclear safety both during the loading and transport operations. The project covered development of a technology and equipment for SFA loading into TUK-19 casks and that for the air shipment. The SFAs were loaded into the TUK-19 casks with a specially designed transfer cask, and the SFA-containing packages were transported in specialized freight 20-foot ISO-containers. The safety of the loading and transport operations was ensured both by reliable engineering solutions, and selected conveyances and routes. The paper shows that the loading and the air shipment of the Romanian SFAs in TUK-19 casks does not contradict Romanian, Russian and international regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material. The outcomes of the SNF shipment from Romania confirmed correctness of the solutions and demonstrated high environmental safety. (author)

  9. The role of parental risk judgements, transport safety attitudes, transport priorities and accident experiences on pupils' walking to school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Milad; Nordfjaern, Trond; Mamdoohi, Amir Reza; Shariat Mohaymany, Afshin

    2017-05-01

    Walking to school could improve pupils' health condition and might also reduce the use of motorized transport modes, which leads to both traffic congestion and air pollution. The current study aims to examine the role of parental risk judgements (i.e. risk perception and worry), transport safety attitudes, transport priorities and accident experiences on pupils' walking and mode choices on school trips in Iran, a country with poor road safety records. A total of 1078 questionnaires were randomly distributed among pupils at nine public and private schools in January 2014 in Rasht, Iran. Results from valid observations (n=711) showed that parents with high probability assessments of accidents and strong worry regarding pupils' accident risk while walking were less likely to let their children walk to school. Parents with high safety knowledge were also more likely to allow their pupils to walk to school. Parents who prioritized convenience and accessibility in transport had a stronger tendency to choose motorized modes over walking modes. Also, parents who prioritized safety and security in transport were less likely to allow pupils to walk to school. Elasticities results showed that a one percent increase in priorities of convenience and accessibility, priorities of safety and security, car ownership and walking time from home to school reduced walking among pupils by a probability of 0.62, 0.20, 0.86 and 0.57%, respectively. A one percent increase in parental safety knowledge increased the walking probability by around 0.25%. A 1 unit increase in parental probability assessment and worry towards pupils' walking, decreased the probability of choosing walking mode by 0.11 and 0.05, respectively. Policy-makers who aim to promote walking to schools should improve safety and security of the walking facilities and increase parental safety knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonlocal transport in the presence of transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2013-10-01

    There is experimental, numerical, and theoretical evidence that transport in plasmas can, under certain circumstances, depart from the standard local, diffusive description. Examples include fast pulse propagation phenomena in perturbative experiments, non-diffusive scaling in L-mode plasmas, and non-Gaussian statistics of fluctuations. From the theoretical perspective, non-diffusive transport descriptions follow from the relaxation of the restrictive assumptions (locality, scale separation, and Gaussian/Markovian statistics) at the foundation of diffusive models. We discuss an alternative class of models able to capture some of the observed non-diffusive transport phenomenology. The models are based on a class of nonlocal, integro-differential operators that provide a unifying framework to describe non- Fickian scale-free transport, and non-Markovian (memory) effects. We study the interplay between nonlocality and internal transport barriers (ITBs) in perturbative transport including cold edge pulses and power modulation. Of particular interest in the nonlocal ``tunnelling'' of perturbations through ITBs. Also, flux-gradient diagrams are discussed as diagnostics to detect nonlocal transport processes in numerical simulations and experiments. Work supported by the US Department of Energy.

  11. Power transport to the poloidal divertor experiment scoop limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Budny, R.; Fonck, R.

    1987-01-01

    Power transport to the Poloidal Divertor Experiment graphite scoop limiter was measured during both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges by observing its front face temperatures using an infrared camera. Measurements were made as a function of a plasma density, current, position, fueling mode, and heating power for both co- and counter-neutral beam injection. The measured thermal load on the scoop limiter was 25 to 50%. of the total plasma heating power. The measured peak front face midplane temperature was 1500 0 C, corresponding to a peak surface power density of 3 kW/cm/sup 2/. This power density implies an effective parallel power flow of 54 kW/cm/sup 2/ in agreement with the radial power distribution extrapolated from television Thomson scattering and calorimetry measurements

  12. Experience with fuel damage caused by abnormal conditions in handling and transporting operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to determine the expected condition of spent USA light-water reactor (LWR) fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or, if fuel is declared a waste, at disposal facilities. Initial findings were described in an earlier PNL paper at PATRAM '80 and in a report. Updated findings are described in this paper, which includes an evaluation of information obtained from the literature and a compilation of cases of known or suspected damage to fuel as a result of handling and/or transporting operations. To date, PNL has evaluated 123 actual cases (98 USA and 25 non-USA). Irradiated fuel was involved in all but 10 of the cases. From this study, it is calculated that the frequency of unusual occurrences involving fuel damage from handling and transporting operations has been low. The damage that did occur was generally minor. The current base of experience with fuel handling and transporting operations indicates that nearly all of these unusual occurrences had only a minor or negligible effect on spent fuel storage facility operations

  13. Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Model of the Redox Zone Experiment of the sp Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinero-Huguet, Jorge; Samper-Calvete, F. Javier; Zhang, Guoxiang; Yang, Changbing

    2004-01-01

    Underground facilities are being operated by several countries around the world for performing research and demonstration of the safety of deep radioactive waste repositories. The ''sp'' Hard Rock Laboratory is one such facility launched and operated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company where various in situ experiments have been performed in fractured granites. One such experiment is the redox zone experiment, which aimed at evaluating the effects of the construction of an access tunnel on the hydrochemical conditions of a fracture zone. Dilution of the initially saline groundwater by fresh recharge water is the dominant process controlling the hydrochemical evolution of most chemical species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate, which unexpectedly increase with time. We present a numerical model of water flow, reactive transport, and microbial processes for the redox zone experiment. This model provides a plausible quantitatively based explanation for the unexpected evolution of bicarbonate and sulfate, reproduces the breakthrough curves of other reactive species, and is consistent with previous hydrogeological and solute transport models

  14. Reactive transport modelling of a heating and radiation experiment in the Boom clay (Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montenegro, L.; Samper, J.; Delgado, J.

    2003-01-01

    Most countries around the world consider Deep Geological Repositories (DGR) as the most safe option for the final disposal of high level radioactive waste (HLW). DGR is based on adopting a system of multiple barriers between the HLW and the biosphere. Underground laboratories provide information about the behaviour of these barriers at real conditions. Here we present a reactive transport model for the CERBERUS experiment performed at the HADES underground laboratory at Mol (Belgium) in order to characterize the thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H) and geochemical (G) behaviour of the Boon clay. This experiment is unique because it addresses the combined effect of heat and radiation produced by the storage of HLW in a DGR. Reactive transport models which are solved with CORE, are used to perform quantitative predictions of Boom clay thermo-hydro-geochemical (THG) behaviour. Numerical results indicate that heat and radiation cause a slight oxidation near of the radioactive source, pyrite dissolution, a pH decrease and slight changes in the pore water chemical composition of the Boom clay. (Author) 33 refs

  15. Simulating surface oil transport during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Experiments with the BioCast system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, Jason Keith; Smith, Travis A.; Ladner, Sherwin; Arnone, Robert A.

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is developing nowcast/forecast software systems designed to combine satellite ocean color data streams with physical circulation models in order to produce prognostic fields of ocean surface materials. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico provided a test case for the Bio-Optical Forecasting (BioCast) system to rapidly combine the latest satellite imagery of the oil slick distribution with surface circulation fields in order to produce oil slick transport scenarios and forecasts. In one such sequence of experiments, MODIS satellite true color images were combined with high-resolution ocean circulation forecasts from the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) to produce 96-h oil transport simulations. These oil forecasts predicted a major oil slick landfall at Grand Isle, Louisiana, USA that was subsequently observed. A key driver of the landfall scenario was the development of a coastal buoyancy current associated with Mississippi River Delta freshwater outflow. In another series of experiments, longer-term regional circulation model results were combined with oil slick source/sink scenarios to simulate the observed containment of surface oil within the Gulf of Mexico. Both sets of experiments underscore the importance of identifying and simulating potential hydrodynamic conduits of surface oil transport. The addition of explicit sources and sinks of surface oil concentrations provides a framework for increasingly complex oil spill modeling efforts that extend beyond horizontal trajectory analysis.

  16. CURITIBA ET RECIFE, DANS L'EXPERIENCE BRÉSILIENNE D'ORGANISATION DES TRANSPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hostilio Xavier Ratton Neto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    A tarefa de organizar sistemas de transporte urbano, se encarada em sua essência, poderia ser resumida em dois pontos: prover acessibilidade aos deslocamentos nas cidades e garantir a mobilidade das pessoas na realização desses deslocamentos. Na pratica, essa equação aparentemente simples se configura em vários e complexos problemas, na medida em que os contextos onde se localizam os deslocamentos, as possibilidades de efetuados, as pessoas envolvidas, seus horários e motivos são diferentes e, em principio, não seriam contemplados pelas mesmas soluções. A diversidade dos processos implantados para a provisão dos serviços de transporte publico reflete essas diferenças. No entanto, nós, planejadores de transporte, vivemos obcecados pela idéia de que é possível racionalizar e parametrizar essas diferenças, descobrindo a formula mágica que resolveria, em condições ótimas, todas as questões envolvidas. Um dos caminhos trilhados para a busca dessa formula e o de encontrar, nas diferenças, as respostas para tratar certos aspectos que ficam mais evidentes numa determinada conjuntura do que em outras, incorporando-as e avaliando os seus impactos. Nesse sentido, a experiência francesa, de transferir seu modelo de organização e gestão de transportes a muitos países em desenvolvimento, sem aprofundar o exame das peculiaridades de cada local, o que resultou em grandes fracassos, acabou dando a pista para essa trilha. Os franceses têm, desde então, se interessado pelas questões de transporte dos países em desenvolvimento, tentando levantar exatamente os aspectos que escaparam em sua formulação original. A propósito, não teria sido por acaso que criaram, em 1980, as Conferencias sobre o Desenvolvimento e Planejamento de Transporte Urbano nos Países em Desenvolvimento (CODATU. O livro de Anísio Brasileiro é fruto da conjugação de todas as perspectivas. Ele é o desdobramento, três anos mais tarde, de sua tese de

  17. Pore-scale and Continuum Simulations of Solute Transport Micromodel Benchmark Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Mehmani, Yashar; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Tang, Y.; Liu, H.; Yoon, Hongkyu; Kang, Qinjun; Joekar Niasar, Vahid; Balhoff, Matthew; Dewers, T.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Leist, Emily AE; Hess, Nancy J.; Perkins, William A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2016-08-01

    Four sets of micromodel nonreactive solute transport experiments were conducted with flow velocity, grain diameter, pore-aspect ratio, and flow focusing heterogeneity as the variables. The data sets were offered to pore-scale modeling groups to test their simulators. Each set consisted of two learning experiments, for which all results was made available, and a challenge experiment, for which only the experimental description and base input parameters were provided. The experimental results showed a nonlinear dependence of the dispersion coefficient on the Peclet number, a negligible effect of the pore-aspect ratio on transverse mixing, and considerably enhanced mixing due to flow focusing. Five pore-scale models and one continuum-scale model were used to simulate the experiments. Of the pore-scale models, two used a pore-network (PN) method, two others are based on a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) approach, and one employed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The learning experiments were used by the PN models to modify the standard perfect mixing approach in pore bodies into approaches to simulate the observed incomplete mixing. The LB and CFD models used these experiments to appropriately discretize the grid representations. The continuum model use published non-linear relations between transverse dispersion coefficients and Peclet numbers to compute the required dispersivity input values. Comparisons between experimental and numerical results for the four challenge experiments show that all pore-scale models were all able to satisfactorily simulate the experiments. The continuum model underestimated the required dispersivity values and, resulting in less dispersion. The PN models were able to complete the simulations in a few minutes, whereas the direct models needed up to several days on supercomputers to resolve the more complex problems.

  18. Experience in developing control integrated multilevel systems for gas transport; Developpement de systemes integres de gestion multi-niveaux pour le transport du gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyukov, V.Y. [NIIIS, (Russian Federation); Bityukov, V.S. [Gasprom, (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the experience of the integrated control multilevel system (IACS) development and implementation for gas transport at the regional enterprises of JSC 'Gasprom', specificity of IACS creation by the Russian enterprises on the basis of the technical and licensed basic software SCADA Geamatics purchased from AEG company under the contract. (authors)

  19. Study of point defects in non crystalline alloys by high temperature mass transport experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1986-09-01

    We present in this communication the results of new experiments designed to study the mass transport mechanism in non-crystalline metallic alloys. They are based on the isothermal measurement of the crystallization kinetics, either without constraint or under electron irradiation or hydrostatic pressure. These experiments show that in the alloys studied, (FeNi) 8 (Pb) 2 and Ni 6 Nb 4 ), irradiation enhances the diffusion on the one hand, and on the other that there exist an activation volume for diffusion, of the order of one atomic volume. We discuss then the atomic model of diffusion needed to explain our results

  20. Spent fuel and HLW transportation: The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Charles, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Transportation of nuclear materials is a key component of the nuclear industry. Transportation takes place in the public domain. This relation with both population and environment has put transportation in the middle of a hard-toned debate. The nuclear transportation system has demonstrated its maturity in terms of safety, reliability, cost-efficiency and environmental respect, through a remarkable track record of successful accomplishments. For 30 years, large quantities of nuclear materials have been shipped smoothly and safely in France, Europe and overseas. General principles and safety rules have been carefully established by international experts, published as recommendations by the IAEA and enforced worldwide through national legislations. The international nuclear industry closely follows this framework, operating with comprehensive quality assurance programs

  1. FRACTEX: an experiment aiming at characterizing the transport properties of a secondary fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.M.; Dick, P.; Cabrera, J.; Barnichon, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    seismic impedance contrast in argillite, results showed that a secondary fault already observed in situ and successfully recognized both in the limestone layer underlying the argillite and at the interface between these two layers, could not be identified in the argillite layer by this method. Since some secondary fault could not be detected in the argillaceous layer during the site characterization, it is crucial to characterize the transport properties associated with such a structure. These data will permit to predict if this kind of secondary fault can act as a preferential pathway for the migration of radionuclide if such a structure is intersected during the excavation operations. To assess the transport properties associated with a secondary fault, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments aiming at evaluating the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on the water flux through (1) damaged argillite (in the structure), (2) potentially disturbed argillite (at the interfaces) and (3) undisturbed argillite. The targeted structure for this study is a hecto-meter-sized sub-vertical strike-slip fault displaying a 2 m vertical offset which has been intercepted in the Upper Toarcian argillite by several drifts and borehole from the Tournemire URL. The first part of this experiment is to air-drill a 50 m-long horizontal borehole (diameter 101 mm) to intercept the structure over a distance far enough of the tunnel in order to get rid off the EDZ effects associates to the drift. In the same time, argillite samples will be selected to performed mineralogical and petrophysical characterization of the rock all along the borehole. The totality of the core samples will be sealed in aluminium-coated plastic bags under a nitrogen atmosphere to limit both oxidation of pyrite and dehydration. Immediately after drilling, the borehole will be equipped with a three packed-off intervals equipment dedicated to perform in situ hydraulic tests (pulse-test) on

  2. Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address high priority research and development for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loarte, A.; Polevoi, A. R.; Hosokawa, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Reinke, M. L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Chilenski, M.; Howard, N.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Köchl, F. [Technische Universität Wien, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pütterich, T.; Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmanstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zhogolev, V. E. [NRC “Kurchatov Institute,” Kurchatov Square 1, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    Experiments in Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasmas in the Enhanced D-alpha H-mode regime with ITER-like mid-radius plasma density peaking and Ion Cyclotron Resonant heating, in which tungsten is introduced by the laser blow-off technique, have demonstrated that accumulation of tungsten in the central region of the plasma does not take place in these conditions. The measurements obtained are consistent with anomalous transport dominating tungsten transport except in the central region of the plasma where tungsten transport is neoclassical, as previously observed in other devices with dominant neutral beam injection heating, such as JET and ASDEX Upgrade. In contrast to such results, however, the measured scale lengths for plasma temperature and density in the central region of these Alcator C-Mod plasmas, with density profiles relatively flat in the core region due to the lack of core fuelling, are favourable to prevent inter and intra sawtooth tungsten accumulation in this region under dominance of neoclassical transport. Simulations of ITER H-mode plasmas, including both anomalous (modelled by the Gyro-Landau-Fluid code GLF23) and neoclassical transport for main ions and tungsten and with density profiles of similar peaking to those obtained in Alcator C-Mod show that accumulation of tungsten in the central plasma region is also unlikely to occur in stationary ITER H-mode plasmas due to the low fuelling source by the neutral beam injection (injection energy ∼ 1 MeV), which is in good agreement with findings in the Alcator C-Mod experiments.

  3. Materials to be used for radionuclide transport experiments (milestones SPL3A1M4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.

    1998-02-01

    Experiments to determine the effect of canister corrosion products on the transport of radionuclides will be undertaken using the FE(III) oxides goethite and hematite as proxies for the expected corrosion envelope that will form as a result of alteration of the corrosion allowance overpack prior to the breaching of the waste container. Samples of ESF invert concrete that have been crushed, or left intact but fractured, and that have been subjected to hydrothermal alteration will be used to determine the effect of cementitious materials on transport of radionuclides. A mixture of CaCO 3 , Si0 2 , and aggregate will be used as a proxy for completely carbonated concrete

  4. Chamber transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system

  5. Batch and column studies of adsorption of Li, Ni and Br by a reference sand for contaminant transport experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigel, M.D.; Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    A processed quartz sand (Wedron 510), mined from the St. Peter sandstone, has been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical methods for use as a reference porous media in transport model validation experiments. Wedron 510 sand was used in an intermediate-scale experiment involving migration of Ni, Li and Br through a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson. Ni and Li adsorption/desorption, and Li/Ni site-competition experiments yielded information on the importance of the trace mineral phases to adsorption of Li and Ni by the sand. The presence of an iron hydroxide coating similar to goethite on the sand grains is suggested by visual observation and leaching experiments. Kaolinite was identified by SEM and XRD as a significant trace mineral phase in the sand and occurs as small particles coating the sand grains. Quartz, the predominant constituent of the sand by weight, does not appear to contribute significantly to the adsorption properties of the sand. Qualitatively, the adsorption properties of the sand can be adequately modeled as a two-mineral system (goethite and kaolinite). The studies described in this report should provide a basis for understanding transport of Ni, Li and Br through porous media similar to the reference sand. Techniques were developed for obtaining parameter values for surface complexation and kinetic adsorption models for the sand and its mineral components. These constants can be used directly in coupled hydrogeochemical transport codes. The techniques should be useful for characterization of other natural materials and elements in high-level nuclear waste in support of coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations for Yucca Mountain

  6. The phase diagram and transport properties of MgO from theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulenburger, Luke

    2013-06-01

    Planetary structure and the formation of terrestrial planets have received tremendous interest due to the discovery of so called super-earth exoplanets. MgO is a major constituent of Earth's mantle, the rocky cores of gas giants and is a likely component of the interiors of many of these exoplanets. The high pressure - high temperature behavior of MgO directly affects equation of state models for planetary structure and formation. In this work, we examine MgO under extreme conditions using experimental and theoretical methods to determine its phase diagram and transport properties. Using plate impact experiments on Sandia's Z facility the solid-solid phase transition from B1 to B2 is clearly determined. The melting transition, on the other hand, is subtle, involving little to no signal in us-up space. Theoretical work utilizing density functional theory (DFT) provides a complementary picture of the phase diagram. The solid-solid phase transition is identified through a series of quasi-harmonic phonon calculations and thermodynamic integration, while the melt boundary is found using phase coexistence calculations. One issue of particular import is the calculation of reflectivity along the Hugoniot and the influence of the ionic structure on the transport properties. Particular care is necessary because of the underestimation of the band gap and attendant overestimation of transport properties due to the use of semi-local density functional theory. We will explore the impact of this theoretical challenge and its potential solutions in this talk. The integrated use of DFT simulations and high-accuracy shock experiments together provide a comprehensive understanding of MgO under extreme conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Transport simulations of ohmic TFTR experiments with profile-consistent microinstability-based models for chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, M.H.; Tang, W.M.; Efthimion, P.C.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1987-03-01

    Transport simulations of ohmically heated TFTR experiments with recently developed profile-consistent microinstability models for the anomalous thermal diffusivities, chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/, give good agreement with experimental data. The steady-state temperature profiles and the total energy confinement times, tau/sub e/, were found to agree for each of the ohmic TFTR experiments simulated, including three high radiation cases and two plasmas fueled by pellet injection. Both collisional and collisionless models are tested. The trapped-electron drift wave microinstability model results are consistent with the thermal confinement of large plasma ohmic experiments on TFTR. We also find that transport due to the toroidal ion temperature gradient (eta/sub i/) modes can cause saturation in tau/sub E/ at the highest densities comparable to that observed on TFTR and equivalent to a neoclassical anomaly factor of 3. Predictions based on stabilized eta/sub i/-mode-driven ion transport are found to be in agreement with the enhanced global energy confinement times for pellet-fueled plasmas. 33 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  8. First Aid and Transportation Course Contents Based on Experience gained in the Iran-Iraq War: a Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhangi, Forogh; Gholami, Hamid Reza; Khaghanizade, Morteza; Najafi Mehri, Soheil

    2015-02-01

    Effective first aid and transportation influences injury-induced mortality. But few qualitative studies have been conducted so far in this area. The aim of this study was to identify the content of the first aid and patient transportation course based on experience gained from the Iran-Iraq war. This was a conventional qualitative content analysis study; a purposeful sample of 14 first aid and transportation experts who had worked during the Iran-Iraq war was recruited. We collected and analyzed the study data by using the semi-structured interview method and the conventional content analysis approach respectively. Each interview transcript was reviewed several times. Words, sentences, and paragraphs were labeled with codes. Codes were compared with each other and categorized according to their similarities. Similar sub-categories and categories were also grouped together and formed themes. Study participants' experiences of wartime first aid and transportation (FAT) education fell into two main themes including 'the congruence of education and educational needs' and 'managers' engagement in FAT education. The four main categories of these two themes were use of appropriate educational facilities, adopting effective teaching strategies, universal FAT education and specialized training skills. The two key requirements of the first aid and transportation courses are practicality and managerial engagement. We developed and provided specific guidance of FAT curriculum by using the study findings. This curriculum is recommended for educating FAT staffs, paramedics, emergency technicians, and military nurses.

  9. Identity physics experiment on internal transport barriers in JT-60U and JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, P C; Beurskens, M N A; Brix, M; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N C; Parail, V [EURATOM/UKAEA Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Sakamoto, Y; Fujita, T; Hayashi, N; Matsunaga, G; Oyama, N; Shinohara, K; Suzuki, T; Takechi, M [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Litaudon, X; Joffrin, E [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Crombe, K [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Mantica, P [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM/ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Salmi, A [Association Euratom-Tekes, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 4100 (Finland); Strintzi, D, E-mail: Peter.de.Vries@jet.u [National Technical University of Athens, EURATOM Association, GR-15773, Athens (Greece)

    2009-12-15

    A series of experiments have been carried out in 2008 at JT-60U and JET to find common characteristics and explain differences between internal transport barriers (ITBs). The identity experiments succeeded in matching the profiles of most dimensionless parameters at the time ITBs were triggered. Thereafter the q-profile development deviated due to differences in non-inductive current density profile, affecting the ITB. Furthermore, the ITBs in JET were more strongly influenced by the H-mode pedestal or edge localized modes. It was found to be difficult to match the plasma rotation characteristics in both devices. However, the wide range of Mach numbers obtained in these experiments shows that the rotation has little effect on the triggering of ITBs in plasmas with reversed magnetic shear. On the other hand the toroidal rotation and more specifically the rotational shear had an impact on the subsequent growth and allowed the formation of strong ITBs.

  10. Transport in the plasma edge specific connection to the wall in the Tore Supra ergodic divertor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosman, A.; Ghendrih, P.; DeMichelis, C.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Vallet, J.C.; Capes, H.; Chatelier, M.; Geraud, A.; Goniche, M.; Grisolia, C.; Guilhem, D.; Harris, G.; Hess, W.; Nguyen, F.; Poutchy, L.; Samain, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ergodic divertor experiments in TORE SUPRA can be analysed along two main lines. The first one refers to the change of the heat and particle transport in the ergodized zone. This is especially true for the electron heat transport which is enhanced in the edge layer. But other distinctive features give evidence of the importance of the parallel connexion length between the plasma edge and the wall. The field lines, which are stochastic in the major part of the perturbed layer (10-15 cm) are such that, in the outermost layer (3 cm), the connexion topology is regular. This has obvious effects on the particle and power deposition, but also on the plasma parameters, and consequently influences the particle recycling and impurity shielding processes. The TORE SUPRA ergodic divertor experiments are reviewed in this framework

  11. Numerical Experiments on Advective Transport in Large Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of flow and solute transport in discrete fracture networks is an important approach for understanding the migration of contaminants in impermeable hard rocks such as granite, where fractures provide dominant flow and transport pathways. The discrete fracture network (DFN) model attempts to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. An integrated DFN meshing [1], flow, and particle tracking [2] simulation capability that enables accurate flow and particle tracking simulation on large DFNs has recently been developed. The new capability has been used in numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs with tens of thousands of fractures and millions of computational cells. The modeling procedure starts from the fracture network generation using a stochastic model derived from site data. A high-quality computational mesh is then generated [1]. Flow is then solved using the highly parallel PFLOTRAN [3] code. PFLOTRAN uses the finite volume approach, which is locally mass conserving and thus eliminates mass balance problems during particle tracking. The flow solver provides the scalar fluxes on each control volume face. From the obtained fluxes the Darcy velocity is reconstructed for each node in the network [4]. Velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest, thus enabling random walk particle tracking. In order to describe the flow field on fractures intersections, the control volume cells on intersections are split into four planar polygons, where each polygon corresponds to a piece of a fracture near the intersection line. Thus

  12. Transport experience of new ''TNF-XI'' powder package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, I.; Fujiwara, T.; Naigeon, P.

    2004-01-01

    Since the Tokai criticality accident in 1999, there has been no specialized manufacturer conducting uranium re-conversion in Japan. For this reason, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) imports from overseas almost all the uranium oxide powder used for manufacturing pellets for nuclear fuel assemblies. To date, an NT-IX package has been used for transporting the uranium oxide powder. However, due to the adoption of IAEA TS-R-1 into Japanese domestic regulations, we have begun to use a new TNF-XI powder package because the NT-IX package can suffer major deformation under the drop test III condition. The TNF-XI package was jointly developed by COGEMA LOGISTICS of France and NFI from 2000, and started to be used for actual transportation in 2003. This package has improved transport efficiency, handling operability and safety performance in comparison to its predecessor. This paper describes the characteristics of the new TNF-XI package and its actual transportation records and performance

  13. Engineering and management experience at Texas A&M Transportation Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arif Tahjibul

    This manuscript presents the author's engineering and management experience during his internship in the Materials and Pavements (M&P) Division at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI), and is a record of study for the Doctor of Engineering at Texas A&M University. Through this internship, he met his established internship objectives of gaining technical knowledge as well as knowledge and skills in project management, organizational communication, and quality management of pavement condition data, and of attaining professional development. In meeting these objectives, the author describes the history, mission, and organizational structure of his workplace. He also presents his experience of developing and delivering a two-week training course on pavement design and construction in Kosovo. Participating in a number of professional development training courses and other activities prepared him for working as an engineering manager. These activities include Delta-T leadership training, an instructor development course, a time management and organizational skills course, and the M&P Division lecture series. Leadership and skills learned through the Delta-T program were beneficial for the employee as well as the employer. For the class project, the author and his teammates performed a study dealing with improving TTI's deliverables. The Delta-T team composed a report summarizing their efforts of examining the current state of TTI's project deliverables, the deliverables' shortcomings, and potential enhancements to expand the deliverables' appeal to additional types of potential users outside the traditional research community. The team also developed a prototype web-based model of deliverables and presented some implementation recommendations. Participating in the Texas Department of Transportation's (TxDOT's) pavement surface distress data collection program enabled the author to become familiar with pavement distress data quality management and thus attain the

  14. Pituitary-adrenocortical adjustments to transport stress in horses with previous different handling and transport conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fazio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The changes of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA axis response to a long distance transportation results in increase of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and cortisol levels. The purpose of the study was to quantify the level of short-term road transport stress on circulating ACTH and cortisol concentrations, related to the effect of previous handling and transport experience of horses. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on 56 healthy horses after short-term road transport of 30 km. The horses were divided into four groups, Groups A, B, C, and D, with respect to the handling quality: Good (Groups A and B, bad (Group D, and minimal handling (Group C conditions. According to the previous transport, experience horses were divided as follows: Horses of Groups A and D had been experienced long-distance transportation before; horses of Groups B and C had been limited experience of transportation. Results: One-way RM-ANOVA showed significant effects of transport on ACTH changes in Groups B and C and on cortisol changes in both Groups A and B. Groups A and B showed lower baseline ACTH and cortisol values than Groups C and D; Groups A and B showed lower post-transport ACTH values than Groups C and D. Groups A, B, and C showed lower post-transport cortisol values than Group D. Only Groups A and B horses have shown an adequate capacity of stress response to transportation. Conclusion: The previous transport experience and quality of handling could influence the HPA axis physiological responses of horses after short-term road transport.

  15. The influence of mass transfer on solute transport in column experiments with an aggregated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Paul V.; Goltz, Mark N.; Summers, R. Scott; Crittenden, John C.; Nkedi-Kizza, Peter

    1987-06-01

    The spreading of concentration fronts in dynamic column experiments conducted with a porous, aggregated soil is analyzed by means of a previously documented transport model (DFPSDM) that accounts for longitudinal dispersion, external mass transfer in the boundary layer surrounding the aggregate particles, and diffusion in the intra-aggregate pores. The data are drawn from a previous report on the transport of tritiated water, chloride, and calcium ion in a column filled with Ione soil having an average aggregate particle diameter of 0.34 cm, at pore water velocities from 3 to 143 cm/h. The parameters for dispersion, external mass transfer, and internal diffusion were predicted for the experimental conditions by means of generalized correlations, independent of the column data. The predicted degree of solute front-spreading agreed well with the experimental observations. Consistent with the aggregate porosity of 45%, the tortuosity factor for internal pore diffusion was approximately equal to 2. Quantitative criteria for the spreading influence of the three mechanisms are evaluated with respect to the column data. Hydrodynamic dispersion is thought to have governed the front shape in the experiments at low velocity, and internal pore diffusion is believed to have dominated at high velocity; the external mass transfer resistance played a minor role under all conditions. A transport model such as DFPSDM is useful for interpreting column data with regard to the mechanisms controlling concentration front dynamics, but care must be exercised to avoid confounding the effects of the relevant processes.

  16. Experiences in the transport of radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds in the last decade in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador B, Z.H.; Perez P, S.; Ayra P, F.E.; Torres B, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of Isotopes (CENTIS) it is the main transport entity of radioactive materials of the Republic of Cuba in whose activity almost accumulates a decade. Its are executed the design, the production, the maintenance and/or repair of the packings, as well as the preparation, remission, charges, transporting (including the in traffic storage), it discharges and reception in the final destination, of the remittances. Presently work the results of the implementation of the radiological safety and quality assurance programs developed for the safe transport of radioactive bulks and the experiences in the design and essay of bulks type A are shown. The postulated radiological events are evaluated. Three courses of 10 school hours each one, they are imparted, with theoretical and practical exams. The maximum, minimum and average values of the annual effective doses of the workers and the collective doses per year are reported, for the period 1996-2005. It is guaranteed the administrative control and the traceability of the bundles. (Author)

  17. Atmospherical experiment in Angra I plant for characterizing the effluent transport threw in the atmospheric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Lobo, M.A. da; Kronemberger, B.M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The Environmental Safety Division of the Nuclear Safety and Fuel Department from FURNAS Electric Station S.A. joint with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), achieved a field experiment for characterizing the atmospheric transport and diffusion in the site complex of Angra I Nuclear Power Plant. The complex topography with the thick vegetation and the neighbour building bring problems for the modelling of the effluent transport and the dispersion. The actual meteorological measure system is automatic and compound with four towers. An intensive atmospheric measure with captive balloon is included, and the collected data shows that the site flux is strongly influenced by the topography and insolation. (C.G.C.). 2 figs

  18. International Road Freight Transport in France: Experiences from Germany, the Netherlands and Driver Costs Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Guihery

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available These last few years, French international road freight transport has been undergoing a loss of influence within Europe while traffic has increased and great manoeuvres are taking place since the opening of the European Union towards East. Some of the French transporters are then focusing back on the French market showing a worrying loss in competitiveness. On the contrary, German and Dutch companies are increasing their shares in the French market and have reorganized themselves within Europe to face Eastern Europe competition: follow-up on customers delocalizing in the East, networking, hyperproductivity, markets segmentation between high quality transport in the West, specific markets and low cost segment in Eastern Germany and East Europe (Poland, Romania, ..., intensive geographical closeness to a great harbour (Rotterdam... What should France learn from German and Dutch experiences? On the basis of a comparison of our neighbours' driving costs and road freight transport structure, our contribution - a synthesis of two recent studies ordered by the Comite National Routier (CNR, studies free to be downloaded by www.cnr.fr - will first propose a cooperation with German or Dutch companies in order to propose a winner-winner model based on exchange of competencies: North Africa (Morocco for instance and Southern Europe for French partners (specialization Storage - Logistics and transport business model and opening towards the East for the German and Dutch partners.

  19. Tungsten Transport in the Core of JET H-mode Plasmas, Experiments and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, Clemente

    2014-10-01

    The physics of heavy impurity transport in tokamak plasmas plays an essential role towards the achievement of practical fusion energy. Reliable predictions of the behavior of these impurities require the development of realistic theoretical models and a complete understanding of present experiments, against which models can be validated. Recent experimental campaigns at JET with the ITER-like wall, with a W divertor, provide an extremely interesting and relevant opportunity to perform this combined experimental and theoretical research. Theoretical models of both neoclassical and turbulent transport must consistently include the impact of any poloidal asymmetry of the W density to enable quantitative predictions of the 2D W density distribution over the poloidal cross section. The agreement between theoretical predictions and experimentally reconstructed 2D W densities allows the identification of the main mechanisms which govern W transport in the core of JET H-mode plasmas. Neoclassical transport is largely enhanced by centrifugal effects and the neoclassical convection dominates, leading to central accumulation in the presence of central peaking of the density profiles and insufficiently peaked ion temperature profiles. The strength of the neoclassical temperature screening is affected by poloidal asymmetries. Only around mid-radius, turbulent diffusion offsets neoclassical transport. Consistently with observations in other devices, ion cyclotron resonance heating in the plasma center can flatten the electron density profile and peak the ion temperature profile and provide a means to reverse the neoclassical convection. MHD activity may hamper or speed up the accumulation process depending on mode number and plasma conditions. Finally, the relationship of JET results to a parallel modelling activity of the W behavior in the core of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas is presented. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation

  20. Conventional transport fuels quality and ATF : recent Asian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desbiens, R. [Consultec, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The experience gained in Manila, Philippines, with regard to transport fuels, was discussed during this presentation. It is estimated that 70 to 80 per cent of air pollution in the city of Manila is generated by vehicular traffic. Diesel-fueled vehicles operate all hours of the day, and motorized tricycles powered by a two-stroke engine, are cause for concern for local authorities. Several factors play a role in the problems experienced: vehicle ownership, poor air, congestion and noise in urban areas, poor transport infrastructure, coupled with policy problems such as fuel and vehicle quality standards, poor monitoring, ancient technologies, etc. The motorization of cities was examined, and special emphasis was places on the situation in Asia. The situation in China was looked at, where approximately 15 million automobiles are in use, with an annual increase of 11 to 13 per cent. The air pollution caused by motor vehicles in China was discussed, and new vehicle emission standards for China were presented. The issue of fuel injection systems for motorcycles in China was discussed, and the author mentioned that cost and reliability problems require further improvement. The use of compressed natural gas vehicles in Beijing was looked at, and some of the barriers are lack of public awareness, capital shortages, high price of natural gas, and shortage of advanced technologies. A feasibility study for the introduction of compressed natural gas vehicles in Beijing was conducted and the main findings presented. Public transport management in Hong Kong was reviewed, including the use of alternative environmentally friendly vehicles and fuel. A look at India, and specifically Delhi, was presented. The norms concerning vehicle emissions in India were briefly reviewed, followed by fuel quality improvements, and compressed natural gas vehicles. The author then discussed alternative fuels in Korea and the country's compressed natural gas bus promotion policy. The next

  1. Development of laboratory experiments serving as a basis for modeling the transport behaviour of arsenate, lead, cadmium and copper in water-saturated columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamer, K.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to work out laboratory experiments which might serve as a link between the bench and the application of CoTAM (Column Transport and Absorption Model) in real practice, thus thanking the development of this computer model which is to permit the simulation of the transport behaviour of heavy metals in porous aquilers. Efforts were made to find a process-oriented concept so as to provide a wide field of application. In developing the model and the laboratory experiments, this meant studying all the processes in groundwater separately as far as possible and avoiding case-specific sum parameters. The work centered on an examination of sorption processes during transport in groundwater, as this combination of processes is always found in natural porous aquifers. In water-saturated-column experiments on combinations of arenaceous quartz, feldspar, montmorillonite, goethite, peat and manganese oxide as the aquifer material, the transport of cadmium, copper, lead and arsenate was simulated on the bench scale. These case examples served to study sorption processes and their diverse kinetics as well as hydrodynamic processes. (orig./BBR) [de

  2. Model Simulations of a Field Experiment on Cation Exchange-affected Multicomponent Solute Transport in a Sandy Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ammentorp, Hans Christian; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1993-01-01

    A large-scale and long-term field experiment on cation exchange in a sandy aquifer has been modelled by a three-dimensional geochemical transport model. The geochemical model includes cation-exchange processes using a Gaines-Thomas expression, the closed carbonate system and the effects of ionic...... by batch experiments and by the composition of the cations on the exchange complex. Potassium showed a non-ideal exchange behaviour with K&z.sbnd;Ca selectivity coefficients indicating dependency on equivalent fraction and K+ concentration in the aqueous phase. The model simulations over a distance of 35 m...... and a period of 250 days described accurately the observed attenuation of Na and the expelled amounts of Ca and Mg. Also, model predictions of plateau zones, formed by interaction with the background groundwater, in general agreed satisfactorily with the observations. Transport of K was simulated over a period...

  3. Reactive transport modeling of the ABM experiment with Comsol Multiphysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekala, Marek; Idiart, Andres; Arcos, David

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Swedish Organisation for Radioactive Waste Disposal (SKB) is considering disposal of the High Level Waste in a deep underground repository in a crystalline rock. According to the disposal concept, bentonite clay will be used in the near-field of the waste packages as buffer material. From solute transport point of view, the bentonite buffer is expected to provide a favourable environment, where radionuclide migration would be limited to slow diffusion and further retarded by sorption. In the KBS-3 repository design, the MX-80 bentonite is the reference buffer material. However, SKB has also been investigating alternative buffer materials. To this end, the field experiment Alternative Buffer Materials (ABM) was started at the Aespoe URL in 2006. Three packages of eleven different compacted bentonite blocks in different configurations have been tested over varying time scales. The packages with outer diameter of 0.28 m were deposited into 3 meter deep boreholes. After installation, packages were saturated and heated differently to target values. This contribution concerns the evolution of Package 1, which was initiated in December 2006 and ran for about 2.5 years. Post-mortem examination after retrieval showed that the initially contrasting chloride concentrations and cation-exchanger compositions between different bentonite blocks became significantly homogenised. It is thought that this behaviour could be explained as a first approximation by diffusion of major ions between the bentonite blocks coupled with cation-exchange. In this work, a modelling study to verify this hypothesis has been undertaken. In addition, the feasibility of implementing a reactive transport model into the Finite Element code COMSOL Multiphysics has been tested. The model considers a two-dimensional axisymmetric geometry of the depositional borehole, and includes coupled diffusion and cation-exchange of Na, K, Ca and Mg (as a chloride

  4. Statistical description of flume experiments on mixed-size bed-load transport and bed armoring processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the statistical properties of experiments on non-uniform bed-load transport as well as the mechanism of bed armoring processes. Despite substantial effort made over the last two decades, the ability to compute the bed-load flux in a turbulent system remains poor. The major obstacles include the poor understanding of the formation of armor lays on bed surfaces. Such a layer is much flow-resistible than the underlying material and therefore significantly inhibits sediment transport from the reach. To study the problem, we conducted a flume study for mixed sand/gravel sediments. We observed that aggregated sediment blocks were the most common characters in armor layers - the largest sizes resist hydraulic forces, while the smaller sizes add interlocking support and prevent loss of fine material through gaps between the larger particles. Fractional transport rates with the existing of armor layers were measured with time by sediment trapping method at the end of flume. To address the intermittent and time-varying behavior of bed-load transport during bed armoring processes, we investigated the probability distribution of the fractional bed-load transport rates, and the underlying dynamic model derived from the continuous time random walk framework. Results indicate that it is critical to consider the impact of armor layers when a flow is sufficient to move some of the finer particles and yet insufficient to move all the larger particles on a channel bed.

  5. Channel-accelerating gap interaction and beam acceleration and transport experiments with the recirculating linear accelerator (RLA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Smith, D.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Bennett, L.F.; Olson, W.R.; Turman, B.N.; Prestwich, K.R.; Wells, J.; Struve, K.

    1992-01-01

    The lifetime of the Ion Focusing Regime (IFR) channel following the pulsing of the post-accelerating gaps is critical for open-ended low energy devices. It dictates the number of allowable beam recirculations through the gaps. In the case of a closed racetrack configuration, it is significant but not as critical, since the presence of the electron beam focuses the ions and lengthens the lifetime of the ion channel. The authors have experimentally established that pulsing an accelerating gap perturbs the IFR channel. However for the parameters studied, the lifetime is long enough to allow at least four beam recirculations in a spiral device. In addition transparent grids of cusp fields positioned upstream and downstream from the gaps prevent them from perturbing the IFR channel. Experiments were performed with and without injected electron beams. For the experiments investigating the IFR channel interaction with the accelerating gap, the injector was removed and the beam line was extended downstream and upstream from the accelerating cavity. Only the first straight section of the RLA with one accelerating cavity (ET-2) was utilized. The acceleration and transport experiments were performed utilizing two injectors: first the low energy 1.3-MV Isolated Blumlein (IB) injector and most recently the new 4-MV 20-kA injector. Beams of 6--20 kA current were produced and successfully transported and accelerated through the ET-2 post-accelerating gap. For both injectors an apertured non-immersed ion-focused foilless diode was selected among various options. It is the simplest and easiest to operate and can be adjusted to provide variable beam impedance loads to the injector. The transport efficiencies were 90% for the low energy injector and 100% for the new 4-MV injector. The beam Gaussian profile and radius (5 mm) remain the same through acceleration. Experimental results will be presented and compared with numerical simulations

  6. MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF FISSION PRODUCT TRANSPORT IN THE AGR-3/4 EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humrickhouse, Paul W.; Collin, Blaise P.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Petti, David A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we describe the ongoing modeling and analysis efforts in support of the AGR-3/4 experiment. AGR-3/4 is intended to provide data to assess fission product retention and transport (e.g., diffusion coefficients) in fuel matrix and graphite materials. We describe a set of pre-test predictions that incorporate the results of detailed thermal and fission product release models into a coupled 1D radial diffusion model of the experiment, using diffusion coefficients reported in the literature for Ag, Cs, and Sr. We make some comparisons of the predicted Cs profiles to preliminary measured data for Cs and find these to be reasonable, in most cases within an order of magnitude. Our ultimate objective is to refine the diffusion coefficients using AGR-3/4 data, so we identify an analytical method for doing so and demonstrate its efficacy via a series of numerical experiments using the model predictions. Finally, we discuss development of a post-irradiation examination plan informed by the modeling effort and simulate some of the heating tests that are tentatively planned.

  7. Hydraulic experiment on formation mechanism of tsunami deposit and verification of sediment transport model for tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Takahashi, T.; Harada, K.; Sakuraba, M.; Nojima, K.

    2017-12-01

    An underestimation of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami caused serious damage in coastal area. Reconsideration for tsunami estimation needs knowledge of paleo tsunamis. The historical records of giant tsunamis are limited, because they had occurred infrequently. Tsunami deposits may include many of tsunami records and are expected to analyze paleo tsunamis. However, present research on tsunami deposits are not able to estimate the tsunami source and its magnitude. Furthermore, numerical models of tsunami and its sediment transport are also important. Takahashi et al. (1999) proposed a model of movable bed condition due to tsunamis, although it has some issues. Improvement of the model needs basic data on sediment transport and deposition. This study investigated the formation mechanism of tsunami deposit by hydraulic experiment using a two-dimensional water channel with slope. In a fixed bed condition experiment, velocity, water level and suspended load concentration were measured at many points. In a movable bed condition, effects of sand grains and bore wave on the deposit were examined. Yamamoto et al. (2016) showed deposition range varied with sand grain sizes. In addition, it is revealed that the range fluctuated by number of waves and wave period. The measurements of velocity and water level showed that flow was clearly different near shoreline and in run-up area. Large velocity by return flow was affected the amount of sand deposit near shoreline. When a cutoff wall was installed on the slope, the amount of sand deposit repeatedly increased and decreased. Especially, sand deposit increased where velocity decreased. Takahashi et al. (1999) adapted the proposed model into Kesennuma bay when the 1960 Chilean tsunami arrived, although the amount of sand transportation was underestimated. The cause of the underestimation is inferred that the velocity of this model was underestimated. A relationship between velocity and sediment transport has to be studied in detail, but

  8. Transient Transport Experiments in the CDX-U Spherical Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Munsat; P.C. Efthimion; B. Jones; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; D. Stutman; G. Taylor

    2001-01-01

    Electron transport has been measured in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) using two separate perturbative techniques. Gas modulation at the plasma edge was used to introduce cold-pulses which propagate towards the plasma center, providing time-of-flight information leading to a determination of chi(subscript e) as a function of radius. Sawteeth at the q=1 radius (r/a ∼ 0.15) induced heat-pulses which propagated outward towards the plasma edge, providing a complementary time-of-flight based chi(subscript e) profile measurement. This work represents the first localized measurement of chi(subscript e) in a spherical torus. It is found that chi(subscript e) = 1-2 meters squared per second in the plasma core (r/a < 1/3), increasing by an order of magnitude or more outside of this region. Furthermore, the chi(subscript e) profile exhibits a sharp transition near r/a = 1/3. Spectral and profile analyses of the soft X-rays, scanning interferometer, and edge probe data show no evidence of a significant magnetic island causing the high chi(subscript e) region

  9. Sustainable Transport: BRT experiences from Mexico and India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogat, Jorge; Dhar, Subash; Joshi, Rutul

    2015-01-01

    Increasing population and urbanization is creating a steadily increasing demand for transportation in the cities of many developing countries, coinciding with rapid economic growth leading to increasing demand for higher standards of living and faster and more efficient modes of transportation...... transit (BRT). The BRT systems of Curitiba and Bogotá have subsequently been adopted all over the world with some variations. Implementation of two recent BRTs, Mexico City and Ahmedabad in India, are examined in this paper....

  10. Charge transport in organic light-emitting diodes. Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Matthias

    2012-11-01

    . Thereby, the agreement between simulation and experiment is excellent, which demonstrates the correctness and applicability of the developed model. Finally, the complete OLED is successfully simulated on the basis of the parameters that have been obtained in the analysis of the single-carrier devices. The simulation of the OLED illustrates the transport levels of electrons and holes, and proofs that the OLED efficiency is low because of non-radiative recombination in the interlayer between the phosphorescent and fluorescent emission zones. In this context, many interesting issues are discussed, e.g. the applicability of the Langevin model in combination with the mobility models for the description of recombination and the relevance of interactions between free charge carriers and excitons.

  11. Neoclassical transport in NCSX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Beidler, C.D.; Maassberg, H.; Houlberg, W.A.; Spong, D.A.; Tribaldos, V.

    2003-01-01

    Methods for calculating neoclassical transport in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) are discussed, with particular attention to developing computationally inexpensive predictions of neoclassical transport. (orig.)

  12. Neutral Transport Simulations of Gas Puff Imaging Experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J.L.; Zweben, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Visible imaging of gas puffs has been used on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to characterize edge plasma turbulence, yielding data that can be compared with plasma turbulence codes. Simulations of these experiments with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code have been carried out to explore the relationship between the plasma fluctuations and the observed light emission. By imposing two-dimensional modulations on the measured time-average plasma density and temperature profiles, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the emission cloud reflects that of the underlying turbulence. However, the photon emission rate depends on the plasma density and temperature in a complicated way, and no simple scheme for inferring the plasma parameters directly from the light emission patterns is apparent. The simulations indicate that excited atoms generated by molecular dissociation are a significant source of photons, further complicating interpretation of the gas puff imaging results.Visibl e imaging of gas puffs has been used on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to characterize edge plasma turbulence, yielding data that can be compared with plasma turbulence codes. Simulations of these experiments with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code have been carried out to explore the relationship between the plasma fluctuations and the observed light emission. By imposing two-dimensional modulations on the measured time-average plasma density and temperature profiles, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the emission cloud reflects that of the underlying turbulence. However, the photon emission rate depends on the plasma density and temperature in a complicated way, and no simple scheme for inferring the plasma parameters directly from the light emission patterns is apparent. The simulations indicate that excited atoms generated by molecular dissociation are a significant source of photons, further complicating interpretation of the gas puff imaging results

  13. World-wide French experience in research reactor fuel cycle transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, D.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1963 Transnucleaire has safely performed a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied suitable packagings for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive material from front-end and back-end products and for power or for research reactors. Transportation of the nuclear fuel material for power reactors is made on a regular and industrial basis. The transportation of material for the research reactor fuel cycle is quite different due to the small quantities involved, the categorisation of material and the numerous places of delivery world-wide. Adapted solutions exist, which require a reactive organisation dealing with all the transportation issues for LEU and HEU products as metal, oxide, fresh fuel elements, spent fuel elements including supply of necessary transport packaging and equipment. This presentation will: - explain the choices made by Transnucleaire and its associates to provide and optimise the corresponding services, - demonstrate the capability to achieve, through reliable partnership, transport operations involving new routes, specific equipment and new political constraints while respecting sophisticated safety and security regulations. (author)

  14. Thermal convection loop experiments and analysis of mass transport process in Lithium/Fe-12Cr-1MoVW systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, G.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium is an attractive coolant and breeder material for first- generation fusion reactor blankets. The compatibility of lithium with structural alloys, in the form of mass transport and deposition, may impose restrictions on blanket operating parameters such as temperature and lithium purity. A ferritic steel, such as Fe-12CrlMoVW, is a candidate for use as a structural alloy in a self-cooled lithium blanket design. Experimental data on mass transport in lithium/Fe-12CrlMoVW were obtained from two thermal convection loops which spanned the fusion relevant temperature range; one operated from 360 to 505/degree/C for 3040 hours and the other from 525 to 655/degree/C for 2510 hours. The experimental effort was supported by analysis of the mechanisms and processes of mass transport and deposition. It was found that mass transport and deposition, as measured by specimen weight change, were not simple functions of temperature for the entire temperature range investigated. The mass transfer behavior and surface morphology at low temperatures were dominated by impurity reactions of nitrogen and carbon in the lithium with the steel. In the experiment between 360 and 505/degree/C, nitrogen levels were sufficient below 450/degree/C to allow the formation of the adherent, protective corrosion product Li 9 CrN 5 . Weight losses in the 360 to 505/degree/C experiment were insensitive to temperature below 450/degree/C. Between 450 and 505/degree/C, the precipitation of carbon in the form of chromium-rich M 23 C 6 (M = Fe or Cr) carbides, due to the formation of Li 9 CrN 5 and corresponding release of carbon, resulted in weight gains for the highest temperature specimens in the experiment. 98 refs., 83 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Measurement of CO2 emissions from road freight transport: A review of UK experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, A.C.; Piecyk, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    It is possible to estimate CO 2 emissions from road freight transport in different ways, depending on the definition of trucking activity, the degree of reliance on survey, vehicle test-cycle and traffic count data and the geographical scope of the calculation. The emergence of differing road freight-related CO 2 estimates from official sources and revisions to statistical series can frustrate the policy-making process and erode the confidence of industry stakeholders in the validity of the figures. Using UK data, this paper examines the various methods of carbon auditing road freight transport at the national level and compares the results both for a single year (2006) and over a time period. It highlights a series of statistical anomalies and approximations and tries to explain discrepancies that have arisen in the UK data sets. A concluding section considers the general lessons that can be learned from the recent UK experience in this field.

  16. Solute transport and extraction by a single root in unsaturated soils: model development and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaisoo; Sung, Kijune; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Drew, Malcolm C

    2004-09-01

    A contaminant transport model was developed to simulate the fate and transport of organic compounds such as TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), using the single-root system. Onions were planted for this system with 50-ml plastic tubes. Mass in the soil, soil solution, root and leaf was monitored using {sup 14}C-TNT. Model parameters were acquired from the experiments in the single-root system and were used to simulate total TNT concentration in soil, providing the average concentrations in the rhizosphere and bulk soil as well as root and leaf compartments. Because the existing RCF (root concentration factor) and TSCF (transpiration stream concentration factor) equations based on log K{sub ow} (octanol-water partition coefficient) were not correlated to TNT uptake, a new term, root uptake rate (R{sub ur}), and a new T{sub scf} equation, based on the experimental data, were introduced in the proposed model. The results from both modeling and experimental studies showed higher concentrations of TNT in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil, because mass transported from the surrounding soil into the rhizosphere was higher than that by root uptake.

  17. Tax and green transport plans: a survey of UK experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, S.; Smith, M.; Rye, T.

    1999-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Green Transport Plans (GTPs) by employer has become an important aim of the UK government transport policy as it tries to find ways of reducing transport demand. However, the tax treatment of employee benefits that form part of many GTPs has been identified by the government and others as a potential barrier to their adoption. Based on telephone interviews with employers and meetings with tax and transport experts, this paper confirms this perception. It also explains precisely how tax forms a barrier to GTP implementation, reviews the approaches taken to this problem in three other countries and makes outline proposals for reform and further research. (Author)

  18. Experience and prospects of WWER-1000 reactor spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyev, A.N.; Yershov, V.N.; Kozlov, Yu.V.; Kosarev, Yu.A.; Ilyin, Yu.V.; Pavlov, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with the USSR experience in shipping the commercial WWER-1000 reactor spent fuel in TK-10 and TK-13 casks. The cask designs, their basic characteristics and the WWER-1000 spent fuel features are described. An example of calculational/experimental approach in the design of a basket (one of the most important components) for spent fuel assembly (SFA) accommodation in a cask is given. The main problems of future development works are presented in brief. A concept of development of nuclear power industry with the closed fuel cycle is assumed in the Soviet Union, hence the spent nuclear fuel is to be transported from NPPs to reprocessing plants. To transport WWER-1000 spent fuel, the casks of two types were developed. These are: a pilot TK-10 cask of 3t capacity in fuel; a commercial TK-13 cask of ∼6t capacity in fuel. The pilot TK-10 cask is thick-walled (360mm) cylindrical vessel manufactured of steel shells and a bottom welded to each other. The material of the body is carbon steel. There is a steel jacket on the outer side of the cask body and at 120 mm distance off the bottom. On its cylindrical part between the jacket and the body there are T-shaped circular ribs acting as shock-absorbers. The space between the jacket and the body is filled with ethylene glycol solution of 65 degree C crystallization temperature, which functions as a neutron shielding. The TK-10 cask coolant is water or air (nitrogen) at minor excess pressure resulted from FA heatup after the cask sealing

  19. Regional transport and dilution during high-pollution episodes in southern France: Summary of findings from the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport (ESCOMPTE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobinski, P.; SaïD, F.; Ancellet, G.; Arteta, J.; Augustin, P.; Bastin, S.; Brut, A.; Caccia, J. L.; Campistron, B.; Cautenet, S.; Colette, A.; Coll, I.; Corsmeier, U.; Cros, B.; Dabas, A.; Delbarre, H.; Dufour, A.; Durand, P.; GuéNard, V.; Hasel, M.; Kalthoff, N.; Kottmeier, C.; Lasry, F.; Lemonsu, A.; Lohou, F.; Masson, V.; Menut, L.; Moppert, C.; Peuch, V. H.; Puygrenier, V.; Reitebuch, O.; Vautard, R.

    2007-07-01

    In the French Mediterranean basin the large city of Marseille and its industrialized suburbs (oil plants in the Fos-Berre area) are major pollutant sources that cause frequent and hazardous pollution episodes, especially in summer when intense solar heating enhances the photochemical activity and when the sea breeze circulation redistributes pollutants farther north in the countryside. This paper summarizes the findings of 5 years of research on the sea breeze in southern France and related mesoscale transport and dilution of pollutants within the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport (ESCOMPTE) program held in June and July 2001. This paper provides an overview of the experimental and numerical challenges identified before the ESCOMPTE field experiment and summarizes the key findings made in observation, simulation, and theory. We specifically address the role of large-scale atmospheric circulation to local ozone vertical distribution and the mesoscale processes driving horizontal advection of pollutants and vertical transport and mixing via entrainment at the top of the sea breeze or at the front and venting along the sloped terrain. The crucial importance of the interactions between processes of various spatial and temporal scales is thus highlighted. The advances in numerical modeling and forecasting of sea breeze events and ozone pollution episodes in southern France are also underlined. Finally, we conclude and point out some open research questions needing further investigation.

  20. Regional transport and dilution during high-pollution episodes in southern France: Summary of findings from the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport (ESCOMPTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobinski, P.; Menut, L.; Ancellet, G.; Bastin, S.; Colette, A.; Said, F.; Brut, A.; Campistron, B.; Cros, B.; Durand, P.; Lohou, F.; Moppert, C.; Puygrenier, V.; Arteta, J.; Cautenet, S.; Augustin, P.; Delbarre, H.; Caccia, J.L.; Guenard, V.; Coll, I.; Lasry, F.; Corsmeier, U.; Hasel, M.; Kalthoff, N.; Kottmeier, C.; Dabas, A.; Dufour, A.; Lemonsu, A.; Masson, V.; Peuch, V.H.; Reitebuch, O.; Vautard, R.

    2007-01-01

    In the French Mediterranean basin the large city of Marseille and its industrialized suburbs (oil plants in the Fos-Berre area) are major pollutant sources that cause frequent and hazardous pollution episodes, especially in summer when intense solar heating enhances the photochemical activity and when the sea breeze circulation redistributes pollutants farther north in the countryside. This paper summarizes the findings of 5 years of research on the sea breeze in southern France and related mesoscale transport and dilution of pollutants within the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport (ESCOMPTE) program held in June and July 2001. This paper provides an overview of the experimental and numerical challenges identified before the ESCOMPTE field experiment and summarizes the key findings made in observation, simulation, and theory. We specifically address the role of large-scale atmospheric circulation to local ozone vertical distribution and the mesoscale processes driving horizontal advection of pollutants and vertical transport and mixing via entrainment at the top of the sea breeze or at the front and venting along the sloped terrain. The crucial importance of the interactions between processes of various spatial and temporal scales is thus highlighted. The advances in numerical modeling and forecasting of sea breeze events and ozone pollution episodes in southern France are also underlined. Finally, we conclude and point out some open research questions needing further investigation. (authors)

  1. Regional transport and dilution during high-pollution episodes in southern France: Summary of findings from the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport (ESCOMPTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobinski, P.; Menut, L. [Ecole Polytechnique, Inst Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Ancellet, G.; Bastin, S.; Colette, A. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Service d' aeronomie, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris, (France); Said, F.; Brut, A.; Campistron, B.; Cros, B.; Durand, P.; Lohou, F.; Moppert, C.; Puygrenier, V. [Univ Toulouse, Lab Aerol, F-31400 Toulouse, (France); Arteta, J.; Cautenet, S. [Univ Clermont Ferrand, Lab Meteorol Phys, F-63174 Aubiere, (France); Augustin, P.; Delbarre, H. [Univ Littoral Cote d' Opale, Lab Physicochim Atmosphere, F-59140 Dunkerque, (France); Caccia, J.L.; Guenard, V. [Univ Toulon and Var, Lab Sondages Electromagnet Environm Terr, F-83957 La Garde, (France); Coll, I.; Lasry, F. [Fac Sci and Technol, Lab Interuniv Syst Atmospher, F-94010 Creteil, (France); Corsmeier, U.; Hasel, M.; Kalthoff, N.; Kottmeier, C. [Univ Karlsruhe, Inst Meteorol and Klimaforsch, Forschungszentrum, D-76133 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Dabas, A.; Dufour, A.; Lemonsu, A.; Masson, V.; Peuch, V.H. [Ctr Natl Rech Meteorol, F-31057 Toulouse, (France); Reitebuch, O. [Deutsch Zentrum Luft and Raumfahrt, Inst Atmospher Phys, D-82234 Wessling, (Germany); Vautard, R. [Inst Pierre Simon Laplace, CEA Saclay, Lab Sci Climat and Environm, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2007-07-01

    In the French Mediterranean basin the large city of Marseille and its industrialized suburbs (oil plants in the Fos-Berre area) are major pollutant sources that cause frequent and hazardous pollution episodes, especially in summer when intense solar heating enhances the photochemical activity and when the sea breeze circulation redistributes pollutants farther north in the countryside. This paper summarizes the findings of 5 years of research on the sea breeze in southern France and related mesoscale transport and dilution of pollutants within the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport (ESCOMPTE) program held in June and July 2001. This paper provides an overview of the experimental and numerical challenges identified before the ESCOMPTE field experiment and summarizes the key findings made in observation, simulation, and theory. We specifically address the role of large-scale atmospheric circulation to local ozone vertical distribution and the mesoscale processes driving horizontal advection of pollutants and vertical transport and mixing via entrainment at the top of the sea breeze or at the front and venting along the sloped terrain. The crucial importance of the interactions between processes of various spatial and temporal scales is thus highlighted. The advances in numerical modeling and forecasting of sea breeze events and ozone pollution episodes in southern France are also underlined. Finally, we conclude and point out some open research questions needing further investigation. (authors)

  2. Validation study of the reactor physics lattice transport code WIMSD-5B by TRX and BAPL critical experiments of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.J.H.; Alam, A.B.M.K.; Ahsan, M.H.; Mamun, K.A.A.; Islam, S.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • To validate the reactor physics lattice code WIMSD-5B by this analysis. • To model TRX and BAPL critical experiments using WIMSD-5B. • To compare the calculated results with experiment and MCNP results. • To rely on WIMSD-5B code for TRIGA calculations. - Abstract: The aim of this analysis is to validate the reactor physics lattice transport code WIMSD-5B by TRX (thermal reactor-one region lattice) and BAPL (Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory-one region lattice) critical experiments of light water reactors for neutronics analysis of 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor at AERE, Dhaka, Bangladesh. This analysis is achieved through the analysis of integral parameters of five light water reactor critical experiments TRX-1, TRX-2, BAPL-UO 2 -1, BAPL-UO 2 -2 and BAPL-UO 2 -3 based on evaluated nuclear data libraries JEFF-3.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1. In integral measurements, these experiments are considered as standard benchmark lattices for validating the reactor physics lattice transport code WIMSD-5B as well as evaluated nuclear data libraries. The integral parameters of the said critical experiments are calculated using the reactor physics lattice transport code WIMSD-5B. The calculated integral parameters are compared to the measured values as well as the earlier published MCNP results based on the Chinese evaluated nuclear data library CENDL-3.0 for assessment of deterministic calculation. It was found that the calculated integral parameters give mostly reasonable and globally consistent results with the experiment and the MCNP results. Besides, the group constants in WIMS format for the isotopes U-235 and U-238 between two data files have been compared using WIMS library utility code WILLIE and it was found that the group constants are well consistent with each other. Therefore, this analysis reveals the validation study of the reactor physics lattice transport code WIMSD-5B based on JEFF-3.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 libraries and can also be essential to

  3. MTX [Microwave Tokamak Experiment] diagnostic and auxiliary systems for confinement, transport, and plasma physics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1989-01-01

    This note describes the diagnostics and auxiliary systems on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) for confinement, transport, and other plasma physics studies. It is intended as a reference on the installed and planned hardware on the machine for those who need more familiarity with this equipment. Combined with the tokamak itself, these systems define the opportunities and capabilities for experiments in the MTX facility. We also illustrate how these instruments and equipment are to be used in carrying out the MTX Operations Plan. Near term goals for MTX are focussed on the absorption and heating by the microwave beam from the FEL, but the Plan also includes using the facility to study fundamental phenomena in the plasma, to control MHD activity, and to drive current noninductively

  4. UrbanTransport Solution An Experience From Prague

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unique firstlady

    Based on the result of the research ... associated with road transport like its impact on environment ..... Prague is utilizing a variety of marketing strategies used for many years in ... at strategic metro stations providing customers with maps , time ...

  5. The International Experience of the State Support for Creating the Transport and Logistics Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharska Iryna O.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at analysis and synthesis of the international experience as to the State support for creating the transport and logistics centers (TLCs. The causes for emergence of the first TLCs in Europe (60-80-ies of XX century were considered. Values of the LPI index for the countries occupying the first 40 positions of the ranking as of 2014 and of 2016 have been provided, and the major changes during this time have been analyzed. The ranking position of Ukraine is displayed separately. Features of the logistics infrastructure of nine countries with a high value of the LPI index have been considered, degree of the State involvement in the formation of the TLC network has been analyzed. It has been substantiated that creation of the transport and logistics centers allows to reduce the logistics costs of individual producers and contributes to enhancing the efficiency of operation of the national economy in general by attracting investments in the infrastructure development, increasing the number of jobs and tax revenues. The basic motifs that determine the interest of the State authorities in providing support for creating the transportation and logistics centers have been defined. Prospect for further research in this direction will be determining the efficiency of using the different models of the State support for creation and development of TLCs

  6. Evaluation of water transport behavior in sodium fire experiment-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagiri, Toshio [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-02-01

    Evaluation of water transport behavior in Sodium Fire-II (Run-D4) was performed. Results of other experiments performed in Oarai-Engineering Center were considered in the evaluation, and the results of the evaluation were compared with the calculated results of ASSCOPS code. The main conclusions are described below. (1) It was estimated that aerosol hydrates were not formed in the test cell in the experiment, because of high gas temperatures (200degC - 300degC), but water vapor absorption by the formation of aerosol hydrates and water vapor condensation were occurred in humility measure line, because of low gas temperature (20degC - 40degC). Therefore, it was considered appropriate that measured water vapor concentration in the humidity measure line was different from the real concentration in the test cell. (2) Water vapor concentration in the test cell was assumed to be about 35,000 ppm during sodium leak, and reached to about 70,000 ppm because of water release from heated concrete (over 100degC) walls after 190 min from sodium leak started. The assumed value of about 35,000 ppm during sodium leak almost agree with assumed value from the quantity of aerosol in the humidity measure line, but no support for the value of about 70,000 ppm after 190 min could be found. Therefore, water release rate from heated concrete walls can change with their temperature history. (author)

  7. Electron beam optics for the FEL experiment and IFEL experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1990-01-01

    Electron beam transport system parameters for the FEL experiment and for the FEL experiment are given. The perturbation of the ''interaction region'' optics due to wiggler focussing is taken into account and a range of solutions are provided for relevant Twiss parameters in the FEL or IFEL region. Modifications of the transport optics in specific sections of the overall beam transport lines, for reasons of enhanced diagnostic capability or enhanced beam momentum analysis resolution, is also presented

  8. Zeroing of the TL signal of sediment undergoing fluvial transportation: a laboratory experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, A.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Rates of bleaching of suspended sediment undergoing fluvial transportation in a closed laboratory flume beneath a u.v. lamp were measured. It was found that the speed of zeroing is inversely related to the speed of flow. This is attributed to the effects of flow turbulence in keeping sediment in suspension, thereby reducing the penetration of u.v. radiation, and to the re-entrainment of partially bleached or unbleached sediment into the flow. The time required to reduce TL to the residual levels indicated by sunlamp bleaching experiments are such as to suggest that at faster flows sediments in a heavily-laden stream may never attain a complete bleaching. (author)

  9. Evidence and concepts for nonlocal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Kissick, M.W.

    1997-08-01

    Up until a few years ago, most transient transport studies observed primarily diffusive plasma transport responses to fast, localized perturbations. Recently, a number of experiments have, in addition, observed nonlocal electron heat responses. Most remarkably, in cold pulse experiments the abrupt edge cooling via radiative processes can induce both a diffusive cooling response moving in from the edge, and simultaneously a rising electron temperature in the central core of tokamak plasmas--an opposite response even before the diffusive cooling from the edge reaches the center. These and other nonlocal electron heat transport conundrums from recent experiments are reviewed. Also, models and physical processes being advanced to explain these puzzling phenomena are discussed. The importance of resolving this transport enigma is emphasized

  10. Edge-core interaction revealed with dynamic transport experiment in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.

    2010-11-01

    Large scale coherent structures in electron heat transport of both core and edge plasmas are clearly found in plasma with a nonlocal transport phenomenon (NTP, a core electron temperature rise in response to an edge cooling) on Large Helical Device (LHD). At the onset of the NTP, a first order transition of the electron heat transport, which is characterized by a discontinuity of electron temperature gradient, is found to take place over a wide region (at least 6 cm wide) in the periphery of the plasma. At about the same time, over a wide region (about 10 cm wide) of the plasma core, a second order transition of the electron heat transport, which is characterized by a discontinuity of the time derivative of the electron temperature gradient, appears. The both large scale coherent structures are of a scale larger than a typical micro-turbulent eddy size (a few mm in this case). In order to assess dynamic characteristics of the electron heat transport state in the core region during the NTP, a transit time distribution analysis is applied to the temporal behaviors of the electron temperature gradient. The analysis results more clearly show the existence of the large coherent structures in electron heat transport. Thus the NTP observed in LHD is considered to be invoked by the interaction of those structures. (author)

  11. Urban form and energy use for transport. A Nordic experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naess, P

    1995-02-10

    The main research problem addressed in this thesis is the possible influence of several urban form variables on the amount of transportation, on the modal split between different means of transport, and on energy use for transportation. This problem is elucidated through five empirical investigations covering different geographic levels in a Nordic context, from individual employees and households to commuting regions. A main feature of the study is the combination of socioeconomic and urban form variables in empirical investigations, employing techniques of multivariate analysis. The investigations of residential areas and job sites have been based on travel surveys, while the investigations where the units of analysis are towns or regions have been based on fuel sales. The socioeconomic data have been collected from official statistics and from questionnaires. It is found that urban form variables exert important influences on transportation energy use. Urban density affects energy use for transportation. A central location of residences as well as workplaces is favourable with respect to energy conservation on an intra-urban scale, but not in a wider geographical context, where decentralization into several dense, relatively self-contained local communities distributed over the region is the most energy-saving pattern of regional development. Urban form characteristics favourable for minimizing transport energy requirements also seem favourable for energy conservation in buildings. 160 refs., 39 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. Long-term financial transportation rights : An experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henze, B.; Noussair, C.N.; Willems, Bert; Kristainsen, T.; Rosellon, J.

    2013-01-01

    One challenge facing operators of network infrastructure, such as gas pipelines and electricity grids, is that large new investments in capacity must be undertaken as overall demand increases. In the European Union alone, roughly 200 Billion Euro must be invested in the energy transport networks

  13. Physics of transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X [Assoc. EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Mantica, P [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma EURATOM-ENEA/CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Angioni, C [MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoz., D-8046 Garching (Germany)] [and others

    2004-12-01

    This paper is an overview of recent results relating to turbulent particle and heat transport, and to the triggering of internal transport barriers (ITBs). The dependence of the turbulent particle pinch velocity on plasma parameters has been clarified and compared with experiment. Magnetic shear and collisionality are found to play a central role. Analysis of heat transport has made progress along two directions: dimensionless scaling laws, which are found to agree with the prediction for electrostatic turbulence, and analysis of modulation experiments, which provide a stringent test of transport models. Finally the formation of ITBs has been addressed by analysing electron transport barriers. It is confirmed that negative magnetic shear, combined with the Shafranov shift, is a robust stabilizing mechanism. However, some well established features of internal barriers are not explained by theory.

  14. Defining sustainable transport in rural tourism: experiences from the New Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Janet E.; Smith, A.; Robbins, Derek K.

    2017-01-01

    Transport policy agendas have long sought to bring about more sustainable transport at tourism destinations. While there are examples of successes, it remains unclear what inroads have been made towards creating a sustainable transport future. Policy directions have evolved over a number of years and in many tourism destination contexts it is far from clear what a desirable transport future looks like. When translated to implementation, the aims of initiatives can be unclear and baseline meas...

  15. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted

  16. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  17. Experimental constraints on transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, K.H.; Burrell, K.H.; Forest, C.B.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; De Haas, J.C.M.; James, R.A.; Makowski, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    Characterization of the cross-field energy transport in magnetic confinement experiments in a manner applicable to the accurate assessment of future machine performance continues to be a challenging goal. Experimental results from the DIII-D tokamak in the areas of dimensionless scaling and non-diffusive transport represent progress toward this goal. Dimensionless scaling shows how beneficial the increase in machine size and magnetic field is for future devices. The experiments on DIII-D are the first to determine separately the electron and ion scaling with normalized gyroradius ρ * ; the electrons scale as expected from gyro-Bohm class theories, while the ions scale consistent with the Goldston empirical scaling. This result predicts an increase in transport relative to Bohm diffusion as ρ * decreases in future devices. The existence of distinct ρ * scalings for ions and electrons cautions against a physical interpretation of one-fluid or global analysis. The second class of experiments reported here are the first to demonstrate the existence of non-diffusive energy transport. Electron cyclotron heating was applied at the half radius; the electron temperature profile remains substantially peaked. Power balance analysis indicates that heat must flow in the direction of increasing temperature, which is inconsistent with purely diffusive transport. The dynamics of electron temperature perturbations indicate the presence in the heat flux of a term dependent on temperature rather than its gradient. These two observations strongly constrain the types of models which can be applied to cross-field heat transport

  18. Investigation of self-organized criticality behavior of edge plasma transport in Torus experiment of technology oriented research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.H.; Jachmich, S.; Weynants, R.R.; Huber, A.; Unterberg, B.; Samm, U.

    2004-01-01

    The self-organized criticality (SOC) behavior of the edge plasma transport has been studied using fluctuation data measured in the plasma edge and the scrape-off layer of Torus experiment of technology oriented research tokamak [H. Soltwisch et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 26, 23 (1984)] before and during the edge biasing experiments. In the 'nonshear' discharge phase before biasing, the fluctuation data clearly show some of the characteristics associated with SOC, including similar frequency spectra to those obtained in 'sandpile' transport and other SOC systems, slowly decaying long tails in the autocorrelation function, values of Hurst parameters larger than 0.5 at all the detected radial locations, and a radial propagation of avalanchelike events in the edge plasma area. During the edge biasing phase, with the generation of an edge radial electric field E r and thus of E r xB flow shear, contrary to theoretical expectation, the Hurst parameters are substantially enhanced in the negative flow shear region and in the scrape-off layer as well. Concomitantly, it is found that the local turbulence is well decorrelated by the E r xB velocity shear, consistent with theoretical predictions

  19. Experience of air transport of nuclear fuel material in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, T.; Toguri, D.; Kawasaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    Certified Reference Materials (hereafter called as to CRMs), which are indispensable for Quality Assurance and Material Accountability in nuclear fuel plants, are being provided by overseas suppliers to Japanese nuclear entities as Type A package (non-fissile) through air transport. However, after the criticality accident at JCO in Japan, special law defining nuclear disaster countermeasures (hereafter called as to the LAW) has been newly enforced in June 2000. Thereafter, nuclear fuel materials must meet not only to the existing transport regulations but also to the LAW for its transport

  20. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  1. Convective transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Yu, G.Q.; Xu, X.Q.; Nevins, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Scrape-off-layer (SOL) convection in fusion experiments appears to be a universal phenomenon that can 'short-circuit' the divertor in some cases. The theory of 'blob' transport provides a simple and robust physical paradigm for studying convective transport. This paper summarizes recent advances in the theory of blob transport and its comparison with 2D and 3D computer simulations. We also discuss the common physical basis relating radial transport of blobs, pellets, and ELMs and a new blob regime that may lead to a connection between blob transport and the density limit. (author)

  2. Inspection of nuclear fuel transport in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo Mendez, J.

    1977-01-01

    The experience acquired in inspecting nuclear fuel shipments carried out in Spain will serve as a basis for establishing the regulations wich must be adhered to for future transports, as the transport of nuclear fuels in Spain will increase considerably within the next years as a result of the Spanish nuclear program. The experience acquired in nuclear fuel transport inspection is described. (author) [es

  3. Flow and contaminant transport in an airliner cabin induced by a moving body: Model experiments and CFD predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussou, Stephane B.; Mazumdar, Sagnik; Plesniak, Michael W.; Sojka, Paul E.; Chen, Qingyan

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a moving human body on flow and contaminant transport inside an aircraft cabin were investigated. Experiments were performed in a one-tenth scale, water-based model. The flow field and contaminant transport were measured using the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) techniques, respectively. Measurements were obtained with (ventilation case) and without (baseline case) the cabin environmental control system (ECS). The PIV measurements show strong intermittency in the instantaneous near-wake flow. A symmetric downwash flow was observed along the vertical centerline of the moving body in the baseline case. The evolution of this flow pattern is profoundly perturbed by the flow from the ECS. Furthermore, a contaminant originating from the moving body is observed to convect to higher vertical locations in the presence of ventilation. These experimental data were used to validate a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model. The CFD model can effectively capture the characteristic flow features and contaminant transport observed in the small-scale model.

  4. Transport of MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, I.R.; Carr, M.

    1997-01-01

    The regulatory framework which governs the transport of MOX fuel is set out, including packages, transport modes and security requirements. Technical requirements for the packages are reviewed and BNFL's experience in plutonium and MOX fuel transport is described. The safety of such operations and the public perception of safety are described and the question of gaining public acceptance for MOX fuel transport is addressed. The paper concludes by emphasising the need for proactive programmes to improve the public acceptance of these operations. (Author)

  5. Spent fuel storage and transport cask decontamination and modification. An overview of management requirements and applications based on practical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    A large increase in the number of casks required for transport and/or storage of spent fuel is forecast into the next century. The principal requirement will be for increased number of storage and dual purpose (transport/storage) casks for interim storage of spent fuel prior to reprocessing or permanent disposal in both on-site and off-site storage facilities. Through contact with radioactive materials spent fuel casks will be contaminated on both internal and external surfaces. In broad terms, cask contamination management can be defined by three components: minimisation, prevention and decontamination. This publication is a compilation of international experience with cask contamination problems and decontamination practices. The objective is to present current knowledge and experience as well as developments, trends and potential for new applications in this field. Furthermore, the report may assist in new design or modification of existing casks, cask handling systems and decontamination equipment

  6. Optimizing beam transport in rapidly compressing beams on the neutralized drift compression experiment – II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton D. Stepanov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II is an induction linac that generates intense pulses of 1.2 MeV helium ions for heating matter to extreme conditions. Here, we present recent results on optimizing beam transport. The NDCX-II beamline includes a 1-m-long drift section downstream of the last transport solenoid, which is filled with charge-neutralizing plasma that enables rapid longitudinal compression of an intense ion beam against space-charge forces. The transport section on NDCX-II consists of 28 solenoids. Finding optimal field settings for a group of solenoids requires knowledge of the envelope parameters of the beam. Imaging the beam on the scintillator gives the radius of the beam, but the envelope angle is not measured directly. We demonstrate how the parameters of the beam envelope (radius, envelop angle, and emittance can be reconstructed from a series of images taken by varying the B-field strengths of a solenoid upstream of the scintillator. We use this technique to evaluate emittance at several points in the NDCX-II beamline and for optimizing the trajectory of the beam at the entry of the plasma-filled drift section. Keywords: Charged-particle beams, Induction accelerators, Beam dynamics, Beam emittance, Ion beam diagnostics, PACS Codes: 41.75.-i, 41.85.Ja, 52.59.Sa, 52.59.Wd, 29.27.Eg

  7. Adverse events during air and ground neonatal transport: 13 years' experience from a neonatal transport team in Northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Johannes; Olsson, Linn; Svensson, Amelie; Håkansson, Stellan

    2015-07-01

    To study the prevalence of adverse events (AEs) associated with neonatal transport, and to categorize, classify and assess the risk estimation of these events. Written comments in 1082 transport records during the period 1999-2011 were reviewed. Comments related to events that infringed on patient and staff safety were included as AEs, and categorized and further classified as complaint, imminent risk of incident/negative event, actual incident or actual negative event. AEs were also grouped into emergency or planned transports, and risk estimation was calculated according to a risk assessment tool and defined as low, intermediate, high or extreme risk. AEs (N = 883) were divided into five categories: logistics (n = 337), organization (n = 177), equipment (n = 165), vehicle (n = 129) and medical/nursing care (n = 75). Eighty-five percent of AEs were classified as incidents or negative events. The majority of AEs were estimated to be of low or intermediate risk in both planned and emergency transports. AEs estimated to be of high or extreme risk were significantly more frequent in emergency transports (OR = 10.1; 95% CI: 5.0-20.9; p transport, often related to imperfect transport logistics or equipment failure. AEs of high or extreme risk were more frequent in emergency transports.

  8. Neoclassical and gyrokinetic analysis of time-dependent helium transport experiments on MAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S. S.; Garzotti, L.; Casson, F. J.; Dickinson, D.; Fox, M. F. J.; O'Mullane, M.; Patel, A.; Roach, C. M.; Summers, H. P.; Valovič, M.; The MAST Team

    2014-09-01

    Time-dependent helium gas puff experiments have been performed on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) during a two point plasma current scan in L-mode and a confinement scan at 900 kA. An evaluation of the He II (n = 4 → 3) spectrum line induced by charge exchange suggests anomalous rates of diffusion and inward convection in the outer regions of both L-mode plasmas. Similar rates of diffusion are found in the H-mode plasma, however these rates are consistent with neoclassical predictions. The anomalous inward pinch found in the core of L-mode plasmas is also not apparent in the H-mode core. Linear gyrokinetic simulations of one flux surface in L-mode using the GS2 and GKW codes find that equilibrium flow shear is sufficient to stabilize ITG modes, consistent with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) observations, and suggest that collisionless TEMs may dominate the anomalous helium particle transport. A quasilinear estimate of the dimensionless peaking factor associated with TEMs is in good agreement with experiment. Collisionless TEMs are more stable in H-mode because the electron density gradient is flatter. The steepness of this gradient is therefore pivotal in determining the inward neoclassical particle pinch and the particle flux associated with TEM turbulence.

  9. Experience within international transport and direct rail services in meeting the IAEA requirement for a radiation protection programme(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billing, D.

    2003-01-01

    BNFL International Transport and Direct Rail Services have successfully developed appropriate Radiation Protection Programmes for their business. The business supports BNFL's worldwide Nuclear Fuel Services with key customer bases in Europe, Japan and the UK, utilising marine, rail and road modal transports. Experience in this business spans over 4 decades. The preparation of RPP's for each aspect of its operations has been made relatively straight forward in that the key elements within the internationally recognised model RPP (by WNTI) were already in place in BNFL's procedures to satisfy current National UK and International Regulations and supported by Management systems which comply with International Standards for Quality Assurance. (author)

  10. Real-Time Management and Control of a Bus Public Transport Network: The STCP Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Freire Sousa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available STCP is the main bus operator in the Porto Metropolitan Area. The experimental phase of using fleet tracking and management systems fitted on public transport vehicles began in the late eighties, but only in 2002 the current system (SAEI covered all the buses of the company. Nowadays, these systems are integral company management systems. In this paper, the experience of the past six years or so is presented. The main reasons for the use of such systems are detailed, the architecture and functionalities are described and the importance of accessing real-time information together with subsequent analysis of the data obtained is underlined.

  11. Packaging and transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this volume: shielding and criticality; transportation accidents; physical security in transit; transport forecasting and logistics; transportation experience, operations and planning; regulation; standards and quality assurance; risk analysis; and environmental impacts. Separate abstracts are prepared for individual items

  12. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Packaging and transportation of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this volume: shielding and criticality; transportation accidents; physical security in transit; transport forecasting and logistics; transportation experience, operations and planning; regulation; standards and quality assurance; risk analysis; and environmental impacts. Separate abstracts are prepared for individual items. (DC)

  14. Urban form, transportation and greenhouse gas emissions- Experiences in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmaajaervi, I; Heinonen, S.; Lahti, P. [VTT, Building and Transport (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The main objective of the project was to identify instruments to develop urban form and transportation systems in a sustainable way to decrease greenhouse gas emissions in the Nordic countries. Instruments can be found on different levels: national, regional and local. The main sectors are land use and transportation planning, land use and transportation policies, tax policy, co-operation, information dissemination, interaction, monitoring and early warning systems. Instruments concern for example control of urban development, supporting residential activities in city centres, control of location of shopping malls, preventing long commuting trips, reduction of transportation need and car dependency, promotion of walking, cycling and public transport and eco-managed telework. (au)

  15. Formation of an internal transport barrier and magnetohydrodynamic activity in experiments with the controlled density of rational magnetic surfaces in the T-10 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razumova, K. A.; Andreev, V. F.; Bel’bas, I. S.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Dyabilin, K. S.; Kislov, A. Ya.; Lysenko, S. E.; Notkin, G. E.; Timchenko, N. N.; Chudnovskiy, A. N.; Shelukhin, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from experiments on the formation of an internal electron transport barrier near the q = 1.5 rational surface in the T-10 tokamak. The experiments were carried out in the regime with off-axis electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating followed by a fast plasma current ramp-up. After suppressing sawtooth oscillations by off-axis ECR heating, an internal transport barrier began to form near the q = 1.5 rational surface. In the phase of the current ramp-up, the quality of the transport barrier improved; as a result, the plasma energy confinement time increased 2–2.5 times. The intentionally produced flattening of the profile of the safety factor q(r) insignificantly affected magnetohydrodynamic activity in the plasma column in spite of the theoretical possibility of formation of substantial m/n = 3/2 and 2/1 magnetic islands. Conditions are discussed under which the flattening of the profile of the safety factor q near low-order rational surfaces leads to the formation of either an internal transport barrier or the development of an island magnetic structure induced by tearing modes

  16. The experience of the Republic of Belarus in the field of safe and secure transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astashka, R.; Kronava, Z.; Prykhodzka, A.; Tkachonak, I.

    2016-01-01

    The experience of the safe and secure transport of radioactive material of the Republic of Belarus includes domestic and international movements. Transit is a substantial part of international movements taking into account the location of the country. Legislative and regulatory requirements on safety and security of radioactive material transport being in force in the country include the demands making by such state structures as the Department on Nuclear and Radiation Safety, the Department on supervision for the safe industrial activities, the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Belarus. At the same time response to accidents and security events belongs to the scope of activity of special subdivisions of the Ministry for Emergency Situations and the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Republic of Belarus. For safety purposes all the above-mentioned structures are executing their duties in close collaboration with each other and are following the IAEA safety and security recommendations. The regulatory infrastructure concerning the safe and secure transport of radioactive material of the Republic of Belarus is the subject of the contributed paper. (author)

  17. Probability of spent fuel transportation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.D.

    1981-07-01

    The transported volume of spent fuel, incident/accident experience and accident environment probabilities were reviewed in order to provide an estimate of spent fuel accident probabilities. In particular, the accident review assessed the accident experience for large casks of the type that could transport spent (irradiated) nuclear fuel. This review determined that since 1971, the beginning of official US Department of Transportation record keeping for accidents/incidents, there has been one spent fuel transportation accident. This information, coupled with estimated annual shipping volumes for spent fuel, indicated an estimated annual probability of a spent fuel transport accident of 5 x 10 -7 spent fuel accidents per mile. This is consistent with ordinary truck accident rates. A comparison of accident environments and regulatory test environments suggests that the probability of truck accidents exceeding regulatory test for impact is approximately 10 -9 /mile

  18. Modelling of Pesticide Transport During An Injection Experiment In A Physical and Geochemical Heterogeneous Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojberg, A. L.; Engesgaard, P.; Bjerg, P. L.

    The fate of selected pesticides under natural groundwater conditions was studied by natural gradient short and long term injection experiments in a shallow uncon- fined aerobic aquifer. Bentazone, DNOC, MCPP, dichlorprop, isoproturon, and BAM (dichlobenil metabolite) were injected in aqueous solution with bromide as a nonre- active tracer. The Bromide and pesticide plumes were sampled during the initial 25 m of migration in a dense monitoring net of multilevel samplers. The aquifer was physical and geochemical heterogeneous, which affected transport of several of the pesticides. A 3D reactive transport code was developed including one- and two-site linear/nonlinear equilibrium/nonequilibrium sorption and first-order as well as single Monod degradation kinetic coupled to microbial growth. Model simulations demon- strated that microbial growth was likely supported by the phenoxy acids MCPP and dichlorprop, while degradation of DNOC was adequately described by first-order degradation with no initial lag time. An observed vertical increase in pH was observed at the site and implemented in the transport code. The numerical analysis indicated that degradation of the three degradable pesticides may have been affected by vertical pH variations. Spatial variability in observed DNOC sorption was similarly suspected to be an effect of varying pH. pH dependency on DNOC sorption was confirmed by the model recognized by a match to observed breakthrough at the individual sampling points, when pH variation was included in the simulations.

  19. Experiences in the transport of radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds in the last decade in Cuba; Experiencias en el transporte de radiofarmacos y compuestos marcados en el ultimo decenio en Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador B, Z.H.; Perez P, S.; Ayra P, F.E.; Torres B, M.B. [Centro de Isotopos, Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada, Km 3, Guanabacoa, Apartado 3415, Ciudad de La Habana, (Cuba)]. e-mail: dsr@centis.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Isotopes (CENTIS) it is the main transport entity of radioactive materials of the Republic of Cuba in whose activity almost accumulates a decade. Its are executed the design, the production, the maintenance and/or repair of the packings, as well as the preparation, remission, charges, transporting (including the in traffic storage), it discharges and reception in the final destination, of the remittances. Presently work the results of the implementation of the radiological safety and quality assurance programs developed for the safe transport of radioactive bulks and the experiences in the design and essay of bulks type A are shown. The postulated radiological events are evaluated. Three courses of 10 school hours each one, they are imparted, with theoretical and practical exams. The maximum, minimum and average values of the annual effective doses of the workers and the collective doses per year are reported, for the period 1996-2005. It is guaranteed the administrative control and the traceability of the bundles. (Author)

  20. UK experience of managing a radioactive materials transport event database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, N.J.; Barrett, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A description is given of the transport event database RAMTED and the related annual accident and incident reports. This database covers accidents and incidents involving the transport of radioactive material in the UK from 1958 to the present day. The paper discusses the history and content of the database, the origin of event data contained in it, the criteria for inclusion and future developments. (author)

  1. Quadrupole beam-transport experiment for heavy ions under extreme space charge conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupp, W.; Faltens, A.; Hartwig, E.C.

    1983-03-01

    A Cs ion-beam-transport experiment is in progress to study beam behavior under extreme space-charge conditions. A five-lens section matches the beam into a periodic electrostatic quadrupole FODO channel and its behavior is found to agree with predictions. With the available parameters (less than or equal to 200 keV, less than or equal to 20 mA, πepsilon/sub n/ greater than or equal to 10 - 7 π rad-m, up to 41 periods) the transverse (betatron) occillation frequency (nu) can be depressed down to one-tenth of its zero current value (nu/sub 0/), where nu/sup 2/ = nu/sub 0//sup 2/ -#betta#/sub p/ 2 /2, and #betta#/sub p/ is the beam plasma frequency. The current can be controlled by adjustment of the gun and the emittance can be controlled independently by means of a set of charged grids

  2. Using ocean bottom pressure from the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) to estimate transport variability in the southern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Jessica K.; Chambers, Don P.; Bonin, Jennifer A.

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that ocean bottom pressure (OBP) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) can be used to measure the depth-averaged, or barotropic, transport variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Here, we use GRACE OBP observations to calculate transport variability in a region of the southern Indian Ocean encompassing the major fronts of the ACC. We use a statistical analysis of a simulated GRACE-like data set to determine the uncertainty of the estimated transport for the 2003.0-2013.0 time period. We find that when the transport is averaged over 60° of longitude, the uncertainty (one standard error) is close to 1 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) for low-pass filtered transport, which is significantly smaller than the signal and lower than previous studies have found. The interannual variability is correlated with the Southern Annual mode (SAM) (0.61), but more highly correlated with circumpolar zonally averaged winds between 45°S and 65°S (0.88). GRACE transport reflects significant changes in transport between 2007 and 2009 that is observed in the zonal wind variations but not in the SAM index. We also find a statistically significant trend in transport (-1.0 ± 0.4 Sv yr-1, 90% confidence) that is correlated with a local deceleration in zonal winds related to an asymmetry in the SAM on multidecadal periods.

  3. Bed-levelling experiments with suspended load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talmon, A.M.; De Graaff, J.

    1991-01-01

    Bed-levelling experiments are conducted in a straight laboratory channel. The experiments involve a significant fraction of suspended sediment transport. The purpose of the experiments is to provide data for modelling of the direction of sediment transport on a transverse sloping alluvial river bed,

  4. Transportation of Radioactive Material Cobalt-60 is one of the Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Derus Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    During transportation of radioactive material in progress, all the procedure (SOP) must have been followed by legally and the wrappers that have been used must be not contaminated, it ensure that safety and security during transportation. (author)

  5. Neoclassical and gyrokinetic analysis of time-dependent helium transport experiments on MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, S.S.; O'Mullane, M.; Summers, H.P.; Garzotti, L.; Casson, F.J.; Dickinson, D.; Fox, M.F.J.; Patel, A.; Roach, C.M.; Valovič, M.

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent helium gas puff experiments have been performed on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) during a two point plasma current scan in L-mode and a confinement scan at 900 kA. An evaluation of the He II (n = 4 → 3) spectrum line induced by charge exchange suggests anomalous rates of diffusion and inward convection in the outer regions of both L-mode plasmas. Similar rates of diffusion are found in the H-mode plasma, however these rates are consistent with neoclassical predictions. The anomalous inward pinch found in the core of L-mode plasmas is also not apparent in the H-mode core. Linear gyrokinetic simulations of one flux surface in L-mode using the GS2 and GKW codes find that equilibrium flow shear is sufficient to stabilize ITG modes, consistent with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) observations, and suggest that collisionless TEMs may dominate the anomalous helium particle transport. A quasilinear estimate of the dimensionless peaking factor associated with TEMs is in good agreement with experiment. Collisionless TEMs are more stable in H-mode because the electron density gradient is flatter. The steepness of this gradient is therefore pivotal in determining the inward neoclassical particle pinch and the particle flux associated with TEM turbulence. (paper)

  6. European experience in the transport of irradiated light-water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods of transport of irradiated fuel flasks in Europe are described. While many problems in the transport of heavy flasks have been solved some remain and new ones have appeared. Some of these problems are the accumulation of crud on the surface of fuel elements, the problems of failed fuel, stringent criticality criteria, the ''sweating out'' of contaminated flasks, the access, road or rail, to reactor sites, and the maintenance of the transport vehicles. Some future trends in the direction of heavy flasks in the range of 75 to 100 tonnes are indicated

  7. Transport analysis of rf drift-velocity filter employing crossed DC and AC electric fields for ion swarm experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, K.; Takebe, M.

    1995-01-01

    The operational characteristics of the RF drift-velocity filter developed to separate a mixture of gaseous ions are examined theoretically. The solutions of the appropriate transport equations provide an analytical formula for the transmission efficiency of the filter in terms of the mobility and diffusion coefficient of the ions, the electric field strength, the RF frequency and the filter dimension. Using the experimental transport data for Li + /Xe and Cs + /Xe, the formula was tested and it was found that it adequately accounts for the degree of ion separation achieved by the filter at high gas pressures. The variation of the profiles of the arrival time spectra for Li + , Na + and Cs + ions in CO 2 , obtained by drift-tube experiments, also supports this analysis. 4 refs., 10 figs

  8. Development of High-Temperature Transport System for Molten Salt in Pyroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, In Tae; Park, Sung Bin

    2014-01-01

    The electrorefining process, which is a key process in pyroprocessing, is composed of two parts, electrorefining to deposit a uranium with a solid cathode and electrowinning to co-deposit TRU and RE with a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC). As the electrorefining operation proceedes, TRU and RE are accumulated in electrolyte LiCl-KCl salt, and after the electrorefining process, the molten salt used in an electrorefining reactor should by transported to the next process, the electrowinning process, to recover U/TRU/RE; Thus, a molten salt transfer system by suction is now being developed. An apparatus for suction transport experiments was designed and constructed for the development of high- temperature molten salt transport technology. Suction transport experiments were performed using LiC-KCl eutectic salt. The feasibility of pyro-reprocessing has been demonstrated through many laboratory-scale experiments. In pyroprocessing, a eutectic LiCl-KCl salt was used as a liquid elextrolyte for a recovery of actinides. However, reliable transport technologies for these high temperature liquids have not yet been developed. A preliminary study on high-temperature transport technology for molten salt by suction is now being carried out. In this study, three different salt transport technologies (gravity, suction pump, and centrifugal pump) were investigated to select the most suitable method for molten salt transport. An apparatus for suction transport experiments was designed and installed for the development of high-temperature molten salt transport technology. Basic preliminary suction transport experiments were carried out using the prepared LiC-KCl eutectic salt at 500 .deg. C to observe the transport behavior of LiCl-KCl molten salt. In addition, a PRIDE salt transport system was designed and installed for an engineering-scale salt transport demonstration. Several types of suction transport experiments using molten salt (LiCl-KCl eutectics) for the development of a high

  9. Development of High-Temperature Transport System for Molten Salt in Pyroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, In Tae; Park, Sung Bin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The electrorefining process, which is a key process in pyroprocessing, is composed of two parts, electrorefining to deposit a uranium with a solid cathode and electrowinning to co-deposit TRU and RE with a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC). As the electrorefining operation proceedes, TRU and RE are accumulated in electrolyte LiCl-KCl salt, and after the electrorefining process, the molten salt used in an electrorefining reactor should by transported to the next process, the electrowinning process, to recover U/TRU/RE; Thus, a molten salt transfer system by suction is now being developed. An apparatus for suction transport experiments was designed and constructed for the development of high- temperature molten salt transport technology. Suction transport experiments were performed using LiC-KCl eutectic salt. The feasibility of pyro-reprocessing has been demonstrated through many laboratory-scale experiments. In pyroprocessing, a eutectic LiCl-KCl salt was used as a liquid elextrolyte for a recovery of actinides. However, reliable transport technologies for these high temperature liquids have not yet been developed. A preliminary study on high-temperature transport technology for molten salt by suction is now being carried out. In this study, three different salt transport technologies (gravity, suction pump, and centrifugal pump) were investigated to select the most suitable method for molten salt transport. An apparatus for suction transport experiments was designed and installed for the development of high-temperature molten salt transport technology. Basic preliminary suction transport experiments were carried out using the prepared LiC-KCl eutectic salt at 500 .deg. C to observe the transport behavior of LiCl-KCl molten salt. In addition, a PRIDE salt transport system was designed and installed for an engineering-scale salt transport demonstration. Several types of suction transport experiments using molten salt (LiCl-KCl eutectics) for the development of a high

  10. Experiments and modelling on biomass transport inside upflow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the experimental and theoretical activities developed to study the biomass transport phenomena occurring in upflow anaerobic reactors influencing the biomass washout. Particularly, the experimental investigations have been carried out on a full-scale ABR and on a pilot UASB intermittently fed with ...

  11. The Grimsel radionuclide migration experiment - a contribution to raising confidence in the validity of solute transport models used in performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, U.

    1995-01-01

    The safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories is to provide confidence that the predictive models utilized are applicable for the specific repository systems. Nagra has carried out radionuclide migration experiments at the Grimsel underground test site (Switzerland) for testing of currently used methodologies, data bases, conceptual approaches and codes for modeling radionuclide transport through fractured host rocks. Specific objectives included: identification of the relevant transport processes, to test the extrapolation of laboratory sorption data to field conditions, and to demonstrate the applicability of currently used methodology for conceptualizing or building realistic transport models. Field tests and transport modeling work are complemented by an extensive laboratory program. The field experimental activities focused predominantly on establishing appropriate conditions for identifying relevant transport mechanisms on the scale of a few meters, aiming at full recovery of injected tracers, simple geometry and long-term stability of induced dipole flow fields. A relatively simple homogeneous, dual-porosity advection/diffusion model was built with input from a state of the art petrographic characterisation of the water conducting feature. It was possible to calibrate the model from conservative tracer breakthrough curves. (J.S.). 21 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs

  12. TMX-U [Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade] tandem-mirror thermal-barrier experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Allen, S.L.; Baldwin, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal-barrier experiments have been carried out in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). Measurements of nonambipolar and ambipolar radial transport show that these transport processes, as well as end losses, can be controlled at modest densities and durations. Central-cell heating methods using ion-cyclotron heating (ICH) and neutral-beam injection have been demonstrated. Potential mesurements with recently developed methods indicate that deep thermal barriers can be established

  13. Establishing Bedding Requirements during Transport and Monitoring Skin Temperature during Cold and Mild Seasons after Transport for Finishing Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGlone

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The broad aim of this study was to determine whether bedding level in the transport trailer influenced pig performance and welfare. Specifically, the objective was to define the bedding requirements of pigs during transportation in commercial settings during cold and mild weather. Animals (n = 112,078 pigs on 572 trailers used were raised in commercial finishing sites and transported in trailers to commercial processing plants. Dead on arrival (DOA, non-ambulatory (NA, and total dead and down (D&D data were collected and skin surface temperatures of the pigs were measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected during winter (Experiment 1 and fall/spring (Experiment 2. Total D&D percent showed no interaction between bedding level and outside air temperature in any experiments. Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01. In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient. Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport.

  14. Comparison of empirical transport models with transient transport experiments in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, Mikhail; Inagaki, Shigeru; Ida, Katsumi

    2004-01-01

    A study of the electron transport in helical plasma of Large Helical Device (LHD) has been performed using a perturbation to an equilibrium state. The periodic perturbation in plasma is induced by on-axis Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) modulated signal for different temperatures of plasma electron. The experimental data are compared with results from simulation within framework of the diffusive model with additional convective term. The convection heat flux is introduced to describe the heat propagation in LHD. It has been shown that the dynamic plasma heat diffusivity coefficient χ e estimated from the transient analysis becomes larger with increasing electron temperature in LHD plasma. (author)

  15. Application of multiphysics models to efficient design of experiments of solute transport across articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouran, Behdad; Arbabi, Vahid; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-11-01

    Transport of solutes helps to regulate normal physiology and proper function of cartilage in diarthrodial joints. Multiple studies have shown the effects of characteristic parameters such as concentration of proteoglycans and collagens and the orientation of collagen fibrils on the diffusion process. However, not much quantitative information and accurate models are available to help understand how the characteristics of the fluid surrounding articular cartilage influence the diffusion process. In this study, we used a combination of micro-computed tomography experiments and biphasic-solute finite element models to study the effects of three parameters of the overlying bath on the diffusion of neutral solutes across cartilage zones. Those parameters include bath size, degree of stirring of the bath, and the size and concentration of the stagnant layer that forms at the interface of cartilage and bath. Parametric studies determined the minimum of the finite bath size for which the diffusion behavior reduces to that of an infinite bath. Stirring of the bath proved to remarkably influence neutral solute transport across cartilage zones. The well-stirred condition was achieved only when the ratio of the diffusivity of bath to that of cartilage was greater than ≈1000. While the thickness of the stagnant layer at the cartilage-bath interface did not significantly influence the diffusion behavior, increase in its concentration substantially elevated solute concentration in cartilage. Sufficient stirring attenuated the effects of the stagnant layer. Our findings could be used for efficient design of experimental protocols aimed at understanding the transport of molecules across articular cartilage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nonisothermal hydrologic transport experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.

    1992-09-01

    A field heater experimental plan is presented for investigating hydrologic transport processes in unsaturated fractured rock related to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in an underground repository. The experimental plan provides a methodology for obtaining data required for evaluating conceptual and computer models related to HLW isolation in an environment where significant heat energy is produced. Coupled-process models are currently limited by the lack of validation data appropriate for field scales that incorporate relevant transport processes. Presented in this document is a discussion of previous nonisothermal experiments. Processes expected to dominate heat-driven liquid, vapor, gas, and solute flow during the experiment are explained, and the conceptual model for nonisothermal flow and transport in unsaturated, fractured rock is described. Of particular concern is the ability to confirm the hypothesized conceptual model specifically, the establishment of higher water saturation zones within the host rock around the heat source, and the establishment of countercurrent flow conditions within the host rock near the heat source. Field experimental plans are presented using the Apache Leap Tuff Site to illustrate the implementation of the proposed methodology. Both small-scale preliminary experiments and a long-term experiment are described

  17. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov; Brown, C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Blue, B. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N. [Fifth Gait Technologies, Inc., 14040 Camden Circle, Huntsville, Alabama 35803 (United States); Seiler, S. W.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A. [Defense Threat Reduction Agency, 8725 John J. Kingman Road, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060-6201 (United States); Hinshelwood, D. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lilly, M. [Dynasen, Inc., 20 Arnold Pl., Goleta, California 93117 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the National Ignition Facility’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built-in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. The measured accuracy of sample responses as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette is discussed.

  18. Physics of transport in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Asp, E.; Bourdelle, C.; Hoang, T.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Angioni, C.; Manini, A.; Peeter, A.; Ryter, F.; Baranov, Y.; Cordey, G.; McDonald, D.C.; Parail, V.; Valovic, M.; Thyagaraja, A.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Budny, R.; Kirneva, N.; Hogeweij, D.; Nordman, H.; Weilland, J.; Tala, T.; Weisen, H.; Zabolotsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is an overview of recent results related to turbulent particle and heat transport, and triggering of Internal Transport Barriers. Particle transport is characterised by a pinch velocity that is found to be larger than the value predicted by theory of collisional transport (Ware pinch) in L-mode plasmas. Also it increases with magnetic shear. In H-mode, density peaking decreases with collisionality. Pinch velocity reaches the Ware value for large collision frequencies. Heat transport has made progress along two directions: dimensionless scaling laws and analysis of modulation experiments. Dimensionless scaling law of thermal confinement agrees with the prediction for electrostatic turbulence. Dependence with collisionality remains to be understood. Heat modulation experiments have been investigated in several devices using a critical gradient model, micro-stability analysis and predictive modelling. Thresholds and stiffness are correctly reproduced by stability analysis and modelling with Weiland model. Analysis with a critical gradient model leads to a large variability of stiffness. Finally the question of triggering Internal Transport Barriers has been addressed by analysing electron transport barriers. It is confirmed that negative magnetic shear combined with Shafranov shift is a robust stabilizing mechanism. However, some well established features of internal barriers are hardly explained by theory, in particular the role of low order rational values of the minimum safety factor, and the existence of multiple barriers. (authors)

  19. Transportation cask contamination weeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.C.; Doughty, D.H.; Chambers, W.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the problem of cask contamination weeping, and efforts to understand the phenomenon and to eliminate its occurrence during spent nuclear fuel transport. The paper summarizes analyses of field experience and scoping experiments, and concentrates on current modelling and experimental validation efforts. (J.P.N.)

  20. Benchmark experiment to verify radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy; Benchmark-Experiment zur Verifikation von Strahlungstransportrechnungen fuer die Dosimetrie in der Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Franziska [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are regarded as the most accurate method of solving complex problems in the field of dosimetry and radiation transport. In (external) radiation therapy they are increasingly used for the calculation of dose distributions during treatment planning. In comparison to other algorithms for the calculation of dose distributions, Monte Carlo methods have the capability of improving the accuracy of dose calculations - especially under complex circumstances (e.g. consideration of inhomogeneities). However, there is a lack of knowledge of how accurate the results of Monte Carlo calculations are on an absolute basis. A practical verification of the calculations can be performed by direct comparison with the results of a benchmark experiment. This work presents such a benchmark experiment and compares its results (with detailed consideration of measurement uncertainty) with the results of Monte Carlo calculations using the well-established Monte Carlo code EGSnrc. The experiment was designed to have parallels to external beam radiation therapy with respect to the type and energy of the radiation, the materials used and the kind of dose measurement. Because the properties of the beam have to be well known in order to compare the results of the experiment and the simulation on an absolute basis, the benchmark experiment was performed using the research electron accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), whose beam was accurately characterized in advance. The benchmark experiment and the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for two different types of ionization chambers and the results were compared. Considering the uncertainty, which is about 0.7 % for the experimental values and about 1.0 % for the Monte Carlo simulation, the results of the simulation and the experiment coincide.

  1. Indian experience with radionuclide transport, deposition and decontamination in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, S.V.; Das, P.C.; Lawrence, D.A.; Mathur, P.K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1983-01-01

    The present generation of water-cooled nuclear reactors uses construction materials chosen with utmost care so that minimum corrosion occurs during the life of the reactor. As interaction between the primary coolant and the construction materials is unavoidable, the coolant is chemically treated to achieve maximum compatibility. First measurements of the chemical and radiochemical composition of the crud present on the in-core and out-of-core primary heat transport system surfaces of a pressurized heavy-water-moderated and cooled reactor (PHWR) are given; then experience in India in the development of a low temperature, one-stage decontaminating formulation for chemical decontamination of the radioactive deposits formed on stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions is discussed. The effect of the magnitude of the transients in parameters such as reactor power, system temperature, dissolved oxygen content in the coolant, etc. on the nature and migration behaviour of primary heat transport system crud in a PHWR is described. Contributions to radioactive sources and insoluble crud from different primary heat transport system materials are identified and correlated with reactor operations in a PHWR. Man-rem problems faced by nuclear reactors, especially during off-line maintenance, stress the need for reducing the deposited radioactive sources from system surfaces which would otherwise be accessible. Laboratory and on-site experimentation was carried out to effect chemical decontamination on the radioactive deposits formed on the stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions. Both the reducing and oxidizing formulations were subsequently used in a small-scale, in-plant trial in the clean-up system of a BWR. More than 85% of the deposited 60 Co activity was found to have been removed by the oxidizing formulation. Efforts to develop a decontaminating mixture containing a reducing agent with the help of a circulating loop are in progress in the laboratory. (author)

  2. Experience with the transport and storage casks CASTOR (registered) MTR 2 for spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack, Allen; Rettenbacher, Katharina; Skrzyppek, Juergen [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The CASTOR (registered) MTR 2 cask was designed and manufactured by the company GNS during the 1990's for the transport and interim storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from various types of research reactors. Casks of this type have been used at the VKTA Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, Germany as well as at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre at Petten and at the HOR reactor at Delft in the Netherlands. A total of 24 units have been used for the functions of transport and storage with various spent fuel types (VVER, HFR-HEU, and HOR-HEU) for more than ten years now. This type of packaging for radioactive material is a member of the CASTOR (registered) family of spent nuclear fuel casks used worldwide. Over 1000 units are loaded and in storage in Europe, Asia, Africa and North America. This paper presents the experience from the use of the casks for transport and storage in the past, as well as the prospects for the future. (author)

  3. UrbanTransport Solution An Experience From Prague | Jeremiah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the urban transport problems in Prague in Czech Republic. Based on the result of the research conducted, it was found that with the collapsed of Communism in Czech Republic, there was an upsurge in the use of private cars which was not possible during communism because the law does not ...

  4. Transporting ideas between marine and social sciences: experiences from interdisciplinary research programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy M. Turner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The oceans comprise 70% of the surface area of our planet, contain some of the world’s richest natural resources and are one of the most significant drivers of global climate patterns. As the marine environment continues to increase in importance as both an essential resource reservoir and facilitator of global change, it is apparent that to find long-term sustainable solutions for our use of the sea and its resources and thus to engage in a sustainable blue economy, an integrated interdisciplinary approach is needed. As a result, interdisciplinary working is proliferating. We report here our experiences of forming interdisciplinary teams (marine ecologists, ecophysiologists, social scientists, environmental economists and environmental law specialists to answer questions pertaining to the effects of anthropogenic-driven global change on the sustainability of resource use from the marine environment, and thus to transport ideas outwards from disciplinary confines. We use a framework derived from the literature on interdisciplinarity to enable us to explore processes of knowledge integration in two ongoing research projects, based on analyses of the purpose, form and degree of knowledge integration within each project. These teams were initially focused around a graduate program, explicitly designed for interdisciplinary training across the natural and social sciences, at the Gothenburg Centre for Marine Research at the University of Gothenburg, thus allowing us to reflect on our own experiences within the context of other multi-national, interdisciplinary graduate training and associated research programs.

  5. How Sensitive Are Transdermal Transport Predictions by Microscopic Stratum Corneum Models to Geometric and Transport Parameter Input?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jessica; Koo, Soh Myoung; Lape, Nancy

    2018-02-01

    While predictive models of transdermal transport have the potential to reduce human and animal testing, microscopic stratum corneum (SC) model output is highly dependent on idealized SC geometry, transport pathway (transcellular vs. intercellular), and penetrant transport parameters (e.g., compound diffusivity in lipids). Most microscopic models are limited to a simple rectangular brick-and-mortar SC geometry and do not account for variability across delivery sites, hydration levels, and populations. In addition, these models rely on transport parameters obtained from pure theory, parameter fitting to match in vivo experiments, and time-intensive diffusion experiments for each compound. In this work, we develop a microscopic finite element model that allows us to probe model sensitivity to variations in geometry, transport pathway, and hydration level. Given the dearth of experimentally-validated transport data and the wide range in theoretically-predicted transport parameters, we examine the model's response to a variety of transport parameters reported in the literature. Results show that model predictions are strongly dependent on all aforementioned variations, resulting in order-of-magnitude differences in lag times and permeabilities for distinct structure, hydration, and parameter combinations. This work demonstrates that universally predictive models cannot fully succeed without employing experimentally verified transport parameters and individualized SC structures. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Traffic and transport technology-road, railway, and water-borne transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This is "Part 2: Case Studies - Chapter 9" of the book, "The Japanese Experience in Technology", and includes the following subsections: Modernization and the railway; The transportation network; Issues in railway policy; Original design and producti...

  7. Metallic insulation transport and strainer clogging tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyvaerinen, J.; Hongisto, O.

    1994-06-01

    Experiments to probe the transport and clogging properties of metallic (metal reflective) insulation have been carried out in order to provide data for evaluation of their influence on the emergency core cooling and containment spray systems of the Finnish boiling water reactors in the event of a design basis accident. The specific metallic insulation tested was DARMET, provided by Darchem Engineering Ltd. The inner foils of Darmet are dimped. Available literature on the metallic insulation performance under design basis accident conditions has been reviewed. On the basis of the review a parametric approach has been chosen for the transport and clogging experiments. This approach involves testing a wide size range of various shapes of foil pieces. Five sets of experiments have been carried out. The first three sets investigate transport properties of the foil pieces, starting from sedimentation in stagnant waste pool and proceeding to transport in horizontal and vertically circulating flows. The clogging experiments have been addressed the differential pressures obtained due to accumulation of both pure and metallic and a mixture of metallic and fibrous (mineral wool) depris. (4 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.)

  8. Transport barrier in Helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    Experiments on the transport barrier in Helical plasmas are reviewed. There are two mechanisms of transport improvement, that results in the formation of the transport barrier. One is the improvement of neoclassical transport by reducing the ripple loss with radial electric field, which exist only in helical plasma. The other is the improvement of anomalous transport due to the suppression of fluctuations associated with a radial electric field shear both in tokamak and helical plasma. The formation of the transport barrier can be triggered by the radial electric field shear associated with the transition of the radial electric field (L/H transition or ion-electron root transition) or the peaked density or the optimization of magnetic field shear. The mechanisms of transport barrier formation are also discussed. (author). 60 refs

  9. Transport simulations TFTR: Theoretically-based transport models and current scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, M.H.; Cummings, J.C.; Bush, C.E.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Hahm, T.S.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Scott, S.D.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, G.

    1991-12-01

    In order to study the microscopic physics underlying observed L-mode current scaling, 1-1/2-d BALDUR has been used to simulate density and temperature profiles for high and low current, neutral beam heated discharges on TFTR with several semi-empirical, theoretically-based models previously compared for TFTR, including several versions of trapped electron drift wave driven transport. Experiments at TFTR, JET and D3-D show that I p scaling of τ E does not arise from edge modes as previously thought, and is most likely to arise from nonlocal processes or from the I p -dependence of local plasma core transport. Consistent with this, it is found that strong current scaling does not arise from any of several edge models of resistive ballooning. Simulations with the profile consistent drift wave model and with a new model for toroidal collisionless trapped electron mode core transport in a multimode formalism, lead to strong current scaling of τ E for the L-mode cases on TFTR. None of the theoretically-based models succeeded in simulating the measured temperature and density profiles for both high and low current experiments

  10. Light ion beam transport research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshelwood, D.D.; Boller, J.R.; Cooperstein, G.

    1996-01-01

    Transport of light ion beams through low-pressure background gas is under investigation at NRL in support of the light-ion ICF program at Sandia National Laboratories. Scaling experiments and the field solver/orbit code ATHETA have been used to design and construct a focusing, extraction applied-B diode for transport experiments. An active anode source has been developed to provide a high proton fraction in the ion beam and a fast ion turn-on time. A very sensitive Zeeman diagnostic is being developed to determine the net current distribution in the beam/transport system. Both analytical and numerical techniques using several codes are being applied to transport modeling, leading to the capability of full system studies. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 10 refs

  11. Light ion beam transport research at NRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinshelwood, D D; Boller, J R; Cooperstein, G [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Plasma Physics Div.; and others

    1997-12-31

    Transport of light ion beams through low-pressure background gas is under investigation at NRL in support of the light-ion ICF program at Sandia National Laboratories. Scaling experiments and the field solver/orbit code ATHETA have been used to design and construct a focusing, extraction applied-B diode for transport experiments. An active anode source has been developed to provide a high proton fraction in the ion beam and a fast ion turn-on time. A very sensitive Zeeman diagnostic is being developed to determine the net current distribution in the beam/transport system. Both analytical and numerical techniques using several codes are being applied to transport modeling, leading to the capability of full system studies. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 10 refs.

  12. Atmospherical experiment in Angra I plant for characterizing the effluent transport threw in the atmospheric; Experimento atmosferico no local da Usina Angra I para caracterizar o transporte de efluentes lancados na atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Lobo, M.A. da [FURNAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kronemberger, B M.E.

    1990-12-31

    Available as short communication only. The Environmental Safety Division of the Nuclear Safety and Fuel Department from FURNAS Electric Station S.A. joint with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), achieved a field experiment for characterizing the atmospheric transport and diffusion in the site complex of Angra I Nuclear Power Plant. The complex topography with the thick vegetation and the neighbour building bring problems for the modelling of the effluent transport and the dispersion. The actual meteorological measure system is automatic and compound with four towers. An intensive atmospheric measure with captive balloon is included, and the collected data shows that the site flux is strongly influenced by the topography and insolation. (C.G.C.). 2 figs.

  13. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu

    2000-07-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with synthetic based drilling fluids under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic oil base drilling fluids. PVT tests with Petrobras Synthetic base mud have been conducted and results are being analyzed Foam flow experiments have been conducted and the analysis of the data has been carried out to characterize the rheology of the foam. Comparison of pressure loss prediction from the available foam hydraulic models and the test results has been made. Cuttings transport experiments in horizontal annulus section have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Currently, cuttings transport tests in inclined test section are being conducted. Foam PVT analysis tests have been conducted. Foam stability experiments have also been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. Design of ACTS flow loop modification for foam and aerated mud flow has been completed. A flow loop operation procedure for conducting foam flow experiments under EPET conditions has been prepared Design of the lab-scale flow loop for dynamic foam characterization and cuttings monitoring instrumentation tests has been completed. The construction of the test loop is underway. As part of the technology transport efforts, Advisory Board Meeting with ACTS-JIP industry members has been organized on May 13, 2000.

  14. Sediment transport via needle ice: a new method for diffusive transport on laboratory-scale hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, K. E.; Roering, J. J.; Rempel, A. W.

    2012-12-01

    Convex hilltops formed by diffusive sediment transport are a fundamental feature of soil-mantled landscapes worldwide. Additionally, the competition and interaction between hillslopes and valleys control basic topographic metrics, such as relief, drainage density, and breaks in slope-area scaling. Despite recent progress in erosive landscape experiments, no published work has explored the competition of hillslope diffusion and channel advection experimentally. Here, we present preliminary findings on the plausibility of needle ice driven frost creep as a mechanism for laboratory hillslope transport of wet sediment. In nature, needle ice is a diurnal form of ice segregation, whereby liquid water held in sediment pore space is driven upward toward a near-surface freezing front by a temperature-controlled liquid pressure gradient. As needles grow perpendicular to the surface, sediment is incorporated in the growing needle ice by temperature perturbations and associated downward shifts in the freezing front. Sediment then moves downslope due to melting or sublimation of the ice needles. We constructed a slope of saturated sediment in a freezer to constrain the temperature, grain size, and soil moisture limits on laboratory needle ice growth and sediment transport. Surficial sediment transport is measured during experimentation by tracking the movement of colored grains. Additionally, at the end of each run we measure depth-dependent sediment transport by taking slices of the experimental slope and observing the displacement of buried columns of colored grains. In agreement with past work, we find that with temperatures just below freezing, soil moisture above 35%, and silt-sized sediment, the moisture migration induced by freezing releases enough latent heat to maintain the location of the freezing front and encourage needle ice growth. Our experiments demonstrate that the amount of sediment incorporated during needle growth, i.e., the transport efficiency, can be

  15. Dynamic Design of Ground Transport With the Help of Computational Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravets Victor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives of ground transport (motor transport vehicle have been considered. Mathematical model of nonlinear dynamics in spatial motion of asymmetric carriage in the form of Euler-Lagrange equations represented as symmetrical block structure in quaternion matrices has been developed. Kinematic equations and partition matrices of external action in which Rodrigues-Hamilton parameters have been applied describe quaternionic matrices.

  16. HA and MAVL technical dialogue - Seminar - Transports of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charron, Sylvie; Eckert, Benoit; Lizot, Marie-Therese; Moutarde, Marianne; Mermaz, Frederic; Brisson, Nicolas; Sene, Monique; Demet, Michel; Jacquet, Benoit; Tran-Thien, Vivien; Ferran, Ghislain; Michel, Maurice; Barbey, Pierre; Miquel, Thierry-Paul; Monot, Bernard; Syren, Julien; Quintin, Christophe; Gilbert, Alain; Lhuillier, Daniel; Domeneghetti, Bertrand; LOURTIE, Guy; Manessier, Joffray

    2016-03-01

    This document gathers the content of a debate and Power Point presentations as contributions to this seminar on transports of nuclear materials. After an introduction, the different sessions addressed the actors of the transport of nuclear materials (regulation, parcel design, organisation on the shipper side and on the transporter side), transport safety and radiation protection (returns on experience by different actors and on event follow-up), the follow-up and safety of transports of nuclear materials (protection against malevolent acts, operational follow-up, case of rail transport), and issues related to crisis management (organisation in case of crisis, means of intervention implemented by the IRSN, return on experience for two accidents)

  17. A first experience with a Smart bus for improving public transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostado, R.; Rovirosa, A.; Velázquez, J. L.; Castillo, E.; Cervantes, O.

    2017-09-01

    An alternative to optimize transportation services in the city of Puebla is presented. Main problems tackled to provide advanced transport applications in a Smart City, are described and some available solutions in other countries are analyzed. As a case of study, the challenges for designing and developing a mobile application oriented to users of the buses provided by Universidad de las Américas Puebla (UDLAP) are presented. Users include students, as well as faculty members and administrative employees. The application provides an innovative way of tracking, in real time, movements of the UDLAP transportation buses through the city of Puebla in Mexico. Modeling and technical implementation solved problems are presented and future steps for extending those services to the city of Puebla are also suggested.

  18. Comprehensive energy transport scalings derived from DIII-D similarity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Baity, F.W.

    1998-12-01

    The dependences of heat transport on the dimensionless plasma physics parameters has been measured for both L-mode and H-mode plasmas on the DIII-D tokamak. Heat transport in L-mode plasmas has a gyroradius scaling that is gyro-Bohm-like for electrons and worse than Bohm-like for ions, with no measurable beta or collisionality dependence; this corresponds to having an energy confinement time that scales like τ E ∝ n 0.5 P -0.5 . H-mode plasmas have gyro-Bohm-like scaling of heat transport for both electrons and ions, weak beta scaling, and moderate collisionality scaling. In addition, H-mode plasmas have a strong safety factor scaling (χ ∼ q 2 ) at all radii. Combining these four dimensionless parameter scalings together gives an energy confinement time scaling for H-mode plasmas like τ E ∝ B -1 ρ -3.15 β 0.03 v -0.42 q 95 -1.43 ∝ I 0.84 B 0.39 n 0.18 P -0.41 L 2.0 , which is similar to empirical scalings derived from global confinement databases

  19. Comprehensive energy transport scalings derived from DIII-D similarity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Baity, F.W.

    1999-01-01

    The dependences of heat transport on the dimensionless plasma physics parameters has been measured for both L-mode and H-mode plasmas on the DIII-D tokamak. Heat transport in L-mode plasmas has a gyroradius scaling that is gyro-Bohm-like for electrons and worse than Bohm-like for ions, with no measurable beta or collisionality dependence; this corresponds to having an energy confinement time that scales like τ E ∝ n 0.5 P -0.5 . H-mode plasmas have gyro-Bohm-like scaling of heat transport for both electrons and ions, weak beta scaling, and moderate collisionality scaling. In addition, H-mode plasmas have a strong safety factor scaling (χ ∼ q 2 ) at all radii. Combining these four dimensionless parameter scalings together gives an energy confinement time scaling for H-mode plasmas like τ E ∝ B -1 ρ -3.15 β 0.03 ν -0.42 q 95 -1.43 ∝ I 0.84 B 0.39 n 0.18 P -0.41 L 2.0 , which is similar to empirical scalings derived from global confinement databases. (author)

  20. Comprehensive energy transport scalings derived from DIII-D similarity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Baker, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    The dependences of heat transport on the dimensionless plasma physics parameters has been measured for both L-mode and H-mode plasmas on the DIII-D tokamak. Heat transport in L-mode plasmas has a gyroradius scaling that is gyro-Bohm-like for electrons and worse than Bohm-like for ions, with no measurable beta or collisionality dependence; this corresponds to having an energy confinement time that scales like τ E ∝n 0.5 P -0.5 . H-mode plasmas have gyro-Bohm-like scaling of heat transport for both electrons and ions, weak beta scaling, and moderate collisionality scaling. In addition, H-mode plasmas have a strong safety factor scaling (χ∼q 2 ) at all radii. Combining these four dimensionless parameter scalings together gives an energy confinement time scaling for H-mode plasmas like τ E ∝ B -1 ρ -3.15 β 0.03 ν -0.42 q 95 -1.43 ∝ I 0.84 B 0.39 n 0.18 P -0.41 L 2.0 , which is similar to empirical scalings derived from global confinement databases. (author)

  1. Transport of reservoir fines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Modeling transport of reservoir fines is of great importance for evaluating the damage of production wells and infectivity decline. The conventional methodology accounts for neither the formation heterogeneity around the wells nor the reservoir fines’ heterogeneity. We have developed an integral...... dispersion equation in modeling the transport and the deposition of reservoir fines. It successfully predicts the unsymmetrical concentration profiles and the hyperexponential deposition in experiments....

  2. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. Y. [Nova Photonics Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  3. Monte Carlo impurity transport modeling in the DIII-D transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Finkenthal, D.F.

    1998-04-01

    A description of the carbon transport and sputtering physics contained in the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is given. Examples of statistically significant carbon transport pathways are examined using MCI's unique tracking visualizer and a mechanism for enhanced carbon accumulation on the high field side of the divertor chamber is discussed. Comparisons between carbon emissions calculated with MCI and those measured in the DIII-D tokamak are described. Good qualitative agreement is found between 2D carbon emission patterns calculated with MCI and experimentally measured carbon patterns. While uncertainties in the sputtering physics, atomic data, and transport models have made quantitative comparisons with experiments more difficult, recent results using a physics based model for physical and chemical sputtering has yielded simulations with about 50% of the total carbon radiation measured in the divertor. These results and plans for future improvement in the physics models and atomic data are discussed

  4. SAFETY PLATFORM OF POLISH TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna CHRUZIK

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the level of Polish transport safety culture can be seen that it is now dependent on the culture of safety management within the organization and the requirements and recommendations of law in this field for different modes of transport (air, rail, road, water. Of the four basic types of transport requirements are widely developed in the aviation, rail, and water – the sea. In order to harmonize the requirements for transport safety so it appears advisable to develop a platform for exchange of safety information for different modes of transport, and the development of good practices multimodal offering the possibility of improving Polish transport safety. Described in the publication of the proposal in addition to the alignment platform experience and knowledge in the field of transport safety in all its kinds, it can also be a tool for perfecting new operators of public transport.

  5. Protective Behaviour of Citizens to Transport Accidents Involving Hazardous Materials: A Discrete Choice Experiment Applied to Populated Areas nearby Waterways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther W de Bekker-Grob

    Full Text Available To improve the information for and preparation of citizens at risk to hazardous material transport accidents, a first important step is to determine how different characteristics of hazardous material transport accidents will influence citizens' protective behaviour. However, quantitative studies investigating citizens' protective behaviour in case of hazardous material transport accidents are scarce.A discrete choice experiment was conducted among subjects (19-64 years living in the direct vicinity of a large waterway. Scenarios were described by three transport accident characteristics: odour perception, smoke/vapour perception, and the proportion of people in the environment that were leaving at their own discretion. Subjects were asked to consider each scenario as realistic and to choose the alternative that was most appealing to them: staying, seeking shelter, or escaping. A panel error component model was used to quantify how different transport accident characteristics influenced subjects' protective behaviour.The response was 44% (881/1,994. The predicted probability that a subject would stay ranged from 1% in case of a severe looking accident till 62% in case of a mild looking accident. All three transport accident characteristics proved to influence protective behaviour. Particularly a perception of strong ammonia or mercaptan odours and visible smoke/vapour close to citizens had the strongest positive influence on escaping. In general, 'escaping' was more preferred than 'seeking shelter', although stated preference heterogeneity among subjects for these protective behaviour options was substantial. Males were less willing to seek shelter than females, whereas elderly people were more willing to escape than younger people.Various characteristics of transport accident involving hazardous materials influence subjects' protective behaviour. The preference heterogeneity shows that information needs to be targeted differently depending on

  6. Transport simulations of ohmic ignition experiment: IGNITEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Howe, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    The IGNITEX device, proposed by Rosenbluth et al., is a compact, super-high-field, high-current, copper-coil tokamak envisioned to reach ignition with ohmic (OH) heating alone. Several simulations of IGNITEX were made with a 0-D global model and with the 1-D PROCTR transport code. It is shown that OH ignition is a sensitive function of the assumptions about density profile, wall reflectivity of synchrotron radiation, impurity radiation, plasma edge conditions, and additional anomalous losses. In IGNITEX, OH ignition is accessible with nearly all scalings based on favorable OH confinement (such as neo-Alcator). Also, OH ignition appears to be accessible for most (not all) L-mode scalings (such as Kaye-Goldston), provided that the density profile is not too broad (parabolic or more peaked profiles are needed), Z/sub eff/ is not too large (≤2), and anomalous radiation and alpha losses and/or other enhanced transport losses (/eta//sub i/ modes, edge convective energy losses, etc.) are not present. In IGNITEX, because the figure-of-merit parameters (aB 0 2 /q* /approximately/ IB 0 , etc.) are large, ignition can be accessed (either with OH heating alone or with the aid of a small amount of auxiliary power) at relatively low beta, far from stability limits. Once the plasma is ignited, thermal runaway is prevented naturally by a combination of increased synchrotron radiation, burnout of the fuel in the plasma core and replacement by thermal alphas, and the reduction in the thermal plasma confinement assumed in L-mode-like scalings. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Transport simulations of ohmic ignition experiment: IGNITEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Howe, H.C.

    1987-12-01

    The IGNITEX device, proposed by Rosenbluth et al., is a compact, super-high-field, high-current, copper-coil tokamak envisioned to reach ignition with ohmic (OH) heating alone. Several simulations of IGNITEX were made with a 0-D global model and with the 1-D PROCTR transport code. It is shown that OH ignition is a sensitive function of the assumptions about density profile, wall reflectivity of synchrotron radiation, impurity radiation, plasma edge conditions, and additional anomalous losses. In IGNITEX, OH ignition is accessible with nearly all scalings based on favorable OH confinement (such as neo-Alcator). Also, OH ignition appears to be accessible for most (not all) L-mode scalings (such as Kaye-Goldston), provided that the density profile is not too broad (parabolic or more peaked profiles are needed), Z/sub eff/ is not too large, and anomalous radiation and alpha losses and/or other enhanced transport losses (eta/sub i/ modes, edge convective energy losses, etc.) are not present. In IGNITEX, because the figure-of-merit parameters are large, ignition can be accessed (either with OH heating alone or with the aid of a small amount of auxiliary power) at relatively low beta, far from stability limits. Once the plasma is ignited, thermal runaway is prevented naturally by a combination of increased synchrotron radiation, burnout of the fuel in the plasma core and replacement by thermal alphas, and the reduction in the thermal plasma confinement assumed in L-mode-like scalings. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Experience with the loading and transport of fuel assembly transport casks, including CASTOR casks, and the radiation exposure of personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentele, W.; Kinzelmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In 1997 and 1998, six spent fuel assembly transports started from the nuclear power plant Gemeinschaftskernkraftwerk Neckar (GKN), using CASTOR-V19 casks. Professor Kuni of Marburg University challenged the statement made by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS)) based on accepted scientific knowledge, according to which so-called CASTOR transports present no risk, either to the population or to the escorting police units. This paper shows that the collective dose during the loading of the CASTOR casks amounted to 4.5 mSv (gamma and neutrons) per cask at the most, and that the maximum individual dose amounted to 0.26 mSv. In addition to these doses, the collective dose during handling and transport must be considered: this amounted to 0.35 mSv (gamma and neutrons). The dose to the police escort was -2 (limit for surface contamination), presented degrees of contamination >4 Bq cm -2 upon reaching the Valognes/Cogema terminal. However, transport casks coming from French plants also revealed degrees of contamination >4 Bq cm -2 , as well as 'hot spots'. No such contamination was found on NTL 11 casks transported from the GKN to Sellafield. Neither was any increased contamination found upon the arrival of CASTOR-V19 casks transported from GKN to Gorleben or Ahaus. The partially sensationalist media reports were inversely proportional to the actual radiological relevance of the matter. The German Commission on Radiation Protection (SSK) confirmed that the radiological effect of such contaminated spent fuel transports is negligible. (author)

  9. Recent transport experiments in W7-AS on the stellarator-tokamak comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroth, U.; Branas, B.; Estrada, T.; Giannone, L.; Hartfuss, H.J.; Hirsch, M.; Kick, M.; Kuener, G.; Sattler, S.; Baldzuhn, J.; Brakel, R.; Erckmann, V.; Jaenicke, R.; Ringler, H.; Wagner, F.

    1995-01-01

    Parameter scans in density, heating power and isotope mass have been carried out in W7-AS. ECRH at a frequency of 140 GHz has allowed to study the density scaling of the energy confinement time of ECRH plasmas up to densities of 10 20 m -3 . In power scans it has been tried to relate the power degradation of the energy confinement to a local plasma parameter. Transport analyses using power balance an heat wave techniques indicate that the transport coefficient does not depend on the electron temperature or related parameters. This observation can be reconciled with power degradation if the transport coefficient is formally allowed to vary with changes in the heating power on a faster than the diffusive time scale. Such a transport process describes also the observations in the dynamic phases following large changes in the heating power. (orig.)

  10. Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after ∼30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been

  11. Liability problems of international transportation of nuclear material: The Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Canadian law in the field of transportation of radioactive materials has largely adopted international standards. Most of the respective laws, however, are as yet untested in court. According to the author it is likely that a broad and liberal interpretation will be given to all of the provisions which entitle injured parties to seek recourse against a transporter who has negligently carried out the duties imposed upon him. (CW) [de

  12. Wind forces and related saltation transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, J.K.; van Boxel, J.H.; Sterk, G.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of several wind characteristics on sand transport was studied in three experiments in north Burkina Faso, West Africa. The first experiment is used to analyse the relation between wind speed and shear stress fluctuations across height. The second experiment is used to study the relation

  13. Proton beam transport experiments with pulsed high-field magnets at the Dresden laser acceleration source Draco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, Florian; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Kraft, Stephan; Metzkes, Josefine; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Zeil, Karl [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Compact laser-driven ion accelerators are a potential alternative to large and expensive conventional accelerators. High-power short-pulse lasers, impinging on e.g. thin metal foils, enable multi-MeV ion acceleration on μm length and fs to ps time scale. The generated ion bunches (typically protons) show unique beam properties, like ultra-high pulse dose. Nevertheless, laser accelerators still require substantial development in reliable beam generation and transport. Recently developed pulsed magnets meet the demands of laser acceleration and open up new research opportunities: We present a pulsed solenoid for effective collection and focusing of laser-accelerated protons that acts as link between fundamental research and application. The solenoid is powered by a capacitor-based pulse generator and can reach a maximum magnetic field of 20 T. It was installed in the target chamber of the Draco laser at HZDR. The transported beam was detected by means of radiochromic film, scintillator and Thomson parabola spectrometer. We present the characterization of the solenoid with regard to future application in radiobiological irradiation studies. Furthermore, a detailed comparison to previous experiments with a similar magnet at the PHELIX laser at GSI, Darmstadt is provided.

  14. Development and validation of a critical gradient energetic particle driven Alfven eigenmode transport model for DIII-D tilted neutral beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, R. E.; Bass, E. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; VanZeeland, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with the DIII-D tilted neutral beam injection (NBI) varying the beam energetic particle (EP) source profiles have provided strong evidence that unstable Alfven eigenmodes (AE) drive stiff EP transport at a critical EP density gradient [Heidbrink et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 093006]. Here the critical gradient is identified by the local AE growth rate being equal to the local ITG/TEM growth rate at the same low toroidal mode number. The growth rates are taken from the gyrokinetic code GYRO. Simulation show that the slowing down beam-like EP distribution has a slightly lower critical gradient than the Maxwellian. The ALPHA EP density transport code [Waltz and Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006], used to validate the model, combines the low-n stiff EP critical density gradient AE mid-core transport with the Angioni et al (2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 055013) energy independent high-n ITG/TEM density transport model controling the central core EP density profile. For the on-axis NBI heated DIII-D shot 146102, while the net loss to the edge is small, about half the birth fast ions are transported from the central core r/a  <  0.5 and the central density is about half the slowing down density. These results are in good agreement with experimental fast ion pressure profiles inferred from MSE constrained EFIT equilibria.

  15. The IRSN experience feedback for the transport package design safety appraisals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sert, G.

    2007-01-01

    The activity of transportation of radioactive materials is in constant evolution; air transport of radio elements for medical use is growing rapidly as well as transport of instruments equipped with radioactive sources for inspections of buildings (controls of presence of lead in paintings) and in industry (non destructive examination of welding by gammagraphy, controls of density on building sites). Transports associated with the recycling of plutonium for the production of electricity by nuclear energy are now accomplished in routine. Globally, 900.000 packages are shipped each year in France; among them, approximately 100.000 packages belong to the category for which design approval is required. To maintain a high level of safety for this activity by limiting the probability of occurrence, the severity and consequences of the incidents and accidents, strict rules are implemented by users under the control of the Safety Authority According to the systematic approach of defence in depth, which is defined by the three principles of safety in design, of operational reliability and of effectiveness of emergency response, the robustness of the design of the package is of primary importance. It is based on regulatory requirements relating to the functions of safety (containment of radioactivity, protection against radiation and prevention of the risks of criticality) that must be ensured by the package in conditions of transport as well as in accident conditions. These rules and the way of applying them evolve with time. Indeed, on the one hand the regulation is reexamined periodically; on the other hand, the technical knowledge on the behaviour of the packages subject to the above mentioned conditions and the means of evaluation of this behaviour progress permanently

  16. Recent transport experiments in W7-AS on the stellarator-tokamak comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroth, U [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Branas, B [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Estrada, T [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Giannone, L. [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Hartfuss, H J [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Hirsch, M [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kick, M [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kuener, G [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Sattler, S [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Baldzuhn, J [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Brakel, R [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Erckmann, V [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Jaenicke, R [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Ringler, H [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wagner, F [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); ECRH Group; W7-AS Team

    1995-05-01

    Parameter scans in density, heating power and isotope mass have been carried out in W7-AS. ECRH at a frequency of 140 GHz has allowed to study the density scaling of the energy confinement time of ECRH plasmas up to densities of 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. In power scans it has been tried to relate the power degradation of the energy confinement to a local plasma parameter. Transport analyses using power balance an heat wave techniques indicate that the transport coefficient does not depend on the electron temperature or related parameters. This observation can be reconciled with power degradation if the transport coefficient is formally allowed to vary with changes in the heating power on a faster than the diffusive time scale. Such a transport process describes also the observations in the dynamic phases following large changes in the heating power. (orig.).

  17. Transport logistics for the transport of radioactive waste form public authorities to the final repository Konrad. Presentation of a simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graffunder, Iris; Karbstein, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    The final repository Konrad will start operation in 2019. The licensed disposal amount of 303.000 m 3 is planned with 10.000 m 3 per year. The waste delivery can be performed by road or rail transport. The infrastructure boundary conditions have to be considered with the transport planning. The transport logistics concept is presented using the examples of the interim storage facilities Lubmin and Karlsruhe. The planned disposal regime for low- and intermediate-level wastes requires a comprehensive logistics concept that provides a delivery according to the schedule. The experience values from transport simulation experiments will be considered in the frame of the planning software EPALKO development as control function and optimization parameters.

  18. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jordan F; Hudson, G Bryant; Avisar, Dror

    2005-06-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (approximately 4 m day(-1)). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two nearby production wells were very similar and suggest that nonequilibrium gas transfer was occurring between the percolating water and the trapped air. At one well screened between 50 and 90 m below ground, both tracers were detected after 5 days and reached a maximum at approximately 24 days. Despite the potential dilution caused by mixing within the production well, the maximum concentration was approximately 25% of the mean pond concentration. More than 50% of the SF6 recharged was recovered by the production wells during the 18 month long experiment. Our results demonstrate that at artificial recharge sites with high infiltration rates and moderately deep water tables, transport times between recharge locations and wells determined with gas tracer experiments are reliable.

  19. Essential relationships between in situ measurements and laboratory experiments for realistic evaluation of transport in the neighbourhood of geological waste storage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancon, D.

    1984-02-01

    As part of the study of waste storage in geological formations, a plan of research was developed which reconciles the difficulty of carrying out transport experiments in formations at a depth of 1000 m and reproducing in the laboratory the real conditions of these environments. In situ measurements should provide the characteristics of the solid and aqueous environments of the formation under consideration. In solid environments, it is essential to distinguish between pulverulent rocks and fissured compact rocks because they have totally different retention mechanisms. In the aqueous environment the physical and chemical properties of the water are of paramount importance for determining the behaviour of the radioisotopes. Borehole core samples enable the structure of the materials to be studied and provide the necessary samples for experiments. The water analysis takes into account the high pressures prevailing at depth, and for this purpose special probes are used which enable direct measurements to be taken (pH, Eh, temperature, pressure). The samples are transferred in air-tight bottles to special facilities for quantitative determination of the dissolved gases. The transformations which the aqueous environment undergoes as a result of interactions with the confinement barriers are to be taken into account in a large-scale ''integral experiment'' which will reproduce the various stages of transport while monitoring the parameters and allowing for the source term. The integral experiment will enable the tests to be carried out from underground laboratories with optimum reliability

  20. Laboratory experiments on the formation and recoil jet transport of aerosol by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Yoshi; Tanaka, Kazuo A.; Imamura, Keisuke; Okazaki, Katsuya

    2016-05-01

    In a high-repetition rate inertial fusion reactor, the first wall will be subjected to repeated ablation along with pellet implosions, which then leads to the formation of aerosol to scatter and/or deflect laser beams for the subsequent implosion, affecting the overall reactor performance. Proposed in the present work is a method of in-situ directed transport of aerosol particles by the use of laser ablation-induced jet recoil momenta. Lithium and carbon are used as the primary ablation targets, the former of which is known to form aerosol in the form of droplet, and the latter of which tends to form carbon nanotubes. Laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted to irradiate airborne aerosol particles with high-intensity laser to produce ablation-induced jet. Data have indicated a change in aerosol flow direction, but only in the case of lithium.

  1. Sulfamethazine transport in agroforestry and cropland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of veterinary antibiotic transport and persistence is critical to understanding environmental risks associated with these potential contaminants. To understand mobility of sulfamethazine (SMZ) and sorption processes involved during SMZ transport in soil, column leaching experiments were p...

  2. A Mercury Model of Atmospheric Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Alex B. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chodash, Perry A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Procassini, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    Using the particle transport code Mercury, accurate models were built of the two sources used in Operation BREN, a series of radiation experiments performed by the United States during the 1960s. In the future, these models will be used to validate Mercury’s ability to simulate atmospheric transport.

  3. Multiscale modeling of transport of grains through granular assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejada Ignacio G

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the transport of moderately large passive particles through granular assemblies caused by seeping flows. This process can only be described by highly nonlinear continuum models, since the local permeability, the advection and dispersion mechanisms are strongly determined by the concentration of transported particles. Particles may sometimes get temporally trapped and thus proper kinetic mass transfer models are required. The mass transfer depends on the complexity of the porous medium, the kind of interaction forces and the concentration of transported particles. We study these two issues by means of numerical and laboratory experiments. In the laboratory we use an oedo-permeameter to force sand grains to move through a gravel bed under conditions of constant hydraulic pressure drop. To understand the process, numerical experiments were performed to approach particle transport at the grain scale with a fully coupled method. The DEM-PFV combines the discrete element method with a pore scale finite volume formulation to solve the interstitial fluid flow and particle transport problems. These experiments help us to set up a continuum transport model that can be used in a boundary value problem.

  4. Transport of silver nanoparticles by runoff and erosion - A flume experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Karrar N M; Commelin, Meindert; Peters, Ruud J B; Baartman, Jantiene E M; Ritsema, Coen; Geissen, Violette

    2017-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are being used in many products as they have unique antimicrobial-biocidal properties. After disposal of these products AgNPs can reach the soil environment possibly affecting soil organisms and disrupting plants. This work aimed to study the transport of AgNPs by water and sediment during overland flow and soil erosion. This was done in a laboratory setting, using a flume and rainfall simulator. A low concentration of AgNPs (50μg·kg -1 ) was applied to two soil-flumes with slope percentages of 20% and 10%. The rainfall was applied in four events of 15min each with a total amount of rainfall of 15mm during each event. After applying the rainfall, samples of the non-transported background soil (BS) and the transported sediment (Sf) were collected from the flume surface. Runoff sediment (RS) and water (RW) were collected from the outlet. AgNPs were detected in all samples collected. However, concentration varied according to sample type (soil or water), time of collection (for runoff water and sediment) and the slope of the soil flume. Higher concentrations of AgNPs in soil were detected in the BS than in the Sf likely due to the BS having more fine particles (silt and clay). The AgNPs concentration in the runoff sediments increased with subsequent applied rain events. In addition, increasing the slope of the flume from 10% to 20% increased the total AgNPs transported with the runoff sediment by a factor 1.5. The study confirms that AgNPs can be transported by both overland flow and sediment due to erosion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of a numerical model's ability to predict bed load transport observed in braided river experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javernick, Luke; Redolfi, Marco; Bertoldi, Walter

    2018-05-01

    New data collection techniques offer numerical modelers the ability to gather and utilize high quality data sets with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such data sets are currently needed for calibration, verification, and to fuel future model development, particularly morphological simulations. This study explores the use of high quality spatial and temporal data sets of observed bed load transport in braided river flume experiments to evaluate the ability of a two-dimensional model, Delft3D, to predict bed load transport. This study uses a fixed bed model configuration and examines the model's shear stress calculations, which are the foundation to predict the sediment fluxes necessary for morphological simulations. The evaluation is conducted for three flow rates, and model setup used highly accurate Structure-from-Motion (SfM) topography and discharge boundary conditions. The model was hydraulically calibrated using bed roughness, and performance was evaluated based on depth and inundation agreement. Model bed load performance was evaluated in terms of critical shear stress exceedance area compared to maps of observed bed mobility in a flume. Following the standard hydraulic calibration, bed load performance was tested for sensitivity to horizontal eddy viscosity parameterization and bed morphology updating. Simulations produced depth errors equal to the SfM inherent errors, inundation agreement of 77-85%, and critical shear stress exceedance in agreement with 49-68% of the observed active area. This study provides insight into the ability of physically based, two-dimensional simulations to accurately predict bed load as well as the effects of horizontal eddy viscosity and bed updating. Further, this study highlights how using high spatial and temporal data to capture the physical processes at work during flume experiments can help to improve morphological modeling.

  6. Transport and confinement studies in the RFX-mod reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, P.; Alfier, A.; Carraro, L.; Lorenzini, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Terranova, D.

    2007-01-01

    In the modified RFX experiment (RFX-mod) external magnetic field coils and a close fitting thin conductive shell control radial magnetic fields. In the so-called virtual shell (VS) operation, radial field zeroing at the thin shell radius is stationary provided by the feedback-controlled coils. First experiments on RFX-mod proved the capability of the active scheme to steadily reduce the radial magnetic field. Furthermore it has been found that such edge magnetic field control extends its beneficial effects to the whole plasma. With respect to the old RFX, where magnetohydrodynamic modes amplitude was controlled by the use of a passive thick conductive shell, a stationary 2- to 3-fold reduction of the B r field amplitude in the core is obtained. The reduction of field fluctuations positively reflects on confinement. In fact, a strong reduction of the loop voltage is observed and correspondingly a 3-fold increase in pulse length is achieved by using the same poloidal flux swing. Temperature and particle measurements confirm the improved confinement properties of the VS operation. With a lower ohmic input power, higher electron temperature and lower particle influx are measured. Particle and heat transport have been studied by means of a 1D code. Local power balance was used to compute the heat conductivity profile: for the VS discharges a lower conductivity over a significant region of the plasma is found. The improved properties of RFX-mod VS operation provide a better confinement scaling in terms of plasma current. The results show that compared with the thick shell configuration, a significant confinement improvement can be obtained under stationary conditions by actively controlling the plasma magnetic boundary

  7. Transporting spent fuel and reactor waste in Sweden experience from 5 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybeck, P.; Gustafsson, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that since the Final Repository for Reactor Waste, SFR, was taken into operation in 1988, the SKB sea transportation system is operating at full capacity by transporting spent fuel and now also reactor waste from the 12 Swedish reactors to CLAB and SFR. Transports from the National Research Center, Studsvik to the repository has recently also been integrated in the system. CLAB, the central intermediate storage for spent fuel, has been in operation since 1985. The SKB Sea Transportation System consists today of the purpose built ship M/s Sigyn, 10 transport casks for spent fuel, 2 casks for spent core components, 27 IP-2 shielded steel containers for reactor waste and 5 terminal vehicles. During an average year about 250 tonnes of spent fuel and 3 -- 4000 m 3 of reactor waste are transported to CLAB and SFR respectively, corresponding to around 30 sea voyages

  8. Thermoelectric transport in superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinecke, T L; Broido, D A

    1997-07-01

    The thermoelectric transport properties of superlattices have been studied using an exact solution of the Boltzmann equation. The role of heat transport along the barrier layers, of carrier tunneling through the barriers, of valley degeneracy and of the well width and energy dependences of the carrier-phonon scattering rates on the thermoelectric figure of merit are given. Calculations are given for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and for PbTe, and the results of recent experiments are discussed.

  9. Experiences in certification of packages for transportation of fresh nuclear fuel in the context of new safety requirements established by IAEA regulations (IAEA-96 regulations, ST-1) for air transportation of nuclear materials (requirements to C-type packages)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudai, V.I.; Kovtun, A.D.; Matveev, V.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Nilulin, V.M.; Shapovalov, V.I.; Yakushev, V.A.; Bobrovsky, V.S.; Rozhkov, V.V.; Agapov, A.M.; Kolesnikov, A.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' MSZ' ' , Electrostal (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' NPCC' ' , Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Minatom of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Gosatomnadzor of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Every year in Russia, a large amount of domestic and international transportation of fresh nuclear fuel (FNF) used in Russian and foreign energy and research atomic reactors and referred to fissile materials based on IAEA Regulations is performed. Here, bulk transportation is performed by air, and it concerns international transportation in particular. According to national ''Main Regulations for Safe Transport and physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (OPBZ- 83)'' and ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Regulations), nuclear and radiation security under normal (accident free) and accident conditions of transport must be completely provided by the package design. In this context, high requirements to fissile packages exposed to heat and mechanical loads in transport accidents are imposed. A long-standing experience in accident free transportation of FM has shown that such approach to provide nuclear and radiation security pays for itself completely. Nevertheless, once in 10 years the International Atomic Energy Agency on every revision of the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' places more stringent requirements upon the FM and transportation thereof, resulting from the objectively increasing risk associated with constant rise in volume and density of transportation, and also strained social and economical situation in a number of regions in the world. In the new edition of the IAEA Regulations (ST-1), published in 1996 and brought into force in 2001 (IAEA-96 Regulations), the requirements to FM packages conveyed by aircraft were radically changed. These requirements are completely presented in new Russian ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' (PBTRM- 2004) which will be brought into force in the time ahead.

  10. Computer simulation of radial transport in tandem mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A code used for simulation of classical radial transport in the 2XIIB experiment has been modified to simulate radial transport in TMX. Results have been obtained using classical transport coefficients and also using very simple trial neoclassical resonant transport coefficients. Comparison of the results obtained with solely classical transport and with both classical and neo-classical transport indicate that neoclassical transport depresses the ion density by approximately 5%. The central cell ion temperature is increased by approximately by the neo-classical transport, as is the electron temperature

  11. Reduced Gravity Studies of Soret Transport Effects in Liquid Fuel Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.

    2004-01-01

    Soret transport, which is mass transport driven by thermal gradients, can be important in practical flames as well as laboratory flames by influencing transport of low molecular weight species (e.g., monatomic and diatomic hydrogen). In addition, gas-phase Soret transport of high molecular weight fuel species that are present in practical liquid fuels (e.g., octane or methanol) can be significant in practical flames (Rosner et al., 2000; Dakhlia et al., 2002) and in high pressure droplet evaporation (Curtis and Farrell, 1992), and it has also been shown that Soret transport effects can be important in determining oxygen diffusion rates in certain classes of microgravity droplet combustion experiments (Aharon and Shaw, 1998). It is thus useful to obtain information on flames under conditions where Soret effects can be clearly observed. This research is concerned with investigating effects of Soret transport on combustion of liquid fuels, in particular liquid fuel droplets. Reduced-gravity is employed to provide an ideal (spherically-symmetrical) experimental model with which to investigate effects of Soret transport on combustion. The research will involve performing reduced-gravity experiments on combustion of liquid fuel droplets in environments where Soret effects significantly influence transport of fuel and oxygen to flame zones. Experiments will also be performed where Soret effects are not expected to be important. Droplets initially in the 0.5 to 1 mm size range will be burned. Data will be obtained on influences of Soret transport on combustion characteristics (e.g., droplet burning rates, droplet lifetimes, gas-phase extinction, and transient flame behaviors) under simplified geometrical conditions that are most amenable to theoretical modeling (i.e., spherical symmetry). The experiments will be compared with existing theoretical models as well as new models that will be developed. Normal gravity experiments will also be performed.

  12. The Potential of Online Respondent Data for Choice Modeling in Transportation Research: Evidence from Stated Preference Experiments using Web-based Samples: Evidence from Stated Preference Experiments using Web-based Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffer, Brice

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze the potential of online survey services for conducting stated preference experiments in the field of transportation planning. Several web-products for hosting questionnaires are evaluated considering important features required when conducting a stated preference survey. Based on this evaluation, the open-source platform LimeSurvey is the most appropriated for this kind of research. A stated preference questionnaire about pedestrians’ route choice in a Sin...

  13. Progress in transport modelling of internal transport barrier plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tala, T.; Bourdelle, C.; Imbeaux, F.; Moreau, D.; Garbet, X.; Joffrin, E.; Laborde, L.; Litaudon, X.; Mazon, D.; Parail, V.; Corrigan, G.; Heading, D.; Crisanti, F.; Mantica, P.; Salmi, A.; Strand, P.; Weiland, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will report on the recent progress in transport modelling of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) plasmas. Two separate issues will be covered, fully predictive transport modelling of ITBs in the multi-tokamak database, including micro-stability analyses of ITBs, and predictive closed-loop (i.e. real-time control) transport simulations of the q-profile and ITBs. For the first time, the predictive capabilities of the mixed Bohm/GyroBohm and Weiland transport models are investigated with discharges from the ITPA ITB database by fully predictive transport simulations. The predictive transport simulations with the Bohm/GyroBohm model agree very well with experimental results from JET and JT-60U. In order to achieve a good agreement in DIII-D, the stabilisation had to be included into the model, showing the significant role played by the stabilisation in governing the physics of the ITBs. The significant role of the stabilisation is also emphasised by the gyrokinetic analysis. The Weiland transport model shows only limited agreement between the model predictions and experimental results with respect to the formation and location of the ITB. The fully predictive closed-loop simulations with real-time control of the q-profile and ITB show that it is possible to reach various set-point profiles for q and ITB and control them for longer than a current diffusion time in JET using the same real-time control technique as in the experiments. (author)

  14. BNFL's experience in preparing and implementing radiation protection programmes for the control of exposure to workers involved with the international transport of nuclear cargoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billing, D.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL International Transport have successfully developed appropriate Radiation Protection Programmes for their business. The business supports BNFL's worldwide Nuclear Fuel Services with key customer bases in Europe, Japan and the UK, utilising marine, rail and road modal transports. Experience in the business spans over 4 decades. The preparation of RPP's for each aspect of its operations has been made relatively straight forward in that the key elements within the internationally recognised model RPP (by WNTI) were already in place in BNFL's procedures to satisfy current National UK and International Regulations. Arrangements are supported by Management systems which comply with International Standards for Quality Assurance. Exposure to key worker groups continues to be within Category 1 (less than 1mSv/y) of the IAEA Transport Regulations TS-R-1 (ST-1 revised)

  15. Spatial glyphosate and AMPA redistribution on the soil surface driven by sediment transport processes - A flume experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Célia P M; Commelin, Meindert C; Baartman, Jantiene E M; Yang, Xiaomei; Peters, Piet; Mol, Hans G J; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the influence of small-scale sediment transport on glyphosate and AMPA redistribution on the soil surface and on their off-site transport during water erosion events. Both a smooth surface (T1) and a surface with "seeding lines on the contour" (T2) were tested in a rainfall simulation experiment using soil flumes (1 × 0.5 m) with a 5% slope. A dose of 178 mg m -2 of a glyphosate-based formulation (CLINIC ® ) was applied on the upper 0.2 m of the flumes. Four 15-min rainfall events (RE) with 30-min interval in between and a total rainfall intensity of 30 mm h -1 were applied. Runoff samples were collected after each RE in a collector at the flume outlet. At the end of the four REs, soil and sediment samples were collected in the application area and in four 20 cm-segments downslope of the application area. Samples were collected according to the following visually distinguished soil surface groups: light sedimentation (LS), dark sedimentation (DS), background and aggregates. Results showed that runoff, suspended sediment and associated glyphosate and AMPA off-site transport were significantly lower in T2 than in T1. Glyphosate and AMPA off-site deposition was higher for T2 than for T1, and their contents on the soil surface decreased with increasing distance from the application area for all soil surface groups and in both treatments. The LS and DS groups presented the highest glyphosate and AMPA contents, but the background group contributed the most to the downslope off-site deposition. Glyphosate and AMPA off-target particle-bound transport was 9.4% (T1) and 17.8% (T2) of the applied amount, while water-dissolved transport was 2.8% (T1) and 0.5% (T2). Particle size and organic matter influenced the mobility of glyphosate and AMPA to off-target areas. These results indicate that the pollution risk of terrestrial and aquatic environments through runoff and deposition can be considerable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  16. Evaluation of intelligent transport systems impact on school transport safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowska-Karpa Dagmara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrated system of safe transport of children to school using Intelligent Transport Systems was developed and implemented in four locations across Europe under the Safeway2School (SW2S project, funded by the EU. The SW2S system evaluation included speed measurements and an eye-tracking experiment carried out among drivers who used the school bus route, where selected elements of the system were tested. The subject of the evaluation were the following system elements: pedestrian safety system at the bus stop (Intelligent Bus Stop and tags for children, Driver Support System, applications for parents’ and students’ mobile phones, bus stop inventory tool and data server. A new sign designed for buses and bus stops to inform about child transportation/children waiting at the bus stop was added to the system. Training schemes for system users were also provided. The article presents evaluation results of the impact of selected elements of the SW2S system on school transport safety in Poland.

  17. Coupling Solute and Fine Particle Transport with Sand Bed Morphodynamics within a Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Ortiz, C. P.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Fine suspended particles are typically considered to pass through streams and rivers as wash load without interacting with the bed, however experiments have demonstrated that hyporheic flow causes advective exchange of fine particles with the stream bed, yielding accumulation of fine particle deposits within the bed. Ultimately, understanding river morphodynamics and ecosystem dynamics requires coupling both fine particle and solute transport with bed morphodynamics. To better understand the coupling between these processes we analyze a novel dataset from a controlled field experiment conducted on Clear Run, a 2nd order sand bed stream located within the North Carolina coastal plain. Data include concentrations of continuously injected conservative solutes and fine particulate tracers measured at various depths within the stream bed, overhead time lapse images of bed forms, stream discharge, and geomorphological surveys of the stream. We use image analysis of bed morphodynamics to assess exchange, retention, and remobilization of solutes and fine particles during constant discharge and a short duration experimental flood. From the images, we extract a time series of bedform elevations and scour depths for the duration of the experiment. The high-resolution timeseries of bed elevation enables us to assess coupling of bed morphodynamics with both the solute and fine particle flux during steady state mobile bedforms prior to the flood and to changing bedforms during the flood. These data allow the application of a stochastic modeling framework relating bed elevation fluctuations to fine particle residence times. This combined experimental and modeling approach ultimately informs our ability to predict not only the fate of fine particulate matter but also associated nutrient and carbon dynamics within streams and rivers.

  18. Coupled transport in field-reversed configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Berk, H. L.; TAE Team

    2018-02-01

    Coupled transport is the close interconnection between the cross-field and parallel fluxes in different regions due to topological changes in the magnetic field. This occurs because perpendicular transport is necessary for particles or energy to leave closed field-line regions, while parallel transport strongly affects evolution of open field-line regions. In most toroidal confinement systems, the periphery, namely, the portion with open magnetic surfaces, is small in thickness and volume compared to the core plasma, the portion with closed surfaces. In field-reversed configurations (FRCs), the periphery plays an outsized role in overall confinement. This effect is addressed by an FRC-relevant model of coupled particle transport that is well suited for immediate interpretation of experiments. The focus here is particle confinement rather than energy confinement since the two track together in FRCs. The interpretive tool yields both the particle transport rate χn and the end-loss time τǁ. The results indicate that particle confinement depends on both χn across magnetic surfaces throughout the plasma and τǁ along open surfaces and that they provide roughly equal transport barriers, inhibiting particle loss. The interpretation of traditional FRCs shows Bohm-like χn and inertial (free-streaming) τǁ. However, in recent advanced beam-driven FRC experiments, χn approaches the classical rate and τǁ is comparable to classic empty-loss-cone mirrors.

  19. Behavior of electron and ion transport in discharges with an internal transport barrier in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C.M.; Staebler, G.M.; Rettig, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    We report results of experiments to further determine the underlying physics behind the formation and development of internal transport barriers (ITB) in the DIII-D tokamak. The initial ITB formation occurs when the neutral beam heating power exceeds a threshold value during the early stages of the current ramp in low-density discharges. This region of reduced transport, made accessible by suppression of long-wavelength turbulence by sheared flows, is most evident in the ion temperature and impurity rotation profiles. In some cases, reduced transport is also observed in the electron temperature and density profiles. If the power is near the threshold, the barrier remains stationary and encloses only a small fraction of the plasma volume. If, however, the power is increased, the transport barrier expands to encompass a larger fraction of the plasma volume. The dynamic behavior of the transport barrier during the growth phase exhibits rapid transport events that are associated with both broadening of the profiles and reductions in turbulence and associated transport. In some, but not all, cases, these events are correlated with the safety factor q passing through integer values. The final state following this evolution is a plasma exhibiting ion thermal transport at or below neoclassical levels. Typically, the electron thermal transport remains anomalously high. Recent experimental results are reported in which rf electron heating was applied to plasmas with an ion ITB, thereby increasing both the electron and ion transport. Although the results are partially in agreement with the usual E-vector x B-vector shear suppression hypothesis, the results still leave questions that must be addressed in future experiments. (author)

  20. Behavior of electron and ion transport in discharges with an internal transport barrier in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C.M.; Staebler, G.M.; Rettig, C.L.

    1998-12-01

    The authors report results of experiments to further determine the underlying physics behind the formation and development of internal transport barriers (ITB) in the DIII-D tokamak. The initial ITB formation occurs when the neutral beam heating power exceeds a threshold value during the early stages of the current ramp in low-density discharges. This region of reduced transport, made accessible by suppression of long-wavelength turbulence by sheared flows, is most evident in the ion temperature and impurity rotation profiles. In some cases, reduced transport is also observed in the electron temperature and density profiles. If the power is near the threshold, the barrier remains stationary and enclosed only a small fraction of the plasma volume. If, however, the power is increased, the transport barrier expands to encompass a larger fraction of the plasma volume. The dynamic behavior of the transport barrier during the growth phase exhibits rapid transport events that are associated with both broadening of the profiles and reductions in turbulence and associated transport. In some, but not all, cases, these events are correlated with the safety factor q passing through integer values. The final state following this evolution is a plasma exhibiting ion thermal transport at or below neoclassical levels. Typically, the electron thermal transport remains anomalously high. Recent experimental results are reported in which rf electron heating was applied to plasmas with an ion ITB, thereby increasing both the electron and ion transport. Although the results are partially in agreement with the usual rvec E x rvec B shear suppression hypothesis, the results still leave questions that must be addressed in future experiments

  1. STATE REGULATION OF CARGO SECURING FOR ROAD TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Anatolievich Atrokhov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the legal documents governing the securing of cargo in road transport, provides an overview of international experience in the safety of road transport of goods by means of securing.

  2. Sustainable transport practices in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogat, J.; Hinostroza, M. [UNEP Risoe Centre (Denmark)

    2007-05-15

    The rapid growth of Latin American cities beginning in the 70s has led to, among other things, growing mobility and demand for transportation. The lack of efficient, reliable and safe public transport systems has promoted the switch away from buses and trains towards private cars. Some of the impacts of a steadily increasing car fleet have been increased congestion, number of accidents and environmental deterioration. Recognising the potential implications of such a development, policy makers and officials found it necessary and went ahead to reformulate transport policies with the aim of providing safe, cost-effective and environmental-friendly public transport systems. Bus rapid transit (BRT) became the answer in a number of Latin American cities. The successful experiences of Curitiba in Brazil and Bogota in Colombia have served as the source of inspiration for other cities in Latin America, Asia, Europe and the USA. Thus, the BRT represents a unique example of South-South, South-North technology transfer. This paper presents some of the Latin American experiences and discusses their achievement and drawbacks. (au)

  3. Trans-European transport networks influence on the regional development and urban systems: Serbian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksin-Mićić Marija

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The trans-European transport network has different effects at macro-regional, mezzo-regional and micro-regional level, and on urban systems development, and its effectiveness rises at the lower regional levels. Possible approaches to the trans-European transport network impact and effect survey and policy options have been pointed out. The importance of increased accessibility and mobility for regional expansion and for more balanced and polycentric system of city networks has been underlined. The question is how the new major transport infrastructure affects the development of functional complementarity between cities and regions. Changes of the spatial organization, utilization and structure of cities, as well as of social benefits and losses subsequent to impacts of trans-European transport corridor "X" on urban system Ćuprija-Jagodina-Paraćin at section Belgrade-Nis have been analysed. The new trans-European or major transport infrastructure does not per se create regional and urban system network development, although it can affect the conditions for the processes that create growth and development. The effects can be increased by co-ordination of measures of regional and urban policy, land use, transport and other policies. The guidances and options of urban systems and urban centres development policies in trans-European transport corridor, as well as possibilities to improve our planning system have been given. The necessary measure is the introduction of spatial impact assessment as sectorial policy instrument for the large transport infrastructure projects.

  4. Irradiated nuclear fuel transport from Japan to Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, M.T.; Shimoyama, S.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been transported from Japan to Europe since 1969, although U.K. experience goes back almost two decades. Both magnox and oxide fuel have been transported, and the technical requirements associated with each type of fuel are outlined. The specialized ships used by British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) for this transport are described, as well as the ships being developed for future use in the Japan trade. The ship requirements are related to the regulatory position both in the United Kingdom and internationally, and the Japanese regulatory requirements are described. Finally, specific operational experience of a Japanese reactor operator is described

  5. High-current beam dynamics and transport, theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of beam physics and technology factors determining the current and brightness of ion and electron beams in linear accelerators will be reviewed. Topics to be discussed including phase-space density constraints of particle sources, low-energy beam transport include charge neutralization, emittance growth due to mismatch, energy exchange, instabilities, nonlinear effects, and longitudinal bunching

  6. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, T; Stallknecht, B M; Pedersen, O

    1990-01-01

    exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training...... session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold......The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers...

  7. Quantum Transport Through Tunable Molecular Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2017-07-31

    Employing self-interaction corrected density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method, we study the quantum transport through molecules with different numbers of phenyl (donor) and pyrimidinyl (acceptor) rings in order to evaluate the effects of the molecular composition on the transport properties. Excellent agreement with the results of recent experiments addressing the rectification behavior of molecular junctions is obtained, which demonstrates the potential of quantum transport simulations for designing high performance junctions by tuning the molecular specifications.

  8. Large orbit neoclassical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    Neoclassical transport in the presence of large ion orbits is investigated. The study is motivated by the recent experimental results that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas fall below the open-quotes irreducible minimum levelclose quotes predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system. Analytical and simulation results are in agreement with trends from experiments. The development of a general formalism for neoclassical transport theory with finite orbit width is also discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Investigations of the role of nonlinear couplings in structure formation and transport regulation: Experiment, simulation, and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, C.; Kim, E.J.; Champeaux, S.; Gurcan, O.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Diamond, P.H.; Tynan, G.R.; Nevins, W.; Candy, J.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the physics of shear flow and structure formation in plasmas is a central problem for the advancement of magnetic fusion because of the roles such flows are believed to play in regulating turbulence and transport levels. In this paper, we report on integrated experimental, computational, and theoretical studies of sheared zonal flows and radially extended convective cells, with the aim of assessing the results of theory experiment and theory-simulation comparisons. In particular, simulations are used as test beds for verifying analytical predictions and demonstrating the suitability of techniques such as bispectral analysis for isolating nonlinear couplings in data. Based on intriguing initial results suggesting increased levels of nonlinear coupling occur during L-H transitions, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of bispectral quantities in fluid and gyrokinetic simulations, and compared these results with theoretical expectations. Topics of study include locality and directionality of energy transfer, amplitude scaling, and parameter dependences. Techniques for inferring nonlinear coupling coefficients from data are discussed, and initial results from experimental data are presented. Future experimental studies are motivated. We also present work investigating the role of structures in transport. Analysis of simulation data indicates that the turbulent heat flux can be represented as an ensemble of 'heat pulses' of varying sizes, with a power law distribution. The slope of the power law is shown to determine global transport scaling (i.e. Bohm or gyro-Bohm). Theoretical work studying the dynamics of the largest cells (termed 'streamers') is presented, as well as results from ongoing analysis studying connections between heat pulse distribution and bispectral quantities. (author)

  10. Analysis of aircraft and satellite measurements from the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX-B to quantify long-range transport of East Asian sulfur to Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Donkelaar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We interpret a suite of satellite, aircraft, and ground-based measurements over the North Pacific Ocean and western North America during April–May 2006 as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B campaign to understand the implications of long-range transport of East Asian emissions to North America. The Canadian component of INTEX-B included 33 vertical profiles from a Cessna 207 aircraft equipped with an aerosol mass spectrometer. Long-range transport of organic aerosols was insignificant, contrary to expectations. Measured sulfate plumes in the free troposphere over British Columbia exceeded 2 μg/m3. We update the global anthropogenic emission inventory in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem and use it to interpret the observations. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD retrieved from two satellite instruments (MISR and MODIS for 2000–2006 are analyzed with GEOS-Chem to estimate an annual growth in Chinese sulfur emissions of 6.2% and 9.6%, respectively. Analysis of aircraft sulfate measurements from the NASA DC-8 over the central Pacific, the NSF C-130 over the east Pacific and the Cessna over British Columbia indicates most Asian sulfate over the ocean is in the lower free troposphere (800–600 hPa, with a decrease in pressure toward land due to orographic effects. We calculate that 56% of the measured sulfate between 500–900 hPa over British Columbia is due to East Asian sources. We find evidence of a 72–85% increase in the relative contribution of East Asian sulfate to the total burden in spring off the northwest coast of the United States since 1985. Campaign-average simulations indicate anthropogenic East Asian sulfur emissions increase mean springtime sulfate in Western Canada at the surface by 0.31 μg/m3 (~30% and account for 50% of the overall regional sulfate burden between 1 and 5 km. Mean measured daily surface sulfate concentrations taken in the Vancouver area increase by

  11. Experiments on the photophoretic motion of chondrules and dust aggregates -indications for the transport of matter in protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wurm, Gerhard; Teiser, Jens; Bischoff, Addi

    2010-01-01

    In a set of 16 drop tower experiments the motion of sub-millimeter to millimeter-sized particles under microgravity was observed. Illumination by a halogen lamp induced acceleration of the particles due to photophoresis. Photophoresis on dust-free chondrules, on chondrules, glass spheres and meta....... The strength of the photophoretic force varies for chondrules, dust covered particles and pure dust from low to strong, respectively. The measurements support the idea that photophoresis in the early Solar System can be efficient to transport solid particles outward....

  12. Sediment transport under breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Mayer, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The sediment transport in the surf zone is modelled by combining a Navier-Stokes solver, a free surface model, a turbulence model, and a sediment transport model. The flow solver is based on the finite volume technique for non-orthogonal grids. The model is capable of simulating the turbulence...... generated at the surface where the wave breaks as well as the turbulence generated near the bed due to the wave-motion and the undertow. In general, the levels of turbulent kinetic energy are found to be higher than experiments show. This results in an over prediction of the sediment transport. Nevertheless...

  13. Modelling transport of chokka squid (Loligo reynaudii) paralarvae off South Africa: reviewing, testing and extending the ‘Westward Transport Hypothesis'

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Martins, RS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available hydrodynamic model (ROMS) to test the WTH and assessed four factors that might influence successful transport – Release Area, Month, Specific Gravity (body density) and Diel Vertical Migration (DVM) – in numerical experiments that estimated successful transport...

  14. Spectroscopic transport studies at the stellerator Wendelstein 7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, E.

    1995-11-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Magnetic confinement experiments with toroidal geometry, foundations of particle transport theory, code calculations (SITAR), gaseous oscillation method for impurity transport study and results

  15. Intermodal transport as an integral part of logistics system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bitkowska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The experience of companies that are successful in the carriage of goods prove that intermodal transport is now a major factor in determining the success of logistics system. A modern approach to the transport is based on intermodal transport. The article is based on the method of external observation. It presents the essence of intermodal transport and its benefits. It specifies transportation as an integral part of logistics system.

  16. Core transport properties in JT-60U and JET identity plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litaudon, X.; Sakamoto, Y.; de Vries, P. C.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; Angioni, C.; Benkadda, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Bourdelle, C.; Brix, M.; Crombe, K.; Fujita, T.; Futatani, S.; Garbet, X.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hayashi, N.; Hoang, G. T.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Matsunaga, G.; Nakano, T.; Oyama, N.; Parail, V.; Shinohara, K.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Takenaga, H.; Takizuka, T.; Urano, H.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Yoshida, M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper compares the transport properties of a set of dimensionless identity experiments performed between JET and JT-60U in the advanced tokamak regime with internal transport barrier, ITB. These International Tokamak Physics Activity, ITPA, joint experiments were carried out with the same plasma

  17. Regional cooperation in transportation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    As Floridas urbanized areas grow and merge, : neighboring jurisdictions experience interrelated : problems and opportunities, and regional : cooperation becomes an imperative. In the : transportation sector, Floridas metropolitan : planning org...

  18. Data acquisition of mass transport parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Riyo; Hama, Katsuhiro; Morikawa, Keita; Hosoya, Shinichi

    2017-02-01

    Tono Geoscience Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been carrying out the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) Project, which is a scientific study understanding the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The aim of the MIU project is to establish comprehensive techniques for the investigation, analysis and assessment of the deep geological environment in fractured crystalline rock, and to develop a range of engineering techniques for deep underground application. This project has three overlapping phases: Surface-based investigation phase (Phase I), Construction phase (Phase II), and Operation phase (Phase III). Currently, the project is being carried out under the Phase III. Mass transport study is mainly performed as part of Phase III project. In Phase III, the goal of mass transport study is to obtain a better understanding of mass transport phenomena in the geological environment as well as to develop technologies for measurement of the mass transport parameters, model construction, numerical analysis and validation of those technologies. This study was planned to understand the influence of the geological characteristics of fracture on the mass transport parameters. This report presents the results of diffusion experiment, observation of polished thin section, sorption experiment and porophysicality measurement. (author)

  19. Lessons learned from bacterial transport research at the South Oyster Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, T.; Hubbard, S.S.; Onstott, T.C.; DeFlaun, M.F.

    2011-04-01

    This paper provides a review of bacterial transport experiments conducted by a multi-investigator, multi-institution, multi-disciplinary team of researchers under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The experiments were conducted during the time period 1999-2001 at a field site near the town of Oyster, Virginia known as the South Oyster Site, and included four major experimental campaigns aimed at understanding and quantifying bacterial transport in the subsurface environment. Several key elements of the research are discussed here: (1) quantification of bacterial transport in physically, chemically and biologically heterogeneous aquifers, (2) evaluation of the efficacy of conventional colloid filtration theory, (3) scale effects in bacterial transport, (4) development of new methods for microbial enumeration and screening for low adhesion strains, (5) application of novel hydrogeophysical techniques for aquifer characterization, and (6) experiences regarding management of a large field research effort. Lessons learned are summarized in each of these areas. The body of literature resulting from South Oyster Site research has been widely cited and continues to influence research into the controls exerted by aquifer heterogeneity on reactive transport (including microbial transport). It also served as a model (and provided valuable experience) for subsequent and ongoing highly-instrumented field research efforts conducted by DOE-sponsored investigators.

  20. Transport roads on peatland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, G

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory tests have given good experiences to develop the technology of building transport roads for truck on peat bogs. The experiences can be summarized in the following points: The bearing capacity can be increased 15-20 times by mixing down, to the depth of 0,5 m, a mixture of gypsum and T-lime. high bearing surface capacity has been achieved at laboratory tests by mixing sulfonated lignin/sodiumbichromate or cement into peat. These mixtures can take a load of 610 kPa will be tested in the field. An ordinary base machine can be used with some modifications for the new technique. Costs for building roads and stores with the new technique can save 6 MSEK/year in Sweden. Remainig problems at full scale tests are: Testroads should be built to get knowledge of settlement, bearing capacity cost of maintenance etc. Heavy metals pollution. Machinery for transportation and admixture of the stabilizing agents must be deloped. By experience a good mixture between firm soil and peat is difficult to achieve. Technique and dimensioning to make a soft mixture ought to be studied.

  1. Transport of Mars atmospheric water into high northern latitudes during a polar warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. R.; Hollingsworth, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Several numerical experiments were conducted with a simplified tracer transport model in order to attempt to examine the poleward transport of Mars atmospheric water during a polar warming like that which occurred during the winter solstice dust storm of 1977. The flow for the transport experiments was taken from numerical simulations with a nonlinear beta-plane dynamical model. Previous studies with this model have demonstrated that a polar warming having essential characteristics like those observed during the 1977 dust storm can be produced by a planetary wave mechanism analogous to that responsible for terrestrial sudden stratospheric warmings. Several numerical experiments intended to simulate water transport in the absence of any condensation were carried out. These experiments indicate that the flow during a polar warming can transport very substantial amounts of water to high northern latitudes, given that the water does not condense and fall out before reaching the polar region.

  2. TEM heat transport and fluctuations in the HSX stellarator: experiments and comparison with gyrokinetic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoniewski, J.; Faber, B. J.; Sánchez, E.; Calvo, I.; Pueschel, M. J.; Likin, K. M.; Deng, C. B.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2017-10-01

    The Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX) has demonstrated reduced neoclassical transport in the plasma core with quasi-symmetry [Lore Thesis 2010], while outside this region the electron thermal diffusivity is well above the neoclassical level, likely due to the Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) [Weir PoP 2015, Faber PoP 2015]. We compare gyrokinetic simulations of the TEM to experimental heat flux and density fluctuation measurements for two configurations: Quasi-Helical Symmetry (QHS) and broken symmetry (Mirror). Both experiment and simulation show that the heat flux for Mirror is larger than for QHS by about a factor of two. Initial interferometer measurements provide evidence that density-gradient-driven TEMs are driving turbulence. Calculations of the collisionless damping of zonal flows provide another perspective into the difference between geometries. Similar to other stellarators [Monreal PPCF 2016], the zonal flow residual goes to zero at long wavelengths in both configurations. Additionally, the very short time decay of the zonal flow due to neoclassical polarization is constant between configurations. However, the collisionless damping time is longer and the zonal flow oscillation frequency is smaller in QHS than Mirror, consistent with reduced radial particle drifts. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  3. ATTILA - Atmospheric Tracer Transport In a Langrangian Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reithmeier, C.; Sausen, R.

    2000-07-01

    The Lagrangian model ATTILA (atmospheric tracer transport in a Lagrangian model) has been developed to treat the global-scale transport of passive trace species in the atmosphere within the framework of a general circulation model (GCM). ATTILA runs online within the GCM ECHAM4 and uses the GCM produced wind field to advect the centrois of 80.000 to 180.000 constant mass air parcels into which the model atmosphere is divided. Each trace constituent is thereby represented by a mass mixing ratio in each parcel. ATTILA contains state-of-the-art parameterizations of convection, turbulent boundary layer mixing, and interparcel transport and provides an algorithm to map the tracer concentrations from the trajectories to the ECHAM model grid. We use two experiments to evaluate the transport characteristics of ATTILA against observations and the standard semiLagrangian transport scheme of ECHAM. In the first experiment we simulate the distribution of the short-lived tracer Radon ({sup 222}Rn) in order to examine fast vertical transport over continents, and long-range transport from the continents to remote areas. In the second experiment, we simulate the distribution of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) that was injected into the northern stratosphere during the nuclear weapon tests in the early 60ties, in order to examine upper tropospheric and stratospheric transport characteristics. ATTILA compares well to the observations and in many respects to the semiLagrangian scheme. However, contrary to the semiLagrangian scheme, ATTILA shows a greatly reduced meridional transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and a reduced downward flux from the stratosphere to the troposphere, especially in midlatitudes. Since both transport schemes use the same model meteorology, we conclude that the often cited enhanced meridional transport and overestimated downward flux in ECHAM as described above is rather due to the numerical properties of the semiLagrangian scheme than due to an

  4. Explaining Cold-Pulse Dynamics in Tokamak Plasmas Using Local Turbulent Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, P.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Grierson, B. A.; Staebler, G. M.; Rice, J. E.; Yuan, X.; Cao, N. M.; Creely, A. J.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J. H.; Sciortino, F.

    2018-02-01

    A long-standing enigma in plasma transport has been resolved by modeling of cold-pulse experiments conducted on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Controlled edge cooling of fusion plasmas triggers core electron heating on time scales faster than an energy confinement time, which has long been interpreted as strong evidence of nonlocal transport. This Letter shows that the steady-state profiles, the cold-pulse rise time, and disappearance at higher density as measured in these experiments are successfully captured by a recent local quasilinear turbulent transport model, demonstrating that the existence of nonlocal transport phenomena is not necessary for explaining the behavior and time scales of cold-pulse experiments in tokamak plasmas.

  5. Contaminant transport at a waste residue deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Traberg, Rikke

    1996-01-01

    Contaminant transport in an aquifer at an incinerator waste residue deposit in Denmark is simulated. A two-dimensional, geochemical transport code is developed for this purpose and tested by comparison to results from another code, The code is applied to a column experiment and to the field site...

  6. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He + and mixed p, H 2+ , H 3+ beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was designed to perform

  7. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-08-25

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He{sup +} and mixed p, H{sup 2+}, H{sup 3+} beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was

  8. Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, A.; Reimus, P.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR), as outlined in its Work Direction and Planning Document (CRWMS MandO 1999a), is to provide retardation factors for colloids with irreversibly-attached radionuclides, such as plutonium, in the saturated zone (SZ) between their point of entrance from the unsaturated zone (UZ) and downgradient compliance points. Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this AMR especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and perhaps other radionuclides may be irreversibly attached to colloids. This report establishes the requirements and elements of the design of a methodology for calculating colloid transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In previous Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses, radionuclide-bearing colloids were assumed to be unretarded in their migration. Field experiments in fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain and in porous media at other sites indicate that colloids may, in fact, experience retardation relative to the mean pore-water velocity, suggesting that contaminants associated with colloids should also experience some retardation. Therefore, this analysis incorporates field data where available and a theoretical framework when site-specific data are not available for estimating plausible ranges of retardation factors in both saturated fractured tuff and saturated alluvium. The distribution of retardation factors for tuff and alluvium are developed in a form consistent with the Performance Assessment (PA) analysis framework for simulating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone. To improve on the work performed so far for the saturated-zone flow and transport modeling, concerted effort has been made in quantifying colloid retardation factors in both fractured tuff and alluvium. The fractured tuff analysis used recent data

  9. Trans-European transport networks influence on the regional development and urban systems: Serbian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksin-Mićić Marija

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The trans-European transport network has different effects at macro regional mezzo-regional and micro-regional level, and its effectiveness rises with the lower regional levels. Possible approaches to the trans-European transport network impact and effect survey and policy options have been pointed out. The importance of increased accessibility and mobility for regional expansion and for a more balanced and polycentric system of city networks has been underlined. Changes in the spatial organization utilization and structure of cities, as well as in social benefits and losses subsequent to impacts of trans-European transport corridor "X" section Belgrade-Niš have been analyzed. The new trans-European or major transport infrastructure does not per se create regional and urban system network development, although it can affect the conditions for the processes that create growth and development. The effects can be increased by co-ordination of measures of regional, spatial and urban policy, land use transport, environmental and other policies. The necessary measure is the introduction of spatial impact assessment as sartorial policy instrument for the large transport infrastructure plans and projects.

  10. Transient heat transport studies in JET conventional and advanced tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Coffey, I.; Dux, R.

    2003-01-01

    Transient transport studies are a valuable complement to steady-state analysis for the understanding of transport mechanisms and the validation of physics-based transport models. This paper presents results from transient heat transport experiments in JET and their modelling. Edge cold pulses and modulation of ICRH (in mode conversion scheme) have been used to provide detectable electron and ion temperature perturbations. The experiments have been performed in conventional L-mode plasmas or in Advanced Tokamak regimes, in the presence of an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). In conventional plasmas, the issues of stiffness and non-locality have been addressed. Cold pulse propagation in ITB plasmas has provided useful insight into the physics of ITB formation. The use of edge perturbations for ITB triggering has been explored. Modelling of the experimental results has been performed using both empirical models and physics-based models. Results of cold pulse experiments in ITBs have also been compared with turbulence simulations. (author)

  11. Plutonium-239 sorption and transport on/in unsaturated sediments. Comparison of batch and column experiments for determining sorption coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinchuan Xie; Jiachun Lu; Xiaohua Zhou; Xuhui Wang; Mei Li; Lili Du; Yueheng Liu; Guoqing Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Sorption (distribution) coefficients of plutonium were most often derived by static batch experiments. However, it is not clear how unsaturated flow conditions including moisture content and pore water velocity change the sorption coefficients. Transport experiments of plutonium through the unsaturated sediments packed into the columns were then performed in order to determine the sorption coefficients (column-K ds ). Static batch experiments were also conducted to obtain batch-K ds and then compare the differences between batch-K ds and column-K ds . The results show that unsaturated flow conditions had no significant effect on column-K ds , and the average column-K d value was 1.74 ± 0.02 m 3 /kg. By comparison, batch-K d values spanned several orders of magnitude, regardless of the specified liquid-solid conditions. Moreover, the batch-K d (22.7 m 3 /kg) at the standard L/S (4 mL/g) recommended by ASTM D 4319 was over an order of magnitude larger than the average column-K d . (author)

  12. Some in-reactor loop experiments on corrosion product transport and water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, P.V.; Allison, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the transport of activated corrosion products in the heat transport circuit of pressurized water-cooled nuclear reactors using an in-reactor loop showed that the concentration of particulate and dissolved corrosion products in the high-temperature water depends on such chemical parameters as pH and dissolved hydrogen concentration. Transients in these parameters, as well as in temperature, generally increase the concentration of suspended corrosion products. The maximum concentration of particles observed is much reduced when high-flow, high-temperature filtration is used. Filtration also reduces the steady-state concentration of particles. Dissolved corrosion products are mainly responsible for activity accumulation on surfaces. The data obtained from this study were used to estimate the rate constants for some of the transfer processes involved in the contamination of the primary heat transport circuit in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

  13. Influence of turbulence on bed load sediment transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Chua, L.; Cheng, N. S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study on the influence of an external turbulence field on the bedload sediment transport in an open channel. The external turbulence was generated by: (1) with a horizontal pipe placed halfway through the depth, h; (2) with a series of grids......-bed experiments and the ripple-covered-bed experiments. In the former case, the flow in the presence of the turbulence generator was adjusted so that the mean bed shear stress was the same as in the case without the turbulence generator in order to single out the effect of the external turbulence on the sediment...... correlated with the sediment transport rate. The sediment transport increases markedly with increasing turbulence level....

  14. Transport of sulfadiazine in soil columns — Experiments and modelling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrhan, Anne; Kasteel, Roy; Simunek, Jirka; Groeneweg, Joost; Vereecken, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotics, such as sulfadiazine, reach agricultural soils directly through manure of grazing livestock or indirectly through the spreading of manure or sewage sludge on the field. Knowledge about the fate of antibiotics in soils is crucial for assessing the environmental risk of these compounds, including possible transport to the groundwater. Transport of 14C-labelled sulfadiazine was investigated in disturbed soil columns at a constant flow rate of 0.26 cm h - 1 near saturation. Sulfadiazine was applied in different concentrations for either a short or a long pulse duration. Breakthrough curves of sulfadiazine and the non-reactive tracer chloride were measured. At the end of the leaching period the soil concentration profiles were determined. The peak maxima of the breakthrough curves were delayed by a factor of 2 to 5 compared to chloride and the decreasing limbs are characterized by an extended tailing. However, the maximum relative concentrations differed as well as the eluted mass fractions, ranging from 18 to 83% after 500 h of leaching. To identify relevant sorption processes, breakthrough curves of sulfadiazine were fitted with a convective-dispersive transport model, considering different sorption concepts with one, two and three sorption sites. Breakthrough curves can be fitted best with a three-site sorption model, which includes two reversible kinetic and one irreversible sorption site. However, the simulated soil concentration profiles did not match the observations for all of the used models. Despite this incomplete process description, the obtained results have implications for the transport behavior of sulfadiazine in the field. Its leaching may be enhanced if it is frequently applied at higher concentrations.

  15. Experience in the analysis of accidents and incidents involving the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner-Jones, S.M.; Hughes, J.S.; Shaw, K.B.

    2002-01-01

    Some half a million packages containing radioactive materials are transported to, from and within the UK annually. Accidents and incidents involving these shipments are rare. However, there is always the potential for such an event, which could lead to a release of the contents of a package or an increase in radiation level caused by damaged shielding. These events could result in radiological consequences for transport workers. As transport occurs in the public environment, such events could also lead to radiation exposures of members of the public. The UK Department for Transport (DfT), together with the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have supported, for almost 20 years, work to compile, analyse and report on accidents and incidents that occur during the transport of radioactive materials. Annual reports on these events have been produced for twelve years. The details of these events are recorded in the Radioactive Materials Transport Event Database (RAMTED) maintained by the National Radiological Protection Board on behalf of the DfT and HSE. Information on accidents and incidents dates back to 1958. RAMTED currently includes information of 708 accidents and incidents, covering the period 1958 to 2000. This paper presents a summary of the data covering this period, identifying trends and lessons learned together with a discussion of some examples. It was found that, historically, the most significant exposures were received as a result of accidents involving the transport of industrial radiography sources. However, the frequency and severity of these events has decreased considerably in the later years of this study due to improvements in training, awareness and equipment. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency, have established the international nuclear event scale (INES), which is described in detail in a users' guide. The INES has been revised to fully include transport events, and the information in RAMTED has been reviewed

  16. The experience of the FERMI@Elettra photon beam transport and diagnostics system (PADReS) during three years of continuous support of machine and user experiments: achievements, lessons learned, and future upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangrando, Marco; Fava, Claudio; Gerusina, Simone; Gobessi, Riccardo; Mahne, Nicola; Mazzucco, Eric; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Rumiz, Luca; Svetina, Cristian

    2014-09-01

    The FERMI FEL facility has begun delivering photons in 2011, becoming in late 2012 the first seeded facility open to external users worldwide. Since then, several tens of experiments have been carried out on the three operative endstations LDM, DiProI, and EIS-TIMEX. Starting from the commissioning phase, the transport and diagnostics system (PADReS) has been continuously developed and upgraded, becoming the indispensable interface between the machine and the experimental chambers. Moreover, PADReS itself has served as an active player for several machine studies as well as for various state-of-the-art experiments. In particular, some elements of PADReS have become key features to perform cutting edge experiments: the online energy spectrometer, the active optics refocusing systems, the split and delay line, and so on. For each of them the peculiar advantages will be described showing the actual implementation in the experiments. The experience gathered so far in fulfilling the needs of both machine and experimental physicists will be discussed, with particular emphasis on the solutions adopted in different scenarios. Recurrent requests and major difficulties will be reported so to give a glimpse about the standard tasks to be solved when preparing new and demanding experiments. Finally, some ideas and near-future improvements will be presented and discussed.

  17. The transport safety of radioactive matters; La surete des transports des matieres radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landier, D.; Louet, Ch.A.; Robert, Ch. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France); Binet, J. [Commission europeenne, DG Energie et transports, Bruxelles (Belgium); Malesys, P. [TN International, 75 - Paris (France); Pourade, C. [Societe Dangexpress, 78 - St Remy l' Honore (France); Le Meur, A.; Robert, M. [Societe Nationale des Chemins de fer Francais, 75 - Paris (France); Turquet de Beauregard, G.Y.; Hello, E. [CIS bio, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Laumond, A. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Regnault, Ph.; Gourlay, M. [AREVA NC, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France); Bruhl, G. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dir. de la Protection et de la Surete Nucleaire, 92 (France); Malvache, P.; Dumesnil, J. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Cohen, B. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Sert, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France); Pain, M. [Ministere de l' Interieur, et de l' Amenagement du Territoire, Dir. de la Defense et la Securite Civiles, 75 - Paris (France); Green, L.; Hartenstein, M. [World Nuclear Transport Institute, London (United Kingdom); Stewart, J. [Ministere des Transport, Royaume Uni (United Kingdom); Cottens, E.; Liebens, M. [Agence Federale de Controle Nucleaire (Belgium); Marignac, Y. [Wise, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-02-15

    Since the control of transport of radioactive materials was given to A.S.N. 10 years ago, A.S.N. has strengthened the radioactive material transport inspections, in particular of the designers, manufacturers, carriers and consignors. A.S.N. has implemented INES scale for incidents during transport. It has participated as much as possible to IAEA working groups in order to improve the international regulatory framework. And, supported by I.R.S.N., A.S.N. has performed a periodic safety review of existing package models and has approved new models incorporating innovative design features. Finally, A.S.N. has tested its emergency responses to procedures to an accident involving the transport of radioactive materials. All these actions taken together have led to improvement in and reinforcement of the safety culture among the transport operators; this has been acknowledged by a recent audit T.R.A.N.S.A.S. performed by IAEA. In spite of all these actions, there are not approved by the competent authority. As A.S.N. is in charge of every field in radioprotection, this should help to intensify the control. In addition, the different kinds of transport are also tackled as rail transport with S.N.C.F. radiological risk training, air transport through nuclear medicine. Some experience feedback are given such radioactive waste transport to the storage facilities in the Aube or how to protect the population after a nuclear transport incident with the O.R.S.E.C.-T.M.S. plans. (N.C.)

  18. Reconfigurable PCI Express cards for low-latency data transport in HEP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Cretaro, P.; Frezza, O.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pastorelli, E.; Simula, F.; Vicini, P.; Lamanna, G.; Pontisso, L.

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art technology supports the High Energy Physics community in addressing the problem of managing an overwhelming amount of experimental data. From the point of view of communication between the detectors’ readout system and computing nodes, the critical issues are the following: latency, moving data in a deterministic and low amount of time; bandwidth, guaranteeing the maximum capability of the link and communication protocol adopted; endpoint consolidation, tight aggregation of channels on a single board. This contribution describes the status and performances of the NaNet project, whose goal is the design of a family of FPGA-based PCIe network interface cards. The efforts of the team are focused on implementing a low-latency, real-time data transport mechanism between the board network multi-channel system and CPU and GPU accelerators memories on the host. Several opportunities concerning technical solutions and scientific applications have been explored: NaNet-1 with a single GbE I/O interface, and NaNet-10, offering four 10GbE ports, for activities related to the GPU-based real-time trigger of NA62 experiment at CERN; NaNet"3, with four 2.5 Gbit optical channels, developed for the KM3NeT-ITALIA underwater neutrino telescope.

  19. Reconfigurable PCI Express cards for low-latency data transport in HEP experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Cretaro, P.; Frezza, O.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Pontisso, L.; Simula, F.; Vicini, P.

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art technology supports the High Energy Physics community in addressing the problem of managing an overwhelming amount of experimental data. From the point of view of communication between the detectors' readout system and computing nodes, the critical issues are the following: latency, moving data in a deterministic and low amount of time; bandwidth, guaranteeing the maximum capability of the link and communication protocol adopted; endpoint consolidation, tight aggregation of channels on a single board. This contribution describes the status and performances of the NaNet project, whose goal is the design of a family of FPGA-based PCIe network interface cards. The efforts of the team are focused on implementing a low-latency, real-time data transport mechanism between the board network multi-channel system and CPU and GPU accelerators memories on the host. Several opportunities concerning technical solutions and scientific applications have been explored: NaNet-1 with a single GbE I/O interface, and NaNet-10, offering four 10GbE ports, for activities related to the GPU-based real-time trigger of NA62 experiment at CERN; NaNet ^3 , with four 2.5Gbit optical channels, developed for the KM3NeT-ITALIA underwater neutrino telescope.

  20. The use of synthetic colloids in tracer transport experiments in saturated rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-08-01

    Studies of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in saturated, fractured geologic media are of great interest to researchers studying the potential long-term storage of hazardous wastes in or near such media. A popular technique for conducting such studies is to introduce tracers having different chemical and physical properties into a system and then observe the tracers at one or more downstream locations, inferring flow and transport mechanisms from the breakthrough characteristics of the different tracers. Many tracer studies have been conducted in saturated, fractured media to help develop and/or refine models capable of predicting contaminant transport over large scales in such media

  1. Experimental challenges to stiffness as a transport paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, T. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Holland, C.; Marinoni, A.; Petty, C. C.; Smith, S. P.; Austin, M. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Zeng, L.

    2018-02-01

    Two power scans were carried out in H-mode plasmas in DIII-D; one employed standard co-current neutral beam injection (NBI), while the other used a mixture of co-current and counter-current NBI to scan power while holding the torque to a low fixed value. Analysis of the ion and electron heat transport, ion toroidal angular momentum transport, and thermal deuterium transport from these scans is presented. Invariance of the gradients or gradient scalelengths, as might be expected from stiff transport, was not generally observed. When invariance was seen, it was not accompanied by a strong increase in transport, except in the case of the absolute deuterium ion transport. Conduction in the ion channel is the dominant energy loss mechanism. The variation of the ion heat transport with applied power is similar for the co-injection and fixed torque scans, indicating that E  ×  B shearing is not determining the plasma response to additional power. There is however, a quantitative difference in the transport between the two scans, indicating E  ×  B shearing does play a role in the transport. Comparison of these results with a previous experiment that directly probed stiffness at a single radius leads to the following conclusion: while local stiffness as formally defined may hold, invariance of the gradients or normalized scalelengths does not follow from stiff transport in more practical scaling experiments, such as the power scans discussed here. Possible reasons for the lack of correspondence between the local picture and the global expectations are discussed.

  2. The YES2 Experience : Towards Sustainable Space Transportation using Tethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Heide, E.J.; Kruijff, M.; Ockels, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Today there is no common vision on sustainable space transportation. Rockets expel gasses and solid rockets often small particles. These have negative effect on the environment, but it is not understood to what extent. With ever growing demand for access to space, sustainable technology developments

  3. Ion temperature gradient driven transport in a density modification experiment on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Lindberg, D.; Kim, J.Y.; Dong, J.Q.; Hammett, G.W.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hamaguchi, S.

    1991-07-01

    TFTR profiles from a supershot density-modification experiment are analyzed for their local and ballooning stability to toroidal η i -modes in order to understand the initially puzzling results showing no increase in X i when a pellet is used to produce an abrupt and large increase in the η i parameter. The local stability analysis assumes that k parallel = 1/qR and ignores the effects of shear, but makes no assumption on the magnitude of k parallel v ti /ω. The ballooning stability analysis determines a self-consistent linear spectrum of k parallel's including the effect of shear and toroidicity, but it expands in k parallel v ti /ω ≤ 1, which is a marginal assumption for this experiment. Nevertheless, the two approaches agree well and show that the mixing length estimate of the transport rate does not change appreciably during the density-modification and has a value close to or less than the observed X i , in contrast to most previous theories which predicted X i 's which were over an order-of-magnitude too large. However, we are still unable to explain the observed increase X i (r) with minor radius by adding the effects of the finite beta drift - MHD mode coupling, the slab-like mode, or the trapped electron response. The experimental tracking 0.2 e /X i i and trapped-electron driving mechanisms are operating. 4 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Radionuclide transport in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, the classical advective-dispersive transport equation was considered to be an adequate model for describing the motion of a solute (e.g. radionuclides) in porous and fractured media. In this model, the dispersion coefficient is either obtained from a microscopic model of the porous medium or by carefully controlled experiments. As a result of such experiments, a large body of data has been accumulated on the dispersivity. Detailed examination of these data has resulted in a curious phenomenon being discovered; namely, that the longitudinal dispersion length is 'scale-dependent'. That is to say the value deduced depends on the 'size' of the experiment, i.e. on the distance over which measurements are made. Several interesting attempts have been made to develop theories which explain this phenomenon, all based on treating the velocity of the water in the porous medium as a spatially random variable, but retaining the advective-dispersive balance equation. In this work we present an entirely new approach to the problem of solute transport in fractured media based upon an analogy with neutron transport. The new method has several advantages over the previous theories and these will be explained below. Results from the new theory are in agreement with experimental trends and do not require any further adjustment to explain the scale-dependent effect

  5. Pore-Scale Hydrodynamics in a Progressively Bioclogged Three-Dimensional Porous Medium: 3-D Particle Tracking Experiments and Stochastic Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, M.; Morales, V. L.; Dentz, M.; Derlon, N.; Morgenroth, E.; Holzner, M.

    2018-03-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous bacterial communities that grow in various porous media including soils, trickling, and sand filters. In these environments, they play a central role in services ranging from degradation of pollutants to water purification. Biofilms dynamically change the pore structure of the medium through selective clogging of pores, a process known as bioclogging. This affects how solutes are transported and spread through the porous matrix, but the temporal changes to transport behavior during bioclogging are not well understood. To address this uncertainty, we experimentally study the hydrodynamic changes of a transparent 3-D porous medium as it experiences progressive bioclogging. Statistical analyses of the system's hydrodynamics at four time points of bioclogging (0, 24, 36, and 48 h in the exponential growth phase) reveal exponential increases in both average and variance of the flow velocity, as well as its correlation length. Measurements for spreading, as mean-squared displacements, are found to be non-Fickian and more intensely superdiffusive with progressive bioclogging, indicating the formation of preferential flow pathways and stagnation zones. A gamma distribution describes well the Lagrangian velocity distributions and provides parameters that quantify changes to the flow, which evolves from a parallel pore arrangement under unclogged conditions, toward a more serial arrangement with increasing clogging. Exponentially evolving hydrodynamic metrics agree with an exponential bacterial growth phase and are used to parameterize a correlated continuous time random walk model with a stochastic velocity relaxation. The model accurately reproduces transport observations and can be used to resolve transport behavior at intermediate time points within the exponential growth phase considered.

  6. Effects of transportation stress on quality and sensory profiles of Nile tilapia fillets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Souza dos Reis Goes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study evaluated pre-slaughter stress and its influence on the stress indicators, quality characteristics and sensory characteristics of Nile tilapia fillets. To this end, two experiments were conducted: (1 two transportation times (60 and 240 min, with a density of 200 kg m−3, were compared to control treatment fish (in which the fish were removed from the net cage and immediately euthanized; and (2 two transportation densities (100 and 400 kg m−3, transported for 180 min, compared with control treatment fish. In experiment 1, the transportation time of 60 min resulted in higher levels of serum cortisol and plasma glucose compared to the transportation time of 240 min and the control. Fish fillets transported for 240 min had higher water-holding capacity, less water loss by pressure and higher levels of juiciness compared to fish transported for 60 min. Color, pH and water loss during cooking were not affected by transportation time. In experiment 2, transportation densities of 100 and 400 kg m−3 did not significantly affect the stress indicators nor the instrumental quality parameters of the fillets, but fish transported at 400 kg m−3 showed better visual acceptance by panellists.

  7. Cross-field blob transport in tokamak scrape-off-layer plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.

    2002-01-01

    Recent measurements show that nondiffusive, intermittent transport of particles can play a major role in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of fusion experiments. A possible mechanism for fast convective plasma transport is related to the plasma filaments or 'blobs' observed in the SOL with fast cameras and probes. In this paper, physical arguments suggesting the importance of blob transport [S. I. Krasheninnikov, Phys. Lett. A 283, 368 (2001)] have been extended by calculations using a three-field fluid model, treating the blobs as coherent propagating structures. The properties of density, temperature and vorticity blobs, and methods of averaging over ensembles of blobs to get the average SOL profiles, are illustrated. The role of ionization of background neutrals in sustaining the density blob transport is also discussed. Many qualitative features of the experiments, such as relatively flat density profiles and transport coefficients increasing toward the wall, are shown to emerge naturally from the blob transport paradigm

  8. Highlight report local initiatives. Experiences with electric transport; Highlight report lokale initiatieven. Ervaringen met elektrisch vervoer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    In March 2013 Linkingreen and XTNT started a survey on local electric transportation initiatives. The aim is to learn from the experiences, problems and obstacles of business users of electric vehicles: cars, vans or trucks, scooters, boats and special vehicles (e.g. garbage trucks) that are all-electric or plug-in (with plug). In this brief report, the main results are presented [Dutch] In maart 2013 is door Linkingreen en XTNT in opdracht van Agentschap NL een enquete uitgezet naar lokale initiatieven elektrisch vervoer. Doel is te leren wat de ervaringen, knelpunten en belemmeringen zijn van zakelijke gebruikers van elektrisch vervoer: personenauto's, bestel- of vrachtauto's, scooters, vaartuigen en bijzondere voertuigen (vuilniswagens etc.) die volledig elektrische of plug in (met stekker) zijn. In dit korte verslag zijn de belangrijkste resultaten opgenomen.

  9. Virginia Power and Department of Energy spent fuel transportation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruska, M.D.; Schoonen, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    Spent fuel assemblies for the Spent Fuel Storage Cask Testing Program conducted by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) were transported to the INEL. A total of 69 spent fuel assemblies (23 shipments) were shipped from Virginia Power's nuclear power plant at Surry, Virginia, to the INEL between July 1985 and June 1986 to fill and test three spent fuel storage casks. The shipments were made over the highway system in Transnuclear, Inc., TN-8L shipping casks on specially constructed trailers. The shipments were moved by diesel tractors owned and operated by Tri-State Motor Transit Company of Joplin, Missouri. The gross vehicle weight for each shipment was 112,000 lb, which was a major consideration when selecting routes for the shipments. Cooperative negotiations with officials for the 17 states involved obtained authorization to transport through their states. The shipping campaign was successfully completed through close communication and cooperation and careful planning and operation by all organizations involved

  10. A longshore sediment transport estimation for the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, B.U.; Chandramohan, P.

    in Tamilnadu, and the Maharashtra Coast experience negligible annual net transport. The direction of annual net transport along the east coast is towards north and along the west coast towards south except at south Gujarat Coast...

  11. Solute transport in aggregated and layered porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, S.

    1993-01-01

    This work is a contribution to research in soil physics dealing with solute transport in porous media. The influence of structural inhomogeneities on solute transport is investigated. Detailed experiments at the laboratory scale are used to enlighten distinct processes which cannot be studied separately at field scale. Two main aspects are followed up: (i) to show the influence of aggregation of a porous medium on breakthrough time and spreading of an inert tracer and consequences on the estimation of parameter values of models describing solute transport in aggregated systems, (ii) to investigate the influences on the dispersion process when stratification is perpendicular to the direction of flow. Several concepts of modelling solute transport in soil are discussed. Models based on the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) are emphasized because they are used here to model solute transport experiments conducted with aggregated porous media. Stochastic concepts are introduced to show the limitations of the deterministic CDE approaches. Experiments are done in columns containing two kinds of solid phases and were saturated with water. The solid phases are porous and solid glass beads exhibiting a distinctly unimodal or bimodal pore size distribution. Experimental breakthrough curves (BTCs) are modelled with the CDE, a bicontinuum model with a phenomenological mass transfer rate and a bicontinuum spherical diffusion model. Experiments are also done in columns that are unsaturated containing porous materials that are layered. Flow is made at a steady rate. It is shown that layer boundaries have a severe influence on lateral mixing. They may force streamlines to converge or cause a lateral redistribution of solutes. (author) figs., tabs., 122 refs

  12. Analysis of NSPP experiment with ART code for analyzing transport behavior of Aerosol and radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    The ART code calculates transport behavior of aerosols and radionuclides during core meltdown accidents in the light water reactors. Since aerosols play an important role in carrying fission products from the core region to the environment, the ART code includes detailed models of aerosol behavior. Aerosols including several radionuclides are classified into many groups according to the aerosol mass. The models of aerosol behavior include agglomeration processes caused by Brownian motion, aerosol settling velocity difference and turbulent flow, and natural deposition processes due to diffusion, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, gravitational settling and forced convection. In order to examine validity of the ART models, the NSPP aerosol experiment was analyzed. The ART calculated results showed good agreement with the experimental data. It was ascertained that aerosol growth due to agglomeration, gravitational settling, thermophoresis in an air atmosphere, and diffusiophoresis in an air-steam atmosphere were important physical phenomena in the aerosol behavior. (author)

  13. Optical beam transport to a remote location for low jitter pump-probe experiments with a free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cinquegrana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a scheme that allows a strong reduction of the timing jitter between the pulses of a free electron laser (FEL and external laser pulses delivered simultaneously at the FEL experimental stations for pump-probe–type experiments. The technique, applicable to all seeding-based FEL schemes, relies on the free-space optical transport of a portion of the seed laser pulse from its optical table to the experimental stations. The results presented here demonstrate that a carefully designed laser beam transport, incorporating also a transverse beam position stabilization, allows one to keep the timing fluctuations, added by as much as 150 m of free space propagation and a number of beam folding mirrors, to less than 4 femtoseconds rms. By its nature our scheme removes the major common timing jitter sources, so the overall jitter in pump-probe measurements done in this way will be below 10 fs (with a margin to be lowered to below 5 fs, much better than the best results reported previously in the literature amounting to 33 fs rms.

  14. Preliminary Study on the High Temperature Transport System for Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is one of the the most promising technologies for the advanced fuel cycle with favorable economic potential and intrinsic proliferation-resistance. The electrorefining process, one of main processes is compos- ed of pyroprocess to recover the useful elements from spent fuel, is under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a sub process of the pyrochemical treatment of spent PWR fuel. High-temperature molten salt transport technologies are required because a molten salt should be transported from the electrorefiner to electrowiner after the electrorefining process. Therefore, in pyroprocessing technology, the development of high-temperature transport technologies for molten salt is a crucial prerequisite. However, there have been a few transport studies on high-temperature molten salt. In this study, an apparatus for suction transport experiments was designed and constructed for the development of high temperature molten salt transport technology. Suction transport experiments were performed using LiC-KCl eutectic salt

  15. JET internal transport barriers: experiment vs theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, B [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Crisanti, F [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Parail, V [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maget, P [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Baranov, Y [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Becoulet, A [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Castaldo, C [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Challis, C D [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Angelis, R De [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Garbet, X [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Giroud, C [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Hawkes, N [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Litaudon, X [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Mazon, D [Association Euratom - CEA pour la Fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Riva, M [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, CP 65, I-00040, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Zastrow, K D [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Cuhlam Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2003-06-01

    A large variety of JET discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs) has been analysed in order to determine the main features which characterize turbulence stabilization at the barrier. It is found that the location of barriers is well correlated with regions where the ExB flow shearing rate exceeds the linear growth rate of the ion temperature gradient mode instability ({gamma}{sub {eta}{sub i}}). A key point is the dependence of {gamma}{sub {eta}{sub i}} on the magnetic shear: in the discharges of this database the reduction of {gamma}{sub {eta}{sub i}} associated to very low or null magnetic shear favours the formation of an ITB. After the ITB formation a positive feedback occurs in which the ExB flow shear mechanism has the leading role and the position of the barrier may be no longer linked to the low shear region.

  16. Sustainable transportation initiatives in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of the workshop was to share experiences of sustainable transport practices from invited medium-sized cities in Latin America and Asia. The purpose was to learn how sustainable mechanisms have been incorporated into national planning and implementation systems. Emphasis was given to understand what concrete mechanism work to promote sustainable transport in the selected projects. The workshop included participation of transport economics and engineers, policy makers and policy-advisors, and key representatives from the transportation government and non-governmental sector in El Salvador. Among participants there were also members from academia, private consultants and international NGOs. The workshop provided a basis for outreach in terms of directly informing participants on the specific experiences brought in by the participating countries. The Workshop set out to address the following main objectives: To demonstrate successful examples of transportation initiatives that show positive sustainable economic, environmental and social benefits in selected developing countries; To provide a forum for discussion of sustainable transport paths; To develop a network for information exchange and capacity building; To gather information on concrete mechanisms to promote sustainable transportation; To demonstrate efficient mechanisms and tools for collection and analysis of data in transport; To create an inventory of success stories and alternative visions for the future. Several institutions collaborated in organising the event: the Intermediate Technology Development Group (ITDG-Sri Lanka), The Peace and Development Research Group from Goeteborg University and institutions within El Salvador: Centro Salvadeoreno de Tecnologia Apropiada (CESTA), and the Climate Change Communication office of the Ministry of Environment in Salvador. This volume contains reports of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop in San Salvador. The agenda

  17. Sustainable transportation initiatives in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, M J [ed.

    2000-03-01

    The primary goal of the workshop was to share experiences of sustainable transport practices from invited medium-sized cities in Latin America and Asia. The purpose was to learn how sustainable mechanisms have been incorporated into national planning and implementation systems. Emphasis was given to understand what concrete mechanism work to promote sustainable transport in the selected projects. The workshop included participation of transport economics and engineers, policy makers and policy-advisors, and key representatives from the transportation government and non-governmental sector in El Salvador. Among participants there were also members from academia, private consultants and international NGOs. The workshop provided a basis for outreach in terms of directly informing participants on the specific experiences brought in by the participating countries. The Workshop set out to address the following main objectives: To demonstrate successful examples of transportation initiatives that show positive sustainable economic, environmental and social benefits in selected developing countries; To provide a forum for discussion of sustainable transport paths; To develop a network for information exchange and capacity building; To gather information on concrete mechanisms to promote sustainable transportation; To demonstrate efficient mechanisms and tools for collection and analysis of data in transport; To create an inventory of success stories and alternative visions for the future. Several institutions collaborated in organising the event: the Intermediate Technology Development Group (ITDG-Sri Lanka), The Peace and Development Research Group from Goeteborg University and institutions within El Salvador: Centro Salvadeoreno de Tecnologia Apropiada (CESTA), and the Climate Change Communication office of the Ministry of Environment in Salvador. This volume contains reports of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop in San Salvador. The agenda

  18. Collisional transport in nonneutral plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubin, D.H.E.

    1999-01-01

    Classical transport theory grossly underestimates collisionally-driven cross-field transport for plasmas in the parameter regime of r c D , where r c ≡ v-bar/Ω c , λ D 2 ≡ T/4πe 2 n. In current experiments operating in this regime, cross-field test particle transport is observed to be a factor of 10 larger than the prediction of classical theory. Heat conduction is enhanced by up to 300 times over classical theory, and viscosity is up to 10 4 times larger. New guiding center theories of transport due to long-range collisions have been developed that agree with the measurements. Theory also predicts that emission and absorption of plasma waves may further enhance the thermal conduction and viscosity, providing a possible mechanism for anomalous thermal conductivity in the electron channel of fusion plasmas. (author)

  19. ISSUES OF ORGANIZING THE PASSENGER TRANSPORTATION ON US RAILWAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Korobiova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper focuses on a study of the US railway transport organization management during passenger transportation. Methodology. Studies were carried out on the basis of the analysis of literature sources and reporting data on passenger transportation in the USA. Findings. Negative trends in the work of the passenger complex of the Ukrainian railways are the slowdown in the volumes of transportation, the progressive aging of the rolling stock and the overall activity running at a loss for Ukrzaliznytsia. In this regard, the actual task for domestic rail transport is the implementation of industry reforms. Therefore, the paper presented the study of the experience of organizing the passenger transportation on US railways, whose peculiarity is the extremely high degree of competition between modes of transport. As a result of the conducted analysis for working conditions of the US and Ukrainian railways, the general conditions for the functioning of the railways in both countries connected with passenger transportation securing have been established. It was found that general condition for execution of railway passenger transportation for the United States and Ukraine is the subsidization of this activity and combined use of infrastructure for the freight and passengers’ transportations. In this connection, when developing approaches to reforming the passenger economy of Ukraine's railways, it is advisable to use the experience of the United States in assessing the social effectiveness of rail transport, the impact of passenger transportation on the conditions of freight trains handling, and combined use of railway infrastructure by freight and passenger companies. Originality. The author determined the general trends in the development of passenger railway transportation in the US and Ukraine. Practical value. The resulted methods of organizing the operation of the US railway passenger transportation complex can be adapted to solve

  20. Transports of radioactive materials. Legal regulations, safety and security concepts, experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Guenther

    2012-01-01

    In Germany, approximately 650,000 to 750,000 units containing radioactive materials for scientific, medical and technical applications are shipped annually by surface, air and water transports. Legally speaking, radioactive materials are dangerous goods which can cause hazards to life, health, property and the environment as a result of faulty handling or accidents in transit. For protection against these hazards, their shipment therefore is regulated in extensive national and international rules of protection and safety. The article contains a topical review of the international and national transport regulations and codes pertaining to shipments of radioactive materials, and of the protection concepts underlying these codes so as to ensure an adequate standard of safety and security in shipping radioactive materials in national and international goods traffic. (orig.)

  1. U.S. integral and benchmark experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, F.C.

    1978-01-01

    Verification of methods for analysis of radiation-transport (shielding) problems in Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors has required a series of experiments that can be classified as benchmark, parametric, or design-confirmation experiments. These experiments, performed at the Oak Ridge Tower Shielding Facility, have included measurements of neutron transport in bulk shields of sodium, steel, and inconel and in configurations that simulate lower axial shields, pipe chases, and top-head shields. They have also included measurements of the effects of fuel stored within the reactor vessel and of gamma-ray energy deposition (heating). The paper consists of brief comments on these experiments, and also on a recent experiment in which neutron streaming problems in a Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor were studied. The need for additional experiments for a few areas of LMFBR shielding is also cited

  2. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a

  3. Manpower analysis in transportation safety. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.S.; Bowden, H.M.; Colford, C.A.; DeFilipps, P.J.; Dennis, J.D.; Ehlert, A.K.; Popkin, H.A.; Schrader, G.F.; Smith, Q.N.

    1977-05-01

    The project described provides a manpower review of national, state and local needs for safety skills, and projects future manning levels for transportation safety personnel in both the public and private sectors. Survey information revealed that there are currently approximately 121,000 persons employed directly in transportation safety occupations within the air carrier, highway and traffic safety, motor carrier, pipeline, rail carrier, and marine carrier transportation industry groups. The projected need for 1980 is over 145,000 of which over 80 percent will be in highway safety. An analysis of transportation tasks is included, and shows ten general categories about which the majority of safety activities are focused. A skills analysis shows a generally high level of educational background and several years of experience are required for most transportation safety jobs. An overall review of safety programs in the transportation industry is included, together with chapters on the individual transportation modes.

  4. Stochastic transport of particles across single barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuter, Christian; Siems, Ullrich; Henseler, Peter; Nielaba, Peter; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Transport phenomena of interacting particles are of high interest for many applications in biology and mesoscopic systems. Here we present measurements on colloidal particles, which are confined in narrow channels on a substrate and interact with a barrier, which impedes the motion along the channel. The substrate of the particle is tilted in order for the particles to be driven towards the barrier and, if the energy gained by the tilt is large enough, surpass the barrier by thermal activation. We therefore study the influence of this barrier as well as the influence of particle interaction on the particle transport through such systems. All experiments are supported with Brownian dynamics simulations in order to complement the experiments with tests of a large range of parameter space which cannot be accessed in experiments.

  5. Fresh MOX fuel transport in Germany: experience for using the MX6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemant, T. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group), Bagnols/sur Ceze (France); Marien, L. [FBFC-I (AREVA Group), Dessel (Belgium); Wagner, R. [RWE, Gundremmingen (Germany); Jahreiss, W. [FRAMATOME ANP GmbH (AREVA Group), Erlangen (Germany); Tschiesche, H. [NCS, Hanau (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The MX6 packaging developed by COGEMA LOGISTICS replaces the BWR SIEMENS packaging and SIEMENS III packaging for the transport of either BWR or PWR fresh MOX assemblies. It is licensed in France, Germany and Belgium according to TS-R-1 requirements (IAEA 1996). The associated security transport system was developed in co-operation with NCS (Nuclear Cargo + Service GmbH). The MX6 packaging is based on innovative solutions implemented at each step of the design. In 2004, RWE GUNDREMMINGEN Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) will be the first NPP delivered with the MX6 system and MOX assemblies manufactured by BELGONUCLEAIRE and FBFC in Belgium. Before this first transport, successful cold tests were performed for qualification of the whole system with the participation of all parties involved: NPP, carrier, fuel supplier and local Authorities. These tests were conducted by the NPP's operators in FBFC and GUNDREMMINGEN facilities and lead to the validation of the operating manual. Specific conditions for the return of the empty MX6 were also agreed between all parties. Similar operation will be conducted in each NPP before the first use of the MX 6. The large payload of the MX6: - 16 BWR MOX assemblies in one packaging instead of 2 - 6 PWR MOX assemblies in one packaging instead of 3 contributes to the optimisation of the dose uptake during unloading in the NPP. In this paper, the main contributors to the first MOX transport to Germany with the MX6 will present their involvement and feedback at each step of the transport of this new type of packaging, including loading and unloading operations. The use of the MX6 will be extended to other German NPP's from the next year. After FBFC in Belgium, MELOX in France will load the MX6 as well as the current MX8 packaging for the delivery to the French NPP's.

  6. Fresh MOX fuel transport in Germany: experience for using the MX6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lallemant, T.; Marien, L.; Wagner, R.; Jahreiss, W.; Tschiesche, H.

    2004-01-01

    The MX6 packaging developed by COGEMA LOGISTICS replaces the BWR SIEMENS packaging and SIEMENS III packaging for the transport of either BWR or PWR fresh MOX assemblies. It is licensed in France, Germany and Belgium according to TS-R-1 requirements (IAEA 1996). The associated security transport system was developed in co-operation with NCS (Nuclear Cargo + Service GmbH). The MX6 packaging is based on innovative solutions implemented at each step of the design. In 2004, RWE GUNDREMMINGEN Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) will be the first NPP delivered with the MX6 system and MOX assemblies manufactured by BELGONUCLEAIRE and FBFC in Belgium. Before this first transport, successful cold tests were performed for qualification of the whole system with the participation of all parties involved: NPP, carrier, fuel supplier and local Authorities. These tests were conducted by the NPP's operators in FBFC and GUNDREMMINGEN facilities and lead to the validation of the operating manual. Specific conditions for the return of the empty MX6 were also agreed between all parties. Similar operation will be conducted in each NPP before the first use of the MX 6. The large payload of the MX6: - 16 BWR MOX assemblies in one packaging instead of 2 - 6 PWR MOX assemblies in one packaging instead of 3 contributes to the optimisation of the dose uptake during unloading in the NPP. In this paper, the main contributors to the first MOX transport to Germany with the MX6 will present their involvement and feedback at each step of the transport of this new type of packaging, including loading and unloading operations. The use of the MX6 will be extended to other German NPP's from the next year. After FBFC in Belgium, MELOX in France will load the MX6 as well as the current MX8 packaging for the delivery to the French NPP's

  7. Indicators for sustainable transport policy in Denmark - why, what and how?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Cornet, Yannick

    in the Danish transport policy, using policy goals, sustainability indicators and performance measures. The paper represents a first step in the SUSTAIN project aiming to develop a framework for national sustainable transport planning. The paper will draw on analysis of experience with the development and use......Denmark and other countries have the ambition to move towards a sustainable transport system. However it is challenging to achieve and credibly demonstrate progress towards sustainability in transport. The paper will specify foundations for monitoring and reporting progress towards sustainability...... of sustainability indicators to report transport policy performance, in Europe, North America and other parts of the world. The experience will be connected to critical literature in the areas of sustainability theory, knowledge utilization, and implementation in order to identify challenges to overcome...

  8. Public transport optimisation emphasising passengers’ travel behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Parbo

    to the case where the two problems are solved sequentially without taking into account interdependencies. Figure 1 - Planning public transport The PhD study develops a metaheuristic algorithm to adapt the line plan configuration in order better to match passengers’ travel demand in terms of transfers as well......Passengers in public transport complaining about their travel experiences are not uncommon. This might seem counterintuitive since several operators worldwide are presenting better key performance indicators year by year. The present PhD study focuses on developing optimisation algorithms...... to enhance the operations of public transport while explicitly emphasising passengers’ travel behaviour and preferences. Similar to economic theory, interactions between supply and demand are omnipresent in the context of public transport operations. In public transport, the demand is represented...

  9. THE ROLE OF DEVELOPMENT OF TRANSPORT TURISM IN ECONOMIC GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Alasgarova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is one of the necessary and very important sectors of country economy. Tourism has its appropriate inimitable characteristics that difference this sector from the other sectors. As to be in the other service industrial fields, in tourism sector the tourists come to the tourism destination place where the tourism services are supplied. To my observation and international experiences, it is hard to think of tourism industry without transportation. Transportation is  mean where to carry the tourists to the relevant place where tourism services are accomplished. The article contains detailed information about the introduction to the concepts of tourism, theoretical approach to the tourism as service industry, the role of transport in tourism development, international experiences in transport tourism, development of transport tourismin Azerbaijan economy. The article can be considered as a useful resource  for experts and researchers conducting research in this field.

  10. Electric-field effects in optically generated spin transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2009-01-01

    Transport of spin-polarized electrons in semiconductors is studied experimentally. Spins are generated by optical excitation because of the selection rules governing optical transitions from heavy-hole and light-hole states to conduction-band states. Experiments designed for the control of spins in semiconductors investigate the bias-dependent spin transport process and detect the spin-polarized electrons during transport. A strong bias dependence is observed. The electric-field effects on the spin-polarized electron transport are also found to be depended on the excitation photon energy and temperature. Based on a field-dependent spin relaxation mechanism, the electric-field effects in the transport process are discussed.

  11. Electric-field effects in optically generated spin transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2009-05-25

    Transport of spin-polarized electrons in semiconductors is studied experimentally. Spins are generated by optical excitation because of the selection rules governing optical transitions from heavy-hole and light-hole states to conduction-band states. Experiments designed for the control of spins in semiconductors investigate the bias-dependent spin transport process and detect the spin-polarized electrons during transport. A strong bias dependence is observed. The electric-field effects on the spin-polarized electron transport are also found to be depended on the excitation photon energy and temperature. Based on a field-dependent spin relaxation mechanism, the electric-field effects in the transport process are discussed.

  12. Formation and collapse of internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.I.; Yagi, M.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical model of internal transport barrier (ITB) is developed. The transport model based on the self-sustained turbulence theory of the current-diffusive ballooning mode is extended to include the effects of ExB rotation shear. Delayed formation of ITB is observed in transport simulations. The influence of finite gyroradius is also discussed. Simulation of the current ramp-up experiment successfully described the radial profile of density, temperature and safety factor. A model of ITB collapse due to magnetic braiding is proposed. Sudden enhancement of transport triggered by overlapping of magnetic islands terminates ITB. The possibility of destabilizing global low-n modes is also discussed. (author)

  13. Formation and collapse of internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical model of internal transport barrier (ITB) is developed. The transport model based on the self-sustained turbulence theory of the current-diffusive ballooning mode is extended to include the effects of ExB rotation shear. Delayed formation of ITB is observed in transport simulations. The influence of finite gyroradius is also discussed. Simulation of the current ramp-up experiment successfully described the radial profile of density, temperature and safety factor. A model of ITB collapse due to magnetic braiding is proposed. Sudden enhancement of transport triggered by overlaping of magnetic islands terminates ITB. The possibility of destabilizing global low-n modes is also discussed. (author)

  14. Clinical presentation and outcome of riboflavin transporter deficiency: mini review after five years of experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Bregje; Bosch, Annet M.

    2016-01-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is absorbed in the small intestine by the human riboflavin transporters RFVT1 and RFVT3. A third riboflavin transporter (RFVT2) is expressed in the brain. In 2010 it was demonstrated that mutations in the riboflavin transporter genes SLC52A2 (coding for RFVT2) and SLC52A3

  15. Modeling Bimolecular Reactive Transport With Mixing-Limitation: Theory and Application to Column Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, T. R.

    2018-01-01

    The challenge of determining mixing extent of solutions undergoing advective-dispersive-diffusive transport is well known. In particular, reaction extent between displacing and displaced solutes depends on mixing at the pore scale, that is, generally smaller than continuum scale quantification that relies on dispersive fluxes. Here a novel mobile-mobile mass transfer approach is developed to distinguish diffusive mixing from dispersive spreading in one-dimensional transport involving small-scale velocity variations with some correlation, such as occurs in hydrodynamic dispersion, in which short-range ballistic transports give rise to dispersed but not mixed segregation zones, termed here ballisticules. When considering transport of a single solution, this approach distinguishes self-diffusive mixing from spreading, and in the case of displacement of one solution by another, each containing a participant reactant of an irreversible bimolecular reaction, this results in time-delayed diffusive mixing of reactants. The approach generates models for both kinetically controlled and equilibrium irreversible reaction cases, while honoring independently measured reaction rates and dispersivities. The mathematical solution for the equilibrium case is a simple analytical expression. The approach is applied to published experimental data on bimolecular reactions for homogeneous porous media under postasymptotic dispersive conditions with good results.

  16. Transportation of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meguro, Toshiichi

    1976-01-01

    The spent nuclear fuel taken out of reactors is cooled in the cooling pool in each power station for a definite time, then transported to a reprocessing plant. At present, there is no reprocessing plant in Japan, therefore the spent nuclear fuel is shipped abroad. In this paper, the experiences and the present situation in Japan are described on the transport of the spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, centering around the works in Tsuruga Power Station, Japan Atomic Power Co. The spent nuclear fuel in Tsuruga Power Station was first transported in Apr. 1973, and since then, about 36 tons were shipped to Britain by 5 times of transport. The reprocessing plant in Japan is expected to start operation in Apr. 1977, accordingly the spent nuclear fuel used for the trial will be transported in Japan in the latter half of this year. Among the permission and approval required for the transport of spent nuclear fuel, the acquisition of the certificate for transport casks and the approval of land and sea transports are main tasks. The relevant laws are the law concerning the regulations of nuclear raw material, nuclear fuel and reactors and the law concerning the safety of ships. The casks used in Tsuruga Power Station and EXL III type, and the charging of spent nuclear fuel, the decontamination of the casks, the leak test, land transport with a self-running vehicle, loading on board an exclusive carrier and sea transport are briefly explained. The casks and the ship for domestic transport are being prepared. (Kato, I.)

  17. Short-term transport of glyphosate with erosion in Chinese loess soil--a flume experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaomei; Wang, Fei; Bento, Célia P M; Xue, Sha; Gai, Lingtong; van Dam, Ruud; Mol, Hans; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2015-04-15

    Repeated applications of glyphosate may contaminate the soil and water and threaten their quality both within the environmental system and beyond it through water erosion related processes and leaching. In this study, we focused on the transport of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) related to soil erosion at two slope gradients (10 and 20°), two rates of pesticide with a formulation of glyphosate (Roundup®) application (360 and 720 mg m(-2)), and a rain intensity of 1.0 mm min(-1) for 1 h on bare soil in hydraulic flumes. Runoff and erosion rate were significantly different within slope gradients (psoil at the end of the experiment decreased significantly with depth (psoil layers, respectively. The risk of contamination in deep soil and the groundwater was thus low, but 5% of the initial application did reach the 2-10 cm soil layer. The risk of contamination of surface water through runoff and sedimentation, however, can be considerable, especially in regions where rain-induced soil erosion is common. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transport Statistics - Transport - UNECE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable Energy Statistics Trade Transport Themes UNECE and the SDGs Climate Change Gender Ideas 4 Change UNECE Weekly Videos UNECE Transport Areas of Work Transport Statistics Transport Transport Statistics About us Terms of Reference Meetings and Events Meetings Working Party on Transport Statistics (WP.6

  19. PATRAM '83: 7th international symposium on packaging and transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Papers were presented at the following sessions: international regulations; materials, fracture toughness of ferritic steels; risk analysis techniques; storage in packagings; packaging design considerations; monolithic cast iron casks; risk analysis; facility/transportation system interface; research and development programs; UF 6 packagings; national regulations; transportation operations and traffic; containment, seals, and leakage; radiation risk experience; emergency response; structural modeling and testing; transportation system planning; institutional issues and public response; packaging systems; thermal analysis and testing; systems analysis; structural analyses; quality assurance; packaging and transportation systems; physical protection; criticality and shielding; transportation operations and experience; standards; shock absorber technology; and information and training for regulatory compliance. Individual summaries are title listed

  20. Molecular electronics: insight from first-principles transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affect the electronic transport. Here we describe key computational ingredients and discuss these in relation to simulations for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments with C60 molecules where the experimental geometry is well characterized. We then show how molecular dynamics simulations may be combined with transport calculations to study more irregular situations, such as the evolution of a nanoscale contact with the mechanically controllable break-junction technique. Finally we discuss calculations of inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a characterization technique that reveals information about the atomic arrangement and transport channels.

  1. Aeolian transport of biota with dust: A wind tunnel experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, J. A., Jr.; Gill, T. E.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Walsh, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ephemeral wetlands are ideal sources for dust emission, as well as repositories for dormant stages of aquatic invertebrates. An important component of invertebrate dispersal and colonization to new areas is the ability to be entrained into the atmosphere. Aquatic invertebrate eggs fall within the size of dust and sand grains (30-600μm), are less dense and aerodynamically shaped. We have shown previously that aquatic invertebrates can be dispersed long distances in dust storms but the extent of transport of taxa based on diapausing egg size/morphology has not been investigated. Here, we control the wind erosion process in a wind tunnel to test entrainment of diapausing stages of brine shrimp, clam shrimp, tadpole shrimp, fairy shrimp, Daphnia, and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and B. calyciflorus into the air by saltation. Diapausing eggs were mixed with sterilized wind-erodible soil. The soil/egg mixture was moistened with distilled water and air dried to form a crust. Dust was generated in a wind tunnel by releasing sand grains that act as saltator material similar to wind-entrained natural sands. Maximum wind velocity was 10m/s and entrained particles were sampled through an isokinetic horizontal intake opening. Aeolian sediment was collected from three points in the system; transfer section for coarse sediment, the pan subtending a settling chamber for finer saltation-sized sediment, and two paper filters for suspension-sized sediment. Samples were then passed through 250 and 350 μm sieves to remove abrader sand and rehydrated with various sterile media depending on the type of organism. We retrieved viable brine, fairy, and tadpole shrimp, ostracods, Daphnia, and diapausing eggs of the rotifers after hydration. This experiment demonstrates that resting stages of many invertebrates can be wind-eroded due to size and egg morphology and remain viable under controlled conditions mimicking dust emission.

  2. The conceptual mismatch: transportation stressors and experiences for low-income adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Physical access to jobs has long been identified as a barrier to employment and earnings, with prior : research identifying the spatial mismatch between suburban entry-level jobs and low-income workers. : However, existing transportation resear...

  3. Column experiments on organic micropollutants - applications and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzhaf, Stefan; Hebig, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    As organic micropollutants become more and more ubiquitous in the aquatic environment, a sound understanding of their fate and transport behaviour is needed. This is to assure both safe and clean drinking water supply for mankind in the future and to protect the aquatic environment from pollution and negative consequences caused by manmade contamination. Apart from countless field studies, column experiments were and are frequently used to study transport of organic micropollutants. As the transport of (organic) solutes in groundwater is controlled by the chemical and physical properties of the compounds, the solvent (the groundwater including all solutes), and the substrate (the aquifer material), the adjustment and control of these boundary conditions allow to study a multitude of different experimental setups and to address specific research questions. The main purpose, however, remains to study the transport of a specific compound and its sorption and degradation behaviour in a specific sediment or substrate. Apart from the effective control of the individual boundary conditions, the main advantage of columns studies compared to other experimental setups (such as field studies, batch/microcosm studies), is that conservative and reactive solute breakthrough curves are obtained, which represent the sum of the transport processes. The analysis of these curves is well-developed and established. Additionally, limitations of this experimental method are presented here: the effects observed in column studies are often a result of dynamic, non-equilibrium processes. Time (or flow velocity) plays a major role in contrast to batch experiments, in which all processes will be observed until equilibrium is reached in the substrate-solution-system. Slightly modifying boundary conditions in different experiments have a strong influence on transport and degradation behaviour of organic micropollutants. This is a significant severe issue when it comes to general findings on the

  4. Transport of charged particles in the plasma of an ECRIS; Transport des particules chargees dans le plasma d'ECRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, A.; Perrer, Douysset; Melin, G. [Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee CEA Centre d' Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France)

    1999-07-01

    The paper has the following contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Electron transport. 2.1. Experiments - Lifetime measurements - Contradiction. 2.2. Modelling; 3. Ion transport. 3.1. Experiments - Measurement of argon K{sub {alpha}}. 3.2. Lifetime. 3.3. Proposed model, controversy; 4. Conclusion. A setup of the experiment and the results concerning the electron density, energy content, mean energy, current density, electron lifetime and lifetime of electron energy as a function of rf power are presented. The results are interpreted and modelled. Also, the experimental setup for the study of ion transport is presented. The density of argon ions is determined by means of the high resolution X ray spectra which, by making use of a simple collisional radiative model, is able to single out the argon K{sub {alpha}} rays corresponding to different ions. These results are also interpreted and modelled. In conclusion, with an electron dynamics controlled by rf, due to a high mirror ratio, the losses are limited. According to the scale law the higher the frequency the higher is the energy content of the electrons and consequently the higher are the performances. The ions are cool and colliding. Their lifetime increases with the charge. If it increases linearly their transport is controlled by the spatial diffusion in the ambipolar electric field. A correct lifetime requires plasma of high dimensions and low ionic temperature.

  5. Modeling electrokinetic transport in phenol contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorn, R.; Haus, R.; Czurda, K. [Dept. of Applied Geology, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Numerical simulations are compared to laboratory experiments of electroremediation in soils contaminated by phenolic pollutants. The developing pH affects the electrokinetic transport behaviour of phenol. It is found that a water chemistry model must be included in an electrokinetic mass transport model to describe the process of electroremediation more accurately, if no buffering system is used at the electrodes. In the case of controlling the pH at the electrode compartments only a simplified chemical reaction model must be included in the numerical code to match the experimental phenolic transport. (orig.)

  6. Efficiency, selectivity, and robustness of nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Zilman

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available All materials enter or exit the cell nucleus through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs, efficient transport devices that combine high selectivity and throughput. NPC-associated proteins containing phenylalanine-glycine repeats (FG nups have large, flexible, unstructured proteinaceous regions, and line the NPC. A central feature of NPC-mediated transport is the binding of cargo-carrying soluble transport factors to the unstructured regions of FG nups. Here, we model the dynamics of nucleocytoplasmic transport as diffusion in an effective potential resulting from the interaction of the transport factors with the flexible FG nups, using a minimal number of assumptions consistent with the most well-established structural and functional properties of NPC transport. We discuss how specific binding of transport factors to the FG nups facilitates transport, and how this binding and competition between transport factors and other macromolecules for binding sites and space inside the NPC accounts for the high selectivity of transport. We also account for why transport is relatively insensitive to changes in the number and distribution of FG nups in the NPC, providing an explanation for recent experiments where up to half the total mass of the FG nups has been deleted without abolishing transport. Our results suggest strategies for the creation of artificial nanomolecular sorting devices.

  7. Reactive transport of uranyl: fixation mode on silica and goethite; experiments in columns and closed reactors; simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, U.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium contaminated areas are found in mine waste disposal sites, former military areas, etc. The present study focuses on the identification or mechanisms which may lead contaminated soils to become a sudden potential threat to surface and ground waters. Mechanisms were studied on model material at two levels. On the molecular scale, the complexation of uranyl at trace metal concentrations was investigated with amorphous silica. Complexation is shown to occur via the formation of surface complexes, characterised by different time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectra and life times and stoichiometry. On the macro-scale the transport behaviour of uranyl in a cristobalite-goethite-carbonate-uranyl system was investigated with laboratory column and batch experiments. Uranium mobility was found to be controlled by the interaction between physical transport and a reversible, rate-controlled, fixation reaction. Sorption was shown to be an ensemble of competing solution and surface complexation reactions, leading to an apparent non-linear (Langmuir-like) adsorption isotherm. Finally the impact of a sudden change in background geochemistry was studied. Conditions leading to a dramatic mobilization of uranium from mildly contaminated systems were experimentally identified. Maximal uranyl concentration are controlled by the total extractable uranyl in the system and limited by uranyl solubility. Evolution of the background geochemical conditions is thus an important part of contaminated sites risk assessment. (author)

  8. Thermal transport in fractal systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments on the thermal transport in systems with partial fractal geometry, silica aerogels, are reviewed. The individual contributions from phonons, fractons and particle modes, respectively, have been identified and can be described by quantitative models consistent with heat capacity...

  9. Safety of transport of radioactive material. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Radioactive material has been transported for decades within and between countries as the use of radioactive material to benefit mankind has expanded. The transport can involve many types of materials (radionuclides and radiation sources for applications in agriculture, energy production, industry, and medicine) and all modes of transport (road, rail, sea and waterways, and air). Among the organizations in the United Nations system, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the statutory function to establish or adopt standards of safety for protection of health against exposure to ionizing radiation. Within its statutory mandate and pursuant to this request, in 1961, the IAEA issued Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (the IAEA Transport Regulations). The Transport Regulations were periodically reviewed and, as appropriate, have been amended or revised. The latest version of the Transport Regulations was issued in 2000 by the IAEA as Publication TS-R-1 (ST-1, Revised). In addition, the IAEA is entrusted by its Statute to provide for the application of its standards at the request of States. The objective of the Conference is to foster the exchange of information on issues related to the safety of transport of radioactive material by providing an opportunity for representatives from sponsoring international organizations and their Member States and from other co-operating and participating organizations to discuss critical issues relating to the safety of transport of radioactive material by all modes and to formulate recommendations, as appropriate, regarding further international co-operation in this area. The following topics have been identified by the Technical Programme Committee as the subjects to be covered in the background briefing sessions: History and Status of the IAEA Transport Regulation Development; Experience in adoption of the IAEA Transport Regulations at the international level; Implementation of the IAEA Transport

  10. Effect of ripple-induced transport on H-mode performance in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parail, V.; Vries, P. de; Lonnroth, J.; Kiviniemi, T.; Johnson, T.; Loarte, A.; Saibene, G.; Hatae, T.; Kamada, Y.; Konovalov, S.; Oyama, N.; Shinohara, K.; Tobita, K.; Urano, H.

    2005-01-01

    A number of experiments have shown that ripple-induced transport influences performance of ELMy H-modes in the tokamak. A noticeable difference in confinement, ELM frequency and amplitude was found between JET (with ripple amplitude δ∼0.1%) and JT-60U (with δ∼1%) in otherwise identical discharges. It was previously shown in JET experiments with enhanced ripple that a gradual increase in the ripple amplitude first leads to a modest improvement in plasma confinement, which is followed by the degradation of edge pedestal and further transition to the L-mode regime if δ increases further. The DIII-D team recently reported a marginal increase in confinement in experiments with an edge transport enhanced by the externally driven resonant magnetic perturbation. Numerical predictive modelling of the dynamics of ELMy H-mode JET plasma relevant to a JET/JT-60U similarity experiment has been conducted taking into account ripple-induced ion transport, which was computed using the orbit following code ASCOT. This predictive modelling reveals that, depending on plasma parameters, ripple amplitude and localisation (the latter depending on the toroidal coil design), this additional transport can either improve global plasma confinement or reduce it. These controlled ripple losses might be used as an effective tool for ELM mitigation and may provide an explanation for the difference between JET and JT-60U observed in the similarity experiments. A detailed comparison between ripple- induced transport and the alternative method of ELM mitigation by an externally driven edge magnetic perturbation is discussed. The fact that ripple losses mainly increase ion transport, while a stochastic magnetic layer increases electron transport indicates that it might be beneficial to use a combination of both methods in future experiments. This work was funded partly by the United Kingdom Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and by the European Communities under the contract of

  11. Experience with contamination protection of spent fuel transport packages in Germany since 2000/2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinninger, H.; Bach, R.; Seidel, J.; Jung, P.

    2004-01-01

    On April 30, 1998 just a few days before the PATRAM 1998 conference at Paris, the French Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate (DSIN now DGSNR) published a press release, that during the year before some 35% of the spent fuel transports to the reprocessing plant of COGEMA at La Hague have non-fixed surface contamination in excess of the regulatory standard. A few day in advance DSIN informed in French Ministries and the competent foreign authorities of the customer countries of COGEMA. The consequences of this publication were multi-fold and perceived by the public as an act negligence of the nuclear industry. Because of concerns about additional radiation exposure to the railway workers by the unions the French Railway company SNCF suspended all transports by May 6, 1998 until implementation of corrective measures. This decision of SNF interupted also the spent fuel transports from continental Europe to the reprocessing plant of BNFL at Sellafield all performed across France to the port of Dunkirk. Furthermore on May 25, 1998 the German Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Protection and Nuclear Safety (BMU) imposed a transport ban for shipment of spent fuel from commercial power plants and for high active waste returned from La Hague to the Gorleben site. The conditions for resumption of these transports were outlined by NMU in a 10-point programme. In response to these publications on contamination findings competent German State and Federal Authorities commissioned investigations by independent experts dealing with the identification of the causes, the proposal of counter measures, the investigation of shortcomings in the transport system in general and recommendations for retification of it

  12. Compendium of NASA data base for the global tropospheric experiment's Transport and Atmospheric Chemistry Near the Equator-Atlantic (TRACE-A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Scott, A. Donald, Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This compendium describes aircraft data that are available from NASA's Transport and Atmospheric Chemistry near the Equator - Atlantic (TRACE-A) conducted in September/October 1992. The broad objectives of TRACE-A were to study chemical processes and long-range transport associated with South American and African continental outflow during periods of widespread vegetation burning, and to understand the ozone enhancements observed from satellite data measured over the southern tropical Atlantic Ocean during the September/October time period. Flight experiments were conducted from Brazil, South Africa, Namibia, and the Ascension Island. This document provides a representation of aircraft data that are available from NASA Langley's Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data format of time series and altitude profile plots is not intended to support original analyses, but to assist the reader in identifying data that are of interest. This compendium is for only the NASA aircraft data. The DAAC data base includes numerous supporting data-meteorological products, results from surface studies, satellite observations, and data from sonde releases.

  13. MARKETING AND LOGISTICS INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TRANSPORT SERVICES MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kopytko

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the modern trends of world economy development, the opportunities of increasing the competitiveness of the Ukrainian transport system on the base of marketing-logistical providing the development of infrastructure of transport services market are presented. The analysis of marketing-logistical approaches of estimation of the efficiency of operation of transport infrastructure objects is performed. The condition of theoretical and practical aspects of the transport services market is elucidated, the examples of logistical concepts are given, considering the work experience of transport enterprises, the ways of formation of regional transport-logistical associations are offered.

  14. Public transport optimisation emphasising passengers’ travel behaviour.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Jens Parbo; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Passengers in public transport complaining about their travel experiences are not uncommon. This might seem counterintuitive since several operators worldwide are presenting better key performance indicators year by year. The present PhD study focuses on developing optimisation algorithms to enhance the operations of public transport while explicitly emphasising passengers’ travel behaviour and preferences. Similar to economic theory, interactions between supply and demand are omnipresent in ...

  15. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters

  16. Transport barriers in bootstrap-driven tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staebler, G. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Pan, C.; McClenaghan, J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Lao, L. L.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments have demonstrated improved energy confinement due to the spontaneous formation of an internal transport barrier in high bootstrap fraction discharges. Gyrokinetic analysis, and quasilinear predictive modeling, demonstrates that the observed transport barrier is caused by the suppression of turbulence primarily from the large Shafranov shift. It is shown that the Shafranov shift can produce a bifurcation to improved confinement in regions of positive magnetic shear or a continuous reduction in transport for weak or negative magnetic shear. Operation at high safety factor lowers the pressure gradient threshold for the Shafranov shift-driven barrier formation. Two self-organized states of the internal and edge transport barrier are observed. It is shown that these two states are controlled by the interaction of the bootstrap current with magnetic shear, and the kinetic ballooning mode instability boundary. Election scale energy transport is predicted to be dominant in the inner 60% of the profile. Evidence is presented that energetic particle-driven instabilities could be playing a role in the thermal energy transport in this region.

  17. The Ship Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS): Observations of Small-Scale Surface Lateral Transport During the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, D. F.; Novelli, G.; Guigand, C.; Özgökmen, T.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Molemaker, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE) will carry out the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER) to study the role of small-scale processes in the transport and dispersion of oil and passive tracers. The Ship-Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS) will observe small-scale surface dispersion in the open ocean. STARRS is built around a high-lift-capacity (30 kg) helium-filled aerostat. STARRS is equipped with a high resolution digital camera. An integrated GNSS receiver and inertial navigation system permit direct geo-rectification of the imagery. Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE) will carry out the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER) to study the role of small-scale processes in the transport and dispersion of oil and passive tracers. The Ship-Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS) was developed to produce observational estimates of small-scale surface dispersion in the open ocean. STARRS is built around a high-lift-capacity (30 kg) helium-filled aerostat. STARRS is equipped with a high resolution digital camera. An integrated GNSS receiver and inertial navigation system permit direct geo-rectification of the imagery. Thousands of drift cards deployed in the field of view of STARRS and tracked over time provide the first observational estimates of small-scale (1-500 m) surface dispersion in the open ocean. The STARRS imagery will be combined with GPS-tracked surface drifter trajectories, shipboard observations, and aerial surveys of sea surface temperature in the DeSoto Canyon. In addition to obvious applications to oil spill modelling, the STARRS observations will provide essential benchmarks for high resolution numerical modelsDrift cards deployed in the field of view of STARRS and tracked over time provide the first observational estimates of small-scale (1-100 m) surface dispersion in the open ocean. The STARRS

  18. Basic Studies of Non-Diffusive Transport in Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, George J. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Maggs, James E. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-10-25

    The project expanded and developed mathematical descriptions, and corresponding numerical modeling, of non-diffusive transport to incorporate new perspectives derived from basic transport experiments performed in the LAPD device at UCLA, and at fusion devices throughout the world. By non-diffusive it is meant that the transport of fundamental macroscopic parameters of a system, such as temperature and density, does not follow the standard diffusive behavior predicted by a classical Fokker-Planck equation. The appearance of non-diffusive behavior is often related to underlying microscopic processes that cause the value of a system parameter, at one spatial position, to be linked to distant events, i.e., non-locality. In the LAPD experiments the underlying process was traced to large amplitude, coherent drift-waves that give rise to chaotic trajectories. Significant advances were made in this project. The results have lead to a new perspective about the fundamentals of edge transport in magnetically confined plasmas; the insight has important consequences for worldwide studies in fusion devices. Progress was also made in advancing the mathematical techniques used to describe fractional diffusion.

  19. Romanian experience in a assessment of the risk and environmental consequences due to radioactive materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The transport of radioactive materials (RAM) is a very important problem taking into consideration its potential risks over the environment and the radiological consequences of this activity. Romania as a Member State of the International Atomic Energy Agency has implemented national regulations for a safe transport of RAM in complying with the Agency's recommendations as well as other international specialized organizations. The paper will present the main sources of radioactive materials in Romania, and their transportation routes with a particular focus on the radioactive wastes (very low level and mixed low-level radioactive materials), radioactive isotopes and sources, and natural uranium ore. Starting from the fact that the safety in the transport of radioactive materials is dependent on packaging appropriate for the contents being shipped, rather than operational and/or administrative actions required for the package, the paper presents, very briefly, the qualification tests for the main packages used for transport and storage of RAM in Romania. There are presented also specific problems related to the identification and evaluation of the environmental risks and impacts as well as the potential radiological consequences associated with the transport of radioactive materials, for all those three possible situations: routine transport (without incidents), normal transport (with minor incidents) and during potential accidents. As a conclusion, it is stated that the evaluated annual collective dose for the population due to RAM transport is less than those received by natural radiation sources. At the same time it is concluded that Romanian made packages are safe and prevent loss of its radioactive contents into environment. (author)

  20. Developments in the transport of radioactive waste. Proceedings of a seminar held in Vienna, 21-25 February 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This document is proceeding of the seminar on development in the transport of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The papers presented in this seminar covered the following areas: IAEA activities in radioactive waste transport; Member State experience and recommendations for international transport regulations; Member State experience with national transport regulations; waste transport and handling; waste generation volumes, characteristics, and disposal requirements; risk assessment; and transport and waste packages. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Developments in the transport of radioactive waste. Proceedings of a seminar held in Vienna, 21-25 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This document is proceeding of the seminar on development in the transport of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The papers presented in this seminar covered the following areas: IAEA activities in radioactive waste transport; Member State experience and recommendations for international transport regulations; Member State experience with national transport regulations; waste transport and handling; waste generation volumes, characteristics, and disposal requirements; risk assessment; and transport and waste packages. Refs, figs and tabs.

  2. Positron deposition in plasmas by positronium beam ionization and transport of positrons in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    In a recently proposed positron transport experiment, positrons would be deposited in a fusion plasma by forming a positronium (Ps) beam and passing it through the plasma. Positrons would be deposited as the beam is ionized by plasma ions and electrons. Radial transport of the positrons to the limiter could then be measured by detecting the gamma radiation produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons in the limiter. This would allow measurements of the transport of electron-mass particles and might shed some light on the mechanisms of electron transport in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the deposition and transport of positrons in a tokamak are simulated and the annihilation signal determined for several transport models. Calculations of the expected signals are necessary for the optimal design of a positron transport experiment. There are several mechanisms for the loss of positrons besides transport to the limiter. Annihilation with plasma electrons and reformation of positronium in positron-hydrogen collisions are two such processes. These processes can alter the signal and place restrictions ons on the plasma conditions in which positron transport experiments can be effectively performed

  3. The coordinated development of China' s inland water transport%The coordinated development of China' s inland water transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Aimin; Tian Feng; Haasis H.D; Mao Lang; Cai Jia

    2012-01-01

    The coordinated development is the core of sustainable development and the hot issue of international research. Inland water transport (IWT) is an important part of the water resources exploiting system and comprehensive transport system under socio-economic context of river basin, and also the country' s sustainable development priorities to achieve resource-conserving and environment-friendly strategy. Based on the coordinated development content, the paper combined Germany' s successful development experience, explored the elements and problem of the coordinated development of IWT system of China' s national economic strategy and basin economy, water resourse system, comprehensive transport system, and system itself, and their countermeasures and suggestions, in order to facilitate rapid and coordinated development of China' s inland water transport.

  4. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Candy, J.; Kaye, S.M.; Nevins, W.M.; Wang, E.; Bell, R.E.; Hammett, G.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Yuh, H.

    2011-01-01

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  5. Intense ion beam transport in magnetic quadrupoles: Experiments on electron and gas effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kireef Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Prost, L.; Vay, J-L.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion induction linacs for inertial fusion energy and high-energy density physics have an economic incentive to minimize the clearance between the beam edge and the aperture wall. This increases the risk from electron clouds and gas desorbed from walls. We have measured electron and gas emission from 1 MeV K + incident on surfaces near grazing incidence on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. Electron emission coefficients reach values >100, whereas gas desorption coefficients are near 10 4 . Mitigation techniques are being studied: A bead-blasted rough surface reduces electron emission by a factor of 10 and gas desorption by a factor of 2. We also discuss the results of beam transport (of 0.03-0.18 A K + ) through four pulsed room-temperature magnetic quadrupoles in the HCX at LBNL. Diagnostics are installed on HCX, between and within quadrupole magnets, to measure the beam halo loss, net charge and expelled ions, from which we infer gas density, electron trapping, and the effects of mitigation techniques. A coordinated theory and computational effort has made significant progress towards a self-consistent model of positive-ion beam and electron dynamics. We are beginning to compare experimental and theoretical results

  6. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)

  7. Logistic innovations in transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Antonowicz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article discusses the issue of logistic innovations in transport. The essentials of logistic innovations in transport together with some examples of specific innovations are presented. The role of the client's needs in transport innovations is indicated. The most vital postulates affecting the innovativeness of shipping companies and derived from the author's experience as well as scholarly publications, are time, safety, reliability as well as comprehensiveness of service offer. Following the analysis of the issue, and on the grounds of Kaizen's and Lean's method, the concept of continuous innovations is suggested as very useful for the development of transport. The potential of clusters as the source of logistic innovations in transport is emphasised. Methods: The discussion of the issue was preceded by the author's analysis of written sources on innovativeness, the evaluation of ratings of innovativeness as well as the analysis of rewarded innovative solutions in transport subsequent to the businesses participation in the programme of innovative solutions in transport. The role of innovation practical business operations is argued following the analysis of some strategic documents such as: 2011 White Paper and the Strategy for the Development of Transport by 2020 adopted by the Polish government in 2013. Aim: The aim of the article is to present the role and significance of the issue of logistic innovations in transport and to cite instances of practical solutions implemented by shipping companies, the solutions which resulted in measurable effects. Following the author's observation of the instances of innovative solutions as well as his analysis of the ratings of innovativeness, the article aims to present the conclusions as for the specific kinds of activities which are indispensable to foster innovativeness in transport. Conclusions: The conclusions derived from the author's analyses and observations show that logistic

  8. The impact of benthic fauna on fluvial bed load transport: Challenges of upscaling laboratory experiments to river and landscape scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    The impact on sediment transport processes and channel morphology of several relatively large, iconic animals including beaver and salmon is increasingly well understood. However, many other aquatic fauna are important zoogeomorphic agents and ecosystem engineers. These somewhat overlooked "Cinderella" species include benthic aquatic insect larvae, freshwater crustaceans and many species of fish. Despite relatively modest individual effects, the ubiquity, abundance and cumulative impact of these organisms makes them a potentially significant agency, with as yet undiscovered and unquantified impacts on channel morphology and sediment fluxes. Their actions (digging, foraging, moving, burrowing), constructions and secretions modify bed sediment characteristics (grain size distribution, interlock, imbrication, protrusion), alter bed topography (thence hydraulic roughness) and contribute to biogenic restraints on grain movement. In turn, they can affect the distribution of surface particle entrainment thresholds and bed shear stresses, with implications for bed load transport. Flume experiments have measured some of these impacts and provided direct observations of the mechanisms involved, but many of the most interesting research questions pertain to the impact of these animals at reach, catchment and even landscape scales: Not least, what is the impact of small aquatic animals on bed load flux and yield? This presentation will consider some of the challenges involved in answering this question; that is, of scaling up experimental understanding of how aquatic animals affect bed load transport processes to river scales. Pertinent themes include: (1) the potential impacts of experimental arrangements on the behaviours and activities that affect hydraulic or geomorphological processes; (2) field coincidence of the spatial and temporal distributions of (a) the animals and their behaviours with (b) the physical conditions (substrates, flows) under which those animals are

  9. Using column experiments to examine transport of As and other trace elements released from poultry litter: Implications for trace element mobility in agricultural watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewumi, Oluyinka; Schreiber, Madeline E

    2017-08-01

    Trace elements are added to poultry feed to control infection and improve weight gain. However, the fate of these trace elements in poultry litter is poorly understood. Because poultry litter is applied as fertilizer in many agricultural regions, evaluation of the environmental processes that influence the mobility of litter-derived trace elements is critical for predicting if trace elements are retained in soil or released to water. This study examined the effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in poultry litter leachate on the fate and transport of litter-derived elements (As, Cu, P and Zn) using laboratory column experiments with soil collected from the Delmarva Peninsula (Mid-Atlantic, USA), a region of intense poultry production. Results of the experiments showed that DOC enhanced the mobility of all of the studied elements. However, despite the increased mobility, 60-70% of Zn, As and P mass was retained within the soil. In contrast, almost all of the Cu was mobilized in the litter leachate experiments, with very little retention in soil. Overall, our results demonstrate that the mobility of As, Cu, Zn and P in soils which receive poultry litter application is strongly influenced by both litter leachate composition, specifically organic acids, and adsorption to soil. Results have implications for understanding fate and transport of trace elements released from litter application to soil water and groundwater, which can affect both human health and the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transport experience of NH-25 spent fuel shipping cask for post irradiation examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Ryuji

    1982-01-01

    Since the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. hot laboratories are located far off from the port which can handle spent fuel shipping casks, it is necessary to use a trailer-mounted cask which can be transported by public roads, bridges and intersections for the transportation of spent fuel specimens to these hot laboratories. Model NH-25 shipping cask was designed, manufactured and oualification tested to meet Japanese regulations and was officially registered as a BM type cask. The NH-25 cask accomodates two BWR fuel assemblies, one PWR assembly or one ATR fuel assembly using interchangeable inner containers. The cask weight is 29.2 t. The cask has three concentric stainless steel shells. Gamma shielding is lead cast between the inner shell and the intermediate shell. Neutro n shielding consists of ethylene-glycol-aqueous solution layer formed between the intermediate shell and the outer shell. The NH-25 cask now has been in operation for 2.5 yr. It was used for the transportation of spent fuel assemblies from six LWR power plants to the port on shipping cask carrier ''Hinouramaru'' on the sea, as well as from the port to the hot laboratory on a trailer. The capability of safe handling and transporting of spent fuel assemblies has been well demonstrated. (author)

  11. Multiscale thermal transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  12. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids. PMID:7237

  13. Transport of contaminants from energy-process-waste leachates through subsurface soils and soil components: laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangen, L.E.; Stallings, E.A.; Walker, R.D.

    1982-08-01

    The subsurface transport and attenuation of inorganic contaminants common to a variety of energy process waste leachates are being studied using laboratory column methods. Anionic species currently being emphasized are As, B, Mo, and Se. Transport of the cations Cd and Ni is also being studied. The solid adsorbents consist of three soil mineral components (silica sand, kaolinite, and goethite), and four subsurface soils (a dunal sand, an oxidic sandy clay loam, an acidic clay loam, and an alkaline clay loam). Breakthrough patterns of these species from packed soil columns are followed by monitoring eluent concentrations vs time under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. This report describes the experimental methods being used, the results of preliminary batch adsorption studies, and the results of column experiments completed through calendar year 1981. Using column influent concentrations of about 10 mg/l, adsorption (mmoles/100 g) has been determined from the eluent volume corresponding to 50% breakthrough. On silica sand, kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, these are 2.0 x 10 -4 , 0.020, 0.013, and 0.31 for cadmium, 4.4 x 10 -4 , 0.039, 0.020, and 0.98 for nickel. On kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, adsorption values (mmoles/100 g) are As (0.24, 0.019, and 20.5), B (0.041, 0.0019, and 1.77), Mo (0.048, 0.0010, and 5.93), and Se (0.029, 0.00048, and 1.30). Arsenic is the most highly adsorbed contaminant species and goethite has the largest adsorption capacity of the adsorbents

  14. Newborn transport in South Australia, 1978-80: experience of the Queen Victoria Hospital, Adelaide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A G; Fitzgerald, A M; Dahlenburg, G W

    1982-01-23

    389 infants were transported to the Queen Victoria Hospital, Adelaide between 1978 and 1980. Twenty-three percent (99) of the infants were ventilated, and 49% (189) received intravenous or intra-arterial therapy. Fifty-six percent (217) of the infants required transport because of prematurity; 11% (46) because of perinatal asphyxia in babies weighing more than 2,500 g. Only one baby died during transport, while 14% of the babies died subsequently. A core temperature of less than 36 degrees C in either hospital is important; a cold baby is 3.5 times more likely to die (X2=25.46, P less than 0.001). The transport of babies over distances greater than 300 kilometres is peculiar to Australia. Significantly more of these babies were cold than those retrieved from hospitals near Adelaide (X2=4.7, P less than 0.05), and significantly more died. Difficulty in transferring mothers in preterm labour may be another reason these babies did relatively badly. Better education and facilities will be important if we are to improve their survival chances.

  15. Vertical hydraulic transport of particulate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restini, C.V.; Massarani, G.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of particulate solid vertical transport is formulated using the conservation equations of Continuum Mechanics. It is shown that the constitutive equation for solid-fluid interaction term in the equations of motion may be determined by rather simple experiments of homogeneous fluidization. The predicted fluid pressure drop and solid concentration are in satisfacting agreement with past experiments and with data obtained in this work. (Author) [pt

  16. Needs of anticipation for transport operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galtier, J.

    2005-01-01

    COGEMA LOGISTICS (formerly Transnucleaire) has designed and manufactured several thousands of casks, and owns fleet of more than 4000 casks. Benefiting from more than 40 years of experience in cask shipment COGEMA LOGISTICS has demonstrated an outstanding performance in transportation and has integrated all feed back from past successful operations in current ones. Early anticipation of needs, i.e. at preliminary design step, is of major importance from a technical point of view (capacity, interface, handling means, licensing), and also in terms of political and public acceptance issues from the design step. This paper will highlight for each step required for the implementation of an optimal transport and storage system: Decision to proceed (including political aspects)-Design of casks to be used (including operational interface)-Licensing process-Manufacturing process-Transport plan, Public Acceptance-Loading Operations-Transport-Maintenance operations. (authors)

  17. INES scale: French application to radioactive material transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowinski, S.; Strawa, S.; Aguilar, J.

    2004-01-01

    After getting the control of radioactive material transport in June 1997, the French safety Authority (ASN) decided to apply the INES scale to transport events. DGSNR (Directorate General for Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection) requests that radioactive material package consignors declare any event occurring during transportation, and has introduced the use of the INES scale adapted to classify transport events in order to inform the public and to have feedback. This paper deals with DGSNR's feedback during the past seven years concerning the french application of the INES scale. Significant events that occurred during transportation are presented. The French experience was used by IAEA to develop a draft guide in 2002 and IAEA asked countries to use a new draft for a trial period in July 2004

  18. Transport of irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In response to public interest in the transport by rail through London of containers of irradiated fuel elements on their way from nuclear power stations to Windscale, the Central Electricity Generating Board and British Rail held three information meetings in London in January 1980. One meeting was for representatives of London Borough Councils and Members of Parliament with a known interest in the subject, and the others were for press, radio and television journalists. This booklet contains the main points made by the principal speakers from the CEGB and BR. (The points covered include: brief description of the fuel cycle; effect of the fission process in producing plutonium and fission products in the fuel element; fuel transport; the fuel flasks; protection against accidents; experience of transporting fuel). (U.K.)

  19. The use of laboratory experiments for the study of conservative solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, S. E.; Zheng, L.; Conwell, P.

    Laboratory experiments on heterogeneous porous media (otherwise known as intermediate scale experiments, or ISEs) have been increasingly relied upon by hydrogeologists for the study of saturated and unsaturated groundwater systems. Among the many ongoing applications of ISEs is the study of fluid flow and the transport of conservative solutes in correlated permeability fields. Recent advances in ISE design have provided the capability of creating correlated permeability fields in the laboratory. This capability is important in the application of ISEs for the assessment of recent stochastic theories. In addition, pressure-transducer technology and visualization methods have provided the potential for ISEs to be used in characterizing the spatial distributions of both hydraulic head and local water velocity within correlated permeability fields. Finally, various methods are available for characterizing temporal variations in the spatial distribution (and, thereby, the spatial moments) of solute concentrations within ISEs. It is concluded, therefore, that recent developments in experimental techniques have provided an opportunity to use ISEs as important tools in the continuing study of fluid flow and the transport of conservative solutes in heterogeneous, saturated porous media. Résumé Les hydrogéologues se sont progressivement appuyés sur des expériences de laboratoire sur des milieux poreux hétérogènes (connus aussi par l'expression "Expériences àéchelle intermédiaire", ISE) pour étudier les zones saturées et non saturées des aquifères. Parmi les nombreuses applications en cours des ISE, il faut noter l'étude de l'écoulement de fluide et le transport de solutés conservatifs dans des champs aux perméabilités corrélées. Les récents progrès du protocole des ISE ont donné la possibilité de créer des champs de perméabilités corrélées au laboratoire. Cette possibilité est importante dans l'application des ISE pour l'évaluation des th

  20. Transport Visualization for Studying Mass Transfer and Solute Transport in Permeable Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy Haggerty

    2004-01-01

    Understanding and predicting mass transfer coupled with solute transport in permeable media is central to several energy-related programs at the US Department of Energy (e.g., CO 2 sequestration, nuclear waste disposal, hydrocarbon extraction, and groundwater remediation). Mass transfer is the set of processes that control movement of a chemical between mobile (advection-dominated) domains and immobile (diffusion- or sorption-dominated) domains within a permeable medium. Consequences of mass transfer on solute transport are numerous and may include (1) increased sequestration time within geologic formations; (2) reduction in average solute transport velocity by as much as several orders of magnitude; (3) long ''tails'' in concentration histories during removal of a solute from a permeable medium; (4) poor predictions of solute behavior over long time scales; and (5) changes in reaction rates due to mass transfer influences on pore-scale mixing of solutes. Our work produced four principle contributions: (1) the first comprehensive visualization of solute transport and mass transfer in heterogeneous porous media; (2) the beginnings of a theoretical framework that encompasses both macrodispersion and mass transfer within a single set of equations; (3) experimental and analytical tools necessary for understanding mixing and aqueous reaction in heterogeneous, granular porous media; (4) a clear experimental demonstration that reactive transport is often not accurately described by a simple coupling of the convection-dispersion equation with chemical reaction equations. The work shows that solute transport in heterogeneous media can be divided into 3 regimes--macrodispersion, advective mass transfer, and diffusive mass transfer--and that these regimes can be predicted quantitatively in binary media. We successfully predicted mass transfer in each of these regimes and verified the prediction by completing quantitative visualization experiments in each of the regimes, the

  1. Transport Accessibility In Light Of The DEA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górniak Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of transport infrastructure and increasing the efficiency of transport services are major factors of economic growth. The concept of transport accessibility can be analysed in various aspects. This article focuses on the accessibility of freight transport by road and rail, measured with infrastructure equipment. The primary objective of this study is to determine the efficiency of selected European countries in 2000, 2005 and 2010 in terms of transport accessibility for given expenditures and results. The efficiency will be measured with the Data Envelopment Analysis, which assesses the efficiency with which a given economy transforms expenditures into results. The hypothesis assumes the existence of differences between the efficiency in terms of transport accessibility in European countries and a possibility to increase this efficiency by using the experience of countries with a high efficiency level.

  2. Runaway electron transport studies in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongzhen; Qi Changwei; Ding Xuantong; Li Wenzhong

    2002-01-01

    The transport of runaway electrons in a hot plasma has been studied in four experiments, which provide the runaway diffusivity D r The first experiment obtained runaway electrons using a steady state approach for values of the runaway confinement time τ r , deduced from hard X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra. In the second experiment, diffusion has been interpreted in terms of the magnetic fluctuation, from which a electron thermal diffusivity can be deduced. Runaway electro diffusion coefficient is determined by intrinsic magnetic fluctuations, rather than electrostatic fluctuations because of the high energy involved. The results presented here demonstrate the efficiency of using runaway transport techniques for determining intrinsic magnetic fluctuations

  3. Transport of silver nanoparticles in single fractured sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are used in various consumer products and are one of the most prevalent metallic nanoparticle in commodities and are released into the environment. Transport behavior of Ag-NP in groundwater is one important aspect for the assessment of environmental impact and protection of drinking water resources in particular. Ag-NP transport processes in saturated single-fractured sandstones using triaxial flow cell experiments with different kind of sandstones is investigated. Ag-NP concentration and size are analyzed using flow field-flow fractionation and coupled SEM-EDX analysis. Results indicate that Ag-NP are more mobile and show generally lower attachment on rock surface compared to experiments in undisturbed sandstone matrix and partially fractured sandstones. Ag-NP transport is controlled by the characteristics of matrix porosity, time depending blocking of attachment sites and solute chemistry. Where Ag-NP attachment occur, it is heterogeneously distributed on the fracture surface.

  4. Transportation Mode Detection Based on Permutation Entropy and Extreme Learning Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing prevalence of GPS devices and mobile phones, transportation mode detection based on GPS data has been a hot topic in GPS trajectory data analysis. Transportation modes such as walking, driving, bus, and taxi denote an important characteristic of the mobile user. Longitude, latitude, speed, acceleration, and direction are usually used as features in transportation mode detection. In this paper, first, we explore the possibility of using Permutation Entropy (PE of speed, a measure of complexity and uncertainty of GPS trajectory segment, as a feature for transportation mode detection. Second, we employ Extreme Learning Machine (ELM to distinguish GPS trajectory segments of different transportation. Finally, to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we make experiments on GeoLife dataset. Experiments results show that we can get more than 50% accuracy when only using PE as a feature to characterize trajectory sequence. PE can indeed be effectively used to detect transportation mode from GPS trajectory. The proposed method has much better accuracy and faster running time than the methods based on the other features and SVM classifier.

  5. Transporting Radioactive Waste: An Engineering Activity. Grades 5-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    This brochure contains an engineering activity for upper elementary, middle school, and high school students that examines the transportation of radioactive waste. The activity is designed to inform students about the existence of radioactive waste and its transportation to disposal sites. Students experiment with methods to contain the waste and…

  6. Root cortical aerenchyma inhibits radial nutrient transport in maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Henry, Amelia; Brown, Kathleen M; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Formation of root cortical aerenchyma (RCA) can be induced by nutrient deficiency. In species adapted to aerobic soil conditions, this response is adaptive by reducing root maintenance requirements, thereby permitting greater soil exploration. One trade-off of RCA formation may be reduced radial transport of nutrients due to reduction in living cortical tissue. To test this hypothesis, radial nutrient transport in intact roots of maize (Zea mays) was investigated in two radiolabelling experiments employing genotypes with contrasting RCA. In the first experiment, time-course dynamics of phosphate loading into the xylem were measured from excised nodal roots that varied in RCA formation. In the second experiment, uptake of phosphate, calcium and sulphate was measured in seminal roots of intact young plants in which variation in RCA was induced by treatments altering ethylene action or genetic differences. In each of three paired genotype comparisons, the rate of phosphate exudation of high-RCA genotypes was significantly less than that of low-RCA genotypes. In the second experiment, radial nutrient transport of phosphate and calcium was negatively correlated with the extent of RCA for some genotypes. The results support the hypothesis that RCA can reduce radial transport of some nutrients in some genotypes, which could be an important trade-off of this trait.

  7. Radioactive materials and nuclear fuel transport requirements in Poland in the light of international regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musialowicz, T.

    1977-01-01

    National regulations for the transport of radioactive materials and nuclear fuel in Poland are discussed. Basic transport requirements and regulations, transport experience including transport accidents and emergency service are described. The comparison with international regulations is given

  8. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  9. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized

  10. Chaotic transport and damping from θ-ruffled separatrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabantsev, A A; Dubin, Daniel H E; Driscoll, C F; Tsidulko, Yu A

    2010-11-12

    Variations in magnetic or electrostatic confinement fields give rise to trapping separatrices, and neoclassical transport theory analyzes effects from collision-induced separatrix crossings. Experiments on pure electron plasmas now quantitatively characterize a broad range of transport and wave damping effects due to "chaotic" separatrix crossings, which occur due to equilibrium plasma rotation across θ-ruffled separatrices, and due to wave-induced separatrix fluctuations.

  11. Implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting in permeable microvessels: Comparison of two-fluid statistical transport model with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ChiBin, Zhang; XiaoHui, Lin, E-mail: lxh60@seu.edu.cn; ZhaoMin, Wang; ChangBao, Wang

    2017-03-15

    In experiments and theoretical analyses, this study examines the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) for implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) in microvessels. It also proposes a three-dimensional statistical transport model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels, which describes blood flow by the two-fluid (Casson and Newtonian) model. The model accounts for the permeable effect of the microvessel wall and the coupling effect between the blood flow and tissue fluid flow. The MDCPs move randomly through the microvessel, and their transport state is described by the Boltzmann equation. The regulated changes and factors affecting the CE of the MDCPs in the assisted magnetic targeting were obtained by solving the theoretical model and by experimental testing. The CE was negatively correlated with the blood flow velocity, and positively correlated with the external magnetic field intensity and microvessel permeability. The predicted CEs of the MDCPs were consistent with the experimental results. Additionally, under the same external magnetic field, the predicted CE was 5–8% higher in the IA-MDT model than in the model ignoring the permeability effect of the microvessel wall. - Highlights: • A model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels was established. • An experimental device was established, the CE of MDCPs was measured. • The predicted CE of MDCPs was 5–8% higher in the IA-MDT model.

  12. Assessment of key transport parameters in a karst system under different dynamic conditions based on tracer experiments: the Jeita karst system, Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doummar, Joanna; Margane, Armin; Geyer, Tobias; Sauter, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Artificial tracer experiments were conducted in the mature karst system of Jeita (Lebanon) under various flow conditions using surface and subsurface tracer injection points, to determine the variation of transport parameters (attenuation of peak concentration, velocity, transit times, dispersivity, and proportion of immobile and mobile regions) along fast and slow flow pathways. Tracer breakthrough curves (TBCs) observed at the karst spring were interpreted using a two-region nonequilibrium approach (2RNEM) to account for the skewness in the TBCs' long tailings. The conduit test results revealed a discharge threshold in the system dynamics, beyond which the transport parameters vary significantly. The polynomial relationship between transport velocity and discharge can be related to the variation of the conduit's cross-sectional area. Longitudinal dispersivity in the conduit system is not a constant value (α = 7-10 m) and decreases linearly with increasing flow rate because of dilution effects. Additionally, the proportion of immobile regions (arising from conduit irregularities) increases with decreasing water level in the conduit system. From tracer tests with injection at the surface, longitudinal dispersivity values are found to be large (8-27 m). The tailing observed in some TBCs is generated in the unsaturated zone before the tracer actually arrives at the major subsurface conduit draining the system. This work allows the estimation and prediction of the key transport parameters in karst aquifers. It shows that these parameters vary with time and flow dynamics, and they reflect the geometry of the flow pathway and the origin of infiltrating (potentially contaminated) recharge.

  13. Fast current ramp experiments on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.; Goldston, R.J.

    1987-05-01

    Electron heat transport on TFTR and other tokamaks is several orders of magnitude larger than neoclassical calculations would predict. Despite considerable effort, there is still no clear theoretical understanding of this anomalous transport. The electron temperature profile T/sub e/(r), shape has shown a marked consistency on many machines, including TFTR, for a wide range of plasma parameters and heating profiles. This could be an important clue as to the process responsible for this enhanced thermal transport. In this paper 'profile consistency' in TFTR is described and an experiment which uses a fast current ramp to transiently decouple the current density profile J(r), and the T/sub e/(r) profiles is discussed. From this experiment the influence of J(r) on electron temperature profile consistency can be determined

  14. Atmospheric transport simulations in support of the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J. M.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Mountain, M. E.; Nehrkorn, T.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Karion, A.; Miller, J. B.; Sweeney, C.; Steiner, N.; Wofsy, S. C.; Miller, C. E.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the atmospheric modeling that underlies the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) science analysis, including its meteorological and atmospheric transport components (polar variant of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models), and provides WRF validation for May-October 2012 and March-November 2013 - the first 2 years of the aircraft field campaign. A triply nested computational domain for WRF was chosen so that the innermost domain with 3.3 km grid spacing encompasses the entire mainland of Alaska and enables the substantial orography of the state to be represented by the underlying high-resolution topographic input field. Summary statistics of the WRF model performance on the 3.3 km grid indicate good overall agreement with quality-controlled surface and radiosonde observations. Two-meter temperatures are generally too cold by approximately 1.4 K in 2012 and 1.1 K in 2013, while 2 m dewpoint temperatures are too low (dry) by 0.2 K in 2012 and too high (moist) by 0.6 K in 2013. Wind speeds are biased too low by 0.2 m s-1 in 2012 and 0.3 m s-1 in 2013. Model representation of upper level variables is very good. These measures are comparable to model performance metrics of similar model configurations found in the literature. The high quality of these fine-resolution WRF meteorological fields inspires confidence in their use to drive STILT for the purpose of computing surface influences ("footprints") at commensurably increased resolution. Indeed, footprints generated on a 0.1° grid show increased spatial detail compared with those on the more common 0.5° grid, better allowing for convolution with flux models for carbon dioxide and methane across the heterogeneous Alaskan landscape. Ozone deposition rates computed using STILT footprints indicate good agreement with observations and exhibit realistic seasonal variability, further indicating that WRF

  15. Radionuclide transport in a single fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.

    1988-12-01

    The study of radionuclide migration through rock is currently of great interest due to its relevance to the possible escape paths into the biosphere of radionuclides released from high level radioactive wastes burried in deep geological repositories. While water will provide the vehicle for transportation, interaction with geological material may greatly influence the radionuclide movement relative that of water. A flow system for laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in natural fissures in granitic rock under reducing conditions is described. The system based on the use of synthetic ground water equilibrated with granitic rock in a well sealed system, allow experiments to be carried out at -240 mV reduction potential. In flow experiments with technetium the retardation was found to be dependent on the method used for reducing TcO 4 - . The preparation of the tracer solutions is crucial, as some of the redox-reactions may be very slow. The dynamics of the Tc(VII) reduction and also speciation need to be carried out in separate experiments. (4 illustrations, 5 tables)

  16. Experience as Excursion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie; Shanks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    researchers and practitioners to travel – making it possible to follow experiences as they are enacted across and between places, modes of transportation, mobile mediation and assemblages of things. Drawing on the nomadic metaphysics of philosopher Michel Serres, the journeying, shifting and propagating...... qualities of experience are highlighted as part of a suggestion that design may indeed relate as much to metaphysics as to mechanics, materials science, and the psychology of the consumer and user. An Experience Design is sketched out as the choreography of temporary and shifting engagements across...

  17. Suprathermal ion transport in turbulent magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovet, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Suprathermal ions, which have an energy greater than the quasi-Maxwellian background plasma temperature, are present in many laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In fusion devices, they are generated by the fusion reactions and auxiliary heating. Controlling their transport is essential for the success of future fusion devices that could provide a clean, safe and abundant source of electric power to our society. In space, suprathermal ions include energetic solar particles and cosmic rays. The understanding of the acceleration and transport mechanisms of these particles is still incomplete. Basic plasma devices allow detailed measurements that are not accessible in astrophysical and fusion plasmas, due to the difficulty to access the former and the high temperatures of the latter. The basic toroidal device TORPEX offers an easy access for diagnostics, well characterized plasma scenarios and validated numerical simulations of its turbulence dynamics, making it the ideal platform for the investigation of suprathermal ion transport. This Thesis presents three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam injected in turbulent TORPEX plasmas. The combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first principle numerical simulations reveals the general non-diffusive nature of the suprathermal ion transport. A precise characterization of their transport regime shows that, depending on their energies, suprathermal ions can experience either a super diffusive transport or a subdiffusive transport in the same background turbulence. The transport character is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma structures, which in turn depends on the ratio between the ion energy and the background plasma temperature. Time-resolved measurements reveal a clear difference in the intermittency of suprathermal ions time-traces depending on the transport regime they experience. Conditionally averaged measurements uncover the influence of

  18. Observation of multi-channel non-local transport in J-TEXT plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuejiang; Chen, Zhongyong; Yang, Zhoujun; Shi, Peng; Zhao, Kaijun; Diamond, Patrick H.; Kwon, JaeMin; Yan, Wei; Zhou, Hao; Pan, Xiaoming; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Zhiping; Yang, SeongMoo; Zhang, Chi; Li, Da; Dong, Yunbo; Wang, Lu; Ding, YongHua; Liang, Yunfeng; Hahn, SangHee; Jhang, HoGun; Na, Yong-Su

    2018-04-01

    In cold pulse experiments in J-TEXT, not only are rapid electron temperature increases in the core observed, but also steep rises in the inner density are found. Moreover, some evidence of acceleration of the core toroidal rotation is also observed during the non-local transport process of electron temperature. These new findings of cold pulse experiments in J-TEXT suggest that turbulence spreading is a possible mechanism for the non-local transport dynamics.

  19. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. González-Pinzón; R. Haggerty; M. Dentz

    2013-01-01

    We investigated scaling of conservative solute transport using temporal moment analysis of 98 tracer experiments (384 breakthrough curves) conducted in 44 streams located on five continents. The experiments span 7 orders of magnitude in discharge (10-3 to 103 m3/s), span 5 orders of magnitude in...

  20. Determination of transport and reaction swarm coefficients from the analysis of complex transient pulses from the pulsed Townsend experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekstein, A; De Urquijo, J; Rodríguez-Luna, J C; Juárez, A M; Ducasse, O

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper the interpretation and analysis of transient pulses from a pulsed Townsend experiment by solving the continuity equations of the charged carriers (electrons and ions) involved in the avalanche. The set of second order partial differential equations is solved by SIMAV, a simulator designed specifically for the pulsed Townsend avalanche. Complex situations involving processes such as electron detachment, ion-molecule reactions, Penning ionization and secondary electron emission from ion impact at the cathode, virtually impossible to solve analytically, are discussed here to illustrate the capability of the simulator to help explain the various reaction processes involved in the avalanche, and also to derive some of the transport and reaction coefficients.

  1. Reactive Transport in a Pipe in Soluble Rock: a Theoretical and Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Opolot, M.; Sousa, R.; Einstein, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive transport processes within the dominant underground flow pathways such as fractures can lead to the widening or narrowing of rock fractures, potentially altering the flow and transport processes in the fractures. A flow-through experiment was designed to study the reactive transport process in a pipe in soluble rock to serve as a simplified representation of a fracture in soluble rock. Assumptions were made to formulate the problem as three coupled, one-dimensional partial differential equations: one for the flow, one for the transport and one for the radius change due to dissolution. Analytical and numerical solutions were developed to predict the effluent concentration and the change in pipe radius. The positive feedback of the radius increase is captured by the experiment and the numerical model. A comparison between the experiment and the simulation results demonstrates the validity of the analytical and numerical models.

  2. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam

  3. How does fiction reading influence empathy? An experimental investigation on the role of emotional transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P.M.; Veltkamp, M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether fiction experiences change empathy of the reader. Based on transportation theory, it was predicted that when people read fiction, and they are emotionally transported into the story, they become more empathic. Two experiments showed that empathy was influenced

  4. Electron and impurity transport studies in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, D.

    2013-05-15

    In this thesis electron and impurity transport are studied in the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) located at CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. Understanding particle transport is primordial for future nuclear fusion power plants. Modeling of experiments in many specific plasma scenarios can help to understand the common elements of the physics at play and to interpret apparently contradictory experiments on the same machine and across different machines. The first part of this thesis deals with electron transport in TCV high confinement mode plasmas. It was observed that the electron density profile in these plasmas flatten when intense electron heating is applied, in contrast to observations on other machines where the increase of the profile peakedness was reported. It is shown with quasi-linear gyrokinetic simulations that this effect, usually interpreted as collisionality dependence, stems from the combined effect of many plasma parameters. The influence of the collisionality, electron to ion temperature ratio, the ratio of temperature gradients, and the Ware-pinch are studied with detailed parameter scans. It is shown that the complex interdependence of the various plasma parameters is greatly simplified when the simulation results are interpreted as a function of the average frequency of the main modes contributing to radial transport. In this way the model is able to explain the experimental results. It was also shown that the same basic understanding is at play in L-modes, H-modes and electron internal transport barriers. The second part of the thesis is devoted to impurity transport. A multi-purpose gas injection system is developed, commissioned and calibrated. It is shown that the system is capable of massive gas injections to provoke disruptions and delivering small puffs of gaseous impurities for perturbative transport experiments. This flexible tool is exploited in a series of impurity transport measurements with argon and neon injections. The impurities

  5. Electron and impurity transport studies in the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis electron and impurity transport are studied in the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) located at CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. Understanding particle transport is primordial for future nuclear fusion power plants. Modeling of experiments in many specific plasma scenarios can help to understand the common elements of the physics at play and to interpret apparently contradictory experiments on the same machine and across different machines. The first part of this thesis deals with electron transport in TCV high confinement mode plasmas. It was observed that the electron density profile in these plasmas flatten when intense electron heating is applied, in contrast to observations on other machines where the increase of the profile peakedness was reported. It is shown with quasi-linear gyrokinetic simulations that this effect, usually interpreted as collisionality dependence, stems from the combined effect of many plasma parameters. The influence of the collisionality, electron to ion temperature ratio, the ratio of temperature gradients, and the Ware-pinch are studied with detailed parameter scans. It is shown that the complex interdependence of the various plasma parameters is greatly simplified when the simulation results are interpreted as a function of the average frequency of the main modes contributing to radial transport. In this way the model is able to explain the experimental results. It was also shown that the same basic understanding is at play in L-modes, H-modes and electron internal transport barriers. The second part of the thesis is devoted to impurity transport. A multi-purpose gas injection system is developed, commissioned and calibrated. It is shown that the system is capable of massive gas injections to provoke disruptions and delivering small puffs of gaseous impurities for perturbative transport experiments. This flexible tool is exploited in a series of impurity transport measurements with argon and neon injections. The impurities

  6. Aespoe modelling task force - experiences of the site specific flow and transport modelling (in detailed and site scale)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, Gunnar [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Stroem, A.; Wikberg, P. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. , Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes was initiated in 1992. The Task Force shall be a forum for the organisations supporting the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Project to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Much emphasis is put on building of confidence in the approaches and methods in use for modelling of groundwater flow and nuclide migration in order to demonstrate their use for performance and safety assessment. The modelling work within the Task Force is linked to the experiments performed at the Aespoe Laboratory. As the first Modelling Task, a large scale pumping and tracer experiment called LPT2 was chosen. This was the final part of the characterisation work for the Aespoe site before the construction of the laboratory in 1990. The construction of the Aespoe HRL access tunnel caused an even larger hydraulic disturbance on a much larger scale than that caused by the LPT2 pumping test. This was regarded as an interesting test case for the conceptual and numerical models of the Aespoe site developed during Task No 1, and was chosen as the third Modelling Task. The aim of Task 3 can be seen from two different perspectives. The Aespoe HRL project saw it as a test of their ability to define a conceptual and structural model of the site that can be utilised by independent modelling groups and be transformed to a predictive groundwater flow model. The modelling groups saw it as a means of understanding groundwater flow in a large fractured rock volume and of testing their computational tools. A general conclusion is that Task 3 has served these purposes well. Non-sorbing tracers tests, made as a part of the TRUE-experiments were chosen as the next predictive modelling task. A preliminary comparison between model predictions made by the Aespoe Task Force and the experimental results, shows that most modelling teams predicted breakthrough from

  7. Operational experience in water chemistry of PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Rao, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    The chemistry related problems encountered in the moderator, primary heat transport systems, chemical control in the steam generators and the experience gained in the decontamination campaigns carried out in the primary heat transport systems of Indian PHWRs are highlighted in this paper. (author)

  8. Standard casks for the transport of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, P.

    1985-01-01

    During the past decade, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has developed, licensed and marketed a family of standard casks for the transport of spent fuel from LWR reactors to reprocessing plants and the ancillary equipments necessary for their operation and transport. A large number of these casks have been manufacturer under TRANSNUCLEAIRE supervision in different countries and are presently used for European and intercontinental transports. The main advantages of these casks are: - large payload for considered modes of transport, - moderate cost, - reliability due to the large experience gained by TRANSNUCLEAIRE as concerns fabrication and operation problems, - standardisation facilitating fabrication, operation and spare part supply [fr

  9. The new context for transport of radioactive and nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anne, C.; Galtier, J.

    2002-01-01

    The transportation of radioactive and nuclear materials involves all modes of transportation with a predominance for road and for air. It is but a minute fraction dangerous good transportation. Around 10 millions of radioactive packages are shipped annually all over the world of which ninety percent total corresponds to shipments of radioisotopes. In spite of the small volume transported, experience, evolution of transport means and technologies, the trend to constantly improve security and safety and public acceptance have modified the transport environment. During the last few years, new evolutions have applied to the transport of radioactive and nuclear materials in various fields and especially: - Safety - Security - Logistics means - Public acceptance - Quality Assurance. We propose to examine the evolution of these different fields and their impact on transportation methods and means. (authors)

  10. Suppressing Electron Turbulence and Triggering Internal Transport Barriers with Reversed Magnetic Shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jayson Luc

    2011-10-01

    Observations in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have found electron temperature gradients that greatly exceed the linear threshold for the onset for electron temperature gradient-driven (ETG) turbulence. These discharges, deemed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), coincide with a reversal in the shear of the magnetic field and with a reduction in electron-scale density fluctuations, qualitatively consistent with earlier gyrokinetic predictions. To investigate this phenomenon further, we numerically model electron turbulence in NSTX reversed-shear plasmas using the gyrokinetic turbulence code GYRO. These first-of-a-kind nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of NSTX e-ITBs confirm that reversing the magnetic shear can allow the plasma to reach electron temperature gradients well beyond the critical gradient for the linear onset of instability. This effect is very strong, with the nonlinear threshold for significant transport approaching three times the linear critical gradient in some cases, in contrast with moderate shear cases, which can drive significant ETG turbulence at much lower gradients. In addition to the experimental implications of this upshifted nonlinear critical gradient, we explore the behavior of ETG turbulence during reversed shear discharges. This work is supported by the SciDAC Center for the Study of Plasma Microturbulence, DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466, and used the resources of NCCS at ORNL and NERSC at LBNL. M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000).

  11. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  12. The Importance of Protons in Reactive Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of pH in aqueous chemistry is evident; yet, its role in reactive transport is complex. Consider a column flow experiment through silica glass beads. Take the column to be saturated and flowing with solution of a distinct pH. An instantaneous change in the influent solution pH can yield a breakthrough curve with both a rarefaction and shock component (composite wave). This behavior is unique among aqueous ions in transport and is more complex than intuition would tell. Analysis of the hyperbolic limit of this physical system can explain these first order transport phenomenon. This analysis shows that transport behavior is heavily dependent on the shape of the adsorption isotherm. Hence it is clear that accurate surface chemistry models are important in reactive transport. The proton adsorption isotherm has nonconstant concavity due to the proton's ability to partition into hydroxide. An eigenvalue analysis shows that an inflection point in the adsorption isotherm allows the development of composite waves. We use electrostatic surface complexation models to calculate realistic proton adsorption isotherms. Surface characteristics such as specific surface area, and surface site density were determined experimentally. We validate the model by comparison against silica glass bead flow through experiments. When coupled to surface complexation models, the transport equation captures the timing and behavior of breakthrough curves markedly better than with commonly used Langmuir assumptions. Furthermore, we use the adsorption isotherm to predict, a priori, the transport behavior of protons across pH composition space. Expansion of the model to multicomponent systems shows that proton adsorption can force composite waves to develop in the breakthrough curves of ions that would not otherwise exhibit such behavior. Given the abundance of reactive surfaces in nature and the nonlinearity of chemical systems, we conclude that building a greater understanding of

  13. On the sample transport time of a pneumatic transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Yoshihide

    1983-01-01

    The counts accumulated in measuring system are affected by the variations in transport time of the sample on cyclic activation experiments with a mechanical sample transfer system. In use of the pneumatic transfer system, which has been set up, the transport time is variable according to the differences as follows: The form, size and weight of samples, the pneumatic pressure and so on. Comprehending the relationships between the transpot time and these variable factors is essentially important to make experiments with this transfer system. (author)

  14. A Rapid Screen Technique for Estimating Nanoparticle Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantifying the mobility of engineered nanoparticles in hydrologic pathways from point of release to human or ecological receptors is essential for assessing environmental exposures. Column transport experiments are a widely used technique to estimate the transport parameters of ...

  15. A Simple Refining Technique of Coconut Oil for Small Holder Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugeng Triyono

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple refining equipment and process for small holder industries of edible coconut oil has beeninvestigated. The equipment consisted of 20-L filtering and NaOH neutralization bottles. Filtration wasintended to remove impurities such as gums and pigment, while neutralization was to remove free fattyacids (FFA and other non-fat materials. In the experiment, the crude coconut oil was found to have impurityof 0.16%, FFA of 8.02%, saponification number of 270, and water content of 0.33%. The results showed thateither granular activated carbon (GAC or zeolite filtration can be chosen individually to remove physicalimpurity. The GAC or zeolite-filtered coconut oil contained impurity less than the SNI standard of 0.05%.In term of FFA; however, the NaOH neutralized coconut oil did not meet the SNI standard of 0.3%. AfterNaOH neutralization, the GAC filtered oil contained 1.20% FFA; while the zeolite filtered oil contained1.32%. These FFA contents were definitely higher than the SNI standard, but could satisfy APCC standardfor grade IV coconut oil which is 5%. The refined coconut oils could also satisfy the SNI standard ofsaponification number which is 196 – 206 at minimum. In term of water content, either the filtered or theneutralized oil could also satisfy the SNI standard of 0.3%. In short, the proposed technique could helpfarmers refine their raw coconut oil, and hopefully improve its marketability.

  16. Transportation of radioactive materials routing analysis: The Nevada experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardila-Coulson, M.V.

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, the Nevada State Legislature passed a Bill requiring the Nevada Dept. of Transportation to develop and enforce a plan for highway routing of highway route controlled quantity shipments of radioactive materials and high-level radioactive waste. A large network with all the major highways in Nevada was created and used in a computer model developed by Sandia National Labs. Twenty-eight highway parameters that included geometrics, traffic characteristics, environment and special facilities were collected. Alternative routes were identified by minimizing primary parameters (population density and accident rates). An analysis using the US DOT Guidelines were performed to identify a preferred route from the alternative routes

  17. Liner Shipping Fleet Deployment with Sustainable Collaborative Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Du

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Facing sharp competition in the market for shipping companies, it is necessary to make reasonable and efficient decisions to optimize the container shipping line network so as to improve the shipping efficiency and reduce the transportation cost, as well as to realize the transportation sustainability. Therefore, the liner ship fleet deployment problem with collaborative transportation is proposed in this paper. This problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming model that takes collaborative transportation into consideration. The model includes fixed cost, variable cost, berth cost, transport cost, penalty, compensation cost, and so on. To achieve the sustainable development of collaborative transportation, the shipping companies could make a selection between the internal routes and the external routes to serve each task by comparing the distance between the above routes. A real Asia-Europe-Oceania numerical experiment shows that the proposed sustainable collaborative transportation model can be efficiently solved by C++ calling ILOG CPLEX. Results demonstrate that the optimized shipping line network with sustainable collaborative transportation can improve the service efficiency, as well as the service level of shipping companies.

  18. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Charge Heterogeneous Porous Media: Microfluidics Experiment and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Meng, X.; Guo, Z.; Zhang, C.; Nguyen, T. H.; Hu, D.; Ji, J.; Yang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Colloidal attachment on charge heterogeneous grains has significant environmental implications for transport of hazardous colloids, such as pathogens, in the aquifer, where iron, manganese, and aluminium oxide minerals are the major source of surface charge heterogeneity of the aquifer grains. A patchwise surface charge model is often used to describe the surface charge heterogeneity of the grains. In the patchwise model, the colloidal attachment efficiency is linearly correlated with the fraction of the favorable patches (θ=λ(θf - θu)+θu). However, our previous microfluidic study showed that the attachment efficiency of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum, a waterborne protozoan parasite, was not linear correlated with the fraction of the favorable patches (λ). In this study, we developed a pore scale model to simulate colloidal transport and attachment on charge heterogeneous grains. The flow field was simulated using the LBM method and colloidal transport and attachment were simulated using the Lagrange particle tracking method. The pore scale model was calibrated with experimental results of colloidal and oocyst transport in microfluidic devices and was then used to simulate oocyst transport in charge heterogeneous porous media under a variety of environmental relative conditions, i.e. the fraction of favorable patchwise, ionic strength, and pH. The results of the pore scale simulations were used to evaluate the effect of surface charge heterogeneity on upscaling of oocyst transport from pore to continuum scale and to develop an applicable correlation between colloidal attachment efficiency and the fraction of the favorable patches.

  19. porewater chemistry experiment at Mont Terri rock laboratory. Reactive transport modelling including bacterial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournassat, Christophe; Gaucher, Eric C.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Wersin, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An in-situ test in the Opalinus Clay formation, termed pore water Chemistry (PC) experiment, was run for a period of five years. It was based on the concept of diffusive equilibration whereby traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed off borehole. The main original focus was to obtain reliable data on the pH/pCO 2 of the pore water, but because of unexpected microbially- induced redox reactions, the objective was then changed to elucidate the biogeochemical processes happening in the borehole and to understand their impact on pH/pCO 2 and pH in the low permeability clay formation. The biologically perturbed chemical evolution of the PC experiment was simulated with reactive transport models. The aim of this modelling exercise was to develop a 'minimal-' model able to reproduce the chemical evolution of the PC experiment, i.e. the chemical evolution of solute inorganic and organic compounds (organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon etc...) that are coupled with each other through the simultaneous occurrence of biological transformation of solute or solid compounds, in-diffusion and out-diffusion of solute species and precipitation/dissolution of minerals (in the borehole and in the formation). An accurate description of the initial chemical conditions in the surrounding formation together with simplified kinetics rule mimicking the different phases of bacterial activities allowed reproducing the evolution of all main measured parameters (e.g. pH, TOC). Analyses from the overcoring and these simulations evidence the high buffer capacity of Opalinus clay regarding chemical perturbations due to bacterial activity. This pH buffering capacity is mainly attributed to the carbonate system as well as to the clay surfaces reactivity. Glycerol leaching from the pH-electrode might be the primary organic source responsible for

  20. Transient particle transport studies at the W7-AS stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the crucial problems in fusion research is the understanding of the transport of particles and heat in plasmas relevant for energy production. Extensive experimental transport studies have unraveled many details of heat transport in tokamaks and stellarators. However, due to larger experimental difficulties, the properties of particle transport have remained much less known. In particular, very few particle transport studies have been carried out in stellarators. This thesis summarises the transient particle transport experiments carried out at the Wendelstein 7-Advanced Stellarator (W7-AS). The main diagnostics tool was a 10-channel microwave interferometer. A technique for reconstructing the electron density profiles from the multichannel interferometer data was developed and implemented. The interferometer and the reconstruction software provide high quality electron density measurements with high temporal and sufficient spatial resolution. The density reconstruction is based on regularization methods studied during the development work. An extensive program of transient particle transport studies was carried out with the gas modulation method. The experiments resulted in a scaling expression for the diffusion coefficient. Transient inward convection was found in the edge plasma. The role of convection is minor in the core plasma, except at higher heating power, when an outward directed convective flux is observed. Radially peaked density profiles were found in discharges free of significant central density sources. Such density profiles are usually observed in tokamaks, but never before in W7-AS. Existence of an inward pinch is confirmed with two independent transient transport analysis methods. The density peaking is possible if the plasma is heated with extreme off-axis Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH), when the temperature gradient vanishes in the core plasma, and if the gas puffing level is relatively low. The transport of plasma particles and heat

  1. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-01-01

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R col is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R col that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k att , and detachment rate constants, k det , of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R col uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly

  2. Combatting workplace aggression in detainee transport: A Dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasthuizen, K.M.; Paanakker, H.L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – In Dutch detainee care custodial transport police officers experience high levels of aggression and violence from detainees. Being a first of its kind in the Netherlands, the purpose of this paper is to unravel the true nature and origins of such workplace aggression against transport

  3. The transport safety of radioactive matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landier, D.; Louet, Ch.A.; Robert, Ch.; Binet, J.; Malesys, P.; Pourade, C.; Le Meur, A.; Robert, M.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.Y.; Hello, E.; Laumond, A.; Regnault, Ph.; Gourlay, M.; Bruhl, G.; Malvache, P.; Dumesnil, J.; Cohen, B.; Sert, G.; Pain, M.; Green, L.; Hartenstein, M.; Stewart, J.; Cottens, E.; Liebens, M.; Marignac, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Since the control of transport of radioactive materials was given to A.S.N. 10 years ago, A.S.N. has strengthened the radioactive material transport inspections, in particular of the designers, manufacturers, carriers and consignors. A.S.N. has implemented INES scale for incidents during transport. It has participated as much as possible to IAEA working groups in order to improve the international regulatory framework. And, supported by I.R.S.N., A.S.N. has performed a periodic safety review of existing package models and has approved new models incorporating innovative design features. Finally, A.S.N. has tested its emergency responses to procedures to an accident involving the transport of radioactive materials. All these actions taken together have led to improvement in and reinforcement of the safety culture among the transport operators; this has been acknowledged by a recent audit T.R.A.N.S.A.S. performed by IAEA. In spite of all these actions, there are not approved by the competent authority. As A.S.N. is in charge of every field in radioprotection, this should help to intensify the control. In addition, the different kinds of transport are also tackled as rail transport with S.N.C.F. radiological risk training, air transport through nuclear medicine. Some experience feedback are given such radioactive waste transport to the storage facilities in the Aube or how to protect the population after a nuclear transport incident with the O.R.S.E.C.-T.M.S. plans. (N.C.)

  4. Fission Product Transport and Source Terms in HTRs: Experience from AVR Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Moormann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission products deposited in the coolant circuit outside of the active core play a dominant role in source term estimations for advanced small pebble bed HTRs, particularly in design basis accidents (DBA. The deposited fission products may be released in depressurization accidents because present pebble bed HTR concepts abstain from a gas tight containment. Contamination of the circuit also hinders maintenance work. Experiments, performed from 1972 to 88 on the AVR, an experimental pebble bed HTR, allow for a deeper insight into fission product transport behavior. The activity deposition per coolant pass was lower than expected and was influenced by fission product chemistry and by presence of carbonaceous dust. The latter lead also to inconsistencies between Cs plate out experiments in laboratory and in AVR. The deposition behavior of Ag was in line with present models. Dust as activity carrier is of safety relevance because of its mobility and of its sorption capability for fission products. All metal surfaces in pebble bed reactors were covered by a carbonaceous dust layer. Dust in AVR was produced by abrasion in amounts of about 5 kg/y. Additional dust sources in AVR were ours oil ingress and peeling of fuel element surfaces due to an air ingress. Dust has a size of about 1  m, consists mainly of graphite, is partly remobilized by flow perturbations, and deposits with time constants of 1 to 2 hours. In future reactors, an efficient filtering via a gas tight containment is required because accidents with fast depressurizations induce dust mobilization. Enhanced core temperatures in normal operation as in AVR and broken fuel pebbles have to be considered, as inflammable dust concentrations in the gas phase.

  5. Transportable Vitrification System: Operational experience gained during vitrification of simulated mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, J.C.; Burket, P.R.; Crowley, D.A.; Hansen, E.K.; Jantzen, C.M.; Smith, M.E.; Singer, R.P.; Young, S.R.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Overcamp, T.J.; Pence, I.W. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a large-scale, fully-integrated, transportable, vitrification system for the treatment of low-level nuclear and mixed wastes in the form of sludges, soils, incinerator ash, and similar waste streams. The TVS was built to demonstrate the vitrification of actual mixed waste at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is working with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) to apply field scale vitrification to actual mixed waste at Oak Ridge Reservation's (ORR) K-25 Site. Prior to the application of the TVS to actual mixed waste it was tested on simulated K-25 B and C Pond waste at Clemson University. This paper describes the results of that testing and preparations for the demonstration on actual mixed waste

  6. An energy-optimal solution for transportation control of cranes with double pendulum dynamics: Design and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Wu, Yiming; Chen, He; Fang, Yongchun

    2018-03-01

    Underactuated cranes play an important role in modern industry. Specifically, in most situations of practical applications, crane systems exhibit significant double pendulum characteristics, which makes the control problem quite challenging. Moreover, most existing planners/controllers obtained with standard methods/techniques for double pendulum cranes cannot minimize the energy consumption when fulfilling the transportation tasks. Therefore, from a practical perspective, this paper proposes an energy-optimal solution for transportation control of double pendulum cranes. By applying the presented approach, the transportation objective, including fast trolley positioning and swing elimination, is achieved with minimized energy consumption, and the residual oscillations are suppressed effectively with all the state constrains being satisfied during the entire transportation process. As far as we know, this is the first energy-optimal solution for transportation control of underactuated double pendulum cranes with various state and control constraints. Hardware experimental results are included to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach, whose superior performance is reflected by being experimentally compared with some comparative controllers.

  7. SITHA program for simulating hadron transport in the 100-1010eV energy range. Simulation of neutron transport with E6 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniehl', A.V.; Dushin, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    The methods for simulation of neutron transport with Z<20 MeV used in the SITHA (simulation transport hadron) program, the original library of group microconstants (175 groups) with subgroup description of resonance range and a set of programs for its creation are described. The results of a number of integral experiments are discussed

  8. Broad survey of radioactive waste transports and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, P.T.

    1986-01-01

    This survey reviews Radioactive Waste (RW) transports in different countries, giving the origins, amounts, distances and modes of transport for the different RW categories currently moved. It appears that: present transport experience concerns mainly Low and Medium level Wastes (LMW) and Spent nuclear Fuel (SF); RW transports are implemented in compliance with IAEA recommendations which proved particularly helpful to gain public acceptance; the bulk of LMW is transported as Low Specific Activity (LSA) materials (i.e. with packaging requirements just equivalent to those needed for their disposal) and SF as well as liquid RW are transported in 'type B' packagings which withstand severe accident conditions; records indicate that transport worker irradiation is kept much below allowable limits and that accidents during RW transports did not cause significant release of activity to environment; and the cost of RW transports including insurances, is small compared to that of RW processing and disposal. Therefore, one may comment that RW movements are by no means slowed down by transport problems and just follow the demand which in some countries may be delayed by reasons linked to RW disposal strategy or its public acceptance. This survey presents also an assessment of RW transports until the end of this century

  9. STUDY OF THE EXPERIENCE OF USE OF INTERMODAL TECHNOLOGY IN THE ORGANIZATION OF PASSENGER TRANSPORTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Andreevna Paramonova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the practice of applying intermodal technology and a single transportation document in the organization of passenger transportations, contains a review of the projects on the use of intermodal technology from theoretical point of view, an analysis of the implemented models.

  10. Sediment transport through self-adjusting, bedrock-walled waterfall plunge pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-05-01

    Many waterfalls have deep plunge pools that are often partially or fully filled with sediment. Sediment fill may control plunge-pool bedrock erosion rates, partially determine habitat availability for aquatic organisms, and affect sediment routing and debris flow initiation. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model to describe sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools. Here we develop an analytical model to predict steady-state plunge-pool depth and sediment-transport capacity by combining existing jet theory with sediment transport mechanics. Our model predicts plunge-pool sediment-transport capacity increases with increasing river discharge, flow velocity, and waterfall drop height and decreases with increasing plunge-pool depth, radius, and grain size. We tested the model using flume experiments under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. The model and experiments show that through morphodynamic feedbacks, plunge pools aggrade to reach shallower equilibrium pool depths in response to increases in imposed sediment supply. Our theory for steady-state pool depth matches the experiments with an R2 value of 0.8, with discrepancies likely due to model simplifications of the hydraulics and sediment transport. Analysis of 75 waterfalls suggests that the water depths in natural plunge pools are strongly influenced by upstream sediment supply, and our model provides a mass-conserving framework to predict sediment and water storage in waterfall plunge pools for sediment routing, habitat assessment, and bedrock erosion modeling.

  11. Safe transport of radioactive materials in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shinawy, R.M.K.

    1994-01-01

    In Egypt the national regulations for safe transport of radioactive materials (RAM) are based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations. In addition, regulations for the safe transport of these materials through the Suez Canal (SC) were laid down by the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) and the Suez Canal Authority (SCA). They are continuously updated to meet the increased knowledge and the gained experience. The technical and protective measures taken during transport of RAM through SC are mentioned. Assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials through the Suez Canal using the INTERTRAN computer code was carried out in cooperation with IAEA. The transported activities and empty containers, the number of vessels carrying RAM through the canal from 1963 and 1991 and their nationalities are also discussed. The protective measures are mentioned. A review of the present situation of the radioactive wastes storage facilities at the Atomic Energy site at Inshas is given along with the regulation for safe transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes. (Author)

  12. Current issues in the transport of radioactive waste and spent fuel: work by the World Nuclear Transport Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neau, H-J.; Bonnardel-Azzarelli, B. [World Nuclear Transport Inst., London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Various kinds of radioactive waste are generated from nuclear power and fuel cycle facilities. These materials have to be treated, stored and eventually sent to a repository site. Transport of wastes between these various stages is crucial for the sustainable utilization of nuclear energy. The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SSR-6) have, for many decades, provided a safe and efficient framework for radioactive materials transport and continue to do so. However, some shippers have experienced that in the transport of certain specific radioactive wastes, difficulties can be encountered. For example, some materials produced in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are unique in terms of composition or size and can be difficult to characterize as surface contaminated objects (SCO) or homogeneous. One way WNTI (World Nuclear Transport Institute) helps develop transport methodologies is through the use of Industry Working Groups, bringing together WNTI members with common interests, issues and experiences. The Back-End Transport Industry Working Group focuses on the following issues currently. - Characterization of Waste: techniques and methods to classify wastes - Large Objects: slightly contaminated large objects (ex. spent steam generators) transport - Dual Use Casks: transportable storage casks for spent nuclear fuels, including the very long term storage of spent fuel - Fissile Exceptions: new fissile exceptions provisions of revised TS-R-1 (SSR-6) The paper gives a broad overview of current issues for the packaging and transport of radioactive wastes and the associated work of the WNTI. (author)

  13. Editorial of the Special Issue “Intelligent Transportation Systems”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Alam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Transportation systems are very important in modern life; therefore, massive research efforts have been devoted to this field of study in the recent past. Effective vehicular connectivity techniques can significantly enhance efficiency of travel, reduce traffic incidents and improve safety, and alleviate the impact of congestion, constituting the so-called Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS experience.[...

  14. New developments in transportation for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondanel, J.L. [Transnucleaire, F-75008 Paris (France)

    1998-07-01

    For more than 30 years, Transnucleaire has been performing safely a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied numerous packagings for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive materials: for front-end and back-end products and for power and research reactors. Since the last meeting held in Bruges, Transnucleaire has been continuously involved in transportation activities for fresh and irradiated materials for research reactors. We are pleased to take the opportunity in this meeting to share with reactor operators, official bodies and other partners, the on-going developments in transportation and associated services. Special attention will be paid to the starting of transports of MTR spent fuel elements to the La Hague reprocessing plant where COGEMA offers reprocessing services on a long-term basis to reactors operators. Detailed information is provided on regulatory issues, which may affect transport activities: evolution of the regulations, real experiences of recent transportation and development of new packaging designs. Options and solutions will be proposed by Transnucleaire to improve the situation for continuation of national and international transports at an acceptable price whilst maintaining an ultimate level of safety (author)

  15. Feasibility study of a microwave or far-infrared scattering experiment to measure small scale turbulence and anomalous transport in J.E.T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koechlin, F.; Olivain, J.; Gresillon, D.; Truc, A.

    1981-03-01

    In the first part, we make a rapid review of what can be expected as low frequency turbulence in J.E.T. This is to define the parameters of the density fluctuations which can be expected. A method to deduce the anomalous transport is described. In the second part, the physical problems of measuring these parameters by microwave or far-infrared scattering are outlined. In the third part, a preliminary study of a microwave scattering experiment at lambda approximately 1.3 mm is made. In the fourth part, a F.I.R. laser experiment at 10.6 μm is also proposed to perform the same measurements. In this last case, an estimation of the thermal nature of the plasma emission could be made, in order to eventually extend the diagnostic to the ion temperature measurement

  16. Regulations of safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, R.J.; Sumathi, E.

    2017-01-01

    BARC is a multi-disciplinary nuclear research organisation with facilities located at various parts of the country. The nuclear and radiological facilities in BARC include fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear research reactors, radiological laboratories, nuclear recycle facilities, waste management facilities and other associated facilities. RAdioactive Material (RAM) such as fresh nuclear fuel, irradiated fuel, radioactive sources, vitrified high level wastes, special nuclear material etc., are transported between these facilities either within the controlled premises or in public domain. In BARC the regulatory approval for the packages used for transport of RAM is issued by BARC Safety Council (BSC). Competent Authority for issuing the design approval for the BARC packages in public domain is Director, BARC. In this aspect BSC is assisted by Safety Review Committee-Transport of Radioactive Material (SRC-TRM) constituted by BSC entrusted with the mandate to ensure the packages are designed, manufactured and transported in accordance with the current regulations. This article summarizes the regulatory requirements for transport of RAM and experience in BARC facilities

  17. Trans-European transport networks influence on the regional development and urban systems: Serbian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Maksin-Mićić Marija

    2004-01-01

    The trans-European transport network has different effects at macro-regional, mezzo-regional and micro-regional level, and on urban systems development, and its effectiveness rises at the lower regional levels. Possible approaches to the trans-European transport network impact and effect survey and policy options have been pointed out. The importance of increased accessibility and mobility for regional expansion and for more balanced and polycentric system of city networks has been underlined...

  18. Radionuclide retardation project at GTS - An overview of lessons learned and ongoing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeri, A.

    2001-01-01

    The joint Nagra/JNC Radionuclide Migration Programme has now been ongoing for more than 15 years in Nagra's Grimsel Test Site (GTS). The main aim of the programme has been the direct testing of radionuclide transport models in as realistic a manner as possible. The understanding and modelling of both the processes and the structures influencing radionuclide transport/retardation in fractured granitic host rocks have matured as has the experimental technology, which has contributed to develop confidence in the applicability of the underlying research models in a repository performance assessment. In this paper, three in situ experiments which were carried out in a discrete granitic shear zone are briefly presented: The Migration Experiment (MI), the Excavation Experiment (EP) and the ongoing Colloid and Radionuclide Retardation Experiment (CRR). Each project expanded on the experimental experience and research results from the preceding experiment. MI provided a sound data base of in situ tracer breakthrough curves which was used to derive relevant transport parameters by inverse modelling in order to enhance the capability for predictive modelling of tracer transport in a granitic shear zone. The Excavation Project (EP) then focussed on the excavation of the dipole flow field in order to describe the flow paths within the shear zone dipole and the retardation behaviour of sorbing radionuclides that are relevant to post-closure safety. The ongoing CRR experiment actually investigates the influence of bentonite colloids on the radionuclide transport behaviour through a fractured granitic host rock. Again, the experience in planning and handling of complex tracer field experiments gained in the proceeding experiments will be availed. The methodology adopted for the geological and hydrological characterisation of water-conducting features and the simplification of this characterisation for modelling purposes proved to be indeed effective on the modelling of

  19. The effect of transport on the quality of rabbit meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Składanowska-Baryza, Joanna; Ludwiczak, Agnieszka; Pruszyńska-Oszmałek, Ewa; Kołodziejski, Paweł; Bykowska, Marta; Stanisz, Marek

    2018-04-01

    The analyzed material included 40 hybrid rabbits slaughtered at the age of 90 days. The control group was transported directly after weaning, while the transport group was transported directly prior to slaughter. The experiment was designed to assess the transport stress, carcass and meat quality implications, taking into account the muscle type and sex. The transported animals were characterized by a higher level of blood cortisol, glucose and triglycerides (P meat were affected by the transport (P meat from the control group was characterized by greater plasticity compared to the transport group (P = 0.003). The chemical composition of rabbit meat was not changed by the effect of transport (P = 0.643-0.979). To conclude, the quality traits of meat from the transported hybrid rabbits clearly indicated the development of dark firm and dry-like lower quality of meat. © 2018 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. Radial transport in the Elmo Bumpy Torus in collisionless electron regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.; Spong, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    One important area of disagreement between radial transport theory and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) experiment has been the degree of collisionality of the toroidal plasma electrons. Experiment shows relatively warm electrons (kTsub(e) approximately 300-600eV) and collisionless scaling, i.e. energy confinement increasing with temperature. But results of early one-dimensional (1-D), neoclassical transport models with radially inward pointing electric fields are limited to relatively cool electrons (kTsub(e) approximately 100-200eV) and collisional scaling. In this paper these early results are extended to include lowest-order effects of ion diffusion in regions where poloidal drift frequencies are small. The effects of direct, or non-diffusive, losses in such regions are neglected along with the effects of finite radial electric fields on electron transport coefficients and of self-consistent poloidal electric fields on ion transport coefficients. Results show that solutions in the collisionless electron regime do exist. Furthermore, when the effects of finite electron ring beta on magnetic fields near the plasma edge are included, these solutions occur at power levels consistent with experiment. (author)

  1. Transport and health: a look at three Latin American cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Janeth Mosquera; Reis, Rodrigo S; Frank, Lawrence D; Ramirez-Marrero, Farah A; Welle, Benjamin; Arriaga Cordero, Eugenio; Mendez Paz, Fabian; Crespo, Carlos; Dujon, Veronica; Jacoby, Enrique; Dill, Jennifer; Weigand, Lynn; Padin, Carlos M

    2013-04-01

    Transport is associated with environmental problems, economic losses, health and social inequalities. A number of European and US cities have implemented initiatives to promote multimodal modes of transport. In Latin America changes are occurring in public transport systems and a number of projects aimed at stimulating non-motorized modes of transport (walking and cycling) have already been implemented. Based on articles from peer-reviewed academic journals, this paper examines experiences in Bogotá (Colombia), Curitiba (Brazil), and Santiago (Chile), and identifies how changes to the transport system contribute to encourage active transportation. Bus rapid transit, ciclovias, bike paths/lanes, and car use restriction are initiatives that contribute to promoting active transportation in these cities. Few studies have been carried out on the relationship between transport and physical activity. Car ownership continues to increase. The public health sector needs to be a stronger activist in the transport policy decision-making process to incorporate health issues into the transport agenda in Latin America.

  2. Management of the process of nuclear transport; Gestion del proceso de transporte nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Requejo, P.

    2015-07-01

    Since 1996 ETSA is the only Spanish logistics operator specialized on servicing the nuclear and radioactive industry. Nowadays ETSA has some technological systems specifically designed for the management of nuclear transports. These tools have been the result of the analysis of multiple factors involved in nuclear shipments, of ETSAs wide experience as a logistics operator and the search for continuous improvement. (Author)

  3. Status of Philippine regulatory infrastructure for the safe transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parami, V.K.; De Jesus, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some regulatory practices and experiences of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in ensuring safe transport of radioactive materials. The regulation and licensing the use of radioactive materials started in 1958. The number of packages containing radioactive materials transported into and within the country has increased with the increase number of licensees. During the period 2000-2002, the total number of licensees is 293, 311 and 311 respectively. The PNRI issues certificates of release and certificate of transport/authority to transport. Based on the data of certificates, the topmost sealed source shipments from abroad, mostly in type A package, are 192 Ir and 125 I for brachytherapy. For unsealed sources, also mostly in type A package, the topmost radioactive materials are 99m Tc (generators), 131 I, 201 Tl mainly for medical diagnosis. From the data on certificates of transport, the total number of packages inspected for the period 2000-2002 is 464, 577 and 747 respectively. The experiences in the enforcement of the transport regulations and the implication of issuing certificates of release and transport are discussed and recommendations are presented. (Authors)

  4. Striking the right chord: moving music increases psychological transportation and behavioral intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, Madelijn; de Bruin, Hanka L; de Ruiter, Linde C; Jonkers, Wouter

    2015-03-01

    Three experiments among university students (N = 372) investigated the persuasive power of moving (i.e., intensely emotional and "chills"-evoking) music in audio-visual advertising. Although advertisers typically aim to increase elaborate processing of the message, these studies illustrate that the persuasive effect of moving music is based on increased narrative transportation ("getting lost" in the ad's story), which reduces critical processing. In Experiment 1, moving music increased transportation and some behavioral intentions (e.g., to donate money). Experiment 2 experimentally increased the salience of manipulative intent of the advertiser, and showed that moving music reduces inferences of manipulative intent, leading in turn to increased behavioral intentions. Experiment 3 tested boundary effects, and showed that moving music fails to increase behavioral intentions when the salience of manipulative intent is either extremely high (which precludes transportation) or extremely low (which precludes reduction of inferences of manipulative intent). Moving music did not increase memory performance, beliefs, and explicit attitudes, suggesting that the influence is affect-based rather cognition-based. Together, these studies illustrate that moving music reduces inferences of manipulation and increases behavioral intentions by transporting viewers into the story of the ad. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Coupled transport and chemistry in clay stone studied by advective displacement: experiments and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Bailly, C.; Ribet, S.; Perrigaud, K.; Baty, V.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication entered in this record. For assessing the mass transfer resistance of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock formation in case of implementing a nuclear waste repository, various strongly coupled processes need to be understood and quantified both in near and far field: multi-species diffusion/advection, mineral/pore water interaction, interaction with the waste matrix and engineered barrier material, radionuclide retention, colloid transport, pore water chemistry evolution etc. To study many of these processes in their interrelationship simultaneously, a series of high pressure stainless steel advection cell was designed and clay cores from different locations of different calcite and clay contents were m