WorldWideScience

Sample records for thatch

  1. Introductory guide to thatching

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Long, K

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Thatch has been used as a roofing material from the earliest times. The basic tools of the thatcher's craft have not changed over hundreds of years. Thatching is a craft that is traditionally handed down from father to son....

  2. Experiments in Robotic Thatching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buthke, Jan; Trempe Jr., Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    as Catalyst.” The intent of this project log is to show the process of design and fabrication of an installation for the exhibition. The project experiments with translating the traditional craft of thatching into a computer aided process using digital fabrication methods on the six-axis robot. Our goal...... was to develop and fabricate a spatial structure in 1:1 which will be exhibited inside the schools exhibition gallery at Ventura Lambrate during Milan’s Design Week 2016. “Consciously and unconsciously we have inherited traditions acquired from our family and friends. Traditions, resulting in customs and habits......, are passed on from generation to generation. And so traditions have found their origin within cultures, families, friendships and personalities. Traditions are everywhere, and form an important source of inspiration for today’s designers.” - Thinking Tradition, Overall theme at The Ventura Lambrate 2016...

  3. Simulation of The Heat Transfer Process Inside The Thatch Walls with The Aim of Saving Energy in The Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Baseri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The insulation is one of the emphasized methods in recent years to reduce energy consumption in buildings. As an insulator, thatch has the advantages such as the accessibility of the site, the least energy consumption in its construction (low cost, recyclability and compatible with the nature and the environment. The aim of this study is determining of the heat transfer coefficient and thatch mechanical properties So that due to its advantages it used as insulation and thereby reducing energy consumption in buildings considered and used. In this study, the heat transfer process in a cylindrical turn of thatch was studied. In the conducted experiments the temperature changes inside a cylinder turn were determined for different values of the ratio of the Straw to the used soil and then the obtained results were simulated using the version 2.4 of the COMSOL software. The compressive strength and mechanical properties of thatch were tested. By increasing the consumed Straw weight of 50 to 90 kg per 1 cubic meter of soil, the heat conductivity coefficient from about 1.1 decreased to about 0.3 (W/m K, the contraction percentage decreased and the porous, the compressive strength and the thatch deformability increased in the failure. Thermal insulation and the mechanical properties of the thatch were improved by the mixing of appropriate ratio of straw to soil in the construction of thatch. It can be used in the plaster of the walls and the internal and external ceilings of the building.

  4. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  5. the place of quinolones in the treatment of enteric fevers in the 21st ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Jombo

    cement plastering, and 54 (20%) lived in mud-walled houses with thatch roofing. (Table 2). Table 2: Housing Structure of TB patients Studied in Calabar. Type of house. Type of Flooring. Presence of ceiling. Concrete Mud wall with zinc. Mud with cement plastering. Thatch. Cement over mud. Concrete. Mud. Yes. No. 132.

  6. Effect of Sun-Drying on Some Quality Characteristics of Sweet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Lake regions of Tanzania sun drying of sweet potatoes is normally done on thatched roofs after peeling and slicing the sweet potato tubers into chips. Future use of alternative drying surfaces including corrugated iron roofs may be practised as thatched roof houses are being slowly replaced with corrugated iron roof ...

  7. Assessing the societal benefits of river restoration using the ecosystem services approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaat, Jan; Ansink, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The success of river restoration was estimated using the ecosystem services approach. In eight pairs of restored–unrestored reaches and floodplains across Europe, we quantified provisioning (agricultural products, wood, reed for thatching, infiltrated drinking water), regulating (flooding and

  8. SEED-BORNE MYCOFLORA OF LOCAL AND IMPROVED WHEAT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2012-12-02

    Dec 2, 2012 ... construction material for roofing thatch. However, wheat is continuously attacked by insect .... pathology. First edition. Pp2-18. Kora, C., McDonald, M.R. and Boland, G.J. (2005):. Occurrence of fungal pathogens of carrot from wooden boxes used for storage. Plant. Pathology, 54:663-670. Kutama, A.S. and ...

  9. Physico-chemical and bacteriological quality of rainwater in Egbema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physico-chemical and bacteriological quality of rainwater in Egbema was determined with samples harvested directly, from zinc roof, thatched roof and asbestos roof, at different periods of the rainy season namely, Early, peak and late rains. The values of the physico-chemical parameters were on the higher side at the early ...

  10. Performance Evaluation of a Biomass Stove Using Particulate Matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In most developing countries like Nigeria, the use of biomass cooking stove is predominant. This is often done in a poorly ventilated kitchen or thatched houses sometimes occupied by up to 3-7 households. Researchers have proved that smoke and other emissions resulting from fuel wood in traditional stoves have led to ...

  11. Investigations on Risk Factors for Malaria in Rufiji District, Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generally, house constructed using mud,grass, palm walls, and roofs made of grass/palm thatch, houses with no or openwindows and without mosquito gauze and houses with open eaves and lowutilization of bed nets (treated and untreated) were common over the entire studyarea. Of the 2,423 houses walls examined; ...

  12. Foliar anatomical study of Thaumatococcus daniellii (Benth.) Benth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    useful in roof thatching as well as making cushion for sleeping mats (Terashima and. Ichikawa, 2003). There are other numerous examples of disposable utensils made of ... There is a dark green region along the mid-rib of all M. macrostachyum studied and again they have big and robust size when compared with T.

  13. Evaluation of various substrates and supplements for biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different substrates namely wheat straw (Triticum aestivum), maize stover (Zea mays L), thatch grass (Hyparrhenia filipendula) and oil/protein rich supplements (maize bran, cottonseed hull [Gossypium hirsutum]) on biological efficiency of two oyster mushroom ...

  14. Grain and straw for whole plant: implications for crop management and genetic improvement strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiere, J.B.; Joshi, A.L.; Seetharam, A.; Oosting, S.J.; Goodchild, A.V.; Deinum, B.; Keulen, van H.

    2004-01-01

    Straws and stovers are often called `by-products` of grain production even though they are increasingly important, e.g. for animal feed, thatching, soil improvement, mushroom production and industrial use. As a result, plant breeders, agronomists, economists and animal nutritionists have to pay more

  15. Ascosphaera callicarpa, a new species of bee-loving fungus, with a key to the Genus for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wynns, Anja Amtoft; Eilenberg, Jørgen; Jensen, Annette Bruun

    2013-01-01

    named Ascosphaera callicarpa, is common on the larval feces of the solitary bee Chelostoma florisomne which nests in the Phragmites reeds of thatched roofs in Europe. Because collections of Ascosphaera from wild bees are scarce and because little is known about the ecology and distribution...

  16. Estimating direct use value of Kilombero Ramsar site based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The largest contribution came from rice production (56.6%), sugarcane production (20.8%), forest products (13.2%), fishing (2.9%), livestock (2.6%), bush meat (0.5%), brick making (1%) and thatch grass (2.1%). This information can be used in designing management options associated with costs and benefits involved in ...

  17. Phytochemistry and anti-microbial evaluation of Thaumatococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaves of T. danielli are mostly used as food wrappers, and for thatching roofs in the rural and sub-urban areas of south-western Nigeria. Phytochemistry of the leaf extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, saponins, anthraquinones, cardenolides and steroidal nucleus compounds. Thin layer chromatography of ...

  18. AFRREV LALIGENS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Department of Igbo, African and Chinese Studies. Nnamdi Azikiwe University,. Awka, Nigeria ... realism as the reflection of nature or reality as completely as it is, that is without bringing idealism into play. .... making baskets, ropes, carving, moulding, and thatch roof construction etc. Basden (1982:177) states that women are ...

  19. A DIURNAL REFLECTANCE MODEL USING GRASS: SURFACE-SUBSTRATE INTERACTION AND INVERSE SOLUTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accuracy of using remote sensing data from earth orbiting radiometers can be improved by using a model that helps to separate the green-fraction in a canopy reflectance () from thatch and soil background, accounts for their diurnal changes, and inverts to a solution of a biop...

  20. A diurnal reflectance model using grass: Surface-substrate interaction and inverse solution - October 16, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report an analysis of canopy reflectance (ρ) experiment, using hand-held radiometer to measure distribution of biomass in a grass field. The analysis: 1) separates the green-fraction from thatch and soil background, 2) accounts for the changing diurnal ρ with the sun elevation...

  1. Potential use of bendiocarb (Ficam VC) for malaria control in an area of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, S M; Kanyimo, K H; Masendu, H

    1991-12-01

    Ficam (bendiocarb) was tested for its residual efficacy and irritation in malaria vector control by using a laboratory bred colony of Anopheles arabiensis. In the study area, the insecticide remained active for up to 8 wk (96% mortality) on thatch. In similar, especially constructed huts, 74% mortality was achieved up to 20 wk on mud compared with up to 100% on thatch. In the special huts, release/capture studies indicated that the lethal effect of Ficam on the insects was more pronounced than its irritant effect. This was shown by the low recapture numbers in exit traps as compared with the hut-floor mortalities. The implications of these findings in relation to studies elsewhere and the potential of Ficam use in malaria control are discussed.

  2. socio-economic risk factors for severe protein energy malnutrition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-09-01

    Sep 1, 2000 ... malnourished and well nourished children. Variable. Cases. Controls Odds 95%. P value. (n=66) (n=66) ratio confidence intervals. House ownership. Yes. 28. 30. No. 38. 36. 1.13. 0.54-2.39. 0.86. Type of roof. Metal. 52. 55. Thatch. 14. 11. 0.74. 0.28-1.94. 0.66. Type of wall. Mud. 46. 32. Concrete. 20. 34.

  3. Thermal-hydraulic code selection for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Bogaard, J.P.A. van den

    1995-06-01

    In order to study the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the thermal-hydraulic computer codes RELAP5, MELCOR, THATCH, MORECA, and VSOP are considered at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. This report presents the selection of the most appropriate codes. To cover the range of relevant accidents, a suite of three codes is recommended for analyses of HTR-M and MHTGR reactors. (orig.).

  4. Breaking the Cycle of Poverty in Ethiopia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Nancy Minogue

    group as the name might suggest, but the lowest tier of civil administration, equivalent to a village.) About 5 000 people live in the 25 square kilometres that comprise Yubdo. Legabato, making their homes in tukuls, one-room huts of mud walls and thatched roofs. “There is quite a lot of poverty at the top [of the slopes],” says ...

  5. Relationship between Cultural Factors and Nematodes on Merion Kentucky Bluegrass

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Ronald F.; Wagner, Richard E.; Halisky, Philip M.

    1992-01-01

    A 2-year study was conducted on Merion Kentucky bluegrass turf (Poa pratensis) to identify potential relationships among seasonal population dynamics of nematodes, chemical applications, thatch, tillering, dollar spot caused by Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, clipping weight, and other factors. Numbers of Tylenchorhynchus maximus determined during June were inversely related to the wet weight of grass from May. One or more monthly counts of Paratylenchus hamatus, Criconemella rusium, and T. maximus ...

  6. Application of natural fibre composites in construction: a research case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available materials (based on straw, hemp, cotton, flax, sisal and sugar cane fibres), paints, floor coverings, geotextiles, thatch, biopolymers and bio composites including board products, and starches for packaging. However, the report suggested... would do much to remove the volatility and risk associated with the agricultural sector through the differentiation of new products and the diversification of non-food crops. Third, the report noted that technological progress in the building...

  7. Pyrethroid use-malaria control and individual applications by households for other pests and home garden use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, Maria Luisa; Eljarrat, Ethel; Manaca, Maria N; Dobaño, Carlota; Barcelo, Damia; Sunyer, Jordi; Alonso, Pedro L; Menendez, Clara; Grimalt, Joan O

    2012-01-01

    Presence of pyrethroid insecticides in human breast milk and in thatch wall material of dwellings from Southern Africa subtropical area (Manhiça, Mozambique) was investigated to assess potential pyrethroid route of human exposure. Human breast milk samples were collected during 2002 when pyrethroids were widely used as insecticides for mosquito bed nets in Mozambique for malaria control. The median concentration value of total pyrethroids ranged between 87 and 1200ng/glw, with λ-cyhalothrin being the most predominant pyrethroid in human breast milk contributing for 35% of the total amount. Moreover, and for the first time, an isomer-specific enrichment was found in human breast milk, showing a selective isomeric accumulation or metabolism in the human body. Based on the calculated pyrethroid concentrations in human breast milk, the daily ingestion rate of pyrethroid was estimated. The nursing infant dietary intake ranged from 0.67 to 9.0μg(kg of body weight)(-1)day(-1). In addition, thatch materials collected after the reintegration of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethene (DDT) as insecticide residual spraying (IRS) in Mozambique, showed the presence of pyrethroids with concentration values ranging between 6.9 and 700ng/gdw. In thatch material as well as in human breast milk, pyrethroid contamination was mainly attributed to the agriculture usage of this insecticide knowing that agriculture represent the 80% of the economy in Mozambique. However, a possible usage of this insecticide as IRS in Mozambique cannot be excluded despite their low efficiency for malaria control. The continued use of these compounds (both for agriculture and malaria prevention) and the ingestion rates calculated from the breast milk concentrations indicate that these insecticides cannot be overlooked for the assessment of the lactation risks of breastfeeding infants from the Manhiça region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Simple Slow-Sand Filter for Drinking Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Yusuf

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Water-borne diseases are commonly encountered when pathogen-contaminated water is consumed. In rural areas, water is usually obtained from ponds, open shallow wells, streams and rain water during rainy season. Rain water is often contaminated by pathogens due to unhygienic of physical and chemical conditions of the roofs thereby making it unsafe for consumption. A simple slow sand filter mechanism was designed and fabricated for purification of water in rural areas where electricity is not available to power water purification devices. Rain water samples were collected from aluminum roof, galvanized roof and thatched roof. The waters samples were allowed to flow through the slow sand filter. The values of turbidity, total dissolved solids, calcium, nitrite, faecal coliform and total coliform from unfiltered water through thatched roof were 0.92 NTU, 27.23 mg/l, 6 mg/l, 0.16 mg/l, 5cfu/100ml and 6.0 cfu/100ml, respectively while the corresponding values for slow sand filter from thatched roof were 0.01 NTU, 0.23 mg/l, 2.5 mg/l, 0.1 mg/l, 0 cfu/100ml and 0 cfu/100ml, respectively. The values of turbidity, total dissolved solid, nitrite, calcium, faecal coliform and total coliform from unfiltered water for aluminum roof were 0.82 NTU, 23.68 mg/l, 2.70 mg/l, 1.0 mg/l, 4 cfu/100ml and 4cfu/100ml, respectively while the corresponding values for slow sand filter were 0.01 NTU, 0.16 mg/l, 0.57 mg/l, 0.2 mg/l, 0 cfu/100ml and 0 cfu/100ml, respectively. The values obtained for galvanized roof were also satisfactory. The slow sand filter is recommended for used in rural areas for water purification to prevent risk of water-borne diseases.

  9. The Attack on Panama City by Henry Morgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-05

    made of wood, were covered with palm leaves soaked in tar to help the ship ignite. The 49 construction of the ship is a testament to the initiative...fire. The arrow ignited some palm fronds used as thatched roofs for some of the buildings inside the fort. As the fire began to spread, the Spanish...difficult, so too was his return trip to Jamaica. The ship he sailed back to Jamaica on, the Jamaica Merchant, wrecked off the coast of Isla Vace, the same

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of fungicides applied to creeping bentgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockemeyer, Kurt R; Latin, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Turf managers often rely on fungicides to limit damage caused by root diseases. Because fungicides are applied to aboveground surfaces and do not move basipetally, they are effective against root pathogens only when fungitoxic concentrations migrate to the rhizosphere. This research focused on the distribution of modern fungicides in verdure, thatch, sand, and roots of creeping bentgrass [ L. var. (Huds.) Farw.] maintained as a putting green. The fungicides azoxystrobin (methyl (E)-2-[2-[6-(2-cyanophenoxy)pyrimidin-4-yloxy]phenyl]-3-methoxyacrylate), propiconazole (1,2,4-triazole, 1-((2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-propyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)methyl), pyraclostrobin (carbamic acid, [2-[[[1-(4-chlorophenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]oxy]methyl]phenyl]methoxy-,methyl ester), and thiophanate-methyl (dimethyl 4,'4-o-phenylenebis[3-thioallophanate]) were applied to replicate field plots in a water volume of 815 L ha. Plots were sampled at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, and 21 d after application by extracting cores measuring 1.9 cm in diameter by 3.8 cm deep. Cores were separated into verdure/thatch, sand, and roots before quantitative determination (liquid chromatography, triple quadrupole mass spectrometry) of fungicide residues. Fungicide residues in verdure/thatch declined steadily with time and support previously reported results describing fungicide depletion. Fungicides were detected in roots and sand within 5 h of application at very low (1-15 mg kg) concentrations and remained at low levels throughout the sampling period. Fungicides differed with respect to amounts recovered per turfgrass component. Azoxystrobin and propiconazole were associated with roots for the duration of the experiment, but pyraclostrobin was nearly undetectable. Near-zero levels of all fungicides were detected in the sand component. Half-life values in the verdure/thatch component ranged from 2.3 to 18.9 d. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of

  11. Analysis of Three Cobble Ring Sites at Abiquiu Reservoir, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Sites and Abiquiu Reservoir Location, Abiquiu Reservoir Cobble Ring Study, ACOE, 1989. G ALLJDMMtAI 1. ___ IT2aN POST RANCH L.LA. 4e T2; PEDRA U 23N...34 (Schroeder 1965:54). These Utes were said to live in thatch-covered huts (Schroeder 1965:54). Utes brought juvenile captives, deer and bufalo meat , and...boiling was documented ethnographically as a cooking process used for immediate consumption of fresh meat by site occupants. Also important in hunting

  12. Should healthcare in rural Botswana focus on integration and group activities to ease the burdens associated with muscle, bone and joint disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Johannessen, Helle; Hartvigsen, Jan

    of independence and social identity to fulfil traditional duties. Activities limited by pain and disability included: caring for family members who suffer debilitating conditions; walking; sweeping; hand-washing clothes; fetching water; farming; harvesting grasses; and, (re-)constructing homesteads with mud...... and thatch. Villagers conveyed interest for group activities to improve MuBoJo health. Word of mouth fueled villager concerns about treatment adverse effects, but most were interested in what “the westerners offer at the caravan.” Providers encouraged integration of MuBoJo care with health and lay personnel...

  13. Evaluation of organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against six vector mosquitoe species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Montada Dorta

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Three organophosphorus compounds- malathion, folithion and temephos- and two synthetic pyrethroids- alphamethrin and deltamethrin- were used for monitoring the susceptibility status of larvae and adults of six vector mosquitoe species: Culex quinquefasciatus (Filariasis and Aedes albopictus (Dengue (both laboratory and field strains; laboratory strains of Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles slephensi and Anopheles culicifacies (Malaria, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Japanese encephalitis in India. From the LC50 values obtained for these insecticides, it was found that all mosquito species including the field strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were highly susceptible Except for Cx. quinquefasciatus (field strain against malathion, 100% mortality was observed at the discriminating dosages recommended by World Health Organization. The residual effect of alphamethrin, deltamethrin, malathion and folithion at 25 mg (ai/m² on different surfaces against six species of vector mosquitoes showed that alphamethrin was the most effective on all four treated surfaces (mud, plywood, cement and thatch. Nevertheless, residual efficacy lasted longer on thatch than on the other surfaces. Therefore, synthetic pyrethroids such as alphamethrin can be effectively employed in integrated vector control operations.

  14. Evaluation of organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against six vector mosquitoe species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montada Dorta Domingo

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Three organophosphorus compounds- malathion, folithion and temephos- and two synthetic pyrethroids- alphamethrin and deltamethrin- were used for monitoring the susceptibility status of larvae and adults of six vector mosquitoe species: Culex quinquefasciatus (Filariasis and Aedes albopictus (Dengue (both laboratory and field strains; laboratory strains of Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles slephensi and Anopheles culicifacies (Malaria, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Japanese encephalitis in India. From the LC50 values obtained for these insecticides, it was found that all mosquito species including the field strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were highly susceptible Except for Cx. quinquefasciatus (field strain against malathion, 100% mortality was observed at the discriminating dosages recommended by World Health Organization. The residual effect of alphamethrin, deltamethrin, malathion and folithion at 25 mg (ai/m² on different surfaces against six species of vector mosquitoes showed that alphamethrin was the most effective on all four treated surfaces (mud, plywood, cement and thatch. Nevertheless, residual efficacy lasted longer on thatch than on the other surfaces. Therefore, synthetic pyrethroids such as alphamethrin can be effectively employed in integrated vector control operations.

  15. Costs and benefits of financial deregulation in the united kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Plus que d'une suppression de la réglementation en vigueur, la déréglementation des activités bancaires et financières mise en oeuvre au Royaume-Uni depuis 1979 a pris la forme d'un allègement du cadre réglementaire, en application de la philosophie libérale inspirant le thatchérisme et en réponse aux circonstances. Ces réformes ont eu des avantages et des inconvénients : à côté de l'essor rapide du secteur dans les années 1980, de la plus grande efficicence des marchés, on relève le surendet...

  16. Roosting, social organization and the annual cycle in a Kenya population of the bat Pipistrellus nanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    The tiny (3.1–3.8 g) vespcrtilionid bat Pipistrellus nanus was studied in Kenya palm-thatched roofs from May 1973 to July 1974. Roosting social organization and related activities and behavior are described. ♂♂ held diurnal roosting territories where ♀♀ gathered in small and compositionally labile groups, attracted to the most vocal ♂♂. Annual variation in population-wide aspects of social organization follows predictable seasonal changes in climate and predator abundance. Variability between individuals follows a common mammalian pattern: high male competition for ♀, variance in presumed male reproductive success, and a mating system resembling one based on resource defense polygyny. Social organization in this population contrasts with that known from studies of other P. nanus populations.

  17. Estructura y sentido de la Oda «Al apartamiento» (XIV de Luis de León

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Uría Maqua

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The author of this article holds the view that the three invocations by the poet, of a safe haven, of a thatched roof and of high mountains, are not references to three material places but rather they represent the same spiritual sphere of peace, harmony and purity where the poet wishes to spend the rest of his life, leaving behind his mistakes and hardships, removed from worldly passions and dangers. These are represented by the metaphor of a storm at sea and the resulting shipwreck of ships and seafarers, the tragic description of which (stanzas 8-12 moves him, in the last stanza, to invoke yet again the so desired safe haven. Thus, the Ode, apart from its strong unity of form and meaning, it is closed and circular.

  18. Dwelling in New Delhi, dwelling in hybridity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Roselli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available I wake up in a ground floor bedroom of a fourth floor building. In the near dining room, the tv is kicking out loud Hindi voices, the musical refrain of a phone company ad. The family hosting me is a family of immigrants. The grandfather and the grandmother arrived in Delhi during the partition time. They originally grew up in Pakistan and met in the place where they live today, when the land was organized as a refugees camp. At the beginning, the refugees camp was only a wasteland. Then, with the passage of time, people started to build small pakka houses, a kind of self-built architecture made of simple oven-cooked red bricks, with a thatched roof.

  19. Effect of nitrogen fertilization, grass species and cultivar on sod production on Valkeasuo peat bog - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. VIRKAJÄRVI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of a research project concerning the agricultural utilization of cut-away peat bogs, a sod production experiment was conducted at Valkeasuo, Tohmajärvi, in 1990-1993. The aim of the experiment was to study the effect of nitrogen and choice of cultivar on sod production and sod quality on peat bogs. The N fertilization rates were 50, 100 and 150 kg ha -1 . The Poa pratensis cultivars were 'Conni', 'Cynthia', 'Haga' and 'Julia', the Festuca rubra cultivars were 'Center', 'Juliska', 'Koket' and 'Näpsä' and the Agrostis capillaris cultivar was 'Rasti'. Two mixtures of P. pratensis/F. rubra and one of A. capillaris/F. rubra imitated commercial sod products. Increasing of N fertilization from 50 kg up to 150 kg ha -1 a had positive effect on general the quality of sod as well as on the green cover before and after transplanting. It increased the thatch formation. The positive effect of N on the number of tillers and green cover in the year following transplanting was dependent on the species and the cultivar. Species and cultivar affected all measured variables excluding thatch formation. Generally, the P. pratensis cultivars tested suited better for sod production than cultivars of F. rubra, but there were clear differences between cultivars with-in species as well. Although the soil was infertile, the contents of Ca, K, Mg, P, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo and Zn in the herbage samples were within normal range. The botanical purity was high, which supports the hypothesis that the absence of seed bank of weeds on peat bogs immediately after harvesting the peat can be utilized.;

  20. Local perceptions as a guide for the sustainable management of natural resources: empirical evidence from a small-scale society in Bolivian Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Research on natural resource management suggests that local perceptions form the basis upon which many small-scale societies monitor availability and change in the stock of common-pool natural resources. In contrast, this literature debates whether local perceptions can be effective in guiding the sustainable management of natural resources. With empirical evidence on this matter still highly limited, we explored the role of local perceptions as drivers of harvesting and management behavior in a small-scale society in Bolivian Amazonia. We conducted structured interviews to capture local perceptions of availability and change in the stock of thatch palm (Geonoma deversa among the Tsimane', an indigenous society of foragers-horticulturalists (n = 296 adults in 13 villages. We analyzed whether perceptions of availability match estimates of abundance obtained from ecological data and whether differences in perception help to explain harvesting behavior and local management of thatch palm. Perceptions of availability of G. deversa are highly contingent upon the social, economic, and cultural conditions within which the Tsimane' have experienced changes in the availability of the resource, thus giving a better reflection of the historical, rather than of the ecological, dimensions of the changes undergone. Although local perceptions might fall short in precision when scrutinized from an ecological standpoint, their importance in informing sustainable management should not be underestimated. Our findings show that most of the harvesting and management actions that the Tsimane' undertake are, at least partially, shaped by their local perceptions. This paper contributes to the broader literature on natural resource management by providing empirical evidence of the critical role of local perceptions in promoting collective responses for the sustainable management of natural resources.

  1. Facing global markets – usage changes in Western Amazonian plants: the example of Euterpe precatoria Mart. and E. oleracea Mart.

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    Rainer W. Bussmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Palms (Arecaceae are one of the most important families of useful plants, and indigenous societies have developed very distinct ways of utilizing this resource. The clonal Euterpe oleracea Mart. has long been used for the preparation of frothy beverages in the eastern Amazon, in particular by colonists and caboclos, but to a much lesser extent by the indigenous population. Euterpe precatoria Mart., which grows in the western Amazon, is traditionally reported as resource for construction and thatch, but not as important species in alimentation. Our recent work indicates that the use of both species has dramatically shifted in the recent past. Prices for Euterpe products have increased dramatically due to the global commodization first of palm hearts and “Açaí berry juice” as nutritional supplement. This is especially evident in western Amazonia: In Bolivia and Peru, where older indigenous informants mostly reported thatch and houseposts as regular use for E. precatoria and did not know E. oleracea. Younger informants most commonly reported to a large extent on E. precatoria being used for the production of palm hearts, but less for other, while the youngest informants in many cases only knew E. precatoria fruits as source of beverages, as commercial fruit, and as source for handicrafts, and indicated that E. oleracea was being introduced because the species yielded higher harvests. In addition, many mid-age and younger informants reported Euterpe sp. as medicinal species, a less frequently mentioned by older informants. The local mestizo population in contrast had a broader distributed knowledge with regard to “food” uses of Euterpe sp., and mentioned the species as source of construction material less frequently.

  2. Seasonal shift from bottom-up to top-down impact in phytophagous insect populations.

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    Gratton, Claudio; Denno, Robert F

    2003-03-01

    Although many studies now examine how multiple factors influence the dynamics of herbivore populations, few studies explicitly attempt to document where and when each is important and how they vary and interact. In fact, how temporal variation in top-down (natural enemies) and bottom-up (host plant resources) factors affect herbivore dynamics has been suggested as a particularly important yet poorly understood feature of terrestrial food webs. In this study we examined how temporal changes in predator density (wolf spiders, sheet-web builders, and mirid egg predators) and host-plant resources (plant quality and structural complexity) influence the population dynamics of the dominant phytophagous insects on Atlantic-coast salt marshes, namely Prokelisia planthoppers (Homoptera: Delphacidae). We designed a factorial experiment in meadows of Spartina alterniflora to mimic natural variation in vegetation quality and structure by establishing two levels of plant nutrition (leaf nitrogen content) by fertilization, and two levels of habitat complexity by adding leaf litter (thatch). We then assessed seasonal changes in the strength of bottom-up (plant quality) and top-down (predator) impacts on planthopper populations. Planthopper populations responded positively to increased plant quality treatments in late summer. Despite the greater number of planthopper adults colonizing fertilized Spartina plots compared to unfertilized controls, the offspring of these colonists were much less abundant at the end of the season in fertilized plots, particularly those with thatch. The initial colonization effect was later erased because arthropod predators selectively accumulated in fertilized plots where they inflicted significant mortality on all stages of planthoppers. Predators rapidly colonized fertilized plots and reached high densities well in advance of planthopper colonization, a response we attribute to their rapid aggregation in complex-structured habitats with readily

  3. Risk factors associated with Chagas disease in pregnant women in Santander, a highly endemic Colombian area.

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    Castellanos-Domínguez, Yeny Z; Cucunubá, Zulma M; Orozco, Luis C; Valencia-Hernández, Carlos A; León, Cielo M; Florez, Astrid C; Muñoz, Lyda; Pavía, Paula; Montilla, Marleny; Uribe, Luz Marina; García, Carlos; Ardila, William; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago; Puerta, Concepción J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with Chagas disease in pregnant women in an endemic area of Santander, Colombia. Cross-sectional study included 23 municipalities of Santander, Colombia. Serological IFAT and ELISA tests were undertaken to detect IgG anti- Trypanosoma cruzi. A questionnaire was conducted for assessing the risk factors of each participant. Newborns were evaluated at birth and followed up to 1 year of age to determine congenital infection. An overall prevalence of 3.2% (95% CI 2.4-4.2) among 1518 pregnant women was detected. Prevalences by provinces were as follows: Guanentina: 6.0% (95% CI 4.1-8.5), García Rovira: 2.9% (95% CI: 1.5-4.8) and Comunera: 0.4% (0.4-2.3). The main risk factors identified were age >32 years old (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1-3.9); currently having a thatched roof (OR: 11.8; CI95% 2.2-63.2) and a thatched roof during childhood (OR: 3.0; 95% CI: 1.4-6.6); having below primary school education level (OR: 4.6; 95% CI: 2.2-9.5); and a history of a close contact with the vector (triatomine bugs) at least once during their lifetime (OR: 6.9; 95% CI: 3.7-12.9). No congenital cases were detected by parasitological or serological techniques. Prevalence of Chagas disease in pregnant women is a potential source of infection in this Colombian endemic area. The main risk factors associated with seropositivity were related to conditions favouring the contact with the vector. The results show that it is necessary to continue an active surveillance in order to offer diagnosis and treatment to mothers and their newborns in addition to screening to pregnant women from endemic areas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against six vector mosquitoe species Avaliação de inseticidas organofosforados e piretroides sintéticos contra seis mosquitos vetores

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    Domingo Montada Dorta

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Three organophosphorus compounds- malathion, folithion and temephos- and two synthetic pyrethroids- alphamethrin and deltamethrin- were used for monitoring the susceptibility status of larvae and adults of six vector mosquitoe species: Culex quinquefasciatus (Filariasis and Aedes albopictus (Dengue (both laboratory and field strains; laboratory strains of Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles slephensi and Anopheles culicifacies (Malaria, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Japanese encephalitis in India. From the LC50 values obtained for these insecticides, it was found that all mosquito species including the field strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were highly susceptible Except for Cx. quinquefasciatus (field strain against malathion, 100% mortality was observed at the discriminating dosages recommended by World Health Organization. The residual effect of alphamethrin, deltamethrin, malathion and folithion at 25 mg (ai/m² on different surfaces against six species of vector mosquitoes showed that alphamethrin was the most effective on all four treated surfaces (mud, plywood, cement and thatch. Nevertheless, residual efficacy lasted longer on thatch than on the other surfaces. Therefore, synthetic pyrethroids such as alphamethrin can be effectively employed in integrated vector control operations.Três compostos organo-fosforados - malation, folition e temefos -e dois piretroides sintéticos - alfametrina e deltametrina - foram usados para controlar o estado da susceptibilidade das larvas e adultos de seis mosquitos vetores na Índia. Foram utilizadas cepas de laboratório e área de Culex quinquefasciatus (filariasis e Aedes albopictus (Dengue e cepas de laboratório de Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles stephensi e Anopheles culicifacies (Malária e Culex tritaenorhynchus (encefalite japonesa. Os valores de C1(50 obtidos para esses inseticidas mostram que todas as espécies incluindo as cepas de área foram muito susceptíveis. Nos

  5. Alternative treatments for indoor residual spraying for malaria control in a village with pyrethroid- and DDT-resistant vectors in the Gambia.

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    Tangena, Julie-Anne A; Adiamoh, Majidah; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Jarju, Lamin; Jawara, Musa; Jeffries, David; Malik, Naiela; Nwakanma, Davis; Kaur, Harparkash; Takken, Willem; Lindsay, Steve W; Pinder, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vector control is threatened by resistance to pyrethroids, the only class of insecticides used for treating bed nets. The second major vector control method is indoor residual spraying with pyrethroids or the organochloride DDT. However, resistance to pyrethroids frequently confers resistance to DDT. Therefore, alternative insecticides are urgently needed. Insecticide resistance and the efficacy of indoor residual spraying with different insecticides was determined in a Gambian village. Resistance of local vectors to pyrethroids and DDT was high (31% and 46% mortality, respectively) while resistance to bendiocarb and pirimiphos methyl was low (88% and 100% mortality, respectively). The vectors were predominantly Anopheles gambiae s.s. with 94% of them having the putative resistant genotype kdr 1014F. Four groups of eight residential compounds were each sprayed with either (1) bendiocarb, a carbamate, (2) DDT, an organochlorine, (3) microencapsulated pirimiphos methyl, an organophosphate, or (4) left unsprayed. All insecticides tested showed high residual activity up to five months after application. Mosquito house entry, estimated by light traps, was similar in all houses with metal roofs, but was significantly less in IRS houses with thatched roofs (p=0.02). Residents participating in focus group discussions indicated that IRS was considered a necessary nuisance and also may decrease the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets. Bendiocarb and microencapsulated pirimiphos methyl are viable alternatives for indoor residual spraying where resistance to pyrethroids and DDT is high and may assist in the management of pyrethroid resistance.

  6. Alternative treatments for indoor residual spraying for malaria control in a village with pyrethroid- and DDT-resistant vectors in the Gambia.

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    Julie-Anne A Tangena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria vector control is threatened by resistance to pyrethroids, the only class of insecticides used for treating bed nets. The second major vector control method is indoor residual spraying with pyrethroids or the organochloride DDT. However, resistance to pyrethroids frequently confers resistance to DDT. Therefore, alternative insecticides are urgently needed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insecticide resistance and the efficacy of indoor residual spraying with different insecticides was determined in a Gambian village. Resistance of local vectors to pyrethroids and DDT was high (31% and 46% mortality, respectively while resistance to bendiocarb and pirimiphos methyl was low (88% and 100% mortality, respectively. The vectors were predominantly Anopheles gambiae s.s. with 94% of them having the putative resistant genotype kdr 1014F. Four groups of eight residential compounds were each sprayed with either (1 bendiocarb, a carbamate, (2 DDT, an organochlorine, (3 microencapsulated pirimiphos methyl, an organophosphate, or (4 left unsprayed. All insecticides tested showed high residual activity up to five months after application. Mosquito house entry, estimated by light traps, was similar in all houses with metal roofs, but was significantly less in IRS houses with thatched roofs (p=0.02. Residents participating in focus group discussions indicated that IRS was considered a necessary nuisance and also may decrease the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Bendiocarb and microencapsulated pirimiphos methyl are viable alternatives for indoor residual spraying where resistance to pyrethroids and DDT is high and may assist in the management of pyrethroid resistance.

  7. Identification of risk factors for plague in the West Nile Region of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Rebecca J; MacMillan, Katherine; Atiku, Linda A; Mpanga, Joseph T; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Graham, Christine B; Boegler, Karen A; Enscore, Russell E; Gage, Kenneth L

    2014-06-01

    Plague is an often fatal, primarily flea-borne rodent-associated zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis. We sought to identify risk factors for plague by comparing villages with and without a history of human plague cases within a model-defined plague focus in the West Nile Region of Uganda. Although rat (Rattus rattus) abundance was similar inside huts within case and control villages, contact rates between rats and humans (as measured by reported rat bites) and host-seeking flea loads were higher in case villages. In addition, compared with persons in control villages, persons in case villages more often reported sleeping on reed or straw mats, storing food in huts where persons sleep, owning dogs and allowing them into huts where persons sleep, storing garbage inside or near huts, and cooking in huts where persons sleep. Compared with persons in case villages, persons in control villages more commonly reported replacing thatch roofing, and growing coffee, tomatoes, onions, and melons in agricultural plots adjacent to their homesteads. Rodent and flea control practices, knowledge of plague, distance to clinics, and most care-seeking practices were similar between persons in case villages and persons in control villages. Our findings reinforce existing plague prevention recommendations and point to potentially advantageous local interventions. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. Field trials of an improved cost-effective device for detecting peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae in rural Argentina

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    GM Vazquez-Prokopec

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available An improved device for detecting peridomestic Triatoma infestans consisting of one-liter recycled Tetra Brik milk boxes with a central structure was tested using a matched-pair study design in two rural areas in Argentina. In Olta (La Rioja, the boxes were installed beneath the thatched roofs and on the vertical wooden posts of each peridomestic structure. After a 5-month exposure, at least one of the recovered boxes detected 88% of the 24 T. infestans-positive sites, and 86% of the 7 negative sites by timed manual collections at baseline. In Amamá (Santiago del Estero, the boxes were paired with the best performing prototype tested before (shelter unit. After 3 months, some evidence of infestation was detected in 89% (boxes and 79% (shelters of 18-19 sites positive by timed collections, whereas 19% and 16% of 32 negative sites were positive, respectively. Neither device differed significantly in the qualitative or quantitative collection of every sign of infestation. The installation site did not modify significantly the boxes' sampling efficiency in both study areas. As the total cost of each box was half as expensive as each shelter unit, the boxes are thus the most cost-effective and easy-to-use tool for detecting peridomestic T. infestans currently available.

  9. Chagas disease screening among HIV-positive Latin American immigrants: an emerging problem.

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    Llenas-García, J; Hernando, A; Fiorante, S; Maseda, D; Matarranz, M; Salto, E; Rubio, R; Pulido, F

    2012-08-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is an emergent disease in Europe that can behave as an opportunistic infection in HIV positive patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a CD screening programme in an HIV unit. An immunochromatography (ICT) of Trypanosoma cruzi was performed as a screening tool in HIV-positive patients born in CD endemic countries. ELISA and IFAT were used to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 155 patients, 116 males and 38 females, were included. Mean age was 36.9 years (± 8.4) and mean length of stay in Spain at the screening was 7.1 years (± 4.7). T. cruzi ICT was positive in four cases (2.6%), being confirmed (by ELISA and IFAT) in three of those (1.9%). Factors associated with confirmed positive T.cruzi serology were: Bolivia origin (p=0.016), Bolivia or Argentina origin (p=0.002), Southern Cone origin (p=0.015), rural origin (p=0.023), previously living in an adobe-made (p=0.001) or thatch-roofed house (pquestions.

  10. Assessment of Useful Plants in the Catchment Area of the Proposed Ntabelanga Dam in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

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    Alfred Maroyi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The developmental projects, particularly construction of dams, result in permanent changes of terrestrial ecosystems through inundation. Objective. The present study was undertaken aiming at documenting useful plant species in Ntabelanga dam catchment area that will be impacted by the construction of the proposed dam. Methods. A total of 55 randomly selected quadrats were used to assess plant species diversity and composition. Participatory rural appraisal (PRA methods were used to identify useful plant species growing in the catchment area through interviews with 108 randomly selected participants. Results. A total of 197 plant species were recorded with 95 species (48.2% utilized for various purposes. Use categories included ethnoveterinary and herbal medicines (46 species, food plants (37 species, construction timber and thatching (14 species, firewood (five species, browse, live fence, and ornamental (four species each, and brooms and crafts (two species. Conclusion. This study showed that plant species play an important role in the daily life and culture of local people. The construction of Ntabelanga dam is, therefore, associated with several positive and negative impacts on plant resources which are not fully integrated into current decision-making, largely because of lack of multistakeholder dialogue on the socioeconomic issues of such an important project.

  11. A study of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny measurement in Tosham region Haryana, India

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    Prabhjot Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study indoor radon, thoron and their decay products concentrations have been measured using the newly developed LR-115 type-ІІ based Radon-Thoron discriminating twin-cup dosimeters with single entry face, direct radon and thoron progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS respectively. The annual annihilation dose has been assessed from measured radionuclide concentration to find out major contributor of lung cancer in the study area. The measurements have been carried out in NINETY dwellings of THIRTEEN different villages situated in and around the Tosham region. This region is known to be composed of acidic volcanic and associated granites. Dwellings were selected mainly targeting different type building material used in construction of houses like concrete–brick, mud-brick, and mud-thatches along with an idea of different ventilation conditions which affects the equilibrium factor (EF. The EF in this region has been varying from 0.20 to 0.72 and 0.03–0.13 for indoor radon and thoron respectively. The average inhalation dose observed in dwellings of different villages varies from 1.33 ± 0.31–3.36 ± 0.72 mSv/y that lies within the safe limits recommended by ICRP (2011.

  12. Prevalence of pneumonia and associated factors among indigenous children in Brazil: results from the First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Andrey M; Horta, Bernardo L; Santos, Ricardo V; Escobar, Ana L; Welch, James R; Coimbra, Carlos E A

    2015-11-01

    Based on data from a nationally representative sample of indigenous villages in Brazilian indigenous reserves, the study sought to estimate the prevalence of pneumonia and evaluate associated factors among indigenous children under 5 years of age. Sociodemographic, clinical and reported data on child respiratory health from the First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition in Brazil were collected for 6128 children. Prevalence of pneumonia was calculated for independent variables and hierarchical multivariate analyses were performed to assess associations. The overall prevalence proportions of cough, nasal congestion, pneumonia, and pneumonia with fever were 44.4%, 31.0%, 2.63%, and 1.28%, respectively. In the multivariate model, pneumonia was more frequent among children living in the South/Southeast and North regions of Brazil. Children living in larger households or houses with wood or thatch roofing, as well those with low birthweight or stunting, presented higher risk of pneumonia. Pneumonia was less prevalent among children living in houses with wood flooring and those presenting low weight-for-age. The study results demonstrate that pneumonia is an important cause of illness among indigenous children throughout Brazil. The association between pneumonia and household characteristics suggests that indoor home environment is closely related to the respiratory health of indigenous children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Geographic distribution of isolated indigenous societies in Amazonia and the efficacy of indigenous territories.

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    Dylan C Kesler

    Full Text Available The headwaters of the Amazon Basin harbor most of the world's last indigenous peoples who have limited contact with encroaching colonists. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of these isolated groups is essential to assist with the development of immediate protections for vulnerable indigenous settlements. We used remote sensing to document the locations of 28 isolated villages within the four Brazilian states of Acre, Amazonas, Roraima, and Rondônia. The sites were confirmed during previous over-flights and by image evidence of thatched-roof houses; they are estimated to host over 1,700 individuals. Locational data were used to train maximum entropy models that identified landscape and anthropogenic features associated with the occurrence of isolated indigenous villages, including elevation, proximity to streams of five different orders, proximity to roads and settlements, proximity to recent deforestation, and vegetation cover type. Isolated villages were identified at mid elevations, within 20 km of the tops of watersheds and at greater distances from existing roads and trails. We further used model results, combined with boundaries of the existing indigenous territory system that is designed to protect indigenous lands, to assess the efficacy of the existing protected area network for isolated peoples. Results indicate that existing indigenous territories encompass all of the villages we identified, and 50% of the areas with high predicted probabilities of isolated village occurrence. Our results are intended to help inform policies that can mitigate against future external threats to isolated peoples.

  14. Asháninka Palm Management and Domestication in the Peruvian Amazon.

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    Sosnowska, Joanna; Walanus, Adam; Balslev, Henrik

    Palms are a natural resource that has been abundantly used by Amerindians for centuries. Only a few palm domestications have been reported in the American tropics, where there is great diversity of the Arecaceae family. We report the results of a survey combining ethnobotanical and ecological methods to study the past and present management and distribution of palms by the Asháninka indigenous people from the Tambo river region in the Peruvian Amazon. Our objectives were to document palm-related traditional ecological knowledge, to examine correlation between palm abundance and Asháninka management practices and social exchange of palm resources, and to address the question of how the Asháninka have modified palm diversity and distribution in their territory. We found that most palm species have multiple uses; the most intensively managed were palms that provide thatch, notably Attalea phalerata, Oenocarpus mapora and Phytelephas macrocarpa. Of these, Attalea phalerata was the most commonly cultivated and was found only in cultivated stands. Our results have implications for understanding the domestication of Attalea weberbaueri, which is a landrace within the Attalea phalerata complex. A closer understanding of this process would require morphometric and genetic methods to compare wild and managed populations.

  15. Economically and ecologically important plant communities in high altitude coniferous forest of Malam Jabba, Swat, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Hassan; Al Yemeni, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    A study on the economically important plant communities was carried out during summer 2008 in various parts of Malam Jabba valley, Swat. The principal aim of the study was phytosociological evaluation with special reference to the occurrence of commercially important medicinal plant species in coniferous forest of the study area. Secondly to prepare ethnobotanical inventory of the plant resources of the area, as well as to evaluate the conservation status of important medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) through rapid vulnerable assessment (RVA) procedure. The study documented 90 species of ethnobotanical importance, out of these 71 spp used as medicinal plant, 20 spp fodder plant, 10 spp vegetables, 14 spp wild fruit, 18 spp fuel wood, 9 spp furniture and agricultural tools, 9 spp thatching, fencing and hedges, 4 spp honey bee, 2 spp evil eyes, 2 spp religious and 3 spp as poison. Phytosociologically six plant communities were found, comprising five herbs-shrubs-trees communities and one meadow community. Further study is, therefore, required to quantify the availability of species and to suggest suitable method for their production and conservation. Recommendations are also given in the spheres of training in identification, sustainable collection, value addition, trade monitoring and cooperative system of marketing.

  16. Cyclone disaster vulnerability and response experiences in coastal Bangladesh.

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    Alam, Edris; Collins, Andrew E

    2010-10-01

    For generations, cyclones and tidal surges have frequently devastated lives and property in coastal and island Bangladesh. This study explores vulnerability to cyclone hazards using first-hand coping recollections from prior to, during and after these events. Qualitative field data suggest that, beyond extreme cyclone forces, localised vulnerability is defined in terms of response processes, infrastructure, socially uneven exposure, settlement development patterns, and livelihoods. Prior to cyclones, religious activities increase and people try to save food and valuable possessions. Those in dispersed settlements who fail to reach cyclone shelters take refuge in thatched-roof houses and big-branch trees. However, women and children are affected more despite the modification of traditional hierarchies during cyclone periods. Instinctive survival strategies and intra-community cooperation improve coping post cyclone. This study recommends that disaster reduction programmes encourage cyclone mitigation while being aware of localised realities, endogenous risk analyses, and coping and adaptation of affected communities (as active survivors rather than helpless victims). © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  17. Conservation and Management of the Endangered Fiji Sago Palm, Metroxylon vitiense, in Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Clare; Rounds, Isaac; Watling, Dick

    2012-05-01

    Recovery planning is a key component of many threatened species conservation initiatives and can be a powerful awareness raising tool. One of the largest impediments to conservation efforts in the Pacific region however, is the lack of ecological data and its subsequent effects on the development of feasible and useful recovery plans for threatened species. Without these plans, the understaffed, underfunded and often technically ill-equipped conservation agencies face huge difficulties in planning, prioritizing and conducting conservation activities to adequately protect biodiversity. The Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, is an endemic endangered palm species whose survival is heavily dependent on a feasible species recovery plan. It is geographically restricted and threatened by habitat destruction and overexploitation for thatch for the tourism industry and palm heart consumption by local consumers. Despite its threatened status, M. vitiense is not currently protected by national or international legislation. Recent field surveys and extensive stakeholder consultation have resulted in the production of a species recovery plan highlighting the importance of the species and advocating sustainable harvesting rather than complete bans to promote conservation. This article summarizes the recovery plan and its current effects on the status of M. vitiense in Fiji. We also discuss the role of different stakeholders in the conservation of M. vitiense, including the absence of significant behavioral changes by the largest consumer - the tourism industry, and the importance of recovery plans for biodiversity conservation in the Pacific.

  18. Ethnobotany of babassu palm ( Attalea speciosa Mart. in the Tucuruí Lake Protected Areas Mosaic - eastern Amazon

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    Fábio Ribeiro Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Documenting the ethnobotanical knowledge of populations living in protected areas is important both for science and for the effective conservation of these areas, as it can help to clarify the level of dependency that human communities have on local plant resources. Babassu (Attalea speciosa, Arecaceae is one of the most important non-timber forest resources of rural communities in the Amazon. We explored the ethnobotanical knowledge and uses of babassu by riverine populations inhabiting the Tucuruí Lake Protected Areas Mosaic in the eastern Amazon, by examining the diversity, purposes and descriptions of its uses and aspects of its extraction. Data were collected in 2010 and 2014 from 193 families. A total of 1,226 use records were cited representing 60 different uses. Records were classified into nine use-categories; utensils and tools was the most important category, followed by construction and human food. The use with the greatest purpose consensus value among the informants was thatch. Babassu proved to be an important resource for the livelihood of the local communities in providing shelter, food and reliable energy. Most informants lacked knowledge about sustainable practices and management of this resource.

  19. Application of pesticide transport model for simulating diazinon runoff in California’s central valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Brian A.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Mailapalli, Damodhara R.

    2010-12-01

    Dormant spray application of pesticides to almond and other stone fruit orchards is the main source of diazinon during the winter in California's central valley. Understanding the pesticide transport and the tradeoffs associated with the various management practices is greatly facilitated by the use of physically-based contaminant transport models. In this study, performance of Joyce's et al. (2008) pesticide transport model was evaluated using experimental data collected from two ground treatments such as resident vegetation and bare soil. The model simulation results obtained in calibration and validation process were analyzed for pesticide concentration and total load. The pesticide transport model accurately predicted the pesticide concentrations and total load in the runoff from bare field and was capable of simulating chemical responses to rainfall-runoff events. In case of resident vegetation, the model results exhibited a larger range of variation than was observed in the bare soil simulations due to increased model parameterization with the addition of foliage and thatch compartments. Furthermore, the model was applied to study the effect of runoff lag time, extent of crop cover, organic content of soil and post-application irrigation on the pesticide peak concentration and total load. Based on the model results, recommendations were suggested to growers prior to implementing certain management decisions to mitigate diazinon transport in the orchard's spray runoff.

  20. Ecosystem Service Changes and Livelihood Impacts in the Maguri-Motapung Wetlands of Assam, India

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    Laxmi D. Bhatta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide a diverse range of ecosystem services supporting livelihoods of many people. Despite their value, wetlands are continuously being degraded. There is scant information on individual wetlands, people’s dependency and their exploitation at a local scale. We therefore assessed wetland ecosystem services, the drivers of change and impacts of those drivers on ecosystem services and people’s dependency through a case study of the Maguri-Motapung Beel wetlands of Assam, India. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected through household surveys, focus group discussions, key informant interviews and community workshops. The analyses showed a total of 29 ecosystem services, and high dependency on these with five out of seven livelihood strategies sourced from ecosystem services. Over-exploitation of wetland resources and siltation were reported as the major direct drivers of change with impacts on both ecosystem services and people’s livelihoods. Drastic decreases in availability of thatch, fish stocks, fodder and tourism were observed. This suggests that there is an urgent need for a comprehensive participatory management plan. Actions are needed to maintain the Maguri-Motapung Beel wetlands and the flow of services in order to sustain people’s livelihoods in the area. With an estimated 50% global loss of wetlands in the last century and the loss of 5,000 square kilometers a year in Asia alone, the loss of ecosystem services and livelihood impacts shown in our study may be typical of what is occurring in the region and perhaps globally.

  1. Identification of Risk Factors for Plague in the West Nile Region of Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Rebecca J.; MacMillan, Katherine; Atiku, Linda A.; Mpanga, Joseph T.; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Graham, Christine B.; Boegler, Karen A.; Enscore, Russell E.; Gage, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Plague is an often fatal, primarily flea-borne rodent-associated zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis. We sought to identify risk factors for plague by comparing villages with and without a history of human plague cases within a model-defined plague focus in the West Nile Region of Uganda. Although rat (Rattus rattus) abundance was similar inside huts within case and control villages, contact rates between rats and humans (as measured by reported rat bites) and host-seeking flea loads were higher in case villages. In addition, compared with persons in control villages, persons in case villages more often reported sleeping on reed or straw mats, storing food in huts where persons sleep, owning dogs and allowing them into huts where persons sleep, storing garbage inside or near huts, and cooking in huts where persons sleep. Compared with persons in case villages, persons in control villages more commonly reported replacing thatch roofing, and growing coffee, tomatoes, onions, and melons in agricultural plots adjacent to their homesteads. Rodent and flea control practices, knowledge of plague, distance to clinics, and most care-seeking practices were similar between persons in case villages and persons in control villages. Our findings reinforce existing plague prevention recommendations and point to potentially advantageous local interventions. PMID:24686743

  2. [Textual research on circulated versions of Wen re lun (On epidemic warm diseases) and its related problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-bin

    2007-10-01

    The Wen re lun (On Epidemic Warm Diseases), written by Ye Tian-shi, a famous physician of epidemic warm diseases in the Qing dynasty, was originally a teaching record between the tutors and disciples. The book was originally anonymous, and there were two different circulated versions compiled by two different scholars. The Wen zheng lun zhi (Treatment of Warm Syndromes) was arranged by Tang Da-lie, and its first edition was Wu yi hui jiang (Collected Discourses of Physicians in Wu Region), an xylographic edition of Tang's Wenxin Thatched Cottage in Wu region block-printed in the 57th year of Qianlong (1792). The Wen re lun (On Epidemic Warm Diseases) was arranged by Hua Xiu-yun, and its first edition was Weisheng Tang edition probably in the 42nd year of Qianlong of the Qing dynasty (1777) with disordered book names, which should be unified and marked. Hua Xiu-yun wasn't Ye's follower, and he looked for and arranged Ye's medical cases because of the adoration to Ye Tian-shi. The texts of these two editions were the same, while the academic style differed substantially.

  3. Activity and Residual Effect of Two Formulations of Lambdacyhalothrin Sprayed on Palm Leaves to Rhodnius prolixus

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    Mazariego-Arana Miguel Angel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal activity and residual effect of two formulations of lambdacyhalothrin were evaluated with Rhodnius prolixus;laboratory and field tests were conducted in the State of Chiapas, Mexico. The results indicate that the lethal concentrations of the active ingredient of SC (LC50 = 2.37 and LC90 = 8.5 mg, a.i./m² were 4-8 times than those with the insecticide WP applied on R. prolixus bugs in palm leaves, a common building material for thatched roofs. Other investigators in South America recommended applying 30 mg a.i./m² in porous materials; we obtained that the products WP and SC were 3.5 and 16 times more effective on palm leaves. Regarding the evaluation of the residual effects in field spraying, there was up to 15 months persistence after the application of WP in two doses (8.6 mg a.i./m² and 3.752 mg a.i./m² with SC. We consider R. prolixus highly susceptible to the employed pyrethroids; they could be used to control this vector in the state of Chiapas, Mexico.

  4. Obtaining botany seed onion (Allium cepa L. under natural conditions in Topes de Collantes, Cuba

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    Elian Bravo Alé

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out in Topes de Collantes with the objective of evaluating two me -thods of “vernalization” of Allium cepa L. var., Caribe 71 in natural conditions. Two groups of bulblets (from the previous harvest were selected and subjected to methods different vernalization, the conventional (storage in cold storage at temperatures between 2 and 3 0C, for 100 days and natural (storage during 125 days within a rustic house with walls of palm board and a thatched roof, at room temperature. The bulblets from both treatments were planted randomly in different field plots. During the development of the plantation were eva-luated, agronomic variables related to seed production and the yield of onion bulbs. The conventional method was tatistically superior to natural, on the seed production; although the natural method was superior in the commercial yield of the onion bulbs. It is concluded that can be used method of natural vernalization in the climatic conditions of Topes de Collantes , because the seeds production are lower than the conventional ver-nalization, but higher yields of commercial onion bulbs are obtained, and is an economical method accessible to the producers

  5. Role of Forest Resources to Local Livelihoods: The Case of East Mau Forest Ecosystem, Kenya

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    D. K. Langat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Forests in Kenya are threatened by unsustainable uses and conversion to alternative land uses. In spite of the consequences of forest degradation and biodiversity loss and reliance of communities on forests livelihoods, there is little empirical data on the role of forest resources in livelihoods of the local communities. Socioeconomic, demographic, and forest use data were obtained by interviewing 367 households. Forest product market survey was undertaken to determine prices of various forest products for valuation of forest use. Forest income was significant to households contributing 33% of total household income. Fuel wood contributed 50%, food (27%, construction material (18%, and fodder, and thatching material 5% to household forest income. Absolute forest income and relative forest income (% were not significantly different across study locations and between ethnic groups. However, absolute forest income and relative forest income (% were significantly different among wealth classes. Poor households were more dependent on forests resources. However, in absolute terms, the rich households derived higher forest income. These results provide valuable information on the role of forest resources to livelihoods and could be applied in developing forest conservation policies for enhanced ecosystem services and livelihoods.

  6. Isolation of fungi from dung of wild herbivores for application in bioethanol production

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    Rhulani Makhuvele

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Producing biofuels such as ethanol from non-food plant material has the potential to meet transportation fuel requirements in many African countries without impacting directly on food security. The current shortcomings in biomass processing are inefficient fermentation of plant sugars, such as xylose, especially at high temperatures, lack of fermenting microbes that are able to resist inhibitors associated with pre-treated plant material and lack of effective lignocellulolytic enzymes for complete hydrolysis of plant polysaccharides. Due to the presence of residual partially degraded lignocellulose in the gut, the dung of herbivores can be considered as a natural source of pre-treated lignocellulose. A total of 101 fungi were isolated (36 yeast and 65 mould isolates. Six yeast isolates produced ethanol during growth on xylose while three were able to grow at 42 °C. This is a desirable growth temperature as it is closer to that which is used during the cellulose hydrolysis process. From the yeast isolates, six isolates were able to tolerate 2 g/L acetic acid and one tolerated 2 g/L furfural in the growth media. These inhibitors are normally generated during the pre-treatment step. When grown on pre-treated thatch grass, Aspergillus species were dominant in secretion of endo-glucanase, xylanase and mannanase.

  7. PRACTICES, KNOWLEDGE AND MEMORY GUARANI IN THE CONQUEST OF LAND. AN EXPERIENCE OF CONFLICT IN THE SANTA CATARINA COAST

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    Clovis Antonio Brighenti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the analysis of the process of demarcation of the Earth Indigenous Hill of the Horses, located in the municipal district of Thatched hut, state of Santa Catarina, we will look for to understand the relationship of the Brazilian State with that indigenous population. In spite of the land still not to be in the indigenous community's definitive ownership, for legal effects she is Declared. Along the process, that he/she had beginning in 1993, the indigenous community's participation has been decisive in the conquest of new stages and in the definition of the current limits. Interferences of several orders have been generating tensions and disturbances in the community, besides exposing the group and the demarcation process to the national public opinion, when a magazine of national circulation made reference to the group how being foreign. It is in that context that we will look for to analyze the process of conquest of the earth and conquest of the citizenship.

  8. Poor housing construction associated with increased malaria incidence in a cohort of young Ugandan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Katherine; Mwangwa, Florence; Bigira, Victor; Kapisi, James; Clark, Tamara D; Osterbauer, Beth; Greenhouse, Bryan; Sturrock, Hugh; Gosling, Roly; Liu, Jenny; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-06-01

    Despite the use of accepted interventions to combat malaria, such as insecticide-treated bed nets and artemisinin-based combination therapy, malaria remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda. We investigated associations between household factors and malaria incidence in a cohort of children living in a highly endemic region of Uganda. Living in a modern house, defined as the use of non-earth floors, non-thatched roofs, and non-mud walls, was associated with approximately half malaria incidence compared with living in a traditional home (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.54, P = 0.001). Other factors found to be associated with a lower incidence of malaria included living in town versus rural setting; sleeping in a room with openings to the outside (windows, eaves, and airbricks); and having an older and more educated primary caregiver. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that improved house construction may be associated with a lower risk of malaria. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. Impact of harvesting and fire on Phragmites australis reed quality in Tembe Elephant Park, Maputaland

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    M.W. van Rooyen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In Maputaland, South Africa, the common reed (Phragmites australis is used extensively for hut building, fencing, craftwork and thatching. As a result of over-harvestingmost reed beds in communal areas have been degraded and are no longer producing reeds of the desired quality. At present the most productive reed beds are all found inconservation areas. The KwaMsomi area of the Muzi Swamp in the Tembe Elephant Park has been allocated to the Sibonisweni community for harvesting purposes. Thiscommunity has recently requested Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife for additional areas for harvesting on the grounds that the current site was no longer yielding reeds of suitable quality. The main objective of this study was therefore to determine whether there was a decline in reed quality in the KwaMsomi harvested area. The results of thisstudy suggest that harvested areas contained more thin, short reeds than unharvested areas. Fire can be used to increase reed diameter in harvested areas, but will not significantly affect reed height. Ideally, reeds should only be harvested after the active growth period, when most of the nutrient reserves have been translocated to the rhizomes andthe buds are still dormant. To improve reed quality a three-year rotational harvesting programme should be implemented to allow the reeds to recover fully before being harvested again.

  10. An ecological assessment of Hispid Hare Caprolagus hispidus (Mammalia: Lagomorpha: Leporidae in Manas National Park, Assam, India

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    Naba K. Nath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study of the Hispid Hare Caprolagus hispidus in the tall grassland habitat of Manas National Park, Assam during 2009–2010 is the first detailed assessment in northeastern India.  We assessed the status, distribution, habitat use and key threats to this rare and little studied lagomorph species.  After interviewing local forest staff, 20 grassland patches within a survey area of 2.65ha were selected and transects (50x2 m laid randomly to determine the presence/absence of Hispid Hare by recording pellets and other indirect evidence.  Hare presence was recorded in 17 grassland patches within transects dominated by Imperata cylindrica and Saccharum narenga.  Hispid Hare preferred dry savannah grasslands to wet alluvial grasslands during winter and avoided recently burned patches due to lack of cover and food.  The distribution pattern observed was clumped (s2/a = 6.2, with more evidence of Hispid Hare presence in areas where ground cover was dense, dry and away from water sources. Population density was estimated at 381.55 individuals/km2, which in comparison with other studies indicates that Manas National Park currently holds the highest density of Hispid Hare.  Habitat loss due to overgrazing, unsustainable thatch harvesting, burning of grassland, weed invasion, encroachment and hunting were identified as key threats which must be addressed to ensure survival of this threatened species in the Park.  

  11. The 21 May 2014 Mw 5.9 Bay of Bengal earthquake: macroseismic data suggest a high‐stress‐drop event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stacey; Hough, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    A modest but noteworthy Mw 5.9 earthquake occurred in the Bay of Bengal beneath the central Bengal fan at 21:51 Indian Standard Time (16:21 UTC) on 21 May 2014. Centered over 300 km from the eastern coastline of India (Fig. 1), it caused modest damage by virtue of its location and magnitude. However, shaking was very widely felt in parts of eastern India where earthquakes are uncommon. Media outlets reported as many as four fatalities. Although most deaths were blamed on heart attacks, the death of one woman was attributed by different sources to either a roof collapse or a stampede (see Table S1, available in the electronic supplement to this article). Across the state of Odisha, as many as 250 people were injured (see Table S1), most after jumping from balconies or terraces. Light damage was reported from a number of towns on coastal deltaic sediments, including collapsed walls and damage to pukka and thatched dwellings. Shaking was felt well inland into east‐central India and was perceptible in multistoried buildings as far as Chennai, Delhi, and Jaipur at distances of ≈1600  km (Table 1).

  12. [Strategy for determining a baseline in areas of vector interruption for Chagas disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Diego; Vera, Mauricio; Zuleta, Liliana; Llanos, Violeta; Junqueira, Angela

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Present a strategy to determine the baseline in endemic areas in the process of vector interruption for Chagas disease (CHD). Methods A social and environmental questionnaire and an entomological survey evaluated the physical conditions of dwellings, the inhabitants' knowledge of CHD, the entomological triatomine indicators and the statistical relationship among these variables. Results Colonization and natural infection with Trypanosoma cruzi exist in Rhodnius prolixus, the principal vector of CHD in Colombia. Colonization was related to palm-thatched houses constructed with adobe or wattle and daub. The Panstrongylus geniculatus vector was found to be colonizing. Almost 50% of the surveyed population associated the term CHD with human disease and 37%, with triatomines. Conclusions R. prolixus can be considered to be the principal vector of T. cruzi in domestic environments and the process of interruption is feasible within the prioritized municipality. New studies are needed to verify the existence of wild populations of R. prolixus that could affect future stages of the process and demonstrate whether P. geniculatus is a factor in the transmission of T. cruzi. These scenarios can be made viable by including the inhabitants throughout the process, since they have been highly sensitive in vector detection inside their houses. The study design presented here can be adapted to other endemic areas of the Region of the Americas.

  13. Degradation and sorption of the fungicide tebuconazole in soils from golf greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Nora; Rosenbom, Annette E; Jensen, Anne M D; Sørensen, Sebastian R

    2016-12-01

    The fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) is used to repress fungal growth in golf greens and ensure their playability. This study determined the degradation and sorption of TBZ applied as an analytical grade compound, a commercial fungicide formulation or in combination with a surfactant product in thatch and soils below two types of greens (USGA and push-up greens) in 12-cm vertical profiles covered by three different types of turf grass. Only minor TBZ degradation was observed and it was most pronounced in treatments with the commercial fungicide product or in combination with the surfactant compared to the analytical grade compound alone. A tendency for higher TBZ sorption when applied as the formulated product and lowest sorption when applied as a formulated product in combination with the surfactant was observed, with this effect being most distinct on USGA greens. No correlation between occurrence of degradation and soil depth, green type or grass type was observed. Sorption seemed to be the main process governing the leaching risk of TBZ from the greens and a positive correlation to the organic matter content was shown. In light of these findings, organic matter content should be taken into consideration during the construction of golf courses, especially when following USGA guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conservation and management of the endangered Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Clare; Rounds, Isaac; Watling, Dick

    2012-05-01

    Recovery planning is a key component of many threatened species conservation initiatives and can be a powerful awareness raising tool. One of the largest impediments to conservation efforts in the Pacific region however, is the lack of ecological data and its subsequent effects on the development of feasible and useful recovery plans for threatened species. Without these plans, the understaffed, underfunded and often technically ill-equipped conservation agencies face huge difficulties in planning, prioritizing and conducting conservation activities to adequately protect biodiversity. The Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, is an endemic endangered palm species whose survival is heavily dependent on a feasible species recovery plan. It is geographically restricted and threatened by habitat destruction and overexploitation for thatch for the tourism industry and palm heart consumption by local consumers. Despite its threatened status, M. vitiense is not currently protected by national or international legislation. Recent field surveys and extensive stakeholder consultation have resulted in the production of a species recovery plan highlighting the importance of the species and advocating sustainable harvesting rather than complete bans to promote conservation. This article summarizes the recovery plan and its current effects on the status of M. vitiense in Fiji. We also discuss the role of different stakeholders in the conservation of M. vitiense, including the absence of significant behavioral changes by the largest consumer - the tourism industry, and the importance of recovery plans for biodiversity conservation in the Pacific.

  15. Social and environmental inequities in dental caries among indigenous population in Brazil: evidence from 2000 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Filho, Pedro; Santos, Ricardo Ventura; Vettore, Mario Vianna

    2013-09-01

    This ecological study investigated the association between social and environmental inequities and dental caries among indigenous people in Brazil. Dental caries data were gathered from articles identified from electronic databases for the period between 2000 and 2007. Independent variables were obtained from the census of Health Information System for Sanitation Indigenous Populations. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to test the association between social and environmental characteristics and dental caries (DMFT index) according to the age group. Results were analyzed for 48 indigenous peoples from 19 selected studies. The occurrence of dental caries in particular age groups was inversely associated with the location of villages outside the Amazon region (12, 15 - 19, and 20 - 34 years), availability of electricity (15 - 19 and 20 - 34 years) and proportion of households covered with straw/thatch (20 - 34 years). The presence of schools was statistically associated with higher DMFT averages (15 - 19 and 20 - 34 years). It can be concluded that aspects of location and existing infrastructure in indigenous communities, which are linked to the availability of oral health services, are associated with the occurrence of dental caries in indigenous populations in Brazil.

  16. Surfactant-amended fertilizer improves turfgrass water use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, J.

    2009-04-01

    Due to increasing efforts for water conservation of amenity turf, irrigation restrictions which reduce irrigation flexibility and increase the intervals between irrigations have become routine regulatory ordinances in communities. Although there are millions of hectares of irrigated residential turf areas there has been no investigation of the relationship of soil water repellency impacts such as impaired soil water retentions and availability and lawn performance in the USA The objective of this experiment was to evaluate commercial fertilizer, an experimental fertilizer containing a surfactant, and a non-fertilized control for the alleviation of soil water availability, time to wilting, and improvement of residential lawn turfgrass quality. The experiment was initiated on October 24, 2006 with the application of the above treatments (application rate of 4.5 g N/m2) on 4 replications of 1m x 2m ‘Floratam' St. Augustinegrass. A custom automated clear plastic rain shelter was constructed for this experiment which covered the plots from 4:00 pm to 8:00 am each day and during any rainfall event (a rain sensor was installed which when wet automatically moved the shelter over the plots and back off the plots when the sensor was dry). Plots received no water (rainfall or irrigation) for the duration of the experiment except when fertilizer was applied at initiation and at the end of a wilt cycle to bring plots back to field capacity. Pre-treatment soil cores were taken with a 5 cm diameter cup cutter for thatch measurement and thatch dry weight. Soil cores were taken with a 2 cm diameter soil probe pre-treatment and after irrigation on each wilt cycle for water drop penetration time (WDPT). Three dry-down cycles were repeated. Turfgrass quality/color ratings (scale of 1-10 with 10=dark green turf, 1=dead/brown turf, and 6=minimally acceptable turf) and visual percent wilt ratings (when evident) were taken throughout the test. Percent soil moisture was also taken using

  17. Managing Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to Reduce Methane Emissions and Increase Carbon Uptake Laurie Koteen, Sara Knox, Cove Sturtevant, Joseph Verfaillie, Jaclyn Hatala, Dennis Baldocchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteen, L. E.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Matthes, J. H.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    methane formation. Under these conditions, it becomes more energetically favorable for alternative chemical transformations to occur in which CO2 and not CH4¬ is released. A second management activity would be implemented to see if wetland carbon uptake could be increased. As wetlands mature, perennial wetland vegetation often develops a significant thatch layer which can reduce photosynthesis of growing shoots by blocking radiation from leaf surfaces. Here we propose to remove the stalks of established vegetation. This would serve two goals: 1. Decomposing vegetation would be incorporated into the soil, leading to soil accretion, and 2. Thatch removal would liberate fledgling shoots, potentially increasing carbon uptake through subsequent seasons. A third investigation would compare CO2 and CH4 fluxes at an existing tower atop low salinity sediments with a new tower where site salinity is relatively high. This effort would inform new site selection efforts for wetland restoration projects. Sites located closer to the San Francisco Bay Area are tidally-influenced, and therefore have higher salinity than the impounded freshwater systems of our current study within the Delta region.

  18. Green technology for keeping soil-water-nutrient fluxes on cultivated steep land and climate change mitigation.

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    Effiom Oku

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of vetiver as a green technology can address African farmers’ ecological problems through protecting farmlands on steep lands. In addition, it offers the opportunity to integrate smallholders into the green economy as it sequesters carbon, keep water and nutrient fluxes within the system, sustain high crop yield with climate change adaptation potentials. This is particularly important as more slopes are converted to agricultural lands due to increase in population density and poverty. Thus, the study investigated the optimal strip width for increases in soil productivity and farmers’ preferences for space. The study planted maize and cassava in between vetiver field structures (VFS installed on the contour at 5, 15 , 25 m apart and compared it with Farmers’ Practice (FP on a 45 % slope and quantified the amount of soil displaced, water and plant nutrient losses and crop yields. Vetiver installed at 5 m surface interval spacing significantly enhanced carbon sequestration indicating potentials for GHGs mitigation and reduced N, P, Ca, Mg, Na and K losses when compared with FP. Vetiver allowed only 7 % rainfall lost as against 29 % on FP this demonstrates the climate change adaptation potentials of vetiver. Soil displaced under FP was 68 times higher than the soil loss tolerance limit of 12 t ha-1 yr-1 whereas under VFS at 5, 15 and 25 m it was 2½, 13 and 12 times higher. Maize grain yield were 35, 23 and 24 % higher on the VFS field at 5, 15 and 25 m respectively when compared to FP. The corresponding values for cassava fresh tuber were 43, 32 and 29 % higher. Unlike other technologies, vetiver grass contributes to the livelihood of the farmers by providing raw material for house thatching, handicrafts and fodder for livestock during lean seasons.

  19. "Earthen constructions" - towards creating a sustainable habitat by minimising the ecological footprint

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    Aparna Das

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustenance of the human race has put an immense pressure on our planet Earth in terms of sustainability of natural resources. The greenhouse effect and the ozone hole are the two most threatening effects of pollution. Constructions of buildings as well as materials contribute to a large percentage to this pollution. Again every material used in the building industry has its source in the Earth. In general the low energy materials will be least polluting. The conventionally used building materials like bricks, cement, steel, timber, plastics, glass etc. usually involve huge transportation costs and also manufacturing processes which are detriment al to the environment. On the other hand the demand for new buildings as well as the cost of building construction is growing a tremendous pace. We have to search for alternative materials which are energy efficient, environment friendly and economical like our traditional building materials - mud walls and thatch roofs. Of all the alternatives available to us which lead the way to sustainability, building with earth has been an ancient and accepted practice among communities all over the world. It is estimated that the construction and the operation of buildings is responsible for around half of all glob al C02 emissions, thereby contributing the largest single source attributable to climate change. Earthen construction has been, is and will continue to be a reality. Stabilised rammed earth walls can be used as a building integrated source of passive cooling technique. A huge population in Indi a lives in the rural areas where there has been a growing trend in shifting towards brick and concrete constructions in search for social status. Even a small percentage can lead to massive increase in glob l C02 emissions if the trend is not checked at this point. This papers looks into the current scenario and hence the corresponding responsibility on architects, planners and policy makers to bring in

  20. Diversity of use and local knowledge of wild and cultivated plants in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroyi, Alfred

    2017-08-08

    Traditional ecological knowledge among indigenous communities plays an important role in retaining cultural identity and achieving sustainable natural resource management. Hundreds of millions of people mostly in developing countries derive a substantial part of their subsistence and income from plant resources. The aim of this study was to assess useful plant species diversity, plant use categories and local knowledge of both wild and cultivated useful species in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa. The study was conducted in six villages in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa between June 2014 and March 2017. Data on socio-economic characteristics of the participants, useful plants harvested from the wild, managed in home gardens were documented by means of questionnaires, observation and guided field walks with 138 participants. A total of 125 plant species belonging to 54 genera were recorded from the study area. More than half of the species (59.2%) are from 13 families, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Araliaceae, Asparagaceae, Asphodelaceae, Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Malvaceae, Myrtaceae, Poaceae, Rosaceae and Solanaceae. More than a third of the useful plants (37.6%) documented in this study are exotic to South Africa. About three quarters of the documented species (74.4%) were collected from the wild, while 20.8% were cultivated and 4.8% were spontaneous. Majority of the species (62.4%) were used as herbal medicines, followed by food plants (30.4%), ethnoveterinary medicine (18.4%), construction timber and thatching (11.2%). Other minor plant use categories (1-5%) included firewood, browse, live fence, ornamentals, brooms and crafts. This study demonstrated that local people in the Eastern Cape province harbour important information on local vegetation that provides people with food, fuel and medicines, as well as materials for construction and the manufacturing of crafts and many other products. This study also demonstrated the dynamism of

  1. Vegetal fibers used in artisan fishing in the Salgado region, Pará

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    Luiz Carlos Batista Lobato

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant-derived fibers used in small-scale fisheries of the Salgado region of Pará state, Brazil. Fiber-providing plants occupy a distinctive place in the daily life of traditional Amazonian communities, next to medicinal plants, food plants, and timber species. In the Salgado region of Pará state, Brazil, on the Atlantic coast (municipalities of Colares, Curuçá, Magalhães Barata, Maracanã, Marapanim, Salinópolis, Santarém Novo, São Caetano de Odivelas, São João de Pirabas, and Vigia plant-derived fibers are used in basketwork, ropes, construction reinforcements (in place of nails, body adornments, and clothing. For this survey, data were obtained from craft workers and fishermen in the Salgado region, in about 150 semi-structured interviews. In all, 17 plant species in eight botanical families and 17 genera are used in the preparation of fishing gear. Supports are made from the stems of Marantaceae and stipes of Arecaceae, woven elements are the aerial roots of Araceae and Cyclanthaceae and the stems of vine-like Bignoniaceae and Dilleniaceae, and roofing thatch is made from the leaves and midribs of Arecaceae. The most represented family in terms of number of species and uses was Arecaceae, with 8 species, followed by Dilleniaceae and Araceae, each with 2 species, and Bignoniaceae, Bombacaceae, Cyclanthaceae, Marantaceae, and Poaceae, each with a single utilized species. In addition, this paper provides information on these fiber-producing plants, in terms of their morphology, the origin and manipulation of plant materials by craftsmen, and the produced artifacts and their uses, as well as reporting cultural aspects of fibrous plant use in daily fishing activities in the Salgado region.

  2. Biomass and energetics of non-timber forest resources in a cluster of tribal villages on the Eastern Ghats of Orissa, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, M.K.; Dash, S.S. [Berhampur University, Orissa (India). Dept. of Botany

    2000-07-01

    An empirical study on the non-timber forest products (NTFPs) in three tribal villages on the Eastern Ghats of India was made during 1994-95. These village ecosystems - Rajikakhola, Nediguda and Badruguda - are situated in the Phulbani district of Orissa and are inhabited by the Kondh tribe. The average annual production of important non-timber forest products (NTFPs) was 1.87 t (26.78 GJ) of mohua flower, 2.96 t (54.41 GJ) of siali leaf, 6.73 t (107.06 GJ) of thatch grass, 4.2 t (8.01 GJ) of sago palm sap and 0.93 t (11.39 GJ) of tamarind pulp per village. Total production of NTFPs was 253.55 GJ per village. Total consumption of NTFPs was 190.57 GJ per village. However, average household consumption was 9.60 GJ. Annual country liquor consumption was 2287 1 per village, out of which a total of 762 1 was prepared locally and the rest imported. Total annual export of NTFPs was 3.69 t (61.47 GJ) per village, maximum being by Rajikakhola. Among the exported products siali leaf ranked highest. Total human energy expended for collection of NTFP was 16.1 GJ per village, out of which men contributed 37.3%, women 53.8% and children 8.9% in these villages. The average input-output ratio of energy for NTFP was 16.56. For sustainable development of tribal villages, conservation and proper management of existing forests, minimisation of waste and increase of the value of products through efficient processing are highly essential. (author)

  3. Distribution of anopheline mosquitoes in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shililu, Josephat; Ghebremeskel, Tewolde; Mengistu, Solomon; Fekadu, Helen; Zerom, Mehari; Mbogo, Charles; Githure, John; Gu, Weidong; Novak, Robert; Beier, John C

    2003-09-01

    The spatial distribution of anopheline mosquito species was studied throughout Eritrea during the 1999-2001 malaria transmission seasons from October to December for the highlands and western lowlands and February to April for the coastal region. Of the 302 villages sampled, 59 were visited in both the first and second year. Overall, 13 anopheline species were identified, with the Anopheles gambiae complex predominating during the first year (75.6%, n = 861) and the second year (91.9%, n = 1,262). Intrazonal variation accounted for 90% of the total variation in mosquito distribution. Polymerase chain reaction results indicated that 99% (n = 1,309) of the An. gambiae s.l. specimens were An. arabiensis, indicating that this was the only member of the gambiae complex present. There was a high degree of aggregation of anophelines within zones and villages, with more than 80% of the total anophelines being collected from less than 20% of the villages and from only 10% of the houses sampled. At least 80% of the anopheline mosquitoes were collected from grass-thatched Agudo-type housing. Vector abundance showed an inverse relationship with elevation, with highest densities in the low-lying western lowlands. Multiple regression analysis of log-transformed mean density of An. arabiensis with rainfall and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (average NDVI, minimum NDVI, and maximum NDVI) showed that these independent variables were not significantly associated with mosquito densities (R2 = 0.058). Our study contributes to the basic understanding of the ecology and distribution of malaria vectors with respect to species composition and spatial heterogeneities both that could be used to guide vector control operations in Eritrea.

  4. MANGROVE RESOURCE USES BY LOCAL COMMUNITY IN INDONESIA

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    Cecep Kusmana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is an archipelagic country of more than 17,504 islands (28 big islands and 17,475 small islands with the length of coastline estimated at 95,181 km, which bears mangroves from several meters to several kilometers. They are estimated at 3.2 million hectares growing extensively in the five big islands (Java, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Papua with various community types comprising of about 157 species (52 species of trees, 21 species of shrubs, 13 species of lyana, seven species of palms, 14 species of grasses, eight species of herbs, three species of parasites, 36 species of epiphytes, three species of ferns. The mangroves resources in Indonesia involve the flora, fauna, and land resources which are needed for supporting many kinds of human needs, especially for local community living in surrounding mangroves. For centuries, the Indonesian people have traditionally utilized mangroves. The most significant value of mangrove utilization is the gathering of forest products, classified into timber and non-timber products. The timber refers to poles and firewood, charcoal, and construction materials (e.g. housing material and fishing gears; the latter include tannin, medicines, dye, nypa thatch and shingles, nypa sap for vinegar and winemaking, and food drinks. Traditional uses of mangrove forest products are mainly the direct utilization of the products, usually in small scale. Beside of those, local community are used to utilizing associated mangrove aquatic fauna for supporting their daily life as well as utilizing mangrove habitat for multipurpose uses through agroforestry techniques (silvofishery, agrosilvofishery, agrosilvopastoralfishery systems. So that, the good mangrove ecosystem serves luxurious both flora and fauna species (biodiversity as well as their abundance for signicantly supporting the welfare of coastal community

  5. Habitat Characteristics of Small-clawed Otter (Aonyx cinereus in Ujong Nga, Samatiga,West Aceh

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    Abdullah Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small-clawed otter (Aonyx cinereus is the smallest among the sub-family Lutrinae, today occurs population decrease of small-clawed otter caused by human activity, depletion of prey species, and exploitation. This research is done to learn physically and biologically of the habitat characteristic of small-clawed otter. Retrieval of data was held on 1-14 in April 2014. The parameters which used are the amount of tracks found in habitat that is used by the small-clawed otter in Ujong Nga village. The data is collected on small-clawed otter habitat in Ujong Nga and sample used are plot with measure of 30x30m and then  divided into 8 plots. The result showed that the small-clawed otter selecting habitat unit with criteria (a the type of habitat are field, swamp, thatch forest, and riverside; (b the availabilty of many feed (1,33 tracks per plot, rare (0,33 tracks per plot, less (0,17 tracks per plot; (c the tracks distance to the nest 0-25 m (1,66 tracks per plot, 25-50 m (1 tracks per plot, > 50 m (0,5 tracks per plot; (d the tracks distance to water source 0-25 m (2,16 tracks per plot, 25-50 m (0,5 tracks per plot, and for distance to > 50 m track is not found; and(e the tracks distance to toilet site0-25 m (1,16 tracks per plot, 25-50 m (0,5 tracks per plot, and> 50 m (0,17 tracks per plot. The conclusion of this research habitat characteristic ofAonyx cinereusare fieldwithavailability of many feed, close to water source, clost to nest, and close to toilet site.

  6. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in blood donors from Veracruz State, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Romano, Pablo; Cámara-Contreras, Mireya; Bravo-Sarmiento, Elidé; López-Balderas, Nayali

    2015-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas disease. Of the Mexican states, Veracruz is among the most affected by this sickness. However, the actual epidemiologic situation of this disease is not well understood. This study sought to determine the prevalence and risk factors for Chagas disease among Veracruzan blood donors. Blood donors from Centro Estatal de la Transfusion Sanguinea de Veracruz were included. Blood units were serologically scrutinized for T. cruzi antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To identify risk factors, demographic data were collected from the medical records of positive donors and a representative sample of healthy donors. A total of 87,232 donations were analyzed, and the mean prevalence of T. cruzi was found to be 0.5%. The identified risk factors were living as a couple and in a rural area, having a low level of education, being a farmer, dwelling in a house with earthen or wooden walls and a tile or thatch roof, living with domestic animals, recognition of or exposure to triatomine bugs, and residing in the Huasteca region. An increase of rural-living donors infected with T. cruzi was observed in the past 3 years of the study period. The prevalence to Chagas disease has not decreased in the past decade and the disease appears to be spreading in rural areas of Veracruz. This increases the risk of T. cruzi transfusion-transmitted infection, not only in Veracruz and Mexico, but also in other nonendemic countries that receive immigrants from Veracruz State. © 2014 AABB.

  7. Risk factors for visceral leishmaniasis in India: further evidence on the role of domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S P; Hasker, E; Picado, A; Gidwani, K; Malaviya, P; Singh, R P; Boelaert, M; Sundar, S

    2010-07-01

    Studies investigating risk factors for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) on the Indian Subcontinent have shown contradictory results related to the role of domestic animals. In some studies having animals in or around the house was a risk factor, in others it was protective. We investigated the specific hypothesis that keeping domestic animals inside the house at night is a risk factor for VL. Individually matched case-control study. All patients with VL diagnosed in the study area in Bihar, India between March 1st, 2007 and December 1st, 2008 were eligible. For each case, we selected two random controls, with no history of previous VL; matched on sex, age group and neighbourhood. Patients and controls were subjected to a structured interview on the main exposure of interest and potential confounders; a conditional logistic regression model was used to analyse the data. We enrolled 141 patients and 282 controls. We found no significant associations between VL and keeping domestic animals inside the house (OR of 0.88 for bovines and 1.00 for 'any animal') or ownership of domestic animals (OR of 0.97 for bovines and 1.02 for 'any animal'). VL was associated with housing conditions. Living in a thatched house (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.50-4.48) or in a house with damp floors (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.25-5.41) were risk factors, independently from socio economic status. Keeping animals inside the house is not a risk factor for VL in Bihar, India. Improving housing conditions for the poor has the potential to reduce VL incidence.

  8. The Architectural and Cultural Heritage of Sabah - The Rungus Longhouse

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    Bahauddin Azizi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper dwells into heritage tourism that is related to the architectural and cultural heritage of the Rungus people of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. It investigates the cultural influence on the architecture of the longhouse. The Rungus tribal group can be found in the northeast corner of Sabah, farming the land mostly on agricultural products in small scale plantations. Their longhouses, facing extinction, are dual-purpose dwellings, constructed entirely of traditional materials utilising small split timbers lashed with rattan for the frame, palm fronds for the thatched roof, split bamboo for the floor and tree bark of hewn wood for the compartment walls. Each family has its own separate quarters off a common hall for socialising and community work and village life is usually based on the cultural traditions. Strongly related to the spirit of the place, the ‘rice spirit’, in particular, figures prominently in the Rungus people’s beliefs and practices in controlling the spirits and the people’s daily life and often governed by the words of the bobohizans, the high priestess. The objectives gear towards analysing the architectural values and investigating cultural understanding associated with the longhouses. Most importantly, the issue of how the Rungus people relate to the environment is studied through the tangible and intangible cultural aspects of the people. The research utilises the observation technique, interviews with the residents, visual data collection and measured drawings of five longhouses as the processes to document data. The paper instigates an investigation into the conformity of the Rungus people of their place in the environment to perpetuate their lifestyle blessed with a unique heritage found in their architecture and culture, in a land where nature reigns. It is a heritage that worth a second look in the tourism industry of Sabah.

  9. The Rungus Longhouse of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo – A Dying Architecture

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    Bahauddin Azizi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rungus tribal group can be found in the northeast corner of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, farming the land mostly on agricultural products in small scale plantations. Their longhouses, facing extinction, are dual-purpose dwellings, constructed entirely of traditional materials utilising small split timbers lashed with rattan for the frame, palm fronds for the thatched roof, split bamboo for the floor and tree bark of hewn wood for the compartment walls. Each family has its own separate quarters off a common hall for socialising and community work. Village life is usually communal and the village is the major political unit based on the cultural traditions. Strongly related to the spirit of the place, the ‘rice spirit’, in particular, figures prominently in the Rungus people’s beliefs and practices in controlling the spirits and the people’s daily life. Unfortunately, all of these unique beliefs seem to have disappeared through time, thus requiring proper documentation of the longhouses. The objectives gear towards analysing the architectural values and investigating cultural understanding associated with the longhouses. Most importantly, the issue of how the Rungus people relate to the environment is studied through the tangible and intangible cultural aspects of the people. The research utilises the observation technique, interviews with the residents, visual data collection and measured drawings of five longhouses as the processes to document data. The paper instigates an investigation into the conformity of the Rungus people of their place in the environment to perpetuate their lifestyle in a land that is surrounded by nature.

  10. A neglected aspect of the epidemiology of sleeping sickness: the propensity of the tsetse fly vector to enter houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Glyn A; Chamisa, Andrew; Mangwiro, Clement; Torr, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    When taking a bloodmeal from humans, tsetse flies can transmit the trypanosomes responsible for sleeping sickness, or human African trypanosomiasis. While it is commonly assumed that humans must enter the normal woodland habitat of the tsetse in order to have much chance of contacting the flies, recent studies suggested that important contact can occur due to tsetse entering buildings. Hence, we need to know more about tsetse in buildings, and to understand why, when and how they enter such places. Buildings studied were single storied and comprised a large house with a thatched roof and smaller houses with roofs of metal or asbestos. Each building was unoccupied except for the few minutes of its inspection every two hours, so focusing on the responses of tsetse to the house itself, rather than to humans inside. The composition, and physiological condition of catches of tsetse flies, Glossina morsitans morsitans and G. pallidipes, in the houses and the diurnal and seasonal pattern of catches, were intermediate between these aspects of the catches from artificial refuges and a host-like trap. Several times more tsetse were caught in the large house, as against the smaller structures. Doors and windows seemed about equally effective as entry points. Many of the tsetse in houses were old enough to be potential vectors of sleeping sickness, and some of the flies alighted on the humans that inspected the houses. Houses are attractive in themselves. Some of the tsetse attracted seem to be in a host-seeking phase of behavior and others appear to be looking for shelter from high temperatures outside. The risk of contracting sleeping sickness in houses varies according to house design.

  11. An outbreak investigation of visceral leishmaniasis among residents of Dharan town, eastern Nepal, evidence for urban transmission of Leishmania donovani

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    Uranw Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a predominantly rural disease, common in the low lands of eastern Nepal. Since 1997 VL cases have also been reported among residents of the city of Dharan. Our main research objective was to find out whether there had been local transmission of VL inside the city. Methods We conducted an outbreak investigation including a case–control study; cases were all urban residents treated for VL between 2000 and 2008 at BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, a university hospital in the city. For each case, we selected four random controls, with no history of previous VL; frequency-matched for age. Cases and controls were subjected to a structured interview on the main exposures of interest and potential confounders; a binominal multilevel model was used to analyze the data. We also collected entomological data from all neighborhoods of the city. Results We enrolled 115 VL patients and 448 controls. Cases were strongly clustered, 70% residing in 3 out of 19 neighborhoods. We found a strong association with socio-economic status, the poorest being most at risk. Housing was a risk factor independent from socio-economic status, most at risk were those living in thatched houses without windows. ‘Sleeping upstairs’ and ‘sleeping on a bed’ were strongly protective, OR of 0.08 and 0.25 respectively; proximity to a case was a strong risk factor (OR 3.79. Sand flies were captured in all neighborhoods; in collections from several neighborhoods presence of L. donovani could be demonstrated by PCR. Conclusion The evidence found in this study is consistent with transmission of anthroponotic VL within the city. The vector P. argentipes and the parasite L. donovani have both been identified inside the town. These findings are highly relevant for policy makers; in VL endemic areas appropriate surveillance and disease control measures must be adopted not only in rural areas but in urban areas as well.

  12. Population matrix models and palm resource management

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    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available MATRICES DE POPULATIONS ET MISE EN VALEUR DES PALMIERS. Au cours des 20 dernières années, les structures de population de nombreuses espèces de palmiers ont été décrites et discutées. La croissance et la stabilité des populations ont été analysées à l’aide de matrices. Dans cet article, nous reprenons un modèle et en discutons les aspects méthodologiques en vue d’une estimation des paramètres de l’histoire de la vie des palmiers. Les généralisations résultant de précédentes études sont présentées et les conséquences pour la mise en valeur des palmiers, concernant en particulier la confection de toitures, les fruits, la récolte des stipes, sont discutées. MATRICES DE POBLACIONES Y MANEJO DE PALMERAS. En los últimos 20 años, las estructuras de población de numerosas especies de palmeras han sido descritas y discutidas. El crecimiento y la estabilidad de las poblaciones han sido analizadas, utilizando matrices. En el presente artículo, presentamos un modelo y discutimos los aspectos metodológicos específicos para hacer una estimación de los parámetros de la historia de la vida de las palmeras. Son presentadas las generalizaciones diseñadas por estudios previos, y discutidas las implicancias en el manejo de las palmeras, en cuanto a techado, frutas, cosecha de los estípites. Population structures of numerous palm species have been described and discussed in the last 20 years. Population growth and stability have been analyzed with matrix models. In this paper we review matrix models and discuss methodological issues specific to estimating palm life history parameters. Generalizations drawn from previous studies are presented and implications for palm resource management, specifically for thatch, fruit, and stem harvest, are discussed.

  13. PIXE analysis of Thaumatococcus danielli in Osun state of Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O.; Osinkolu, G.A.; Pelemo, D.A., E-mail: skayode2002@yahoo.co.uk [Centre for Energy Research and Development (CERD), Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-lfe (Nigeria); Oladele, A.T. [Department of Pharmacognosy, Facully of Pharmacy, Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-lfe (Nigeria)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Thaumatococcus danielli (Marantaceae Benn.) Benth [Miraculous berry] is a multi-purpose perennial herb that is widely distributed in the tropical rainforest areas of West Africa. The leaves are simple, broad with slender stems connected underground to the perennial rhizomes. Farmers grow it in pockets within cocoa (Theobroma cacao) and kola (Cola nitida) plantations in South western Nigeria, Ghana and Cameroon. Propagation is mainly by rhizomes cuttings and occasionally by the seed. T. danielli plays very important roles in the rural economy generating income for the peasant farmers and traders. T. danielli is used mainly in three ways by the people. The leaves are used in food wrapping because of its very good flavour and its preservative ability; and roof thatching while the stem is locally used as straw in weaving mats and in making baskets, bags, hats, hand fans and other artistic works. Research has shown that the fruits of T.danielli contain low-calorie protein named 'Thaumatin' which is about 2000 times as sweet as sucrose. The stems also can be processed to produce fibre industrially in addition to the industrial potential of Thaumatin. Thaumatin have been implicated to be suitable sweetener for diabetes patients. However, despite the great economic values, potentials and benefits of T. danielli, there is hardly any data on its elemental compositions. This work therefore presents the elemental composition of T. danielli plant's parts (Ieaves, stems, fruits (mesocarps), seeds and roots (rhizomes)) from six different towns in Osun State of Nigeria using the Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. The 2.0 MV collimated proton beam from the NEC 1.7 MV 5SDH Tandem accelerator of the Centre for Energy Research and Development(CERD), Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-lfe, Nigeria was employed for the measurements. The results showed the detection of elements which include K, Ca, Fe, Mn, Sr, Zn, Pb, Br, and CI at various

  14. Factors Affecting Infestation by Triatoma infestans in a Rural Area of the Humid Chaco in Argentina: A Multi-Model Inference Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevitz, Juan M.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Gaspe, María Sol; Alvarado-Otegui, Julián A.; Enríquez, Gustavo F.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi by Triatoma infestans remains a major public health problem in the Gran Chaco ecoregion, where understanding of the determinants of house infestation is limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study to model factors affecting bug presence and abundance at sites within house compounds in a well-defined rural area in the humid Argentine Chaco. Methodology/Principal Findings Triatoma infestans bugs were found in 45.9% of 327 inhabited house compounds but only in 7.4% of the 2,584 sites inspected systematically on these compounds, even though the last insecticide spraying campaign was conducted 12 years before. Infested sites were significantly aggregated at distances of 0.8–2.5 km. The most frequently infested ecotopes were domiciles, kitchens, storerooms, chicken coops and nests; corrals were rarely infested. Domiciles with mud walls and roofs of thatch or corrugated tarred cardboard were more often infested (32.2%) than domiciles with brick-and-cement walls and corrugated metal-sheet roofs (15.1%). A multi-model inference approach using Akaike's information criterion was applied to assess the relative importance of each variable by running all possible (17,406) models resulting from all combinations of variables. Availability of refuges for bugs, construction with tarred cardboard, and host abundance (humans, dogs, cats, and poultry) per site were positively associated with infestation and abundance, whereas reported insecticide use showed a negative association. Ethnic background (Creole or Toba) adjusted for other factors showed little or no association. Conclusions/Significance Promotion and effective implementation of housing improvement (including key peridomestic structures) combined with appropriate insecticide use and host management practices are needed to eliminate infestations. Fewer refuges are likely to result in fewer residual foci after insecticide spraying, and will facilitate community-based vector

  15. Técnica para a observação do comportamento do Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834 em uma miniatura de casa de pau-a-pique e sapê Technic for the observation of the behavior of Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834 in a miniature of a mud-walled and tatch roofed house

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Mac Cord

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de observar e registrar o comportamento do Triatoma infestans quanto a movimentos, posturas e estados fisiológicos, como preconizam os etólogos, foi construída uma réplica de uma casa de paua-pique e sapê com uma proteção externa de acrílico transparente. Para o registro das atividades empregou-se a cinematografia com lapso de tempo, através de uma filmadora super-8 sincronizada a um flash eletrônico e programada para disparos simultâneos de 1 fotograma a cada 30 segundos. A análise dos dados foi feita com um projetor super-8 e um editor, que permitiu observar cada fotograma. Com um período de registros durante 6 dias ininterruptos, os resultados permitiram concluir que: a na ausência de estímulo alimentar, não ocorre atividade locomotora no T. infestans, independente de ser dia ou noite, mesmo com o inseto privado de alimentos; b em presençaa do estímulo alimentar a atividade locomotora ocorre durante as 24 horas do dia, embora em proporção significantemente maior no período de obscuridade.In order to observe and record the behaviour of Triatoma infestans in relation to movement, position and physiological state, like the ethologists commend, a mud-walled thatch roofed house within an external transparent acrilic protection was built. To record the bug activity a time-lapse cinematographic tecnique using a super-8 mm movie camera synchronized to and eletronic flash and programmed for simultaneous shots of one photograph every 30 seconds was employed. The analysis of the data was done with super-8 mm film projector and a movieola editor which allowed the observation of each photograph. After six days of continous observation by this method the following statements could be made: a In the absence of the alimentary stimulus the locomotory activity in T. investans does not occur, being day or night, even if the insect is deprived of its blood-meal, b In presence of an alimentary stimulus the locomotory activity

  16. Multi-level natural resources governance based on local community: A case study on semi-natural grassland in Tarōji, Nara, Japan

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    Daisaku Shimada

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Japan is facing a bio-diversity crisis as a result of rapid industrialisation. The Japanese Ministry of the Environment formulated a National Biodiversity Strategy based on the Convention on Biological Diversity signed at the Earth Summit in 1992. After an amendment in 2002, the National Biodiversity Strategy addressed three crises in biodiversity: over-exploitation and development that destroys habitats, underutilisation (the satoyama problem and artificially introduced factors (chemicals, alien species and so on. This paper focuses on the second problem. Secondary natural environments called satoyama have been created and maintained over the centuries by human activity. Because natural environments in Japan have been affected by human-induced disturbances for 35,000 years, many species have evolved in response to these disturbances. If the human activities cease, many of the species that have evolved to survive in managed environments become threatened. Many satoyama have been managed as commonage or common lands, called iriai in Japan. One natural resource system created by commoners is semi-natural grassland, and economic modernisation has led to abandonment of traditional management practices on these grasslands – one of the more evident changes in Japanese iriai practices. Before industrialisation, semi-natural grasslands were managed as a source of green manure, as a harvest for roofing materials (thatch and as pasture for animals. After industrialisation, however, introduction of chemical fertilizers, changes in building practices and importation of animal feeds rapidly decreased the use value of these grasslands for local residents. On the other hand, their value as public goods – as historical, cultural landscapes and places of biodiversity – which concern a much broader population than the local community – became relatively more important. The resulting problem is how to manage this resource with its new value for new

  17. Applying Retrospective Demographic Models to Assess Sustainable Use: the Maya Management of Xa'an Palms

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    Andrea Martínez-Ballesté

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Xa'an palm (Sabal yapa has been used to thatch traditional Maya houses for over 3000 years. In the Yucatan Peninsula, this palm has been introduced to pasturelands, maize fields (milpas, and homegardens. These and other traditional management systems are usually believed to be sustainable, but there is as yet little evidence to support this hypothesis. Demographic models have been used for this purpose, mainly focusing on population growth rate (λ. So far, retrospective analysis has not been applied, even though it examines how changes in the the life cycle of a species, caused by different management regimes, affect its λ. In this study, we assess whether ecologically sustainable use of xa'an occurs in homegardens, pasturelands, and milpas, and if so, how it is achieved. We constructed matrix population models for four populations of xa'an that were followed for 3 years, and then conducted a retrospective analysis on them. Management in homegardens seems to be oriented to increasing the availability of xa'an leaves, favoring the survival of seedlings, and increasing the density of harvestable-sized palms. However, in the milpa and the pastureland, the population size structure resembles that of unmanaged populations. Our λ values suggest that the traditional use of xa'an in all the studied management regimes is sustainable. Nevertheless, the processes that lead to sustainable use are different in each system, as shown by our retrospective analysis. Although fecundity contributes positively to λ only in homegardens, permanence and growth maintain palm populations at an equilibrium in the pastureland and in the milpa, respectively. Between-year climatic differences had a smaller impact on λ than management practices, which may vary from one year to another, leading to different balances in the sustainable use of the populations involved. Even though no significant differences were found in λ values, Maya achieve sustainable use of xa

  18. Challenges of Implementing Antenatal Ultrasound Screening in a Rural Study Site: A Case Study From the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, David; Lokangaka, Adrien; Bauserman, Melissa; Swanson, Jonathan; Nathan, Robert O; Tshefu, Antoinette; McClure, Elizabeth M; Bose, Carl L; Garces, Ana; Saleem, Sarah; Chomba, Elwyn; Esamai, Fabian; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-06-27

    Persistent global disparities in maternal and neonatal outcomes and the emergence of compact ultrasound technology as an increasingly viable technology for low-resource settings provided the genesis of the First Look Ultrasound study. Initiated in 2014 in 5 low- and middle-income countries and completed in June 2016, the study's intervention included the training of health personnel to perform antenatal ultrasound screening and to refer women identified with high-risk pregnancies to hospitals for appropriate care. This article examines the challenges that arose in implementing the study, with a particular focus on the site in Equateur Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) where the challenges were greatest and the efforts to meet these challenges most illuminating. During the study period, we determined that with resources and dedicated staff, it was possible to leverage the infrastructure and implement ultrasound at antenatal care across a variety of remote sites, including rural DRC. However, numerous technical and logistical challenges had to be addressed including security of the equipment, electricity requirements, and integration of the intervention into the health system. To address security concerns, in most of the countries field sonographers were hired and dispatched each day with the equipment to the health centers. At the end of each day, the equipment was locked in a secure, central location. To obtain the required power source, the DRC health centers installed solar panels bolted on adjacent poles since the thatch roofs of the centers prohibited secure roof-top installation. To realize the full value of the ultrasound intervention, women screened with high-risk pregnancies had to seek a higher level of care at the referral hospital for a definitive diagnosis and appropriate care. While the study did provide guidance on referral and systems management to health center and hospital administration, the extent to which this resulted in

  19. Commercial activities and subsistence utilization of mangrove forests around the Wouri estuary and the Douala-Edea reserve (Cameroon

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    Dahdouh-Guebas Farid

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide there is growing research interest in the ethnobiology of mangrove forests. Notwithstanding that, little information has been published about ethnobiology of mangrove forests in Cameroon. The aims of this study were a to analyze the harvesting methods and the local selling of mangrove wood products by loggers in the vicinity of Wouri estuary and b to investigate the patterns of subsistence uses of mangrove wood products around the Douala-Edea reserve. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 120 active mangrove loggers in 23 Douala wood markets and 103 households located in three villages (Mbiako, Yoyo I and Yoyo II close to Douala-Edea reserve. In each of the three densely populated villages, every second household was chosen for sampling while in all markets, mangrove loggers were chosen randomly. In addition, log diameters were measured in each market using a wooden foldable tape measure. A post hoc analysis (Newman-Keuls test was performed in order to detect the common wood class diameter sold in the Douala wood markets. Results The analysis of the loggers' survey data has shown that large logs of Rhizophora with diameter greater than 40 cm were common in the Douala wood markets and were more closely associated with loggers who used chainsaws. In addition to the general mangroves wood products selling, the analysis on a subsistence level (households' survey suggests the local population's dependence on mangroves, with multiple uses of Rhizophora racemosa Meyer, R. harrisonii Leechman, Avicennia germinans L. Stearn., Laguncularia racemosa Gaertn. f. and Conocarpus erectus L. timbers for furniture, fences, smoking fish, and fuelwood. Finally, Nypa fruticans (Thunb. Wurmb. leaves were used as thatching material for house walls and roofs. Conclusion Our findings revealed that big logs of Rhizophora were commonly sold by the loggers. A majority of loggers (60% reported that mangrove marketed wood

  20. Evapotranspiration and water balance of an anthropogenic coastal desert wetland: responses to fire, inflows and salinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Edward P.; Mexicano, Lourdes; Garcia-Hernandez, Jaqueline; Nagler, Pamela L.; Gomez-Sapiens, Martha M.; Tang, Dawei; Lomeli, Marcelo A.; Ramírez-Hernández, Jorge; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) and other water balance components were estimated for Cienega de Santa Clara, an anthropogenic brackish wetland in the delta of the Colorado River in Mexico. The marsh is in the Biosphere Reserve of the Upper Gulf of California and Delta of the Colorado River, and supports a high abundance and diversity of wildlife. Over 95% of its water supply originates as agricultural drain water from the USA, sent for disposal in Mexico. This study was conducted from 2009 to 2011, before, during and after a trial run of the Yuma Desalting Plant in the USA, which will divert water from the wetland and replace it with brine from the desalting operation. The goal was to estimate the main components in the water budget to be used in creating management scenarios for this marsh. We used a remote sensing algorithm to estimate ET from meteorological data and Enhanced Vegetation Index values from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on the Terra satellite. ET estimates from the MODIS method were then compared to results from a mass balance of water and salt inflows and outflows over the study period. By both methods, mean annual ET estimates ranged from 2.6 to 3.0 mm d−1, or 50 to 60% of reference ET (ETo). Water entered at a mean salinity of 2.6 g L−1 TDS and mean salinity in the wetland was 3.73 g L−1 TDS over the 33 month study period. Over an annual cycle, 54% of inflows supported ET while the rest exited the marsh as outflows; however, in winter when ET was low, up to 90% of the inflows exited the marsh. An analysis of ET estimates over the years 2000–2011 showed that annual ET was proportional to the volume of inflows, but was also markedly stimulated by fires. Spring fires in 2006 and 2011 burned off accumulated thatch, resulting in vigorous growth of new leaves and a 30% increase in peak summer ET compared to non-fire years. Following fires, peak summer ET estimates were equal to ETo, while in non-fire years peak ET was

  1. The cob building technique. Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson, L.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cob, an ancient earth building technique has given rise to hundreds of thousand buildings across Europe for centuries. It has a very distinct appearance of substantial organic walls punctuated with small apertures whose windows and doors are set back to create deep reveals. Traditionally protected by thatched roofs, these vernacular buildings make an important contribution to local identity. Cob buildings still survive and continue to be occupied in many European countries including France, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Czech Republic and England (1. Following a description of the cob technique, this paper will present a brief overview of the history of cob in Devon, a county in South West England. Recent English cob buildings will be introduced with a discussion of the potential of this earth building technique for future architecture.

    A través de Europa, cientos de miles de edificios han sido construidos por un método de construcción antiguo, el uso del cob. Estos edificios tienen una apariencia característica de muros orgánicos salpicados con pequeñas aperturas cuyas puertas y ventanas se rehunden para crear profundos relieves. Tradicionalmente protegidos por techos de paja, en estos edificios vernáculos está una parte importante de la identidad local. En muchos países europeos todavía se encuentran edificios hechos de cob, como Francia, Italia, Alemania, Bélgica, República Checa, e Inglaterra (1. Después de una descripción sobre el uso de cob, este artículo presentará una historia breve del uso de cob en Devon, una región en el suroeste de Inglaterra. También introducirá ejemplos de edificios modernos de cob, con una discusión sobre el potencial de usar este método de construcción en proyectos arquitectónicos en el futuro.

  2. Cultural or Ecological Sustainability? The Effect of Cultural Change on Sabal Palm Management Among the Lowland Maya of Mexico

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    Andrea Martínez-Ballesté

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Sabal palm has been used for thatching the traditional Maya house for over 3000 yr. The great importance of this resource has promoted its management within home gardens. Although traditionally managed populations in home gardens are capable of ecological long-term persistence, the impact of cultural change on sustainable resource management is poorly understood. By means of interviews in 108 households, we obtained information about Sabal management practices, leaf demand, and sociocultural data. Density and size structure of the palm populations in the respective home gardens were also measured. By means of principal components analysis, the sociocultural data were summarized into a cultural change index, which was then statistically related to palm density, size structure, leaf demand, and management practices. Leaf demand along the cultural change gradient was estimated. Sabal populations were affected by the cultural change index. Palm density and the proportion of harvestable individuals were higher in the more traditional households. The number of management practices decreased, and the probability of felling adult palms increased with cultural change. As a result, the percentage of the total leaf demand satisfied by home garden production diminished from 118.2-69.4% as cultural change increased. Traditional practices seem oriented to increasing the palm availability. Seed sowing and the protection of seedlings and adults affect the life stages with the largest impact on the population growth rate, as measured through sensitivity analysis. This means that abandoning traditional practices and felling adults more frequently should reduce rapidly, which is consistent with the low palm density observed in less traditional households. The application of demographic models to Sabal tells us that traditional management warrants the persistence of the resource as long as the current conditions remain unchanged. In contrast, our data show that

  3. Commercial activities and subsistence utilization of mangrove forests around the Wouri estuary and the Douala-Edea reserve (Cameroon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atheull, Adolphe Nfotabong; Din, Ndongo; Longonje, Simon N; Koedam, Nico; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid

    2009-11-17

    Worldwide there is growing research interest in the ethnobiology of mangrove forests. Notwithstanding that, little information has been published about ethnobiology of mangrove forests in Cameroon. The aims of this study were a) to analyze the harvesting methods and the local selling of mangrove wood products by loggers in the vicinity of Wouri estuary and b) to investigate the patterns of subsistence uses of mangrove wood products around the Douala-Edea reserve. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 120 active mangrove loggers in 23 Douala wood markets and 103 households located in three villages (Mbiako, Yoyo I and Yoyo II) close to Douala-Edea reserve. In each of the three densely populated villages, every second household was chosen for sampling while in all markets, mangrove loggers were chosen randomly. In addition, log diameters were measured in each market using a wooden foldable tape measure. A post hoc analysis (Newman-Keuls test) was performed in order to detect the common wood class diameter sold in the Douala wood markets. The analysis of the loggers' survey data has shown that large logs of Rhizophora with diameter greater than 40 cm were common in the Douala wood markets and were more closely associated with loggers who used chainsaws. In addition to the general mangroves wood products selling, the analysis on a subsistence level (households' survey) suggests the local population's dependence on mangroves, with multiple uses of Rhizophora racemosa Meyer, R. harrisonii Leechman, Avicennia germinans L. Stearn., Laguncularia racemosa Gaertn. f. and Conocarpus erectus L. timbers for furniture, fences, smoking fish, and fuelwood. Finally, Nypa fruticans (Thunb.) Wurmb. leaves were used as thatching material for house walls and roofs. Our findings revealed that big logs of Rhizophora were commonly sold by the loggers. A majority of loggers (60%) reported that mangrove marketed wood constitute a principal source of income. Most of the villagers (85

  4. Resting and feeding preferences of Anopheles stephensi in an urban setting, perennial for malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shalu; Ravishankaran, Sangamithra; Justin, N A Johnson Amala; Asokan, Aswin; Mathai, Manu Thomas; Valecha, Neena; Montgomery, Jacqui; Thomas, Matthew B; Eapen, Alex

    2017-03-10

    The Indian city of Chennai is endemic for malaria and the known local malaria vector is Anopheles stephensi. Plasmodium vivax is the predominant malaria parasite species, though Plasmodium falciparum is present at low levels. The urban ecotype of malaria prevails in Chennai with perennial transmission despite vector surveillance by the Urban Malaria Scheme (UMS) of the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP). Understanding the feeding and resting preferences, together with the transmission potential of adult vectors in the area is essential in effective planning and execution of improved vector control measures. A yearlong survey was carried out in cattle sheds and human dwellings to check the resting, feeding preferences and transmission potential of An. stephensi. The gonotrophic status, age structure, resting and host seeking preferences were studied. The infection rate in An. stephensi and Anopheles subpictus were analysed by circumsporozoite ELISA (CS-ELISA). Adult vectors were found more frequently and at higher densities in cattle sheds than human dwellings. The overall Human Blood Index (HBI) was 0.009 indicating the vectors to be strongly zoophilic. Among the vectors collected from human dwellings, 94.2% were from thatched structures and the remaining 5.8% from tiled and asbestos structures. 57.75% of the dissected vectors were nulliparous whereas, 35.83% were monoparous and the rest 6.42% biparous. Sporozoite positivity rate was 0.55% (4/720) and 1.92% (1/52) for An. stephensi collected from cattle sheds and human dwellings, respectively. One adult An. subpictus (1/155) was also found to be infected with P. falciparum. Control of the adult vector populations can be successful only by understanding the resting and feeding preferences. The present study indicates that adult vectors predominantly feed on cattle and cattle sheds are the preferred resting place, possibly due to easy availability of blood meal source and lack of any

  5. A cross-sectional study of determinants of indoor environmental exposures in households with and without chronic exposure to biomass fuel smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Suzanne L; Williams, D'Ann L; Breysse, Patrick N; Baron, Patrick A; Grajeda, Laura M; Gilman, Robert H; Miranda, J Jaime; Checkley, William

    2014-03-24

    Burning biomass fuels indoors for cooking is associated with high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and carbon monoxide (CO). More efficient biomass-burning stoves and chimneys for ventilation have been proposed as solutions to reduce indoor pollution. We sought to quantify indoor PM and CO exposures in urban and rural households and determine factors associated with higher exposures. A secondary objective was to identify chronic vs. acute changes in cardiopulmonary biomarkers associated with exposure to biomass smoke. We conducted a census survey followed by a cross-sectional study of indoor environmental exposures and cardiopulmonary biomarkers in the main household cook in Puno, Peru. We measured 24-hour indoor PM and CO concentrations in 86 households. We also measured PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations gravimetrically for 24 hours in urban households and during cook times in rural households, and generated a calibration equation using PM2.5 measurements. In a census of 4903 households, 93% vs. 16% of rural vs. urban households used an open-fire stove; 22% of rural households had a homemade chimney; and <3% of rural households participated in a national program encouraging installation of a chimney. Median 24-hour indoor PM2.5 and CO concentrations were 130 vs. 22 μg/m3 and 5.8 vs. 0.4 ppm (all p<0.001) in rural vs. urban households. Having a chimney did not significantly reduce median concentrations in 24-hour indoor PM2.5 (119 vs. 137 μg/m3; p=0.40) or CO (4.6 vs. 7.2 ppm; p=0.23) among rural households with and without chimneys. Having a chimney did not significantly reduce median cook-time PM2.5 (360 vs. 298 μg/m3, p=0.45) or cook-time CO concentrations (15.2 vs. 9.4 ppm, p=0.23). Having a thatched roof (p=0.007) and hours spent cooking (p=0.02) were associated with higher 24-hour average PM concentrations. Rural participants had higher median exhaled CO (10 vs. 6 ppm; p=0.01) and exhaled carboxyhemoglobin (1.6% vs. 1.0%; p=0.04) than urban

  6. Nitorgen Deposition Impacts on a Sensitive Grassland Ecosystem: Conservation, Management, and Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S. B.; Luth, D. C.

    2002-12-01

    Humans have greatly increased the flux of reactive nitrogen in the biosphere, altering many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, grasslands on nutrient-poor serpentinitic soils are being invaded by nutrient-demanding introduced annual grasses, driven by dry N-deposition on the order of 10 kg ha-1 yr-1. These grass invasions threaten the rich native biodiversity of the serpentinitic grasslands, including the federally-protected Bay checkerspot butterfly and several endemic plant species. A passive monitoring network for reactive nitrogen gases (NOx, NO2, NH3, HNO3, and O3) has been set up to investigate regional and local N-deposition gradients. The regional gradient extends from clean coastal areas to inland valleys downwind of the highly urbanized Santa Clara Valley, driven by prevailing NW winds. A local gradient extends upwind and downwind of an 8-lane freeway carrying 100,000 cars/day, located in a relatively clean near-coastal area. Plant surveys at the clean-air site bisected by the freeway show greater grass invasion closer to the freeway, but only on the downwind side (controlling for soil depth, the other main factor affecting grass density). Grassed-over areas build up thatch that suppresses native plants. Restoration experiments include mowing, goat grazing, and prescribed fire. Carefully-timed mowing appears to be an effective treatment for small areas. Removal of cuttings removes 5-8 kg-N/ha, the same order of magnitude as the estimated N-inputs from the freeway. Additional NOx and NH3 sources planned for the region include a 600 MW natural gas fired power plant, industrial parks that may eventually draw 20,000 to 50,000 additional cars per day, 25,000 housing units, and associated highway improvements. Mitigation proposals include purchase and long-term management of hundreds of hectares of habitat. Management of the larger areas necessitates continued moderate cattle grazing. Cattle selectively crop nitrogen

  7. The challenge of water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1960-01-01

    In a sandy, riverside location in Wisconsin my family has a farm, once abandoned by a previous owner because it would not produce much corn. By the time we bought it for a pittance, only a few remnants of white pine remained from the magnificent stands made famous by Paul Bunyan. The variability of the glacial topography had resulted in an interesting mixture of prairie marsh, swamp woodlot, and sandhill.We did not acquire this farm because it had a great potential for growing crops. Rather we were interested in the variety of ecologic and topographic types which, even within the confines of our property, represented a condensed version of many different types of land in the Wisconsin countryside. It has also a very peculiar esthetic and historical interest. Marquette's canoes slipped quietly past our favorite fishing hole on the river. Passenger pigeons had once roosted in our great oaks. The few remaining white pines silhouetted against the sky-glow of evening made one think of the Round River and the Blue Ox.All right, we had acquired this place. What were we to do with it. Its resources were narrowly limited and peculiar. They had little economic value. All the more reason that they should be appraised in order that they be fully utilized and appreciated. So, while we were hammering and sawing the old stable into a useable homestead, we walked, sat, dug, and pruned in every coulee and covert, in every thicket and thatch. By compass and pace we mapped the boundaries, the vegetation, and sketched in the topography with notes on the distribution of soil and the occurrence of water. We counted the various kinds of birds and found there was a reasonable population of woods species, mostly transients. There were no pheasant, no quail, practically no grouse, and in spring only an occasional woodcock.In conjunction with the analysis of what we had to work with we started immediately on the task of development. The techniques were chosen with an eye to specific goals

  8. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Saptari

    1994-07-01

    , Harold Brookfield, South-East Asia’s environmental future; The search for sustainability. Tokyo: United Nations University Press, Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press, 1993, xxxii + 422 pp., maps, tables, figures, index., Yvonne Byron (eds. - Antje van der Hoek, Keebet von Benda-Beckmann, De emancipatie van Molukse vrouwen in Nederland. Utrecht: Van Arkel,1992, Francy Leatemia-Toma-tala (eds. - Michael Hitchcock, Brita L. Miklouho-Maklai, Exposing Society’s Wounds; Some aspects of Indonesian Art since 1966. Adelaide: Flinders University Asian studies Monograph No.5, illustrations, 1991, iii + 125 pp - Nico Kaptein, Fred R. von der Mehden, Two Worlds of Islam; Interaction between Southeast Asia and the Middle East.Gainesville etc: University Press of Florida 1993, xiii + 128 pp - Nico Kaptein, Karel Steenbrink, Dutch Colonialism and Indonesian Islam; Contacts and Conflicts 1596-1950. Amsterdam-Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 1993. - Harry A. Poeze, Rudolf Mrázek, Sjahrir; Politics and exile in Indonesia. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University, Southeast Asia Program, 1994. - W.G.J. Remmelink, Takao Fusayama, A Japanese memoir of Sumatra 1945-1946; Love and hatred in the liberation war. Ithaca: Cornell University (Cornell Modern Indonesia Project Monograph series 71, 1993, 151 pp., maps, illustrations. - Ratna Saptari, Diana Wolf, Factory Daughters; Gender, Household Dynamics, and Rural Industrialization in Java. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992. - Ignatius Supriyanto, Ward Keeler, Javanese Shadow Puppets. Singapore (etc.: Oxford University Press, 1992, vii + 72 pp.,bibl., ills. (Images of Asia. - Brian Z. Tamanaha,S.J.D., Juliana Flinn, Review of diplomas and thatch houses; Asserting tradition in a changing Micronesia. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992. - Gerard Termorshuizen, Dorothée Buur, Indische jeugdliteratuur; Geannoteerde bibliografie van jeugdboeken over Nederlands-Indië en Indonesië, 1825-1991. Leiden, KITLV Uitgeverij, 1992, 470 pp

  9. Paludiculture on marginal lands - sustainable use of wet peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmke, Claudia; Dahms, Tobias; Wichmann, Sabine; Wichtmann, Wendelin

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are marginal lands. If they are drained, they show a short initial productive period. Soil degradation due to peat oxidation leads to numerous problems which increasingly restrict agricultural use and cause significant environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions and eutrophication and thereby produce high external costs. Worldwide greenhouse gas emissions from drained peatlands have a significant share ( 10%) in the emissions from agriculture, forestry and other land use (AFOLU) sectors (Smith et al. 2014). In Germany they contribute more than 35% to the total emissions from agriculture (agricultural sector and cropland and grassland management) (UBA 2016). Rewetting drained peatlands can significantly reduce environmental problems caused by peatland drainage. Continuation of agricultural use with adapted crops and machinery, so called paludiculture (Latin ‚palus' = swamp) stops further degradation, maintains the peat body, reduces climate change mitigation and produces renewable fuels and raw materials. Fen and bog soils are suitable for various different paludicultures. The biomass of Sphagnum (sphagnum farming) cultivated on cut-over bogs or degraded bog grasslands can be used as raw material for horticultural growing media. Flood-tolerant and productive plant species like Common Reed, Reed Canary Grass, Cattail, Black Alder and different Sedge species are suitable for paludiculture on fen soils. Biomass utilization ranges from traditional forms, like fodder production or the use of Common Reed as roof thatch, to new utilization options, that includes biomass use for heat generation, co-subtrates for biorefineries or construction and insulation products. The above-ground biomass of one hectare Common Reed (winter yield=8 t DM) equates to an energy content of 3,000 litre heating oil. A district heating plant (800 kW) in NE Germany demonstrates the feasibility of using biomass from wet fen meadows for local heat generation. Moreover, tests

  10. Forest gardening on abandoned terraces links local biomass carbon accumulation to international carbon markets, reverses land degradation, improves food diversity, and increases farmer income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Pandit, Bishnu Hari; Kammann, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Despite chronic underproduction of food in Nepal, more and more agricultural land is abandoned especially in the remote middle hills and mountains. Male and young workers leave the villages for higher wages in the bigger cities or abroad. By now, most villages are mainly populated by women, children and elderly persons maintaining the gardens and fields close to the houses and leave the centenarian terraces fallow. Erosion, vanishing water resources, losses of soil organic carbon and the weakening of the local agro-economy become increasingly problematic. During the rainy season of 2015/16, 86 farmer families from four villages replanted their abandoned terraces with 25,000 mixed trees, mostly Cinnamon, Moringa, Mulberry, Lemon, Michelia, Paulownia, and various nuts. All trees were planted with a blend of organic biochar-based fertilizer and compost, since it was convincingly demonstrated by more than 20 field trials in this region that this was the most plant-growth promoting method. Mulching of the trees with rice straw or thatch grass was generalized. To let the young tries pass the critical seven months of dry season, water retention ponds with pipe irrigation were installed. Farmers were organized in groups of three families to mutually help and control the tree maintenance which led to an average tree survival rate of more than 80% after the first year compared to less than 50% in many country-wide forestation projects since the 1980s. Between the lower and upper lines of trees on the terraces, ginger, turmeric, black beans, onions, lentils and other secondary crops were cultivated using the same organic biochar based fertilizer and mulching techniques. What may seem a reasonable approach for many places, is in many of the poorest countries simply not possible to realize because village families do often not have the necessary initial investment for saplings and irrigation facilities at their disposal. Therefore, the Ithaka Institute linked the forest garden

  11. HIDROLISIS SELULOSA MENJADI GLUKOSA DENGAN KATALIS HETEROGEN ARANG AKTIF TERSULFONASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didi Dwi Anggoro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available CELLULOCE HYDROLYSIS TO GLUCOSE USING ACTIVE CARBON SULPHONATED HETEROGENOUS CATALYST. Enzimatic process and acid hydrolysis process are common process for conversion of cellulose to glucose. Unfornately, the two processes are expensive process and korosif process. Hence, the new process, that use sulfonaned active carbon catalyst is important to developing. The sulfonated active carbon is made from carbonated coconut sheel under temperature at 350oC. After carbonation, sulfonated active carbon soaked under sulphate acid 96% at 150oC until 15 hours. The result is then washed and dried, and tested catalyst characteristics in the form of H+ capacity, pore size catalysts by used BET surface area, functional groups by used FTIR, and morphology catalyst structure by used SEM. Catalyst performance was tested in an autoclave reactor through a hydrothermal process with difference of the catalyst amount and temperature. The results showed that the test characteristics of H+ capacity is 2.95 mmol/g, the pore size is 29 m2/gr. FTIR analyze showed that the presence of sulfonate groups read at a wavelength of vibration 1750 cm-1 and 1379 cm-1. By SEM analyze showed that the morphological structure of sulfonated active carbon is more open than other catalyst. By testing catalyst, the highest conversion of glucose is 87.2 %. Keywords: cellulose; glucose; sulfonate active carbon; thatch Abstrak Teknologi yang sudah digunakan dalam mengubah selulosa menjadi glukosa adalah dengan proses enzimatik dan hidrolisis asam. Kedua teknologi tersebut masih memiliki kendala teknis, yaitu  harga enzim yang mahal, proses yang korosif dan menimbulkan limbah, sehingga diperlukan pengembangan teknologi baru salah satu diantaranya yaitu dengan metode katalis heterogen berupa karbon aktif tersulfonasi. Karbon aktif tersulfonasi ini dibuat dari tempurung kelapa yang dikarbonisasi pada temperatur 350oC, selanjutnya direndam dalam asam sulfat 96% pada temperatur 150oC selama 15 jam

  12. Risk factors for house-entry by culicine mosquitoes in a rural town and satellite villages in The Gambia

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    Jasseh Momodou

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening doors, windows and eaves of houses should reduce house entry by eusynanthropic insects, including the common African house mosquito Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and other culicines. In the pre-intervention year of a randomized controlled trial investigating the protective effects of house screening against mosquito house entry, a multi-factorial risk factor analysis study was used to identify factors influencing house entry by culicines of nuisance biting and medical importance. These factors were house location, architecture, human occupancy and their mosquito control activities, and the number and type of domestic animals within the compound. Results 40,407 culicines were caught; the dominant species were Culex thalassius, Cx. pipiens s.l., Mansonia africanus, M. uniformis and Aedes aegypti. There were four times more Cx. pipiens s.l. in Farafenni town (geometric mean/trap/night = 8.1, 95% confidence intervals, CIs = 7.2–9.1 than in surrounding villages (2.1, 1.9–2.3, but over five times more other culicines in the villages (25.1, 22.1–28.7 than in town (4.6, 4.2–5.2. The presence of Cx. pipiens s.l. was reduced in both settings if the house had closed eaves (odds ratios, OR town = 0.62, 95% CIs = 0.49–0.77; OR village = 0.49, 0.33–0.73, but increased per additional person in the trapping room (OR town = 1.16, 1.09–1.24; OR village = 1.10, 1.02–1.18. In the town only, Cx. pipiens s.l. numbers were reduced if houses had a thatched roof (OR = 0.70, 0.51–0.96, for each additional cow tethered near the house (OR = 0.73, 0.65–0.82 and with increasing distance from a pit latrine (OR = 0.97, 0.95–0.99. In the villages a reduction in Cx. pipiens s.l. numbers correlated with increased horses in the compound (OR = 0.90, 0.82–0.99. The presence of all other culicines was reduced in houses with closed eaves (both locations, with horses tethered outside (village only and with increasing room height

  13. LA PALMA AMARGA (Sabal mauritiiformis, Arecaceae EN SISTEMAS PRODUCTIVOS DEL CARIBE COLOMBIANO: ESTUDIO DE CASO EN PIOJÓ, ATLÁNTICO

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    Viviana Andrade-Erazo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENLa palma Sabal mauritiiformis es un recurso importante en el Caribe colombiano debido al uso de sus hojas para techar. Para evaluar el estado de sus poblaciones en Piojó (Atlántico, uno de los municipios más productores de hojas, se estudió la densidad y la estructura poblacional de la palma. Se establecieron 16 parcelas de 0,1 ha, en los tres sistemas de uso de suelo más comunes en la zona: ganadería (6, cultivos (5 y rastrojo (5. Se encontró que la palma amarga constituye un recurso silvestre, muy resistente y capaz de adaptarse a ambientes perturbados pues está incorporada en sistemas productivos de cultivos, rastrojos y ganadería, donde las prácticas de manejo influyen en la densidad y estructura de sus poblaciones. La palma es muy resistente y capaz de adaptarse a ambientes perturbados. El área estudiada incluyó 5349 individuos distribuidos en cuatro categorías de tamaño. Los rastrojos (3620 ± 2808 individuos/hectárea y los cultivos (5612 ± 3361 ind/ha presentaron más individuos y mejores estructuras poblacionales que las áreas de ganadería (1488 ± 827 ind/ha, en las cuales se encontraron poblaciones más deterioradas por efecto del pisoteo y el forrajeo. La prevalencia de individuos en algunas clases de tamaño refleja las condiciones de manejo actual e histórico; actividades como el pastoreo o las quemas, sin una apropiada planificación, pueden comprometer el desarrollo de las poblaciones de la palma y la futura disponibilidad del recurso.ABSTRACTThe palm Sabal mauritiiformis is an important resource in the Colombian Caribbean, as its leaves are used for thatching. In order to assess the status of its populations in Piojó (Atlántico department, one of the major leaf producers in the region, palm population structure was studied by randomly establishing 16 sample plots of 0.1 ha in the three major use areas where the palm occurs:: pastures (6, crops (5 and fallows (5. We found that the bitter palm is a

  14. Availability, usage, and threats to freshwater resources on low carbonate islands in Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboroši, Danko; Jenson, John W.; Sánchez Collazo, Maricruz; Zega, Mojca

    2010-05-01

    Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) is an insular nation in the western Pacific. It consists of 4 high volcanic islands and 37 low carbonate units, mostly coral atolls. The high islands are relatively large, and are developing socioeconomic centers of the country, whereas low islands are small and remote outposts of traditional subsistence lifestyle. The latter are inhabited by a fifth of the nation's population of 107,000 people. Total land area of a typical low island is a fraction of a km2, yet may be home to hundreds of people, creating some of the highest population densities in the Pacific. The resultant extreme pressures on natural resources are exacerbated by severe weather hazards, especially typhoons and unusually high tides which have recently flooded some islands in entirety, damaging homes and food sources. Freshwater resources are particularly sensitive. Crowded low islands have some of the world's most unfavorable relationships between population density and freshwater availability. As there are no communal or municipal facilities and government operated infrastructure, people have only two sources of water available for consumption: rainwater and groundwater. Rain is captured by individual households' thatch or corrugated iron roofs and transferred by gutters to concrete or fiberglass tanks. It is used for drinking, cooking, and dishwashing, and depending on availability, for laundry and showering. Such arrangement are highly unreliable, because they depend on sufficient rainfall and islanders' ability to capture and store it. Some communities have actually run out of water in the past, as a result of prolonged droughts or typhoons' damage to the catchment systems. In addition, tropical climate and pervasive organic matter and microorganisms make the tanks' maintenance difficult, because even most conscientious cleaning cannot ensure that stored water remains potable. Stomach problems and more serious health complications are common. Groundwater

  15. Growing plants on atoll soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E L; Migvar, L; Robison, W L

    2000-02-16

    Many years ago people living on atolls depended entirely on foods gathered from the sea and reefs and grown on land. Only a few plants, such as coconut (ni), Pandanus (bob), and arrowroot (mok-mok), could be grown on the lower rainfall atolls, although adequate groundwater conditions also allowed taro (iaraj, kotak, wot) to be cultivated. On higher rainfall atolls, breadfruit (ma) was a major food source, and banana (binana, kepran), lime (laim), and taros (iaraj, kotak, wot) could be grown. The early atoll populations were experts in growing plants that were vital to sustaining their nutrition requirements and to providing materials for thatch, basketry, cordage, canoe construction, flowers, and medicine. They knew which varieties of food plants grew well or poorly on their atolls, how to propagate them, and where on their atoll they grew best. They knew the uses of most native plants and what the various woods were well suited for. Many varieties of Pandanus (bob) and breadfruit (ma) grew well with high rainfall, but only a few produced well on drier atolls. Such information had been passed down through the generations although some of it has been lost in the last century. Today there are new plants and new varieties of existing plants that can be grown on atolls. There are also new materials and information on how to grow both the old and new plants more effectively. However, there are also introduced weeds and pests to control. Today, there is also an acute need to grow more of the useful plants adapted to atolls. Increasing numbers of people living on an atoll without an equal increase in income or food production stretches the available food supplies. Much has been written about the poor conditions for plant growth on atolls. As compared with many places in the world where crops are grown, however, atolls can provide some highly favorable conditions. For instance, the driving force for plant growth is sunlight, and on atolls light is abundant throughout the

  16. Using geoinformatics and cultural anthropology to identify links between land change, driving forces and actors in the Okavango catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Achim; Stellmes, Marion; Pröpper, Michael; Schneibel, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The recent acceleration of land use transformations, coupled with an increasing global population has manifested in an alteration of almost all terrestrial ecosystems (Millenium Ecosystem Assessment 2005). In particular, the extension and intensification of agricultural and pastoral uses has supported unprecedented rates of population growth (Ellis and Ramankutty 2008). However, this development stands opposed to increased greenhouse gas emissions, declining biodiversity, declining air quality and increasing soil degradation, being reflected in the general reduction in ecosystem services and functions (Sala, Chapin III et al. 2000; Butchart, Walpole et al. 2010; Banwart 2011; Lal 2013). Such global change processes are to a large degree driven by land-use transformations or modifications (Foley, Defries et al. 2005). These are in turn a result of the complex interaction of factors playing out at different scales, varying from global market dynamics through national policies to regional planning and local traditions (Hein, van Koppen et al. 2006). The Okavango Basin represents a highly complex social-ecological system, where the variation in physio-geographic characteristics is reflected by manifold livelihood strategies in the three adjacent countries Angola, Namibia and Botswana. In mostly rural areas, small-scale subsistence agriculture, livestock-keeping and the utilization of natural resources such as thatch grass, timber, fruits etc. have traditionally formed the basis for human well-being. These strategies are juxtaposed by recent urban and transportation infrastructure developments, the expansion of commodity markets, the creation of commercial irrigated farming schemes and dams for energy production, or the growing role of tourism, in particular in the Delta region, as a major source of income generation. At present, the three countries bordering the river have individual legislations governing the use of natural resources, which usually originate at