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Sample records for thaliana phosphorylation site

  1. Phosphorylation site prediction in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiuming; Schulze, Waltraud X; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation events on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are the most pervasive protein covalent bond modifications in plant signaling. Both low and high throughput studies reveal the importance of phosphorylation in plant molecular biology. Although becoming more and more common, the proteome-wide screening on phosphorylation by experiments remains time consuming and costly. Therefore, in silico prediction methods are proposed as a complementary analysis tool to enhance the phosphorylation site identification, develop biological hypothesis, or help experimental design. These methods build statistical models based on the experimental data, and they do not have some of the technical-specific bias, which may have advantage in proteome-wide analysis. More importantly computational methods are very fast and cheap to run, which makes large-scale phosphorylation identifications very practical for any types of biological study. Thus, the phosphorylation prediction tools become more and more popular. In this chapter, we will focus on plant specific phosphorylation site prediction tools, with essential illustration of technical details and application guidelines. We will use Musite, PhosPhAt and PlantPhos as the representative tools. We will present the results on the prediction of the Arabidopsis protein phosphorylation events to give users a general idea of the performance range of the three tools, together with their strengths and limitations. We believe these prediction tools will contribute more and more to the plant phosphorylation research community.

  2. Identification of Polyadenylation Sites within Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal

    2011-09-01

    Machine Learning (ML) is a field of artificial intelligence focused on the design and implementation of algorithms that enable creation of models for clustering, classification, prediction, ranking and similar inference tasks based on information contained in data. Many ML algorithms have been successfully utilized in a variety of applications. The problem addressed in this thesis is from the field of bioinformatics and deals with the recognition of polyadenylation (poly(A)) sites in the genomic sequence of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. During the RNA processing, a tail consisting of a number of consecutive adenine (A) nucleotides is added to the terminal nucleotide of the 3’- untranslated region (3’UTR) of the primary RNA. The process in which these A nucleotides are added is called polyadenylation. The location in the genomic DNA sequence that corresponds to the start of terminal A nucleotides (i.e. to the end of 3’UTR) is known as a poly(A) site. Recognition of the poly(A) sites in DNA sequence is important for better gene annotation and understanding of gene regulation. In this study, we built an artificial neural network (ANN) for the recognition of poly(A) sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Our study demonstrates that this model achieves improved accuracy compared to the existing predictive models for this purpose. The key factor contributing to the enhanced predictive performance of our ANN model is a distinguishing set of features used in creation of the model. These features include a number of physico-chemical characteristics of relevance, such as dinucleotide thermodynamic characteristics, electron-ion interaction potential, etc., but also many of the statistical properties of the DNA sequences from the region surrounding poly(A) site, such as nucleotide and polynucleotide properties, common motifs, etc. Our ANN model was compared in performance with several other ML models, as well as with the PAC tool that is specifically developed for

  3. Identification of novel PAMP-triggered phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events in arabidopsis thaliana by quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Rayapuram, Naganand

    2014-04-04

    Signaling cascades rely strongly on protein kinase-mediated substrate phosphorylation. Currently a major challenge in signal transduction research is to obtain high confidence substrate phosphorylation sites and assign them to specific kinases. In response to bacterial flagellin, a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), we searched for rapidly phosphorylated proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana by combining multistage activation (MSA) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation modes, which generate complementary spectra and identify phosphopeptide sites with increased reliability. Of a total of 825 phosphopeptides, we identified 58 to be differentially phosphorylated. These peptides harbor kinase motifs of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), as well as yet unknown protein kinases. Importantly, 12 of the phosphopeptides show reduced phosphorylation upon flagellin treatment. Since protein abundance levels did not change, these results indicate that flagellin induces not only various protein kinases but also protein phosphatases, even though a scenario of inhibited kinase activity may also be possible. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Mapping of p140Cap phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repetto, Daniele; Aramu, Simona; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation tightly regulates specific binding of effector proteins that control many diverse biological functions of cells (e. g. signaling, migration and proliferation). p140Cap is an adaptor protein, specifically expressed in brain, testis and epithelial cells, that undergoes...... phosphorylation and tunes its interactions with other regulatory molecules via post-translation modification. In this work, using mass spectrometry, we found that p140Cap is in vivo phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y) within the peptide GEGLpYADPYGLLHEGR (from now on referred to as EGLYA) as well as on three serine...... residues. Consistently, EGLYA has the highest score of in silico prediction of p140Cap phosphorylation. To further investigate the p140Cap function, we performed site specific mutagenesis on tyrosines inserted in EGLYA and EPLYA, a second sequence with the same highest score of phosphorylation. The mutant...

  5. Reconstruction and analysis of nutrient-induced phosphorylation networks in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyou eDuan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the dynamics of molecular processes in living organisms in response to external perturbations is a central goal in modern systems biology. We investigated the dynamics of protein phosphorylation events in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to changing nutrient conditions. Phosphopeptide expression levels were detected at five consecutive time points over a time interval of 30 minutes after nutrient resupply following prior starvation. The three tested inorganic, ionic nutrients NH4+, NO3-, PO43- elicited similar phosphosignaling responses that were distinguishable from those invoked by the sugars mannitol, sucrose. When embedded in the protein-protein interaction network of Arabidopsis thaliana, phosphoproteins were found to exhibit a higher degree compared to average proteins. Based on the time-series data, we reconstructed a network of regulatory interactions mediated by phosphorylation. The performance of different network inference methods was evaluated by the observed likelihood of physical interactions within and across different subcellular compartments and based on gene ontology semantic similarity. The dynamic phosphorylation network was then reconstructed using a Pearson correlation method with added directionality based on partial variance differences. The topology of the inferred integrated network corresponds to an information dissemination architecture, in which the phosphorylation signal is passed on to an increasing number of phosphoproteins stratified into an initiation, processing, and effector layer. Specific phosphorylation peptide motifs associated with the distinct layers were identified indicating the action of layer-specific kinases. Despite the limited temporal resolution, combined with information on subcellular location, the available time-series data proved useful for reconstructing the dynamics of the molecular signaling cascade in response to nutrient stress conditions in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

  6. LHC II protein phosphorylation in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in non-photochemical quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitholtz, Hanna-Leena; Srivastava, Renu; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2005-06-01

    Phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex II (LHC II) proteins is induced in light via activation of the LHC II kinase by reduction of cytochrome b(6)f complex in thylakoid membranes. We have recently shown that, besides this activation, the LHC II kinase can be regulated in vitro by a thioredoxin-like component, and H2O2 that inserts an inhibitory loop in the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation in the chloroplast. In order to disclose the complex network for LHC II protein phosphorylation in vivo, we studied phosphorylation of LHC II proteins in the leaves of npq1-2 and npq4-1 mutants of Arabidopis thaliana. In comparison to wild-type, these mutants showed reduced non-photochemical quenching and increased excitation pressure of Photosystem II (PS II) under physiological light intensities. Peculiar regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation was observed in mutant leaves under illumination. The npq4-1 mutant was able to maintain a high amount of phosphorylated LHC II proteins in thylakoid membranes at light intensities that induced inhibition of phosphorylation in wild-type leaves. Light intensity-dependent changes in the level of LHC II protein phosphorylation were smaller in the npq1-2 mutant compared to the wild-type. No significant differences in leaf thickness, dry weight, chlorophyll content, or the amount of LHC II proteins were observed between the two mutant and wild-type lines. We propose that the reduced capacity of the mutant lines to dissipate excess excitation energy induces changes in the production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which consequently affects the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation.

  7. Phosphorylation sites within Ebola virus nucleoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sora Yasri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To understand the infection process, the viral multiplication and entry to the cell is widely studied. The Ebola virus nucleoprotein is the important problem for the pathological process. Focusing on the specific biological process, the post translational modification is needed. Here, the authors used the bioinformatics study to find the phosphorylation sites within the Ebola virus nucleoprotein and could identify many new sites.

  8. Phosphorylation of the 12 S globulin cruciferin in wild-type and abi1-1 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lianglu; Ross, Andrew R. S.; Yang, Jingyi; Hegedus, Dwayne D.; Kermode, Allison R.

    2007-01-01

    Cruciferin (a 12 S globulin) is the most abundant storage protein in the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) and other crucifers, sharing structural similarity with the cupin superfamily of proteins. Cruciferin is synthesized as a precursor in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Subunit assembly is accompanied by structural rearrangements involving proteolysis and disulfide-bond formation prior to deposition in protein storage vacuoles. The A. thaliana cv. Columbia genome contains four cruciferin loci, two of which, on the basis of cDNA analysis, give rise to three alternatively spliced variants. Using MS, we confirmed the presence of four variants encoded by genes At4g28520.1, At5g44120.3, At1g03880.1 and At1g3890.1 in A. thaliana seeds. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, along with immunological detection using anti-cruciferin antiserum and antibodies against phosphorylated amino acid residues, revealed that cruciferin was the major phosphorylated protein in Arabidopsis seeds and that polymorphism far exceeded that predicted on the basis of known isoforms. The latter may be attributed, at least in part, to phosphorylation site heterogeneity. A total of 20 phosphorylation sites, comprising nine serine, eight threonine and three tyrosine residues, were identified by MS. Most of these are located on the IE (interchain disulfide-containing) face of the globulin trimer, which is involved in hexamer formation. The implications of these findings for cruciferin processing, assembly and mobilization are discussed. In addition, the protein phosphatase 2C-impaired mutant, abi1-1, was found to exhibit increased levels of cruciferin phosphorylation, suggesting either that cruciferin may be an in vivo target for this enzyme or that abi1-1 regulates the protein kinase/phosphatase system required for cruciferin phosphorylation. PMID:17313365

  9. The in vivo phosphorylation sites of rat brain dynamin I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Mark E; Anggono, Victor; Bache, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    -824). To resolve the discrepancy and to better understand the biological roles of dynI phosphorylation, we undertook a systematic identification of all phosphorylation sites in rat brain nerve terminal dynI. Using phosphoamino acid analysis, exclusively phospho-serine residues were found. Thr(780) phosphorylation...

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals widespread full phosphorylation site occupancy during mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Brunak, Søren; Olsen, JV

    2010-01-01

    ) or CDK2 were almost fully phosphorylated in mitotic cells. In particular, nuclear proteins and proteins involved in regulating metabolic processes have high phosphorylation site occupancy in mitosis. This suggests that these proteins may be inactivated by phosphorylation in mitotic cells....

  11. PhosphoBase: a database of phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Nikolaj; Kreegipuu, Andres; Brunak, Søren

    1998-01-01

    PhosphoBase is a database of experimentally verified phosphorylation sites. Version 1.0 contains 156 entries and 398 experimentally determined phosphorylation sites. Entries are compiled and revised from the literature and from major protein sequence databases such as SwissProt and PIR. The entries...... displaying the overall conservation of positions around serines phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA). PhosphoBase is available on the WWW at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/databases/PhosphoBase/....

  12. A Grammar Inference Approach for Predicting Kinase Specific Phosphorylation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    Kinase mediated phosphorylation site detection is the key mechanism of post translational mechanism that plays an important role in regulating various cellular processes and phenotypes. Many diseases, like cancer are related with the signaling defects which are associated with protein phosphorylation. Characterizing the protein kinases and their substrates enhances our ability to understand the mechanism of protein phosphorylation and extends our knowledge of signaling network; thereby helping us to treat such diseases. Experimental methods for predicting phosphorylation sites are labour intensive and expensive. Also, manifold increase of protein sequences in the databanks over the years necessitates the improvement of high speed and accurate computational methods for predicting phosphorylation sites in protein sequences. Till date, a number of computational methods have been proposed by various researchers in predicting phosphorylation sites, but there remains much scope of improvement. In this communication, we present a simple and novel method based on Grammatical Inference (GI) approach to automate the prediction of kinase specific phosphorylation sites. In this regard, we have used a popular GI algorithm Alergia to infer Deterministic Stochastic Finite State Automata (DSFA) which equally represents the regular grammar corresponding to the phosphorylation sites. Extensive experiments on several datasets generated by us reveal that, our inferred grammar successfully predicts phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. It performs significantly better when compared with the other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. We have also compared our inferred DSFA with two other GI inference algorithms. The DSFA generated by our method performs superior which indicates that our method is robust and has a potential for predicting the phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. PMID:25886273

  13. Characterization of the in vivo sites of serine phosphorylation on Lck identifying serine 59 as a site of mitotic phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, Kamala P; Isaacson, Christina C; Ashendel, Curtis L; Geahlen, Robert L; Harrison, Marietta L

    2002-04-26

    The lymphocyte-specific protein-tyrosine kinase Lck plays a critical role in T cell activation. In response to T cell antigen receptor binding Lck undergoes phosphorylation on serine residues that include serines 59 and 194. Serine 59 is phosphorylated by ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase. Recently, we showed that in mitotic T cells Lck becomes hyper-phosphorylated on serine residues. In this report, using one-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping analysis, we identify serine 59 as a site of in vivo mitotic phosphorylation in Lck. The mitotic phosphorylation of serine 59 did not require either the catalytic activity or functional SH2 or SH3 domains of Lck. In addition, the presence of ZAP-70 also was dispensable for the phosphorylation of serine 59. Although previous studies demonstrated that serine 59 is a substrate for the ERK MAPK pathway, inhibitors of this pathway did not block the mitotic phosphorylation of serine 59. These results identify serine 59 as a site of mitotic phosphorylation in Lck and suggest that a pathway distinct from that induced by antigen receptor signaling is responsible for its phosphorylation. Thus, the phosphorylation of serine 59 is the result of two distinct signaling pathways, differentially activated in response to the physiological state of the T cell.

  14. Combining metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC and selective mass spectrometry for robust identification of in vivo protein phosphorylation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weckwerth Wolfram

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphorylation is accepted as a major regulatory pathway in plants. More than 1000 protein kinases are predicted in the Arabidopsis proteome, however, only a few studies look systematically for in vivo protein phosphorylation sites. Owing to the low stoichiometry and low abundance of phosphorylated proteins, phosphorylation site identification using mass spectrometry imposes difficulties. Moreover, the often observed poor quality of mass spectra derived from phosphopeptides results frequently in uncertain database hits. Thus, several lines of evidence have to be combined for a precise phosphorylation site identification strategy. Results Here, a strategy is presented that combines enrichment of phosphoproteins using a technique termed metaloxide affinity chromatography (MOAC and selective ion trap mass spectrometry. The complete approach involves (i enrichment of proteins with low phosphorylation stoichiometry out of complex mixtures using MOAC, (ii gel separation and detection of phosphorylation using specific fluorescence staining (confirmation of enrichment, (iii identification of phosphoprotein candidates out of the SDS-PAGE using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and (iv identification of phosphorylation sites of these enriched proteins using automatic detection of H3PO4 neutral loss peaks and data-dependent MS3-fragmentation of the corresponding MS2-fragment. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the identification of phosphorylation sites in Arabidopsis thaliana seed proteins. Regulatory importance of the identified sites is indicated by conservation of the detected sites in gene families such as ribosomal proteins and sterol dehydrogenases. To demonstrate further the wide applicability of MOAC, phosphoproteins were enriched from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cell cultures. Conclusion A novel phosphoprotein enrichment procedure MOAC was applied to seed proteins of A. thaliana and to

  15. Functional Characterization of APOBEC-1 Complementation Factor Phosphorylation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, David M.; Galloway, Chad A.; MacElrevey, Celeste; Sowden, Mark P.; Wedekind, Joseph E.; Smith, Harold C.

    2007-01-01

    ApoB mRNA editing involves site-specific deamination of cytidine 6666 producing an in-frame translation stop codon. Editing minimally requires APOBEC-1 and APOBEC-1 complementation factor (ACF). Metabolic stimulation of apoB mRNA editing in hepatocytes is associated with serine phosphorylation of ACF localized to editing competent, nuclear 27S editosomes. We demonstrate that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) stimulated editing and enhanced ACF phosphorylation in rat primary hepatocytes. Conversely, activation of protein kinase A (PKA) had no effect on editing. Recombinant PKC efficiently phosphorylated purified ACF64 protein in vitro, whereas PKA did not. Mutagenesis of predicted PKC phosphorylation sites S154 and S368 to alanine inhibited ethanol-stimulated induction of editing suggesting that these sites function in the metabolic regulation of editing. Consistent with this interpretation, substitution of S154 and S368 with aspartic acid stimulated editing to levels comparable to ethanol treatment in control McArdle RH7777 cells. These data suggest that phosphorylation of ACF by PKC may be a key regulatory mechanism of apoB mRNA editing in rat hepatocytes. PMID:17229474

  16. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca2+ and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism. © 2017 The author(s). All Rights Reserved.

  17. Phosphorylation site dynamics of early T-cell receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chylek, Lily A; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Dengjel, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    that diverse dynamic patterns emerge within seconds. We detected phosphorylation dynamics as early as 5 s and observed widespread regulation of key TCR signaling proteins by 30 s. Development of a computational model pointed to the presence of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling phosphorylation of sites......In adaptive immune responses, T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling impacts multiple cellular processes and results in T-cell differentiation, proliferation, and cytokine production. Although individual protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation events have been studied extensively, we lack...... a systems-level understanding of how these components cooperate to control signaling dynamics, especially during the crucial first seconds of stimulation. Here, we used quantitative proteomics to characterize reshaping of the T-cell phosphoproteome in response to TCR/CD28 co-stimulation, and found...

  18. Identification of ATM Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Sites by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin F; Kozlov, Sergei V

    2017-01-01

    ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) protein kinase is a key regulator of cellular responses to DNA damage and oxidative stress. DNA damage triggers complex cascade of signaling events leading to numerous posttranslational modification on multitude of proteins. Understanding the regulation of ATM kinase is therefore critical not only for understanding the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia and potential treatment strategies, but essential for deciphering physiological responses of cells to stress. These responses play an important role in carcinogenesis, neurodegeneration, and aging. We focus here on the identification of DNA damage inducible ATM phosphorylation sites to understand the importance of autophosphorylation in the mechanism of ATM kinase activation. We demonstrate the utility of using immunoprecipitated ATM in quantitative LC-MS/MS workflow with stable isotope dimethyl labeling of ATM peptides for identification of phosphorylation sites.

  19. Identification of a phosphorylation site in the hinge region of the human progesterone receptor and additional amino-terminal phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knotts, T A; Orkiszewski, R S; Cook, R G; Edwards, D P; Weigel, N L

    2001-03-16

    We have previously reported the identification of seven in vivo phosphorylation sites in the amino-terminal region of the human progesterone receptor (PR). From our previous in vivo studies, it was evident that several phosphopeptides remained unidentified. In particular, we wished to determine whether human PR contains a phosphorylation site in the hinge region, as do other steroid receptors including chicken PR, human androgen receptor, and mouse estrogen receptor. Previously, problematic trypsin cleavage sites hampered our ability to detect phosphorylation sites in large incomplete tryptic peptides. Using a combination of mass spectrometry and in vitro phosphorylation, we have identified six previously unidentified phosphorylation sites in human PR. Using nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry, we have identified two new in vivo phosphorylation sites, Ser(20) and Ser(676), in baculovirus-expressed human PR. Ser(676) is analogous to the hinge site identified in other steroid receptors. Additionally, precursor ion scans identified another phosphopeptide that contains Ser(130)-Pro(131), a likely candidate for phosphorylation. In vitro phosphorylation of PR with Cdk2 has revealed five additional in vitro Cdk2 phosphorylation sites: Ser(25), Ser(213), Thr(430), Ser(554), and Ser(676). At least two of these, Ser(213) and Ser(676), are authentic in vivo sites. We confirmed the presence of the Cdk2-phosphorylated peptide containing Ser(213) in PR from in vivo labeled T47D cells, indicating that this is an in vivo site. Our combined studies indicate that most, if not all, of the Ser-Pro motifs in human PR are sites for phosphorylation. Taken together, these data indicate that the phosphorylation of PR is highly complex, with at least 14 phosphorylation sites.

  20. Brassinosteroid-regulated GSK3/Shaggy-like Kinases Phosphorylate Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Kinases, Which Control Stomata Development in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mamoona; Rozhon, Wilfried; Bigeard, Jean; Pflieger, Delphine; Husar, Sigrid; Pitzschke, Andrea; Teige, Markus; Jonak, Claudia; Hirt, Heribert; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid hormones that coordinate fundamental developmental programs in plants. In this study we show that in addition to the well established roles of BRs in regulating cell elongation and cell division events, BRs also govern cell fate decisions during stomata development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In wild-type A. thaliana, stomatal distribution follows the one-cell spacing rule; that is, adjacent stomata are spaced by at least one intervening pavement cell. This rule is interrupted in BR-deficient and BR signaling-deficient A. thaliana mutants, resulting in clustered stomata. We demonstrate that BIN2 and its homologues, GSK3/Shaggy-like kinases involved in BR signaling, can phosphorylate the MAPK kinases MKK4 and MKK5, which are members of the MAPK module YODA-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 that controls stomata development and patterning. BIN2 phosphorylates a GSK3/Shaggy-like kinase recognition motif in MKK4, which reduces MKK4 activity against its substrate MPK6 in vitro. In vivo we show that MKK4 and MKK5 act downstream of BR signaling because their overexpression rescued stomata patterning defects in BR-deficient plants. A model is proposed in which GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of MKK4 and MKK5 enables for a dynamic integration of endogenous or environmental cues signaled by BRs into cell fate decisions governed by the YODA-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 module. PMID:23341468

  1. Variation in seed dormancy quantitative trait loci in Arabidopsis thaliana originating from one site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silady, R.A.; Effgen, S.; Koornneef, M.; Reymond, M.

    2011-01-01

    A Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis was performed using two novel Recombinant Inbred Line (RIL) populations, derived from the progeny between two Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes collected at the same site in Kyoto (Japan) crossed with the reference laboratory strain Landsberg erecta (Ler). We

  2. NetPhosYeast: prediction of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, C.R.; Miller, Martin Lee; Jensen, O.N.

    2007-01-01

    We here present a neural network-based method for the prediction of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast-an important model organism for basic research. Existing protein phosphorylation site predictors are primarily based on mammalian data and show reduced sensitivity on yeast phosphorylation...... sites compared to those in humans, suggesting the need for an yeast-specific phosphorylation site predictor. NetPhosYeast achieves a correlation coefficient close to 0.75 with a sensitivity of 0.84 and specificity of 0.90 and outperforms existing predictors in the identification of phosphorylation sites...

  3. Common Hydrogen Bond Interactions in Diverse Phosphoryl Transfer Active Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerton, Jean C.; Martin, Gregory M.; Evanseck, Jeffrey D.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions figure prominently in energy metabolism, signaling, transport and motility. Prior detailed studies of selected systems have highlighted mechanistic features that distinguish different phosphoryl transfer enzymes. Here, a top-down approach is developed for comparing statistically the active site configurations between populations of diverse structures in the Protein Data Bank, and it reveals patterns of hydrogen bonding that transcend enzyme families. Through analysis of large samples of structures, insights are drawn at a level of detail exceeding the experimental precision of an individual structure. In phosphagen kinases, for example, hydrogen bonds with the O3β of the nucleotide substrate are revealed as analogous to those in unrelated G proteins. In G proteins and other enzymes, interactions with O3β have been understood in terms of electrostatic favoring of the transition state. Ground state quantum mechanical calculations on model compounds show that the active site interactions highlighted in our database analysis can affect substrate phosphate charge and bond length, in ways that are consistent with prior experimental observations, by modulating hyperconjugative orbital interactions that weaken the scissile bond. Testing experimentally the inference about the importance of O3β interactions in phosphagen kinases, mutation of arginine kinase Arg280 decreases kcat, as predicted, with little impact upon KM. PMID:25238155

  4. Phospho.ELM: A database of experimentally verified phosphorylation sites in eukaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diella, F.; Cameron, S.; Gemund, C.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Post-translational phosphorylation is one of the most common protein modifications. Phosphoserine, threonine and tyrosine residues play critical roles in the regulation of many cellular processes. The fast growing number of research reports on protein phosphorylation points to a general...... instances for 556 phosphorylated proteins. Conclusion: Phospho. ELM will be a valuable tool both for molecular biologists working on protein phosphorylation sites and for bioinformaticians developing computational predictions on the specificity of phosphorylation reactions....

  5. Natural variation in phosphorylation of photosystem II proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana: is it caused by genetic variation in the STN kinases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Pádraic J.; Yin, Lan; Herdean, Andrei; Harbinson, Jeremy; Aarts, Mark G. M.; Spetea, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of photosystem II (PSII) proteins is an important regulatory mechanism that can protect plants from changes in ambient light intensity and quality. We hypothesized that there is natural variation in this process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and that this results from genetic variation in the STN7 and STN8 kinase genes. To test this, Arabidopsis accessions of diverse geographical origins were exposed to two light regimes, and the levels of phospho-D1 and phospho-light harvesting complex II (LHCII) proteins were quantified by western blotting with anti-phosphothreonine antibodies. Accessions were classified as having high, moderate or low phosphorylation relative to Col-0. This variation could not be explained by the abundance of the substrates in thylakoid membranes. In genotypes with atrazine-resistant forms of the D1 protein, low D1 and LHCII protein phosphorylation was observed, which may be due to low PSII efficiency, resulting in reduced activation of the STN kinases. In the remaining genotypes, phospho-D1 levels correlated with STN8 protein abundance in high-light conditions. In growth light, D1 and LHCII phosphorylation correlated with longitude and in the case of LHCII phosphorylation also with temperature variability. This suggests a possible role of natural variation in PSII protein phosphorylation in the adaptation of Arabidopsis to diverse environments. PMID:24591726

  6. Pinpointing Phosphorylation Sites: Quantitative Filtering and a Novel Site-specific x-Ion Fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Christian D; Hekmat, Omid; Francavilla, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    assignments in large-scale phosphoproteomics data sets. To improve methods for site localization, we made use of a synthetic phosphopeptide library and SILAC-labeled peptides from whole cell lysates and analyzed these with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry on an LTQ Orbitrap Velos. We validated gas......-phase phosphate rearrangement reactions during collision-induced dissociation (CID) and used these spectra to devise a quantitative filter that by comparing signal intensities of putative phosphorylated fragment ions with their nonphosphorylated counterparts allowed us to accurately pinpoint which fragment ions...... contain a phosphorylated residue and which ones do not. We also evaluated higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) and found this to be an accurate method for correct phosphorylation site localization with no gas-phase rearrangements observed above noise level. Analyzing a large set of HCD spectra...

  7. Changes in the effective gravitational field strength affect the state of phosphorylation of stress-related proteins in callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjaktarović, Žarko; Schütz, Wolfgang; Madlung, Johannes; Fladerer, Claudia; Nordheim, Alfred; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study it was shown that callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana respond to changes in gravitational field strengths by changes in protein expression. Using ESI-MS/MS for proteins with differential abundance after separation by 2D-PAGE, 28 spots which changed reproducibly and significantly in amount (P gravitational fields induce the production of ROS. Our data further indicate that responses toward RP are more by post-translational protein modulation (most changes in the degree of phosphorylation occur under RP-treatment) than by protein expression (hypergravity). PMID:19129159

  8. Large-scale analysis of phosphorylation site occupancy in eukaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    in proteins is currently lacking. We have therefore analyzed the occurrence and occupancy of phosphorylated sites (~ 100,281) in a large set of eukaryotic proteins (~ 22,995). Phosphorylation probability was found to be much higher in both the  termini of protein sequences and this is much pronounced...... maximum randomness. An analysis of phosphorylation motifs indicated that just 40 motifs and a much lower number of associated kinases might account for nearly 50% of the known phosphorylations in eukaryotic proteins. Our results provide a broad picture of the phosphorylation sites in eukaryotic proteins....

  9. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, M.; Stensballe, A.; Rasmussen, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...... kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites. The neural network was trained with a positive set of 258 experimentally verified PKA phosphorylation sites. The predictions by NetPhosK were! validated using four novel PKA substrates: Necdin, RFX5, En-2, and Wee 1. The four proteins were phosphorylated by PKA...... in vitro and 13 PKA phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometry. NetPhosK was 100% sensitive and 41% specific in predicting PKA sites in the four proteins. These results demonstrate the potential of using integrated computational and experimental methods for detailed investigations...

  10. Phosphorylation sites of Arabidopsis MAP Kinase Substrate 1 (MKS1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, M.B.; Qiu, J.-L.; Zhang, X.

    2007-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) substrate MKS1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, full-length, 6x histidine (His)-tagged MKS1 was phosphorylated in vitro by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MPK4 immuno-precipitated from plants. MKS1 phosphorylation was initially verified by electrophore......The Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) substrate MKS1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, full-length, 6x histidine (His)-tagged MKS1 was phosphorylated in vitro by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MPK4 immuno-precipitated from plants. MKS1 phosphorylation was initially verified...

  11. dbPSP: a curated database for protein phosphorylation sites in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhicheng; Wang, Bangshan; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yongbo; Ullah, Shahid; Jian, Ren; Liu, Zexian; Xue, Yu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most important post-translational modifications, phosphorylation is highly involved in almost all of biological processes through temporally and spatially modifying substrate proteins. Recently, phosphorylation in prokaryotes attracted much attention for its critical roles in various cellular processes such as signal transduction. Thus, an integrative data resource of the prokaryotic phosphorylation will be useful for further analysis. In this study, we presented a curated database of phosphorylation sites in prokaryotes (dbPSP, Database URL: http://dbpsp.biocuckoo.org) for 96 prokaryotic organisms, which belong to 11 phyla in two domains including bacteria and archaea. From the scientific literature, we manually collected experimentally identified phosphorylation sites on seven types of residues, including serine, threonine, tyrosine, aspartic acid, histidine, cysteine and arginine. In total, the dbPSP database contains 7391 phosphorylation sites in 3750 prokaryotic proteins. With the dataset, the sequence preferences of the phosphorylation sites and functional annotations of the phosphoproteins were analyzed, while the results shows that there were obvious differences among the phosphorylation in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. All the phosphorylation sites were annotated with original references and other descriptions in the database, which could be easily accessed through user-friendly website interface including various search and browse options. Taken together, the dbPSP database provides a comprehensive data resource for further studies of protein phosphorylation in prokaryotes. Database URL: http://dbpsp.biocuckoo.org © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Exploring the intramolecular phosphorylation sites in human Chk2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Birgitte B; Larsen, Martin R; Boldyreff, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    A comparative biochemical analysis was performed using recombinant human protein kinase Chk2 (checkpoint kinase 2) expressed in bacteria and insect cells. Dephosphorylated, inactive, recombinant human Chk2 could be reactivated in a concentration-dependent manner. Despite distinct time....... Mass spectrometric analyses of human recombinant Chk2 isolated from bacteria and insect cells showed distinct differences. The number of phosphorylated residues in human recombinant Chk2 isolated from bacteria was 16, whereas in the case of the recombinant human Chk2 from insect cells it was 8. Except...... for phosphorylated amino acid T378 which was not found in the Chk2 isolated from bacteria, all other phosphorylated residues identified in human Chk2 from insect cells were present also in Chk2 from bacteria....

  13. Using multitask classification methods to investigate the kinase-specific phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Xu, Shuo; Fang, Yaping; Fang, Jianwen

    2012-06-21

    Identification of phosphorylation sites by computational methods is becoming increasingly important because it reduces labor-intensive and costly experiments and can improve our understanding of the common properties and underlying mechanisms of protein phosphorylation. A multitask learning framework for learning four kinase families simultaneously, instead of studying each kinase family of phosphorylation sites separately, is presented in the study. The framework includes two multitask classification methods: the Multi-Task Least Squares Support Vector Machines (MTLS-SVMs) and the Multi-Task Feature Selection (MT-Feat3). Using the multitask learning framework, we successfully identify 18 common features shared by four kinase families of phosphorylation sites. The reliability of selected features is demonstrated by the consistent performance in two multi-task learning methods. The selected features can be used to build efficient multitask classifiers with good performance, suggesting they are important to protein phosphorylation across 4 kinase families.

  14. Kinase-specific prediction of protein phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Blom, Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    -substrate specificity. Here, we briefly describe the available resources for predicting kinase-specific phosphorylation from sequence properties. We address the strengths and weaknesses of these resources, which are based on methods ranging from simple consensus patterns to more advanced machine-learning algorithms...

  15. NetPhosBac - A predictor for Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites in bacterial proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Soufi, Boumediene; Jers, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    predictors on bacterial systems. We used these large bacterial datasets and neural network algorithms to create the first bacteria-specific protein phosphorylation predictor: NetPhosBac. With respect to predicting bacterial phosphorylation sites, NetPhosBac significantly outperformed all benchmark predictors....... Moreover, NetPhosBac predictions of phosphorylation sites in E. coli proteins were experimentally verified on protein and site-specific levels. In conclusion, NetPhosBac clearly illustrates the advantage of taxa-specific predictors and we hope it will provide a useful asset to the microbiological community....

  16. High-accuracy identification and bioinformatic analysis of in vivo protein phosphorylation sites in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Florian; de Godoy, Lyris M F; Cox, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a fundamental regulatory mechanism that affects many cell signaling processes. Using high-accuracy MS and stable isotope labeling in cell culture-labeling, we provide a global view of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoproteome, containing 3620 phosphorylation sites ma...

  17. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, Majbrit; Stensballe, Allan; Rasmussen, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...

  18. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M. (WU)

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  19. Site-specific mapping of the human SUMO proteome reveals co-modification with phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Lyon, David; Young, Clifford

    2017-01-01

    -predictive analyses revealed that lysines residing in disordered regions are preferentially targeted by SUMO, in notable contrast to other widespread lysine modifications. In our data set, we identified 807 SUMOylated peptides that were co-modified by phosphorylation, along with dozens of SUMOylated peptides...... that were co-modified by ubiquitylation, acetylation and methylation. Notably, 9% of the identified SUMOylome occurred proximal to phosphorylation, and numerous SUMOylation sites were found to be fully dependent on prior phosphorylation events. SUMO-proximal phosphorylation occurred primarily in a proline-directed...

  20. Machine learning approach to predict protein phosphorylation sites by incorporating evolutionary information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikder Abdur

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the existing in silico phosphorylation site prediction systems use machine learning approach that requires preparing a good set of classification data in order to build the classification knowledge. Furthermore, phosphorylation is catalyzed by kinase enzymes and hence the kinase information of the phosphorylated sites has been used as major classification data in most of the existing systems. Since the number of kinase annotations in protein sequences is far less than that of the proteins being sequenced to date, the prediction systems that use the information found from the small clique of kinase annotated proteins can not be considered as completely perfect for predicting outside the clique. Hence the systems are certainly not generalized. In this paper, a novel generalized prediction system, PPRED (Phosphorylation PREDictor is proposed that ignores the kinase information and only uses the evolutionary information of proteins for classifying phosphorylation sites. Results Experimental results based on cross validations and an independent benchmark reveal the significance of using the evolutionary information alone to classify phosphorylation sites from protein sequences. The prediction performance of the proposed system is better than those of the existing prediction systems that also do not incorporate kinase information. The system is also comparable to systems that incorporate kinase information in predicting such sites. Conclusions The approach presented in this paper provides an efficient way to identify phosphorylation sites in a given protein primary sequence that would be a valuable information for the molecular biologists working on protein phosphorylation sites and for bioinformaticians developing generalized prediction systems for the post translational modifications like phosphorylation or glycosylation. PPRED is publicly available at the URL http://www.cse.univdhaka.edu/~ashis/ppred/index.php.

  1. Specific mixing facilitates the comparative quantification of phosphorylation sites with significant dysregulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic R& A Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Bo [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic R& A Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Dalian 116023 (China); Liu, Zheyi; Dong, Mingming; Mao, Jiawei; Zhou, Ye; Chen, Jin [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic R& A Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Fangjun, E-mail: wangfj@dicp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic R& A Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Dalian 116023 (China); Zou, Hanfa [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic R& A Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Dalian 116023 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Mass spectrometry (MS) based quantitative analyses of proteome and proteome post-translational modifications (PTMs) play more and more important roles in biological, pharmaceutical and clinical studies. However, it is still a big challenge to accurately quantify the proteins or proteins PTM sites with extreme relative abundances in comparative protein samples, such as the significantly dysregulated ones. Herein, a novel quantification strategy, Mixing at Specific Ratio (MaSR) before isotope labeling, had been developed to improve the quantification accuracy and coverage of extreme proteins and protein phosphorylation sites. Briefly, the comparative protein samples were firstly mixed together at specific ratios of 9:1 and 1:9 (w/w), followed with mass differentiate light and heavy isotope labeling, respectively. The extreme proteins and protein phosphorylation sites, even if the newly expressed or disappeared ones, could be accurately quantified due to all of the proteins' relative abundances had been adjusted to 2 orders of magnitude (1/9-9) by this strategy. The number of quantified phosphorylation sites with more than 20 folds changes was improved about 10 times in comparative quantification of pervanadate stimulated phosphoproteome of HeLa cells, and 134 newly generated and 21 disappeared phosphorylation sites were solely quantified by the MaSR strategy. The significantly up-regulated phosphorylation sites were mainly involved in the key phosphoproteins regulating the insulin-related pathways, such as PI3K-AKT and RAS-MAPK pathways. Therefore, the MaSR strategy exhibits as a promising way in elucidating the biological processes with significant dysregulations. - Highlights: • All the proteins' relative abundances were adjusted into 2 orders of magnitude (1/9-9). • The quantification accuracy and coverage of extreme proteins and protein phosphorylation sites had been improved. • The newly expressed or disappeared proteins and protein

  2. Identification of the sites for CaMK-II-dependent phosphorylation of GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Catriona M; Lee, Henry H C; Hosie, Alastair M; Moss, Stephen J; Smart, Trevor G

    2007-06-15

    Phosphorylation can affect both the function and trafficking of GABA(A) receptors with significant consequences for neuronal excitability. Serine/threonine kinases can phosphorylate the intracellular loops between M3-4 of GABA(A) receptor beta and gamma subunits thereby modulating receptor function in heterologous expression systems and in neurons (1, 2). Specifically, CaMK-II has been demonstrated to phosphorylate the M3-4 loop of GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed as GST fusion proteins (3, 4). It also increases the amplitude of GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in a number of neuronal cell types (5-7). To identify which substrate sites CaMK-II might phosphorylate and the consequent functional effects, we expressed recombinant GABA(A) receptors in NG108-15 cells, which have previously been shown to support CaMK-II modulation of GABA(A) receptors containing the beta3 subunit (8). We now demonstrate that CaMK-II mediates its effects on alpha1beta3 receptors via phosphorylation of Ser(383) within the M3-4 domain of the beta subunit. Ablation of beta3 subunit phosphorylation sites for CaMK-II revealed that for alphabetagamma receptors, CaMK-II has a residual effect on GABA currents that is not mediated by previously identified sites of CaMK-II phosphorylation. This residual effect is abolished by mutation of tyrosine phosphorylation sites, Tyr(365) and Tyr(367), on the gamma2S subunit, and by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. These results suggested that CaMK-II is capable of directly phosphorylating GABA(A) receptors and activating endogenous tyrosine kinases to phosphorylate the gamma2 subunit in NG108-15 cells. These findings were confirmed in a neuronal environment by expressing recombinant GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar granule neurons.

  3. Identification of phosphorylation sites on human deoxycytidine kinase after overexpression in eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smal, C; Vertommen, D; Bertrand, L; Rider, M H; van den Neste, E; Bontemps, F

    2006-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a key enzyme in the salvage of deoxyribonucleosides and in the activation of clinically relevant nucleoside analogues, can be regulated by reversible phosphorylation. In this study, we show that dCK overexpressed in HEK-293T cells was labelled after incubation of the cells with [32P]orthophosphate. Tandem mass spectrometry allowed the identification of 4 in vivo phosphorylation sites, Thr3, Ser11, Ser15, and Ser74. These results provide the first evidence that dCK is constitutively multiphosphorylated in intact cells. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that phosphorylation of Ser74, the major in vivo phosphorylation site, is crucial for dCK activity.

  4. Distinct and site-specific phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein at serine 612 in differentiated cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hattori

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma susceptibility protein (pRB is a phosphoprotein that regulates cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition. In quiescent and early G1 cells, pRB predominantly exists in the active hypophosphorylated form. The cyclin/cyclin-dependent protein kinase complexes phosphorylate pRB at the late G1 phase to inactivate pRB. This event leads to the dissociation and activation of E2F family transcriptional factors. At least 12 serine/threonine residues in pRB are phosphorylated in vivo. Although there have been many reports describing bulk phosphorylation of pRB, detail research describing the function of each phosphorylation site remains unknown. Besides its G1/S inhibitory function, pRB is involved in differentiation, prevention of cell death and control of tissue fate. To uncover the function of phosphorylation of pRB in various cellular conditions, we have been investigating phosphorylation of each serine/threonine residue in pRB with site-specific phospho-serine/threonine antibodies. Here we demonstrate that pRB is specifically phosphorylated at Ser612 in differentiated cells in a known kinase-independent manner. We also found that pRB phosphorylated at Ser612 still associates with E2F-1 and tightly binds to nuclear structures including chromatin. Moreover, expression of the Ser612Ala mutant pRB failed to induce differentiation. The findings suggest that phosphorylation of Ser612 provides a distinct function that differs from the function of phosphorylation of other serine/threonine residues in pRB.

  5. Characterization of intracellular regions in the human serotonin transporter for phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lena; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    /dephosphorylation during transporter regulation by multiple pathways. In particular, activation and/or inhibition of kinases including PKC, PKG, p38MAPK, and CaMKII modulate SERT function and trafficking. The molecular mechanisms by which kinase activity is linked to SERT regulation are poorly understood, including...... the identity of specific phosphorylated residues. To elucidate SERT phosphorylation sites, we have generated peptides corresponding to the entire intracellular region of human SERT and performed in vitro phosphorylation assays with a panel of kinases suggested to be involved in SERT regulation or for which...

  6. Characterization of a novel phosphorylation site in the sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaek, L L; Assentoft, Mette; Pedersen, Nis Borbye

    2012-01-01

    The sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho-specific antib......The sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho......DAVP significantly increased pS124-NCC abundance, with no changes in total NCC plasma membrane abundance. pS124-NCC levels also increased in abundance in rats after stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by dietary low sodium intake. In contrast to other NCC phosphorylation sites, the STE20/SPS1......-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidative stress-response kinases (SPAK and OSR1) were not able to phosphorylate NCC at S124. Protein kinase arrays identified multiple kinases that were able to bind to the region surrounding S124. Four of these kinases (IRAK2, CDK6/Cyclin D1, NLK and m...

  7. Phosphorylation of the Fas associated factor FAF1 by protein kinase CK2 and identification of serines 289 and 291 as the in vitro phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H H; Hjerrild, M; Guerra, B

    2001-01-01

    obtained evidence that CK2 is the major cellular kinase responsible for FAF1 phosphorylation, using tissue extracts as kinase sources. By MALDI-MS we identified the two serine residues at positions 289 and 291 as the major in vitro CK2 phosphorylation sites. These data may help us elucidate the functions...

  8. HMMpTM: improving transmembrane protein topology prediction using phosphorylation and glycosylation site prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaousis, Georgios N; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2014-02-01

    During the last two decades a large number of computational methods have been developed for predicting transmembrane protein topology. Current predictors rely on topogenic signals in the protein sequence, such as the distribution of positively charged residues in extra-membrane loops and the existence of N-terminal signals. However, phosphorylation and glycosylation are post-translational modifications (PTMs) that occur in a compartment-specific manner and therefore the presence of a phosphorylation or glycosylation site in a transmembrane protein provides topological information. We examine the combination of phosphorylation and glycosylation site prediction with transmembrane protein topology prediction. We report the development of a Hidden Markov Model based method, capable of predicting the topology of transmembrane proteins and the existence of kinase specific phosphorylation and N/O-linked glycosylation sites along the protein sequence. Our method integrates a novel feature in transmembrane protein topology prediction, which results in improved performance for topology prediction and reliable prediction of phosphorylation and glycosylation sites. The method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/HMMpTM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prediction of phosphorylation sites based on the integration of multiple classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, R Z; Wang, D; Chen, Y H; Dong, L K; Fan, Y L

    2017-02-23

    Phosphorylation is an important part of post-translational modifications of proteins, and is essential for many biological activities. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation can regulate signal transduction, gene expression, and cell cycle regulation in many cellular processes. Phosphorylation is extremely important for both basic research and drug discovery to rapidly and correctly identify the attributes of a new protein phosphorylation sites. Moreover, abnormal phosphorylation can be used as a key medical feature related to a disease in some cases. The using of computational methods could improve the accuracy of detection of phosphorylation sites, which can provide predictive guidance for the prevention of the occurrence and/or the best course of treatment for certain diseases. Furthermore, this approach can effectively reduce the costs of biological experiments. In this study, a flexible neural tree (FNT), particle swarm optimization, and support vector machine algorithms were used to classify data with secondary encoding according to the physical and chemical properties of amino acids for feature extraction. Comparison of the classification results obtained from the three classifiers showed that the classification of the FNT was the best. The three classifiers were then integrated in the form of a minority subordinate to the majority vote to obtain the results. The performance of the integrated model showed improvement in sensitivity (87.41%), specificity (87.60%), and accuracy (87.50%).

  10. Splice site prediction in Arabidopsis thaliana pre-mRNA by combining local and global sequence information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebsgaard, Stefan M.; Korning, Peter G.; Tolstrup, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been combined with a rule based system to predict intron splice sites in the dicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A two step prediction scheme, where a global prediction of the coding potential regulates a cutoff level for a local predicition of splice sites, is refined...... with three other approaches, GeneFinder, GeneMark and Grail. Overall the method presented here is an order of magnitude better. We show that the new method is able to find a donor site in the coding sequence for the jelly fish Green Fluorescent Protein, exactly at the position that was experimentally...

  11. Quantitative maps of protein phosphorylation sites across 14 different rat organs and tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Secher, Anna; Lage, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    across 14 rat organs and tissues. We provide the data set as an easily accessible resource via a web-based database, the CPR PTM Resource. A major fraction of the presented phosphorylation sites are tissue-specific and modulate protein interaction networks that are essential for the function...

  12. Insulin stimulation regulates AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylation sites in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelbeek, R J W; Chambers, M A; Tantiwong, P

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are typically insulin resistant, exhibiting impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Animal and cell culture experiments have shown that site-specific phosphorylation of the Rab-GTPase-activating proteins AS160 and TBC1D1 is critical for GLUT4...

  13. The protein kinase DYRK1A phosphorylates the splicing factor SF3b1/SAP155 at Thr434, a novel in vivo phosphorylation site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilischkis Richard

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP component SF3b1/SAP155 is the only spliceosomal protein known to be phosphorylated concomitant with splicing catalysis. DYRK1A is a nuclear protein kinase that has been localized to the splicing factor compartment. Here we describe the identification of DYRK1A as a protein kinase that phosphorylates SF3b1 in vitro and in cultivated cells. Results Overexpression of DYRK1A caused a markedly increased phosphorylation of SF3b1 in COS-7 cells as assessed by Western blotting with an antibody specific for phosphorylated Thr-Pro dipeptide motifs. Phosphopeptide mapping of metabolically labelled SF3b1 showed that the majority of the in vivo-phosphopeptides corresponded to sites also phosphorylated by DYRK1A in vitro. Phosphorylation with cyclin E/CDK2, a kinase previously reported to phosphorylate SF3b1, generated a completely different pattern of phosphopeptides. By mass spectrometry and mutational analysis of SF3b1, Thr434 was identified as the major phosphorylation site for DYRK1A. Overexpression of DYRK1A or the related kinase, DYRK1B, resulted in an enhanced phosphorylation of Thr434 in endogenous SF3b1 in COS-7 cells. Downregulation of DYRK1A in HEK293 cells or in HepG2 cells by RNA interference reduced the phosphorylation of Thr434 in SF3b1. Conclusion The present data show that the splicing factor SF3b1 is a substrate of the protein kinase DYRK1A and suggest that DYRK1A may be involved in the regulation of pre mRNA-splicing.

  14. The different function of single phosphorylation sites of Drosophila melanogaster lamin Dm and lamin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba-Czogalla, Magdalena; Piekarowicz, Katarzyna; Wachowicz, Katarzyna; Kozioł, Katarzyna; Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Rzepecki, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    Lamins' functions are regulated by phosphorylation at specific sites but our understanding of the role of such modifications is practically limited to the function of cdc 2 (cdk1) kinase sites in depolymerization of the nuclear lamina during mitosis. In our study we used Drosophila lamin Dm (B-type) to examine the function of particular phosphorylation sites using pseudophosphorylated mutants mimicking single phosphorylation at experimentally confirmed in vivo phosphosites (S(25)E, S(45)E, T(435)E, S(595)E). We also analyzed lamin C (A-type) and its mutant S(37)E representing the N-terminal cdc2 (mitotic) site as well as lamin Dm R(64)H mutant as a control, non-polymerizing lamin. In the polymerization assay we could observe different effects of N-terminal cdc2 site pseudophosphorylation on A- and B-type lamins: lamin Dm S(45)E mutant was insoluble, in contrast to lamin C S(37)E. Lamin Dm T(435)E (C-terminal cdc2 site) and R(64)H were soluble in vitro. We also confirmed that none of the single phosphorylation site modifications affected the chromatin binding of lamin Dm, in contrast to the lamin C N-terminal cdc2 site. In vivo, all lamin Dm mutants were incorporated efficiently into the nuclear lamina in transfected Drosophila S2 and HeLa cells, although significant amounts of S(45)E and T(435)E were also located in cytoplasm. When farnesylation incompetent mutants were expressed in HeLa cells, lamin Dm T(435)E was cytoplasmic and showed higher mobility in FRAP assay.

  15. Phosphoproteomics of the Arabidopsis plasma membrane and a new phosphorylation site database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nühse, Thomas S; Stensballe, Allan; Jensen, Ole N

    2004-01-01

    of research must shift to the dynamic aspects of biology: molecular mechanisms of function and regulation. Phosphorylation is a key regulatory factor in all aspects of plant biology; but it is difficult, if not impossible, for most researchers to identify in vivo phosphorylation sites within their proteins....... Finally, the data also provide empirical evidence on the topology of transmembrane proteins. This information indicates that prediction programs incorrectly identified the cytosolic portion of the protein in 25% of the transmembrane proteins found in this study. All data are deposited in a new searchable...

  16. Cooperative interaction between phosphorylation sites on PERIOD maintains circadian period in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Garbe

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in Drosophila rely on cyclic regulation of the period (per and timeless (tim clock genes. The molecular cycle requires rhythmic phosphorylation of PER and TIM proteins, which is mediated by several kinases and phosphatases such as Protein Phosphatase-2A (PP2A and Protein Phosphatase-1 (PP1. Here, we used mass spectrometry to identify 35 "phospho-occupied" serine/threonine residues within PER, 24 of which are specifically regulated by PP1/PP2A. We found that cell culture assays were not good predictors of protein function in flies and so we generated per transgenes carrying phosphorylation site mutations and tested for rescue of the per(01 arrhythmic phenotype. Surprisingly, most transgenes restore wild type rhythms despite carrying mutations in several phosphorylation sites. One particular transgene, in which T610 and S613 are mutated to alanine, restores daily rhythmicity, but dramatically lengthens the period to ~ 30 hrs. Interestingly, the single S613A mutation extends the period by 2-3 hours, while the single T610A mutation has a minimal effect, suggesting these phospho-residues cooperate to control period length. Conservation of S613 from flies to humans suggests that it possesses a critical clock function, and mutational analysis of residues surrounding T610/S613 implicates the entire region in determining circadian period. Biochemical and immunohistochemical data indicate defects in overall phosphorylation and altered timely degradation of PER carrying the double or single S613A mutation(s. The PER-T610A/S613A mutant also alters CLK phosphorylation and CLK-mediated output. Lastly, we show that a mutation at a previously identified site, S596, is largely epistatic to S613A, suggesting that S613 negatively regulates phosphorylation at S596. Together these data establish functional significance for a new domain of PER, demonstrate that cooperativity between phosphorylation sites maintains PER function, and support a model

  17. Determination of phosphorylation sites for NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase from mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinekar, Rithvik; Ghosh, Indira

    2009-06-01

    Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (ICD) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation reaction of 2R,3S-isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate in the Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA) cycle. Two isoforms of NADP-specific ICDs with the E.C number 1.1.1.42 have been annotated in the organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis, monomeric ICD2 and dimeric ICD1. BLAST search against the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database shows a marked similarity between dimeric Mycobacterium tuberculosis ICD1 sequence and that of Sus scrofa, a cytosolic eukaryotic ICD (65% identity). Escherischia coli ICD shows less sequence similarity than the eukaryotic structure. A Homology model has thus been built for M. tuberculosis ICD1 using Sus scrofa and human ICD as templates. Inactivation of ICD1 by phosphorylation similar to E. coli ICD is important to open up the shunt pathway in the TCA cycle, which has been indicated in the case of M. tuberculosis. We therefore attempted to identify a number of likely phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis using pattern prediction and checked with the homology models for the accessibility of the peptides containing Serine. It was found that the homologous Serine by alignment with E. coli on M. tuberculosis ICD1 is difficult to access by specific kinases. Hence other probable sites of phosphorylation were checked and three highly probable serine-containing peptides were identified. The effect of phosphorylation at each of these sites was determined by checking the degree of conformational changes, the differences caused by the effect of phosphorylation in the active-site and other apparent motion different from that of the control, i.e., unphosphorylated M. tuberculosis ICD1 model, using molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Phosphobutyrylcholinesterase: phosphorylation of the esteratic site of butyrylcholinesterase by ethephon [(2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid] dianion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haux, J E; Quistad, G B; Casida, J E

    2000-07-01

    Ethephon [(2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid] has two seemingly unrelated types of biological activity. It is a major agrochemical absorbed by crops, slowly releasing ethylene as a plant growth regulator. Ethephon also inhibits the activity of plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) in humans, dogs, rats, and mice. This is totally unexpected for an ionized phosphonic acid (mostly the dianion at physiological pH), in contrast to the classical inhibitors (nonionized triester phosphates) which phosphorylate serine at the active site. This study tests the hypothesis that ethephon (as the dianion) also acts as a phosphorylating agent in inhibiting BuChE activity. The sensitivity of plasma BuChE to ethephon (90 min preincubation at 25 degrees C) is greatest for humans, dogs, and mice (IC(50) = 6-23 microM), intermediate for chickens, rabbits, rats, and guinea pigs (IC(50) = 26-53 microM), and lowest for pigs and horses (IC(50) = 92-172 microM). The IC(50) decreases linearly with time on a log-log scale to values of 0.15-0. 3 microM for human, dog, and horse BuChE at 24 h. The inhibition rate is generally related to ethephon concentration, consistent with a bimolecular reaction, e.g., phosphorylation. The extent of inhibition of the esteratic activity of BuChE by ethephon is directly proportional to the extent of inhibition of [(3)H]diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate ([(3)H]DFP) postlabeling which is not reversible on removing the ethephon, either directly or after further incubation for 24 h at 25 degrees C. These observations strongly suggest that ethephon, as DFP, phosphorylates human plasma BuChE at Ser-198 of the esteratic site, or more generally, the formation of a phosphobutyrylcholinesterase. With human plasma BuChE, (2-bromoethyl)- and (2-iodoethyl)phosphonic acids have lower affinities for the site than ethephon but higher phosphorylation rate constants, consistent with their relative hydrolysis rates at pH 7.4 (phosphorylation of water). (2-Chlorohexyl)phosphonic acid is

  19. DNA Replication Stress Phosphoproteome Profiles Reveal Novel Functional Phosphorylation Sites on Xrs2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongqing; Piening, Brian D; Kennedy, Jacob J; Lin, Chenwei; Jones-Weinert, Corey W; Yan, Ping; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-05-01

    In response to replication stress, a phospho-signaling cascade is activated and required for coordination of DNA repair and replication of damaged templates (intra-S-phase checkpoint) . How phospho-signaling coordinates the DNA replication stress response is largely unknown. We employed state-of-the-art liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approaches to generate high-coverage and quantitative proteomic and phospho-proteomic profiles during replication stress in yeast, induced by continuous exposure to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) . We identified 32,057 unique peptides representing the products of 4296 genes and 22,061 unique phosphopeptides representing the products of 3183 genes. A total of 542 phosphopeptides (mapping to 339 genes) demonstrated an abundance change of greater than or equal to twofold in response to MMS. The screen enabled detection of nearly all of the proteins known to be involved in the DNA damage response, as well as many novel MMS-induced phosphorylations. We assessed the functional importance of a subset of key phosphosites by engineering a panel of phosphosite mutants in which an amino acid substitution prevents phosphorylation. In total, we successfully mutated 15 MMS-responsive phosphorylation sites in seven representative genes including APN1 (base excision repair); CTF4 and TOF1 (checkpoint and sister-chromatid cohesion); MPH1 (resolution of homologous recombination intermediates); RAD50 and XRS2 (MRX complex); and RAD18 (PRR). All of these phosphorylation site mutants exhibited MMS sensitivity, indicating an important role in protecting cells from DNA damage. In particular, we identified MMS-induced phosphorylation sites on Xrs2 that are required for MMS resistance in the absence of the MRX activator, Sae2, and that affect telomere maintenance. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Impairments in site-specific AS160 phosphorylation and effects of exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Consitt, Leslie A; Van Meter, Jessica; Newton, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if site-specific phosphorylation at the level of Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) is altered in skeletal muscle from sedentary humans across a wide range of the adult lifespan (18 to 84 years) and if endurance- and/or strength-oriented exercise training...... in whole-body insulin action were associated with impairments in insulin-induced phosphorylation of skeletal muscle AS160 on sites Ser-588, Thr-642, Ser-666 and phospho-Akt substrate (PAS), but not Ser-318 or Ser-751. Twelve weeks of either endurance- or strength-oriented exercise training increased whole...... population and that exercise training is an effective intervention for treating these impairments....

  1. A Novel p53 Phosphorylation Site within the MDM2 Ubiquitination Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Jennifer A.; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Bramham, Janice; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.; Verma, Chandra; Hupp, Ted R.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 DNA-binding domain harbors a conformationally flexible multiprotein binding site that regulates p53 ubiquitination. A novel phosphorylation site exists within this region at Ser269, whose phosphomimetic mutation inactivates p53. The phosphomimetic p53 (S269D) exhibits characteristics of mutant p53: stable binding to Hsp70 in vivo, elevated ubiquitination in vivo, inactivity in DNA binding and transcription, increased thermoinstability using thermal shift assays, and λmax of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence at 403 nm rather than 346 nm, characteristic of wild type p53. These data indicate that p53 conformational stability is regulated by a phosphoacceptor site within an exposed flexible surface loop and that this can be destabilized by phosphorylation. To test whether other motifs within p53 have similarly evolved, we analyzed the effect of Ser215 mutation on p53 function because Ser215 is another inactivating phosphorylation site in the conformationally flexible PAb240 epitope. The p53S215D protein is inactive like p53S269D, whereas p53S215A is as active as p53S269A. However, the double mutant p53S215A/S269A was transcriptionally inactive and more thermally unstable than either individual Ser-Ala loop mutant. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that (i) solvation of phospho-Ser215 and phospho-Ser269 by positive charged residues or solvent water leads to local unfolding, which is accompanied by local destabilization of the N-terminal loop and global destabilization of p53, and (ii) the double alanine 215/269 mutation disrupts hydrogen bonding normally stabilized by both Ser215 and Ser269. These data indicate that p53 has evolved two serine phosphoacceptor residues within conformationally flexible epitopes that normally stabilize the p53 DNA-binding domain but whose phosphorylation induces a mutant conformation to wild type p53. PMID:20847049

  2. Characterization of phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain of the 300 kDa mannose-6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Mieskes, G; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    The human 300 kDa mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300) is phosphorylated in vivo at serine residues of its cytoplasmic domain. Two-dimensional separation can resolve tryptic phosphopeptides into four major species. To identify the kinases involved in MPR 300 phosphorylation...... kinases phosphorylate the cytoplasmic tail exclusively on serine residues. Inhibition studies using synthetic peptides, partial sequencing of isolated tryptic phosphopeptides and co-migration with tryptic phosphopeptides from MPR 300 labelled in vivo showed that (i) PKA phosphorylates the cytoplasmic MPR...... 300 domain at Ser20 and at a non-identified site, neither of which are phosphorylated in vivo, and that (ii) the two sites phosphorylated by CK II in vivo and in vitro are Ser82 and Ser157. The results indicate that the human MPR 300 is a physiological substrate of either CK II or a related kinase...

  3. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  4. The in vivo phosphorylation sites in multiple isoforms of amphiphysin I from rat brain nerve terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craft, George E; Graham, Mark E; Bache, Nicolai

    2008-01-01

    Amphiphysin I (amphI) is dephosphorylated by calcineurin during nerve terminal depolarization and synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE). Some amphI phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) have been identified with in vitro studies or phosphoproteomics screens. We used a multifaceted strategy including 32......P tracking to identify all in vivo amphI phosphosites and determine their relative abundance and potential relevance to SVE. AmphI was extracted from 32P-labeled synaptosomes, phosphopeptides were isolated from proteolytic digests using TiO2 chromatography, and mass spectrometry revealed 13 sites...

  5. Novel protein phosphorylation site identification in spinach stroma membranes by titanium dioxide microcolumns and tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinalducci, Sara; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2006-01-01

    In this work, spinach stroma membrane, instead of thylakoid, has been investigated for the presence of phosphorylated proteins. We identified seven previously unknown phosphorylation sites by taking advantage of TiO(2) phosphopeptides enrichment coupled to mass spectrometric analysis. Upon illumi...

  6. Identification and functional analysis of SOX10 phosphorylation sites in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Julia C; Loftus, Stacie K; Baxter, Laura L; Swatkoski, Steve; Gucek, Marjan; Pavan, William J

    2018-01-01

    The transcription factor SOX10 plays an important role in vertebrate neural crest development, including the establishment and maintenance of the melanocyte lineage. SOX10 is also highly expressed in melanoma tumors, and SOX10 expression increases with tumor progression. The suppression of SOX10 in melanoma cells activates TGF-β signaling and can promote resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. Since resistance to BRAF/MEK inhibitors is seen in the majority of melanoma patients, there is an immediate need to assess the underlying biology that mediates resistance and to identify new targets for combinatorial therapeutic approaches. Previously, we demonstrated that SOX10 protein is required for tumor initiation, maintenance and survival. Here, we present data that support phosphorylation as a mechanism employed by melanoma cells to tightly regulate SOX10 expression. Mass spectrometry identified eight phosphorylation sites contained within SOX10, three of which (S24, S45 and T240) were selected for further analysis based on their location within predicted MAPK/CDK binding motifs. SOX10 mutations were generated at these phosphorylation sites to assess their impact on SOX10 protein function in melanoma cells, including transcriptional activation on target promoters, subcellular localization, and stability. These data further our understanding of SOX10 protein regulation and provide critical information for identification of molecular pathways that modulate SOX10 protein levels in melanoma, with the ultimate goal of discovering novel targets for more effective combinatorial therapeutic approaches for melanoma patients.

  7. Assessment of current mass spectrometric workflows for the quantification of low abundant proteins and phosphorylation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bauer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data described here provide a systematic performance evaluation of popular data-dependent (DDA and independent (DIA mass spectrometric (MS workflows currently used in quantitative proteomics. We assessed the limits of identification, quantification and detection for each method by analyzing a dilution series of 20 unmodified and 10 phosphorylated synthetic heavy labeled reference peptides, respectively, covering six orders of magnitude in peptide concentration with and without a complex human cell digest background. We found that all methods performed very similarly in the absence of background proteins, however, when analyzing whole cell lysates, targeted methods were at least 5–10 times more sensitive than directed or DDA methods. In particular, higher stage fragmentation (MS3 of the neutral loss peak using a linear ion trap increased dynamic quantification range of some phosphopeptides up to 100-fold. We illustrate the power of this targeted MS3 approach for phosphopeptide monitoring by successfully quantifying 9 phosphorylation sites of the kinetochore and spindle assembly checkpoint component Mad1 over different cell cycle states from non-enriched pull-down samples. The data are associated to the research article ‘Evaluation of data-dependent and data-independent mass spectrometric workflows for sensitive quantification of proteins and phosphorylation sites׳ (Bauer et al., 2014 [1]. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000964.

  8. Asymmetric catalysis at a distance: catalytic, site-selective phosphorylation of teicoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sunkyu; Miller, Scott J

    2013-08-21

    We report three distinct, peptide-based catalysts that enable site-selective phosphorylation of three distinct hydroxyl groups within the complex glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin A2-2. Two of the catalysts are based on a design that capitalizes on a catalyst-substrate interaction that mimics the biological mechanism of action for teicoplanin. These catalysts are based on a DXaa-DXaa peptide motif that is known to target the teicoplanin structure in a specific manner. The third was identified through evaluation of a set of catalysts that had been developed for historically distinct projects. Each catalyst contains additional functionality designed to dispose a catalytic moiety (a nucleophilic alkylimidazole) at a different region of the glycopeptide structure. A combination of mass spectrometry and 2D-NMR spectroscopy allowed structural assignment of the distinct phosphorylated teicoplanin derivatives. Mechanistic studies are also reported that support the hypotheses that led to the discovery of the catalysts. In this manner, small molecule catalysts have been achieved that allow rational, catalytic control over reactions at sites that are separated by 11.6, 16.5, and nearly 17.7 Å, based on the X-ray crystal structure of teicoplanin A2-2. Finally, we report the biological activity of the new phosphorylated teicoplanin analogs and compare the results to the natural product itself.

  9. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and

  10. Coarse-grained molecular simulation of epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase multi-site self-phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Koland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites in either of the two C-terminal (CT domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in

  11. Pim kinases phosphorylate multiple sites on Bad and promote 14-3-3 binding and dissociation from Bcl-XL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hastie C James

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pim-1, 2 and 3 are a group of enzymes related to the calcium calmodulin family of protein kinases. Over-expression of Pim-1 and Pim-2 in mice promotes the development of lymphomas, and up-regulation of Pim expression has been observed in several human cancers. Results Here we show that the pim kinases are constitutively active when expressed in HEK-293 cells and are able to phosphorylate the Bcl-2 family member Bad on three residues, Ser112, Ser136 and Ser155 in vitro and in cells. In vitro mapping showed that Pim-2 predominantly phosphorylated Ser112, while Pim-1 phosphorylated Ser112, but also Ser136 and Ser155 at a reduced rate compared to Ser112. Pim-3 was found to be the least specific for Ser112, and the most effective at phosphorylating Ser136 and Ser155. Pim-3 was also able to phosphorylate other sites in Bad in vitro, including Ser170, another potential in vivo site. Mutation of Ser136 to alanine prevented the phosphorylation of Ser112 and Ser155 by Pim kinases in HEK-293 cells, suggesting that this site must be phosphorylated first in order to make the other sites accessible. Pim phosphorylation of Bad was also found to promote the 14-3-3 binding of Bad and block its association with Bcl-XL. Conclusion All three Pim kinase family members predominantly phosphorylate Bad on Ser112 and in addition are capable of phosphorylating Bad on multiple sites associated with the inhibition of the pro-apoptotic function of Bad in HEK-293 cells. This would be consistent with the proposed function of Pim kinases in promoting cell proliferation and preventing cell death.

  12. Identification of sites phosphorylated by the vaccinia virus B1R kinase in viral protein H5R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardie Grahame

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus gene B1R encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. In vitro this protein kinase phosphorylates ribosomal proteins Sa and S2 and vaccinia virus protein H5R, proteins that become phosphorylated during infection. Nothing is known about the sites phosphorylated on these proteins or the general substrate specificity of the kinase. The work described is the first to address these questions. Results Vaccinia virus protein H5R was phosphorylated by the B1R protein kinase in vitro, digested with V8 protease, and phosphopeptides separated by HPLC. The N-terminal sequence of one radioactively labelled phosphopeptide was determined and found to correspond to residues 81-87 of the protein, with Thr-84 and Thr-85 being phosphorylated. A synthetic peptide based on this region of the protein was shown to be a substrate for the B1R protein kinase, and the extent of phosphorylation was substantially decreased if either Thr residue was replaced by an Ala. Conclusions We have identified the first phosphorylation site for the vaccinia virus B1R protein kinase. This gives important information about the substrate-specificity of the enzyme, which differs from that of other known protein kinases. It remains to be seen whether the same site is phosphorylated in vivo.

  13. Cooperativity within proximal phosphorylation sites is revealed from large-scale proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linial Michal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation is the most prevalent post-translational modification on eukaryotic proteins. Multisite phosphorylation enables a specific combination of phosphosites to determine the speed, specificity and duration of biological response. Until recent years, the lack of high quality data limited the possibility for analyzing the properties of phosphorylation at the proteome scale and in the context of a wide range of conditions. Thanks to advances of mass spectrometry technologies, thousands of phosphosites from in-vivo experiments were identified and archived in the public domain. Such resource is appropriate to derive an unbiased view on the phosphosites properties in eukaryotes and on their functional relevance. Results We present statistically rigorous tests on the spatial and functional properties of a collection of ~70,000 reported phosphosites. We show that the distribution of phosphosites positioning along the protein tends to occur as dense clusters of Serine/Threonines (pS/pT and between Serine/Threonines and Tyrosines, but generally not as much between Tyrosines (pY only. This phenomenon is more ubiquitous than anticipated and is pertinent for most eukaryotic proteins: for proteins with ≥ 2 phosphosites, 54% of all pS/pT sites are within 4 amino acids of another site. We found a strong tendency for clustered pS/pT to be activated by the same kinase. Large-scale analyses of phosphopeptides are thus consistent with a cooperative function within the cluster. Conclusions We present evidence supporting the notion that clusters of pS/pT but generally not pY should be considered as the elementary building blocks in phosphorylation regulation. Indeed, closely positioned sites tend to be activated by the same kinase, a signal that overrides the tendency of a protein to be activated by a single or only few kinases. Within these clusters, coordination and positional dependency is evident. We postulate that cellular

  14. Evaluation of glyphosate resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana expressing an altered target site EPSPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, R Douglas; You, Jinsong; Qi, Youlin; Flasinski, Stanislaw; Kavanaugh, Christina; Washam, Jeannie; Ostrander, Elizabeth; Wang, Dafu; Heck, Greg

    2017-07-05

    Glyphosate-resistant goosegrass has recently evolved and is homozygous for the double mutant of EPSPS (T102 I, P106 S or TIPS). These same mutations combined with EPSPS overexpression, have been used to create transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops. Arabidopsis thaliana (Wt EPSPS Ki  ∼ 0.5 μM) was engineered to express a variant AtEPSPS-T102 I, P106 A (TIPA Ki  = 150 μM) to determine the resistance magnitude for a more potent variant EPSPS that might evolve in weeds. Transgenic A. thaliana plants, homozygous for one, two or four copies of AtEPSPS-TIPA, had resistance (IC50 values, R/S) as measured by seed production ranging from 4.3- to 16-fold. Plants treated in reproductive stage were male sterile with a range of R/S from 10.1- to 40.6-fold. A significant hormesis (∼ 63% gain in fresh weight) was observed for all genotypes when treated at the initiation of reproductive stage with 0.013 kg ha-1 . AtEPSPS-TIPA enzyme activity was proportional to copy number and correlated with resistance magnitude. A. thaliana, as a model weed expressing one copy of AtEPSPS-TIPA (300-fold more resistant), had only 4.3-fold resistance to glyphosate for seed production. Resistance behaved as a single dominant allele. Vegetative tissue resistance was 4.7-fold greater than reproductive tissue resistance and was linear with gene copy number. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Identification and functional characterization of novel phosphorylation sites in TAK1-binding protein (TAB 1.

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    Alexander Wolf

    Full Text Available TAB1 was defined as a regulatory subunit of the protein kinase TAK1, which functions upstream in the pathways activated by interleukin (IL-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF, toll-like receptors (TLRs and stressors. However, TAB1 also functions in the p38 MAPK pathway downstream of TAK1. We identified amino acids (aa 452/453 and 456/457 of TAB1 as novel sites phosphorylated by TAK1 as well as by p38 MAPK in intact cells as well as in vitro. Serines 452/453 and 456/457 were phosphorylated upon phosphatase blockade by calyculin A, or in response to IL-1 or translational stressors such as anisomycin and sorbitol. Deletion or phospho-mimetic mutations of aa 452-457 of TAB1 retain TAB1 and p38 MAPK in the cytoplasm. The TAB1 mutant lacking aa 452-457 decreases TAB1-dependent phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. It also enhances TAB1-dependent CCL5 secretion in response to IL-1 and increases activity of a post-transcriptional reporter gene, which contains the CCL5 3' untranslated region. These data suggest a complex role of aa 452-457 of TAB1 in controlling p38 MAPK activity and subcellular localization and implicate these residues in TAK1- or p38 MAPK-dependent post-transcriptional control of gene expression.

  16. In silico determination of intracellular glycosylation and phosphorylation sites in human selectins: Implications for biological function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, I.; Hoessli, D.C.; Gupta, Ramneek

    2007-01-01

    Post-translational modifications provide the proteins with the possibility to perform functions in addition to those determined by their primary sequence. However, analysis of multifunctional protein structures in the environment of cells and body fluids is made especially difficult by the presence...... both modifications are likely to occur can also be predicted (YinYang sites), to suggest further functional versatility. Structural modifications of hydroxyl groups of P-, E-, and L-selectins have been predicted and possible functions resulting from such modifications are proposed. Functional changes...... of the three selectins are based on the assumption that transitory and reversible protein modifications by phosphate and O-GlcNAc cause specific conformational changes and generate binding sites for other proteins. The computer-assisted prediction of glycosylation and phosphorylation sites in selectins should...

  17. AthMethPre: a web server for the prediction and query of mRNA m6A sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shunian; Yan, Zhangming; Liu, Ke; Zhang, Yaou; Sun, Zhirong

    2016-10-18

    N6-Methyladenosine (m6A) is the most prevalent and abundant modification in mRNA that has been linked to many key biological processes. High-throughput experiments have generated m6A-peaks across the transcriptome of A. thaliana, but the specific methylated sites were not assigned, which impedes the understanding of m6A functions in plants. Therefore, computational prediction of mRNA m6A sites becomes emergently important. Here, we present a method to predict the m6A sites for A. thaliana mRNA sequence(s). To predict the m6A sites of an mRNA sequence, we employed the support vector machine to build a classifier using the features of the positional flanking nucleotide sequence and position-independent k-mer nucleotide spectrum. Our method achieved good performance and was applied to a web server to provide service for the prediction of A. thaliana m6A sites. The server also provides a comprehensive database of predicted transcriptome-wide m6A sites and curated m6A-seq peaks from the literature for query and visualization. The AthMethPre web server is the first web server that provides a user-friendly tool for the prediction and query of A. thaliana mRNA m6A sites, which is freely accessible for public use at .

  18. Dual-site phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator impacts group a streptococcal global gene expression and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Horstmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation relays are a major mechanism by which bacteria alter transcription in response to environmental signals, but understanding of the functional consequences of bacterial response regulator phosphorylation is limited. We sought to characterize how phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator (CovR protein from the major human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS influences GAS global gene expression and pathogenesis. CovR mainly serves to repress GAS virulence factor-encoding genes and has been shown to homodimerize following phosphorylation on aspartate-53 (D53 in vitro. We discovered that CovR is phosphorylated in vivo and that such phosphorylation is partially heat-stable, suggesting additional phosphorylation at non-aspartate residues. Using mass spectroscopy along with targeted mutagenesis, we identified threonine-65 (T65 as an additional CovR phosphorylation site under control of the serine/threonine kinase (Stk. Phosphorylation on T65, as mimicked by the recombinant CovR T65E variant, abolished in vitro CovR D53 phosphorylation. Similarly, isoallelic GAS strains that were either unable to be phosphorylated at D53 (CovR-D53A or had functional constitutive phosphorylation at T65 (CovR-T65E had essentially an identical gene repression profile to each other and to a CovR-inactivated strain. However, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E isoallelic strains retained the ability to positively influence gene expression that was abolished in the CovR-inactivated strain. Consistent with these observations, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E strains were hypervirulent compared to the CovR-inactivated strain in a mouse model of invasive GAS disease. Surprisingly, an isoalleic strain unable to be phosphorylated at CovR T65 (CovR-T65A was hypervirulent compared to the wild-type strain, as auto-regulation of covR gene expression resulted in lower covR gene transcript and CovR protein levels in the CovR-T65A strain. Taken together, these data

  19. TRANSFORMATION EFFECTIVENESS FOR ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA PLANTS BY DNA-CONSTRUCTIONS WITH SITE-SPECIFIC RECOMBINASE SYSTEM Cre/loxP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Sekan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using of new approach with site-specific recombinase system Cre/loxP under the control of 35S-promoter to generate marker-free genetically modified plants was developed. The analysis of recombinase system was carried out during the next generation of Arabidopsis thaliana plants, produced by agrobacterium transformation method. For this purpose two types of DNA-constructions were used for establishing better variant. The histochemical analysis of the plants progeny T1 transformed by both construct types was described. As a result of our work, it was established that the amount of marker-free transformants was arising during every next transformation offspring independently of the used construct type. The new strategy provides a simple and rapid way to eliminate swelective and marker genes.

  20. Assigning Quantitative Function to Post-Translational Modifications Reveals Multiple Sites of Phosphorylation That Tune Yeast Pheromone Signaling Output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pincus, David; Ryan, Christopher J.; Smith, Richard D.; Brent, Roger; Resnekov, Orna; Hakimi, Mohamed Ali

    2013-03-12

    Cell signaling systems transmit information by post-­translationally modifying signaling proteins, often via phosphorylation. While thousands of sites of phosphorylation have been identified in proteomic studies, the vast majority of sites have no known function. Assigning functional roles to the catalog of uncharacterized phosphorylation sites is a key research challenge. Here we present a general approach to address this challenge and apply it to a prototypical signaling pathway, the pheromone response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The pheromone pathway includes a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade activated by a G-­protein coupled receptor (GPCR). We used mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify sites whose phosphorylation changed when the system was active, and evolutionary conservation to assign priority to a list of candidate MAPK regulatory sites. We made targeted alterations in those sites, and measured the effects of the mutations on pheromone pathway output in single cells. Our work identified six new sites that quantitatively tuned system output. We developed simple computational models to find system architectures that recapitulated the quantitative phenotypes of the mutants. Our results identify a number of regulated phosphorylation events that contribute to adjust the input-­output relationship of this model eukaryotic signaling system. We believe this combined approach constitutes a general means not only to reveal modification sites required to turn a pathway on and off, but also those required for more subtle quantitative effects that tune pathway output. Our results further suggest that relatively small quantitative influences from individual regulatory phosphorylation events endow signaling systems with plasticity that evolution may exploit to quantitatively tailor signaling outcomes.

  1. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site on TBC1D4 regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treebak, Jonas Thue; Taylor, Eric B.; Witczak, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    , suggesting this site is regulated by one or more additional upstream kinases. Despite increased S711 phosphorylation with AICAR, contraction, and insulin, mutation of S711 to alanine did not alter glucose uptake in response to these stimuli. S711 is a novel TBC1D4 phosphorylation site regulated by AMPK....... The majority of known phosphorylation sites on TBC1D4 lie within the Akt consensus motif and are phosphorylated by insulin stimulation. However, the 5 AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other kinases may also phosphorylate TBC1D4, and therefore we hypothesized the presence of additional phosphorylation...... sites. Mouse skeletal muscles were contracted or stimulated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxmide riboside (AICAR) and muscle lysates were subjected to mass spectrometry analyses resulting in identification of novel putative phosphorylation sites on TBC1D4. The surrounding amino acid sequence predicted...

  2. β-carboline compounds, including harmine, inhibit DYRK1A and tau phosphorylation at multiple Alzheimer's disease-related sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Frost

    Full Text Available Harmine, a β-carboline alkaloid, is a high affinity inhibitor of the dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A protein. The DYRK1A gene is located within the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR on chromosome 21. We and others have implicated DYRK1A in the phosphorylation of tau protein on multiple sites associated with tau pathology in Down Syndrome and in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Pharmacological inhibition of this kinase may provide an opportunity to intervene therapeutically to alter the onset or progression of tau pathology in AD. Here we test the ability of harmine, and numerous additional β-carboline compounds, to inhibit the DYRK1A dependent phosphorylation of tau protein on serine 396, serine 262/serine 356 (12E8 epitope, and threonine 231 in cell culture assays and in vitro phosphorylation assays. Results demonstrate that the β-carboline compounds (1 potently reduce the expression of all three phosphorylated forms of tau protein, and (2 inhibit the DYRK1A catalyzed direct phosphorylation of tau protein on serine 396. By assaying several β-carboline compounds, we define certain chemical groups that modulate the affinity of this class of compounds for inhibition of tau phosphorylation.

  3. Human ATP synthase beta is phosphorylated at multiple sites and shows abnormal phosphorylation at specific sites in insulin-resistant muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, K; Yi, Z; Lefort, N

    2009-01-01

    -specific phosphorylation of the catalytic beta subunit of ATP synthase (ATPsyn-beta) and determine protein abundance of ATPsyn-beta and other OxPhos components in skeletal muscle from healthy and insulin-resistant individuals. METHODS: Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from lean, healthy, obese, non-diabetic and type......-beta at Tyr361 and Thr213 (within the nucleotide-binding region of ATP synthase) as well as a coordinated downregulation of ATPsyn-beta protein and other OxPhos components. Insulin increased Tyr361 phosphorylation of ATPsyn-beta by approximately 50% in lean and healthy, but not insulin-resistant, individuals...

  4. A functional screen provides evidence for a conserved, regulatory, juxtamembrane phosphorylation site in guanylyl cyclase a and B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R Yoder

    Full Text Available Kinase homology domain (KHD phosphorylation is required for activation of guanylyl cyclase (GC-A and -B. Phosphopeptide mapping identified multiple phosphorylation sites in GC-A and GC-B, but these approaches have difficulty identifying sites in poorly detected peptides. Here, a functional screen was conducted to identify novel sites. Conserved serines or threonines in the KHDs of phosphorylated receptor GCs were mutated to alanine and tested for reduced hormone to detergent activity ratios. Mutation of Ser-489 in GC-B to alanine but not glutamate reduced the activity ratio to 60% of wild type (WT levels. Similar results were observed with Ser-473, the homologous site in GC-A. Receptors containing glutamates for previously identified phosphorylation sites (GC-A-6E and GC-B-6E were activated to ~20% of WT levels but the additional glutamate substitution for S473 or S489 increased activity to near WT levels. Substrate-velocity assays indicated that GC-B-WT-S489E and GC-B-6E-S489E had lower Km values and that WT-GC-B-S489A, GC-B-6E and GC-B-6E-S489A had higher Km values than WT-GC-B. Homologous desensitization was enhanced when GC-A contained the S473E substitution, and GC-B-6E-S489E was resistant to inhibition by a calcium elevating treatment or protein kinase C activation--processes that dephosphorylate GC-B. Mass spectrometric detection of a synthetic phospho-Ser-473 containing peptide was 200-1300-fold less sensitive than other phosphorylated peptides and neither mass spectrometric nor (32PO(4 co-migration studies detected phospho-Ser-473 or phospho-Ser-489 in cells. We conclude that Ser-473 and Ser-489 are Km-regulating phosphorylation sites that are difficult to detect using current methods.

  5. The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and the origin of hyperhomocysteinemia in aging and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2015-01-01

    The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in mitochondria is proposed to consist of two molecules of thioretinamide bound to cobalamin, forming thioretinaco, complexed with ozone, oxygen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. and inorganic phosphate, TR2CoO3O2NAD(+)H2PO4(-). Reduction of the pyridinium nitrogen of the nicotinamide group by an electron from electron transport complexes initiates polymerization of phosphate with adenosine diphosphate, yielding nicotinamide riboside and ATP bound to thioretinaco ozonide oxygen. A second electron reduces oxygen to hydroperoxyl radical, releasing ATP from the active site. A proton gradient is created within F1F0 ATPase complexes of mitochondria by reaction of protons with reduced nicotinamide riboside and with hydroperoxyl radical, yielding reduced nicotinamide riboside and hydroperoxide. The hyperhomocysteinemia of aging and dementia is attributed to decreased synthesis of adenosyl methionine by thioretinaco ozonide and ATP, causing decreased allosteric activation of cystathionine synthase and decreased allosteric inhibition of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and resulting in dysregulation of methionine metabolism. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  6. Functional characterization of the major and minor phosphorylation sites of the P protein of Borna disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Sonja; Mayer, Daniel; Schneider, Urs; Schwemmle, Martin

    2007-06-01

    The phosphoprotein P of Borna disease virus (BDV) is an essential cofactor of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. It is preferentially phosphorylated at serine residues 26 and 28 by protein kinase C epsilon (PKCepsilon) and, to a lesser extent, at serine residues 70 and 86 by casein kinase II (CKII). To determine whether P phosphorylation is required for viral polymerase activity, we generated P mutants lacking either the PKCepsilon or the CKII phosphate acceptor sites by replacing the corresponding serine residues with alanine (A). Alternatively, these sites were replaced by aspartic acid (D) to mimic phosphorylation. Functional characterization of the various mutants in the BDV minireplicon assay revealed that D substitutions at the CKII sites inhibited the polymerase-supporting activity of P, while A substitutions maintained wild-type activity. Likewise, D substitutions at the PKC sites did not impair the cofactor function of BDV-P, whereas A substitutions at these sites led to increased activity. Interestingly, recombinant viruses could be rescued only when P mutants with modified PKCepsilon sites were used but not when both CKII sites were altered. PKCepsilon mutant viruses showed a reduced capacity to spread in cell culture, while viral RNA and protein expression levels in persistently infected cells were almost normal. Further mutational analyses revealed that substitutions at individual CKII sites were, with the exception of a substitution of A for S86, detrimental for viral rescue. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to other viral P proteins, the cofactor activity of BDV-P is negatively regulated by phosphorylation.

  7. Functional Characterization of the Major and Minor Phosphorylation Sites of the P Protein of Borna Disease Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Sonja; Mayer, Daniel; Schneider, Urs; Schwemmle, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The phosphoprotein P of Borna disease virus (BDV) is an essential cofactor of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. It is preferentially phosphorylated at serine residues 26 and 28 by protein kinase C ɛ (PKCɛ) and, to a lesser extent, at serine residues 70 and 86 by casein kinase II (CKII). To determine whether P phosphorylation is required for viral polymerase activity, we generated P mutants lacking either the PKCɛ or the CKII phosphate acceptor sites by replacing the corresponding serine residues with alanine (A). Alternatively, these sites were replaced by aspartic acid (D) to mimic phosphorylation. Functional characterization of the various mutants in the BDV minireplicon assay revealed that D substitutions at the CKII sites inhibited the polymerase-supporting activity of P, while A substitutions maintained wild-type activity. Likewise, D substitutions at the PKC sites did not impair the cofactor function of BDV-P, whereas A substitutions at these sites led to increased activity. Interestingly, recombinant viruses could be rescued only when P mutants with modified PKCɛ sites were used but not when both CKII sites were altered. PKCɛ mutant viruses showed a reduced capacity to spread in cell culture, while viral RNA and protein expression levels in persistently infected cells were almost normal. Further mutational analyses revealed that substitutions at individual CKII sites were, with the exception of a substitution of A for S86, detrimental for viral rescue. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to other viral P proteins, the cofactor activity of BDV-P is negatively regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:17376920

  8. PHOSPHORYLATION SITE MUTANTS OF THE MANNITOL TRANSPORT PROTEIN ENZYME IIMTL OF ESCHERICHIA-COLI - STUDIES ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE MANNITOL TRANSLOCATING C-DOMAIN AND THE PHOSPHORYLATION SITE ON THE ENERGY-COUPLING B-DOMAIN : Studies on the Interaction between the Mannitol Translocating C-Domain and the Phosphorylation Site on the Energy-Coupling B-Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hoeve-Duurkens, R.H.; Lolkema, J.S.; Robillard, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    Mannitol binding and translocation catalyzed by the C domain of the Escherichia coli mannitol transport protein enzyme IImtl is influenced by domain B. This interaction was studied by monitoring the effects of mutating the B domain phosphorylation site, C384, on the kinetics of mannitol binding to

  9. Increased phosphorylation of skeletal muscle glycogen synthase at NH2-terminal sites during physiological hyperinsulinemia in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Staehr, Peter; Hansen, Bo Falck

    2003-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, insulin activation of muscle glycogen synthase (GS) is impaired. This defect plays a major role for the development of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. In animal muscle, insulin activates GS by reducing phosphorylation at both NH(2)- and COOH-terminal sites, but the mecha......In type 2 diabetes, insulin activation of muscle glycogen synthase (GS) is impaired. This defect plays a major role for the development of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. In animal muscle, insulin activates GS by reducing phosphorylation at both NH(2)- and COOH-terminal sites......, but the mechanism involved in human muscle and the defect in type 2 diabetes remain unclear. We studied the effect of insulin at physiological concentrations on glucose metabolism, insulin signaling and phosphorylation of GS in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic and well-matched control subjects during euglycemic......-hyperinsulinemic clamps. Analysis using phospho-specific antibodies revealed that insulin decreases phosphorylation of sites 3a + 3b in human muscle, and this was accompanied by activation of Akt and inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha. In type 2 diabetic subjects these effects of insulin were fully intact...

  10. Aurora-B dysfunction of multinucleated giant cells in glioma detected by site-specific phosphorylated antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Mitsugu; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagasaka, Tetsuro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Maeda, Kenkou; Ishii, Dai; Arima, Toru; Kawajiri, Aie; Inagaki, Masaki; Yoshida, Jun

    2004-12-01

    The origin of multinucleated giant cells in glioma has not been made clear. In a previous paper the authors studied multinucleated giant tumor cells by using mitosis-specific phosphorylated antibodies to determine the phosphorylation of intermediate filaments and demonstrated that these cells stay in the early mitotic stage, undergoing neither fusion nor degeneration. In the current study the authors investigated the possible genetic causes of multinucleated giant tumor cells. Cultured mono- or multinucleated human glioma cells were immunostained with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 4A4, YT33, TM71, HTA28, YG72, and alphaAIM-1. The three former antibodies revealed a particular mitotic cell cycle through site-specific phosphorylation of vimentin; that is, the early phase, mid phase, and late phase, respectively. The three later antibodies demonstrated phosphorylation of H3 at Ser28, phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser72, and aurora-B, respectively, making it possible to identify aurora-B distribution and function during mitosis. In addition, paraffin-embedded tissue sections obtained in three patients with giant cell glioblastoma were also examined. Multinucleated giant tumor cells immunoreacted with the mAb 4A4 and alphaAIM-1 but not with YT33, TM71, HTA28, and YG72 in vitro and in vivo. Findings in this study indicated that multinucleated giant tumor cells remain in the early mitotic phase because of aurora-B dysfunction, effecting aberrations in cytoplasmic cleavage without affecting nuclear division.

  11. Scanning mutagenesis of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib eAhsan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated Ser-residue and the sequences of the flanking amino acids are highly conserved. We have used the synthetic peptide-based kinase client assay plus recombinant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α and E1α-kinase to perform scanning mutagenesis of the residues flanking the site of phosphorylation. Consistent with the results from phylogenetic analysis of the flanking sequences, the direct peptide-based kinase assays tolerated very few changes. Even conservative changes such as Leu, Ile, or Val for Met, or Glu for Asp, gave very marked reductions in phosphorylation. Overall the results indicate that regulation of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation is an extreme example of multiple, interdependent instances of co-evolution.

  12. Phosphorylation at serine 52 and 635 does not alter the transport properties of glucosinolate transporter AtGTR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how plants regulate transporters of defense compounds. In A. thaliana, glucosinolates are transported between tissues by NPF2.10 (AtGTR1) and NPF2.11 (AtGTR2). Mining of the PhosPhat4.0 database showed two cytosol exposed phosphorylation sites for AtGTR1 and one membrane......-buried phosphorylation site for AtGTR2. In this study, we investigate whether mutation of the two potential regulatory sites of AtGTR1 affected transport of glucosinolates in Xenopus oocytes. Characterization of AtGTR1 phosphorylation mutants showed that phosphorylation of AtGTR1 - at the two reported phosphorylation...... sites - is not directly involved in regulating AtGTR1 transport activity. We hypothesize a role for AtGTR1-phosphorylation in regulating protein-protein interactions....

  13. Polyglutamine expansion of ataxin-3 alters its degree of ubiquitination and phosphorylation at specific sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Line V.; Oppermann, Felix S.; Rauen, Matthias J.

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitination and phosphorylation of proteins represent post translational modifications (PTMs) capable of regulating a variety of cellular processes. In the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), the disease causing protein ataxin-3 carries an expanded polyglutamine...

  14. Multiple phosphorylation sites in the beta subunit of thylakoid ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Riego, Guillermo; Casano, Leonardo M; Martín, Mercedes; Sabater, Bartolomé

    2006-07-01

    Proteomic analyses of the beta subunit of the plastid ATP synthase of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) revealed that mature protein was not carboxy terminus processed and suggested the correction of the 274 codon (GAT to AAT) in the data bank that was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Six isoforms of the ATP synthase beta subunit with pI ranging from 4.95 to 5.14 were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the six isoforms differ in their phosphorylation degree, which was confirmed by the disappearance of more acidic forms after incubation with the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Six Ser and/or Thr were detected as phosphorylated, among them the conserved Thr-179 that is also phosphorylated in the beta subunit of human mitochondria. The results are discussed in relation with the proposed regulation of the ATP synthase by phosphorylation and 14-3-3 proteins.

  15. Study of O-Phosphorylation Sites in Proteins Involved in Photosynthesis-Related Processes in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Application of the SRM Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeleri, Martina; Muth-Pawlak, Dorota; Aro, Eva-Mari; Battchikova, Natalia

    2016-12-02

    O-Phosphorylation has been shown in photosynthesis-related proteins in a cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (thereafter Synechocystis 6803), suggesting that phosphorylation of S, T, and Y residues might be important in photosynthesis-related processes. Investigation of biological roles of these phosphorylation events requires confident knowledge of the phosphorylated sites and prospects for their individual assessment. We performed phosphoproteomic analysis of Synechocystis 6803 using TiO2 enrichment of the phosphopeptides, followed by LC-MS/MS, and discovered 367 phosphorylation sites in 190 proteins participating in various cellular functions. Furthermore, we focused on the large group of phosphoproteins that are involved in light harvesting, photosynthesis-driven electron flow, photoprotection, and CO2 fixation. The SRM approach was applied to verify/improve assignments of phosphorylation sites in these proteins and to investigate possibilities for analysis of phosphopeptide isomers. The SRM assays were designed for peptides comprising 45 phosphorylation sites. The assays contain peptide iRT values and Q1/Q3 transitions comprising those discriminating between phosphopeptide isoforms. The majority of investigated phosphopeptides and phosphorylated isoforms could be individually assessed with the SRM technique. The assays could be potentially used in future quantitative studies to evaluate an extent of phosphorylation in photosynthesis-related proteins in Synechocystis 6803 cells challenged with various environmental stresses.

  16. An unbiased approach to identifying tau kinases that phosphorylate tau at sites associated with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Annalisa; Brewerton, Suzanne; Bell, Amanda; Sargent, Samantha; Glover, Sarah; Hardy, Clare; Moore, Roger; Calley, John; Ramachandran, Devaki; Poidinger, Michael; Karran, Eric; Davies, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Szekeres, Philip; Bose, Suchira

    2013-08-09

    Neurofibrillary tangles, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), are composed of paired helical filaments of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. The accumulation of these proteinaceous aggregates in AD correlates with synaptic loss and severity of dementia. Identifying the kinases involved in the pathological phosphorylation of tau may identify novel targets for AD. We used an unbiased approach to study the effect of 352 human kinases on their ability to phosphorylate tau at epitopes associated with AD. The kinases were overexpressed together with the longest form of human tau in human neuroblastoma cells. Levels of total and phosphorylated tau (epitopes Ser(P)-202, Thr(P)-231, Ser(P)-235, and Ser(P)-396/404) were measured in cell lysates using AlphaScreen assays. GSK3α, GSK3β, and MAPK13 were found to be the most active tau kinases, phosphorylating tau at all four epitopes. We further dissected the effects of GSK3α and GSK3β using pharmacological and genetic tools in hTau primary cortical neurons. Pathway analysis of the kinases identified in the screen suggested mechanisms for regulation of total tau levels and tau phosphorylation; for example, kinases that affect total tau levels do so by inhibition or activation of translation. A network fishing approach with the kinase hits identified other key molecules putatively involved in tau phosphorylation pathways, including the G-protein signaling through the Ras family of GTPases (MAPK family) pathway. The findings identify novel tau kinases and novel pathways that may be relevant for AD and other tauopathies.

  17. Epileptogenesis and epileptic maturation in phosphorylation site-specific SNAP-25 mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamori, Saori; Otsuka, Shintaro; Saito, Masanori; Suzuki, Eiji; Kataoka, Masakazu; Miyaoka, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masami

    2015-09-01

    Snap25(S187A/S187A) mouse is a knock-in mouse with a single amino acid substitution at a protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation site of the synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), which is a target-soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) protein essential for neurotransmitter release. Snap25(S187A/S187A) mice exhibit several distinct phenotypes, including reductions in dopamine and serotonin release in the brain, anxiety-like behavior, and cognitive dysfunctions. Homozygous mice show spontaneous epileptic convulsions, and about 15% of the mice die around three weeks after birth. The remaining mice survive for almost two years and exhibit spontaneous recurrent seizures throughout their lifetime. Here, we conducted long-term continuous video electroencephalogram recording of the mice and analyzed the process of epileptogenesis and epileptic maturation in detail. Spikes and slow-wave discharges (SWDs) were observed in the cerebral cortex and thalamus before epileptic convulsions began. SWDs showed several properties similar to those observed in absence seizures including (1) lack of in the hippocampus, (2) movement arrest during SWDs, and (3) inhibition by ethosuximide. Multiple generalized seizures occurred in all homozygous mice around three weeks after birth. However, seizure generation stopped within several days, and a seizure-free latent period began. Following a spike-free quiet period, the number of spikes increased gradually, and epileptic seizures reappeared. Subsequently, spontaneous seizures occurred cyclically throughout the life of the mice, and several progressive changes in seizure frequency, seizure duration, seizure cycle interval, seizure waveform, and the number and waveform of epileptic discharges during slow-wave sleep occurred with different time courses over 10 weeks. Anxiety-related behaviors appeared suddenly within three days after epileptic seizures began and were delayed markedly by oral administration of

  18. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of Ikaros Induced by Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Regulates Cell Cycle Progression of B Lymphoblast Through CK2 and AKT Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Kang, Hana [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Young [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Sun [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Suhkneung [College of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kwang Hee, E-mail: kwangheey@khnp.co.kr [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To determine how low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) regulates B lympho-proliferation and its molecular mechanism related with Ikaros, transcription factor. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes and IM-9 cells were uniformly irradiated with various doses of a {sup 137}Cs γ-source, and cell proliferation was analyzed. To determine the LDIR-specific phosphorylation of Ikaros, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis were performed. To investigate the physiologic function of LDIR-mediatied Ikaros phosphorylation, Ikaros mutants at phosphorylation sites were generated, and cell cycle analysis was performed. Results: First, we found that LDIR enhances B lymphoblast proliferation in an Ikaros-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that LDIR elevates the phosphorylation level of Ikaros protein. Interestingly, we showed that CK2 and AKT are involved in LDIR-induced Ikaros phosphorylation and capable of regulating DNA binding activity of Ikaros via specific phosphorylation. Finally, we identified LDIR-specific Ikaros phosphorylation sites at S391/S393 and showed that the Ikaros phosphorylations at these sites control Ikaros's ability to regulate G1/S cell cycle progression. Conclusion: Low-dose ionizing radiation specifically phosphorylates Ikaros protein at Ser 391/393 residues to regulate cell cycle progression in B lymphoblast.

  19. Phospho.ELM: a database of phosphorylation sites--update 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinkel, Holger; Chica, Claudia; Via, Allegra

    2011-01-01

    The Phospho.ELM resource (http://phospho.elm.eu.org) is a relational database designed to store in vivo and in vitro phosphorylation data extracted from the scientific literature and phosphoproteomic analyses. The resource has been actively developed for more than 7 years and currently comprises ...

  20. Phosphorylation sites of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1 regulate its function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Sarah J; Thompson, Katie L; Coon, Joshua J; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis and a risk factor for developing a variety of lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is the only viral protein found in all EBV-related malignancies. It plays a key role in establishing and maintaining the altered state of cells transformed with EBV. EBNA1 is required for a variety of functions, including gene regulation, replication and maintenance of the viral genome, but the regulation of EBNA1's functions is poorly understood. We demonstrate that phosphorylation affects the functions of EBNA1. By using electron-transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, ten specific phosphorylated EBNA1 residues were identified. A mutant derivative preventing the phosphorylation of all ten phosphosites retained the unusually long half-life and the ability to translocate into the nucleus of wild-type EBNA1. This phosphorylation-deficient mutant, however, had a significantly reduced ability to activate transcription and to maintain EBV's plasmids in cells.

  1. Phosphorylation sites of Epstein–Barr virus EBNA1 regulate its function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Sarah J.; Thompson, Katie L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Burgess, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis and a risk factor for developing a variety of lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is the only viral protein found in all EBV-related malignancies. It plays a key role in establishing and maintaining the altered state of cells transformed with EBV. EBNA1 is required for a variety of functions, including gene regulation, replication and maintenance of the viral genome, but the regulation of EBNA1's functions is poorly understood. We demonstrate that phosphorylation affects the functions of EBNA1. By using electron-transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, ten specific phosphorylated EBNA1 residues were identified. A mutant derivative preventing the phosphorylation of all ten phosphosites retained the unusually long half-life and the ability to translocate into the nucleus of wild-type EBNA1. This phosphorylation-deficient mutant, however, had a significantly reduced ability to activate transcription and to maintain EBV's plasmids in cells. PMID:19439552

  2. Phosphorylation of phosphatidate phosphatase regulates its membrane association and physiological functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: identification of SER(602), THR(723), AND SER(744) as the sites phosphorylated by CDC28 (CDK1)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Su, Wen-Min; Morgan, Jeanelle M; Han, Gil-Soo; Xu, Zhi; Karanasios, Eleftherios; Siniossoglou, Symeon; Carman, George M

    2011-01-14

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of triacylglycerol and plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. PAP is phosphorylated at multiple Ser and Thr residues and is dephosphorylated for in vivo function by the Nem1p-Spo7p protein phosphatase complex localized in the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In this work, we characterized seven previously identified phosphorylation sites of PAP that are within the Ser/Thr-Pro motif. When expressed on a low copy plasmid, wild type PAP could not complement the pah1Δ mutant in the absence of the Nem1p-Spo7p complex. However, phosphorylation-deficient PAP (PAP-7A) containing alanine substitutions for the seven phosphorylation sites bypassed the requirement of the phosphatase complex and complemented the pah1Δ nem1Δ mutant phenotypes, such as temperature sensitivity, nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane expansion, decreased triacylglycerol synthesis, and derepression of INO1 expression. Subcellular fractionation coupled with immunoblot analysis showed that PAP-7A was highly enriched in the membrane fraction. In fluorescence spectroscopy analysis, the PAP-7A showed tighter association with phospholipid vesicles than wild type PAP. Using site-directed mutagenesis of PAP, we identified Ser(602), Thr(723), and Ser(744), which belong to the seven phosphorylation sites, as the sites phosphorylated by the CDC28 (CDK1)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase. Compared with the dephosphorylation mimic of the seven phosphorylation sites, alanine substitution for Ser(602), Thr(723), and/or Ser(744) had a partial effect on circumventing the requirement for the Nem1p-Spo7p complex.

  3. The latency of the light response is modulated by the phosphorylation state of Drosophila TRP at a specific site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ben; Voolstra, Olaf; Tzadok, Hanan; Yasin, Bushra; Rhodes-Modrov, Elisheva; Bartels, Jonas-Peter; Strauch, Lisa; Huber, Armin; Minke, Baruch

    2017-11-02

    Drosophila photoreceptors respond to oscillating light of high frequency (∼100 Hz), while increasing the oscillating light intensity raises the maximally detected frequency. Recently, we reported that dephosphorylation of the light-activated TRP ion channel at S936 is a fast, graded, light-, and Ca2+-dependent process. We further found that this process affects the detection limit of high frequency oscillating light. Accordingly, transgenic Drosophila, which do not undergo phosphorylation at the S936-TRP site (trpS936A), revealed a short time-interval before following the high stimulus frequency (oscillation-lock response) in both dark- and light-adapted flies. In contrast, the trpS936D transgenic flies, which mimic constant phosphorylation, showed a long-time interval to oscillation-lock response in both dark- and light-adapted flies. Here we extend these findings by showing that dark-adapted trpS936A flies reveal light-induced current (LIC) with short latency relative to trpWT or trpS936D flies, indicating that the channels are a limiting factor of response kinetics. The results indicate that properties of the light-activated channels together with the dynamic light-dependent process of TRP phosphorylation at the S936 site determine response kinetics.

  4. LRRK2 Kinase Activity and Biology are Not Uniformly Predicted by its Autophosphorylation and Cellular Phosphorylation Site Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April eReynolds

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Missense mutations in the Leucine Rich Repeat protein Kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are the most common genetic predisposition to develop Parkinson’s disease (PD LRRK2 is a large multi-domain phosphoprotein with a GTPase domain and a serine/threonine protein kinase domain whose activity is implicated in neuronal toxicity; however the precise mechanism is unknown. LRRK2 autophosphorylates on several serine/threonine residues across the enzyme and is found constitutively phosphorylated on Ser910, Ser935, Ser955 and Ser973, which are proposed to be regulated by upstream kinases. Here we investigate the phosphoregulation at these sites by analyzing the effects of disease-associated mutations Arg1441Cys, Arg1441Gly, Ala1442Pro, Tyr1699Cys, Ile2012Thr, Gly2019Ser, and Ile2020Thr. We also studied alanine substitutions of phosphosite serines 910, 935, 955 and 973 and specific LRRK2 inhibition on autophosphorylation of LRRK2 Ser1292, Thr1491, Thr2483 and phosphorylation at the cellular sites. We found that mutants in the Roc-COR domains, including Arg1441Cys, Arg1441His, Ala1442Pro and Tyr1699Cys, can positively enhance LRRK2 kinase activity while concomitantly inducing the dephosphorylation of the cellular sites. Mutation of the cellular sites individually did not affect LRRK2 intrinsic kinase activity; however, Ser910/935/955/973Ala mutations trended toward increased kinase activity of LRRK2. Increased cAMP levels did not lead to increased LRRK2 cellular site phosphorylation, 14-3-3 binding or kinase activity. In cells, inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity leads to dephosphorylation of Ser1292 by Calyculin A and okadaic acid sensitive phosphatases, while the cellular sites are dephosphorylated by Calyculin A sensitive phosphatases. These findings indicate that comparative analysis of both Ser1292 and Ser910/935/955/973 phosphorylation sites will provide important and distinct measures of LRRK2 kinase and biological activity in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Mutation of the SHP-2 binding site in growth hormone (GH) receptor prolongs GH-promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of GH receptor, JAK2, and STAT5B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stofega, M R; Herrington, J; Billestrup, Nils

    2000-01-01

    association of the SH2 domains of SHP-2 with GHR. Mutation of tyrosine 595 dramatically prolongs the duration of tyrosyl phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT5B in response to GH, while mutation of tyrosine 487 moderately prolongs the duration of STAT5B tyrosyl...... phosphorylation. Consistent with the effects on STAT5B phosphorylation, tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation of tyrosine 595 prolongs the duration of tyrosyl phosphorylation of GHR and JAK2. These data suggest that tyrosine 595 is a major site of interaction of GHR with SHP-2, and that GHR-bound SHP-2 negatively...

  6. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karaca

    Full Text Available Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  7. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Mehmet; Liu, Yuanbo; Zhang, Zhentao; De Silva, Dinuka; Parker, Joel S; Earp, H Shelton; Whang, Young E

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  8. Phosphorylation of tau protein at sites Ser(396-404) is one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Rodríguez, S; Perry, G; Luna-Muñoz, J; Acevedo-Aquino, M C; Williams, S

    2014-02-01

    Phosphorylation, conformational changes and cleavage of tau protein have been widely suggested to contribute to abnormal tau processing in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, as well as in other tauopathies. Consistently, many phosphorylated sites, such as Ser(199-202) -Thr(205) and Ser(396-404) , have been associated with this pathological processing. The present study examined the chronological appearance of phosphorylation during the neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) evolution in Alzheimer disease (AD) and Down syndrome. Immunohistochemistry for modified tau [phosphorylated at Ser(199-202) -Thr(205) (AT8) and Ser(396-404) (PHF-1) or truncated at D(421) (TauC3) and E(391) (MN423)] was performed on paraffin-embedded human brain sections. Double immunofluorescence for phosphorylated and truncated tau was used to detect intensity and distribution of tau immunoreactivity, and provided detailed characterization of NFT pathology. Phosphorylation at sites Ser(396-404) was significantly increased when compared with phosphorylations at sites Ser(199-202) -Thr(205) . Around 50% of the total structures containing phosphorylation at sites Ser(396-404) were found as early phospho-tau aggregates with a well-preserved neuronal soma. Phosphorylation of tau protein at sites Ser(396) coexists with early and late truncation events. Tau abnormal processing in Down syndrome consistently showed similar alterations as observed in AD. Phosphorylation of tau protein at the carboxyl terminus may be among the earliest tau events, and it occurs prior to the apparition of the classical fibrillar structure. Finally, these data validate PHF-1 as an efficient marker for AD cytopathology following the progression of tau aggregation into NFT. © 2013 British Neuropathological Society.

  9. Characterization of HSP27 phosphorylation sites in human atherosclerotic plaque secretome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durán, Mari-Carmen; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of death in developed countries. Atheroma plaque formation is promoted by the interaction between the cells conforming the arterial wall, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells, together with lipoproteins and inflammatory cells (mainly macrophages and T......-lymphocytes). These interactions can be mediated by proteins secreted from these cells, which therefore exert an important role in the atherosclerotic process. We recently described a novel strategy for the characterization of the human atherosclerotic plaque secretome, combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass......, the role that phosphorylated HSP27 could play in the atherosclerotic process is actually under study. The present work shows the strategies employed to characterize the phosphorylation in the HSP27 secreted by atheroma plaque samples. The application of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS...

  10. Identification of the In Vivo Phosphorylation Sites of the Ras Suppressor Rsu-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-11

    1991 ; Zhang, 1990). The neurofibromatosis protein NF-I contains a GAP- related domain which has RasGAP activity (Ballester, 1990; DeClue, 1991...intact), Rsu- l phosphorylation is less efficient but still possible. Interestingly, serine- 163 is located in the fifth segment of the LRR region...2825. DeClue, J ., Cohen, B., and Lowy. D.R. (1991). Identification and characterization of the Neurofibromatosis type 1 protein product. Proc. Natl

  11. PhosphoBase, a database of phosphorylation sites: release 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreegipuu, A.; Blom, Nikolaj; Brunak, Søren

    1999-01-01

    phosphoprotein entries covering 1052 phosphorylatable serine, threonine and tyrosine residues. The kinetic data from peptide phosphorylation assays for similar to 330 oligopeptides is also included. The database entries are cross-referenced to the corresponding records in the Swiss-Prot protein database...... and literature references are linked to MedLine records. PhosphoBase is available via the WWW at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/databases/ PhosphoBase/....

  12. A Casein Kinase II Phosphorylation Site in AtYY1 Affects Its Activity, Stability, and Function in the ABA Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiu-Yun; Li, Tian

    2017-01-01

    The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins are crucial in the regulation of protein activity and stability in various signaling pathways. In this study, we identified an ABA repressor, Arabidopsis Ying Yang 1 (AtYY1) as a potential target of casein kinase II (CKII). AtYY1 physically interacts with two regulatory subunits of CKII, CKB3, and CKB4. Moreover, AtYY1 can be phosphorylated by CKII in vitro, and the S284 site is the major CKII phosphorylation site. Further analyses indicated that S284 phosphorylation can enhance the transcriptional activity and protein stability of AtYY1 and hence strengthen the effect of AtYY1 as a negative regulator in the ABA response. Our study provides novel insights into the regulatory mechanism of AtYY1 mediated by CKII phosphorylation.

  13. Novel tyrosine phosphorylation sites in rat skeletal muscle revealed by phosphopeptide enrichment and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Højlund, Kurt; Luo, Moulun

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a fundamental role in many cellular processes including differentiation, growth and insulin signaling. In insulin resistant muscle, aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins has been detected. However, due to the low abundance of tyrosine phosphorylation (...

  14. Novel binding partners and differentially regulated phosphorylation sites clarify Eps8 as a multi-functional adaptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L Cunningham

    Full Text Available Eps8 is involved in both cell signalling and receptor trafficking. It is a known phosphorylation substrate for two proteins involved in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR signalling pathway: the receptor itself and Src. Here we report a differential proteomic analysis of Eps8 aimed to identify specific FGFR and Src family kinase dependent phosphosites and co-associated phosphodependent binding partners. This study reveals a total of 22 Eps8 pTyr and pSer/Thr phosphorylation sites, including those that are dependent on Src family and FGFR kinase activity. Peptide affinity purification of proteins that bind to a selection of the pTyr phosphosites has identified a range of novel Eps8 binding partners including members of the intracellular vesicle trafficking machinery (clathrin and AP-2, proteins which have been shown to regulate activated receptor trafficking (NBR1 and Vav2, and proteins involved in receptor signalling (IRS4 and Shp2. Collectively this study significantly extends the understanding of Eps8 post-translational modification by regulated phosphorylation, identifies novel Eps8 binding partners implicated in receptor trafficking and signalling, and confirms the functions of Eps8 at the nexus of receptor signalling and vesicular trafficking.

  15. Role of phospholemman phosphorylation sites in mediating kinase-dependent regulation of the Na+-K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Bossuyt, Julie; Martin, Jody L; Despa, Sanda; Bers, Donald M

    2010-12-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) is a major target for phosphorylation mediated by both PKA (at Ser68) and PKC (at both Ser63 and Ser68) in the heart. In intact cardiac myocytes, PLM associates with and inhibits Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA), mainly by reducing its affinity for internal Na(+). The inhibition is relieved upon PLM phosphorylation by PKA or PKC. The aim here was to distinguish the role of the Ser63 and Ser68 PLM phosphorylation sites in mediating kinase-induced modulation of NKA function. We expressed wild-type (WT) PLM and S63A, S68A, and AA (Ser63 and Ser68 to alanine double mutant) PLM mutants in HeLa cells that stably express rat NKA-α(1) and we measured the effect of PKA and PKC activation on NKA-mediated intracellular Na(+) concentration decline. PLM expression (WT or mutant) significantly decreased the apparent NKA affinity for internal Na(+) and had no significant effect on the maximum pump rate (V(max)). PKA activation with forskolin (20 μM) restored NKA Na(+) affinity in cells expressing WT but not AA PLM and did not affect V(max) in either case. Similarly, PKC activation with 300 nM phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate increased NKA Na(+) affinity in cells expressing WT, S63A, and S68A PLM and had no effect in cells expressing AA PLM. Neither forskolin nor phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate affected NKA function in the absence of PLM. We conclude that PLM phosphorylation at either Ser63 or Ser68 is both necessary and sufficient for completely relieving the PLM-induced NKA inhibition.

  16. Localisation of the sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitochondria using top-down elasticity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesseler, A; Brand, M D

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the significant sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitocondria. We simplified the system to three convenient subsystems linked via the production or consumption of a common intermediate, namely protonmotive force. The three subsystems were substrate oxidation, which produces protonmotive force, and the proton leak reactions and the phosphorylation reactions, which consume protonmotive force. By measuring the effect of cadmium on the kinetic response of each subsystem to protonmotive force (top-down elasticity analysis), we found that cadmium stimulated proton leak reactions and strongly inhibited substrate oxidation, but had no measurable effect on the phosphorylation reactions. Cadmium therefore decreases the amount of ATP produced/oxygen consumed (the effective P/O ratio) not by inhibiting the phosphorylation reactions directly, but by inhibiting the production of protonmotive force and by diverting proton flux from phosphorylation reactions to the proton leak reactions.

  17. Serine 77 in the PDZ domain of PICK1 is a protein kinase Cα phosphorylation site regulated by lipid membrane binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal protein binding PDZ domain and a C-terminal lipid binding BAR domain. PICK1 plays a key role in several physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms governing...... the activity of PICK1 itself. Here we show that PICK1 is a substrate in vitro both for PKCα (protein kinase Cα), as previously shown, and for CaMKIIα (Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα). By mutation of predicted phosphorylation sites, we identify Ser77 in the PDZ domain as a major phosphorylation...... for optimal phosphorylation. Binding of PKCα to the PICK1 PDZ domain was not required for phosphorylation, but a PDZ domain peptide ligand reduced the overall level of phosphorylation ~30%. The phosphomimic S77D reduced the extent of cytosolic clustering of eYFP-PICK1 in COS7 cells and thereby conceivably its...

  18. Mapping of p140Cap phosphorylation sites: the EPLYA and EGLYA motifs have a key role in tyrosine phosphorylation and Csk binding, and are substrates of the Abl kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Repetto

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation tightly regulates specific binding of effector proteins that control many diverse biological functions of cells (e. g. signaling, migration and proliferation. p140Cap is an adaptor protein, specifically expressed in brain, testis and epithelial cells, that undergoes phosphorylation and tunes its interactions with other regulatory molecules via post-translation modification. In this work, using mass spectrometry, we found that p140Cap is in vivo phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y within the peptide GEGLpYADPYGLLHEGR (from now on referred to as EGLYA as well as on three serine residues. Consistently, EGLYA has the highest score of in silico prediction of p140Cap phosphorylation. To further investigate the p140Cap function, we performed site specific mutagenesis on tyrosines inserted in EGLYA and EPLYA, a second sequence with the same highest score of phosphorylation. The mutant protein, in which both EPLYA/EGLYA tyrosines were converted to phenylalanine, was no longer tyrosine phosphorylated, despite the presence of other tyrosine residues in p140Cap sequence. Moreover, this mutant lost its ability to bind the C-terminal Src kinase (Csk, previously shown to interact with p140Cap by Far Western analysis. In addition, we found that in vitro and in HEK-293 cells, the Abelson kinase is the major kinase involved in p140Cap tyrosine phosphorylation on the EPLYA and EGLYA sequences. Overall, these data represent an original attempt to in vivo characterise phosphorylated residues of p140Cap. Elucidating the function of p140Cap will provide novel insights into its biological activity not only in normal cells, but also in tumors.

  19. Photosynthetic control of Arabidopsis leaf cytoplasmic translation initiation by protein phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Boex-Fontvieille

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation is the carbon source for plant anabolism, including amino acid production and protein synthesis. The biosynthesis of leaf proteins is known for decades to correlate with photosynthetic activity but the mechanisms controlling this effect are not documented. The cornerstone of the regulation of protein synthesis is believed to be translation initiation, which involves multiple phosphorylation events in Eukaryotes. We took advantage of phosphoproteomic methods applied to Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes harvested under controlled photosynthetic gas-exchange conditions to characterize the phosphorylation pattern of ribosomal proteins (RPs and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs. The analyses detected 14 and 11 new RP and eIF phosphorylation sites, respectively, revealed significant CO2-dependent and/or light/dark phosphorylation patterns and showed concerted changes in 13 eIF phosphorylation sites and 9 ribosomal phosphorylation sites. In addition to the well-recognized role of the ribosomal small subunit protein RPS6, our data indicate the involvement of eIF3, eIF4A, eIF4B, eIF4G and eIF5 phosphorylation in controlling translation initiation when photosynthesis varies. The response of protein biosynthesis to the photosynthetic input thus appears to be the result of a complex regulation network involving both stimulating (e.g. RPS6, eIF4B phosphorylation and inhibiting (e.g. eIF4G phosphorylation molecular events.

  20. Quantitative in vivo Analyses Reveal Calcium-dependent Phosphorylation Sites and Identifies a Novel Component of the Toxoplasma Invasion Motor Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebl, Thomas; Prieto, Judith Helena; Kapp, Eugene; Smith, Brian J.; Williams, Melanie J.; Yates, John R.; Cowman, Alan F.; Tonkin, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites depend on the invasion of host cells for survival and proliferation. Calcium-dependent signaling pathways appear to be essential for micronemal release and gliding motility, yet the target of activated kinases remains largely unknown. We have characterized calcium-dependent phosphorylation events during Toxoplasma host cell invasion. Stimulation of live tachyzoites with Ca2+-mobilizing drugs leads to phosphorylation of numerous parasite proteins, as shown by differential 2-DE display of 32[P]-labeled protein extracts. Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) identified ∼546 phosphorylation sites on over 300 Toxoplasma proteins, including 10 sites on the actomyosin invasion motor. Using a Stable Isotope of Amino Acids in Culture (SILAC)-based quantitative LC-MS/MS analyses we monitored changes in the abundance and phosphorylation of the invasion motor complex and defined Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation patterns on three of its components - GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA. Furthermore, calcium-dependent phosphorylation of six residues across GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA is correlated with invasion motor activity. By analyzing proteins that appear to associate more strongly with the invasion motor upon calcium stimulation we have also identified a novel 15-kDa Calmodulin-like protein that likely represents the MyoA Essential Light Chain of the Toxoplasma invasion motor. This suggests that invasion motor activity could be regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by the direct binding of calcium ions to this new component. PMID:21980283

  1. Predikin and PredikinDB: a computational framework for the prediction of protein kinase peptide specificity and an associated database of phosphorylation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemp Bruce E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously described an approach to predicting the substrate specificity of serine-threonine protein kinases. The method, named Predikin, identifies key conserved substrate-determining residues in the kinase catalytic domain that contact the substrate in the region of the phosphorylation site and so determine the sequence surrounding the phosphorylation site. Predikin was implemented originally as a web application written in Javascript. Results Here, we describe a new version of Predikin, completely revised and rewritten as a modular framework that provides multiple enhancements compared with the original. Predikin now consists of two components: (i PredikinDB, a database of phosphorylation sites that links substrates to kinase sequences and (ii a Perl module, which provides methods to classify protein kinases, reliably identify substrate-determining residues, generate scoring matrices and score putative phosphorylation sites in query sequences. The performance of Predikin as measured using receiver operator characteristic (ROC graph analysis equals or surpasses that of existing comparable methods. The Predikin website has been redesigned to incorporate the new features. Conclusion New features in Predikin include the use of SQL queries to PredikinDB to generate predictions, scoring of predictions, more reliable identification of substrate-determining residues and putative phosphorylation sites, extended options to handle protein kinase and substrate data and an improved web interface. The new features significantly enhance the ability of Predikin to analyse protein kinases and their substrates. Predikin is available at http://predikin.biosci.uq.edu.au.

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics after auxin-stimulated lateral root induction identifies an SNX1 protein phosphorylation site required for growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/37155179X; Zhou, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341566500; Berke, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/363341447; Heck, A.J.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Mohammed, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483632X; Scheres, B.J.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07493662X; Menke, F.L.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/187445273

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is instrumental to early signaling events. Studying system-wide phosphorylation in relation to processes under investigation requires a quantitative proteomics approach. In Arabidopsis, auxin application can induce pericycle cell divisions and lateral root formation.

  3. Multi site polyadenylation and transcriptional response to stress of a vacuolar type H+-ATPase subunit A gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten Johann

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vacuolar type H+-ATPases play a critical role in the maintenance of vacuolar homeostasis in plant cells. V-ATPases are also involved in plants' defense against environmental stress. This research examined the expression and regulation of the catalytic subunit of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis thaliana and the effect of environmental stress on multiple transcripts generated by this gene. Results Evidence suggests that subunit A of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase is encoded by a single gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome blot analysis showed no indication of a second subunit A gene being present. The single gene identified was shown by whole RNA blot analysis to be transcribed in all organs of the plant. Subunit A was shown by sequencing the 3' end of multiple cDNA clones to exhibit multi site polyadenylation. Four different poly (A tail attachment sites were revealed. Experiments were performed to determine the response of transcript levels for subunit A to environmental stress. A PCR based strategy was devised to amplify the four different transcripts from the subunit A gene. Conclusions Amplification of cDNA generated from seedlings exposed to cold, salt stress, and etiolation showed that transcript levels for subunit A of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis were responsive to stress conditions. Cold and salt stress resulted in a 2–4 fold increase in all four subunit A transcripts evaluated. Etiolation resulted in a slight increase in transcript levels. All four transcripts appeared to behave identically with respect to stress conditions tested with no significant differential regulation.

  4. Potential regulatory phosphorylation sites in a Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump implicated during early symbiotic signaling in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T; Volkening, Jeremy D; Rose, Christopher M; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-08-04

    In plants and fungi the plasma membrane proton pump generates a large proton-motive force that performs essential functions in many processes, including solute transport and the control of cell elongation. Previous studies in yeast and higher plants have indicated that phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory domain is involved in regulating pump activity. In this report we examine the Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump gene family, and in particular MtAHA5. Yeast complementation assays with phosphomimetic mutations at six candidate sites support a phosphoregulatory role for two residues, suggesting a molecular model to explain early Nod factor-induced changes in the plasma membrane proton-motive force of legume root cells. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous quantification of protein phosphorylation sites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics: a linear algebra approach for isobaric phosphopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Sheng, Yuan; Zhong, Ting; Yang, Mi; Chen, Yun

    2014-12-05

    As one of the most studied post-translational modifications (PTM), protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in almost all cellular processes. Current methods are able to predict and determine thousands of phosphorylation sites, whereas stoichiometric quantification of these sites is still challenging. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted proteomics is emerging as a promising technique for site-specific quantification of protein phosphorylation using proteolytic peptides as surrogates of proteins. However, several issues may limit its application, one of which relates to the phosphopeptides with different phosphorylation sites and the same mass (i.e., isobaric phosphopeptides). While employment of site-specific product ions allows for these isobaric phosphopeptides to be distinguished and quantified, site-specific product ions are often absent or weak in tandem mass spectra. In this study, linear algebra algorithms were employed as an add-on to targeted proteomics to retrieve information on individual phosphopeptides from their common spectra. To achieve this simultaneous quantification, a LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was first developed and validated for each phosphopeptide. Given the slope and intercept of calibration curves of phosphopeptides in each transition, linear algebraic equations were developed. Using a series of mock mixtures prepared with varying concentrations of each phosphopeptide, the reliability of the approach to quantify isobaric phosphopeptides containing multiple phosphorylation sites (≥ 2) was discussed. Finally, we applied this approach to determine the phosphorylation stoichiometry of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) at Ser78 and Ser82 in breast cancer cells and tissue samples.

  6. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  7. Structures of KaiC Circadian Clock Mutant Proteins: A New Phosphorylation Site at T426 and Mechanisms of Kinase, ATPase and Phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Mori, Tetsuya; Xu, Yao; Pattanayek, Sabuj; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin; (Vanderbilt)

    2010-09-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro by three proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. Homo-hexameric KaiC displays kinase, phosphatase and ATPase activities; KaiA enhances KaiC phosphorylation and KaiB antagonizes KaiA. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the two known sites in the C-terminal half of KaiC subunits, T432 and S431, follow a strict order (TS {yields} pTS {yields} pTpS {yields} TpS {yields} TS) over the daily cycle, the origin of which is not understood. To address this void and to analyze the roles of KaiC active site residues, in particular T426, we determined structures of single and double P-site mutants of S. elongatus KaiC. The conformations of the loop region harboring P-site residues T432 and S431 in the crystal structures of six KaiC mutant proteins exhibit subtle differences that result in various distances between Thr (or Ala/Asn/Glu) and Ser (or Ala/Asp) residues and the ATP {gamma}-phosphate. T432 is phosphorylated first because it lies consistently closer to P{gamma}. The structures of the S431A and T432E/S431A mutants reveal phosphorylation at T426. The environments of the latter residue in the structures and functional data for T426 mutants in vitro and in vivo imply a role in dephosphorylation. We provide evidence for a third phosphorylation site in KaiC at T426. T426 and S431 are closely spaced and a KaiC subunit cannot carry phosphates at both sites simultaneously. Fewer subunits are phosphorylated at T426 in the two KaiC mutants compared to phosphorylated T432 and/or S431 residues in the structures of wt and other mutant KaiCs, suggesting that T426 phosphorylation may be labile. The structures combined with functional data for a host of KaiC mutant proteins help rationalize why S431 trails T432 in the loss of its phosphate and shed light on the mechanisms of the KaiC kinase, ATPase and phosphatase activities.

  8. A Kinase-Independent Function of c-Src Mediates p130Cas Phosphorylation at the Serine-639 Site in Pressure Overloaded Myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Arun P; Suryakumar, Geetha; Panneerselvam, Kavin; Willey, Christopher D; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2015-12-01

    Early work in pressure overloaded (PO) myocardium shows that integrins mediate focal adhesion complex formation by recruiting the adaptor protein p130Cas (Cas) and nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Src. To explore c-Src role in Cas-associated changes during PO, we used a feline right ventricular in vivo PO model and a three-dimensional (3D) collagen-embedded adult cardiomyocyte in vitro model that utilizes a Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGD) peptide for integrin stimulation. Cas showed slow electrophoretic mobility (band-shifting), recruitment to the cytoskeleton, and tyrosine phosphorylation at 165, 249, and 410 sites in both 48 h PO myocardium and 1 h RGD-stimulated cardiomyocytes. Adenoviral mediated expression of kinase inactive (negative) c-Src mutant with intact scaffold domains (KN-Src) in cardiomyocytes did not block the RGD stimulated changes in Cas. Furthermore, expression of KN-Src or kinase active c-Src mutant with intact scaffold function (A-Src) in two-dimensionally (2D) cultured cardiomyocytes was sufficient to cause Cas band-shifting, although tyrosine phosphorylation required A-Src. These data indicate that c-Src's adaptor function, but not its kinase function, is required for a serine/threonine specific phosphorylation(s) responsible for Cas band-shifting. To explore this possibility, Chinese hamster ovary cells that stably express Cas were infected with either β-gal or KN-Src adenoviruses and used for Cas immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry analysis. In the KN-Src expressing cells, Cas showed phosphorylation at the serine-639 (human numbering) site. A polyclonal antibody raised against phospho-serine-639 detected Cas phosphorylation in 24-48 h PO myocardium. Our studies indicate that c-Src's adaptor function mediates serine-639 phosphorylation of Cas during integrin activation in PO myocardium. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Quantitative in vivo analyses reveal calcium-dependent phosphorylation sites and identifies a novel component of the Toxoplasma invasion motor complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nebl

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites depend on the invasion of host cells for survival and proliferation. Calcium-dependent signaling pathways appear to be essential for micronemal release and gliding motility, yet the target of activated kinases remains largely unknown. We have characterized calcium-dependent phosphorylation events during Toxoplasma host cell invasion. Stimulation of live tachyzoites with Ca²⁺-mobilizing drugs leads to phosphorylation of numerous parasite proteins, as shown by differential 2-DE display of ³²[P]-labeled protein extracts. Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT identified ∼546 phosphorylation sites on over 300 Toxoplasma proteins, including 10 sites on the actomyosin invasion motor. Using a Stable Isotope of Amino Acids in Culture (SILAC-based quantitative LC-MS/MS analyses we monitored changes in the abundance and phosphorylation of the invasion motor complex and defined Ca²⁺-dependent phosphorylation patterns on three of its components--GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA. Furthermore, calcium-dependent phosphorylation of six residues across GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA is correlated with invasion motor activity. By analyzing proteins that appear to associate more strongly with the invasion motor upon calcium stimulation we have also identified a novel 15-kDa Calmodulin-like protein that likely represents the MyoA Essential Light Chain of the Toxoplasma invasion motor. This suggests that invasion motor activity could be regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by the direct binding of calcium ions to this new component.

  10. Automated and high confidence protein phosphorylation site localization using complementary collision-activated dissociation and electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas A; Sylvester, Marc; Jensen, Ole N

    2012-01-01

    ), respectively. Compared with the Ascore using either CAD or ETD, the Cscore identified up to 88% more phosphorylation sites. Using a phosphopeptide library revealed that the score threshold for obtaining a false-localization rate of 0.5% was lower for the Cscore than either the Ascore (CAD) or the Ascore (ETD)....

  11. A specific p47phox -serine phosphorylated by convergent MAPKs mediates neutrophil NADPH oxidase priming at inflammatory sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Pham My-Chan; Stensballe, Allan; Boussetta, Tarek

    2006-01-01

    containing a TAT-p47phox-Ser345 sequence. Furthermore, ROS generation, p47phox-Ser345 phosphorylation, and ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were increased in synovial neutrophils from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and TAT-Ser345 peptide inhibited ROS production by these primed neutrophils...

  12. Thermal destabilization of non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans upon phosphate binding in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahuel-Clermont, Sophie; Arutyunov, Denis; Marchal, Stéphane; Orlov, Victor; Muronetz, Vladimir; Branlant, Guy

    2005-05-13

    Catalysis by the NADP-dependent non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN) from Streptococcus mutans, a member of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family, relies on a local conformational reorganization of the active site. This rearrangement is promoted by the binding of NADP and is strongly kinetically favored by the formation of the ternary complex enzyme.NADP.substrate. Adiabatic differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the effect of ligands on the irreversible thermal denaturation of GAPN. We showed that phosphate binds to GAPN, resulting in the formation of a GAPN.phosphate binary complex characterized by a strongly decreased thermal stability, with a difference of at least 15 degrees C between the maximum temperatures of the thermal transition peaks. The kinetics of phosphate association and dissociation are slow, allowing both free and GAPN.phosphate complexes to be observed by differential scanning calorimetry and to be separated by native polyacrylamide electrophoresis run in phosphate buffer. Analysis of a set of mutants of GAPN strongly suggests that phosphate is bound to the substrate C-3 subsite. In addition, the substrate analog glycerol-3-phosphate has similar effects as does phosphate on the thermal behavior of GAPN. Based on the current knowledge on the catalytic mechanism of GAPN and other ALDHs, we propose that ligand-induced thermal destabilization is a mechanism that provides to ALDHs the required flexibility for an efficient catalysis.

  13. The autophosphorylation and p34cdc2 phosphorylation sites of casein kinase-2 beta-subunit are not essential for reconstituting the fully-active heterotetrameric holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    Two mutants of human casein kinase-2 beta-subunit with short deletions at either their amino (delta 1-4) or carboxy (delta 209-215) terminal side have been created that have lost the capability to undergo autophosphorylation and p34cdc2 mediated phosphorylation, respectively. Both mutants give rise...... the wild-type beta and beta(delta 209-215), however, beta(delta 1-4) fails to confer to the reconstituted holoenzyme the typical responsiveness to NaCl stimulation. These results suggest that while neither the autophosphorylation nor the p34cdc2 phosphorylation sites are required for conferring a stable...

  14. Phosphorylation of a specific cdk site in E2F-1 affects its electrophoretic mobility and promotes pRB-binding in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeper, D S; Keblusek, P; Helin, K

    1995-01-01

    of the retinoblastoma gene (pRB). We find that E2F-1 proteins are heterogeneously phosphorylated in insect cells, as a result of which they migrate as a doublet on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. This electrophoretic shift is shown to be dependent upon specific phosphorylation of E2F-1 on serine-375 (S375), near the pRB......-binding site. Phosphorylation on S375 also occurs in human cells. E2F-1 was most efficiently phosphorylated on this residue by cyclin A/cdk2 kinase, and to a lesser extent by cyclin A/cdk2, irrespective of the presence of the pRB-related p107 protein. Phosphorylation of E2F-1 on S375 greatly enhanced its......The E2F transcription factor family participates in growth control presumably through transcriptional activation of genes that promote entry into S phase. E2F activity is believed to be controlled across the cell cycle by association with various cellular proteins, including the product...

  15. Interactome-Wide Prediction of Protein-Protein Binding Sites Reveals Effects of Protein Sequence Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentim, F.L.; Neven, F.; Boyen, P.; Dijk, van A.D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The specificity of protein-protein interactions is encoded in those parts of the sequence that compose the binding interface. Therefore, understanding how changes in protein sequence influence interaction specificity, and possibly the phenotype, requires knowing the location of binding sites in

  16. Analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in signaling molecules by a phosphotyrosine-specific immonium ion scanning method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Hanno; Pandey, Akhilesh; Andersen, Jens S

    2002-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways involve cascades of events, such as formation of second messengers and protein complexes that alter the activities of proteins. This can ultimately lead to changes in gene expression in response to the stimuli. Reversible phosphorylation of proteins is an important....... Because of its simplicity and specificity, PSI scanning is likely to become an important tool in proteomic studies of pathways involving tyrosine phosphorylation....

  17. [Effect of electroacupuncture on phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr 1742 site in the spinal dorsal horn of CFA rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yi; Fang, Jian-Qiao; Fang, Jun-Fan; Du, Jun-Ying; Qiu, Yu-Jie; Liu, Jin

    2013-10-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on phosphorylation of spinal NR2B at Tyr 1742 site in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced inflammatory pain rats. METHods Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal group (N group, n = 10), the model group (CFA group, n = 15), and the EA group (n = 15). The inflammatory pain model was established by subcutaneous injecting CFA (0.1 mL per rat) into the right hind paw. Paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) were measured before CFA injection (as the base), as well as at 24 h, 25 h, 3rd day, and 7th day after CFA injection. Phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr 1742 site in the ispilateral spinal dorsal horn at the 3rd day post-injection were detected using immunohistochemical assay. PWTs in the CFA group were significantly lower than those of the N group at every detective time point post-injection (P horn of rats in the CFA group was up-regulated. Compared with the CFA group, the ratio of p-NR2B positive cells in the ispilateral spinal dorsal horn of rats showed a decreasing tendency in the EA group. EA might effectively inhibit CFA-induced inflammatory pain possibly associated with down-regulating phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr 1742 site in the ispilateral spinal dorsal horn.

  18. PKA phosphorylation reshapes the pharmacological kinetics of BmK AS, a unique site-4 sodium channel-specific modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z R; Zhang, H; Wu, J Q; Zhou, J J; Ji, Y H

    2014-01-16

    Although modulation of the activity of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation has been investigated in multiple preparations, the pharmacological sensitivity of VGSCs to scorpion toxins after PKA phosphorylation has rarely been approached. In this study, the effects of BmK AS, a sodium channel-specific modulator from Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, on the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of Nav1.2 were examined before and after PKA activation. After PKA phosphorylation, the pattern of dose-dependent modulation of BmK AS, on both Nav1.2α and Nav1.2 (α + β1) was reshaped. Meanwhile, the shifts in voltage-dependency of activation and inactivation induced by BmK AS were attenuated. The results suggested that PKA might play a role in different patterns how β-like toxins such as BmK AS modulate gating properties and peak currents of VGSCs.

  19. Identification of NEK3 Kinase Threonine 165 as a Novel Regulatory Phosphorylation Site That Modulates Focal Adhesion Remodeling Necessary for Breast Cancer Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Katherine M; Clevenger, Charles V

    2016-10-07

    Accumulating evidence supports a role for prolactin (PRL) in the development and progression of human breast cancer. Although PRL is an established chemoattractant for breast cancer cells, the precise molecular mechanisms of how PRL regulates breast cancer cell motility and invasion are not fully understood. PRL activates the serine/threonine kinase NEK3, which was reported to enhance breast cancer cell migration, invasion, and the actin cytoskeletal reorganization necessary for these processes. However, the specific mechanisms of NEK3 activation in response to PRL signaling have not been defined. In this report, a novel PRL-inducible regulatory phosphorylation site within the activation segment of NEK3, threonine 165 (Thr-165), was identified. Phosphorylation at NEK3 Thr-165 was found to be dependent on activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway using both pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-mediated knockdown approaches. Strikingly, inhibition of phosphorylation at NEK3 Thr-165 by expression of a phospho-deficient mutant (NEK3-T165V) resulted in increased focal adhesion size, formation of zyxin-positive focal adhesions, and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton into stress fibers. Concordantly, NEK3-T165V cells exhibited migratory defects. Together, these data support a modulatory role for phosphorylation at NEK3 Thr-165 in focal adhesion maturation and/or turnover to promote breast cancer cell migration. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Ser-634 and Ser-636 of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus RTA are Involved in Transactivation and are Potential Cdk9 Phosphorylation Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Hua; Wang, Pei-Wen; Lin, Shu-Yu; Wu, I-Lin; Ko, Ying-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Lian; Li, Mengtao; Lin, Su-Fang

    2012-01-01

    The replication and transcription activator (RTA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), K-RTA, is a lytic switch protein that moderates the reactivation process of KSHV latency. By mass spectrometric analysis of affinity purified K-RTA, we showed that Thr-513 or Thr-514 was the primary in vivo phosphorylation site. Thr-513 and Thr-514 are proximal to the nuclear localization signal ((527)KKRK(530)) and were previously hypothesized to be target sites of Ser/Thr kinase hKFC. However, substitutions of Thr with Ala at 513 and 514 had no effect on K-RTA subcellular localization or transactivation activity. By contrast, replacement of Ser with Ala at Ser-634 and Ser-636 located in a Ser/Pro-rich region of K-RTA, designated as S634A/S636A, produced a polypeptide with ∼10 kDa shorter in molecular weight and reduced transactivation in a luciferase reporter assay relative to the wild type. In contrast to prediction, the decrease in molecular weight was not due to lack of phosphorylation because the overall Ser and Thr phosphorylation state in K-RTA and S634A/S636A were similar, excluding that Ser-634 or Ser-636 motif served as docking sites for consecutive phosphorylation. Interestingly, S634A/S636A lost ∼30% immuno-reactivity to MPM2, an antibody specific to pSer/pThr-Pro motif, indicating that (634)SPSP(637) motif was in vivo phosphorylated. By in vitro kinase assay, we showed that K-RTA is a substrate of CDK9, a Pro-directed Ser/Thr kinase central to transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the capability of K-RTA in associating with endogenous CDK9 was reduced in S634A/S636A, which suggested that Ser-634 and Ser-636 may be involved in CDK9 recruitment. In agreement, S634A/S636A mutant exhibited ∼25% reduction in KSHV lytic cycle reactivation relative to that by the wild type K-RTA. Taken together, our data propose that Ser-634 and Ser-636 of K-RTA are phosphorylated by host transcriptional kinase CDK9 and such a process contributes to a full

  1. Ser-634 and Ser-636 of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus RTA are involved in transactivation and are potential CDK9 phosphorylation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Hua eTsai

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The replication and transcription activator (RTA of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, K-RTA, is a lytic switch protein that moderates the reactivation process of KSHV latency. By mass spectrometric analysis of affinity-purified K-RTA, we showed that Thr-513 or Thr-514 was the primary in vivo phosphorylation site. Thr-513 and Thr-514 are proximal to the nuclear localization signal (527KKRK530 and were previously hypothesized to be target sites of Ser/Thr kinase hKFC. However, substitutions of Thr with Ala at 513 and 514 had no effect on K-RTA subcellular localization or transactivation activity. By contrast, replacement of Ser with Ala at Ser-634 and Ser-636 located in a Ser/Pro-rich region of K-RTA, designated as S634A/S636A, produced a polypeptide with ∼10 kDa shorter in molecular weight and reduced transactivation in a luciferase reporter assay relative to the wild type. In contrast to prediction, the decrease in molecular weight was not due to lack of phosphorylation because the overall Ser and Thr phosphorylation state in K-RTA and S634A/S636A were similar, excluding that Ser-634 or Ser-636 motif served as docking sites for consecutive phosphorylation. Interestingly, S634A/S636A lost ~30% immuno-reactivity to MPM2, an antibody specific to pSer/pThr-Pro motif, indicating that 634SPSP637 motif was in vivo phosphorylated. By in vitro kinase assay, we showed that K-RTA is a substrate of CDK9, a Pro-directed Ser/Thr kinase central to transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the capability of K-RTA in associating with endogenous CDK9 was reduced in S634A/S636A, which suggested that Ser-634 and Ser-636 may be involved in CDK9 recruitment. In agreement, S634A/S636A mutant exhibited ~30% reduction in KSHV lytic cycle reactivation relative to that by the wild type K-RTA. Taken together, our data propose that Ser-634 and Ser-636 of K-RTA are phosphorylated by host transcriptional kinase CDK9 and such a process contributes to a full

  2. SMRT-mediated co-shuttling enables export of class IIa HDACs independent of their CaM kinase phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Francesc X; Chawla, Sangeeta; Skehel, Paul; Hardingham, Giles E

    2013-01-01

    The Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDAC)4 and HDAC5 play a role in neuronal survival and behavioral adaptation in the CNS. Phosphorylation at 2/3 N-terminal sites promote their nuclear export. We investigated whether non-canonical signaling routes to Class IIa HDAC export exist because of their association with the co-repressor Silencing Mediator Of Retinoic And Thyroid Hormone Receptors (SMRT). We found that, while HDAC5 and HDAC4 mutants lacking their N-terminal phosphorylation sites (HDAC4(MUT), HDAC5(MUT)) are constitutively nuclear, co-expression with SMRT renders them exportable by signals that trigger SMRT export, such as synaptic activity, HDAC inhibition, and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) signaling. We found that SMRT's repression domain 3 (RD3) is critical for co-shuttling of HDAC5(MUT), consistent with the role for this domain in Class IIa HDAC association. In the context of BDNF signaling, we found that HDAC5(WT), which was more cytoplasmic than HDAC5(MUT), accumulated in the nucleus after BDNF treatment. However, co-expression of SMRT blocked BDNF-induced HDAC5(WT) import in a RD3-dependent manner. In effect, SMRT-mediated HDAC5(WT) export was opposing the BDNF-induced HDAC5 nuclear accumulation observed in SMRT's absence. Thus, SMRT's presence may render Class IIa HDACs exportable by a wider range of signals than those which simply promote direct phosphorylation. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Phosphorylation of sites 3 and 2 in rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen synthase by a multifunctional protein kinase (ATP-citrate lyase kinase)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheorain, V.S.; Ramakrishna, S.; Benjamin, W.B.; Soderling, T.R.

    1985-10-05

    A multifunctional protein kinase, purified from rat liver as ATP-citrate lyase kinase, has been identified as a glycogen synthase kinase. This kinase catalyzed incorporation of up to 1.5 mol of and)2numberSPO4/mol of synthase subunit associated with a decrease in the glycogen synthase activity ratio from 0.85 to a value of 0.15. Approximately 65-70% of the TUPO4 was incorporated into site 3 and 30-35% into site 2 as determined by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. This multifunctional kinase was distinguished from glycogen synthase kinase-3 on the basis of nucleotide and protein substrate specificities. Since the phosphate contents in glycogen synthase of sites 3 and 2 are altered in diabetes and by insulin administration, the possible involvement of the multifunctional kinase was explored. Glycogen synthase purified from diabetic rabbits was phosphorylated in vitro by this multifunctional kinase at only 10% of the rate compared to synthase purified from control rabbits. Treatment of the diabetics with insulin restored the synthase to a form that was readily phosphorylated in vitro.

  4. Phosphorylation and specific ubiquitin acceptor sites are required for ubiquitination and degradation of the IFNAR1 subunit of type I interferon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K G Suresh; Krolewski, John J; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2004-11-05

    Ubiquitination, endocytosis, and lysosomal degradation of the IFNAR1 (interferon alpha receptor 1) subunit of the type I interferon (IFN) receptor is mediated by the SCFbeta-Trcp (Skp1-Cullin1-F-box protein beta transducin repeat-containing protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. In addition, stability of IFNAR1 is regulated by its binding to Tyk2 kinase. Here we characterize the determinants of IFNAR1 ubiquitination and degradation. We found that the integrity of two Ser residues at positions 535 and 539 within the specific destruction motif present in the cytoplasmic tail of IFNAR1 is essential for the ability of IFNAR1 to recruit beta-Trcp as well as to undergo efficient ubiquitination and degradation. Using an antibody that specifically recognizes IFNAR1 phosphorylated on Ser535 we found that IFNAR1 is phosphorylated on this residue in cells. This phosphorylation is promoted by treatment of cells with IFNalpha. Although the cytoplasmic tail of IFNAR1 contains seven Lys residues that could function as potential ubiquitin acceptor sites, we found that only three (Lys501, Lys525, and Lys526), all located proximal to the destruction motif, are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of IFNAR1. Expression of Tyk2 stabilized IFNAR1 in a manner that was dependent neither on its binding to beta-Trcp nor IFNAR1 ubiquitination. We discuss the complexities and specifics of the ubiquitination and degradation of IFNAR1, which is a beta-Trcp substrate that undergoes degradation via a lysosomal pathway.

  5. Distinction between human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms and identification of new phosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redlich, Gorden; Zanger, Ulrich M; Riedmaier, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    on sequence homology. In the present work, we demonstrate the performance of a mass spectrometry-based strategy to simultaneously detect and differentiate distinct human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms including the highly similar CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, as well as CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, and CYP4F2......, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP4F12. Compared to commonly used immunodetection methods, mass spectrometry overcomes limitations such as low antibody specificity and offers high multiplexing possibilities. Furthermore, CYP phosphorylation, which may affect various biochemical and enzymatic properties...

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Manipulating the fragmentation patterns of phosphopeptides via gas-phase boron derivatization: determining phosphorylation sites in peptides with multiple serines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronert, Scott; Li, Kathy H; Horiuchi, Mizue

    2005-12-01

    Trivalent boron species readily react with protonated phosphopeptides to give addition products with the loss of boron ligands. In the present study, trimethoxyborane (TMB), diisopropoxymethylborane (DIPM), and diethylmethoxyborane (DEMB) were allowed to react with four phosphopeptides, VsSF, LSsF, LsGASA, and VSGAsA (lower-case s indicates phosphoserine). Each of the phosphopeptides contains one serine that is phosphorylated and one that is not. Under collision-activated dissociation (CAD) conditions, the boron-derivatized peptides give fragmentation patterns that differ significantly from that of the protonated phosphopeptide. The patterns vary, depending on the number of labile (i.e., alkoxy) ligands on the boron. In general, boron derivatization increases the yield of phosphate-containing sequence ions, but dramatic effects are only seen with certain reagent/peptide combinations. However, the suite of reagents provides a means of altering and increasing the information content of phosphopeptide CAD spectra.

  8. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/.

  9. αvβ3 integrins negatively regulate cellular forces by phosphorylation of its distal NPXY site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milloud, Rachel; Destaing, Olivier; de Mets, Richard; Bourrin-Reynard, Ingrid; Oddou, Christiane; Delon, Antoine; Wang, Irène; Albigès-Rizo, Corinne; Balland, Martial

    2017-03-01

    Integrins are key receptors that allow cells to sense and respond to their mechanical environment. Although they bind the same ligand, β1 and β3 integrins have distinct and cooperative roles in mechanotransduction. Using traction force microscopy on unconstrained cells, we show that deleting β3 causes traction forces to increase, whereas the deletion of β1 integrin results in a strong decrease of contractile forces. Consistently, loss of β3 integrin also induces an increase in β1 integrin activation. Using a genetic approach, we identified the phosphorylation of the distal NPXY domain as an essential process for β3 integrin to be able to modulate traction forces. Loss of β3 integrins also impacted cell shape and the spatial distribution of traction forces, by causing forces to be generated closer to the cell edge, and the cell shape. Our results emphasize the role of β3 integrin in spatial distribution of cellular forces. We speculate that, by modulating its affinity with kindlin, β3 integrins may be able to locate near the cell edge where it can control β1 integrin activation and clustering. Tensional homeostasis at the single cell level is performed by the ability of β3 adhesions to negatively regulate the activation degree and spatial localization of β1 integrins. By combining genetic approaches and new tools to analyze traction distribution and cell morphology on a population of cells we were able to identify the molecular partners involved in cellular forces regulation. © 2016 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Analysis of protein phosphorylation using mass spectrometry: deciphering the phosphoproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Matthias; Ong, Shao En; Grønborg, Mads

    2002-01-01

    In signal transduction in eukaryotes, protein phosphorylation is a key event. To understand signaling processes, we must first acquire an inventory of phosphoproteins and their phosphorylation sites under different conditions. Because phosphorylation is a dynamic process, elucidation of signaling...

  11. Phosphorylation in hydrogen bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, L

    1967-05-01

    The electron-transport system of cell-free extracts obtained from Hydrogenomonas H-20 has been studied with particular reference to phosphorylation associated with the oxyhydrogen reaction. Cell-free preparations of this organism exhibit oxidative phosphorylation with hydrogen and succinate as electron donors. This activity could be uncoupled with a number of agents. Ratios of phosphorylative activity to oxidative activity observed varied from 0.2 to 0.7. Factors affecting the efficiency of phosphorylation were examined. Inhibitor and spectrophotometric studies indicated that phosphorylation with hydrogen as electron donor occurs exclusively at a site in an abbreviated electron transport chain between H(2) and cytochrome b. The possible occurrence of a cytochrome b oxidase and the requirement for a quinone are discussed, as well as the correlation between the abbreviated pathway and the energy generation by the cell. Evidence is presented which indicates that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide does not participate in the hydrogen oxidation path which is coupled to adenosine triphosphate formation.

  12. Drosophila melanogaster, Vicia faba and Arabidopsis thaliana short-term bioassays in genotoxicity evaluation of air and soil samples from sites surrounding two industrial factories in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chroust, K; Kuglík, P; Relichová, J; Holoubek, I; Cáslavský, J; Veselská, R; Rysková, M; Benedík, J

    1997-01-01

    The Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) in wing cells of Drosophila melanogaster, the Vicia faba cytogenetic tests-Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) and Micronucleus Test (MN), and the Müller test for gametic mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were used for genotoxicity testing of environmental samples of pollutants from the surroundings of LACHEMA chemical factory (Brno, Czech Republic) and DEZA factory in Valasské Mezirící (Moravia, Czech Republic). Tested soil and air samples were taken from the near vicinity of both factories. The surroundings of both sites are heavy loaded by exhalation of chemicals from the factories. Chemical analyses of the 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) list of priority pollutants and heavy metals were performed in both soil and air samples. The Drosophila wing spot test was positive in 70.6% of the tested samples, the Vicia sister chromatid exchange test in 62.5%, and the Arabidopsis Müller test in 58.9%. The micronucleus Vicia faba test was quite insensitive in tested environmental samples. The concordance between SMART and SCE was 62.5%, between SMART and Müller test 76.5%, and between Müller test and SCE 100%. Total concordance of these three tests was 79.7%. Müller test for gametic mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana and cytogenetic SCE test in Vicia faba seem to be quite sensitive and convenient plant bioassays for assessing the mutagenic potential of environmental agents, when compared to the SMART test in Drosophila melanogaster.

  13. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a constituent of the mammalian mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex, and is essential for oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero-Martos, Estefanía; Ortega-Vila, Bernardo; Pol-Fuster, Josep; Cisneros-Barroso, Eugenia; Ruiz-Guerra, Laura; Medina-Dols, Aina; Heine-Suñer, Damián; Lladó, Jerònia; Olmos, Gabriel; Vives-Bauzà, Cristofol

    2016-10-01

    Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has been associated with a broad spectrum of mental disorders. DISC1 is a multi-compartmentalized protein found in the cytoplasm, centrosome, nuclei and mostly enriched in mitochondria. In order to shed light on DISC1 mitochondrial function, we have studied its topology within the organelle. We show in here that in mammals DISC1 resides in the 'Mitochondrial contact site and Cristae Organizing system' (MICOS) complex, involved in cristae organization. DISC1 knockdown in SH-SY5Y cells causes MICOS disassembly and fragmentation of the mitochondrial morphology network. Moreover, DISC1 depleted cells have decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and steady state levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits. As a consequence, OXPHOS complexes and supercomplexes are partially disassembled in DISC1 knockdown cells, which suffer severe bioenergetic defects, evidenced by impaired oxygen consumption, adenosine triphosphate synthesis and mitochondrial membrane potential. Transfection of recombinant full-length human DISC1 restores MICOS complex assembly and rescues OXPHOS function, meanwhile overexpression of the DISC1 truncated form Δ597-854, known to be pathogenic, fails to rescue the bioenergetic impairment caused by DISC1 knockdown. These results should contribute to reveal DISC1 physiological function and potential pathogenic role in severe mental illnesses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Impaired insulin-induced site-specific phosphorylation of TBC1 domain family, member 4 (TBC1D4) in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetes patients is restored by endurance exercise-training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, B F; Pehmøller, C; Treebak, J T

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-mediated glucose disposal rates (R(d)) are reduced in type 2 diabetic patients, a process in which intrinsic signalling defects are thought to be involved. Phosphorylation of TBC1 domain family, member 4 (TBC1D4) is at present the most distal insulin receptor signalling event linked to gl...... to glucose transport. In this study, we examined insulin action on site-specific phosphorylation of TBC1D4 and the effect of exercise training on insulin action and signalling to TBC1D4 in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic patients....

  15. Identification and characterization of Aplysia adducin, an Aplysia cytoskeletal protein homologous to mammalian adducins: increased phosphorylation at a protein kinase C consensus site during long-term synaptic facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Lore M; Gilligan, Diana M; Picciotto, Marina R; Marinesco, Stéphane; Carew, Thomas J

    2003-04-01

    Structural changes at synapses are associated with long-term facilitation (LTF) of synaptic transmission between sensory and motor neurons in Aplysia. We have cloned a cDNA encoding Aplysia adducin (ApADD), the Aplysia homolog of mammalian adducins that are regulatory components of the membrane cytoskeleton. ApADD is recovered in the particulate fraction of nervous system extracts and is localized predominantly in the submembraneous region of Aplysia neurons. ApADD is phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C (PKC) at a site homologous to the in vivo PKC phosphorylation site in mammalian adducins. Phosphorylation of ApADD at this site is also detected in vivo in the intact Aplysia nervous system and is increased 18 hr after serotonin-induced LTF. In contrast, there is no change in phosphorylation during short-term facilitation or 1 hr after initial LTF induction. Thus, ApADD is modulated specifically with later phases of LTF and provides an attractive candidate protein that contributes to structural changes accompanying long-lasting synaptic alteration.

  16. Physical nature of intermolecular interactions within cAMP-dependent protein kinase active site: differential transition state stabilization in phosphoryl transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarek, Pawel; Dyguda-Kazimierowicz, Edyta; Tachibana, Akitomo; Sokalski, W Andrzej

    2008-09-18

    The origin of enzyme catalytic activity may be effectively explored within the nonempirical theory of intermolecular interactions. The knowledge of electrostatic, exchange, delocalization, and correlation components of the transition state and substrates stabilization energy arising from each enzyme active site residue allows to examine the most essential physical effects involved in enzymatic catalysis. Consequently, one can build approximate models of the catalytic activity in a systematic and legitimate manner. Whenever the dominant role of electrostatic interactions is recognized or assumed, the properties of an optimal catalytic environment could be simply generalized and visualized by means of catalytic fields that, in turn, aids the design of new catalysts. Differential transition state stabilization (DTSS) methodology has been applied herein to the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The MP2 results correlate well with the available experimental data and theoretical findings indicating that Lys72, Asp166, and the two magnesium ions contribute -22.7, -13.3, -32.4, and -15.2 kcal/mol to differential transition state stabilization, respectively. Although all interaction energy components except that of electron correlation contribution are meaningful, the first-order electrostatic term correlates perfectly with MP2 catalytic activity. Catalytic field technique was also employed to visualize crucial electrostatic features of an ideal catalyst and to compare the latter with the environment provided by PKA active site. The map of regional electronic chemical potential was used to analyze the unfavorable catalytic effect of Lys168. It was found that locally induced polarization of TS atoms thermodynamically destabilizes electrons, pulling them to regions displaying higher electronic chemical potential.

  17. Positional effect of phosphorylation sites 266 and 267 in the cytoplasmic domain of the E2 protein of hepatitis C virus 3a genotype: Interferon Resistance analysis via Sequence Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ur Rehman Irshad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon is well thought-out as the key defence against all infections including HCV. The only treatment for HCV infection is pegylated interferon alpha (IFN-α but unluckily more than half of the infected individuals do not act in response to the cure and become chronic HCV carriers. The mechanism how HCV induce interferon resistance is still elusive. It is recently reported that HCV envelope protein 2 interacts with PKR which is the interferon-inducible protein kinase and which in turn blocks the activity of its target molecule called eukaryotic initiation factor elF2. Sequence analysis of Envelope protein reveals it contains a domain homologous to phosphorylation sites of PKR andthe translation initiation factor eIF2alpha. Envelope protein competes for phosphorylation with PKR. Inhibition of kinase activity of PKR is postulated as a mechanism of to interferon (IFN resistance. Results Present study involves the insilico investigation of possible role of potential phosphorylation in envelope 2 protein of 3a genotype in interferon resistance. Envelope protein coding genes were isolated from local HCV isolates, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis was done and tertiary structure of envelope gene was predicted. Visualization of phosphorylation in tertiary structure reveals that residue 266 and 267 of envelope gene 2 are surface exposed and their phosphorylation may compete with the phosphorylation of PKR protein and possibly involved in mediating Interferon Resistance. Conclusion A hybrid in-silico and wet laboratory approach of motif prediction, evolutionary and structural analysis has pointed out serine 266 and 267 of the HCV E2 gene as a hopeful claimant for the serine phosphorylation. Recognition of these nucleotide variations may assist to propose genotype precise therapy to avoid and resolve HCV infections.

  18. Phosphorylation at Ser²⁶ in the ATP-binding site of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II as a mechanism for switching off the kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mehtap; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Leavis, Paul; Grabarek, Zenon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2013-02-07

    CaMKII (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) is a serine/threonine phosphotransferase that is capable of long-term retention of activity due to autophosphorylation at a specific threonine residue within each subunit of its oligomeric structure. The γ isoform of CaMKII is a significant regulator of vascular contractility. Here, we show that phosphorylation of CaMKII γ at Ser²⁶, a residue located within the ATP-binding site, terminates the sustained activity of the enzyme. To test the physiological importance of phosphorylation at Ser²⁶, we generated a phosphospecific Ser²⁶ antibody and demonstrated an increase in Ser²⁶ phosphorylation upon depolarization and contraction of blood vessels. To determine if the phosphorylation of Ser²⁶ affects the kinase activity, we mutated Ser²⁶ to alanine or aspartic acid. The S26D mutation mimicking the phosphorylated state of CaMKII causes a dramatic decrease in Thr²⁸⁷ autophosphorylation levels and greatly reduces the catalytic activity towards an exogenous substrate (autocamtide-3), whereas the S26A mutation has no effect. These data combined with molecular modelling indicate that a negative charge at Ser²⁶ of CaMKII γ inhibits the catalytic activity of the enzyme towards its autophosphorylation site at Thr²⁸⁷ most probably by blocking ATP binding. We propose that Ser²⁶ phosphorylation constitutes an important mechanism for switching off CaMKII activity.

  19. Infection with CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strain containing three EPIYA C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Júnior, M; Batista, S A; Vidigal, P V T; Cordeiro, A A C; Oliveira, F M S; Prata, L O; Diniz, A E T; Barral, C M; Barbuto, R C; Gomes, A D; Araújo, I D; Queiroz, D M M; Caliari, M V

    2015-04-27

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains containing high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites in the CagA is associated with significant gastritis and increased risk of developing pre-malignant gastric lesions and gastric carcinoma. However, these findings have not been reproduced in animal models yet. Therefore, we investigated the effect on the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains exhibiting one or three EPIYA-C phosphorilation sites. Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with H. pylori clonal isolates containing one or three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. Control group was composed by uninfected animals challenged with Brucella broth alone. Gastric fragments were evaluated by the modified Sydney System and digital morphometry. Clonal relatedness between the isolates was considered by the identical RAPD-PCR profiles and sequencing of five housekeeping genes, vacA i/d region and of oipA. The other virulence markers were present in both isolates (vacA s1i1d1m1, iceA2, and intact dupA). CagA of both isolates was translocated and phosphorylated in AGS cells. After 45 days of infection, there was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells and in the area of the lamina propria in the infected animals, notably in those infected by the CagA-positive strain with three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. After six months of infection, a high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites was associated with progressive increase in the intensity of gastritis and in the area of the lamina propria. Atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia were also observed more frequently in animals infected with the CagA-positive isolate with three EPIYA-C sites.  We conclude that infection with H. pylori strain carrying a high number of CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in an animal model of H. pylori infection.

  20. Infection with CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strain containing three EPIYA C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ferreira Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains containing high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites in the CagA is associated with significant gastritis and increased risk of developing pre-malignant gastric lesions and gastric carcinoma. However, these findings have not been reproduced in animal models yet. Therefore, we investigated the effect on the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains exhibiting one or three EPIYA-C phosphorilation sites. Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with H. pylori clonal isolates containing one or three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. Control group was composed by uninfected animals challenged with Brucella broth alone. Gastric fragments were evaluated by the modified Sydney System and digital morphometry. Clonal relatedness between the isolates was considered by the identical RAPD-PCR profiles and sequencing of five housekeeping genes, vacA i/d region and of oipA. The other virulence markers were present in both isolates (vacA s1i1d1m1, iceA2, and intact dupA. CagA of both isolates was translocated and phosphorylated in AGS cells. After 45 days of infection, there was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells and in the area of the lamina propria in the infected animals, notably in those infected by the CagA-positive strain with three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. After six months of infection, a high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites was associated with progressive increase in the intensity of gastritis and in the area of the lamina propria. Atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia were also observed more frequently in animals infected with the CagA-positive isolate with three EPIYA-C sites.  We conclude that infection with H. pylori strain carrying a high number of CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in an animal model of H. pylori infection.

  1. Endothelial CD47 promotes vascular endothelial-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation and participates in T cell recruitment at sites of inflammation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcutia, Veronica; Stefanidakis, Michael; Tsuboi, Naotake; Mayadas, Tanya; Croce, Kevin J; Fukuda, Daiju; Aikawa, Masanori; Newton, Gail; Luscinskas, Francis W

    2012-09-01

    At sites of inflammation, endothelial adhesion molecules bind leukocytes and transmit signals required for transendothelial migration (TEM). We previously reported that adhesive interactions between endothelial cell CD47 and leukocyte signal regulatory protein γ (SIRPγ) regulate human T cell TEM. The role of endothelial CD47 in T cell TEM in vivo, however, has not been explored. In this study, CD47⁻/⁻ mice showed reduced recruitment of blood T cells as well as neutrophils and monocytes in a dermal air pouch model of TNF-α-induced inflammation. Reconstitution of CD47⁻/⁻ mice with wild-type bone marrow cells did not restore leukocyte recruitment to the air pouch, indicating a role for endothelial CD47. The defect in leukocyte TEM in the CD47⁻/⁻ endothelium was corroborated by intravital microscopy of inflamed cremaster muscle microcirculation in bone marrow chimera mice. In an in vitro human system, CD47 on both HUVEC and T cells was required for TEM. Although previous studies showed CD47-dependent signaling required G(αi)-coupled pathways, this was not the case for endothelial CD47 because pertussis toxin, which inactivates G(αi), had no inhibitory effect, whereas G(αi) was required by the T cell for TEM. We next investigated the endothelial CD47-dependent signaling events that accompany leukocyte TEM. Ab-induced cross-linking of CD47 revealed robust actin cytoskeleton reorganization and Src- and Pyk-2-kinase dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the vascular endothelial-cadherin cytoplasmic tail. This signaling was pertussis toxin insensitive, suggesting that endothelial CD47 signaling is independent of G(αi). These findings suggest that engagement of endothelial CD47 by its ligands triggers outside-in signals in endothelium that facilitate leukocyte TEM.

  2. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of chromatin-associated proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    The nucleus is the organelle where basically all DNA-related processes take place in eukaryotes, such as replication, transcription, and splicing as well as epigenetic regulation. The identification and description of the nuclear proteins is one of the requisites toward a comprehensive understanding of the biological functions accomplished in the nucleus. Many of the regulatory mechanisms of protein functions rely on their PTMs among which phosphorylation is probably one of the most important properties affecting enzymatic activity, interaction with other molecules, localization, or stability. So far, the nuclear and subnuclear proteome and phosphoproteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been the subject of very few studies. In this work, we developed a purification protocol of Arabidopsis chromatin-associated proteins and performed proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses identifying a total of 879 proteins of which 198 were phosphoproteins that were mainly involved in chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, and RNA processing. From 230 precisely localized phosphorylation sites (phosphosites), 52 correspond to hitherto unidentified sites. This protocol and data thereby obtained should be a valuable resource for many domains of plant research.

  3. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. SIMAC - A phosphoproteomic strategy for the rapid separation of mono-phosphorylated from multiply phosphorylated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Jensen, Ole N; Robinson, Phillip J

    2008-01-01

    spectrometric analysis, such as immobilized metal affinity chromatography or titanium dioxide the coverage of the phosphoproteome of a given sample is limited. Here we report a simple and rapid strategy - SIMAC - for sequential separation of mono-phosphorylated peptides and multiply phosphorylated peptides from...... and an optimized titanium dioxide chromatographic method. More than double the total number of identified phosphorylation sites was obtained with SIMAC, primarily from a three-fold increase in recovery of multiply phosphorylated peptides....

  5. Details of Mannitol Transport in Escherichia coli Elucidated by Site-Specific Mutagenesis and Complementation of Phosphorylation Site Mutants of the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Mannitol-Specific Phosphotransferase System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeghel, R.P. van; Hoek, Y.Y. van der; Pas, H.H.; Elferink, Maria; Keck, W.; Robillard, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    The mannitol transport protein (EIImtl) carries out translocation with concomitant phosphorylation of mannitol from the periplasm to the cytoplasm, at the expense of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The phosphoryl group which is needed for this group translocation is sequentially transferred from PEP via

  6. Protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of Na+/K+-ATPase opens intracellular C-terminal water pathway leading to third Na+-binding site in molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Hanne; Nissen, Poul; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the major mechanisms for posttranscriptional modification of proteins. The addition of a compact, negatively charged moiety to a protein can significantly change its function and localization by affecting its structure and interaction network. We have used all-atom Molec...

  7. Akt2 influences glycogen synthase activity in human skeletal muscle through regulation of NH2-terminal (sites 2+2a) phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Martin; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Richter, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by reduced muscle glycogen synthesis. The key enzyme in this process, glycogen synthase (GS), is activated via proximal insulin signaling, but the exact molecular events remain unknown. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of Threonine-308 on Akt (p...

  8. Identification of ischemia-regulated phosphorylation sites in connexin43: A possible target for the antiarrhythmic peptide analogue rotigaptide (ZP123)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Stahlhut, Martin; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2006-01-01

    and presence of the antiarrhythmic peptide analogue rotigaptide (formerly known as ZP123). Phosphorylation analysis was performed on Cx43 purified from isolated perfused rat hearts using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass...

  9. Mutation of a Src phosphorylation site in the PDGF beta-receptor leads to increased PDGF-stimulated chemotaxis but decreased mitogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Johnell, M; Siegbahn, A

    1996-01-01

    is phosphorylated by Src. Cell lines expressing a beta-receptor mutant, in which Tyr934 was replaced with a phenyalanine residue, showed reduced mitogenic signaling in response to PDGF-BB. In contrast, the mutant receptor mediated increased signals for chemotaxis and actin reorganization. Whereas the motility...... responses of cells expressing wild-type beta-receptors were attenuated by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase, those of cells expressing the mutant receptor were only slightly influenced. In contrast, PDGF-BB-induced chemotaxis of the cells with the mutant receptor was attenuated by inhibition......, the characteristics of the Y934F mutant suggest that the phosphorylation of Tyr934 by Src negatively modulates a signal transduction pathway leading to motility responses which involves phospholipase C-gamma, and shifts the response to increased mitogenicity....

  10. JNK1ß1 is phosphorylated during expression in E. coli and in vitro by MKK4 at three identical novel sites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Owen, GR

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available , Ikechukwu Achilonua, Heini W. Dirra* aProtein Structure-Function Research Unit, School of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa. bCouncil for Scientific and Industrial Research, Biosciences, Pretoria..., and may be responsible for the diversity in the function of the individual JNKs. Although the mechanism by which the JNKs are regulated in the cell by phosphorylation before and immediately after stress in still not fully understood, the involvement...

  11. CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strain containing three EPIYA C phosphorylation sites produces increase of G cell and decrease of D cell in experimentally infected gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnior, Moacir Ferreira; Batista, Sérgio de Assis; Barbuto, Rafael Calvão; Gomes, Adriana Dias; Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães; Araújo, Ivana Duval; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal

    2016-09-01

    Human infection by Helicobacter pylori is associated with an increase in the number of gastrin-producing G cells and a concomitant decrease of somatostatin-producing D cells. However, to our knowledge, changes in G and D cell numbers in response to infection with H. pylori CagA-positive strains containing different number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites have not been analyzed to date. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform a quantitative analysis of the number of G and D cells in Mongolian gerbils challenged with H. pylori strains with different numbers of EPIYA-C motifs. Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with isogenic H. pylori strains containing one to three phosphorylation sites. Mucosal fragments were evaluated by morphometry and immunohistochemistry using primary polyclonal rabbit anti-gastrin and anti-somatostatin antibodies. Positive cells were counted using an image analyzer. Forty-five days after infection, there was a decrease in the number of D cells and an increase in the G/D cell ratio in the group with three EPIYA-C. Six months after infection, there was a progressive and significant increase in the number of G cells and in the G/D cell ratio, with a concomitant decrease in the number of D cells, especially in the three EPIYA-C group. CagA-positive H. pylori strains containing a large number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites induce a decrease in D cell number and an increase in G cell number and G/D ratio, which were correlated with the number of inflammatory cells of the lamina propria. Copyright © 2016 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  13. Cleaning the GenBank Arabidopsis thaliana data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korning, Peter G.; Hebsgaard, Stefan M.; Rouze, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    Data driven computational biology relies on the large quantities of genomic data stored in international sequence data banks. However, the possibilities are drastically impaired if the stored data is unreliable. During a project aiming to predict splice sites in the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana, we...... extracted a data set from the A. thaliana entries in GenBank. A number of simple `sanity' checks, based on the nature of the data, revealed an alarmingly high error rate. More than 15% of the most important entries extracted did contain erroneous information. In addition, a number of entries had directly...... common. It is proposed that the level of error correction should be increased and that gene structure sanity checks should be incorporated - also at the submitter level - to avoid or reduce the problem in the future. A non-redundant and error corrected subset of the data for A. thaliana is made available...

  14. Global analysis of phosphorylation and ubiquitylation crosstalk in protein degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaney, Danielle L.; Beltrao, Pedro; Starita, Lea; Guo, Ailan; Rush, John; Fields, Stanley; Krogan, Nevan J.; Villén, Judit

    2013-01-01

    Crosstalk between different types of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the same protein molecule adds specificity and combinatorial logic to signal processing, but has not been characterized on a large-scale basis. Here, we developed two methods to identify protein isoforms that are both phosphorylated and ubiquitylated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, identifying 466 proteins with 2,100 phosphorylation sites co-occurring with 2,189 ubiquitylation sites. We applied these methods quantitatively to identify phosphorylation sites that regulate protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our results demonstrate that distinct phosphorylation sites are often used in conjunction with ubiquitylation, and these sites are more highly conserved than the entire set of phosphorylation sites. Finally, we investigated how the phosphorylation machinery can be regulated by ubiquitylation. We found evidence for novel regulatory mechanisms of kinases and 14-3-3 scaffold proteins via proteasome-independent ubiquitylation. PMID:23749301

  15. Physicochemical mechanisms of protein regulation by phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafumi eNishi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation offers a dynamic way to regulate protein activity and subcellular localization, which is achieved through reversibility and fast kinetics of posttranslational modifications. Adding or removing a dianionic phosphate group somewhere on a protein often changes the protein’s structural properties, its stability and dynamics. Moreover, the majority of signaling pathways involve an extensive set of protein-protein interactions, and phosphorylation can be used to regulate and modulate protein-protein binding. Losses of phosphorylation sites, as a result of disease mutations, might disrupt protein binding and deregulate signal transduction. In this paper we focus on the effects of phosphorylation on protein stability, dynamics and binding. We describe several physico-chemical mechanisms of protein regulation through phosphorylation and pay particular attention to phosphorylation in protein complexes and phosphorylation in the context of disorder-order and order-disorder transitions. Finally we assess the role of multiple phosphorylation sites in a protein molecule, their possible cooperativity and function.

  16. Propofol directly increases tau phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Whittington

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD and other tauopathies, the microtubule-associated protein tau can undergo aberrant hyperphosphorylation potentially leading to the development of neurofibrillary pathology. Anesthetics have been previously shown to induce tau hyperphosphorylation through a mechanism involving hypothermia-induced inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A activity. However, the effects of propofol, a common clinically used intravenous anesthetic, on tau phosphorylation under normothermic conditions are unknown. We investigated the effects of a general anesthetic dose of propofol on levels of phosphorylated tau in the mouse hippocampus and cortex under normothermic conditions. Thirty min following the administration of propofol 250 mg/kg i.p., significant increases in tau phosphorylation were observed at the AT8, CP13, and PHF-1 phosphoepitopes in the hippocampus, as well as at AT8, PHF-1, MC6, pS262, and pS422 epitopes in the cortex. However, we did not detect somatodendritic relocalization of tau. In both brain regions, tau hyperphosphorylation persisted at the AT8 epitope 2 h following propofol, although the sedative effects of the drug were no longer evident at this time point. By 6 h following propofol, levels of phosphorylated tau at AT8 returned to control levels. An initial decrease in the activity and expression of PP2A were observed, suggesting that PP2A inhibition is at least partly responsible for the hyperphosphorylation of tau at multiple sites following 30 min of propofol exposure. We also examined tau phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells transfected to overexpress human tau. A 1 h exposure to a clinically relevant concentration of propofol in vitro was also associated with tau hyperphosphorylation. These findings suggest that propofol increases tau phosphorylation both in vivo and in vitro under normothermic conditions, and further studies are warranted to determine the impact of this anesthetic on the acceleration of

  17. Action at a distance: amino acid substitutions that affect binding of the phosphorylated CheY response regulator and catalysis of dephosphorylation can be far from the CheZ phosphatase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ashalla M; Mole, Beth M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2011-09-01

    Two-component regulatory systems, in which phosphorylation controls the activity of a response regulator protein, provide signal transduction in bacteria. For example, the phosphorylated CheY response regulator (CheYp) controls swimming behavior. In Escherichia coli, the chemotaxis phosphatase CheZ stimulates the dephosphorylation of CheYp. CheYp apparently binds first to the C terminus of CheZ and then binds to the active site where dephosphorylation occurs. The phosphatase activity of the CheZ(2) dimer exhibits a positively cooperative dependence on CheYp concentration, apparently because the binding of the first CheYp to CheZ(2) is inhibited compared to the binding of the second CheYp. Thus, CheZ phosphatase activity is reduced at low CheYp concentrations. The CheZ21IT gain-of-function substitution, located far from either the CheZ active site or C-terminal CheY binding site, enhances CheYp binding and abolishes cooperativity. To further explore mechanisms regulating CheZ activity, we isolated 10 intragenic suppressor mutations of cheZ21IT that restored chemotaxis. The suppressor substitutions were located along the central portion of CheZ and were not allele specific. Five suppressor mutants tested biochemically diminished the binding of CheYp and/or the catalysis of dephosphorylation, even when the suppressor substitutions were distant from the active site. One suppressor mutant also restored cooperativity to CheZ21IT. Consideration of results from this and previous studies suggests that the binding of CheYp to the CheZ active site (not to the C terminus) is rate limiting and leads to cooperative phosphatase activity. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions distant from the active site can affect CheZ catalytic activity and CheYp binding, perhaps via the propagation of structural or dynamic perturbations through a helical bundle. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Regulation of Arabidopsis leaf hydraulics involves light-dependent phosphorylation of aquaporins in veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Karine; Boursiac, Yann; Tournaire-Roux, Colette; Monneuse, Jean-Marc; Postaire, Olivier; Da Ines, Olivier; Schäffner, Anton R; Hem, Sonia; Santoni, Véronique; Maurel, Christophe

    2013-03-01

    The water status of plant leaves depends on the efficiency of the water supply, from the vasculature to inner tissues. This process is under hormonal and environmental regulation and involves aquaporin water channels. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the rosette hydraulic conductivity (Kros) is higher in darkness than it is during the day. Knockout plants showed that three plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) sharing expression in veins (PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;6) contribute to rosette water transport, and PIP2;1 can fully account for Kros responsiveness to darkness. Directed expression of PIP2;1 in veins of a pip2;1 mutant was sufficient to restore Kros. In addition, a positive correlation, in both wild-type and PIP2;1-overexpressing plants, was found between Kros and the osmotic water permeability of protoplasts from the veins but not from the mesophyll. Thus, living cells in veins form a major hydraulic resistance in leaves. Quantitative proteomic analyses showed that light-dependent regulation of Kros is linked to diphosphorylation of PIP2;1 at Ser-280 and Ser-283. Expression in pip2;1 of phosphomimetic and phosphorylation-deficient forms of PIP2;1 demonstrated that phosphorylation at these two sites is necessary for Kros enhancement under darkness. These findings establish how regulation of a single aquaporin isoform in leaf veins critically determines leaf hydraulics.

  19. Titania as a chemo-affinity support for the column-switching HPLC analysis of phosphopeptides: application to the characterization of phosphorylation sites in proteins by combination with protease digestion and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Akira; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    A method for the determination of phosphorylation sites in phosphoproteins based on column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed. The HPLC system consisted of a titania precolumn for the selective adsorption of phosphopeptides, an anion-exchange analytical column and a UV detector (215 nm). Rabbit muscle phosphorylase a (RPa) and porcine stomach pepsin (PSP) were tested as model phosphoproteins. After protease digestion, the resulting phosphopeptides were successfully isolated by column-switching HPLC. The phosphopeptide fractions were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with a positive or negative ion mode after purification by reversed-phase HPLC. Pseudo-molecular ion peaks corresponding to Gln-Ile-Ser(p)-Val-Arg (MW 681.7) and Glu-Ala-Thr-Ser(p)-Gln-Glu-Leu (MW 856.8) were detected from the tryptic digest of RPa and chymotryptic digest of PSP, respectively, which agreed with the theoretically expected phosphopeptide fragments.

  20. Effect of Phosphorylation on Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions of the Active Site Histidine of the Phosphocarrier Protein HPr of the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotransferase System Determined by 15N NMR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Alard A. van; Lange, Liesbeth C.M. de; Bachovchin, William W.; Robillard, George T.

    1990-01-01

    The phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system of Escherichia coli can exist in a phosphorylated and a nonphosphorylated form. During phosphorylation, the phosphoryl group is carried on a histidine residue, His15. The hydrogen-bonding state of this

  1. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yates, Darran M

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  2. Transposon diversity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang Hien; Wright, Stephen; Yu, Zhihui; Bureau, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Recent availability of extensive genome sequence information offers new opportunities to analyze genome organization, including transposon diversity and accumulation, at a level of resolution that was previously unattainable. In this report, we used sequence similarity search and analysis protocols to perform a fine-scale analysis of a large sample (≈17.2 Mb) of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia) genome for transposons. Consistent with previous studies, we report that the A. thaliana genome harbors diverse representatives of most known superfamilies of transposons. However, our survey reveals a higher density of transposons of which over one-fourth could be classified into a single novel transposon family designated as Basho, which appears unrelated to any previously known superfamily. We have also identified putative transposase-coding ORFs for miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), providing clues into the mechanism of mobility and origins of the most abundant transposons associated with plant genes. In addition, we provide evidence that most mined transposons have a clear distribution preference for A + T-rich sequences and show that structural variation for many mined transposons is partly due to interelement recombination. Taken together, these findings further underscore the complexity of transposons within the compact genome of A. thaliana. PMID:10861007

  3. A phosphorylation cascade controls the degradation of active SREBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria T; Ericsson, Johan

    2009-02-27

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are a family of transcription factors that regulates cholesterol and lipid metabolism. The active forms of these transcription factors are targeted by a number of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Thr-426 and Ser-430 in SREBP1a creates a docking site for the ubiquitin ligase Fbw7, resulting in the degradation of the transcription factor. Here, we identify a novel phosphorylation site in SREBP1a, Ser-434, which regulates the Fbw7-dependent degradation of SREBP1. We demonstrate that both SREBP1a and SREBP1c are phosphorylated on this residue (Ser-410 in SREBP1c). Importantly, we demonstrate that the mature form of endogenous SREBP1 is phosphorylated on Ser-434. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 phosphorylates Ser-434, and the phosphorylation of this residue is attenuated in response to insulin signaling. Interestingly, phosphorylation of Ser-434 promotes the glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent phosphorylation of Thr-426 and Ser-430 and destabilizes SREBP1. Consequently, mutation of Ser-434 blocks the interaction between SREBP1 and Fbw7 and attenuates Fbw7-dependent degradation of SREBP1. Importantly, insulin fails to enhance the levels of mature SREBP1 in cells lacking Fbw7. Thus, the degradation of mature SREBP1 is controlled by cross-talk between multiple phosphorylated residues in its C-terminal domain and the phosphorylation of Ser-434 could function as a molecular switch to control these processes.

  4. A unique phosphorylation-dependent eIF4E assembly on 40S ribosomes co-ordinated by hepatitis C virus protein NS5A that activates internal ribosome entry site translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Swarupa; Vedagiri, Dhiviya; Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Harshan, Krishnan Harinivas

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported that the HCV (hepatitis C virus) protein NS5A up-regulated mRNA cap binding eIF4F (eukaryotic initiation factor 4F) complex assembly through mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin)-4EBP1 (eIF4E-binding protein 1) pathway and that NS5A (non-structural protein 5A) physically interacted with translation apparatus. In the present study, we demonstrate that NS5A co-ordinates a unique assembly of the cap binding protein eIF4E and 40S ribosome to form a complex that we call ENR (eIF4E-NS5A-ribosome). Recruitment of NS5A and eIF4E to 40S ribosome was confirmed by polysome fractionation, subcellular fractionation and high-salt-wash immunoprecipitation. These observations were also confirmed in HCV-infected cells, validating its biological significance. eIF4E phosphorylation was critical for ENR assembly. 80S ribosome dissociation and RNase integrity assays revealed that, once associated, the ENR complex is stable and RNA interaction is dispensable. Both the N- and C-terminal regions of NS5A domain 1 were indispensable for this assembly and for the NS5A-induced HCV IRES (internal ribosome entry site) activation. The present study demonstrates that NS5A initially associates with phosphorylated eIF4E of eIF4F complex and subsequently recruits it to 40S ribosomes. This is the first time the interaction of viral protein with both eIF4E and ribosomes has been reported. We propose that this assembly would determine the outcome of HCV infection and pathogenesis through regulation of viral and host translation.

  5. A role for the gene regulatory module microRNA172/TARGET OF EARLY ACTIVATION TAGGED 1/FLOWERING LOCUS T (miRNA172/TOE1/FT) in the feeding sites induced by Meloidogyne javanica in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Manzano, Fernando E; Cabrera, Javier; Ripoll, Juan-José; Del Olmo, Iván; Andrés, Mari Fe; Silva, Ana Cláudia; Barcala, Marta; Sánchez, María; Ruíz-Ferrer, Virginia; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Yanofsky, Martin F; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, Jose Antonio; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2018-01-01

    Root knot nematodes (RKNs) penetrate into the root vascular cylinder, triggering morphogenetic changes to induce galls, de novo formed 'pseudo-organs' containing several giant cells (GCs). Distinctive gene repression events observed in early gall/GCs development are thought to be mediated by post-transcriptional silencing via microRNAs (miRNAs), a process that is far from being fully characterized. Arabidopsis thaliana backgrounds with altered activities based on target 35S::MIMICRY172 (MIM172), 35S::TARGET OF EARLY ACTIVATION TAGGED 1 (TOE1)-miR172-resistant (35S::TOE1R ) and mutant (flowering locus T-10 (ft-10)) lines were used for functional analysis of nematode infective and reproductive parameters. The GUS-reporter lines, MIR172A-E::GUS, treated with auxin (IAA) and an auxin-inhibitor (a-(phenyl ethyl-2-one)-indole-3-acetic acid (PEO-IAA)), together with the MIR172C AuxRE::GUS line with two mutated auxin responsive elements (AuxREs), were assayed for nematode-dependent gene expression. Arabidopsis thaliana backgrounds with altered expression of miRNA172, TOE1 or FT showed lower susceptibility to the RKNs and smaller galls and GCs. MIR172C-D::GUS showed restricted promoter activity in galls/GCs that was regulated by auxins through auxin-responsive factors. IAA induced their activity in galls while PEO-IAA treatment and mutations in AuxRe motifs abolished it. The results showed that the regulatory module miRNA172/TOE1/FT plays an important role in correct GCs and gall development, where miRNA172 is modulated by auxins. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Chemical structure analyses of phosphorylated chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaipeng; Liu, Qi

    2014-03-11

    Chemical modification of chitosan to generate new bio-functional materials can bring more desirable properties depending on the nature of the groups introduced. Phosphorylated chitosan has attracted interests in recent years. The literature has reported that the phosphorylation of chitosan could be achieved through three different reaction routes, namely, in the presence of H3PO4/urea, H3PO4/Et3PO4/P2O5, or P2O5/CH3SO3H. However, the exact chemical structure of phosphorylated chitosan synthesized by different reaction routes has not been systematically studied and compared. Meanwhile, the most common opinion is that the hydroxyl group in chitosan is the main substitution site. In this work, phosphorylated chitosan was synthesized using three different reaction routes, and the chemical structures of the products were studied by infrared, X-ray photoelectron and (13)C NMR spectroscopic characterization. It was observed that in the reaction routes using H3PO4/urea and H3PO4/Et3PO4/P2O5, the amino groups were substituted instead of the hydroxyl groups. In the reaction route using P2O5/CH3SO3H, the amino groups were shielded by the ionic binding with CH3SO3H, and the C-6 hydroxyl groups were phosphorylated. Different structures of the phosphorylated chitosan were proposed based on the characterization results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein phosphorylation during Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Morales, Alberto; González-López, Lorena; Cázares-Raga, Febe Elena; Cortés-Martínez, Leticia; Torres-Monzón, Jorge Aurelio; Gallegos-Pérez, José Luis; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; James, Anthony A; Hernández-Hernández, Fidel de la Cruz

    2015-09-01

    Plasmodium gametogenesis within the mosquito midgut is a complex differentiation process involving signaling mediated by phosphorylation, which modulate metabolic routes and protein synthesis required to complete this development. However, the mechanisms leading to gametogenesis activation are poorly understood. We analyzed protein phosphorylation during Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis in vitro in serum-free medium using bidimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with immunoblotting (IB) and antibodies specific to phosphorylated serine, threonine and tyrosine. Approximately 75 protein exhibited phosphorylation changes, of which 23 were identified by mass spectrometry. These included components of the cytoskeleton, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in DNA synthesis and signaling pathways among others. Novel phosphorylation events support a role for these proteins during gametogenesis. The phosphorylation sites of six of the identified proteins, HSP70, WD40 repeat protein msi1, enolase, actin-1 and two isoforms of large subunit of ribonucleoside reductase were investigated using TiO2 phosphopeptides enrichment and tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, transient exposure to hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of ribonucleoside reductase, impaired male gametocytes exflagellation in a dose-dependent manner, and provides a resource for functional studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A casein kinase II phosphorylation site in the cytoplasmic domain of the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor determines the high affinity interaction of the AP-1 Golgi assembly proteins with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauxion, F; Le Borgne, R; Munier-Lehmann, H; Hoflack, B

    1996-01-26

    The transport of proteins from the secretory to the endocytic pathway is mediated by carrier vesicles coated with the AP-1 Golgi assembly proteins and clathrin. The mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPHs) are two major transmembrane proteins segregated into these transport vesicles. Together with the GTPase ARF-1, these cargo proteins are essential components for the efficient translocation of the cytosolic AP-1 onto membranes of the trans-Golgi network, the first step of clathrin coat assembly, MPR-negative fibroblasts have a low capacity of recruiting AP-1 which can be restored by re-expressing the MPRs in these cells. This property was used to identify the protein motif of the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CD-MPR) cytoplasmic domain that is essential for these interactions. Thus, the affinity of AP-1 for membranes and in vivo transport of cathepsin D were measured for MPR-negative cells re-expressing various CD-MPR mutants. The results indicate that the targeting of lysosomal enzymes requires the CD-PDR cytoplasmic domain that are different from tyrosine-based endocytosis motifs. The first is a casein kinase II phosphorylation site (ESEER) that is essential for high affinity binding of AP-1 and therefore probably acts as a dominant determinant controlling CD-MPR sorting in the trans-Golgi network. The second is the adjacent di-leucine motif (HLLPM), which, by itself, is not critical for AP-1 binding, but is absolutely required for a downstream sorting event.

  9. A fragmented alignment method detects a putative phosphorylation site and a putative BRC repeat in the Drosophila melanogaster BRCA2 protein [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1wc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the BRCA2 tumor suppressor protein leave individuals susceptible to breast, ovarian and other cancers. The BRCA2 protein is a critical component of the DNA repair pathways in eukaryotes, and also plays an integral role in fostering genomic variability through meiotic recombination. Although present in many eukaryotes, as a whole the BRCA2 gene is weakly conserved. Conserved fragments of 30 amino acids (BRC repeats, which mediate interactions with the recombinase RAD51, helped detect orthologs of this protein in other organisms. The carboxy-terminal of the human BRCA2 has been shown to be phosphorylated by checkpoint kinases (Chk1/Chk2 at T3387, which regulate the sequestration of RAD51 on DNA damage. However, apart from three BRC repeats, the Drosophila melanogaster gene has not been annotated and associated with other functionally relevant sequence fragments in human BRCA2. In the current work, the carboxy-terminal phosphorylation threonine site (E=9.1e-4 and a new BRC repeat (E=17e-4 in D. melanogaster has been identified, using a fragmented alignment methodology (FRAGAL. In a similar study, FRAGAL has also identified a novel half-a- tetratricopeptide (HAT motif (E=11e-4, a helical repeat motif implicated in various aspects of RNA metabolism, in Utp6 from yeast. The characteristic three aromatic residues with conserved spacing are observed in this new HAT repeat, further strengthening my claim. The reference and target sequences are sliced into overlapping fragments of equal parameterized lengths. All pairs of fragments in the reference and target proteins are aligned, and the gap penalties are adjusted to discourage gaps in the middle of the alignment. The results of the best matches are sorted based on differing criteria to aid the detection of known and putative sequences. The source code for FRAGAL results on these sequences is available at https://github.com/sanchak/FragalCode, while the database can be accessed at www.sanchak.com/fragal.html.

  10. Phosphorylation of a WRKY Transcription Factor by MAPKs Is Required for Pollen Development and Function in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yuefeng; Meng, Xiangzong; Khanna, Reshma; LaMontagne, Erica; Liu, Yidong; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-01-01

    Plant male gametogenesis involves complex and dynamic changes in gene expression. At present, little is known about the transcription factors involved in this process and how their activities are regulated. Here, we show that a pollen-specific transcription factor, WRKY34, and its close homolog, WRKY2, are required for male gametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. When overexpressed using LAT52, a strong pollen-specific promoter, epitope-tagged WRKY34 is temporally phosphorylated by MPK3 and MPK6, two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, or MPKs), at early stages in pollen development. During pollen maturation, WRKY34 is dephosphorylated and degraded. Native promoter-driven WRKY34-YFP fusion also follows the same expression pattern at the protein level. WRKY34 functions redundantly with WRKY2 in pollen development, germination, and pollen tube growth. Loss of MPK3/MPK6 phosphorylation sites in WRKY34 compromises the function of WRKY34 in vivo. Epistasis interaction analysis confirmed that MPK6 belongs to the same genetic pathway of WRKY34 and WRKY2. Our study demonstrates the importance of temporal post-translational regulation of WRKY transcription factors in the control of developmental phase transitions in plants. PMID:24830428

  11. Regulation of Arabidopsis Leaf Hydraulics Involves Light-Dependent Phosphorylation of Aquaporins in Veins[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Karine; Boursiac, Yann; Tournaire-Roux, Colette; Monneuse, Jean-Marc; Postaire, Olivier; Da Ines, Olivier; Schäffner, Anton R.; Hem, Sonia; Santoni, Véronique; Maurel, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The water status of plant leaves depends on the efficiency of the water supply, from the vasculature to inner tissues. This process is under hormonal and environmental regulation and involves aquaporin water channels. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the rosette hydraulic conductivity (Kros) is higher in darkness than it is during the day. Knockout plants showed that three plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) sharing expression in veins (PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;6) contribute to rosette water transport, and PIP2;1 can fully account for Kros responsiveness to darkness. Directed expression of PIP2;1 in veins of a pip2;1 mutant was sufficient to restore Kros. In addition, a positive correlation, in both wild-type and PIP2;1-overexpressing plants, was found between Kros and the osmotic water permeability of protoplasts from the veins but not from the mesophyll. Thus, living cells in veins form a major hydraulic resistance in leaves. Quantitative proteomic analyses showed that light-dependent regulation of Kros is linked to diphosphorylation of PIP2;1 at Ser-280 and Ser-283. Expression in pip2;1 of phosphomimetic and phosphorylation-deficient forms of PIP2;1 demonstrated that phosphorylation at these two sites is necessary for Kros enhancement under darkness. These findings establish how regulation of a single aquaporin isoform in leaf veins critically determines leaf hydraulics. PMID:23532070

  12. Phosphorylation of a WRKY transcription factor by MAPKs is required for pollen development and function in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuefeng Guan

    Full Text Available Plant male gametogenesis involves complex and dynamic changes in gene expression. At present, little is known about the transcription factors involved in this process and how their activities are regulated. Here, we show that a pollen-specific transcription factor, WRKY34, and its close homolog, WRKY2, are required for male gametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. When overexpressed using LAT52, a strong pollen-specific promoter, epitope-tagged WRKY34 is temporally phosphorylated by MPK3 and MPK6, two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, or MPKs, at early stages in pollen development. During pollen maturation, WRKY34 is dephosphorylated and degraded. Native promoter-driven WRKY34-YFP fusion also follows the same expression pattern at the protein level. WRKY34 functions redundantly with WRKY2 in pollen development, germination, and pollen tube growth. Loss of MPK3/MPK6 phosphorylation sites in WRKY34 compromises the function of WRKY34 in vivo. Epistasis interaction analysis confirmed that MPK6 belongs to the same genetic pathway of WRKY34 and WRKY2. Our study demonstrates the importance of temporal post-translational regulation of WRKY transcription factors in the control of developmental phase transitions in plants.

  13. Phosphorylation of a WRKY transcription factor by two pathogen-responsive MAPKs drives phytoalexin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guohong; Meng, Xiangzong; Liu, Yidong; Zheng, Zuyu; Chen, Zhixiang; Zhang, Shuqun

    2011-04-01

    Plant sensing of invading pathogens triggers massive metabolic reprogramming, including the induction of secondary antimicrobial compounds known as phytoalexins. We recently reported that MPK3 and MPK6, two pathogen-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases, play essential roles in the induction of camalexin, the major phytoalexin in Arabidopsis thaliana. In search of the transcription factors downstream of MPK3/MPK6, we found that WRKY33 is required for MPK3/MPK6-induced camalexin biosynthesis. In wrky33 mutants, both gain-of-function MPK3/MPK6- and pathogen-induced camalexin production are compromised, which is associated with the loss of camalexin biosynthetic gene activation. WRKY33 is a pathogen-inducible transcription factor, whose expression is regulated by the MPK3/MPK6 cascade. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays reveal that WRKY33 binds to its own promoter in vivo, suggesting a potential positive feedback regulatory loop. Furthermore, WRKY33 is a substrate of MPK3/MPK6. Mutation of MPK3/MPK6 phosphorylation sites in WRKY33 compromises its ability to complement the camalexin induction in the wrky33 mutant. Using a phospho-protein mobility shift assay, we demonstrate that WRKY33 is phosphorylated by MPK3/MPK6 in vivo in response to Botrytis cinerea infection. Based on these data, we conclude that WRKY33 functions downstream of MPK3/MPK6 in reprogramming the expression of camalexin biosynthetic genes, which drives the metabolic flow to camalexin production in Arabidopsis challenged by pathogens.

  14. Phosphorylation of a WRKY transcription factor by MAPKs is required for pollen development and function in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yuefeng; Meng, Xiangzong; Khanna, Reshma; LaMontagne, Erica; Liu, Yidong; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-01-01

    Plant male gametogenesis involves complex and dynamic changes in gene expression. At present, little is known about the transcription factors involved in this process and how their activities are regulated. Here, we show that a pollen-specific transcription factor, WRKY34, and its close homolog, WRKY2, are required for male gametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. When overexpressed using LAT52, a strong pollen-specific promoter, epitope-tagged WRKY34 is temporally phosphorylated by MPK3 and MPK6, two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, or MPKs), at early stages in pollen development. During pollen maturation, WRKY34 is dephosphorylated and degraded. Native promoter-driven WRKY34-YFP fusion also follows the same expression pattern at the protein level. WRKY34 functions redundantly with WRKY2 in pollen development, germination, and pollen tube growth. Loss of MPK3/MPK6 phosphorylation sites in WRKY34 compromises the function of WRKY34 in vivo. Epistasis interaction analysis confirmed that MPK6 belongs to the same genetic pathway of WRKY34 and WRKY2. Our study demonstrates the importance of temporal post-translational regulation of WRKY transcription factors in the control of developmental phase transitions in plants.

  15. Phosphorylation Modulates Ameloblastin Self-assembly and Ca2+ Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein Stakkestad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastin (AMBN, an important component of the self-assembled enamel extra cellular matrix, contains several in silico predicted phosphorylation sites. However, to what extent these sites actually are phosphorylated and the possible effects of such post-translational modifications are still largely unknown. Here we report on in vitro experiments aimed at investigating what sites in AMBN are phosphorylated by casein kinase 2 (CK2 and protein kinase A (PKA and the impact such phosphorylation has on self-assembly and calcium binding. All predicted sites in AMBN can be phosphorylated by CK2 and/or PKA. The experiments show that phosphorylation, especially in the exon 5 derived part of the molecule, is inversely correlated with AMBN self-assembly. These results support earlier findings suggesting that AMBN self-assembly is mostly dependent on the exon 5 encoded region of the AMBN gene. Phosphorylation was significantly more efficient when the AMBN molecules were in solution and not present as supramolecular assemblies, suggesting that post-translational modification of AMBN must take place before the enamel matrix molecules self-assemble inside the ameloblast cell. Moreover, phosphorylation of exon 5, and the consequent reduction in self-assembly, seem to reduce the calcium binding capacity of AMBN suggesting that post-translational modification of AMBN also can be involved in control of free Ca2+ during enamel extra cellular matrix biomineralization. Finally, it is speculated that phosphorylation can provide a functional crossroad for AMBN either to be phosphorylated and act as monomeric signal molecule during early odontogenesis and bone formation, or escape phosphorylation to be subsequently secreted as supramolecular assemblies that partake in enamel matrix structure and mineralization.

  16. Activating PER repressor through a DBT-directed phosphorylation switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Kivimäe

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in the generation of circadian rhythms, regulating the stability, activity, and subcellular localization of certain proteins that constitute the biological clock. This study examines the role of the protein kinase Doubletime (DBT, a Drosophila ortholog of human casein kinase I (CKIepsilon/delta. An enzymatically active DBT protein is shown to directly phosphorylate the Drosophila clock protein Period (PER. DBT-dependent phosphorylation sites are identified within PER, and their functional significance is assessed in a cultured cell system and in vivo. The per(S mutation, which is associated with short-period (19-h circadian rhythms, alters a key phosphorylation target within PER. Inspection of this and neighboring sequence variants indicates that several DBT-directed phosphorylations regulate PER activity in an integrated fashion: Alternative phosphorylations of two adjoining sequence motifs appear to be associated with switch-like changes in PER stability and repressor function.

  17. Chemical Approaches to Studying Labile Amino Acid Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmelstein, Alan M; Moreno, Javier; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is the archetypal posttranslational modification of proteins. While phosphorylation of these residues has become standard textbook knowledge, phosphorylation of other amino acid side chains is underappreciated and minimally characterized by comparison. This disparity is rooted in the relative instability of these chemically distinct amino acid side chain moieties, namely phosphoramidates, acyl phosphates, thiophosphates, and phosphoanhydrides. In the case of the O-phosphorylated amino acids, synthetic constructs were critical to assessing their stability and developing tools for their study. As the chemical biology community has become more aware of these alternative phosphorylation sites, methodology has been developed for the synthesis of well-characterized standards and close mimics of these phosphorylated amino acids as well. In this article, we review the synthetic chemistry that is a prerequisite to progress in this field.

  18. The short-term response of Arabidopsis thaliana (C3) and Zea mays (C4) chloroplasts to red and far red light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienkiewicz, Maksymilian; Drożak, Anna; Wasilewska, Wioleta; Bacławska, Ilona; Przedpełska-Wąsowicz, Ewa; Romanowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    Light quality has various effects on photochemistry and protein phosphorylation in Zea mays and Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoids due to different degrees of light penetration across leaves and redox status in chloroplasts. The effect of the spectral quality of light (red, R and far red, FR) on the function of thylakoid proteins in Zea mays and Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. It was concluded that red light stimulates PSII activity in A. thaliana thylakoids and in maize bundle sheath (BS) thylakoids, but not in mesophyll (M) thylakoids. The light quality did not change PSI activity in M thylakoids of maize. FR used after a white light period increased PSI activity significantly in maize BS and only slightly in A. thaliana thylakoids. As shown by blue native (BN)-PAGE followed by SDS-PAGE, proteins were differently phosphorylated in the thylakoids, indicating their different functions. FR light increased dephosphorylation of LHCII proteins in A. thaliana thylakoids, whereas in maize, dephosphorylation did not occur at all. The rate of phosphorylation was higher in maize BS than in M thylakoids. D1 protein phosphorylation increased in maize and decreased in A. thaliana upon irradiation with both R and growth light (white light, W). Light variations did not change the level of proteins in thylakoids. Our data strongly suggest that response to light quality is a species-dependent phenomenon. We concluded that the maize chloroplasts were differently stimulated, probably due to different degrees of light penetration across the leaf and thereby the redox status in the chloroplasts. These acclimation changes induced by light quality are important in the regulation of chloroplast membrane flexibility and thus its function.

  19. Aquaporin-2 Ser-261 phosphorylation is regulated in combination with Ser-256 and Ser-269 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Naofumi; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2017-01-22

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is a water channel in collecting duct principal cells in the kidney. Vasopressin catalyzes AQP2 phosphorylation at several serine sites in its C-terminus: Ser-256, Ser-261, and Ser-269. Upon stimulation by vasopressin, Ser-269 phosphorylation increases and Ser-261 phosphorylation decreases. Ser-256 phosphorylation is relatively constant. However, whether these types of phospho-regulation occur independently in distinct AQP2 populations or sequentially in the same AQP2 population is unclear. Especially, the manner of vasopressin-mediated Ser-261 phospho-regulation has been in controversy. In this study, we established phospho-specific AQP2 immunoprecipitation assays and investigated how pS256-positive AQP2 and pS269-positive AQP2 are catalyzed by forskolin or vasopressin, focusing on their Ser-261 phosphorylation status in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and in mice. In forskolin-treated MDCK cells, Ser-269 phosphorylation preceded Ser-261 dephosphorylation and Ser-256 phosphorylation was constant. In both MDCK cells and mouse kidney, phospho-specific immunoprecipitation revealed that the regulated Ser-269 phosphorylation occurred in the pS256-positive AQP2 population. Importantly, basal-state Ser-261 phosphorylation and its regulated dephosphorylation occurred in the pS256- and pS269-positive AQP2 population. These results provide the direct evidence that the Ser-261 dephosphorylation is involved in the pS256- and pS269-related AQP2 regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Androgen Receptor Exon 1 Mutation Causes Androgen Insensitivity by Creating Phosphorylation Site and Inhibiting Melanoma Antigen-A11 Activation of NH2- and Carboxyl-terminal Interaction-dependent Transactivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, William H.; Blackwelder, Amanda J.; Minges, John T.; Hnat, Andrew T.; French, Frank S.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH2- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH2-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif 433WHTLF437 required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero. PMID:22334658

  1. Androgen receptor exon 1 mutation causes androgen insensitivity by creating phosphorylation site and inhibiting melanoma antigen-A11 activation of NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction-dependent transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, William H; Blackwelder, Amanda J; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-30

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH(2)- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH(2)-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif (433)WHTLF(437) required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero.

  2. Phosphorylation of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grässer, F A; Göttel, S; Haiss, P

    1992-01-01

    A major in vivo phosphorylation site of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2) was found to be localized at the C-terminus of the protein. In vitro phosphorylation studies using casein kinase 1 (CK-1) and casein kinase 2 (CK-2) revealed that EBNA-2 is a substrate for CK-2, but not for CK......-1. The CK-2 specific phosphorylation site was localized in the 140 C-terminal amino acids using a recombinant trpE-C-terminal fusion protein. In a similar experiment, the 58 N-terminal amino acids expressed as a recombinant trpE-fusion protein were not phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of a synthetic...

  3. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy eSabila

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85-93% sequence identity between them. Loss of function mutant in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways.

  4. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabila, Mercy; Kundu, Nabanita; Smalls, Deana; Ullah, Hemayet

    2016-01-01

    Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85-93%) sequence identity among them. Loss of function mutation in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways.

  5. Global analysis of phosphorylation and ubiquitylation cross-talk in protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaney, Danielle L; Beltrao, Pedro; Starita, Lea; Guo, Ailan; Rush, John; Fields, Stanley; Krogan, Nevan J; Villén, Judit

    2013-07-01

    Cross-talk between different types of post-translational modifications on the same protein molecule adds specificity and combinatorial logic to signal processing, but it has not been characterized on a large-scale basis. We developed two methods to identify protein isoforms that are both phosphorylated and ubiquitylated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, identifying 466 proteins with 2,100 phosphorylation sites co-occurring with 2,189 ubiquitylation sites. We applied these methods quantitatively to identify phosphorylation sites that regulate protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our results demonstrate that distinct phosphorylation sites are often used in conjunction with ubiquitylation and that these sites are more highly conserved than the entire set of phosphorylation sites. Finally, we investigated how the phosphorylation machinery can be regulated by ubiquitylation. We found evidence for novel regulatory mechanisms of kinases and 14-3-3 scaffold proteins via proteasome-independent ubiquitylation.

  6. Absolute Phosphorylation Stoichiometry Analysis by Motif-Targeting Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Feng; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chen, Yu-Ju; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    Direct measurement of site-specific phosphorylation stoichiometry can unambiguously distinguish whether the degree of phosphorylation is regulated by upstream kinase/phosphatase activity or by transcriptional regulation to alter protein expression level. Here, we describe a motif-targeting quantitative proteomic approach that integrates dephosphorylation, isotope tag labeling, and enzymatic kinase reaction for large-scale phosphorylation stoichiometry measurement of the human proteome.

  7. Sequence- and structure-based prediction of eukaryotic proteinphosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Nikolaj; Gammeltoft, Steen; Brunak, Søren

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation at serine, threonine or tyrosine residues affects a multitude of cellular signaling processes. Howis specificity in substrate recognition and phosphorylation by protein kinases achieved? Here, we present an artificialneural network method that predicts phosphorylation site...

  8. The promoter of the nematode resistance gene Hs1pro-1 activates a nematode-responsive and feeding site-specific gene expression in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurau, Tim; Kifle, Sirak; Jung, Christian; Cai, Daguang

    2003-06-01

    The Hs1pro-1 gene confers resistance to the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) on the basis of a gene-for-gene relationship. RNA-gel blot analysis revealed that the transcript of Hs1pro-1 was present in uninfected roots of resistant beet at low levels but increased by about fourfold one day after nematode infection. Treatments of plants with external stimuli including salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid as well as wounding or salt stress did not result in changes in the gene transcription, indicating de novo transcription of Hs1pro-1 upon nematode infection specifically. To study transcriptional regulation of Hs1pro-1 expression at the cellular level, a 3082 bp genomic fragment representing the Hs1pro-1 promoter, isolated from the YAC-DNA housing the Hs1pro-1 gene, was fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene (1832prm1::GUS) and transformed into susceptible beet roots and Arabidopsis plants, respectively. Fluorometric and histochemical GUS assays on transgenic beet roots and Arabidopsis plants carrying the 1832prm1::GUS construct demonstrated that the Hs1pro-1 promoter is functional in both species and drives a nematode responsive and feeding site-specific GUS-expression. GUS activity was detected as early as at initiation of the nematode feeding sites and GUS staining was restricted to the nematode feeding sites. To delineate the regulatory domains of the Hs1pro-1 promoter, fusion genes with various 5' deletions of the Hs1pro-1 promoter and the GUS gene were constructed and analysed in transgenic beet roots as well. Cis elements responsible for feeding site-specific gene expression reside between -355 and +247 from the transcriptional initiation site of Hs1pro-1 whereas an enhancer region necessary for higher gene expression is located between -1199 and -705 of the promoter. The Hs1pro-1 promoter drives a nematode feeding site-specific GUS expression in both sugar beet and Arabidopsis

  9. Histone phosphorylation: a chromatin modification involved in diverse nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes.

  10. Lagging adaptation to warming climate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Amity M; Cooper, Martha D; Korves, Tonia M; Schmitt, Johanna

    2014-06-03

    If climate change outpaces the rate of adaptive evolution within a site, populations previously well adapted to local conditions may decline or disappear, and banked seeds from those populations will be unsuitable for restoring them. However, if such adaptational lag has occurred, immigrants from historically warmer climates will outperform natives and may provide genetic potential for evolutionary rescue. We tested for lagging adaptation to warming climate using banked seeds of the annual weed Arabidopsis thaliana in common garden experiments in four sites across the species' native European range: Valencia, Spain; Norwich, United Kingdom; Halle, Germany; and Oulu, Finland. Genotypes originating from geographic regions near the planting site had high relative fitness in each site, direct evidence for broad-scale geographic adaptation in this model species. However, genotypes originating in sites historically warmer than the planting site had higher average relative fitness than local genotypes in every site, especially at the northern range limit in Finland. This result suggests that local adaptive optima have shifted rapidly with recent warming across the species' native range. Climatic optima also differed among seasonal germination cohorts within the Norwich site, suggesting that populations occurring where summer germination is common may have greater evolutionary potential to persist under future warming. If adaptational lag has occurred over just a few decades in banked seeds of an annual species, it may be an important consideration for managing longer-lived species, as well as for attempts to conserve threatened populations through ex situ preservation.

  11. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Huguenin-Dezot

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages.

  12. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  13. Phosphorylation of connexin43 on serine 306 regulates electrical coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Procida, Kristina; Jørgensen, Lone; Schmitt, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phosphorylation is a key regulatory event in controlling the function of the cardiac gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43). Three new phosphorylation sites (S296, S297, S306) have been identified on Cx43; two of these sites (S297 and S306) are dephosphorylated during ischemia....... The functional significance of these new sites is currently unknown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of S296, S297, and S306 in the regulation of electrical intercellular communication. METHODS: To mimic constitutive dephosphorylation, serine was mutated to alanine at the three sites...... and expressed in HeLa cells. Electrical coupling and single channel measurements were performed by double patch clamp. Protein expression levels were assayed by western blotting, localization of Cx43, and phosphorylation of S306 by immunolabeling. Free hemichannels were assessed by biotinylation. RESULTS...

  14. Prediction of cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel J Chang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation, mediated by a family of enzymes called cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks, plays a central role in the cell-division cycle of eukaryotes. Phosphorylation by Cdks directs the cell cycle by modifying the function of regulators of key processes such as DNA replication and mitotic progression. Here, we present a novel computational procedure to predict substrates of the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 (Cdk1 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Currently, most computational phosphorylation site prediction procedures focus solely on local sequence characteristics. In the present procedure, we model Cdk substrates based on both local and global characteristics of the substrates. Thus, we define the local sequence motifs that represent the Cdc28 phosphorylation sites and subsequently model clustering of these motifs within the protein sequences. This restraint reflects the observation that many known Cdk substrates contain multiple clustered phosphorylation sites. The present strategy defines a subset of the proteome that is highly enriched for Cdk substrates, as validated by comparing it to a set of bona fide, published, experimentally characterized Cdk substrates which was to our knowledge, comprehensive at the time of writing. To corroborate our model, we compared its predictions with three experimentally independent Cdk proteomic datasets and found significant overlap. Finally, we directly detected in vivo phosphorylation at Cdk motifs for selected putative substrates using mass spectrometry.

  15. Biochemical and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase from Entamoeba histolytica, which possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a unicellular eukaryote that possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways. In the present study, we described enzymological and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) from E. histolytica. E. histolytica PSAT (EhPSAT) showed maximum activity for the forward reaction at basic pH, dissimilar to mammalian PSAT, which showed sharp neutral optimum pH. EhPSAT activity was significantly inhibited by substrate analogs, O-phospho-d-serine, O-phospho-l-threonine, and O-acetylserine, suggesting possible regulation of the amoebic PSAT by these metabolic intermediates. Fractionation of the whole parasite lysate and rEhPSAT by anion exchange chromatography verified that EhPSAT represents a dominant PSAT activity. EhPSAT showed a close kinship to PSAT from bacteroides based on amino acid alignment and phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that E. histolytica gained this gene from bacteroides by lateral gene transfer. Comparisons of kinetic properties of recombinant PSAT from E. histolytica and Arabidopsis thaliana showed that EhPSAT possesses significantly higher affinity toward glutamate than the A. thaliana counterpart, which may be explained by significant differences in the isoelectric point and the substitution of arginine, which is involved the binding to the gamma-carboxylate moiety of glutamate, in Escherichia coli PSAT, to serine or threonine in E. histolytica or A. thaliana PSAT, respectively. Heterologous expression of EhPSAT successfully rescued growth defect of a serine-auxotrophic E. coli strain KL282, where serC was deleted, confirming its in vivo role in serine biosynthesis. Together with our previous demonstration of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the present study reinforces physiological significance of the phosphorylated pathway in amoeba.

  16. Cytochrome C is tyrosine 97 phosphorylated by neuroprotective insulin treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Sanderson

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in isolation techniques for cytochrome c (Cytc have allowed us to discover post-translational modifications of this protein. We previously identified two distinct tyrosine phosphorylated residues on Cytc in mammalian liver and heart that alter its electron transfer kinetics and the ability to induce apoptosis. Here we investigated the phosphorylation status of Cytc in ischemic brain and sought to determine if insulin-induced neuroprotection and inhibition of Cytc release was associated with phosphorylation of Cytc. Using an animal model of global brain ischemia, we found a ∼50% decrease in neuronal death in the CA1 hippocampal region with post-ischemic insulin administration. This insulin-mediated increase in neuronal survival was associated with inhibition of Cytc release at 24 hours of reperfusion. To investigate possible changes in the phosphorylation state of Cytc we first isolated the protein from ischemic pig brain and brain that was treated with insulin. Ischemic brains demonstrated no detectable tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast Cytc isolated from brains treated with insulin showed robust phosphorylation of Cytc, and the phosphorylation site was unambiguously identified as Tyr97 by immobilized metal affinity chromatography/nano-liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We next confirmed these results in rats by in vivo application of insulin in the absence or presence of global brain ischemia and determined that Cytc Tyr97-phosphorylation is strongly induced under both conditions but cannot be detected in untreated controls. These data suggest a mechanism whereby Cytc is targeted for phosphorylation by insulin signaling, which may prevent its release from the mitochondria and the induction of apoptosis.

  17. Phosphorylation-mediated Regulatory Networks in Mycelia of Pyricularia oryzae Revealed by Phosphoproteomic Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Jin; Peng, Junbo; Li, Qing X; Peng, You-Liang

    2017-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is known to regulate pathogenesis, mycelial growth, conidiation and stress response in Pyricularia oryzae However, phosphorylation mediated regulatory networks in the fungal pathogen remain largely to be uncovered. In this study, we identified 1621 phosphorylation sites of 799 proteins in mycelia of P. oryzae, including 899 new p-sites of 536 proteins and 47 new p-sites of 31 pathogenicity-related proteins. From the sequences flanking the phosphorylation sites, 19 conserved phosphorylation motifs were identified. Notably, phosphorylation was detected in 7 proteins that function upstream of Pmk1, but not in Pmk1 and its downstream Mst12 and Sfl1 that have been known to regulate appressorium formation and infection hyphal growth of P. oryzae Interestingly, phosphorylation was detected at the site Ser(240) of Pmp1, which is a putative protein phosphatase highly conserved in filamentous fungi but not characterized. We thus generated Δpmp1 deletion mutants and dominant allele PMP1(S240D) mutants. Phenotyping analyses indicated that Pmp1 is required for virulence, conidiation and mycelial growth. Further, we observed that phosphorylation level of Pmk1 in mycelia was significantly increased in the Δpmp1 mutant, but decreased in the PMP1(S240D) mutant in comparison with the wild type, demonstrating that Pmp1 phosphorylated at Ser(240) is important for regulating phosphorylation of Pmk1. To our surprise, phosphorylation of Mps1, another MAP kinase required for cell wall integrity and appressorium formation of P. oryzae, was also significantly enhanced in the Δpmp1 mutant, but decreased in the PMP1(S240D) mutant. In addition, we found that Pmp1 directly interacts with Mps1 and the region AA180-230 of Pmp1 is required for the interaction. In summary, this study sheds new lights on the protein phosphorylation mediated regulatory networks in P. oryzae. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Identification of a histidine acid phosphatase (phyA)-like gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, E J; Ullah, A H

    1998-10-09

    A close examination of the protein sequence encoded by the Arabidopsis thaliana gene F21M12.26 reveals the gene product to be a phosphomonoesterase, acid optimum (EC 3.1.3.2). A subclass of this broad acid phosphatase is also known as 'histidine acid phosphatase. ' This is the first sequence-based evidence for a 'histidine acid phosphatase' in a dicotyledon. One important member of this class of enzymes is Aspergillus niger (ficuum) phytase, which came into prominence for its commercial application as a feed additive. The putative protein from A. thaliana gene F21M12.26 shares many important features of Aspergillus phytase, namely, size, active-site sequence, catalytic dipeptide and ten cysteine residues located in the key areas of the molecule, but lacks all nine N-glycosylation sites. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  19. A novel post-translational modification in nerve terminals: O-linked N-acetylglucosamine phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Mark E; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Bache, Nicolai

    2011-01-01

    purified from rat brain contains a phosphorylated O-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc-P) within a highly conserved sequence. O-GlcNAc or O-GlcNAc-P, but not phosphorylation alone, was found at Thr-310. Analysis of synthetic GlcNAc-6-P produced identical fragmentation products to GlcNAc-P from AP180. Direct O-linkage of Glc......NAc-P to a Thr residue was confirmed by electron transfer dissociation MS. A second AP180 tryptic peptide was also glycosyl phosphorylated, but the site of modification was not assigned. Sequence similarities suggest there may be a common motif within AP180 involving glycosyl phosphorylation and dual flanking...... phosphorylation sites within 4 amino acid residues. This novel type of protein glycosyl phosphorylation adds a new signaling mechanism to the regulation of neurotransmission and more complexity to the study of O-GlcNAc modification....

  20. The pattern of polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We resequenced 876 short fragments in a sample of 96 individuals of Arabidopsis thaliana that included stock center accessions as well as a hierarchical sample from natural populations. Although A. thaliana is a selfing weed, the pattern of polymorphism in general agrees with what is expected for a widely distributed, sexually reproducing species. Linkage disequilibrium decays rapidly, within 50 kb. Variation is shared worldwide, although population structure and isolation by distance are evident. The data fail to fit standard neutral models in several ways. There is a genome-wide excess of rare alleles, at least partially due to selection. There is too much variation between genomic regions in the level of polymorphism. The local level of polymorphism is negatively correlated with gene density and positively correlated with segmental duplications. Because the data do not fit theoretical null distributions, attempts to infer natural selection from polymorphism data will require genome-wide surveys of polymorphism in order to identify anomalous regions. Despite this, our data support the utility of A. thaliana as a model for evolutionary functional genomics.

  1. Multisite phosphorylation networks as signal processors for Cdk1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõivomägi, Mardo; Ord, Mihkel; Iofik, Anna; Valk, Ervin; Venta, Rainis; Faustova, Ilona; Kivi, Rait; Balog, Eva Rose M; Rubin, Seth M; Loog, Mart

    2013-12-01

    The order and timing of cell-cycle events is controlled by changing substrate specificity and different activity thresholds of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). However, it is not understood how a single protein kinase can trigger hundreds of switches in a sufficiently time-resolved fashion. We show that cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1-dependent phosphorylation of multisite targets in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controlled by key substrate parameters including distances between phosphorylation sites, distribution of serines and threonines as phosphoacceptors and positioning of cyclin-docking motifs. The component mediating the key interactions in this process is Cks1, the phosphoadaptor subunit of the cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1 complex. We propose that variation of these parameters within networks of phosphorylation sites in different targets provides a wide range of possibilities for differential amplification of Cdk1 signals, thus providing a mechanism to generate a wide range of thresholds in the cell cycle.

  2. CDK8 Kinase Phosphorylates Transcription Factor STAT1 to Selectively Regulate the Interferon Response

    OpenAIRE

    Bancerek, Joanna; Poss, Zachary C.; Steinparzer, Iris; Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Pfaffenwimmer, Thaddäus; Mikulic, Ivana; Dölken, Lars; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Kovarik, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Gene regulation by cytokine-activated transcription factors of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family requires serine phosphorylation within the transactivation domain (TAD). STAT1 and STAT3 TAD phosphorylation occurs upon promoter binding by an unknown kinase. Here, we show that the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module of the Mediator complex phosphorylated regulatory sites within the TADs of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, including S727 within the STAT1 TAD ...

  3. The effect of phosphorylation on arrestin-rhodopsin interaction in the squid visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kelly A; Ou, Wei-Lin; Guan, Xinyu; Sugamori, Kim S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhishek; Ernst, Oliver P; Mitchell, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Invertebrate visual opsins are G protein-coupled receptors coupled to retinoid chromophores that isomerize reversibly between inactive rhodopsin and active metarhodopsin upon absorption of photons of light. The squid visual system has an arrestin protein that binds to metarhodopsin to block signaling to Gq and activation of phospholipase C. Squid rhodopsin kinase (SQRK) can phosphorylate both metarhodopsin and arrestin, a dual role that is unique among the G protein-coupled receptor kinases. The sites and role of arrestin phosphorylation by SQRK were investigated here using recombinant proteins. Arrestin was phosphorylated on serine 392 and serine 397 in the C-terminus. Unphosphorylated arrestin bound to metarhodopsin and phosphorylated metarhodopsin with similar high affinities (Kd 33 and 21 nM respectively), while phosphorylation of arrestin reduced the affinity 3- to 5-fold (Kd 104 nM). Phosphorylation of metarhodopsin slightly increased the dissociation of arrestin observed during a 1 hour incubation. Together these studies suggest a unique role for SQRK in phosphorylating both receptor and arrestin and inhibiting the binding of these two proteins in the squid visual system. Invertebrate visual systems are inactivated by arrestin binding to metarhodopsin that does not require receptor phosphorylation. Here we show that squid rhodopsin kinase phosphorylates arrestin on two serines (S392,S397) in the C-terminus and phosphorylation decreases the affinity of arrestin for squid metarhodopsin. Metarhodopsin phosphorylation has very little effect on arrestin binding but does increase arrestin dissociation. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Expression of Cucumber mosaic virus suppressor 2b alters FWA methylation and its siRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Hamera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV suppressor 2b co-localizes with AGO4 in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions of Arabidopsis thaliana. Biochemical fractionation of A. thaliana cellular extracts revealed that 2b and AGO4 coexist in multiple size exclusions. 2b transgenic A. thaliana exhibited an enhanced accumulation of 24nt siRNAs from flowering wageningen (FWA and other heterochromatic loci. These plants also exhibited hypo-methylation of an endogenous- as well as transgene-FWA promoter at non-CG sites. In corroboration, both transgenic 2b and CMV infection affected the regulation of transposons which mimics the ago4 phenotype. In conclusion, 2b perturbs plant defense by interfering with AGO4-regulated transcriptional gene silencing.

  5. Cellular Functions Regulated by Phosphorylation of EGFR on Tyr845

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Sato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Src gene product (Src and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR are prototypes of oncogene products and function primarily as a cytoplasmic non-receptor tyrosine kinase and a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, respectively. The identification of Src and EGFR, and the subsequent extensive investigations of these proteins have long provided cutting edge research in cancer and other molecular and cellular biological studies. In 1995, we reported that the human epidermoid carcinoma cells, A431, contain a small fraction of Src and EGFR in which these two kinase were in physical association with each other, and that Src phosphorylates EGFR on tyrosine 845 (Y845 in the Src-EGFR complex. Y845 of EGFR is located in the activation segment of the kinase domain, where many protein kinases contain kinase-activating autophosphorylation sites (e.g., cAMP-dependent protein kinase, Src family kinases, transmembrane receptor type tyrosine kinases or trans-phosphorylation sites (e.g., cyclin-dependent protein kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Akt protein kinase. A number of studies have demonstrated that Y845 phosphorylation serves an important role in cancer as well as normal cells. Here we compile the experimental facts involving Src phosphorylation of EGFR on Y845, by which cell proliferation, cell cycle control, mitochondrial regulation of cell metabolism, gamete activation and other cellular functions are regulated. We also discuss the physiological relevance, as well as structural insights of the Y845 phosphorylation.

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana dehydroascorbate reductase 2: Conformational flexibility during catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodra, Nandita; Young, David; Astolfi Rosado, Leonardo; Pallo, Anna; Wahni, Khadija; de Proft, Frank; Huang, Jingjing; van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2017-02-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate and plays a direct role in regenerating ascorbic acid, an essential plant antioxidant vital for defense against oxidative stress. DHAR enzymes bear close structural homology to the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily of enzymes and contain the same active site motif, but most GSTs do not exhibit DHAR activity. The presence of a cysteine at the active site is essential for the catalytic functioning of DHAR, as mutation of this cysteine abolishes the activity. Here we present the crystal structure of DHAR2 from Arabidopsis thaliana with GSH bound to the catalytic cysteine. This structure reveals localized conformational differences around the active site which distinguishes the GSH-bound DHAR2 structure from that of DHAR1. We also unraveled the enzymatic step in which DHAR releases oxidized glutathione (GSSG). To consolidate our structural and kinetic findings, we investigated potential conformational flexibility in DHAR2 by normal mode analysis and found that subdomain mobility could be linked to GSH binding or GSSG release.

  7. Tousled-like kinases phosphorylate Asf1 to promote histone supply during DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamalyukova, Ilnaz M; Young, Clifford; Strømme, Caroline B

    2014-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes are rapidly assembled on newly synthesized DNA to restore chromatin organization. Asf1, a key histone H3-H4 chaperone required for this process, is phosphorylated by Tousled-like kinases (TLKs). Here, we identify TLK phosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry...

  8. KIF5C S176 Phosphorylation Regulates Microtubule Binding and Transport Efficiency in Mammalian Neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padzik, Artur; Deshpande, Prasannakumar; Hollos, Patrik; Franker, Mariella; Rannikko, Emmy H; Cai, Dawen; Prus, Piotr; Mågård, Mats; Westerlund, Nina; Verhey, Kristen J; James, Peter; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Coffey, Eleanor T

    2016-01-01

    Increased phosphorylation of the KIF5 anterograde motor is associated with impaired axonal transport and neurodegeneration, but paradoxically also with normal transport, though the details are not fully defined. JNK phosphorylates KIF5C on S176 in the motor domain; a site that we show is

  9. Distinct phosphorylation events regulate p130- and p107-mediated repression of E2F-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, Thomas; Hansen, Klaus; Holm, Karin

    2002-01-01

    The "pocket proteins" pRb (retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein), p107, and p130 regulate cell proliferation via phosphorylation-sensitive interactions with E2F transcription factors and other proteins. We previously identified 22 in vivo phosphorylation sites in human p130, including three...

  10. Mapping and Dynamics of Regulatory DNA and Transcription Factor Networks in A. thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Sullivan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of gene regulation in plants is constrained by our limited knowledge of plant cis-regulatory DNA and its dynamics. We mapped DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs in A. thaliana seedlings and used genomic footprinting to delineate ∼700,000 sites of in vivo transcription factor (TF occupancy at nucleotide resolution. We show that variation associated with 72 diverse quantitative phenotypes localizes within DHSs. TF footprints encode an extensive cis-regulatory lexicon subject to recent evolutionary pressures, and widespread TF binding within exons may have shaped codon usage patterns. The architecture of A. thaliana TF regulatory networks is strikingly similar to that of animals in spite of diverged regulatory repertoires. We analyzed regulatory landscape dynamics during heat shock and photomorphogenesis, disclosing thousands of environmentally sensitive elements and enabling mapping of key TF regulatory circuits underlying these fundamental responses. Our results provide an extensive resource for the study of A. thaliana gene regulation and functional biology.

  11. Determination of the starch-phosphorylating enzyme activity in plant extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritte, G.; Steup, M.; Kossmann, J.

    2003-01-01

    incorporation of phosphate whereas extracts from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber expressing a GWD antisense construct exhibited less activity than the wild-type control. To our knowledge this is the first time that a quantification of the starch-phosphorylating activity has been achieved in plant crude......For quantification of alpha-glucan, water dikinase(GWD) activity in crude extracts of plant tissues a radio-labeling assay was established that uses soluble starch and P-33-labeled ATP as phosphate acceptor and donor, respectively. A constant rate of starch labeling was observed only if the ATP...... applied was labeled at the beta position. In wild-type extracts from leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. the maximum rate of starch phosphorylation was approximately 27 pmol min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Leaf extracts from the GWD-deficient sex1 mutants of Arabidopsis showed no significant...

  12. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat...

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation in human lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haralambieva, E; Jones, M.; Roncador, GM; Cerroni, L; Lamant, L; Ott, G; Rosenwald, A; Sherman, C; Thorner, P; Kusec, R; Wood, KM; Campo, E; Falini, B; Ramsay, A; Marafioti, T; Stein, H; Kluin, PM; Pulford, K; Mason, DY

    2002-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the high level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation present in lymphomas containing an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) can be demonstrated in routinely processed paraffin tissue sections using immunolabelling techniques. In the present study we investigated

  14. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  15. Biocatalytic asymmetric phosphorylation of mevalonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumi, R.; Hellriegel, C.; Schoenenberger, B.; Milesi, T.; Oost, van der J.; Wohlgemuth, R.

    2014-01-01

    The excellent selectivity of the mevalonate kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of mevalonate simplifies lengthy multi-step routes to (R)-mevalonate-5-phosphate to a one-step biocatalytic reaction, because the phosphate group can be transferred directly and without any additional reaction steps

  16. Insulin Induces Phosphorylation of Serine Residues of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in 293T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeehye Maeng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Insulin induces the activation of Na,K-ATPase while translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP inhibits this enzyme and the associated pump activity. Because binding of insulin with its membrane receptor is known to mediate the phosphorylation of multiple intracellular proteins, phosphorylation of TCTP by insulin might be related to the sodium pump regulation. We therefore examined whether insulin induces TCTP phosphorylation in embryonic kidney 293T cells. Using immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, we found that insulin phosphorylates serine (Ser residues of TCTP. Following fractionation of the insulin-treated cells into cytosol and membrane fractions, phosphorylated TCTP at its Ser residue (p-Ser-TCTP was detected exclusively in the cytosolic part and not in the membrane fraction. Phosphorylation of TCTP reached maximum in about 10 min after insulin treatment in 293T cells. In studies of cell-type specificity of insulin-mediated phosphorylation of TCTP, insulin did not phosphorylate TCTP in HeLa cells. Computational prediction and immunoprecipitation using several constructs having Ser to Ala mutation at potential p-Ser sites of TCTP revealed that insulin phosphorylated the serine-9 and -15 residues of TCTP. Elucidations of how insulin-mediated TCTP phosphorylation promotes Na,K-ATPase activation, may offer potential therapeutic approaches to diseases associated with vascular activity and sodium pump dysregulation.

  17. Structural insights into the recruitment of SMRT by the corepressor SHARP under phosphorylative regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Takizawa, Naoki; Kobayashi, Ayaho; Maesaki, Ryoko; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2014-01-07

    The transcriptional corepressors SMRT/NCoR, components of histone deacetylase complexes, interact with nuclear receptors and many other transcription factors. SMRT is a target for the ubiquitously expressed protein kinase CK2, which is known to phosphorylate a wide variety of substrates. Increasing evidence suggests that CK2 plays a regulatory role in many cellular events, particularly, in transcription. However, little is known about the precise mode of action involved. Here, we report the three-dimensional structure of a SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) in complex with phosphorylated SMRT, as determined by solution NMR. Phosphorylation of the CK2 site on SMRT significantly increased affinity for SHARP. We also confirmed the significance of CK2 phosphorylation by reporter assay and propose a mechanism involving the process of phosphorylation acting as a molecular switch. Finally, we propose that the SPOC domain functions as a phosphorylation binding module. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-occurring protein phosphorylation are functionally associated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications (PTMs add a further layer of complexity to the proteome and regulate a wide range of cellular protein functions. With the increasing number of known PTM sites, it becomes imperative to understand their functional interplays. In this study, we proposed a novel analytical strategy to explore functional relationships between PTM sites by testing their tendency to be modified together (co-occurrence under the same condition, and applied it to proteome-wide human phosphorylation data collected under 88 different laboratory or physiological conditions. Co-occurring phosphorylation occurs significantly more frequently than randomly expected and include many known examples of cross-talk or functional connections. Such pairs, either within the same phosphoprotein or between interacting partners, are more likely to be in sequence or structural proximity, be phosphorylated by the same kinases, participate in similar biological processes, and show residue co-evolution across vertebrates. In addition, we also found that their co-occurrence states tend to be conserved in orthologous phosphosites in the mouse proteome. Together, our results support that the co-occurring phosphorylation are functionally associated. Comparison with existing methods further suggests that co-occurrence analysis can be a useful complement to uncover novel functional associations between PTM sites.

  19. The Arabidopsis thaliana Cyclic-Nucleotide-Dependent Response – a Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Alqurashi, May M.

    2013-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation governs many regulatory pathways and an increasing number of kinases, proteins that transfer phosphate groups, are in turn activated by cyclic nucleotides. One of the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), has been shown to be a second messenger in abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the precise role of cAMP in plants and in the down-stream activation of kinases, and hence cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. To increase our understanding of the role of cAMP, proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension culture cells were analyzed before and after treatment of cells with two different concentrations of 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 µM and 100 nM) and over a time-course of one hour. A comparative quantitative analysis was undertaken using two- dimensional gel electrophoresis and the Delta 2D software (DECODON) followed by protein spot identification by tandem mass spectrometry combined with Mascot and Scaffold. Differentially expressed proteins and regulated phosphoproteins were categorized according to their biological function using bioinformatics tools. The results revealed that the treatment with 1 µM and 100 nM 8-Bromo-cAMP was sufficient to induce specific concentration- and time-dependent changes at the proteome and phosphoproteome levels. In particular, different phosphorylation patterns were observed overtime preferentially affecting proteins in a number of functional categories, notably phosphatases, proteins that remove phosphate groups. This suggests that cAMP both transiently activates and deactivates proteins through specific phosphorylation events and provides new insight into biological mechanisms and functions at the systems level.

  20. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylation-coupled Saccharide Transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Cao; X Jin; E Levin; H Huang; Y Zong; W Hendrickson; J Javitch; K Rajashankar; M Zhou; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Saccharides have a central role in the nutrition of all living organisms. Whereas several saccharide uptake systems are shared between the different phylogenetic kingdoms, the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system exists almost exclusively in bacteria. This multi-component system includes an integral membrane protein EIIC that transports saccharides and assists in their phosphorylation. Here we present the crystal structure of an EIIC from Bacillus cereus that transports diacetylchitobiose. The EIIC is a homodimer, with an expansive interface formed between the amino-terminal halves of the two protomers. The carboxy-terminal half of each protomer has a large binding pocket that contains a diacetylchitobiose, which is occluded from both sides of the membrane with its site of phosphorylation near the conserved His250 and Glu334 residues. The structure shows the architecture of this important class of transporters, identifies the determinants of substrate binding and phosphorylation, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of sugar translocation.

  1. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes between Brassica species and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingyin; Tehrim, Sadia; Zhang, Fengqi; Tong, Chaobo; Huang, Junyan; Cheng, Xiaohui; Dong, Caihua; Zhou, Yanqiu; Qin, Rui; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi

    2014-01-03

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes with the nucleotide binding site (NBS) play an important role in offering resistance to pathogens. The availability of complete genome sequences of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa provides an important opportunity for researchers to identify and characterize NBS-encoding R genes in Brassica species and to compare with analogues in Arabidopsis thaliana based on a comparative genomics approach. However, little is known about the evolutionary fate of NBS-encoding genes in the Brassica lineage after split from A. thaliana. Here we present genome-wide analysis of NBS-encoding genes in B. oleracea, B. rapa and A. thaliana. Through the employment of HMM search and manual curation, we identified 157, 206 and 167 NBS-encoding genes in B. oleracea, B. rapa and A. thaliana genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis among 3 species classified NBS-encoding genes into 6 subgroups. Tandem duplication and whole genome triplication (WGT) analyses revealed that after WGT of the Brassica ancestor, NBS-encoding homologous gene pairs on triplicated regions in Brassica ancestor were deleted or lost quickly, but NBS-encoding genes in Brassica species experienced species-specific gene amplification by tandem duplication after divergence of B. rapa and B. oleracea. Expression profiling of NBS-encoding orthologous gene pairs indicated the differential expression pattern of retained orthologous gene copies in B. oleracea and B. rapa. Furthermore, evolutionary analysis of CNL type NBS-encoding orthologous gene pairs among 3 species suggested that orthologous genes in B. rapa species have undergone stronger negative selection than those in B .oleracea species. But for TNL type, there are no significant differences in the orthologous gene pairs between the two species. This study is first identification and characterization of NBS-encoding genes in B. rapa and B. oleracea based on whole genome sequences. Through tandem duplication and whole genome

  2. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H. [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiao, Jing [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); You, Jianxin, E-mail: jianyou@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  3. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Diaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  4. Monitoring the native phosphorylation state of plasma membrane proteins from a single mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal processing in the cerebellum involves the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of various plasma membrane proteins such as AMPA or NMDA receptors. Despite the importance of changes in phosphorylation pattern, no global phospho-proteome analysis has yet been performed. As plasma membrane...... proteins are major targets of the signalling cascades, we developed a protocol to monitor their phosphorylation state starting from a single mouse cerebellum. An aqueous polymer two-phase system was used to enrich for plasma membrane proteins. Subsequently, calcium phosphate precipitation, immobilized...... with a confidence level of 99% or higher. 41.4% of the identified proteins were allocated to the plasma membrane and about half of the phosphorylation sites have not been reported previously. A bioinformatic screen for 12 consensus sequences identified putative kinases for 642 phosphorylation sites. In summary...

  5. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas James Thestrup

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that multiple proteins involved in key regulatory processes in mitochondria are phosphorylated in mammalian tissues. Insulin regulates glucose metabolism by phosphorylation-dependent signaling and has been shown to stimulate ATP synthesis in human skeletal muscle. Here......, we investigated the effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo. Using a combination of TiO2 phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC−MS/MS, we compared the phosphoproteomes of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle samples...... obtained from healthy individuals before and after 4 h of insulin infusion. In total, we identified 207 phosphorylation sites in 95 mitochondrial proteins. Of these phosphorylation sites, 45% were identified in both basal and insulin-stimulated samples. Insulin caused a 2-fold increase in the number...

  6. Quantitation of multisite EGF receptor phosphorylation using mass spectrometry and a novel normalization approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erba, Elisabetta Boeri; Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Using stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry, we performed a sensitive, quantitative analysis of multiple phosphorylation sites of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Phosphopeptide detection efficiency was significantly improved by using the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium...

  7. Discrimination between acid and alkali-labile phosphorylated residues on Immobilon: phosphorylation studies of nucleoside diphosphate kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, R M; Walz, K; Issinger, O G

    1996-01-01

    in buffers containing 5% methanol allows unambiguous distinction between serine/threonine and histidine phosphorylation (O-phosphomonoesters and phosphoramide, respectively) since under these conditions only one type of residue is dephosphorylated. The addition of 5% methanol to all buffers was indispensable...... to deplete phosphate from membranes incubated successively under acid and basic conditions. The technique was applied to the study of nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDP kinase) phosphorylation. In this enzyme, autophosphorylation of active site histidine is an accepted intermediate step in the catalytic...... of phosphoserine after strong acid hydrolysis of the histidine autophosphorylated enzyme is in fact a nonenzymatic transphosphorylation from phosphohistidine due to the harsh acid treatment. This methodology was also applied to in vivo phosphorylation studies of C. albicans NDP kinase. We believe...

  8. Symposia on Plant (Protein) Phosphorylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, de, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    From September 14-16, 2011 the twelfth symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was held in Tübingen, Germany. The topic is as broad as the name suggests and covers all aspects of this important means of protein modification in plants. I have had the pleasure of attending the 2007 and the 2011 symposia. The interesting concept behind these meetings is to hear about the same biochemical mechanism operative in a multitude of experimental systems. The meetings are quite informal and prese...

  9. Differential phosphorylation of perilipin 1A at the initiation of lipolysis revealed by novel monoclonal antibodies and high content analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M McDonough

    Full Text Available Lipolysis in adipocytes is regulated by phosphorylation of lipid droplet-associated proteins, including perilipin 1A and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL. Perilipin 1A is potentially phosphorylated by cAMP(adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA on several sites, including conserved C-terminal residues, serine 497 (PKA-site 5 and serine 522 (PKA-site 6. To characterize perilipin 1A phosphorylation, novel monoclonal antibodies were developed, which selectively recognize perilipin 1A phosphorylation at PKA-site 5 and PKA-site 6. Utilizing these novel antibodies, as well as antibodies selectively recognizing HSL phosphorylation at serine 563 or serine 660, we used high content analysis to examine the phosphorylation of perilipin 1A and HSL in adipocytes exposed to lipolytic agents. We found that perilipin PKA-site 5 and HSL-serine 660 were phosphorylated to a similar extent in response to forskolin (FSK and L-γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (L-γ-MSH. In contrast, perilipin PKA-site 6 and HSL-serine 563 were phosphorylated more slowly and L-γ-MSH was a stronger agonist for these sites compared to FSK. When a panel of lipolytic agents was tested, including multiple concentrations of isoproterenol, FSK, and L-γ-MSH, the pattern of results was virtually identical for perilipin PKA-site 5 and HSL-serine 660, whereas a distinct pattern was observed for perilipin PKA-site 6 and HSL-serine 563. Notably, perilipin PKA-site 5 and HSL-serine 660 feature two arginine residues upstream from the phospho-acceptor site, which confers high affinity for PKA, whereas perilipin PKA-site 6 and HSL-serine 563 feature only a single arginine. Thus, we suggest perilipin 1A and HSL are differentially phosphorylated in a similar manner at the initiation of lipolysis and arginine residues near the target serines may influence this process.

  10. Auxin activates the plasma membrane H+-ATPase by phosphorylation during hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Koji; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2012-06-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a major regulator of diverse aspects of plant growth and development. The ubiquitin-ligase complex SCF(TIR1/AFB) (for Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein), which includes the TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE1/AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX (TIR1/AFB) auxin receptor family, has recently been demonstrated to be critical for auxin-mediated transcriptional regulation. Early-phase auxin-induced hypocotyl elongation, on the other hand, has long been explained by the acid-growth theory, for which proton extrusion by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is a functional prerequisite. However, the mechanism by which auxin mediates H(+)-ATPase activation has yet to be elucidated. Here, we present direct evidence for H(+)-ATPase activation in etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by auxin through phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine during early-phase hypocotyl elongation. Application of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to endogenous auxin-depleted hypocotyl sections induced phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine of the H(+)-ATPase and increased H(+)-ATPase activity without altering the amount of the enzyme. Changes in both the phosphorylation level of H(+)-ATPase and IAA-induced elongation were similarly concentration dependent. Furthermore, IAA-induced H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation occurred in a tir1-1 afb2-3 double mutant, which is severely defective in auxin-mediated transcriptional regulation. In addition, α-(phenylethyl-2-one)-IAA, the auxin antagonist specific for the nuclear auxin receptor TIR1/AFBs, had no effect on IAA-induced H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation. These results suggest that the TIR1/AFB auxin receptor family is not involved in auxin-induced H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation. Our results define the activation mechanism of H(+)-ATPase by auxin during early-phase hypocotyl elongation; this is the long-sought-after mechanism that is central to the acid-growth theory.

  11. Phosphorylation statuses at different residues of lamin B2, B1, and A/C dynamically and independently change throughout the cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuga, Takahisa, E-mail: t-kuga@nibio.go.jp [Laboratory of Proteome Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Department of Molecular Diagnosis (F8), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Nozaki, Naohito [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 238-8580 (Japan); Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Nomura, Fumio [Department of Molecular Diagnosis (F8), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Tomonaga, Takeshi, E-mail: tomonaga@nibio.go.jp [Laboratory of Proteome Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Department of Molecular Diagnosis (F8), Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Lamins, major components of the nuclear lamina, undergo phosphorylation at multiple residues during cell cycle progression, but their detailed phosphorylation kinetics remain largely undetermined. Here, we examined changes in the phosphorylation of major phosphorylation residues (Thr14, Ser17, Ser385, Ser387, and Ser401) of lamin B2 and the homologous residues of lamin B1, A/C during the cell cycle using novel antibodies to the site-specific phosphorylation. The phosphorylation levels of these residues independently changed during the cell cycle. Thr14 and Ser17 were phosphorylated during G{sub 2}/M phase to anaphase/telophase. Ser385 was persistently phosphorylated during mitosis to G{sub 1} phase, whereas Ser387 was phosphorylated discontinuously in prophase and G{sub 1} phase. Ser401 phosphorylation was enhanced in the G{sub 1}/S boundary. Immunoprecipitation using the phospho-antibodies suggested that metaphase-phosphorylation at Thr14, Ser17, and Ser385 of lamins occurred simultaneously, whereas G{sub 1}-phase phosphorylation at Ser385 and Ser387 occurred in distinct pools or with different timings. Additionally, we showed that lamin B2 phosphorylated at Ser17, but not Ser385, Ser387 and Ser401, was exclusively non-ionic detergent soluble, depolymerized forms in growing cells, implicating specific involvement of Ser17 phosphorylation in lamin depolymerization and nuclear envelope breakdown. These results suggest that the phosphorylations at different residues of lamins might play specific roles throughout the cell cycle.

  12. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-06

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  13. The alphabet of galactolipids in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina eIbrahim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Galactolipids constitute the major lipid class in plants. In recent years oxygenated derivatives of galactolipids have been detected. They are discussed as signal molecules during leaf damage, since they accumulate in wounded leaves in high levels. Using different analytical methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance, infra-red spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS earlier reports focused on the analysis of either oxidized or non-oxidized species and needed high levels of analytes. Here, we report on the analysis of the galactolipid subfraction of the Arabidopsis leaf lipidome by an improved HPLC/MS2-based method that is fast, robust and comparatively simple in its performance. Due to a combination of phase partitioning, solid phase fractionation, liquid chromatography and MS2 experiments this method has high detection sensitivity and requires only low amounts of plant material. With this method 167 galactolipid species were detected in leaves of A. thaliana. Out of these 79 being newly described species. From all species the head group and acyl side chains were identified via MS2 experiments. Moreover, the structural identification was supported by HPLC/time-of-flight (TOF-MS and gas chromatography (GC/MS analysis. The quantification of different galactolipid species that accumulated 30 min after a mechanical wounding in A. thaliana leaves showed that the oxidized acyl side chains in galactolipids are divided into 65 % cyclopentenones, 27 % methyl-branched ketols, 3.8 % hydroperoxides/straight-chain ketols, 2.0 % hydroxides and 2.6 % phytoprostanes. In comparison to the free cyclopentenon derivatives, the esterifed forms occur in a 149-fold excess supporting the hypothesis that galactolipids might function as storage compounds for cyclopentenones. Additional analysis of the ratio of non-oxidized to oxidized galactolipid species in leaves of wounded plants was performed resulting in a ratio of 2.0 in

  14. Phosphorylation of rat aquaporin-4 at Ser(111) is not required for channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assentoft, Mette; Kaptan, Shreyas; Fenton, Robert A; Hua, Susan Z; de Groot, Bert L; MacAulay, Nanna

    2013-07-01

    Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is the predominant water channel in the mammalian brain and is mainly expressed in the perivascular glial endfeet at the brain-blood interface. AQP4 has been described as an important entry and exit site for water during formation of brain edema and regulation of AQP4 is therefore of therapeutic interest. Phosphorylation of some aquaporins has been proposed to regulate their water permeability via gating of the channel itself. Protein kinase (PK)-dependent phosphorylation of Ser(111) has been reported to increase the water permeability of AQP4 expressed in an astrocytic cell line. This possibility was, however, questioned based on the crystal structure of the human AQP4. Our study aimed to resolve if Ser(111) was indeed a site involved in phosphorylation-mediated gating of AQP4. The water permeability of AQP4-expressing Xenopus oocytes was not altered by a range of activators and inhibitors of PKG and PKA. Mutation of Ser(111) to alanine or aspartate (to prevent or mimic phosphorylation) did not change the water permeability of AQP4. PKG activation had no effect on the water permeability of AQP4 in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Molecular dynamics simulations of a phosphorylation of AQP4.Ser(111) recorded no phosphorylation-induced change in water permeability. A phospho-specific antibody, exclusively recognizing AQP4 when phosphorylated on Ser(111) , failed to detect phosphorylation in cell lysate of rat brain stimulated by conditions proposed to induce phosphorylation of this residue. Thus, our data indicate a lack of phosphorylation of Ser(111) and of phosphorylation-dependent gating of AQP4. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Post-translational Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Proteins in Response to Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Parrott, Brian

    2011-12-12

    The introduction of mass spectrometry techniques to the field of biology has made possible the exploration of the proteome as a whole system as opposed to prior techniques, such as anti-body based assays or yeast two-hybrid studies, which were strictly limited to the study of a few proteins at a time. This practice has allowed for a systems biology approach of exploring the proteome, with the possibility of viewing entire pathways over increments of time. In this study, the effect of treating Arabidopsis thaliana suspension culture cells with 3’,5’-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which is a native second messenger, was examined. Samples were collected at four time points and proteins were extracted and enriched for both oxidation and phosphorylation before analysis via mass spectrometry. Preliminary results suggest a tendency towards an increased number of phosphorylated proteins as a result of cGMP treatment. The data also showed a sharp increase in methionine oxidation in response to the treatment, occurring within the first ten minutes. This finding suggests that cGMP may utilize methionine oxidation as a mechanism of signal transduction. As such, this study corroborates a growing body of evidence supporting the inclusion of methionine oxidation in intracellular signaling pathways.

  16. Protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of the nuclear egress core complex of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Eric; Milbradt, Jens; Svrlanska, Adriana; Strojan, Hanife; Häge, Sigrun; Kraut, Alexandra; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Amin, Bushra; Sonnewald, Uwe; Couté, Yohann; Marschall, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear egress of herpesvirus capsids is mediated by a multi-component nuclear egress complex (NEC) assembled by a heterodimer of two essential viral core egress proteins. In the case of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this core NEC is defined by the interaction between the membrane-anchored pUL50 and its nuclear cofactor, pUL53. NEC protein phosphorylation is considered to be an important regulatory step, so this study focused on the respective role of viral and cellular protein kinases. Multiply phosphorylated pUL50 varieties were detected by Western blot and Phos-tag analyses as resulting from both viral and cellular kinase activities. In vitro kinase analyses demonstrated that pUL50 is a substrate of both PKCα and CDK1, while pUL53 can also be moderately phosphorylated by CDK1. The use of kinase inhibitors further illustrated the importance of distinct kinases for core NEC phosphorylation. Importantly, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses identified five major and nine minor sites of pUL50 phosphorylation. The functional relevance of core NEC phosphorylation was confirmed by various experimental settings, including kinase knock-down/knock-out and confocal imaging, in which it was found that (i) HCMV core NEC proteins are not phosphorylated solely by viral pUL97, but also by cellular kinases; (ii) both PKC and CDK1 phosphorylation are detectable for pUL50; (iii) no impact of PKC phosphorylation on NEC functionality has been identified so far; (iv) nonetheless, CDK1-specific phosphorylation appears to be required for functional core NEC interaction. In summary, our findings provide the first evidence that the HCMV core NEC is phosphorylated by cellular kinases, and that the complex pattern of NEC phosphorylation has functional relevance.

  17. Bacillus subtilis single-stranded DNA-binding protein SsbA is phosphorylated at threonine 38 by the serine/threonine kinase YabT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derouiche, Abderahmane; Petranovic, Dina; Macek, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins participate in all stages of DNA metabolism that involve single-stranded DNA, from replication, recombination, repair of DNA damage, to natural competence in species such as Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis single-stranded DNA...... phosphorylation of SsbA purified from B. subtilis cells. The detected phosphorylation site was assessed for its influence on DNA-binding in vitro, using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The ability of B. subtilis serine/threonine kinases to phosphorylate SsbA was assessed using in vitro phosphorylation...... assays.Results: In addition to the known tyrosine phosphorylation of SsbA on tyrosine 82, we identified a new phosphorylation site: threonine 38. The in vitro assays demonstrated that SsbA is preferentially phosphorylated by the B. subtilis Hanks-type kinase YabT, and phosphorylation of threonine 38...

  18. Quantifying Kinase-Specific Phosphorylation Stoichiometry Using Stable Isotope Labeling In a Reverse In-Gel Kinase Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiang; Cox, Jonathan T.; Huang, Weiliang; Kane, Maureen; Tang, Keqi; Bieberich, Charles J.

    2016-12-06

    Reversible protein phosphorylation regulates essentially all cellular activities. Aberrant protein phosphorylation is an etiological factor in a wide array of diseases, including cancer1, diabetes2, and Alzheimer’s3. Given the broad impact of protein phosphorylation on cellular biology and organismal health, understanding how protein phosphorylation is regulated and the consequences of gain and loss of phosphoryl moieties from proteins is of primary importance. Advances in instrumentation, particularly in mass spectrometry, coupled with high throughput approaches have recently yielded large datasets cataloging tens of thousands of protein phosphorylation sites in multiple organisms4-6. While these studies are seminal in term of data collection, our understanding of protein phosphorylation regulation remains largely one-dimensional.

  19. Protein Methionine Sulfoxide Dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana under Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Silke; Ghesquière, Bart; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Demol, Hans; Wahni, Khadija; Willems, Patrick; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide can modify proteins via direct oxidation of their sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Methionine oxidation, studied here, is a reversible posttranslational modification that is emerging as a mechanism by which proteins perceive oxidative stress and function in redox signaling. Identification of proteins with oxidized methionines is the first prerequisite toward understanding the functional effect of methionine oxidation on proteins and the biological processes in which they are involved. Here, we describe a proteome-wide study of in vivo protein-bound methionine oxidation in plants upon oxidative stress using Arabidopsis thaliana catalase 2 knock-out plants as a model system. We identified over 500 sites of oxidation in about 400 proteins and quantified the differences in oxidation between wild-type and catalase 2 knock-out plants. We show that the activity of two plant-specific glutathione S-transferases, GSTF9 and GSTT23, is significantly reduced upon oxidation. And, by sampling over time, we mapped the dynamics of methionine oxidation and gained new insights into this complex and dynamic landscape of a part of the plant proteome that is sculpted by oxidative stress. PMID:25693801

  20. Genome-wide analysis of mutations in mutant lineages selected following fast-neutron irradiation mutagenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Belfield, E.J.

    2012-04-12

    Ionizing radiation has long been known to induce heritable mutagenic change in DNA sequence. However, the genome-wide effect of radiation is not well understood. Here we report the molecular properties and frequency of mutations in phenotypically selected mutant lines isolated following exposure of the genetic model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana to fast neutrons (FNs). Previous studies suggested that FNs predominantly induce deletions longer than a kilobase in A. thaliana. However, we found a higher frequency of single base substitution than deletion mutations. While the overall frequency and molecular spectrum of fast-neutron (FN)-induced single base substitutions differed substantially from those of "background" mutations arising spontaneously in laboratory-grown plants, G:C>A:T transitions were favored in both. We found that FN-induced G:C>A:T transitions were concentrated at pyrimidine dinucleotide sites, suggesting that FNs promote the formation of mutational covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine residues. In addition, we found that FNs induced more single base than large deletions, and that these single base deletions were possibly caused by replication slippage. Our observations provide an initial picture of the genome-wide molecular profile of mutations induced in A. thaliana by FN irradiation and are particularly informative of the nature and extent of genome-wide mutation in lines selected on the basis of mutant phenotypes from FN-mutagenized A. thaliana populations.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of mutations in mutant lineages selected following fast-neutron irradiation mutagenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Eric J; Gan, Xiangchao; Mithani, Aziz; Brown, Carly; Jiang, Caifu; Franklin, Keara; Alvey, Elizabeth; Wibowo, Anjar; Jung, Marko; Bailey, Kit; Kalwani, Sharan; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Mott, Richard; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2012-07-01

    Ionizing radiation has long been known to induce heritable mutagenic change in DNA sequence. However, the genome-wide effect of radiation is not well understood. Here we report the molecular properties and frequency of mutations in phenotypically selected mutant lines isolated following exposure of the genetic model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana to fast neutrons (FNs). Previous studies suggested that FNs predominantly induce deletions longer than a kilobase in A. thaliana. However, we found a higher frequency of single base substitution than deletion mutations. While the overall frequency and molecular spectrum of fast-neutron (FN)-induced single base substitutions differed substantially from those of "background" mutations arising spontaneously in laboratory-grown plants, G:C>A:T transitions were favored in both. We found that FN-induced G:C>A:T transitions were concentrated at pyrimidine dinucleotide sites, suggesting that FNs promote the formation of mutational covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine residues. In addition, we found that FNs induced more single base than large deletions, and that these single base deletions were possibly caused by replication slippage. Our observations provide an initial picture of the genome-wide molecular profile of mutations induced in A. thaliana by FN irradiation and are particularly informative of the nature and extent of genome-wide mutation in lines selected on the basis of mutant phenotypes from FN-mutagenized A. thaliana populations.

  2. Phosphorylation of beta-catenin by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Qin, Yimin; Browning, Darren; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2006-04-14

    Beta-catenin is a signaling molecule that promotes cell proliferation by the induction of gene transcription through the activation of T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) transcription factors. The canonical mechanism of the regulation of beta-catenin involves its phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 at the Ser-45 site and by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) at the Thr-41, Ser-37, and Ser-33 sites. This phosphorylation targets beta-catenin to ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome system. Mitogenic factors promote beta-catenin signaling through the inhibition of GSK3, resulting in reduced beta-catenin phosphorylation, its stabilization, and subsequent accumulation in the nucleus, where it stimulates TCF/LEF-dependent gene transcription. In the present study, we have shown that (i) beta-catenin can be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) in vitro and in intact cells at two novel sites, Ser-552 and Ser-675; (ii) phosphorylation by PKA promotes the transcriptional activity (TCF/LEF transactivation) of beta-catenin; (iii) mutation of Ser-675 attenuates the promoting effect of PKA; (iv) phosphorylation by PKA does not affect the GSK3-dependent phosphorylation of beta-catenin, its stability, or intracellular localization; and (v) phosphorylation at the Ser-675 site promotes the binding of beta-catenin to its transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel, noncanonical mechanism of modulation of beta-catenin signaling through direct phosphorylation of beta-catenin by PKA, promoting its interaction with CREB-binding protein.

  3. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    OpenAIRE

    Yanjun Zan; Xia Shen; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Örjan Carlborg

    2016-01-01

    An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least o...

  4. PR65A phosphorylation regulates PP2A complex signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Kotlo

    Full Text Available Serine-threonine Protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A, a member of the PPP family of phosphatases, regulates a variety of essential cellular processes, including cell-cycling, DNA replication, transcription, translation, and secondary signaling pathways. In the heart, increased PP2A activity/signaling has been linked to cardiac remodeling, contractile dysfunction and, in failure, arrythmogenicity. The core PP2A complex is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme consisting of a 36 kDa catalytic subunit (PP2Ac; a regulatory scaffold subunit of 65 kDa (PR65A or PP2Aa; and one of at least 18 associated variable regulatory proteins (B subunits classified into 3 families. In the present study, three in vivo sites of phosphorylation in cardiac PR65A are identified (S303, T268, S314. Using HEK cells transfected with recombinant forms of PR65A with phosphomimetic (P-PR65A and non-phosphorylated (N-PR65A amino acid substitutions at these sites, these phosphorylations were shown to inhibit the interaction of PR65A with PP2Ac and PP2A holoenzyme signaling. Forty-seven phospho-proteins were increased in abundance in HEK cells transfected with P-PR65A versus N-PR65A by phospho-protein profiling using 2D-DIGE analysis on phospho-enriched whole cell protein extracts. Among these proteins were elongation factor 1α (EF1A, elongation factor 2, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60, NADPH-dehydrogenase 1 alpha sub complex, annexin A, and PR65A. Compared to controls, failing hearts from the Dahl rat had less phosphorylated PR65A protein abundance and increased PP2A activity. Thus, PR65A phosphorylation is an in vivo mechanism for regulation of the PP2A signaling complex and increased PP2A activity in heart failure.

  5. Light-dependent phosphorylation of the Drosophila inactivation no afterpotential D (INAD scaffolding protein at Thr170 and Ser174 by eye-specific protein kinase C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Voolstra

    Full Text Available Drosophila inactivation no afterpotential D (INAD is a PDZ domain-containing scaffolding protein that tethers components of the phototransduction cascade to form a supramolecular signaling complex. Here, we report the identification of eight INAD phosphorylation sites using a mass spectrometry approach. PDZ1, PDZ2, and PDZ4 each harbor one phosphorylation site, three phosphorylation sites are located in the linker region between PDZ1 and 2, one site is located between PDZ2 and PDZ3, and one site is located in the N-terminal region. Using a phosphospecific antibody, we found that INAD phosphorylated at Thr170/Ser174 was located within the rhabdomeres of the photoreceptor cells, suggesting that INAD becomes phosphorylated in this cellular compartment. INAD phosphorylation at Thr170/Ser174 depends on light, the phototransduction cascade, and on eye-Protein kinase C that is attached to INAD via one of its PDZ domains.

  6. Sustained AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylations in human skeletal muscle 30 minutes after a single bout of exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Møller, Andreas Buch; Treebak, Jonas Thue

    2014-01-01

    Background: Phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 plays an important role for GLUT4 mobilization to the cell surface. The phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1 in humans in response to acute exercise is not fully characterized. Objective: To study AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylation in human skeletal...... and in a time-matched non-exercised control condition. We obtained muscle biopsies 30 minutes after exercise and in a time-matched non-exercised control condition (t=30) and after 30 minutes of insulin stimulation (t=270) and investigated site-specific phosphorylation of AS160 and TBC1D1. Results...... phosphorylation. Unlike TBC1D1, insulin-stimulated site-specific AS160 phosphorylation is modified by prior exercise, but these sites do not include Thr(642) and Ser(588). Together, these data provide new insights into phosphorylation of key regulators of glucose transport in human skeletal muscle....

  7. Identification of novel motif patterns to decipher the promoter architecture of co-expressed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Yosvany; Patil, Ashwini; Nakai, Kenta

    2013-10-16

    The understanding of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation remains a challenge for molecular biologists in the post-genome era. It is hypothesized that the regulatory regions of genes expressed in the same tissue or cell type share a similar structure. Though several studies have analyzed the promoters of genes expressed in specific metazoan tissues or cells, little research has been done in plants. Hence finding specific patterns of motifs to explain the promoter architecture of co-expressed genes in plants could shed light on their transcription mechanism. We identified novel patterns of sets of motifs in promoters of genes co-expressed in four different plant structures (PSs) and in the entire plant in Arabidopsis thaliana. Sets of genes expressed in four PSs (flower, seed, root, shoot) and housekeeping genes expressed in the entire plant were taken from a database of co-expressed genes in A. thaliana. PS-specific motifs were predicted using three motif-discovery algorithms, 8 of which are novel, to the best of our knowledge. A support vector machine was trained using the average upstream distance of the identified motifs from the translation start site on both strands of binding sites. The correctly classified promoters per PS were used to construct specific patterns of sets of motifs to describe the promoter architecture of those co-expressed genes. The discovered PS-specific patterns were tested in the entire A. thaliana genome, correctly identifying 77.8%, 81.2%, 70.8% and 53.7% genes expressed in petal differentiation, synergid cells, root hair and trichome, as well as 88.4% housekeeping genes. We present five patterns of sets of motifs which describe the promoter architecture of co-expressed genes in five PSs with the ability to predict them from the entire A. thaliana genome. Based on these findings, we conclude that the positioning and orientation of transcription factor binding sites at specific distances from the translation start site is a

  8. Regulation of CREB phosphorylation in the suprachiasmatic nucleus by light and a circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginty, D D; Kornhauser, J M; Thompson, M A; Bading, H; Mayo, K E; Takahashi, J S; Greenberg, M E

    1993-04-09

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are regulated by a pacemaker within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The molecular mechanisms controlling the synchronization of the circadian pacemaker are unknown; however, immediate early gene (IEG) expression in the SCN is tightly correlated with entrainment of SCN-regulated rhythms. Antibodies were isolated that recognize the activated, phosphorylated form of the transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB). Within minutes after exposure of hamsters to light, CREB in the SCN became phosphorylated on the transcriptional regulatory site, Ser133. CREB phosphorylation was dependent on circadian time: CREB became phosphorylated only at times during the circadian cycle when light induced IEG expression and caused phase shifts of circadian rhythms. These results implicate CREB in neuronal signaling in the hypothalamus and suggest that circadian clock gating of light-regulated molecular responses in the SCN occurs upstream of phosphorylation of CREB.

  9. Quantitation, network and function of protein phosphorylation in plant cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eZHU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications (PTMs as it participates in regulating various cellular processes and biological functions. It is therefore crucial to identify phosphorylated proteins to construct a phosphor-relay network, and eventually to understand the underlying molecular regulatory mechanism in response to both internal and external stimuli. The changes in phosphorylation status at these novel phosphosites can be accurately measured using a 15N-stable isotopic labeling in Arabidopsis (SILIA quantitative proteomic approach in a high-throughput manner. One of the unique characteristics of the SILIA quantitative phosphoproteomic approach is the preservation of native PTM status on protein during the entire peptide preparation procedure. Evolved from SILIA is another quantitative PTM proteomic approach, AQUIP (absolute quantitation of isoforms of post-translationally modified proteins, which was developed by combining the advantages of targeted proteomics with SILIA. Bioinformatics-based phosphorylation site prediction coupled with an MS-based in vitro kinase assay is an additional way to extend the capability of phosphosite identification from the total cellular protein. The combined use of SILIA and AQUIP provides a novel strategy for molecular systems biological study and for investigation of in vivo biological functions of these phosphoprotein isoforms and combinatorial codes of PTMs.

  10. Cdc15 Phosphorylates the C-terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II for Transcription during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Shukla, Harish; Asalam, Mohd; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2017-03-31

    In eukaryotes, the basal transcription in interphase is orchestrated through the regulation by kinases (Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1) and phosphatases (Ssu72, Rtr1, and Fcp1), which act through the post-translational modification of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The CTD comprises the repeated Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser motif with potential epigenetic modification sites. Despite the observation of transcription and periodic expression of genes during mitosis with entailing CTD phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, the associated CTD specific kinase(s) and its role in transcription remains unknown. Here we have identified Cdc15 as a potential kinase phosphorylating Ser-2 and Ser-5 of CTD for transcription during mitosis in the budding yeast. The phosphorylation of CTD by Cdc15 is independent of any prior Ser phosphorylation(s). The inactivation of Cdc15 causes reduction of global CTD phosphorylation during mitosis and affects the expression of genes whose transcript levels peak during mitosis. Cdc15 also influences the complete transcription of clb2 gene and phosphorylates Ser-5 at the promoter and Ser-2 toward the 3' end of the gene. The observation that Cdc15 could phosphorylate Ser-5, as well as Ser-2, during transcription in mitosis is in contrast to the phosphorylation marks put by the kinases in interphase (G1, S, and G2), where Cdck7/Kin28 phosphorylates Ser-5 at promoter and Bur1/Ctk1 phosphorylates Ser-2 at the 3' end of the genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. O-GlcNAc modification: why so intimately associated with phosphorylation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ande Sudharsana R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modification of proteins at serine and threonine side chains by β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc mediated by the enzyme β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase has been emerging as a fundamental regulatory mechanism encompassing a wide range of proteins involved in cell division, metabolism, transcription and cell signaling. Furthermore, an extensive interplay between O-GlcNAc modification and serine/threonine phosphorylation in a variety of proteins has been reported to exist. However, our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involved in O-GlcNAc modification and its interplay with serine/threonine phosphorylation in proteins is still elusive. Recent success in the mapping of O-GlcNAc modification sites in proteins as a result of technological advancement in mass spectrometry have revealed two important clues which may be inherently connected to the regulation of O-GlcNAc modification and its interplay with phosphorylation in proteins. First, almost all O-GlcNAc modified proteins are known phospho proteins. Second, the prevalence of tyrosine phosphorylation among O-GlcNAc modified proteins is exceptionally higher (~68% than its normal occurrence (~2% alone. We hypothesize that phosphorylation may be a requisite for O-GlcNAc modification and tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in the interplay between O-GlcNAc modification and serine/threonine phosphorylation in proteins. In other words, the interplay between O-GlcNAc modification and phosphorylation is not limited to serine/threonine phosphorylation but also includes tyrosine phosphorylation. Our hypothesis provides an opportunity to understand the underlying mechanism involved in O-GlcNAc modification and its interplay with serine/threonine phosphorylation in proteins. Furthermore, implication of our hypothesis extends to tyrosine kinase signaling.

  12. Pro-Tumorigenic Phosphorylation of p120 Catenin in Renal and Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis Kourtidis

    Full Text Available Altered protein expression and phosphorylation are common events during malignant transformation. These perturbations have been widely explored in the context of E-cadherin cell-cell adhesion complexes, which are central in the maintenance of the normal epithelial phenotype. A major component of these complexes is p120 catenin (p120, which binds and stabilizes E-cadherin to promote its adhesive and tumor suppressing function. However, p120 is also an essential mediator of pro-tumorigenic signals driven by oncogenes, such as Src, and can be phosphorylated at multiple sites. Although alterations in p120 expression have been extensively studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC in the context of tumor progression, little is known about the status and role of p120 phosphorylation in cancer. Here we show that tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation of p120 in two sites, Y228 and T916, is elevated in renal and breast tumor tissue samples. We also show that tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 at its N-terminus, including at the Y228 site is required for its pro-tumorigenic potential. In contrast, phosphorylation of p120 at T916 does not affect this p120 function. However, phosphorylation of p120 at T916 interferes with epitope recognition of the most commonly used p120 antibody, namely pp120. As a result, this antibody selectively underrepresents p120 levels in tumor tissues, where p120 is phosphorylated. Overall, our data support a role of p120 phosphorylation as a marker and mediator of tumor transformation. Importantly, they also argue that the level and localization of p120 in human cancer tissues immunostained with pp120 needs to be re-evaluated.

  13. Phosphorylation impact on Spleen Tyrosine kinase conformation by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottat, Maximilien; Yasukuni, Ryohei; Homma, Yo; Lidgi-Guigui, Nathalie; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Lamy de La Chapelle, Marc; Le Roy, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) plays a crucial role in immune cell signalling and its altered expression or activation are involved in several cancers. Syk activity relies on its phosphorylation status and its multiple phosphorylation sites predict several Syk conformations. In this report, we characterized Syk structural changes according to its phosphorylation/activation status by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). Unphosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active Syk forms were produced into two expression systems with different phosphorylation capability. Syk forms were then analysed by SERS that was carried out in liquid condition on a lithographically designed gold nanocylinders array. Our study demonstrated that SERS signatures of the two Syk forms were drastically distinct, indicating structural modifications related to their phosphorylation status. By comparison with the atomic structure of the unphosphorylated Syk, the SERS peak assignments of the phosphorylated Syk nearest gold nanostructures revealed a differential interaction with the gold surface. We finally described a model for Syk conformational variations according to its phosphorylation status. In conclusion, SERS is an efficient technical approach for studying in vitro protein conformational changes and might be a powerful tool to determine protein functions in tumour cells.

  14. Gene networks controlling Arabidopsis thaliana flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid Seosamh; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The formation of flowers is one of the main models for studying the regulatory mechanisms that underlie plant development and evolution. Over the past three decades, extensive genetic and molecular analyses have led to the identification of a large number of key floral regulators and to detailed insights into how they control flower morphogenesis. In recent years, genome-wide approaches have been applied to obtaining a global view of the gene regulatory networks underlying flower formation. Furthermore, mathematical models have been developed that can simulate certain aspects of this process and drive further experimentation. Here, we review some of the main findings made in the field of Arabidopsis thaliana flower development, with an emphasis on recent advances. In particular, we discuss the activities of the floral organ identity factors, which are pivotal for the specification of the different types of floral organs, and explore the experimental avenues that may elucidate the molecular mechanisms and gene expression programs through which these master regulators of flower development act. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Telomere-binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, U

    1995-02-01

    The nucleoprotein structure of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres was investigated. A protein specifically binding to telomeric sequences was characterized by gel mobility shift assays with synthetic oligonucleotides consisting of four 7 bp telomeric repeats of Arabidopsis (TTTAGGG) and crude nuclear protein extracts of Arabidopsis leaves. These DNA-protein binding studies revealed that the binding affinity of this telomere-binding protein to the G-rich single-strand as well as to the double-stranded telomeric DNA is much higher than to the C-rich single-strand. The molecular mass of the protein was identified by SDS-PAGE to be 67 kDa. The isoelectric points were determined to be 5.0, 4.85 and 4.7, respectively, indicating that either one protein with different modifications or three slightly different proteins have been isolated. An RNA component, possibly serving as a template for reverse transcription of a plant telomerase, does not mediate the DNA-protein contact because the DNA-protein interactions were not RNAse-sensitive.

  16. Copper-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, C; Anderson, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-11-01

    A Cu-sensitive mutant, cup1-1, of Arabidopsis thaliana has a pattern of heavy-metal sensitivity different from that of the cad1 and cad2 mutants, which are deficient in phytochelatin biosynthesis. The latter are significantly sensitive to Cd and Hg and only slightly sensitive to Cu, whereas the cup1-1 mutant is significantly sensitive to Cu, slightly sensitive to Cd, and not more sensitive to Hg, compared to the wild type. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus, which has been mapped to chromosome 1. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that the cup1-1 mutant is not affected in phytochelatin biosynthesis or function. The sensitive phenotype of the cup1-1 mutant is associated with, and probably due to, increased accumulation of higher levels of Cd and Cu compared with the wild type. Consistent with this, a Cu-inducible, root-specific metallothionein gene, MT2a, is expressed in cup1-1 roots under conditions in which it is not expressed in the wild type. Undifferentiated cup1-1 callus tissue did not show the Cu-sensitive phenotype, suggesting that the mutant phenotype, in contrast to cad1 and cad2, is not expressed at the cellular level.

  17. Cadmium-Sensitive Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, R; Cobbett, C S

    1992-09-01

    A screening procedure for identifying Cd-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is described. With this procedure, two Cd-sensitive mutants were isolated. These represent independent mutations in the same locus, referred to as CAD1. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed that the mutation is closely linked to the tt3 locus on chromosome 5. In addition to Cd, the mutants are also significantly more sensitive to mercuric ions and only slightly more sensitive to Cu and Zn, while being no more sensitive than the wild type to Mn, thus indicating a degree of specificity in the mechanism affected by the mutation. Undifferentiated callus tissue is also Cd sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. Both wild-type and mutant plants showed increased sensitivity to Cd in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of the cadmium-binding (gamma-glutamylcysteine)(n)-glycine peptides, suggesting that the mutant is still able to synthesize these peptides. However, the effects of a cad1 mutation and buthionine sulfoximine together on cadmium sensitivity are essentially nonadditive, indicating that they may affect different aspects of the same detoxification mechanism. Assays of Cd uptake by intact plants indicate that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester Cd.

  18. Spontaneous deleterious mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, S T; Lynch, M; Willis, J H

    1999-09-28

    The frequency and selective impact of deleterious mutations are fundamental parameters in evolutionary theory, yet they have not been directly measured in a plant species. To estimate these quantities, we allowed spontaneous mutations to accumulate for 10 generations in 1,000 inbred lines of the annual, self-fertilizing plant Arabidopsis thaliana and assayed fitness differences between generations 0 and 10 in a common garden. Germination rate, fruit set, and number of seeds per fruit each declined by less than 1% per generation in the mutation lines, and total fitness declined by 0.9% per generation. Among-line variances increased in the mutation lines for all traits. Application of an equal-effects model suggests a downwardly biased genomic deleterious mutation rate of 0.1 and a upwardly biased effect of individual mutations on total fitness of 20%. This genomic deleterious mutation rate is consistent with estimates of nucleotide substitution rates in flowering plants, the genome size of Arabidopsis, and the equilibrium inbreeding depression observed in this highly selfing plant species.

  19. Ecotype dependent expression and alternative splicing of epithiospecifier protein (ESP) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissen, R; Hyldbakk, E; Wang, C-W V; Sørmo, C G; Rossiter, J T; Bones, A M

    2012-03-01

    Epithiospecifier protein (ESP) is responsible for diverting glucosinolate hydrolysis from the generation of isothiocyanates to that of epithionitriles or nitriles, and thereby negatively affects the ability of the plant to defend itself against certain insects. Despite this important role of ESP, little is known about its expression in plant tissues and the regulation thereof. We therefore investigated ESP expression by qPCR and Western blot in different organs during the growth cycle of the two Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Mt-0. Besides the fact that ESP transcript and protein levels were revealed to be much higher in Mt-0 than in Col-0 in all cases, our qPCR results also indicated that ESP expression is regulated differently in the two A. thaliana ecotypes. No ESP protein was detected by Western blot in any organ or developmental stage for Col-0. During the assays an alternative splice variant of ESP was identified in Col-0, but not Mt-0, leading to a mis-spliced transcript which could explain the low expression levels of ESP in the former ecotype. Analysis of genomic sequences containing the ESP splice sites, of ESP protein level and ESP activity from seven A. thaliana ecotypes showed a positive correlation between the presence of a non-canonical 5' splice site for ESP and the absence of detectable ESP protein levels and ESP activity. When analysing the expression of both transcript variants in Col-0 after treatment with methyl jasmonate, a condition known to "induce ESP", it was indeed the alternative splice variant that was preferentially induced.

  20. Symposia on Plant (Protein Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacco C. De Vries

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available From September 14-16, 2011 the twelfth symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was held in Tübingen, Germany. The topic is as broad as the name suggests and covers all aspects of this important means of protein modification in plants. I have had the pleasure of attending the 2007 and the 2011 symposia. The interesting concept behind these meetings is to hear about the same biochemical mechanism operative in a multitude of experimental systems. The meetings are quite informal and present an excellent mix ranging from technology to biochemical experience and novel findings and tools.The two-and-a-half-day program was divided into five double sessions: biotic interactions, hormone signaling, abiotic interactions, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK and Ca++ pathways and phosphoproteomics. It was hosted by the Zentrum für Molekularbiologie der Pflanzen (ZMBP and the organizing committee chaired by Klaus Harter.

  1. Impact of SNPs on Protein Phosphorylation Status in Rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoukai Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are widely used in functional genomics and genetics research work. The high-quality sequence of rice genome has provided a genome-wide SNP and proteome resource. However, the impact of SNPs on protein phosphorylation status in rice is not fully understood. In this paper, we firstly updated rice SNP resource based on the new rice genome Ver. 7.0, then systematically analyzed the potential impact of Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs on the protein phosphorylation status. There were 3,897,312 SNPs in Ver. 7.0 rice genome, among which 9.9% was nsSNPs. Whilst, a total 2,508,261 phosphorylated sites were predicted in rice proteome. Interestingly, we observed that 150,197 (39.1% nsSNPs could influence protein phosphorylation status, among which 52.2% might induce changes of protein kinase (PK types for adjacent phosphorylation sites. We constructed a database, SNP_rice, to deposit the updated rice SNP resource and phosSNPs information. It was freely available to academic researchers at http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn. As a case study, we detected five nsSNPs that potentially influenced heterotrimeric G proteins phosphorylation status in rice, indicating that genetic polymorphisms showed impact on the signal transduction by influencing the phosphorylation status of heterotrimeric G proteins. The results in this work could be a useful resource for future experimental identification and provide interesting information for better rice breeding.

  2. Detection of tyrosine phosphorylated peptides via skimmer collision-induced dissociation/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolodz, Melissa D; Wood, Karl V

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is an important post-translational protein modification in cellular response to environmental change and occurs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Identification of the amino acid on individual proteins that become phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimulus is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in the intracellular signals that these modifications facilitate. Most protein kinases catalyze the phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine or tyrosine. Although tyrosine phosphorylation is often the least abundant of the three major phosphorylation sites, it is important owing to its role in signal pathways. Currently available methods for the identification of phosphorylation sites can often miss low levels of tyrosine phosphorylations. This paper describes a method for the identification of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides using electrospray ionization on an ion trap mass spectrometer. Skimmer-activated collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to generate the phosphotyrosine immonium ion at m/z 216. This method is gentle enough that the protonated molecule of the intact peptide is still observed. In-trap CID was employed for the verification of the phosphotyrosine immonium ion. Using this technique, low levels of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides can be identified from peptide mixtures separated by nanoflow micro liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. CK2 phosphorylates Sec31 and regulates ER-To-Golgi trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Koreishi

    Full Text Available Protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an initial and rate-limiting step of molecular trafficking and secretion. This is mediated by coat protein II (COPII-coated vesicles, whose formation requires small GTPase Sar1 and 6 Sec proteins including Sec23 and Sec31. Sec31 is a component of the outer layer of COPII coat and has been identified as a phosphoprotein. The initiation and promotion of COPII vesicle formation is regulated by Sar1; however, the mechanism regulating the completion of COPII vesicle formation followed by vesicle release is largely unknown. Hypothesizing that the Sec31 phosphorylation may be such a mechanism, we identified phosphorylation sites in the middle linker region of Sec31. Sec31 phosphorylation appeared to decrease its association with ER membranes and Sec23. Non-phosphorylatable mutant of Sec31 stayed longer at ER exit sites and bound more strongly to Sec23. We also found that CK2 is one of the kinases responsible for Sec31 phosphorylation because CK2 knockdown decreased Sec31 phosphorylation, whereas CK2 overexpression increased Sec31 phosphorylation. Furthermore, CK2 knockdown increased affinity of Sec31 for Sec23 and inhibited ER-to-Golgi trafficking. These results suggest that Sec31 phosphorylation by CK2 controls the duration of COPII vesicle formation, which regulates ER-to-Golgi trafficking.

  4. Impact of SNPs on Protein Phosphorylation Status in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shoukai; Chen, Lijuan; Tao, Huan; Huang, Jian; Xu, Chaoqun; Li, Lin; Ma, Shiwei; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wei; Xue, Lichun; Ai, Yufang; He, Huaqin

    2016-11-11

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used in functional genomics and genetics research work. The high-quality sequence of rice genome has provided a genome-wide SNP and proteome resource. However, the impact of SNPs on protein phosphorylation status in rice is not fully understood. In this paper, we firstly updated rice SNP resource based on the new rice genome Ver. 7.0, then systematically analyzed the potential impact of Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on the protein phosphorylation status. There were 3,897,312 SNPs in Ver. 7.0 rice genome, among which 9.9% was nsSNPs. Whilst, a total 2,508,261 phosphorylated sites were predicted in rice proteome. Interestingly, we observed that 150,197 (39.1%) nsSNPs could influence protein phosphorylation status, among which 52.2% might induce changes of protein kinase (PK) types for adjacent phosphorylation sites. We constructed a database, SNP_rice, to deposit the updated rice SNP resource and phosSNPs information. It was freely available to academic researchers at http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn. As a case study, we detected five nsSNPs that potentially influenced heterotrimeric G proteins phosphorylation status in rice, indicating that genetic polymorphisms showed impact on the signal transduction by influencing the phosphorylation status of heterotrimeric G proteins. The results in this work could be a useful resource for future experimental identification and provide interesting information for better rice breeding.

  5. Comparison of phosphorylation patterns across eukaryotes by discriminative N-gram analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Frades, Itziar; Resj?, Svante; Andreasson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Background How protein phosphorylation relates to kingdom/phylum divergence is largely unknown and the amino acid residues surrounding the phosphorylation site have profound importance on protein kinase?substrate interactions. Standard motif analysis is not adequate for large scale comparative analysis because each phophopeptide is assigned to a unique motif and perform poorly with the unbalanced nature of the input datasets. Results First the discriminative n-grams of five species from five ...

  6. Differential phosphorylation signals control endocytosis of GPR15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yukari; Shikano, Sojin

    2017-08-15

    GPR15 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that serves for an HIV coreceptor and was also recently found as a novel homing receptor for T-cells implicated in colitis. We show that GPR15 undergoes a constitutive endocytosis in the absence of ligand. The endocytosis was clathrin dependent and partially dependent on β-arrestin in HEK293 cells, and nearly half of the internalized GPR15 receptors were recycled to the plasma membrane. An Ala mutation of the distal C-terminal Arg-354 or Ser-357, which forms a consensus phosphorylation site for basophilic kinases, markedly reduced the endocytosis, whereas phosphomimetic mutation of Ser-357 to Asp did not. Ser-357 was phosphorylated in vitro by multiple kinases, including PKA and PKC, and pharmacological activation of these kinases enhanced both phosphorylation of Ser-357 and endocytosis of GPR15. These results suggested that Ser-357 phosphorylation critically controls the ligand-independent endocytosis of GPR15. The functional role of Ser-357 in endocytosis was distinct from that of a conserved Ser/Thr cluster in the more proximal C-terminus, which was responsible for the β-arrestin- and GPCR kinase-dependent endocytosis of GPR15. Thus phosphorylation signals may differentially control cell surface density of GPR15 through endocytosis. © 2017 Okamoto and Shikano. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. Phosphorylation of Gβ is crucial for efficient chemotropism in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflorio, Reagan; Brett, Marie-Elena; Waszczak, Nicholas; Apollinari, Elisabetta; Metodiev, Metodi V; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Eddington, David; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2013-07-15

    Mating yeast cells interpret complex pheromone gradients and polarize their growth in the direction of the closest partner. Chemotropic growth depends on both the pheromone receptor and its associated G-protein. Upon activation by the receptor, Gα dissociates from Gβγ and Gβ is subsequently phosphorylated. Free Gβγ signals to the nucleus via a MAPK cascade and recruits Far1-Cdc24 to the incipient growth site. It is not clear how the cell establishes and stabilizes the axis of polarity, but this process is thought to require local signal amplification via the Gβγ-Far1-Cdc24 chemotropic complex, as well as communication between this complex and the activated receptor. Here we show that a mutant form of Gβ that cannot be phosphorylated confers defects in directional sensing and chemotropic growth. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Gβ plays a role in localized signal amplification and in the dynamic communication between the receptor and the chemotropic complex, which underlie growth site selection and maintenance.

  8. TTBK2: A Tau Protein Kinase beyond Tau Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Chi Liao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tau tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2 is a kinase known to phosphorylate tau and tubulin. It has recently drawn much attention due to its involvement in multiple important cellular processes. Here, we review the current understanding of TTBK2, including its sequence, structure, binding sites, phosphorylation substrates, and cellular processes involved. TTBK2 possesses a casein kinase 1 (CK1 kinase domain followed by a ~900 amino acid segment, potentially responsible for its localization and substrate recruitment. It is known to bind to CEP164, a centriolar protein, and EB1, a microtubule plus-end tracking protein. In addition to autophosphorylation, known phosphorylation substrates of TTBK2 include tau, tubulin, CEP164, CEP97, and TDP-43, a neurodegeneration-associated protein. Mutations of TTBK2 are associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 11. In addition, TTBK2 is essential for regulating the growth of axonemal microtubules in ciliogenesis. It also plays roles in resistance of cancer target therapies and in regulating glucose and GABA transport. Reported sites of TTBK2 localization include the centriole/basal body, the midbody, and possibly the mitotic spindles. Together, TTBK2 is a multifunctional kinase involved in important cellular processes and demands augmented efforts in investigating its functions.

  9. Phosphorylation of myocardin by extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Yau, Douglas M; Sethakorn, Nan; Kach, Jacob; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2009-12-04

    The contractile phenotype of smooth muscle (SM) cells is controlled by serum response factor (SRF), which drives the expression of SM-specific genes including SM alpha-actin, SM22, and others. Myocardin is a cardiac and SM-restricted coactivator of SRF that is necessary for SM gene transcription. Growth factors inducing proliferation of SM cells inhibit SM gene transcription, in a manner dependent on the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2. In this study, we found that ERK1/2 phosphorylates mouse myocardin (isoform B) at four sites (Ser(812), Ser(859), Ser(866), and Thr(893)), all of which are located within the transactivation domain of myocardin. The single mutation of each site either to alanine or to aspartate has no effect on the ability of myocardin to activate SRF. However, the phosphomimetic mutation of all four sites to aspartate (4xD) significantly impairs activation of SRF by myocardin, whereas the phosphodeficient mutation of all four sites to alanine (4xA) has no effect. This translates to a reduced ability of the 4xD (but not of 4xA) mutant of myocardin to stimulate expression of SM alpha-actin and SM22, as assessed by corresponding promoter, mRNA, or protein assays. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of myocardin at these sites impairs its interaction with acetyltransferase, cAMP response element-binding protein-binding protein, which is known to promote the transcriptional activity of myocardin. In conclusion, we describe a novel mode of modulation of SM gene transcription by ERK1/2 through a direct phosphorylation of myocardin.

  10. Phosphorylation of Myocardin by Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Yau, Douglas M.; Sethakorn, Nan; Kach, Jacob; Dulin, Nickolai O.

    2009-01-01

    The contractile phenotype of smooth muscle (SM) cells is controlled by serum response factor (SRF), which drives the expression of SM-specific genes including SM α-actin, SM22, and others. Myocardin is a cardiac and SM-restricted coactivator of SRF that is necessary for SM gene transcription. Growth factors inducing proliferation of SM cells inhibit SM gene transcription, in a manner dependent on the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2. In this study, we found that ERK1/2 phosphorylates mouse myocardin (isoform B) at four sites (Ser812, Ser859, Ser866, and Thr893), all of which are located within the transactivation domain of myocardin. The single mutation of each site either to alanine or to aspartate has no effect on the ability of myocardin to activate SRF. However, the phosphomimetic mutation of all four sites to aspartate (4×D) significantly impairs activation of SRF by myocardin, whereas the phosphodeficient mutation of all four sites to alanine (4×A) has no effect. This translates to a reduced ability of the 4×D (but not of 4×A) mutant of myocardin to stimulate expression of SM α-actin and SM22, as assessed by corresponding promoter, mRNA, or protein assays. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of myocardin at these sites impairs its interaction with acetyltransferase, cAMP response element-binding protein-binding protein, which is known to promote the transcriptional activity of myocardin. In conclusion, we describe a novel mode of modulation of SM gene transcription by ERK1/2 through a direct phosphorylation of myocardin. PMID:19776005

  11. Chemiosmotic coupling in oxidative and photosynthetic phosphorylation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    ... in oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria is that, for the equivalent of each pair of electrons traversing the respiratory chain, up to 3 anhydrobond equivalents may normally traverse the h/d pathway from adenosine diphosphate plus inorganic phosphate (ADP + P i ) to water. In photosynthetic phosphorylation the stoichiometry is less certain, and it is thought...

  12. Mining phosphopeptide signals in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data for protein phosphorylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Yi; Tseng, Vincent Shin-Mu; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2007-05-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a key post-translational modification that governs biological processes. Despite the fact that a number of analytical strategies have been exploited for the characterization of protein phosphorylation, the identification of protein phosphorylation sites is still challenging. We proposed here an alternative approach to mine phosphopeptide signals generated from a mixture of proteins when liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis is involved. The approach combined dephosphorylation reaction, accurate mass measurements from a quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a computing algorithm to differentiate possible phosphopeptide signals obtained from the LC-MS analyses by taking advantage of the mass shift generated by alkaline phosphatase treatment. The retention times and m/z values of these selected LC-MS signals were used to facilitate subsequent LC-MS/MS experiments for phosphorylation site determination. Unlike commonly used neutral loss scan experiments for phosphopeptide detection, this strategy may not bias against tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. We have demonstrated the applicability of this strategy to sequence more, in comparison with conventional data-dependent LC-MS/MS experiments, phosphopeptides in a mixture of alpha- and beta-caseins. The analytical scheme was applied to characterize the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cellular phosphoproteome and yielded 221 distinct phosphorylation sites. Our data presented in this paper demonstrated the merits of computation in mining phosphopeptide signals from a complex mass spectrometric data set.

  13. GFP Loss-of-Function Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jason L; Kanno, Tatsuo; Liang, Shih-Chieh; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2015-07-06

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related fluorescent proteins are widely used in biological research to monitor gene expression and protein localization in living cells. The GFP chromophore is generated spontaneously in the presence of oxygen by a multi-step reaction involving cyclization of the internal tripeptide Ser65 (or Thr65)-Tyr66-Gly67, which is embedded in the center of an 11-stranded β-barrel structure. Random and site-specific mutagenesis has been used to optimize GFP fluorescence and create derivatives with novel properties. However, loss-of-function mutations that would aid in understanding GFP protein folding and chromophore formation have not been fully cataloged. Here we report a collection of ethyl methansulfonate-induced GFP loss-of-function mutations in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations that alter residues important for chromophore maturation, such as Arg96 and Ser205, greatly reduce or extinguish fluorescence without dramatically altering GFP protein accumulation. By contrast, other loss-of-fluorescence mutations substantially diminish the amount of GFP protein, suggesting that they compromise protein stability. Many mutations in this category generate substitutions of highly conserved glycine residues, including the following: Gly67 in the chromogenic tripeptide; Gly31, Gly33, and Gly35 in the second β-strand; and Gly20, Gly91, and Gly127 in the lids of the β-barrel scaffold. Our genetic analysis supports conclusions from structural and biochemical studies and demonstrates a critical role for multiple, highly conserved glycine residues in GFP protein stability. Copyright © 2015 Fu et al.

  14. An Arabidopsis thaliana methyltransferase Capable of Methylating Farnesoic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang,Y.; Yuan, J.; Ross, J.; Noel, J.; Pichersky, E.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of a new family of plant methyltransferases (MTs), named the SABATH family, that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to methylate a carboxyl moiety or a nitrogen-containing functional group on a diverse array of plant compounds. The Arabidopsis genome alone contains 24 distinct SABATH genes. To identify the catalytic specificities of members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we screened recombinantly expressed and purified enzymes with a large number of potential substrates. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g44860 encodes a protein with high catalytic specificity towards farnesoic acid (FA). Under steady-state conditions, this farnesoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (FAMT) exhibits K{sub M} values of 41 and 71 {mu}M for FA and SAM, respectively. A three-dimensional model of FAMT constructed based upon similarity to the experimentally determined structure of Clarkia breweri salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) suggests a reasonable model for FA recognition in the FAMT active site. In plants, the mRNA levels of At3g44860 increase in response to the exogenous addition of several compounds previously shown to induce plant defense responses at the transcriptional level. Although methyl farnesoate (MeFA) has not yet been detected in Arabidopsis, the presence of a FA-specific carboxyl methyltransferase in Arabidopsis capable of producing MeFA, an insect juvenile hormone made by some plants as a presumed defense against insect herbivory, suggests that MeFA or chemically similar compounds are likely to serve as new specialized metabolites in Arabidopsis.

  15. The role of Atg29 phosphorylation in PAS assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Kai; Chew, Leon H; Yip, Calvin K; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) initiates at the phagophore assembly site (PAS), where most of the AuTophaGy-related (Atg) proteins are at least transiently localized. As the first protein complex targeted to the PAS, the Atg17-Atg31-Atg29 complex serves as the scaffold for other Atg proteins and plays a critical role for the organization of the PAS, and in autophagy initiation. We recently showed that this complex is constitutively formed and activated by the phosphorylation of Atg29 when autophagy is induced. Phosphorylation of Atg29 is required for its interaction with Atg11, another scaffold protein, and its function for promoting the proper assembly of the PAS. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis of the Atg17-Atg31-Atg29 complex reveals an elongated structure with Atg29 located at the opposing ends. This structural arrangement allows Atg29 to interact with Atg11, and is critical in the organization of the intact Atg1 complex.

  16. Local Populations ofArabidopsis thalianaShow Clear Relationship between Photoperiodic Sensitivity of Flowering Time and Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska-Sabat, Anna M; Fjellheim, Siri; Olsen, Jorunn E; Rognli, Odd A

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of plants to local conditions that vary substantially within their geographic range is essential for seasonal timing of flowering, a major determinant of plant reproductive success. This study investigates photoperiodic responses in natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana from high northern latitudes and their significance for local adaptation. Thirty lineages from ten local A. thaliana populations, representing different locations across an altitudinal gradient (2-850 m a.s.l.) in Norway, were grown under uniform controlled conditions, and used to screen for responses to five different photoperiods. We studied relationships between variation in photoperiodic sensitivity of flowering time, altitude, and climatic factors associated with the sites of origin. We found that variation in response to photoperiod is significantly correlated with altitude and climatic variables associated with the sites of origin of the populations. Populations originating from lower altitudes showed stronger photoperiodic sensitivity than populations from higher altitudes. Our results indicate that the altitudinal climatic gradient generates clinal variation in adaptive traits in A. thaliana .

  17. Transcriptional Changes of the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita in Response to Arabidopsis thaliana Root Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, Alice; Dybal, Katarzyna; Kerry, Brian R.; Miller, Anthony J.; Curtis, Rosane H. C.; Hedden, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes are obligate parasites that invade roots and induce the formation of specialized feeding structures. Although physiological and molecular changes inside the root leading to feeding site formation have been studied, very little is known about the molecular events preceding root penetration by nematodes. In order to investigate the influence of root exudates on nematode gene expression before plant invasion and to identify new genes potentially involved in parasitism, sterile root exudates from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were produced and used to treat Meloidogyne incognita pre-parasitic second-stage juveniles. After confirming the activity of A. thaliana root exudates (ARE) on M. incognita stylet thrusting, six new candidate genes identified by cDNA-AFLP were confirmed by qRT-PCR as being differentially expressed after incubation for one hour with ARE. Using an in vitro inoculation method that focuses on the events preceding the root penetration, we show that five of these genes are differentially expressed within hours of nematode exposure to A. thaliana roots. We also show that these genes are up-regulated post nematode penetration during migration and feeding site initiation. This study demonstrates that preceding root invasion plant-parasitic nematodes are able to perceive root signals and to respond by changing their behaviour and gene expression. PMID:23593446

  18. Interdependent phosphorylation within the kinase domain T-loop Regulates CHK2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Ward, Michael D; Tiedebohl, Jessica B; Oden, Yvonne M; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Semmes, O John

    2010-10-22

    Chk2 is a critical regulator of the cellular DNA damage repair response. Activation of Chk2 in response to IR-induced damage is initiated by phosphorylation of the Chk2 SQ/TQ cluster domain at Ser(19), Ser(33), Ser(35), and Thr(68). This precedes autophosphorylation of Thr(383)/Thr(387) in the T-loop region of the kinase domain an event that is a prerequisite for efficient kinase activity. We conducted an in-depth analysis of phosphorylation within the T-loop region (residues 366-406). We report four novel phosphorylation sites at Ser(372), Thr(378), Thr(389), and Tyr(390). Substitution mutation Y390F was defective for kinase function. The substitution mutation T378A ablated the IR induction of kinase activity. Interestingly, the substitution mutation T389A demonstrated a 6-fold increase in kinase activity when compared with wild-type Chk2. In addition, phosphorylation at Thr(389) was a prerequisite to phosphorylation at Thr(387) but not at Thr(383). Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis revealed IR-induced phosphorylation and subcellular distribution of Chk2 phosphorylated species. We observed IR-induced increase in phosphorylation at Ser(379), Thr(389), and Thr(383)/Thr(389). Phosphorylation at Tyr(390) was dramatically reduced following IR. Exposure to IR was also associated with changes in the ratio of chromatin/nuclear localization. IR-induced increase in chromatin localization was associated with phosphorylation at Thr(372), Thr(379), Thr(383), Thr(389), Thr(383)/Thr(387), and Thr(383)/Thr(389). Chk2 hyper-phosphorylated species at Thr(383)/Thr(387)/Thr(389) and Thr(383)/Thr(387)/Thr(389)/Tyr(390) relocalized from almost exclusively chromatin to predominately nuclear expression, suggesting a role for phosphorylation in regulation of chromatin targeting and egress. The differential impact of T-loop phosphorylation on Chk2 ubiquitylation suggests a co-dependence of these modifications. The results demonstrate that a complex interdependent network of

  19. Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, X.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. I studied numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The large genomic changes are important for

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the conformational dynamics of Arabidopsis thaliana BRI1 and BAK1 receptor-like kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Alexander S; Bender, Kyle W; Huber, Steven C; Shukla, Diwakar

    2017-07-28

    The structural motifs responsible for activation and regulation of eukaryotic protein kinases in animals have been studied extensively in recent years, and a coherent picture of their activation mechanisms has begun to emerge. In contrast, non-animal eukaryotic protein kinases are not as well understood from a structural perspective, representing a large knowledge gap. To this end, we investigated the conformational dynamics of two key Arabidopsis thaliana receptor-like kinases, brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 (BRI1) and BRI1-associated kinase 1 (BAK1), through extensive molecular dynamics simulations of their fully phosphorylated kinase domains. Molecular dynamics simulations calculate the motion of each atom in a protein based on classical approximations of interatomic forces, giving researchers insight into protein function at unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions. We found that in an otherwise "active" BAK1 the αC helix is highly disordered, a hallmark of deactivation, whereas the BRI1 αC helix is moderately disordered and displays swinging behavior similar to numerous animal kinases. An analysis of all known sequences in the A. thaliana kinome found that αC helix disorder may be a common feature of plant kinases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Demographic history of european populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier François

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana is successful at colonizing land that has recently undergone human-mediated disturbance. To investigate the prehistoric spread of A. thaliana, we applied approximate Bayesian computation and explicit spatial modeling to 76 European accessions sequenced at 876 nuclear loci. We find evidence that a major migration wave occurred from east to west, affecting most of the sampled individuals. The longitudinal gradient appears to result from the plant having spread in Europe from the east approximately 10,000 years ago, with a rate of westward spread of approximately 0.9 km/year. This wave-of-advance model is consistent with a natural colonization from an eastern glacial refugium that overwhelmed ancient western lineages. However, the speed and time frame of the model also suggest that the migration of A. thaliana into Europe may have accompanied the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic transition.

  2. The Golgi localization of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein beta requires the protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of serine 262 and is essential for maintaining plasma membrane sphingomyelin levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tiel, Claudia M.; Westerman, Jan; Paasman, Marten A.; Hoebens, Martha M.; Wirtz, Karel W. A.; Snoek, Gerry T.

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant mouse phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP)beta is a substrate for protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation in vitro. Based on site-directed mutagenesis and two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping, Ser(262) was identified as the major site of phosphorylation and Ser(165)

  3. Ionizing radiation-dependent and independent phosphorylation of the 32-kDa subunit of replication protein A during mitosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stephan, Holger

    2009-10-01

    The human single-stranded DNA-binding protein, replication protein A (RPA), is regulated by the N-terminal phosphorylation of its 32-kDa subunit, RPA2. RPA2 is hyperphosphorylated in response to various DNA-damaging agents and also phosphorylated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner during S- and M-phase, primarily at two CDK consensus sites, S23 and S29. Here we generated two monoclonal phospho-specific antibodies directed against these CDK sites. These phospho-specific RPA2-(P)-S23 and RPA2-(P)-S29 antibodies recognized mitotically phosphorylated RPA2 with high specificity. In addition, the RPA2-(P)-S23 antibody recognized the S-phase-specific phosphorylation of RPA2, suggesting that during S-phase only S23 is phosphorylated, whereas during M-phase both CDK sites, S23 and S29, are phosphorylated. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the mitotic phosphorylation of RPA2 starts at the onset of mitosis, and dephosphorylation occurs during late cytokinesis. In mitotic cells treated with ionizing radiation (IR), we observed a rapid hyperphosphorylation of RPA2 in addition to its mitotic phosphorylation at S23 and S29, associated with a significant change in the subcellular localization of RPA. Our data also indicate that the RPA2 hyperphosphorylation in response to IR is facilitated by the activity of both ATM and DNA-PK, and is associated with activation of the Chk2 pathway.

  4. Top-Down Targeted Proteomics Reveals Decrease in Myosin Regulatory Light-Chain Phosphorylation That Contributes to Sarcopenic Muscle Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorich, Zachery R; Peng, Ying; Cai, Wenxuan; Jin, Yutong; Wei, Liming; Chen, Albert J; McKiernan, Susan H; Aiken, Judd M; Moss, Richard L; Diffee, Gary M; Ge, Ying

    2016-08-05

    Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with advancing age, is a significant cause of disability and loss of independence in the elderly and thus, represents a formidable challenge for the aging population. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying sarcopenia-associated muscle dysfunction remain poorly understood. In this study, we employed an integrated approach combining top-down targeted proteomics with mechanical measurements to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) in age-related muscle dysfunction. Top-down targeted proteomic analysis uncovered a progressive age-related decline in the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), a critical protein involved in the modulation of muscle contractility, in the skeletal muscle of aging rats. Top-down tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified a previously unreported bis-phosphorylated proteoform of fast skeletal RLC and localized the sites of decreasing phosphorylation to Ser14/15. Of these sites, Ser14 phosphorylation represents a previously unidentified site of phosphorylation in RLC from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Subsequent mechanical analysis of single fast-twitch fibers isolated from the muscles of rats of different ages revealed that the observed decline in RLC phosphorylation can account for age-related decreases in the contractile properties of sarcopenic fast-twitch muscles. These results strongly support a role for decreasing RLC phosphorylation in sarcopenia-associated muscle dysfunction and suggest that therapeutic modulation of RLC phosphorylation may represent a new avenue for the treatment of sarcopenia.

  5. Characterisation of the first enzymes committed to lysine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D W Griffin

    Full Text Available In plants, the lysine biosynthetic pathway is an attractive target for both the development of herbicides and increasing the nutritional value of crops given that lysine is a limiting amino acid in cereals. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS and dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR catalyse the first two committed steps of lysine biosynthesis. Here, we carry out for the first time a comprehensive characterisation of the structure and activity of both DHDPS and DHDPR from Arabidopsis thaliana. The A. thaliana DHDPS enzyme (At-DHDPS2 has similar activity to the bacterial form of the enzyme, but is more strongly allosterically inhibited by (S-lysine. Structural studies of At-DHDPS2 show (S-lysine bound at a cleft between two monomers, highlighting the allosteric site; however, unlike previous studies, binding is not accompanied by conformational changes, suggesting that binding may cause changes in protein dynamics rather than large conformation changes. DHDPR from A. thaliana (At-DHDPR2 has similar specificity for both NADH and NADPH during catalysis, and has tighter binding of substrate than has previously been reported. While all known bacterial DHDPR enzymes have a tetrameric structure, analytical ultracentrifugation, and scattering data unequivocally show that At-DHDPR2 exists as a dimer in solution. The exact arrangement of the dimeric protein is as yet unknown, but ab initio modelling of x-ray scattering data is consistent with an elongated structure in solution, which does not correspond to any of the possible dimeric pairings observed in the X-ray crystal structure of DHDPR from other organisms. This increased knowledge of the structure and function of plant lysine biosynthetic enzymes will aid future work aimed at improving primary production.

  6. A sequential multi-target Mps1 phosphorylation cascade promotes spindle checkpoint signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhejian; Gao, Haishan; Jia, Luying; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao

    2017-01-10

    The master spindle checkpoint kinase Mps1 senses kinetochore-microtubule attachment and promotes checkpoint signaling to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. The kinetochore scaffold Knl1, when phosphorylated by Mps1, recruits checkpoint complexes Bub1-Bub3 and BubR1-Bub3 to unattached kinetochores. Active checkpoint signaling ultimately enhances the assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) consisting of BubR1-Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20, which inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome bound to Cdc20 (APC/C(Cdc20)) to delay anaphase onset. Using in vitro reconstitution, we show that Mps1 promotes APC/C inhibition by MCC components through phosphorylating Bub1 and Mad1. Phosphorylated Bub1 binds to Mad1-Mad2. Phosphorylated Mad1 directly interacts with Cdc20. Mutations of Mps1 phosphorylation sites in Bub1 or Mad1 abrogate the spindle checkpoint in human cells. Therefore, Mps1 promotes checkpoint activation through sequentially phosphorylating Knl1, Bub1, and Mad1. This sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade makes the checkpoint highly responsive to Mps1 and to kinetochore-microtubule attachment.

  7. Akt-dependent Girdin phosphorylation regulates repair processes after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Shinji; Takefuji, Mikito; Maeda, Kengo; Noda, Tomonori; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Koichi; Enomoto, Atsushi; Asai, Naoya; Takahashi, Masahide; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial infarction is a leading cause of death, and cardiac rupture following myocardial infarction leads to extremely poor prognostic feature. A large body of evidence suggests that Akt is involved in several cardiac diseases. We previously reported that Akt-mediated Girdin phosphorylation is essential for angiogenesis and neointima formation. The role of Girdin expression and phosphorylation in myocardial infarction, however, is not understood. Therefore, we employed Girdin-deficient mice and Girdin S1416A knock-in (Girdin(SA/SA)) mice, replacing the Akt phosphorylation site with alanine, to address this question. We found that Girdin was expressed and phosphorylated in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro and that its phosphorylation was crucial for the proliferation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts. In vivo, Girdin was localized in non-cardiomyocyte interstitial cells and phosphorylated in α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells, which are likely to be cardiac myofibroblasts. In an acute myocardial infarction model, Girdin(SA/SA) suppressed the accumulation and proliferation of cardiac myofibroblasts in the infarcted area. Furthermore, lower collagen deposition in Girdin(SA/SA) mice impaired cardiac repair and resulted in increased mortality attributed to cardiac rupture. These findings suggest an important role of Girdin phosphorylation at serine 1416 in cardiac repair after acute myocardial infarction and provide insights into the complex mechanism of cardiac rupture through the Akt/Girdin-mediated regulation of cardiac myofibroblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Responses of cyclic phosphorylation of MAPK-like proteins in intertidal macroalgae after environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parages, María L; Capasso, Juan M; Niell, F Xavier; Jiménez, Carlos

    2014-02-15

    The presence and activation of MAPK-like proteins in intertidal macroalgae is described in the current study. Two MAPK-like proteins of 40 and 42 kDa in size similar to p38 and JNK, of mammalian cells have been identified in six representative species of intertidal macroalgae from the Strait of Gibraltar (Southern Spain), namely in the chlorophytes Ulva rigida and Chaetomorpha aerea, the rhodophytes Corallina elongata and Jania rubens, and the phaeophytes Dictyota dichotoma and Dilophus spiralis. Phosphorylation of MAPK-like proteins was studied during semi-tidal cycles. Analysis of p38-like and JNK-like MAPKs in macroalgae protein extracts was carried out by using specific antibodies against the phosphorylated forms of both MAPKs. Protein blot analysis of samples collected from 2009 to 2011 in natural growing sites on days when either low or high tide occurred at midday, indicated that MAPK-like proteins in all species were highly phosphorylated in response to desiccation imposed by low tide or high irradiance. Phosphorylation of p38-like MAPK always preceded that of JNK-like MAPK. In addition, phosphorylation of MAPKs was fastest in rhodophytes, followed by chlorophytes and then finally phaeophytes. In the first group, phosphorylation was mostly dependent on desiccation, whereas both high irradiance and desiccation were responsible for p38-like and JNK-like phosphorylation in chlorophytes. In phaeophytes, high irradiance was mostly responsible for MAPK-like activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Manipulation of alternative oxidase can influence salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chevaun Anne; Melino, Vanessa Jane; Sweetman, Crystal; Soole, Kathleen Lydia

    2009-12-01

    The growth and development of plants can be limited by environmental stresses such as salinity. It has been suggested that the non-phosphorylating alternative respiratory pathway in plants, mediated by the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [NAD(P)H DH] and alternative oxidase (AOX), is important during environmental stresses. The involvement of this alternative pathway in a stress response may be linked to its capacity to uncouple carbon metabolism from adenylate control and/or the minimization of the formation of destructive reactive oxygen species (ROS). Salinity stress is a widespread, adverse environmental stress, which leads to an ionic imbalance, hyperosmotic stress and oxidative stress, the latter being the result of ROS formation. In this study, we show that salinity stress of Arabidopsis thaliana plants resulted in the formation of ROS, increased levels of Na+ in both the shoot and the root and an increase in transcription of Ataox1a, Atndb2 and Atndb4 genes, indicating the formation of an abridged non-phosphorylating electron transport chain in response to salinity stress. Furthermore, plants constitutively over-expressing Ataox1a, with increased AOX capacity, showed lower ROS formation, 30-40% improved growth rates and lower shoot Na+ content compared with controls, when grown under salinity stress conditions. Thus, more active AOX in roots and shoots can improve the salt tolerance of Arabidopsis as defined by its ability to grow more effectively in the presence of NaCl, and maintain lower shoot Na+ content. AOX does have an important role in stress adaptation in plants, and these results provide some validation of the hypothesis that AOX can play a critical role in cell re-programming under salinity stress.

  10. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.

    2005-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that this post-translational modifi cation could regulate physiological processes ranging from stress response and exopolysaccharide synthesis to DNA metabolism. Some interesting work in this fi eld was done in Bacillus subtilis , and we here present the current state of knowledge...... on protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in this gram-positive model organism. With its two kinases, two kinase modulators, three phosphatases and at least four different tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, B. subtilis is the bacterium with the highest number of presently known participants in the global network...

  11. Phosphorylation-Dependent Activation of the ESCRT Function of ALIX in Cytokinetic Abscission and Retroviral Budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sheng; Sun, Le; Zhou, Xi; Wu, Chuanfen; Wang, Ruoning; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2016-02-08

    The modular adaptor protein ALIX is a key player in multiple ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling processes. ALIX is normally present in a closed conformation due to an intramolecular interaction that renders ALIX unable to perform its ESCRT functions. Here we demonstrate that M phase-specific phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site within the proline-rich domain (PRD) of ALIX transforms cytosolic ALIX from closed to open conformation. Defining the role of this mechanism of ALIX regulation in three classical ESCRT-mediated processes revealed that phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site in the PRD is required for ALIX to function in cytokinetic abscission and retroviral budding, but not in multivesicular body sorting of activated epidermal growth factor receptor. Thus, phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site in the PRD is one of the major mechanisms that activates the ESCRT function of ALIX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Paxillin Enables Attachment-independent Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Transformation by RAS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ramon; Brimer, Nicole; Lyons, Charles; Pol, Scott Vande

    2011-01-01

    Paxillin and HIC5 are closely related adapter proteins that regulate cell migration and are tyrosine-phosphorylated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Paxillin, HIC5, and FAK tyrosine phosphorylation increase upon cell attachment and decrease upon detachment from extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly, we found that although FAK tyrosine phosphorylation in attached cells did not require paxillin, in detached fibroblasts there was remaining FAK tyrosine phosphorylation that required expression of paxillin and was not supported by HIC5. The support of attachment-independent FAK tyrosine phosphorylation required the paxillin LIM domains and suggested that paxillin might facilitate oncogenic transformation. Paxillin but not HIC5 augmented anchorage-independent cell proliferation induced by RAS. Both anchorage-independent FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and RAS-induced colony formation required multiple docking sites on paxillin, including LD4 (docking sites for FAK-Src and GIT1/2-PIX-NCK-PAK complex), LD5, and all four carboxyl-terminal LIM domains (that bind tubulin and PTP-PEST). Analysis using paxillin mutants dissociated domains of paxillin that are required for regulation of cell migration from domains that are required for anchorage-independent cell proliferation and demonstrated essential functions of the paxillin LIM domains that are not found in HIC5 LIM domains. These results highlight the role of paxillin in facilitating attachment-independent signal transduction implicated in cancer. PMID:21900245

  13. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKeown, Peter C

    2011-08-12

    Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs) displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination). We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag) which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i) their size and (ii) which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1 seeds was

  14. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennblom Trevor J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination. We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i their size and (ii which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1

  15. ROS-activated ATM-dependent phosphorylation of cytoplasmic substrates identified by large scale phosphoproteomics screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signalling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoi......ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signalling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle...... to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and A-T (ataxia-telangiectasia) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites...

  16. Regulation of the autophagy protein LC3 by phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherra, Salvatore J.; Kulich, Scott M.; Uechi, Guy; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Mountzouris, John; Day, Billy W.

    2010-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a major catabolic pathway that impacts cell survival, differentiation, tumorigenesis, and neurodegeneration. Although bulk degradation sustains carbon sources during starvation, autophagy contributes to shrinkage of differentiated neuronal processes. Identification of autophagy-related genes has spurred rapid advances in understanding the recruitment of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) in autophagy induction, although braking mechanisms remain less understood. Using mass spectrometry, we identified a direct protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site on LC3 that regulates its participation in autophagy. Both metabolic (rapamycin) and pathological (MPP+) inducers of autophagy caused dephosphorylation of endogenous LC3. The pseudophosphorylated LC3 mutant showed reduced recruitment to autophagosomes, whereas the nonphosphorylatable mutant exhibited enhanced puncta formation. Finally, autophagy-dependent neurite shortening induced by expression of a Parkinson disease–associated G2019S mutation in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 was inhibited by dibutyryl–cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cytoplasmic expression of the PKA catalytic subunit, or the LC3 phosphorylation mimic. These data demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in regulating LC3 activity. PMID:20713600

  17. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation.

  18. Characterizing genomic variation of Arabidopsis thaliana: the roles of geography and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Jesse R; Des Marais, David L; McKay, John K; Richards, James H; Juenger, Thomas E; Keitt, Timothy H

    2012-11-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana inhabits diverse climates and exhibits varied phenology across its range. Although A. thaliana is an extremely well-studied model species, the relationship between geography, growing season climate and its genetic variation is poorly characterized. We used redundancy analysis (RDA) to quantify the association of genomic variation [214 051 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] with geography and climate among 1003 accessions collected from 447 locations in Eurasia. We identified climate variables most correlated with genomic variation, which may be important selective gradients related to local adaptation across the species range. Climate variation among sites of origin explained slightly more genomic variation than geographical distance. Large-scale spatial gradients and early spring temperatures explained the most genomic variation, while growing season and summer conditions explained the most after controlling for spatial structure. SNP variation in Scandinavia showed the greatest climate structure among regions, possibly because of relatively consistent phenology and life history of populations in this region. Climate variation explained more variation among nonsynonymous SNPs than expected by chance, suggesting that much of the climatic structure of SNP correlations is due to changes in coding sequence that may underlie local adaptation. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Long-chain base kinase1 affects freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Yiting

    2017-06-01

    Long-chain base kinases (LCBKs) phosphorylate sphingolipid-derived long-chain base lipids and participate in the regulation of stress responses in plants. Here, we isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, lcbk1-2, which was extremely sensitive to freezing temperatures with or without cold acclimation. Physiological assays revealed that concentrations of osmolytes (proline and soluble sugars) and the activity of superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased in the lcbk1-2 mutant, compared with wild type. Also, the balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was disrupted in the lcbk1-2 mutant with or without cold treatment and, consistent with this, gene expression profiling analysis showed that the expression of cold-responsive ROS-scavenging genes was substantially decreased in the lcbk1-2 mutant. The expression of membrane lipid-related genes, which are linked to freezing tolerance in plants, was also impaired in the lcbk1-2 mutant. Furthermore, transgenic lines overexpressing LCBK1 showed enhanced freezing tolerance with over-accumulation of osmolytes. Collectively, our results suggested that LCBK1 functions as a novel positive regulator of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis and may participate in the accumulation of osmolytes, the regulation of ROS homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Lack of phosphoserine phosphatase activity alters pollen and tapetum development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tornero, M; Anoman, A D; Rosa-Téllez, S; Ros, R

    2015-06-01

    Formation of mature pollen grain, an essential process for the reproduction of higher plants, is affected in lines that are deficient in the enzymes of the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis (PPSB). Mutants of phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), the enzyme that catalyses the last step of PPSB, are embryo-lethal. When they are complemented with a construct carrying PSP1 cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter (psp1.1 35S:PSP1), which is poorly expressed in anther tissues, plants display a wild-type phenotype, but are male-sterile. The pollen from the psp1.1 35S:PSP1 lines are shrunken and unviable. Here we report the morphological alterations that appear in the psp1.1 35S:PSP1 lines during microspore development. We show that the pollen wall from these lines presents a normal exine layer, but a shrunken and collapsed shape. Lack of PSP activity also affects oil bodies formation in the tapetosomes of tapetal cells which, in turn, may influence microspore pollen coat formation. All these results highlight the important role of the PPSB in the normal development of microspores in Arabidopsis thaliana. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. TNNI3K is a novel mediator of myofilament function and phosphorylates cardiac troponin I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Lin; Song, Li; Zhang, Yan-Wan; Ye, Jue; Xu, Rui-Xia; Shi, Na; Meng, Xian-Min [Core Laboratory, Fu Wai Hospital and Cardiovascular Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2013-02-01

    The phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) plays an important role in the contractile dysfunction associated with heart failure. Human cardiac troponin I-interacting kinase (TNNI3K) is a novel cardiac-specific functional kinase that can bind to cTnI in a yeast two-hybrid screen. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether TNNI3K can phosphorylate cTnI at specific sites and to examine whether the phosphorylation of cTnI caused by TNNI3K can regulate cardiac myofilament contractile function. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to confirm that TNNI3K could interact with cTnI. Kinase assays further indicated that TNNI3K did not phosphorylate cTnI at Ser23/24 and Ser44, but directly phosphorylated Ser43 and Thr143 in vitro. The results obtained for adult rat cardiomyocytes also indicated that enhanced phosphorylation of cTnI at Ser43 and Thr143 correlated with rTNNI3K (rat TNNI3K) overexpression, and phosphorylation was reduced when rTNNI3K was knocked down. To determine the contractile function modulated by TNNI3K-mediated phosphorylation of cTnI, cardiomyocyte contraction was studied in adult rat ventricular myocytes. The contraction of cardiomyocytes increased with rTNNI3K overexpression and decreased with rTNNI3K knockdown. We conclude that TNNI3K may be a novel mediator of cTnI phosphorylation and contribute to the regulation of cardiac myofilament contraction function.

  2. Regulation of gap junction conductance by calcineurin through Cx43 phosphorylation: implications for action potential conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabr, Rita I; Hatch, Fiona S; Salvage, Samantha C; Orlowski, Alejandro; Lampe, Paul D; Fry, Christopher H

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are associated with raised intracellular [Ca 2+ ] and slowed action potential conduction caused by reduced gap junction (GJ) electrical conductance (Gj). Ventricular GJs are composed of connexin proteins (Cx43), with Gj determined by Cx43 phosphorylation status. Connexin phosphorylation is an interplay between protein kinases and phosphatases but the precise pathways are unknown. We aimed to identify key Ca 2+ -dependent phosphorylation sites on Cx43 that regulate cardiac gap junction conductance and action potential conduction velocity. We investigated the role of the Ca 2+ -dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. Intracellular [Ca 2+ ] was raised in guinea-pig myocardium by a low-Na solution or increased stimulation. Conduction velocity and Gj were measured in multicellular strips. Phosphorylation of Cx43 serine residues (S365 and S368) and of the intermediary regulator I1 at threonine35 was measured by Western blot. Measurements were made in the presence and absence of inhibitors to calcineurin, I1 or protein phosphatase-1 and phosphatase-2.Raised [Ca 2 + ] i decreased Gj, reduced Cx43 phosphorylation at S365 and increased it at S368; these changes were reversed by calcineurin inhibitors. Cx43-S368 phosphorylation was reversed by the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine. Raised [Ca 2+ ] i also decreased I1 phosphorylation, also prevented by calcineurin inhibitors, to increase activity of the Ca 2+ -independent phosphatase, PPI. The PP1 inhibitor, tautomycin, prevented Cx43-365 dephosphorylation, Cx43-S368 phosphorylation and Gj reduction in raised [Ca 2+ ] i . PP2A had no role. Conduction velocity was reduced by raised [Ca 2+ ] i and reversed by calcineurin inhibitors. Reduced action potential conduction and Gj in raised [Ca 2+ ] are regulated by calcineurin-dependent Cx43-S365 phosphorylation, leading to Cx43-S368 dephosphorylation. The calcineurin action is indirect, via I1 dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of PP1.

  3. Sonic Hedgehog dependent phosphorylation by CK1α and GRK2 is required for ciliary accumulation and activation of smoothened.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling regulates embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the GPCR-like protein Smoothened (Smo, but how vertebrate Smo is activated remains poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hh dependent phosphorylation activates Smo. Whether this is also the case in vertebrates is unclear, owing to the marked sequence divergence between vertebrate and Drosophila Smo (dSmo and the involvement of primary cilia in vertebrate Hh signaling. Here we demonstrate that mammalian Smo (mSmo is activated through multi-site phosphorylation of its carboxyl-terminal tail by CK1α and GRK2. Phosphorylation of mSmo induces its active conformation and simultaneously promotes its ciliary accumulation. We demonstrate that graded Hh signals induce increasing levels of mSmo phosphorylation that fine-tune its ciliary localization, conformation, and activity. We show that mSmo phosphorylation is induced by its agonists and oncogenic mutations but is blocked by its antagonist cyclopamine, and efficient mSmo phosphorylation depends on the kinesin-II ciliary motor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Hh signaling recruits CK1α to initiate mSmo phosphorylation, and phosphorylation further increases the binding of CK1α and GRK2 to mSmo, forming a positive feedback loop that amplifies and/or sustains mSmo phosphorylation. Hence, despite divergence in their primary sequences and their subcellular trafficking, mSmo and dSmo employ analogous mechanisms for their activation.

  4. A sesquiterpenelactone from Inula britannica induces anti-tumor effects dependent on Bcl-2 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafi, Mohamed M; Bai, Nai-Sheng; Chi-Tang-Ho; Rosen, Robert T; White, Eileen; Perez, Denise; Dipaola, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    The over-expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in cancer is associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. The phosphorylation of Bcl-2 is one mechanism by which anti-microtubule agents, such as paclitaxel or docetaxel, may inactivate Bcl-2. Although initially active in clinical studies, current anti-microtubule agents are only temporarily effective and the discovery of new agents is warranted. We isolated and identified two known sesquiterpenelactones, O, O-diacetylbritannilactone (OODABL) and O-acetylbritaanilactone (OABL) from the flowers of the medicinal plant Inula britannica and studied their mechanism of anti-tumor effects. To determine the biological significance of Bcl-2 phosphorylation, we used a baby rat kidney (BRK-p53) cell line that was transformed with EIA and a temperature-sensitive mutant p53. The BRK-p53 cell line was transfected with either a vector with wild type Bcl-2 or a vector in which Bcl-2 had mutations in the paclitaxel phosphorylation sites (pcDNA3.1 V5/His Bcl-2 S70, 87A). OODABL and OABL induced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 in breast, ovary and prostate cancer cell lines and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. Using the BRK cells with mutant Bcl-2 (BRK-Bcl-2-mt) and control (BRK-Bcl-2-wt), we found that OODABL induced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at sites similar to paclitaxel. Phosphorylation of Bcl-2 was important for OODABL-induced cytotoxicity, since the abrogation of phosphorylation in BRK-Bcl-2-mt cells decreased OODABL-induced cytotoxicity. We concluded that OODABL is cytotoxic in multiple tumor cell lines, and the cytotoxicity is dependent, at least in part, on the phosphorylation of Bcl-2.

  5. Metabolic changes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing chalcone synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dao, Thi Thanh Hien

    2010-01-01

    The study has shown that it is possible to introduce the heterologous CHS gene in Arabidopsis thaliana and common multicopies of transgenes containing plants were obtained. Analysis of the change in metabolome of CHS transgenic plants, high expression transgenic lines can be identified by markers

  6. Multi-element bioimaging of Arabidopsis thaliana roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persson, Daniel Pergament; Chen, Anle; Aarts, Mark G.M.; Salt, David E.; Schjoerring, Jan K.; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of root function is central for the development of plants with more efficient nutrient uptake and translocation. We here present a method for multielement bioimaging at the cellular level in roots of the genetic model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using

  7. The influences of Hygromycin B on growth of Arabidopsis thaliana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling cotyledon and leaf were evidently affected by Hygromycin B. As compared to the control, cotyledon of seedling on Murashige and Skoog (MS) with Hygromycin B was very small and its leaf was not formed. Along with increase in culture time, cells in the ...

  8. Human intrinsic factor expressed in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Laursen, Niels B; Nexø, Ebba

    2003-01-01

    and contamination by other B12 binders. We tested the use of recombinant plants for large-scale production of pathogen-free human recombinant IF. Human IF was successfully expressed in the recombinant plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Extract from fresh plants possessed high B12-binding capacity corresponding to 70 mg...

  9. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Zan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least one accession. Thousands of genes had high transcript levels in some accessions, but no transcripts at all in others, and this pattern was correlated with the genome-wide genotype. In total, 2669 eQTL were mapped in the largest population, and 717 of them were replicated in the other population. A total of 646 cis-eQTL-regulated genes that lacked detectable transcripts in some accessions was found, and for 159 of these we identified one, or several, common structural variants in the populations that were shown to be likely contributors to the lack of detectable RNA transcripts for these genes. This study thus provides new insights into the overall genetic regulation of global gene expression diversity in the leaf of natural A. thaliana accessions. Further, it also shows that strong cis-acting polymorphisms, many of which are likely to be structural variations, make important contributions to the transcriptional variation in the worldwide A. thaliana population.

  10. Experimental and genetic analysis of root development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.; McKhann, H.; Berg, C. van den; Willemsen, V.; Wolkenfelt, H.; Vrieze, G. de; Weisbeek, P.

    1996-01-01

    The cellular organisation of the Arabidopsis thaliana root is remarkably regular. A fate map of the primary root and root meristem that predicts the developmental destinies of cells within the embryonic root primordium has been constructed. Nevertheless, laser ablation experiments demonstrate that

  11. Highlights of meiotic genes in Arabidopsis thaliana | Consiglio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meiosis is a fascinating and complex phenomenon and, despite its central role in sexual plant reproduction, little is known on the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. We review the progress made in recent years using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for isolating meiotic genes. In particular, emphasis is given on ...

  12. Functional detection of chemopreventive glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross; Dalebout; Grubb; Abel

    2000-11-06

    Natural isothiocyanates, derived from glucosinolates by myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis, are potent chemopreventive agents that favorably modify carcinogen metabolism in mammals by inhibiting metabolic activation of carcinogens and/or by inducing carcinogen-detoxifying enzymes. Methylsulfinylalkyl isothiocyanates are potent selective inducers of mammalian Phase 2 detoxification enzymes such as quinone reductase [NADP(H):quinone-acceptor oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.99.2]. Members of the Cruciferae family, including the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heyhn, synthesize methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. We have adapted a colorimetric bioassay for quinone reductase activity in Hepa 1c1c7 murine hepatoma cells as a versatile tool to rapidly monitor methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate content in A. thaliana leaf extracts. Using wild type plants and mutant plants defective in the synthesis of 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate (glucoraphanin), we have demonstrated that A. thaliana (ecotype Columbia) is a rich source of Phase 2 enzyme inducers and that methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, predominantly glucoraphanin, account for about 80% of the quinone reductase inducer potency of Columbia leaf extracts. We have optimized leaf extraction conditions and the quinone reductase bioassay to allow for screening of large numbers of plant extracts in a molecular genetic approach to dissecting glucosinolate biosynthesis in A. thaliana.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana chalcone synthase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinbaum, R.L.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1988-05-01

    The authors cloned an Arabiodpsis thaliana chalcone synthase (CHS) gene on the basis of cross-hybridization with a Petroselinum hortense CHS cDNA clone. The protein sequence deduced from the A. thaliana CHS DNA sequence is at least 85% homologous to the CHS sequences from P. hortense, Antirrhinum majus, and Petunia hybrida. Southern blot analysis indicated that CHS is a single-copy gene in A. thaliana. High-intensity light treatment of A. thaliana plants for 24 h caused a 50-fold increase in CHS enzyme activity and an accumulation of visibly detectable levels of anthocyanin pigments in the vegetative structures of these plants. A corresponding increase in the steady-state level of CHS mRNA was detected after high-intensity light treatment for the same period of time. The accumulation of CHS mRNA in response to high-intensity light was due, at least in part, to an increased rate of transcription of the CHS gene as demonstrated by nuclear runoff experiment.

  14. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    phosphorylated tyro - sine indicated by an asterisk (*). LcA− and LcA+ represent Src reaction mixtures that were incubated without and with (0.2mM...CONCLUSION In vitro reaction of LcA, LcB, LcC1, LcD, LcE, and LcG with Tyrosine kinase Src resulted in phosphorylation of several tyro - sine residues

  15. Physicochemical mechanisms of protein regulation by phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Hafumi; Shaytan, Alexey; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation offers a dynamic way to regulate protein activity and subcellular localization, which is achieved through reversibility and fast kinetics of posttranslational modifications. Adding or removing a dianionic phosphate group somewhere on a protein often changes the protein’s structural properties, its stability and dynamics. Moreover, the majority of signaling pathways involve an extensive set of protein-protein interactions, and phosphorylation can be used to regulate and modulat...

  16. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eToth

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are most potent of all toxins. Their N-terminal light chain domain (Lc translocates into peripheral cholinergic neurons to exert its endoproteolytic action leading to muscle paralysis. Therapeutic development against these toxins is a major challenge due to their in vitro and in vivo structural differences. Although three-dimensional structures and reaction mechanisms are very similar, the seven serotypes designated A through G vastly vary in their intracellular catalytic stability. To investigate if protein phosphorylation could account for this difference, we employed Src-catalyzed tyrosine phosphorylation of the Lc of six serotypes namely LcA, LcB, LcC1, LcD, LcE, and LcG. Very little phosphorylation was observed with LcD and LcE but LcA, LcB and LcG were maximally phosphorylated by Src. Phosphorylation of LcA, LcB, and LcG did not affect their secondary and tertiary structures and thermostability significantly. Phosphorylation of Y250 and Y251 made LcA resistant to autocatalysis and drastically reduced its kcat/Km for catalysis. A tyrosine residue present near the essential cysteine at the C-terminal tail of LcA, LcB and LcG was readily phosphorylated in vitro. Inclusion of a competitive inhibitor protected this Y426 of LcA from phosphorylation, shedding light on the role of the C-terminus in the enzyme’s substrate or product binding.

  17. Mcm2 phosphorylation and the response to replicative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stead Brent E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The replicative helicase in eukaryotic cells is comprised of minichromosome maintenance (Mcm proteins 2 through 7 (Mcm2-7 and is a key target for regulation of cell proliferation. In addition, it is regulated in response to replicative stress. One of the protein kinases that targets Mcm2-7 is the Dbf4-dependent kinase Cdc7 (DDK. In a previous study, we showed that alanine mutations of the DDK phosphorylation sites at S164 and S170 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm2 result in sensitivity to caffeine and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS leading us to suggest that DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2 is required in response to replicative stress. Results We show here that a strain with the mcm2 allele lacking DDK phosphorylation sites (mcm2AA is also sensitive to the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, hydroxyurea (HU and to the base analogue 5-fluorouracil (5-FU but not the radiomimetic drug, phleomycin. We screened the budding yeast non-essential deletion collection for synthetic lethal interactions with mcm2AA and isolated deletions that include genes involved in the control of genome integrity and oxidative stress. In addition, the spontaneous mutation rate, as measured by mutations in CAN1, was increased in the mcm2AA strain compared to wild type, whereas with a phosphomimetic allele (mcm2EE the mutation rate was decreased. These results led to the idea that the mcm2AA strain is unable to respond properly to DNA damage. We examined this by screening the deletion collection for suppressors of the caffeine sensitivity of mcm2AA. Deletions that decrease spontaneous DNA damage, increase homologous recombination or slow replication forks were isolated. Many of the suppressors of caffeine sensitivity suppressed other phenotypes of mcm2AA including sensitivity to genotoxic drugs, the increased frequency of cells with RPA foci and the increased mutation rate. Conclusions Together these observations point to a role for DDK-mediated phosphorylation

  18. Partial purification of a spinach thylakoid protein kinase that can phosphorylate light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, R.D.; Hind, G.; Bennett, J.

    1985-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation in plant tissues is particularly marked in chloroplasts, protein kinase activity being associated with the outer envelope, the soluble stromal fraction, and the thylakoid membrane. Furthermore, thylakoid-bound activity probably includes several distinct kinases, as suggested by studies of divalent cation specificity and thermal lability carried out with intact thylakoids and by subfractionation of solubilized membranes. Illumination of thylakoids, particularly with red light, promotes the rapid and extensive phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCII) on a threonine residue near the amino terminus of the protein. This phosphorylation is thought to be involved in regulating the distribution of absorbed quanta between photosystems II and I and is modulated by the redox state of the thylakoid plastoquinone pool. Neither of the thylakoid kinases reported to date was capable of phosphorylating purified LHCII in vitro or of incorporating phosphate into threonyl residues of exogenous substrates, that some LHCII phosphorylation was catalyzed by a preliminary fraction led workers to suggest that at least one other kinase remained to be isolated. Here, the authors report the solubilization and partial purification of a protein kinase from spinach thylakoids that is capable of phosphorylating LHCII in vitro, and they show that the specific site of phosphorylation is very nearly the same as, if not identical with, the site phosphorylated in organello.

  19. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Toledo

    Full Text Available MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25 in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS.

  20. Edaphic history over seedling characters predicts integration and plasticity of integration across geologically variable populations ofArabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Elsa A; Murren, Courtney J

    2017-12-01

    Studies on phenotypic plasticity and plasticity of integration have uncovered functionally linked modules of aboveground traits and seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana , but we lack details about belowground variation in adult plants. Functional modules can be comprised of additional suites of traits that respond to environmental variation. We assessed whether shoot and root responses to nutrient environments in adult A. thaliana were predictable from seedling traits or population-specific geologic soil characteristics at the site of origin. We compared 17 natural accessions from across the native range of A. thaliana using 14-day-old seedlings grown on agar or sand and plants grown to maturity across nutrient treatments in sand. We measured aboveground size, reproduction, timing traits, root length, and root diameter. Edaphic characteristics were obtained from a global-scale dataset and related to field data. We detected significant among-population variation in root traits of seedlings and adults and in plasticity in aboveground and belowground traits of adult plants. Phenotypic integration of roots and shoots varied by population and environment. Relative integration was greater in roots than in shoots, and integration was predicted by edaphic soil history, particularly organic carbon content, whereas seedling traits did not predict later ontogenetic stages. Soil environment of origin has significant effects on phenotypic plasticity in response to nutrients, and on phenotypic integration of root modules and shoot modules. Root traits varied among populations in reproductively mature individuals, indicating potential for adaptive and integrated functional responses of root systems in annuals. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  1. Redirection of auxin flow in Arabidopsis thaliana roots after infection by root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Tina; Goverse, Aska; Haegeman, Annelies; Warmerdam, Sonja; Wanjau, Cecilia; Jahani, Mona; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2016-08-01

    Plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes induce the formation of giant cells within the plant root, and it has been recognized that auxin accumulates in these feeding sites. Here, we studied the role of the auxin transport system governed by AUX1/LAX3 influx proteins and different PIN efflux proteins during feeding site development in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Data generated via promoter-reporter line and protein localization analyses evoke a model in which auxin is being imported at the basipetal side of the feeding site by the concerted action of the influx proteins AUX1 and LAX3, and the efflux protein PIN3. Mutants in auxin influx proteins AUX1 and LAX3 bear significantly fewer and smaller galls, revealing that auxin import into the feeding sites is needed for their development and expansion. The feeding site development in auxin export (PIN) mutants was only slightly hampered. Expression of some PINs appears to be suppressed in galls, probably to prevent auxin drainage. Nevertheless, a functional PIN4 gene seems to be a prerequisite for proper nematode development and gall expansion, most likely by removing excessive auxin to stabilize the hormone level in the feeding site. Our data also indicate a role of local auxin peaks in nematode attraction towards the root. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. The roles of genetic drift and natural selection in quantitative trait divergence along an altitudinal gradient in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y; Widmer, A; Karrenberg, S

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how natural selection and genetic drift shape biological variation is a central topic in biology, yet our understanding of the agents of natural selection and their target traits is limited. We investigated to what extent selection along an altitudinal gradient or genetic drift contributed to variation in ecologically relevant traits in Arabidopsis thaliana. We collected seeds from 8 to 14 individuals from each of 14 A. thaliana populations originating from sites between 800 and 2700 m above sea level in the Swiss Alps. Seed families were grown with and without vernalization, corresponding to winter-annual and summer-annual life histories, respectively. We analyzed putatively neutral genetic divergence between these populations using 24 simple sequence repeat markers. We measured seven traits related to growth, phenology and leaf morphology that are rarely reported in A. thaliana and performed analyses of altitudinal clines, as well as overall QST-FST comparisons and correlation analyses among pair-wise QST, FST and altitude of origin differences. Multivariate analyses suggested adaptive differentiation along altitude in the entire suite of traits, particularly when expressed in the summer-annual life history. Of the individual traits, a decrease in rosette leaf number in the vegetative state and an increase in leaf succulence with increasing altitude could be attributed to adaptive divergence. Interestingly, these patterns relate well to common within- and between-species trends of smaller plant size and thicker leaves at high altitude. Our results thus offer exciting possibilities to unravel the underlying mechanisms for these conspicuous trends using the model species A. thaliana.

  3. AtCDKA;1 silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana reduces reproduction of sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Cappelle, Elke; Plovie, Eva; Kyndt, Tina; Grunewald, Wim; Cannoot, Bernard; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2008-10-01

    The activity of the Arabidopsis thaliana cyclin-dependent kinase AtCDKA;1 is important throughout G(1)/S and G(2)/M transitions and guarantees the progression of the cell cycle. Inhibitor studies have shown that activation of the cell cycle is important for the development of nematode feeding sites. The aim of this study was to silence the expression of the AtCDKA;1 gene in nematode feeding sites to interfere with their development. Therefore, sense and antisense constructs were made for the AtCDKA;1 gene and fused to a nematode-inducible promoter which was activated in nematode feeding sites at an earlier time point than AtCDKA;1. Two transgenic A. thaliana lines (S266 and S306) containing inverted repeats of the AtCDKA;1 gene and with reduced AtCDKA;1 expression in seedlings and galls were analysed in more detail. When the lines were infected with the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita, significantly fewer galls and egg masses developed on the roots of the transgenic than wild-type plants. Infection of the AtCDKA;1-silenced lines with Heterodera schachtii resulted in significantly fewer cysts compared with controls. The S266 and S306 lines showed no phenotypic aberrations in root morphology, and analysis at different time points after infection demonstrated that the number of penetrating nematodes was the same, but fewer nematodes developed to maturity in the silenced lines. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that silencing of CDKA;1 can be used as a strategy to produce transgenic plants less susceptible to plant-parasitic nematodes.

  4. Allosteric interactions direct binding and phosphorylation of ASF/SF2 by SRPK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nhat; Ma, Chen-Ting; Giang, Ngoc; Hagopian, Jonathan; Ngo, Jacky; Adams, Joseph; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2009-12-08

    ASF/SF2, a member of the serine-arginine (SR) protein family, has two RRM domains (RRM1 and RRM2) and a C-terminal domain rich in RS dipeptides. SR protein kinase 1 (SRPK1) phosphorylates approximately 12 of these serines using a semiprocessive mechanism. The X-ray structure of the ASF/SF2-SRPK1 complex revealed several features of the complex that raised intriguing questions about how the substrate is phosphorylated by the kinase. The part of the RS domain destined to be phosphorylated at later stages of the reaction docks to a kinase groove distal to the active site while the neighboring RRM2 binds near the active site [Ngo, J. C., et al. (2008) Mol. Cell 29, 563-576]. In this study, we investigate the interplay between the RS domain and RRM2 for stable association and phosphorylation of ASF/SF2. Despite several contacts in the enzyme-substrate complex, free RRM2 does not bind efficiently to SRPK1 unless the docking groove is occupied by the RS domain. This domain cross-talk enhances the processive phosphorylation of the RS domain. The RRM-SRPK1 contact residues control the folding of a critical beta-strand in RRM2. Unfolding of this structural element may force the N-terminal serines of the RS domain into the active site for sequential phosphorylation. Thus, ASF/SF2 represents a new class of substrates that use unique primary sequence to induce allosteric binding, processive phosphorylation, and product release.

  5. Kinome analysis of receptor-induced phosphorylation in human natural killer cells.

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    Sebastian König

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural killer (NK cells contribute to the defense against infected and transformed cells through the engagement of multiple germline-encoded activation receptors. Stimulation of the Fc receptor CD16 alone is sufficient for NK cell activation, whereas other receptors, such as 2B4 (CD244 and DNAM-1 (CD226, act synergistically. After receptor engagement, protein kinases play a major role in signaling networks controlling NK cell effector functions. However, it has not been characterized systematically which of all kinases encoded by the human genome (kinome are involved in NK cell activation. RESULTS: A kinase-selective phosphoproteome approach enabled the determination of 188 kinases expressed in human NK cells. Crosslinking of CD16 as well as 2B4 and DNAM-1 revealed a total of 313 distinct kinase phosphorylation sites on 109 different kinases. Phosphorylation sites on 21 kinases were similarly regulated after engagement of either CD16 or co-engagement of 2B4 and DNAM-1. Among those, increased phosphorylation of FYN, KCC2G (CAMK2, FES, and AAK1, as well as the reduced phosphorylation of MARK2, were reproducibly observed both after engagement of CD16 and co-engagement of 2B4 and DNAM-1. Notably, only one phosphorylation on PAK4 was differentally regulated. CONCLUSIONS: The present study has identified a significant portion of the NK cell kinome and defined novel phosphorylation sites in primary lymphocytes. Regulated phosphorylations observed in the early phase of NK cell activation imply these kinases are involved in NK cell signaling. Taken together, this study suggests a largely shared signaling pathway downstream of distinct activation receptors and constitutes a valuable resource for further elucidating the regulation of NK cell effector responses.

  6. Kinome analysis of receptor-induced phosphorylation in human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Sebastian; Nimtz, Manfred; Scheiter, Maxi; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Bryceson, Yenan T; Jänsch, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the defense against infected and transformed cells through the engagement of multiple germline-encoded activation receptors. Stimulation of the Fc receptor CD16 alone is sufficient for NK cell activation, whereas other receptors, such as 2B4 (CD244) and DNAM-1 (CD226), act synergistically. After receptor engagement, protein kinases play a major role in signaling networks controlling NK cell effector functions. However, it has not been characterized systematically which of all kinases encoded by the human genome (kinome) are involved in NK cell activation. A kinase-selective phosphoproteome approach enabled the determination of 188 kinases expressed in human NK cells. Crosslinking of CD16 as well as 2B4 and DNAM-1 revealed a total of 313 distinct kinase phosphorylation sites on 109 different kinases. Phosphorylation sites on 21 kinases were similarly regulated after engagement of either CD16 or co-engagement of 2B4 and DNAM-1. Among those, increased phosphorylation of FYN, KCC2G (CAMK2), FES, and AAK1, as well as the reduced phosphorylation of MARK2, were reproducibly observed both after engagement of CD16 and co-engagement of 2B4 and DNAM-1. Notably, only one phosphorylation on PAK4 was differentally regulated. The present study has identified a significant portion of the NK cell kinome and defined novel phosphorylation sites in primary lymphocytes. Regulated phosphorylations observed in the early phase of NK cell activation imply these kinases are involved in NK cell signaling. Taken together, this study suggests a largely shared signaling pathway downstream of distinct activation receptors and constitutes a valuable resource for further elucidating the regulation of NK cell effector responses.

  7. Claudin-1 required for HCV virus entry has high potential for phosphorylation and O-glycosylation

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    Fouzia Kiran

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HCV is a leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis all over the world. Claudins belong to family of tight junction's proteins that are responsible for establishing barriers for controlling the flow of molecules around cells. For therapeutic strategies, regulation of viral entry into the host cells holds a lot of promise. During HCV infection claudin-1 is highly expressed in liver and believed to be associated with HCV virus entry after HCV binding with or without co-receptor CD81. The claudin-1 assembly with tight junctions is regulated by post translational modifications. During claudins assembly and disassembly with tight junctions, phosphorylation is required at C-terminal tail. In cellular proteins, interplay between phosphorylation and O-β-GlcNAc modification is believed to be functional switch, but it is very difficult to monitor these functional and vibrant changes in vivo. Netphos 2.0 and Disphos 1.3 programs were used for potential phosphorylation; NetPhosK 1.0 and KinasePhos for kinase prediction; and YinOYang 1.2 and OGPET to predict possible O-glycosylation sites. We also identified Yin Yang sites that may have potential for O-β-GlcNAc and phosphorylation interplay at same Ser/Thr residues. We for the first time proposed that alternate phosphorylation and O-β-GlcNAc modification on Ser 192, Ser 205, Ser 206; and Thr 191 may provide an on/off switch to regulate assembly of claudin-1 at tight junctions. In addition these phosphorylation sites may be targeted by novel chemotherapeutic agents to prevent phosphorylation lead by HCV viral entry complex.

  8. Bypass of Activation Loop Phosphorylation by Aspartate 836 in Activation of the Endoribonuclease Activity of Ire1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael C.; Šestak, Sergej; Ali, Ahmed A.; Sagini, Hanan A. M.; Brown, Max; Baty, Karen; Treumann, Achim

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bifunctional protein kinase-endoribonuclease Ire1 initiates splicing of the mRNA for the transcription factor Hac1 when unfolded proteins accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ire1 coincides with autophosphorylation of its activation loop at S840, S841, T844, and S850. Mass spectrometric analysis of Ire1 expressed in Escherichia coli identified S837 as another potential phosphorylation site in vivo. Mutation of all five potential phosphorylation sites in the activation loop decreased, but did not completely abolish, splicing of HAC1 mRNA, induction of KAR2 and PDI1 mRNAs, and expression of a β-galactosidase reporter activated by Hac1i. Phosphorylation site mutants survive low levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress better than IRE1 deletions strains. In vivo clustering and inactivation of Ire1 are not affected by phosphorylation site mutants. Mutation of D836 to alanine in the activation loop of phosphorylation site mutants nearly completely abolished HAC1 splicing, induction of KAR2, PDI1, and β-galactosidase reporters, and survival of ER stress, but it had no effect on clustering of Ire1. By itself, the D836A mutation does not confer a phenotype. These data argue that D836 can partially substitute for activation loop phosphorylation in activation of the endoribonuclease domain of Ire1. PMID:28559428

  9. Thermodynamic study of the native and phosphorylated regulatory domain of the CFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasini, Carlotta, E-mail: marasini@ge.ibf.cnr.it [Istituto di Biofisica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via De Marini 6, 16149 Genova (Italy); Galeno, Lauretta; Moran, Oscar [Istituto di Biofisica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via De Marini 6, 16149 Genova (Italy)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFTR mutations produce cystic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloride transport depends on the regulatory domain phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulatory domain is intrinsically disordered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary structure and protein stability change upon phosphorylation. -- Abstract: The regulatory domain (RD) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the defective protein in cystic fibrosis, is the region of the channel that regulates the CFTR activity with multiple phosphorylation sites. This domain is an intrinsically disordered protein, characterized by lack of stable or unique tertiary structure. The disordered character of a protein is directly correlated with its function. The flexibility of RD may be important for its regulatory role: the continuous conformational change may be necessary for the progressive phosphorylation, and thus activation, of the channel. However, the lack of a defined and stable structure results in a considerable limitation when trying to in build a unique molecular model for the RD. Moreover, several evidences indicate significant structural differences between the native, non-phosphorylated state, and the multiple phosphorylated state of the protein. The aim of our work is to provide data to describe the conformations and the thermodynamic properties in these two functional states of RD. We have done the circular dichroism (CD) spectra in samples with a different degree of phosphorylation, from the non-phosphorylated state to a bona fide completely phosphorylated state. Analysis of CD spectra showed that the random coil and {beta}-sheets secondary structure decreased with the polypeptide phosphorylation, at expenses of an increase of {alpha}-helix. This observation lead to interpret phosphorylation as a mechanism favoring a more structured state. We also studied the thermal denaturation curves of the protein in the two

  10. Discovery of protein phosphorylation motifs through exploratory data analysis.

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    Yi-Cheng Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The need for efficient algorithms to uncover biologically relevant phosphorylation motifs has become very important with rapid expansion of the proteomic sequence database along with a plethora of new information on phosphorylation sites. Here we present a novel unsupervised method, called Motif Finder (in short, F-Motif for identification of phosphorylation motifs. F-Motif uses clustering of sequence information represented by numerical features that exploit the statistical information hidden in some foreground data. Furthermore, these identified motifs are then filtered to find "actual" motifs with statistically significant motif scores. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: We have applied F-Motif to several new and existing data sets and compared its performance with two well known state-of-the-art methods. In almost all cases F-Motif could identify all statistically significant motifs extracted by the state-of-the-art methods. More importantly, in addition to this, F-Motif uncovers several novel motifs. We have demonstrated using clues from the literature that most of these new motifs discovered by F-Motif are indeed novel. We have also found some interesting phenomena. For example, for CK2 kinase, the conserved sites appear only on the right side of S. However, for CDK kinase, the adjacent site on the right of S is conserved with residue P. In addition, three different encoding methods, including a novel position contrast matrix (PCM and the simplest binary coding, are used and the ability of F-motif to discover motifs remains quite robust with respect to encoding schemes. CONCLUSIONS: An iterative algorithm proposed here uses exploratory data analysis to discover motifs from phosphorylated data. The effectiveness of F-Motif has been demonstrated using several real data sets as well as using a synthetic data set. The method is quite general in nature and can be used to find other types of motifs also. We have also provided a server for F

  11. Insights into the Phosphoryl Transfer Mechanism of Human Ubiquitous Mitochondrial Creatine Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quanjie; Fan, Shuai; Li, Xiaoyu; Jin, Yuanyuan; He, Weiqing; Zhou, Jinming; Cen, Shan; Yang, ZhaoYong

    2016-12-02

    Human ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase (uMtCK) is responsible for the regulation of cellular energy metabolism. To investigate the phosphoryl-transfer mechanism catalyzed by human uMtCK, in this work, molecular dynamic simulations of uMtCK∙ATP-Mg2+∙creatine complex and quantum mechanism calculations were performed to make clear the puzzle. The theoretical studies hereof revealed that human uMtCK utilizes a two-step dissociative mechanism, in which the E227 residue of uMtCK acts as the catalytic base to accept the creatine guanidinium proton. This catalytic role of E227 was further confirmed by our assay on the phosphatase activity. Moreover, the roles of active site residues in phosphoryl transfer reaction were also identified by site directed mutagenesis. This study reveals the structural basis of biochemical activity of uMtCK and gets insights into its phosphoryl transfer mechanism.

  12. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    B. Nature 410, 487-490. Jarillo, J. A., Gabrys, H., Capel, J., Alonso, J. M., Ecker, J. R., and Cashmore, A. R. (2001b). Phototropin-related NPL1 controls chloroplast relocation induced by blue light. Nature 410, 952-954. Kinoshita, T., Doi, M., Suetsugu, N., Kagawa, T., Wada, M., and Shimazaki Ki, K. (2001). phot1 and phot2 mediate blue light regulation of stomatal opening. Nature 414, 656-660. Mas, P., Kim, W. Y., Somers, D. E., and Kay, S. A. (2003). Targeted degradation of TOC1 by ZTL modulates circadian function in Arabidopsis thaliana. Nature 426, 567-570.

  13. Regulation of RIPK1 activation by TAK1-mediated phosphorylation dictates apoptosis and necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jiefei; Ito, Yasushi; Shi, Linyu; Amin, Palak; Chu, Jiachen; Ouchida, Amanda Tomie; Mookhtiar, Adnan Kasim; Zhao, Heng; Xu, Daichao; Shan, Bing; Najafov, Ayaz; Gao, Guangping; Akira, Shizuo; Yuan, Junying

    2017-08-25

    Stimulation of TNFR1 by TNFα can promote three distinct alternative mechanisms of cell death: necroptosis, RIPK1-independent and -dependent apoptosis. How cells decide which way to die is unclear. Here, we report that TNFα-induced phosphorylation of RIPK1 in the intermediate domain by TAK1 plays a key role in regulating this critical decision. Using phospho-Ser321 as a marker, we show that the transient phosphorylation of RIPK1 intermediate domain induced by TNFα leads to RIPK1-independent apoptosis when NF-κB activation is inhibited by cycloheximide. On the other hand, blocking Ser321 phosphorylation promotes RIPK1 activation and its interaction with FADD to mediate RIPK1-dependent apoptosis (RDA). Finally, sustained phosphorylation of RIPK1 intermediate domain at multiple sites by TAK1 promotes its interaction with RIPK3 and necroptosis. Thus, absent, transient and sustained levels of TAK1-mediated RIPK1 phosphorylation may represent distinct states in TNF-RSC to dictate the activation of three alternative cell death mechanisms, RDA, RIPK1-independent apoptosis and necroptosis.TNFα can promote three distinct mechanisms of cell death: necroptosis, RIPK1-independent and dependent apoptosis. Here the authors show that TNFα-induced phosphorylation of RIPK1 in the intermediate domain by TAK1 plays a key role in regulating this decision.

  14. Identification of tyrosine-9 of MAVS as critical target for inducible phosphorylation that determines activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyang Wen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Innate immunity to viruses involves receptors such as RIG-I, which senses viral RNA and triggers an IFN-β signaling pathway involving the outer mitochondrial membrane protein MAVS. However, the functional status of MAVS phosphorylation remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate for the first time that MAVS undergoes extensive tyrosine phosphorylation upon viral infection, indicating that MAVS phosphorylation might play an important role in MAVS function. A tyrosine-scanning mutational analysis revealed that MAVS tyrosine-9 (Y9 is a phosphorylation site that is required for IFN-β signaling. Indeed, MAVS Y9F mutation severely impaired TRAF3/TRAF6 recruitment and displayed decreased tyrosine phosphorylation in response to VSV infection compared to wild type MAVS. Functionally, MAVS Y9 phosphorylation contributed to MAVS antiviral function without interfering with its apoptosis property. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments identify a novel residue of MAVS that is crucially involved in the recruitment of TRAF3/TRAF6 and in downstream propagation of MAVS signaling.

  15. A CSF-1 Receptor Phosphotyrosine 559 Signaling Pathway Regulates Receptor Ubiquitination and Tyrosine Phosphorylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Song, Da; Cai, Yunfei; Yu, Wenfeng; Yeung, Yee-Guide; Stanley, E. Richard

    2011-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation involves ligand-induced receptor dimerization and transphosphorylation on tyrosine residues. Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1)-induced CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination were studied in mouse macrophages. Phosphorylation of CSF-1R Tyr-559, required for the binding of Src family kinases (SFKs), was both necessary and sufficient for these responses and for c-Cbl tyrosine phosphorylation and all three responses were inhibited by SFK inhibitors. In c-Cbl-deficient macrophages, CSF-1R ubiquitination and tyrosine phosphorylation were substantially inhibited. Reconstitution with wild-type, but not ubiquitin ligase-defective C381A c-Cbl rescued these responses, while expression of C381A c-Cbl in wild-type macrophages suppressed them. Analysis of site-directed mutations in the CSF-1R further suggests that activated c-Cbl-mediated CSF-1R ubiquitination is required for a conformational change in the major kinase domain that allows amplification of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation and full receptor activation. Thus the results indicate that CSF-1-mediated receptor dimerization leads to a Tyr-559/SFK/c-Cbl pathway resulting in receptor ubiquitination that permits full receptor tyrosine phosphorylation of this class III RTK in macrophages. PMID:21041311

  16. Phosphorylation of SNAP-23 regulates its dynamic membrane association during mast cell exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Pieu; Puri, Niti

    2017-09-15

    Upon allergen challenge, mast cells (MCs) respond by releasing pre-stored mediators from their secretory granules by the transient mechanism of porosome-mediated cell secretion. The target SNARE SNAP-23 has been shown to be important for MC exocytosis, and our previous studies revealed the presence of one basal (Thr 102 ) and two induced (Ser 95 and Ser 120 ) phosphorylation sites in its linker region. To study the role of SNAP-23 phosphorylation in the regulation of exocytosis, green fluorescence protein-tagged wild-type SNAP-23 (GFP-SNAP-23) and its phosphorylation mutants were transfected into rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) MCs. Studies on GFP-SNAP-23 transfected MCs revealed some dynamic changes in SNAP-23 membrane association. SNAP-23 was associated with plasma membrane in resting MCs, however, on activation a portion of it translocated to cytosol and internal membranes. These internal locations were secretory granule membranes. This dynamic change in the membrane association of SNAP-23 in MCs may be important for mediating internal granule-granule fusions in compound exocytosis. Further studies with SNAP-23 phosphorylation mutants revealed an important role for the phosphorylation at Thr 102 in its initial membrane association, and of induced phosphorylation at Ser 95 and Ser 120 in its internal membrane association, during MC exocytosis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Hydrogen bond based smart polymer for highly selective and tunable capture of multiply phosphorylated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Guangyan; Lu, Qi; Li, Xiuling; Liu, Jing; Ye, Mingliang; Liang, Xinmiao; Sun, Taolei

    2017-09-06

    Multisite phosphorylation is an important and common mechanism for finely regulating protein functions and subsequent cellular responses. However, this study is largely restricted by the difficulty to capture low-abundance multiply phosphorylated peptides (MPPs) from complex biosamples owing to the limitation of enrichment materials and their interactions with phosphates. Here we show that smart polymer can serve as an ideal platform to resolve this challenge. Driven by specific but tunable hydrogen bonding interactions, the smart polymer displays differential complexation with MPPs, singly phosphorylated and non-modified peptides. Importantly, MPP binding can be modulated conveniently and precisely by solution conditions, resulting in highly controllable MPP adsorption on material surface. This facilitates excellent performance in MPP enrichment and separation from model proteins and real biosamples. High enrichment selectivity and coverage, extraordinary adsorption capacities and recovery towards MPPs, as well as high discovery rates of unique phosphorylation sites, suggest its great potential in phosphoproteomics studies.Capture of low-abundance multiply phosphorylated peptides (MPPs) is difficult due to limitation of enrichment materials and their interactions with phosphates. Here the authors show, a smart polymer driven by specific but tunable hydrogen bonding interactions can differentially complex with MPPs, singly phosphorylated and non-modified peptides.

  18. Src-Dependent Phosphorylation of ASAP1 Regulates Podosomes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Sanita; Inoue, Hiroki; Bharti, Kapil; Hirsch, Dianne S.; Nie, Zhongzhen; Yoon, Hye-Young; Artym, Vira; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Mueller, Susette C.; Barr, Valarie A.; Randazzo, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    Invadopodia are Src-induced cellular structures that are thought to mediate tumor invasion. ASAP1, an Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) containing Src homology 3 (SH3) and Bin, amphiphysin, and RVS161/167 (BAR) domains, is a substrate of Src that controls invadopodia. We have examined the structural requirements for ASAP1-dependent formation of invadopodia and related structures in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts called podosomes. We found that both predominant splice variants of ASAP1 (ASAP1a and ASAP1b) associated with invadopodia and podosomes. Podosomes were highly dynamic, with rapid turnover of both ASAP1 and actin. Reduction of ASAP1 levels by small interfering RNA blocked formation of invadopodia and podosomes. Podosomes were formed in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts in which endogenous ASAP1 was replaced with either recombinant ASAP1a or ASAP1b. ASAP1 mutants that lacked the Src binding site or GAP activity functioned as well as wild-type ASAP1 in the formation of podosomes. Recombinant ASAP1 lacking the BAR domain, the SH3 domain, or the Src phosphorylation site did not support podosome formation. Based on these results, we conclude that ASAP1 is a critical target of tyrosine kinase signaling involved in the regulation of podosomes and invadopodia and speculate that ASAP1 may function as a coincidence detector of simultaneous protein association through the ASAP1 SH3 domain and phosphorylation by Src. PMID:17893324

  19. Src-dependent phosphorylation of ASAP1 regulates podosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Sanita; Inoue, Hiroki; Bharti, Kapil; Hirsch, Dianne S; Nie, Zhongzhen; Yoon, Hye-Young; Artym, Vira; Yamada, Kenneth M; Mueller, Susette C; Barr, Valarie A; Randazzo, Paul A

    2007-12-01

    Invadopodia are Src-induced cellular structures that are thought to mediate tumor invasion. ASAP1, an Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) containing Src homology 3 (SH3) and Bin, amphiphysin, and RVS161/167 (BAR) domains, is a substrate of Src that controls invadopodia. We have examined the structural requirements for ASAP1-dependent formation of invadopodia and related structures in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts called podosomes. We found that both predominant splice variants of ASAP1 (ASAP1a and ASAP1b) associated with invadopodia and podosomes. Podosomes were highly dynamic, with rapid turnover of both ASAP1 and actin. Reduction of ASAP1 levels by small interfering RNA blocked formation of invadopodia and podosomes. Podosomes were formed in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts in which endogenous ASAP1 was replaced with either recombinant ASAP1a or ASAP1b. ASAP1 mutants that lacked the Src binding site or GAP activity functioned as well as wild-type ASAP1 in the formation of podosomes. Recombinant ASAP1 lacking the BAR domain, the SH3 domain, or the Src phosphorylation site did not support podosome formation. Based on these results, we conclude that ASAP1 is a critical target of tyrosine kinase signaling involved in the regulation of podosomes and invadopodia and speculate that ASAP1 may function as a coincidence detector of simultaneous protein association through the ASAP1 SH3 domain and phosphorylation by Src.

  20. Actin-binding and Cell Proliferation Activities of Angiomotin Family Members Are Regulated by Hippo Pathway-mediated Phosphorylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siew Wee; Lim, Chun Jye; Guo, Fusheng; Tan, Ivan; Leung, Thomas; Hong, Wanjin

    2013-01-01

    Whether the Hippo pathway has downstream targets other than YAP and TAZ is unknown. In this report, we have identified angiomotin (Amot) family members as novel substrates of Hippo core kinases. The N-terminal regions of Amot proteins contain a conserved HXRXXS consensus site for LATS1/2-mediated phosphorylation. Phospho-specific antibodies showed that Hippo core kinases could mediate phosphorylation of endogenous as well as exogenous Amot family members. Knockdown of LATS1 and LATS2 endogenously reduced the phosphorylation of Amots detected by the phospho-specific antibodies. Mutation of the serine to alanine within this HXRXXS site in Amot and AmotL2 established that this site was essential for Hippo core kinase-mediated phosphorylation. Wild-type and non-phosphorylated Amot (Amot-S175A) were targeted to actin filaments, whereas phospho-mimic Amot (Amot-S175D) failed to be localized with actin. Overexpression of LATS2 caused dissociation of Amot from actin but not Amot-S175A. Mapping of the actin-binding site of Amot showed that serine 175 of Amot was important for the actin-binding activity. Amot-S175A promoted, whereas Amot and Amot-S175D inhibited, cell proliferation. These results collectively suggest that the Hippo pathway negatively regulates the actin-binding activity of Amot family members through direct phosphorylation. PMID:24225952

  1. Actin-binding and cell proliferation activities of angiomotin family members are regulated by Hippo pathway-mediated phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siew Wee; Lim, Chun Jye; Guo, Fusheng; Tan, Ivan; Leung, Thomas; Hong, Wanjin

    2013-12-27

    Whether the Hippo pathway has downstream targets other than YAP and TAZ is unknown. In this report, we have identified angiomotin (Amot) family members as novel substrates of Hippo core kinases. The N-terminal regions of Amot proteins contain a conserved HXRXXS consensus site for LATS1/2-mediated phosphorylation. Phospho-specific antibodies showed that Hippo core kinases could mediate phosphorylation of endogenous as well as exogenous Amot family members. Knockdown of LATS1 and LATS2 endogenously reduced the phosphorylation of Amots detected by the phospho-specific antibodies. Mutation of the serine to alanine within this HXRXXS site in Amot and AmotL2 established that this site was essential for Hippo core kinase-mediated phosphorylation. Wild-type and non-phosphorylated Amot (Amot-S175A) were targeted to actin filaments, whereas phospho-mimic Amot (Amot-S175D) failed to be localized with actin. Overexpression of LATS2 caused dissociation of Amot from actin but not Amot-S175A. Mapping of the actin-binding site of Amot showed that serine 175 of Amot was important for the actin-binding activity. Amot-S175A promoted, whereas Amot and Amot-S175D inhibited, cell proliferation. These results collectively suggest that the Hippo pathway negatively regulates the actin-binding activity of Amot family members through direct phosphorylation.

  2. Effect of Phosphorylation of CM2 Protein on Influenza C Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takanari; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Muraki, Yasushi; Sho, Ri; Sugawara, Kanetsu; Hongo, Seiji

    2017-11-15

    CM2 is the second membrane protein of the influenza C virus and has been demonstrated to play a role in the uncoating and genome packaging processes in influenza C virus replication. Although the effects of N-linked glycosylation, disulfide-linked oligomerization, and palmitoylation of CM2 on virus replication have been analyzed, the effect of the phosphorylation of CM2 on virus replication remains to be determined. In this study, a phosphorylation site(s) at residue 78 and/or 103 of CM2 was replaced with an alanine residue(s), and the effects of the loss of phosphorylation on influenza C virus replication were analyzed. No significant differences were observed in the packaging of the reporter gene between influenza C virus-like particles (VLPs) produced from 293T cells expressing wild-type CM2 and those from the cells expressing the CM2 mutants lacking the phosphorylation site(s). Reporter gene expression in HMV-II cells infected with VLPs containing the CM2 mutants was inhibited in comparison with that in cells infected with wild-type VLPs. The virus production of the recombinant influenza C virus possessing CM2 mutants containing a serine-to-alanine change at residue 78 was significantly lower than that of wild-type recombinant influenza C virus. Furthermore, the virus growth of the recombinant viruses possessing CM2 with a serine-to-aspartic acid change at position 78, to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, was virtually identical to that of the wild-type virus. These results suggest that phosphorylation of CM2 plays a role in efficient virus replication, probably through the addition of a negative charge to the Ser78 phosphorylation site. IMPORTANCE It is well-known that many host and viral proteins are posttranslationally modified by phosphorylation, which plays a role in the functions of these proteins. In influenza A and B viruses, phosphorylation of viral proteins NP, M1, NS1, and the nuclear export protein (NEP), which are not integrated into the

  3. Novel Serine 176 Phosphorylation of YBX1 Activates NF-κB in Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew; Hua, Laiqing; Wang, Benlian; Wei, Han; Prabhu, Lakshmi; Hartley, Antja-Voy; Jiang, Guanglong; Liu, Yunlong; Lu, Tao

    2017-02-24

    Y box protein 1 (YBX1) is a well known oncoprotein that has tumor-promoting functions. YBX1 is widely considered to be an attractive therapeutic target in cancer. To develop novel therapeutics to target YBX1, it is of great importance to understand how YBX1 is finely regulated in cancer. Previously, we have shown that YBX1 could function as a tumor promoter through phosphorylation of its Ser-165 residue, leading to the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway (1). In this study, using mass spectrometry analysis, we discovered a distinct phosphorylation site, Ser-176, on YBX1. Overexpression of the YBX1-S176A (serine-to-alanine) mutant in either HEK293 cells or colon cancer HT29 cells showed dramatically reduced NF-κB-activating ability compared with that of WT-YBX1, confirming that Ser-176 phosphorylation is critical for the activation of NF-κB by YBX1. Importantly, the mutant of Ser-176 and the previously reported Ser-165 sites regulate distinct groups of NF-κB target genes, suggesting the unique and irreplaceable function of each of these two phosphorylated serine residues. Our important findings could provide a novel cancer therapy strategy by blocking either Ser-176 or Ser-165 phosphorylation or both of YBX1 in colon cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Evolutionary origins of Brassicaceae specific genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background All sequenced genomes contain a proportion of lineage-specific genes, which exhibit no sequence similarity to any genes outside the lineage. Despite their prevalence, the origins and functions of most lineage-specific genes remain largely unknown. As more genomes are sequenced opportunities for understanding evolutionary origins and functions of lineage-specific genes are increasing. Results This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origins of lineage-specific genes (LSGs) in Arabidopsis thaliana that are restricted to the Brassicaceae family. In this study, lineage-specific genes within the nuclear (1761 genes) and mitochondrial (28 genes) genomes are identified. The evolutionary origins of two thirds of the lineage-specific genes within the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are also identified. Almost a quarter of lineage-specific genes originate from non-lineage-specific paralogs, while the origins of ~10% of lineage-specific genes are partly derived from DNA exapted from transposable elements (twice the proportion observed for non-lineage-specific genes). Lineage-specific genes are also enriched in genes that have overlapping CDS, which is consistent with such novel genes arising from overprinting. Over half of the subset of the 958 lineage-specific genes found only in Arabidopsis thaliana have alignments to intergenic regions in Arabidopsis lyrata, consistent with either de novo origination or differential gene loss and retention, with both evolutionary scenarios explaining the lineage-specific status of these genes. A smaller number of lineage-specific genes with an incomplete open reading frame across different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions are further identified as accession-specific genes, most likely of recent origin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Putative de novo origination for two of the Arabidopsis thaliana-only genes is identified via additional sequencing across accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and closely related sister species

  5. Tissue specific phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins isolated from rat liver, heart muscle, and skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Steffen; León, Ileana R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    -specific phosphorylation sites were identified in tissue-specific enzymes such as those encoded by HMGCS2, BDH1, PCK2, CPS1, and OTC in liver mitochondria, and CKMT2 and CPT1B in heart and skeletal muscle. Kinase prediction showed an important role for PKA and PKC in all tissues but also for proline-directed kinases...

  6. Phosphorylation and Methylation of Proteasomal Proteins of the Haloarcheon Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Humbard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are composed of 20S core particles (CPs of α- and β-type subunits that associate with regulatory particle AAA ATPases such as the proteasome-activating nucleotidase (PAN complexes of archaea. In this study, the roles and additional sites of post-translational modification of proteasomes were investigated using the archaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model. Indicative of phosphorylation, phosphatase-sensitive isoforms of α1 and α2 were detected by 2-DE immunoblot. To map these and other potential sites of post-translational modification, proteasomes were purified and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Using this approach, several phosphosites were mapped including α1 Thr147, α2 Thr13/Ser14 and PAN-A Ser340. Multiple methylation sites were also mapped to α1, thus, revealing a new type of proteasomal modification. Probing the biological role of α1 and PAN-A phosphorylation by site-directed mutagenesis revealed dominant negative phenotypes for cell viability and/or pigmentation for α1 variants including Thr147Ala, Thr158Ala and Ser58Ala. An H. volcanii Rio1p Ser/Thr kinase homolog was purified and shown to catalyze autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer to α1. The α1 variants in Thr and Ser residues that displayed dominant negative phenotypes were significantly reduced in their ability to accept phosphoryl groups from Rio1p, thus, providing an important link between cell physiology and proteasomal phosphorylation.

  7. Phosphorylation is required for the pathogen defense function of the Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter accumulates at sites of pathogen detection, where it is involved in defense against multiple pathogens. Perception of PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors initiates recruitment of PEN3 and also leads to PEN3 phosphorylation at multiple amino acid residues. Whet...

  8. Phosphorylation of the synaptonemal complex protein SYP-1 promotes meiotic chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Carlton, Aya; Nakamura-Tabuchi, Chihiro; Chartrand, Stephane Kazuki; Uchino, Tomoki; Carlton, Peter Mark

    2017-12-08

    Chromosomes that have undergone crossing over in meiotic prophase must maintain sister chromatid cohesion somewhere along their length between the first and second meiotic divisions. Although many eukaryotes use the centromere as a site to maintain cohesion, the holocentric organism Caenorhabditis elegans instead creates two chromosome domains of unequal length termed the short arm and long arm, which become the first and second site of cohesion loss at meiosis I and II. The mechanisms that confer distinct functions to the short and long arm domains remain poorly understood. Here, we show that phosphorylation of the synaptonemal complex protein SYP-1 is required to create these domains. Once crossover sites are designated, phosphorylated SYP-1 and PLK-2 become cooperatively confined to short arms and guide phosphorylated histone H3 and the chromosomal passenger complex to the site of meiosis I cohesion loss. Our results show that PLK-2 and phosphorylated SYP-1 ensure creation of the short arm subdomain, promoting disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis I. © 2018 Sato-Carlton et al.

  9. Collection of apoplastic fluids from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Svend Roesen; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    The leaf apoplast comprises the extracellular continuum outside cell membranes. A broad range of processes take place in the apoplast, including intercellular signaling, metabolite transport, and plant-microbe interactions. To study these processes, it is essential to analyze the metabolite conte...... in apoplastic fluids. Due to the fragile nature of leaf tissues, it is a challenge to obtain apoplastic fluids from leaves. Here, methods to collect apoplastic washing fluid and guttation fluid from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves are described....

  10. The structure of the major anthocyanin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloor, Stephen J; Abrahams, Sharon

    2002-02-01

    The major anthocyanin in the leaves and stems of Arabidopsis thaliana has been isolated and shown to be cyanidin 3-O-[2-O(2-O-(sinapoyl)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-6-O-(4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-p-coumaroyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside] 5-O-[6-O-(malonyl) beta-D-glucopyranoside]. This anthocyanin is a glucosylated version of one of the anthocyanins found in the flowers of the closely related Matthiola incana.

  11. Shear stress stimulates phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635) by a protein kinase A-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Hwang, Jinah; Sykes, Michelle; Michell, Belinda J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Lum, Hazel; Jo, Hanjoong

    2002-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) production by phosphorylating endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) at Ser(1179) in a phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner. The eNOS has additional potential phosphorylation sites, including Ser(116), Thr(497), and Ser(635). Here, we studied these potential phosphorylation sites in response to shear, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and 8-bromocAMP (8-BRcAMP) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). All three stimuli induced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635), which was consistently slower than that at Ser(1179). Thr(497) was rapidly dephosphorylated by 8-BRcAMP but not by shear and VEGF. None of the stimuli phosphorylated Ser(116). Whereas shear-stimulated Ser(635) phosphorylation was not affected by phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002, it was blocked by either treating the cells with a PKA inhibitor H89 or infecting them with a recombinant adenovirus-expressing PKA inhibitor. These results suggest that shear stress stimulates eNOS by two different mechanisms: 1) PKA- and PI3K-dependent and 2) PKA-dependent but PI3K-independent pathways. Phosphorylation of Ser(635) may play an important role in chronic regulation of eNOS in response to mechanical and humoral stimuli.

  12. Myosin binding protein-C phosphorylation is the principal mediator of protein kinase A effects on thick filament structure in myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Brett A.; Patel, Jitandrakumar R.; Chen, Peter P.; Bekyarova, Tanya; Abdalla, Mohamed I.; Tong, Carl W.; Fitzsimons, Daniel P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Moss, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is a regulator of pump function in healthy hearts. However, the mechanisms of regulation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-mediated cMyBP-C phosphorylation have not been completely dissociated from other myofilament substrates for PKA, especially cardiac troponin I (cTnI). We have used synchrotron X-ray diffraction in skinned trabeculae to elucidate the roles of cMyBP-C and cTnI phosphorylation in myocardial inotropy and lusitropy. Myocardium in this study was isolated from four transgenic mouse lines in which the phosphorylation state of either cMyBP-C or cTnI was constitutively altered by site-specific mutagenesis. Analysis of peak intensities in X-ray diffraction patterns from trabeculae showed that cross-bridges are displaced similarly from the thick filament and toward actin (1) when both cMyBP-C and cTnI are phosphorylated, (2) when only cMyBP-C is phosphorylated, and (3) when cMyBP-C phosphorylation is mimicked by replacement with negative charge in its PKA sites. These findings suggest that phosphorylation of cMyBP-C relieves a constraint on cross-bridges, thereby increasing the proximity of myosin to binding sites on actin. Measurements of Ca2+-activated force in myocardium defined distinct molecular effects due to phosphorylation of cMyBP-C or co-phosphorylation with cTnI. Echocardiography revealed that mimicking the charge of cMyBP-C phosphorylation protects hearts from hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction that develops with constitutive dephosphorylation or genetic ablation, underscoring the importance of cMyBP-C phosphorylation for proper pump function. PMID:22850286

  13. Multiple reference genomes and transcriptomes for Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Xiangchao

    2011-08-28

    Genetic differences between Arabidopsis thaliana accessions underlie the plants extensive phenotypic variation, and until now these have been interpreted largely in the context of the annotated reference accession Col-0. Here we report the sequencing, assembly and annotation of the genomes of 18 natural A. thaliana accessions, and their transcriptomes. When assessed on the basis of the reference annotation, one-third of protein-coding genes are predicted to be disrupted in at least one accession. However, re-annotation of each genome revealed that alternative gene models often restore coding potential. Gene expression in seedlings differed for nearly half of expressed genes and was frequently associated with cis variants within 5 kilobases, as were intron retention alternative splicing events. Sequence and expression variation is most pronounced in genes that respond to the biotic environment. Our data further promote evolutionary and functional studies in A. thaliana, especially the MAGIC genetic reference population descended from these accessions. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. The fate of retrotransposed processed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkarim, Basma T M; Maranda, Vincent; Drouin, Guy

    2017-04-20

    Processed genes are functional genes that have arisen as a result of the retrotransposition of mRNA molecules. We found 6 genes that generated processed genes in the common ancestor of five Brassicaceae species (Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, Capsella rubella, Brassica rapa and Thellungiella parvula). These processed genes have therefore been kept for at least 30millionyears. Analyses of the Ka/Ks ratio of these genes, and of those having given rise to them, show that they evolve relatively slowly and suggest that the processed genes maintained the same function as that of their parental gene. There is a significant negative correlation between the number of ESTs and transcripts produced and the Ka/Ks ratios of the parental genes but not of the processed genes. This suggests that selection has not yet adapted the selective pressure the processed genes experience to their expression level. However, the A. thaliana processed genes tend to be expressed in the same tissues as that of their parental genes. Furthermore, most have a CAATT-box, a TATA-box and are located about 1kb from another protein-coding gene. Altogether, our results suggest that the processed genes found in the A. thaliana genome have been kept to produce more of the same product, and in the same tissues, as that encoded by their parental gene. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptome response analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana to leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Sufang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants have evolved a complicated resistance system and exhibit a variety of defense patterns in response to different attackers. Previous studies have shown that responses of plants to chewing insects and phloem-feeding insects are significantly different. Less is known, however, regarding molecular responses to leafminer insects. To investigate plant transcriptome response to leafminers, we selected the leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis, which has a special feeding pattern more similar to pathogen damage than that of chewing insects, as a model insect, and Arabidopsis thaliana as a response plant. Results We first investigated local and systemic responses of A. thaliana to leafminer feeding using an Affymetrix ATH1 genome array. Genes related to metabolic processes and stimulus responses were highly regulated. Most systemically-induced genes formed a subset of the local response genes. We then downloaded gene expression data from online databases and used hierarchical clustering to explore relationships among gene expression patterns in A. thaliana damaged by different attackers. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that plant response patterns are strongly coupled to damage patterns of attackers.

  16. Stage-specific changes in myofilament protein phosphorylation following myocardial infarction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lori A; Walker, John S; Ambler, S Kelly; Buttrick, Peter M

    2010-06-01

    The response of cardiac muscle to an insult such as myocardial infarction includes changes in the expression of numerous signaling proteins and modulation of gene expression, as well as post-translational modifications of existing proteins. Most studies to date have defined these in end-stage cardiac muscle thus obviating consideration of the temporal progression that causes the heart to transition from a compensated to a decompensated phenotype. To explore these transitions, we examined contractile protein biochemistry in a mouse MI model at two early time points: 2 days and 2 weeks post-infarct and at two later time points: 2 and 4 months post-infarct. Phosphorylation of myofilament proteins was analyzed using phosphospecific staining of polyacrylamide gels, and whenever possible, phosphospecific antibodies. Phosphorylation of myosin binding protein c, the myosin regulatory light chain and troponin I were all decreased relative to sham operated animals at both early time points. However, by 2 months, total phosphorylation of all the major myofilament proteins normalized and at both 2 and 4 months, there was a significant increase in troponin I phosphorylation. One-dimensional IEF of troponin I coupled with phospho-specific antibody analysis demonstrated a redistribution of phosphorylation sites with a significant initial decline at the putative PKA sites, Serine 22,23, and a subsequent increase at the putative PKC site, serine 43,45. These data suggest that temporal changes in myofilament protein phosphorylation contribute both to the initial compensatory hyperdynamic response to myocardial infarction and subsequently to the gradual progression to myocardial failure. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An acetylation-phosphorylation switch that regulates tau aggregation propensity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Yari; Chung, Dah-Eun Chloe; Yue, Mei; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Madden, Benjamin J; Dunmore, Judy; Tong, Jimei; DeTure, Michael; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard; Cook, Casey

    2017-09-15

    The aberrant accumulation of tau protein is a pathological hallmark of a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. On the basis of previous observations that tau is a direct substrate of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), we sought to map all HDAC6-responsive sites in tau and determine how acetylation in a site-specific manner affects tau's biophysical properties in vitro Our findings indicate that several acetylation sites in tau are responsive to HDAC6 and that acetylation on Lys-321 (within a KCGS motif) is both essential for acetylation-mediated inhibition of tau aggregation in vitro and a molecular tactic for preventing phosphorylation on the downstream Ser-324 residue. To determine the functional consequence of this HDAC6-regulated phosphorylation event, we examined tau's ability to promote microtubule assembly and found that phosphorylation of Ser-324 interferes with the normal microtubule-stabilizing function of tau. Tau phosphorylation of Ser-324 (pSer-324) has not previously been evaluated in the context of tauopathy, and here we observed increased deposition of pSer-324-positive tau both in mouse models of tauopathy and in patients with Alzheimer's disease. These findings uncover a novel acetylation-phosphorylation switch at Lys-321/Ser-324 that coordinately regulates tau polymerization and function. Because the disease relevance of this finding is evident, additional studies are needed to examine the role of pSer-324 in tau pathobiology and to determine whether therapeutically modulating this acetylation-phosphorylation switch affects disease progression in vivo. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks Paulo Shakarian1*, J. Kenneth Wickiser2 1 Paulo Shakarian...significantly attacked. Citation: Shakarian P, Wickiser JK (2012) Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks...to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  19. EFFECTS OF KANAMYCIN ON GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA SEEDLING AND ITS ROOT

    OpenAIRE

    Guan Hongying; Ding Xiaosheng; Da Hong; Chune Zhou; Longdou LU

    2008-01-01

    In this article, it was found that growth and development of main root and lateral root of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling were evidently affected by kanamycin, and etiolation of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling was very serious. Compared to the controls, main root of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling on MS with kanamycin was very short, lateral root was not formed, and meristematic zone of root tip diminished and exhibited large intercellular space. Furthermore, effect of kanamycin on roo...

  20. Phosphorylation Variation during the Cell Cycle Scales with Structural Propensities of Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyanova, S.; Frishman, D.; Cox, J.

    2013-01-01

    that includes a temporal dimension. By contrast, structural properties of identified phosphorylation sites have so far been investigated in a static, non-quantitative way. Here we combine for the first time dynamic properties of the phosphoproteome with protein structural features. At six time points......, whereas regions with predominantly regular secondary structures retain more constant phosphorylation levels. The two groups show preferences for different amino acids in their kinase recognition motifs - proline and other disorder-associated residues are enriched in the former group and charged residues...

  1. Phosphorylation by Cdc28 Activates the Cdc20-Dependent Activity of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Rudner, Adam D.; MURRAY, ANDREW W.

    2000-01-01

    Budding yeast initiates anaphase by activating the Cdc20-dependent anaphase-promoting complex (APC). The mitotic activity of Cdc28 (Cdk1) is required to activate this form of the APC, and mutants that are impaired in mitotic Cdc28 function have difficulty leaving mitosis. This defect can be explained by a defect in APC phosphorylation, which depends on mitotic Cdc28 activity in vivo and can be catalyzed by purified Cdc28 in vitro. Mutating putative Cdc28 phosphorylation sites in three compone...

  2. Phytotoxic effects of trichothecenes on the growth and morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daisuke Masuda; Mamoru Ishida; Kazuo Yamaguchi; Isamu Yamaguchi; Makoto Kimura; Takumi Nishiuchi

    2007-01-01

    .... To perform a comparative analysis of the phytotoxic action of representative trichothecenes, the growth and morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana growing on media containing these compounds was investigated...

  3. Human herpesvirus 6B induces phosphorylation of p53 in its regulatory domain by a CK2- and p38-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Bundgaard, Bettina; Hupp, TR

    2008-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) infection upregulates the tumour suppressor p53 and induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392. Interestingly, phosphorylation at the equivalent site has previously been shown to correlate with p53 tumour suppression in murine models. Although......, eluted in column fractions that phosphorylated p53 at Ser392. However, treatment of cells with neither the CK2 and Cdk9 inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) nor p38 kinase inhibitors reduced HHV-6B-induced Ser392 phosphorylation significantly. Knockdown of the CK2beta subunit...... or p38alpha by small interfering RNA had no effect on HHV-6B-induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392. Thus, HHV-6B induces p53 Ser392 phosphorylation by an atypical pathway independent of CK2 and p38 kinases, whereas mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathways are involved in viral...

  4. Metallochaperone-like genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehseen, Muhammad; Cairns, Narelle; Sherson, Sarah; Cobbett, Christopher S

    2010-08-01

    A complete inventory of metallochaperone-like proteins containing a predicted HMA domain in Arabidopsis revealed a large family of 67 proteins. 45 proteins, the HIPPs, have a predicted isoprenylation site while 22 proteins, the HPPs, do not. Sequence comparisons divided the proteins into seven major clusters (I-VII). Cluster IV is notable for the presence of a conserved Asp residue before the CysXXCys, metal binding motif, analogous to the Zn binding motif in E. coli ZntA. HIPP20, HIPP21, HIPP22, HIPP26 and HIPP27 in Cluster IV were studied in more detail. All but HIPP21 could rescue the Cd-sensitive, ycf1 yeast mutant but failed to rescue the growth of zrt1zrt2, zrc1cot1 and atx1 mutants. In Arabidopsis, single and double mutants did not show a phenotype but the hipp20/21/22 triple mutant was more sensitive to Cd and accumulated less Cd than the wild-type suggesting the HIPPs can have a role in Cd-detoxification, possibly by binding Cd. Promoter-GUS reporter expression studies indicated variable expression of these HIPPs. For example, in roots, HIPP22 and HIPP26 are only expressed in lateral root tips while HIPP20 and HIPP25 show strong expression in the root vasculature.

  5. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein phosphorylation networks in Tetrahymena thermophila, a model single-celled organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miao; Chen, Xiulan; Xiong, Qian; Xiong, Jie; Xiao, Chuanle; Ge, Feng; Yang, Fuquan; Miao, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila is a widely used unicellular eukaryotic model organism in biological research and contains more than 1000 protein kinases and phosphatases with specificity for Ser/Thr/Tyr residues. However, only a few dozen phosphorylation sites in T. thermophila are known, presenting a major obstacle to further understanding of the regulatory roles of reversible phosphorylation in this organism. In this study, we used high-accuracy mass-spectrometry-based proteomics to conduct global and site-specific phosphoproteome profiling of T. thermophila. In total, 1384 phosphopeptides and 2238 phosphorylation sites from 1008 T. thermophila proteins were identified through the combined use of peptide prefractionation, TiO2 enrichment, and two-dimensional LC-MS/MS analysis. The identified phosphoproteins are implicated in the regulation of various biological processes such as transport, gene expression, and mRNA metabolic process. Moreover, integrated analysis of the T. thermophila phosphoproteome and gene network revealed the potential biological functions of many previously unannotated proteins and predicted some putative kinase-substrate pairs. Our data provide the first global survey of phosphorylation in T. thermophila using a phosphoproteomic approach and suggest a wide-ranging regulatory scope of this modification. The provided dataset is a valuable resource for the future understanding of signaling pathways in this important model organism.

  6. Intracerebroventricular administration of okadaic acid induces hippocampal glucose uptake dysfunction and tau phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broetto, Núbia; Hansen, Fernanda; Brolese, Giovana; Batassini, Cristiane; Lirio, Franciane; Galland, Fabiana; Dos Santos, João Paulo Almeida; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Intraneuronal aggregates of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), together with beta-amyloid plaques and astrogliosis, are histological markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying mechanism of sporadic AD remains poorly understood, but abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau protein is suggested to have a role in NFTs genesis, which leads to neuronal dysfunction and death. Okadaic acid (OKA), a strong inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, has been used to induce dementia similar to AD in rats. We herein investigated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of OKA (100 and 200ng) on hippocampal tau phosphorylation at Ser396, which is considered an important fibrillogenic tau protein site, and on glucose uptake, which is reduced early in AD. ICV infusion of OKA (at 200ng) induced a spatial cognitive deficit, hippocampal astrogliosis (based on GFAP increment) and increase in tau phosphorylation at site 396 in this model. Moreover, we observed a decreased glucose uptake in the hippocampal slices of OKA-treated rats. In vitro exposure of hippocampal slices to OKA altered tau phosphorylation at site 396, without any associated change in glucose uptake activity. Taken together, these findings further our understanding of OKA neurotoxicity, in vivo and vitro, particularly with regard to the role of tau phosphorylation, and reinforce the importance of the OKA dementia model for studying the neurochemical alterations that may occur in AD, such as NFTs and glucose hypometabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phosphorylation of AMPA receptors is required for sensory deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhuti Goel

    Full Text Available Sensory experience, and the lack thereof, can alter the function of excitatory synapses in the primary sensory cortices. Recent evidence suggests that changes in sensory experience can regulate the synaptic level of Ca(2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a process have not been determined. We found that binocular visual deprivation, which is a well-established in vivo model to produce multiplicative synaptic scaling in visual cortex of juvenile rodents, is accompanied by an increase in the phosphorylation of AMPAR GluR1 (or GluA1 subunit at the serine 845 (S845 site and the appearance of CP-AMPARs at synapses. To address the role of GluR1-S845 in visual deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity, we used mice lacking key phosphorylation sites on the GluR1 subunit. We found that mice specifically lacking the GluR1-S845 site (GluR1-S845A mutants, which is a substrate of cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA, show abnormal basal excitatory synaptic transmission and lack visual deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. We also found evidence that increasing GluR1-S845 phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to produce normal multiplicative synaptic scaling. Our study provides concrete evidence that a GluR1 dependent mechanism, especially S845 phosphorylation, is a necessary pre-requisite step for in vivo homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

  8. Conformational switching of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 via regulated phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Joanna; Wandinger, Sebastian K; Mäusbacher, Nina; Schreiber, Thiemo; Richter, Klaus; Daub, Henrik; Buchner, Johannes

    2012-02-24

    Hsp90 is an essential molecular chaperone in the eukaryotic cytosol. Its function is modulated by cochaperones and posttranslational modifications. Importantly, the phosphatase Ppt1 is a dedicated regulator of the Hsp90 chaperone system. Little is known about Ppt1-dependent phosphorylation sites and how these affect Hsp90 activity. Here, we identified the major phosphorylation sites of yeast Hsp90 in its middle or the C-terminal domain and determined the subset regulated by Ppt1. In general, phosphorylation decelerates the Hsp90 machinery, reduces chaperone function in vivo, sensitizes yeast cells to Hsp90 inhibition and affects DNA repair processes. Modification of one particular site (S485) is lethal, whereas others modulate Hsp90 activity via distinct mechanisms affecting the ATPase activity, cochaperone binding and manipulating conformational transitions in Hsp90. Our mechanistic analysis reveals that phosphorylation of Hsp90 permits a regulation of the conformational cycle at distinct steps by targeting switch points for the communication of remote regions within Hsp90. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase3 beta phosphorylates serine 33 of p53 and activates p53's transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Brendan D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress, oncogene expression and during senescence, p53 transcriptionally activates genes involved in growth arrest and apoptosis. p53 activation is regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation of the N-terminal transactivation domain. Here, we have examined how Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3, a protein kinase involved in tumorigenesis, differentiation and apoptosis, phosphorylates and regulates p53. Results The 2 isoforms of GSK3, GSK3α and GSK3β, phosphorylate the sequence Ser-X-X-X-Ser(P when the C-terminal serine residue is already phosphorylated. Several p53 kinases were examined for their ability to create GSK3 phosphorylation sites on the p53 protein. Our results demonstrate that phosphorylation of serine 37 of p53 by DNA-PK creates a site for GSK3β phosphorylation at serine 33 in vitro. GSK3α did not phosphorylate p53 under any condition. GSK3β increased the transcriptional activity of the p53 protein in vivo. Mutation of either serine 33 or serine 37 of p53 to alanine blocked the ability of GSK3β to regulate p53 transcriptional activity. GSK3β is therefore able to regulate p53 function in vivo. p53's transcriptional activity is commonly increased by DNA damage. However, GSK3β kinase activity was inhibited in response to DNA damage, suggesting that GSK3β regulation of p53 is not involved in the p53-DNA damage response. Conclusions GSK3β can regulate p53's transcriptional activity by phosphorylating serine 33. However, GSK3β does not appear to be part of the p53-DNA damage response pathway. Instead, GSK3β may provide the link between p53 and non-DNA damage mechanisms for p53 activation.

  10. Arginine phosphorylation marks proteins for degradation by a Clp protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentini, Débora Broch; Suskiewicz, Marcin Józef; Heuck, Alexander; Kurzbauer, Robert; Deszcz, Luiza; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2016-11-03

    Protein turnover is a tightly controlled process that is crucial for the removal of aberrant polypeptides and for cellular signalling. Whereas ubiquitin marks eukaryotic proteins for proteasomal degradation, a general tagging system for the equivalent bacterial Clp proteases is not known. Here we describe the targeting mechanism of the ClpC-ClpP proteolytic complex from Bacillus subtilis. Quantitative affinity proteomics using a ClpP-trapping mutant show that proteins phosphorylated on arginine residues are selectively targeted to ClpC-ClpP. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrate that arginine phosphorylation by the McsB kinase is required and sufficient for the degradation of substrate proteins. The docking site for phosphoarginine is located in the amino-terminal domain of the ClpC ATPase, as resolved at high resolution in a co-crystal structure. Together, our data demonstrate that phosphoarginine functions as a bona fide degradation tag for the ClpC-ClpP protease. This system, which is widely distributed across Gram-positive bacteria, is functionally analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  11. Dynamic Phosphorylation of VP30 Is Essential for Ebola Virus Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedenkopf, Nadine; Lier, Clemens; Becker, Stephan

    2016-05-15

    Ebola virus is the causative agent of a severe fever with high fatality rates in humans and nonhuman primates. The regulation of Ebola virus transcription and replication currently is not well understood. An important factor regulating viral transcription is VP30, an Ebola virus-specific transcription factor associated with the viral nucleocapsid. Previous studies revealed that the phosphorylation status of VP30 impacts viral transcription. Together with NP, L, and the polymerase cofactor VP35, nonphosphorylated VP30 supports viral transcription. Upon VP30 phosphorylation, viral transcription ceases. Phosphorylation weakens the interaction between VP30 and the polymerase cofactor VP35 and/or the viral RNA. VP30 thereby is excluded from the viral transcription complex, simultaneously leading to increased viral replication which is supported by NP, L, and VP35 alone. Here, we use an infectious virus-like particle assay and recombinant viruses to show that the dynamic phosphorylation of VP30 is critical for the cotransport of VP30 with nucleocapsids to the sites of viral RNA synthesis, where VP30 is required to initiate primary viral transcription. We further demonstrate that a single serine residue at amino acid position 29 was sufficient to render VP30 active in primary transcription and to generate a recombinant virus with characteristics comparable to those of wild-type virus. In contrast, the rescue of a recombinant virus with a single serine at position 30 in VP30 was unsuccessful. Our results indicate critical roles for phosphorylated and dephosphorylated VP30 during the viral life cycle. The current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has caused more than 28,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. Very little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of how the Ebola virus transcribes and replicates its genome. Previous investigations showed that the transcriptional support activity of VP30 is activated upon VP30 dephosphorylation. The current study reveals that

  12. Structural and functional characterization of the protein kinase Mps1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alves Gamosa de Oliveira

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, protein kinases catalyze the transfer of a gamma-phosphate from ATP (or GTP to specific amino acids in protein targets. In plants, protein kinases have been shown to participate in signaling cascades driving responses to environmental stimuli and developmental processes. Plant meristems are undifferentiated tissues that provide the major source of cells that will form organs throughout development. However, non-dividing specialized cells can also dedifferentiate and re-initiate cell division if exposed to appropriate conditions. Mps1 (Monopolar spindle is a dual-specificity protein kinase that plays a critical role in monitoring the accuracy of chromosome segregation in the mitotic checkpoint mechanism. Although Mps1 functions have been clearly demonstrated in animals and fungi, its role in plants is so far unclear. Here, using structural and biochemical analyses here we show that Mps1 has highly similar homologs in many plant genomes across distinct lineages (e.g. AtMps1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Several structural features (i.e. catalytic site, DFG motif and threonine triad are clearly conserved in plant Mps1 kinases. Structural and sequence analysis also suggest that AtMps1 interact with other cell cycle proteins, such as Mad2 and MAPK1. By using a very specific Mps1 inhibitor (SP600125 we show that compromised AtMps1 activity hampers the development of A. thaliana seedlings in a dose-dependent manner, especially in secondary roots. Moreover, concomitant administration of the auxin IAA neutralizes the AtMps1 inhibition phenotype, allowing secondary root development. These observations let us to hypothesize that AtMps1 might be a downstream regulator of IAA signaling in the formation of secondary roots. Our results indicate that Mps1 might be a universal component of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint machinery across very distant lineages of eukaryotes.

  13. Microtubule-Targeting Drugs Induce Bcl-2 Phosphorylation and Association with Pin1

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    Nuzhat Pathan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Bcl-2 is a critical suppressor of apoptosis that is overproduced in many types of cancer. Phosphorylation of the Bcl-2 protein is induced on serine residues in tumor cells arrested by microtubule-targeting drugs (paclitaxel, vincristine, nocodazole and has been associated with inactivation of antiapoptotic function through an unknown mechanism. Comparison of a variety of pharmacological inhibitors of serinel threonine-specific protein kinases demonstrated that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, selectively blocks Bcl-2 phosphorylation induced by antimicrotubule drugs. Bel-2 could also be coimmunoprecipitated with the kinase Cdc2 in M-phase -arrested cells, suggesting that a Cdc2 may be responsible for phosphorylation of Bcl-2 in cells treated with microtubule-targeting drugs. Examination of several serine→alanine substitution mutants of Bcl-2 suggested that serine 70 and serine 87 represent major sites of Bcl2 phosphorylation induced in response to microtubuletargeting drugs. Both these serines are within sequence contexts suitable for proline-directed kinases such as Cdc2. Phosphorylated Bel-2 protein was discovered to associate in M-phase -arrested cells with Pint, a mitotic peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPlase known to interact with substrates of Cdc2 during mitosis. In contrast, phosphorylation of Bcl-2 induced by microtubuletargeting drugs did not alter its ability to associate with Bel-2 (homodimerization, Bax, BAG1, or other Bel-2binding proteins. Since the region in Bcl-2 containing serine 70 and serine 87 represents a proline-rich loop that has been associated with autorepression of its antiapoptotic activity, the discovery of pint interactions with phosphorylated Bcl-2 raises the possibility that pint alters the conformation of Bcl-2 and thereby modulates its function in cells arrested with antimicrotubule drugs.

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 is required for ligand-regulated, but not constitutive, endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Confalonieri, S; Salcini, A E; Puri, C

    2000-01-01

    Membrane receptors are internalized either constitutively or upon ligand engagement. Whereas there is evidence for differential regulation of the two processes, little is known about the molecular machinery involved. Previous studies have shown that an unidentified kinase substrate is required fo...... determinant, other than those contained in the receptors themselves, which is involved in the differential regulation of constitutive vs. regulated endocytosis....... for endocytosis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the prototypical ligand-inducible receptor, but not of the transferrin receptor (TfR), the prototypical constitutively internalized receptor. Eps15, an endocytic protein that is tyrosine phosphorylated by EGFR, is a candidate for such a function...... of the EGFR, but not of the TfR. A phosphopeptide, corresponding to the phosphorylated sequence of Eps15, inhibited EGFR endocytosis, suggesting that phosphotyrosine in Eps15 serves as a docking site for a phosphotyrosine binding protein. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 represents the first molecular...

  15. Plk4-dependent phosphorylation of STIL is required for centriole duplication

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    Anne-Sophie Kratz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of centrioles, namely the formation of a procentriole next to the parental centriole, is regulated by the polo-like kinase Plk4. Only a few other proteins, including STIL (SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus, SIL and Sas-6, are required for the early step of centriole biogenesis. Following Plk4 activation, STIL and Sas-6 accumulate at the cartwheel structure at the initial stage of the centriole assembly process. Here, we show that STIL interacts with Plk4 in vivo. A STIL fragment harboring both the coiled-coil domain and the STAN motif shows the strongest binding affinity to Plk4. Furthermore, we find that STIL is phosphorylated by Plk4. We identified Plk4-specific phosphorylation sites within the C-terminal domain of STIL and show that phosphorylation of STIL by Plk4 is required to trigger centriole duplication.

  16. Spatial-specific regulation of root development by phytochromes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2011-12-01

    Distinct tissues and organs of plants exhibit dissimilar responses to light exposure--cotyledon growth is promoted by light, whereas hypocotyl growth is inhibited by light. Light can have different impacts on root development, including impacting root elongation, morphology, lateral root proliferation and root tropisms. In many cases, light inhibits root elongation. There has been much attention given to whether roots themselves are the sites of photoperception for light that impacts light-dependent growth and development of roots. A number of approaches including photoreceptor localization in planta, localized irradiation and exposure of dissected roots to light have been used to explore the site(s) of light perception for the photoregulation of root development. Such approaches have led to the observation that photoreceptors are localized to roots in many plant species, and that roots are capable of light absorption that can alter morphology and/or gene expression. Our recent results show that localized depletion of phytochrome photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana disrupts root development and root responsiveness to the plant hormone jasmonic acid. Thus, root-localized light perception appears central to organ-specific, photoregulation of growth and development in roots. © 2011 Landes Bioscience

  17. Neurofilament Phosphorylation during Development and Disease: Which Came First, the Phosphorylation or the Accumulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jeffrey M; Garcia, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins is a ubiquitous cellular mechanism for regulating protein function. Some of the most heavily modified neuronal proteins are cytoskeletal proteins of long myelinated axons referred to as neurofilaments (NFs). NFs are type IV intermediate filaments (IFs) that can be composed of four subunits, neurofilament heavy (NF-H), neurofilament medium (NF-M), neurofilament light (NF-L), and α-internexin. Within wild type axons, NFs are responsible for mediating radial growth, a process that determines axonal diameter. NFs are phosphorylated on highly conserved lysine-serine-proline (KSP) repeats located along the C-termini of both NF-M and NF-H within myelinated axonal regions. Phosphorylation is thought to regulate aspects of NF transport and function. However, a key pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases is ectopic accumulation and phosphorylation of NFs. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the posttranslational modifications that occur in both normal and diseased axons. We review evidence that challenges the role of KSP phosphorylation as essential for radial growth and suggests an alternative role for NF phosphorylation in myelinated axons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that regulation of NF phosphorylation dynamics may be essential to avoiding NF accumulations.

  18. A Phos-tag SDS-PAGE method that effectively uses phosphoproteomic data for profiling the phosphorylation dynamics of MEK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Kubota, Yuji; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Koike, Tohru

    2016-07-01

    MEK1, an essential component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, is phosphorylated during activation of the pathway; 12 phosphorylation sites have been identified in human MEK1 by MS-based phosphoproteomic methods. By using Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, we found that multiple variants of MEK1 with different phosphorylation states are constitutively present in typical human cells. The Phos-tag-based strategy, which makes effective use of existing information on the location of phosphorylation sites, permits quantitative time-course profiling of MEK1 phosphospecies in their respective phosphorylation states. By subsequent immunoblotting with an anti-HaloTag antibody, we analyzed a HaloTag-fused MEK1 protein and 12 potential phosphorylation-site-directed mutants of the protein transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells. This strategy revealed that MEK1 is constitutively and mainly phosphorylated at the Thr-292, Ser-298, Thr-386, and Thr-388 residues in vivo, and that combinations of phosphorylations at these four residues produce at least six phosphorylated variants of MEK1. Like the levels of phosphorylation of the Ser-218 and Ser-222 residues by RAF1, which have been well studied, the phosphorylation statuses of Thr-292, Ser-298, Thr-386, and Thr-388 residues vary widely during activation and deactivation of the MAPK pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrated inhibitor-specific profiling of MEK1 phosphospecies by using three MEK inhibitors: TAK-733, PD98059, and U0126. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Regulation of WRKY46 transcription factor function by mitogen-activated protein kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsheed Hussain Sheikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are central signalling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defence as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defence.

  20. Cdc5 influences phosphorylation of Net1 and disassembly of the RENT complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Wenying; Azzam, Ramzi; Chen, Susan L; Huddleston, Michael J; Baskerville, Christopher; Charbonneau, Harry; Annan, Roland S; Carr, Steve A; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2002-04-17

    In S. cerevisiae, the mitotic exit network (MEN) proteins, including the Polo-like protein kinase Cdc5 and the protein phosphatase Cdc14, are required for exit from mitosis. In pre-anaphase cells, Cdc14 is sequestered to the nucleolus by Net1 as a part of the RENT complex. When cells are primed to exit mitosis, the RENT complex is disassembled and Cdc14 is released from the nucleolus. Here, we show that Cdc5 is necessary to free nucleolar Cdc14 in late mitosis, that elevated Cdc5 activity provokes ectopic release of Cdc14 in pre-anaphase cells, and that the phosphorylation state of Net1 is regulated by Cdc5 during anaphase. Furthermore, recombinant Cdc5 and Xenopus Polo-like kinase can disassemble the RENT complex in vitro by phosphorylating Net1 and thereby reducing its affinity for Cdc14. Surprisingly, although RENT complexes containing Net1 mutants (Net1(7m) and Net1(19m') lacking sites phosphorylated by Cdc5 in vitro are refractory to disassembly by Polo-like kinases in vitro, net1(7m) and net1(19m') cells grow normally and exhibit only minor defects in releasing Cdc14 during anaphase. However, net1(19m') cells exhibit a synergistic growth defect when combined with mutations in CDC5 or DBF2 (another MEN gene). We propose that although Cdc5 potentially disassembles RENT by directly phosphorylating Net1, Cdc5 mediates exit from mitosis primarily by phosphorylating other targets. Our study suggests that Cdc5/Polo is unusually promiscuous and highlights the need to validate Cdc5/Polo in vitro phosphorylation sites by direct in vivo mapping experiments.

  1. Design Principles of Phosphorylation-Dependent Timekeeping in Eukaryotic Circadian Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Koji L; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2017-10-16

    The circadian clock in cyanobacteria employs a posttranslational oscillator composed of a sequential phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle of KaiC protein, in which the dynamics of protein structural changes driven by temperature-compensated KaiC's ATPase activity are critical for determining the period. On the other hand, circadian clocks in eukaryotes employ transcriptional feedback loops as a core mechanism. In this system, the dynamics of protein accumulation and degradation affect the circadian period. However, recent studies of eukaryotic circadian clocks reveal that the mechanism controlling the circadian period can be independent of the regulation of protein abundance. Instead, the circadian substrate is often phosphorylated at multiple sites at flexible protein regions to induce structural changes. The phosphorylation is catalyzed by kinases that induce sequential multisite phosphorylation such as casein kinase 1 (CK1) with temperature-compensated activity. We propose that the design principles of phosphorylation-dependent circadian-period determination in eukaryotes may share characteristics with the posttranslational oscillator in cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. Identification of phosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase in human plasma using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryal, Uma K.; Lin, Chiann Tso; Kim, Jong Seo; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Wang, Jun; Qian, Weijun; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-04-20

    Paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate) is an active metabolite of the common insecticide parathion and is acutely toxic due to the inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity in the nervous systems. The Inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity by paraoxon is due to the formation of phosphorylated BChE adduct, and the detection of the phosphorylated BChE adduct in human plasma can serve as an exposure biomarker of organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents. In this study, we performed immunoaffinity purification and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis for identifying phosphorylated BChE in human plasma treated by paraoxon. BChE was captured by biotinylated anti-BChE polyclonal antibodies conjugated to streptavidin magnetic beads. Western blot analysis showed that the antibody was effective to recognize both native and modified BChE with high specificity. The exact phosphorylation site of BChE was confirmed on Serine 198 by MS/MS with a 108 Da modification mass and accurately measured parent ion masses. The phosphorylated BChE peptide was also successfully detected in the immunoaffinity purified sample from paraoxon treated human plasma. Thus, immunoaffinity purification combined with mass spectrometry represents a viable approach for the detection of paraoxon-modified BChE and other forms of modified BChE as exposure biomarkers of organophosphates and nerve agents.

  3. CDK8 kinase phosphorylates transcription factor STAT1 to selectively regulate the interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancerek, Joanna; Poss, Zachary C; Steinparzer, Iris; Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Pfaffenwimmer, Thaddäus; Mikulic, Ivana; Dölken, Lars; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Taatjes, Dylan J; Kovarik, Pavel

    2013-02-21

    Gene regulation by cytokine-activated transcription factors of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family requires serine phosphorylation within the transactivation domain (TAD). STAT1 and STAT3 TAD phosphorylation occurs upon promoter binding by an unknown kinase. Here, we show that the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module of the Mediator complex phosphorylated regulatory sites within the TADs of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, including S727 within the STAT1 TAD in the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. We also observed a CDK8 requirement for IFN-γ-inducible antiviral responses. Microarray analyses revealed that CDK8-mediated STAT1 phosphorylation positively or negatively regulated over 40% of IFN-γ-responsive genes, and RNA polymerase II occupancy correlated with gene expression changes. This divergent regulation occurred despite similar CDK8 occupancy at both S727 phosphorylation-dependent and -independent genes. These data identify CDK8 as a key regulator of STAT1 and antiviral responses and suggest a general role for CDK8 in STAT-mediated transcription. As such, CDK8 represents a promising target for therapeutic manipulation of cytokine responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of dendritogenesis by ZBP1 depends on its phosphorylation at Ser181

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sara Urbanska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zipcode Binding Protein 1 (ZBP1 is one of proteins involved in local translation, a mechanism present in polarized cells, enabling rapid, localized protein synthesis in response to extracellular stimuli. It was previously shown that in neurons, processes coordinated by ZBP1 are indispensable for proper axonal growth cone and spine formation. We recently showed that developing neurons with overexpressed or knockdown ZBP1 cannot obtain proper morphology. We also proved that phosphorylation of ZBP1 by Src kinase is needed for proper dendritic branching [1]. Subsequently, we asked a question about other regulators of ZBP1 during dendritogenesis. Now, we demonstrate that ZBP1 is effectively phosphorylated in vitro by mTOR kinase. We took advantage of recently published data regarding potential mTOR-dependent phosphorylation sites in ZBP1 i.e. Ser181 [2] and examined role of this phosphorylation in (i dendritic arborization and (ii cellular distribution of ZBP1. To address these questions, we constructed non-phosphorable (S181A and phosphomimicking (S181E mutants of ZBP1 fused to GFP. We observed that S181E but not S181A reversed morphological deficits caused by ZBP1 knockdown. Another observation was that distribution along the dendrites of non-phosphorable mutant was more even than distribution of wild type ZBP1, which is denser at the dendritic branching points. Thus, we concluded that Ser181 phosphorylation is involved in ZBP1 functions during dendritic growth.

  5. Phosphorylation of NS5A Serine-235 is essential to hepatitis C virus RNA replication and normal replication compartment formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyre, Nicholas S., E-mail: nicholas.eyre@adelaide.edu.au [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Hampton-Smith, Rachel J.; Aloia, Amanda L. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Eddes, James S. [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Simpson, Kaylene J. [Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Hoffmann, Peter [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS), University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Beard, Michael R. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A protein is essential for HCV RNA replication and virus assembly. Here we report the identification of NS5A phosphorylation sites Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 during an infectious HCV replication cycle and demonstrate that Ser-235 phosphorylation is essential for HCV RNA replication. Confocal microscopy revealed that both phosphoablatant (S235A) and phosphomimetic (S235D) mutants redistribute NS5A to large juxta-nuclear foci that display altered colocalization with known replication complex components. Using electron microscopy (EM) we found that S235D alters virus-induced membrane rearrangements while EM using ‘APEX2’-tagged viruses demonstrated S235D-mediated enrichment of NS5A in irregular membranous foci. Finally, using a customized siRNA screen of candidate NS5A kinases and subsequent analysis using a phospho-specific antibody, we show that phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha (PI4KIIIα) is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation. We conclude that Ser-235 phosphorylation of NS5A is essential for HCV RNA replication and normal replication complex formation and is regulated by PI4KIIIα. - Highlights: • NS5A residues Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 are phosphorylated during HCV infection. • Phosphorylation of Ser-235 is essential to HCV RNA replication. • Mutation of Ser-235 alters replication compartment localization and morphology. • Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation.

  6. Lys169 of human glucokinase is a determinant for glucose phosphorylation: implication for the atomic mechanism of glucokinase catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GK, a glucose sensor, maintains plasma glucose homeostasis via phosphorylation of glucose and is a potential therapeutic target for treating maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY and persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI. To characterize the catalytic mechanism of glucose phosphorylation by GK, we combined molecular modeling, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM calculations, experimental mutagenesis and enzymatic kinetic analysis on both wild-type and mutated GK. Our three-dimensional (3D model of the GK-Mg(2+-ATP-glucose (GMAG complex, is in agreement with a large number of mutagenesis data, and elucidates atomic information of the catalytic site in GK for glucose phosphorylation. A 10-ns MD simulation of the GMAG complex revealed that Lys169 plays a dominant role in glucose phosphorylation. This prediction was verified by experimental mutagenesis of GK (K169A and enzymatic kinetic analyses of glucose phosphorylation. QM/MM calculations were further used to study the role of Lys169 in the catalytic mechanism of the glucose phosphorylation and we found that Lys169 enhances the binding of GK with both ATP and glucose by serving as a bridge between ATP and glucose. More importantly, Lys169 directly participates in the glucose phosphorylation as a general acid catalyst. Our findings provide mechanistic details of glucose phorphorylation catalyzed by GK, and are important for understanding the pathogenic mechanism of MODY.

  7. Growth hormone, interferon-gamma, and leukemia inhibitory factor promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, L S; Hsu, G W; Myers, M G

    1995-01-01

    The identification of JAK2 as a growth hormone (GH) receptor-associated, GH-activated tyrosine kinase has established tyrosyl phosphorylation as a signaling mechanism for GH. In the present study, GH is shown to stimulate tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), the princi......The identification of JAK2 as a growth hormone (GH) receptor-associated, GH-activated tyrosine kinase has established tyrosyl phosphorylation as a signaling mechanism for GH. In the present study, GH is shown to stimulate tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1......), the principle substrate of the insulin receptor. Tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a critical step in insulin signaling and provides binding sites for proteins with the appropriate Src homology 2 domains, including the 85-kDa regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3'-kinase. In 3T3-F442A fibroblasts......, GH-dependent tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 was detected by 1 min and at GH concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml (0.23 nM). Tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 was transient, with maximal stimulation detected at 30 min and diminished signal detected at 60 min. The ability of GH receptor (GHR) to transduce...

  8. Functional diversification of thylakoidal processing peptidases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chi Hsu

    Full Text Available Thylakoidal processing peptidase (TPP is responsible for removing amino-terminal thylakoid-transfer signals from several proteins in the thylakoid lumen. Three TPP isoforms are encoded by the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies showed that one of them termed plastidic type I signal peptidase 1 (Plsp1 was necessary for processing three thylakoidal proteins and one protein in the chloroplast envelope in vivo. The lack of Plsp1 resulted in seedling lethality, apparently due to disruption of proper thylakoid development. The physiological roles of the other two TPP homologs remain unknown. Here we show that the three A. thaliana TPP isoforms evolved to acquire diverse functions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TPP may have originated before the endosymbiotic event, and that there are two groups of TPP in seed plants: one includes Plsp1 and another comprises the other two A. thaliana TPP homologs, which are named as Plsp2A and Plsp2B in this study. The duplication leading to the two groups predates the gymnosperm-angiosperm divergence, and the separation of Plsp2A and Plsp2B occurred after the Malvaceae-Brassicaceae diversification. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed that the two PLSP2 genes were co-expressed in both photosynthetic tissues and roots, whereas the PLSP1 transcript accumulated predominantly in photosynthetic tissues. Both PLSP2 genes were expressed in the aerial parts of the plsp1-null mutant at levels comparable to those in wild-type plants. The seedling-lethal phenotype of the plsp1-null mutant could be rescued by a constitutive expression of Plsp1 cDNA but not by that of Plsp2A or Plsp2B. These results indicate that Plsp1 and Plsp2 evolved to function differently, and that neither of the Plsp2 isoforms is necessary for proper thylakoid development in photosynthetic tissues.

  9. Homeopathic Treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana Plants Infected with Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Shah-Rossi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeopathic basic research is still in the screening phase to identify promising model systems that are adapted to the needs and peculiarities of homeopathic medicine and pharmacy. We investigated the potential of a common plant-pathogen system, Arabidopsis thaliana infected with the virulent bacteria Pseudomonas syringae, regarding its response towards a homeopathic treatment. A. thaliana plants were treated with homeopathic preparations before and after infection. Outcome measure was the number of P. syringae bacteria in the leaves of A. thaliana, assessed in randomized and blinded experiments. After a screening of 30 homeopathic preparations, we investigated the effect of Carbo vegetabilis 30x, Magnesium phosphoricum 30x, Nosode 30x, Biplantol (a homeopathic complex remedy, and Biplantol 30x on the infection rate in five or six independent experiments in total. The screening yielded significant effects for four out of 30 tested preparations. In the repeated experimental series, only the homeopathic complex remedy Biplantol induced a significant reduction of the infection rate (p = 0.01; effect size, d = 0.38. None of the other four repeatedly tested preparations (Carbo vegetabilis 30x, Magnesium phosphoricum 30x, Nosode 30x, Biplantol 30x yielded significant effects in the overall evaluation. This phytopathological model yielded a small to medium effect size and thus might be of interest for homeopathic basic research after further improvement. Compared to Bion (a common SAR inducer used as positive control, the magnitude of the treatment effect of Biplantol was about 50%. Thus, homeopathic formulations might have a potential for the treatment of plant diseases after further optimization. However, the ecological impact should be investigated more closely before widespread application.

  10. Reversible phosphorylation of the 26S proteasome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The 26S proteasome at the center of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is essential for virtually all cellular processes of eukaryotes. A common misconception about the proteasome is that, once made, it remains as a static and uniform complex with spontaneous and constitutive activity for protein degradation. Recent discoveries have provided compelling evidence to support the exact opposite insomuch as the 26S proteasome undergoes dynamic and reversible phosphorylation under a variety of physiopathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the history and current understanding of proteasome phosphorylation, and advocate the idea of targeting proteasome kinases/phosphatases as a new strategy for clinical interventions of several human diseases.

  11. Protein phosphorylation in bcterial signaling and regulation

    KAUST Repository

    Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-01-26

    In 2003, it was demonstrated for the first time that bacteria possess protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases), capable of phosphorylating other cellular proteins and regulating their activity. It soon became apparent that these kinases phosphorylate a number of protein substrates, involved in different cellular processes. More recently, we found out that BY-kinases can be activated by several distinct protein interactants, and are capable of engaging in cross-phosphorylation with other kinases. Evolutionary studies based on genome comparison indicate that BY-kinases exist only in bacteria. They are non-essential (present in about 40% bacterial genomes), and their knockouts lead to pleiotropic phenotypes, since they phosphorylate many substrates. Surprisingly, BY-kinase genes accumulate mutations at an increased rate (non-synonymous substitution rate significantly higher than other bacterial genes). One direct consequence of this phenomenon is no detectable co-evolution between kinases and their substrates. Their promiscuity towards substrates thus seems to be “hard-wired”, but why would bacteria maintain such promiscuous regulatory devices? One explanation is the maintenance of BY-kinases as rapidly evolving regulators, which can readily adopt new substrates when environmental changes impose selective pressure for quick evolution of new regulatory modules. Their role is clearly not to act as master regulators, dedicated to triggering a single response, but they might rather be employed to contribute to fine-tuning and improving robustness of various cellular responses. This unique feature makes BY-kinases a potentially useful tool in synthetic biology. While other bacterial kinases are very specific and their signaling pathways insulated, BY-kinase can relatively easily be engineered to adopt new substrates and control new biosynthetic processes. Since they are absent in humans, and regulate some key functions in pathogenic bacteria, they are also very promising

  12. Solid polymer electrolyte from phosphorylated chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauzi, Iqbal, E-mail: arcana@chem.itb.ac.id; Arcana, I Made, E-mail: arcana@chem.itb.ac.id [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Research Groups, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Recently, the need of secondary battery application continues to increase. The secondary battery which using a liquid electrolyte was indicated had some weakness. A solid polymer electrolyte is an alternative electrolytes membrane which developed in order to replace the liquid electrolyte type. In the present study, the effect of phosphorylation on to polymer electrolyte membrane which synthesized from chitosan and lithium perchlorate salts was investigated. The effect of the component’s composition respectively on the properties of polymer electrolyte, was carried out by analyzed of it’s characterization such as functional groups, ion conductivity, and thermal properties. The mechanical properties i.e tensile resistance and the morphology structure of membrane surface were determined. The phosphorylation processing of polymer electrolyte membrane of chitosan and lithium perchlorate was conducted by immersing with phosphoric acid for 2 hours, and then irradiated on a microwave for 60 seconds. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan derived from shrimp shells was obtained around 75.4%. Relative molecular mass of chitosan was obtained by viscometry method is 796,792 g/mol. The ionic conductivity of chitosan membrane was increase from 6.33 × 10{sup −6} S/cm up to 6.01 × 10{sup −4} S/cm after adding by 15 % solution of lithium perchlorate. After phosphorylation, the ionic conductivity of phosphorylated lithium chitosan membrane was observed 1.37 × 10{sup −3} S/cm, while the tensile resistance of 40.2 MPa with a better thermal resistance. On the strength of electrolyte membrane properties, this polymer electrolyte membrane was suggested had one potential used for polymer electrolyte in field of lithium battery applications.

  13. Solid polymer electrolyte from phosphorylated chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, Iqbal; Arcana, I. Made

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the need of secondary battery application continues to increase. The secondary battery which using a liquid electrolyte was indicated had some weakness. A solid polymer electrolyte is an alternative electrolytes membrane which developed in order to replace the liquid electrolyte type. In the present study, the effect of phosphorylation on to polymer electrolyte membrane which synthesized from chitosan and lithium perchlorate salts was investigated. The effect of the component's composition respectively on the properties of polymer electrolyte, was carried out by analyzed of it's characterization such as functional groups, ion conductivity, and thermal properties. The mechanical properties i.e tensile resistance and the morphology structure of membrane surface were determined. The phosphorylation processing of polymer electrolyte membrane of chitosan and lithium perchlorate was conducted by immersing with phosphoric acid for 2 hours, and then irradiated on a microwave for 60 seconds. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan derived from shrimp shells was obtained around 75.4%. Relative molecular mass of chitosan was obtained by viscometry method is 796,792 g/mol. The ionic conductivity of chitosan membrane was increase from 6.33 × 10-6 S/cm up to 6.01 × 10-4 S/cm after adding by 15 % solution of lithium perchlorate. After phosphorylation, the ionic conductivity of phosphorylated lithium chitosan membrane was observed 1.37 × 10-3 S/cm, while the tensile resistance of 40.2 MPa with a better thermal resistance. On the strength of electrolyte membrane properties, this polymer electrolyte membrane was suggested had one potential used for polymer electrolyte in field of lithium battery applications.

  14. Extraction and Characterization of Extracellular Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications from Arabidopsis thaliana Suspension Cell Cultures and Seedlings: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghahremani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by plant cells into the extracellular space, consisting of the cell wall, apoplastic fluid, and rhizosphere, play crucial roles during development, nutrient acquisition, and stress acclimation. However, isolating the full range of secreted proteins has proven difficult, and new strategies are constantly evolving to increase the number of proteins that can be detected and identified. In addition, the dynamic nature of the extracellular proteome presents the further challenge of identifying and characterizing the post-translational modifications (PTMs of secreted proteins, particularly glycosylation and phosphorylation. Such PTMs are common and important regulatory modifications of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes. This review explores the most recent methods in isolating and characterizing the plant extracellular proteome with a focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, highlighting the current challenges yet to be overcome. Moreover, the crucial role of protein PTMs in cell wall signalling, development, and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress is discussed.

  15. Extraction and Characterization of Extracellular Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications from Arabidopsis thaliana Suspension Cell Cultures and Seedlings: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremani, Mina; Stigter, Kyla A; Plaxton, William

    2016-09-01

    Proteins secreted by plant cells into the extracellular space, consisting of the cell wall, apoplastic fluid, and rhizosphere, play crucial roles during development, nutrient acquisition, and stress acclimation. However, isolating the full range of secreted proteins has proven difficult, and new strategies are constantly evolving to increase the number of proteins that can be detected and identified. In addition, the dynamic nature of the extracellular proteome presents the further challenge of identifying and characterizing the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of secreted proteins, particularly glycosylation and phosphorylation. Such PTMs are common and important regulatory modifications of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes. This review explores the most recent methods in isolating and characterizing the plant extracellular proteome with a focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, highlighting the current challenges yet to be overcome. Moreover, the crucial role of protein PTMs in cell wall signalling, development, and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress is discussed.

  16. Arabinose Kinase-Deficient Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, O; Cobbett, C S

    1991-08-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is sensitive to exogenous l-arabinose has been isolated. Comparisons of growth of the wild type, mutant, and F1 and F2 progeny of crosses showed the arabinose-sensitive phenotype is semidominant and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed the mutation is linked to the eceriferum-2 locus on chromosome 4. In vivo incorporation of exogenous labeled l-arabinose into ethanol-insoluble polysaccharides was greatly reduced in the mutant with a concomitant accumulation of free labeled arabinose. Enzyme assays of crude plant extracts demonstrated a defect in arabinose kinase activity in the mutant.

  17. CB5C affects the glucosinolate profile in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vik, Daniel; Crocoll, Christoph; Andersen, Tonni Grube

    2016-01-01

    proteins support the cytochrome P450 enzymes of plant specialized metabolism and found CB5C from Arabidopsis thaliana to co-express with glucosinolate biosynthetic genes. We characterized the glucosinolate profiles of two T-DNA insertion mutants of CB5C, and found that long-chained aliphatic glucosinolates...... were reduced in one of the mutant lines - a phenotype that was exaggerated upon methyl-jasmonate treatment. These results support the hypothesis, that CB5C influences glucosinolate biosynthesis, however, the mode of action remains unknown. Furthermore, the mutants differed in their biomass response...

  18. Steroid hormone receptor phosphorylation: Is there a physiological role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAll members of the steroid hormone receptor family are phosphoproteins. Additional phosphorylation occurs in the presence of hormone. This hormone-induced phosphorylation, which is 2- to 7-fold more than the basal phosphorylation, is a rapid process. All steroid receptors are

  19. Shear stress regulates occludin content and phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaio, L; Chang, Y S; Gardner, T W; Tarbell, J M; Antonetti, D A

    2001-07-01

    Previous studies determined that shear stress imposed on bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) monolayers increased the hydraulic conductivity (L(P)); however, the mechanism by which shear stress increases L(P) remains unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that shear stress regulates paracellular transport by altering the expression and phosphorylation state of the tight junction protein occludin. The effect of shear stress on occludin content was examined by Western blot analysis. Ten dyn/cm(2) significantly reduced occludin content in a time-dependent manner such that after a 3 h exposure to shear, occludin content decreased to 44% of control. Twenty dyn/cm(2) decreased occludin content to 50% of control and increased L(P) by 4.7-fold after 3 h. Occludin expression and L(P) depend on tyrosine kinase activity because erbstatin A (10 microM) attenuated both the shear-induced decrease in occludin content and increase in L(P). Shear stress increased occludin phosphorylation after 5 min, 15 min, and 3 h exposures. The shear-induced increase in occludin phosphorylation was attenuated with dibutyryl (DB) cAMP (1 mM), a reagent previously shown to reverse the shear-induced increase in L(P). We conclude that shear stress rapidly (shear stress increases L(P).

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of immunophilin-like FKBP42 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhoff, Andreas; Granzin, Joachim [Institut für Biologische Informationsverarbeitung (IBI-2, Biologische Strukturforschung), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Kamphausen, Thilo [Max-Planck-Forschungsstelle für Enzymologie der Proteinfaltung, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Büldt, Georg [Institut für Biologische Informationsverarbeitung (IBI-2, Biologische Strukturforschung), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Schulz, Burkhard [Universität Tübingen, ZMBP, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany); Purdue University, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Weiergräber, Oliver H., E-mail: o.h.weiergraeber@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Biologische Informationsverarbeitung (IBI-2, Biologische Strukturforschung), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The crystallization of FKBP42, a multi-domain member of the FK506-binding protein family, from the plant A. thaliana is reported. Two fragments of FKBP42 from Arabidopsis thaliana covering differing lengths of the molecule have been expressed, purified and crystallized. For each construct, crystals belonging to two different space groups were obtained and subjected to preliminary X-ray analysis.

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana and Thlaspi caerulescens respond comparably to low zinc supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talukdar, S.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to study the response of Arabidopsis thaliana L. and Thlaspi caerulescens J. & C. Presl to different Zn supplies. The A. thaliana plants were exposed to Zn-deficiency (0 and 0.05 ¿M Zn) and compared to the plants grown on media containing standard Zn (2

  2. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Rasmussen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking. RE...

  3. Local-scale patterns of genetic variability, outcrossing, and spatial structure in natural stands of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Bomblies

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As Arabidopsis thaliana is increasingly employed in evolutionary and ecological studies, it is essential to understand patterns of natural genetic variation and the forces that shape them. Previous work focusing mostly on global and regional scales has demonstrated the importance of historical events such as long-distance migration and colonization. Far less is known about the role of contemporary factors or environmental heterogeneity in generating diversity patterns at local scales. We sampled 1,005 individuals from 77 closely spaced stands in diverse settings around Tübingen, Germany. A set of 436 SNP markers was used to characterize genome-wide patterns of relatedness and recombination. Neighboring genotypes often shared mosaic blocks of alternating marker identity and divergence. We detected recent outcrossing as well as stretches of residual heterozygosity in largely homozygous recombinants. As has been observed for several other selfing species, there was considerable heterogeneity among sites in diversity and outcrossing, with rural stands exhibiting greater diversity and heterozygosity than urban stands. Fine-scale spatial structure was evident as well. Within stands, spatial structure correlated negatively with observed heterozygosity, suggesting that the high homozygosity of natural A. thaliana may be partially attributable to nearest-neighbor mating of related individuals. The large number of markers and extensive local sampling employed here afforded unusual power to characterize local genetic patterns. Contemporary processes such as ongoing outcrossing play an important role in determining distribution of genetic diversity at this scale. Local "outcrossing hotspots" appear to reshuffle genetic information at surprising rates, while other stands contribute comparatively little. Our findings have important implications for sampling and interpreting diversity among A. thaliana accessions.

  4. Inhibition of GSK3 phosphorylation of beta-catenin via phosphorylated PPPSPXS motifs of Wnt coreceptor LRP6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Wu

    Full Text Available The Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway plays essential roles in cell proliferation and differentiation, and deregulated beta-catenin protein levels lead to many types of human cancers. On activation by Wnt, the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor related protein 6 (LRP6 is phosphorylated at multiple conserved intracellular PPPSPXS motifs by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 and casein kinase 1 (CK1, resulting in recruitment of the scaffolding protein Axin to LRP6. As a result, beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3 is inhibited and beta-catenin protein is stabilized. However, how LRP6 phosphorylation and the ensuing LRP6-Axin interaction lead to the inhibition of beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3 is not fully understood. In this study, we reconstituted Axin-dependent beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3 and CK1 in vitro using recombinant proteins, and found that the phosphorylated PPPSPXS peptides directly inhibit beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3 in a sequence and phosphorylation-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect of phosphorylated PPPSPXS motifs is direct and specific for GSK3 phosphorylation of beta-catenin at Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 but not for CK1 phosphorylation of beta-catenin at Ser45, and is independent of Axin function. We also show that a phosphorylated PPPSPXS peptide is able to activate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and to induce axis duplication in Xenopus embryos, presumably by inhibition of GSK3 in vivo. Based on these observations, we propose a working model that Axin recruitment to the phosphorylated LRP6 places GSK3 in the vicinity of multiple phosphorylated PPPSPXS motifs, which directly inhibit GSK3 phosphorylation of beta-catenin. This model provides a possible mechanism to account, in part, for inhibition of beta-catenin phosphorylation by Wnt-activated LRP6.

  5. A phosphoserine/threonine-binding pocket in AGC kinases and PDK1 mediates activation by hydrophobic motif phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, Morten; Antal, Torben L; Dümmler, Bettina A

    2002-01-01

    The growth factor-activated AGC protein kinases RSK, S6K, PKB, MSK and SGK are activated by serine/threonine phosphorylation in the activation loop and in the hydrophobic motif, C-terminal to the kinase domain. In some of these kinases, phosphorylation of the hydrophobic motif creates a specific...... docking site that recruits and activates PDK1, which then phosphorylates the activation loop. Here, we discover a pocket in the kinase domain of PDK1 that recognizes the phosphoserine/phosphothreonine in the hydrophobic motif by identifying two oppositely positioned arginine and lysine residues that bind...... in which the phosphorylated hydrophobic motif and activation loop act on the alphaC-helix of the kinase structure to induce synergistic stimulation of catalytic activity. Sequence conservation suggests that this mechanism is a key feature in activation of >40 human AGC kinases....

  6. Redundant mechanisms prevent mitotic entry following replication arrest in the absence of Cdc25 hyper-phosphorylation in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Frazer

    Full Text Available Following replication arrest the Cdc25 phosphatase is phosphorylated and inhibited by Cds1. It has previously been reported that expressing Cdc25 where 9 putative amino-terminal Cds1 phosphorylation sites have been substituted to alanine results in bypass of the DNA replication checkpoint. However, these results were acquired by expression of the phosphorylation mutant using a multicopy expression vector in a genetic background where the DNA replication checkpoint is intact. In order to clarify these results we constructed a Cdc25(9A-GFP native promoter integrant and examined its effect on the replication checkpoint at endogenous expression levels. In this strain the replication checkpoint operates normally, conditional on the presence of the Mik1 kinase. In response to replication arrest the Cdc25(9A-GFP protein is degraded, suggesting the presence of a backup mechanism to eliminate the phosphatase when it cannot be inhibited through phosphorylation.

  7. MOF phosphorylation by ATM regulates 53BP1-mediated DSB repair pathway choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Hunt, Clayton R.; Hegdec, Muralidhar L.; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh1, Mayank; Ramnarain, Deepti B.; Hittelman, Walter N.; Namjoshi, Sarita; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Hazra, Tapas K.; Ludwig, Thomas; Pandita, Raj K.; Tyler, Jessica K.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle phase is a critical determinant of the choice between DNA damage repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here we report that DSBs induce ATM-dependent MOF (a histone H4 acetyl-transferase) phosphorylation (p-T392-MOF) and that phosphorylated MOF co-localizes with γ-H2AX, ATM, and 53BP1 foci. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (MOF-T392A) impedes DNA repair in S- and G2-phase but not G1-phase cells. Expression of MOF-T392A also reverses the reduction in DSB associated 53BP1 seen in wild type S/G2-phase cells, resulting in enhanced 53BP1 and reduced BRCA1 association. Decreased BRCA1 levels at DSB sites correlates with defective repairosome formation, reduced HR repair and decreased cell survival following irradiation. These data support a model whereby ATM mediated MOF-T392 phosphorylation modulates 53BP1 function to facilitate the subsequent recruitment of HR repair proteins, uncovering a regulatory role for MOF in DSB repair pathway choice during S/G2-phase. PMID:24953651

  8. MOF phosphorylation by ATM regulates 53BP1-mediated double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Hunt, Clayton R; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Ramnarain, Deepti B; Hittelman, Walter N; Namjoshi, Sarita; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Hazra, Tapas K; Ludwig, Thomas; Pandita, Raj K; Tyler, Jessica K; Pandita, Tej K

    2014-07-10

    Cell-cycle phase is a critical determinant of the choice between DNA damage repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here, we report that double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce ATM-dependent MOF (a histone H4 acetyl-transferase) phosphorylation (p-T392-MOF) and that phosphorylated MOF colocalizes with γ-H2AX, ATM, and 53BP1 foci. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (MOF-T392A) impedes DNA repair in S and G2 phase but not G1 phase cells. Expression of MOF-T392A also blocks the reduction in DSB-associated 53BP1 seen in wild-type S/G2 phase cells, resulting in enhanced 53BP1 and reduced BRCA1 association. Decreased BRCA1 levels at DSB sites correlates with defective repairosome formation, reduced HR repair, and decreased cell survival following irradiation. These data support a model whereby ATM-mediated MOF-T392 phosphorylation modulates 53BP1 function to facilitate the subsequent recruitment of HR repair proteins, uncovering a regulatory role for MOF in DSB repair pathway choice during S/G2 phase. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global quantitative analysis of phosphorylation underlying phencyclidine signaling and sensorimotor gating in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchy, D B; Savas, J N; Martínez-Bartolomé, S; Park, S K; Maher, P; Powell, S B; Yates, J R

    2016-02-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is an example of sensorimotor gating and deficits in PPI have been demonstrated in schizophrenia patients. Phencyclidine (PCP) suppression of PPI in animals has been studied to elucidate the pathological elements of schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PCP treatment or PPI in the brain are still poorly understood. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on the prefrontal cortex from rats that were subjected to PPI after being systemically injected with PCP or saline. PCP downregulated phosphorylation events were significantly enriched in proteins associated with long-term potentiation (LTP). Importantly, this data set identifies functionally novel phosphorylation sites on known LTP-associated signaling molecules. In addition, mutagenesis of a significantly altered phosphorylation site on xCT (SLC7A11), the light chain of system xc-, the cystine/glutamate antiporter, suggests that PCP also regulates the activity of this protein. Finally, new insights were also derived on PPI signaling independent of PCP treatment. This is the first quantitative phosphorylation proteomic analysis providing new molecular insights into sensorimotor gating.

  10. Insulin controls subcellular localization and multisite phosphorylation of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, lipin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Thurl E; Huffman, Todd A; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Kumar, Anil; Lawrence, John C

    2007-01-05

    Brain, liver, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle from fatty liver dystrophy (fld/fld) mice, which do not express lipin 1 (lipin), contained much less Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) activity than tissues from wild type mice. Lipin harboring the fld(2j) (Gly(84) --> Arg) mutation exhibited relatively little PAP activity. These results indicate that lipin is a major PAP in vivo and that the loss of PAP activity contributes to the fld phenotype. PAP activity was readily detected in immune complexes of lipin from 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where the protein was found both as a microsomal form and a soluble, more highly phosphorylated, form. Fifteen phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometric analyses. Insulin increased the phosphorylation of multiple sites and promoted a gel shift that was due in part to phosphorylation of Ser(106). In contrast, epinephrine and oleic acid promoted dephosphorylation of lipin. The PAP-specific activity of lipin was not affected by the hormones or by dephosphorylation of lipin with protein phosphatase 1. However, the ratio of soluble to microsomal lipin was markedly increased in response to insulin and decreased in response to epinephrine and oleic acid. The results suggest that insulin and epinephrine control lipin primarily by changing localization rather than intrinsic PAP activity.

  11. Mammalian FMRP S499 Is Phosphorylated by CK2 and Promotes Secondary Phosphorylation of FMRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Christopher M; O'Keefe, Rachel A; Blice-Baum, Anna; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita; Gong, Xuan; Miyares, Laura; Karaca, Esra; Bordey, Angélique

    2016-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an mRNA-binding regulator of protein translation that associates with 4-6% of brain transcripts and is central to neurodevelopment. Autism risk genes' transcripts are overrepresented among FMRP-binding mRNAs, and FMRP loss-of-function mutations are responsible for fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of monogenetic autism. It is thought that FMRP-dependent translational repression is governed by the phosphorylation of serine residue 499 (S499). However, recent evidence suggests that S499 phosphorylation is not modulated by metabotropic glutamate receptor class I (mGluR-I) or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), two molecules shown to regulate FMRP translational repression. Moreover, the mammalian FMRP S499 kinase remains unknown. We found that casein kinase II (CK2) phosphorylates murine FMRP S499. Further, we show that phosphorylation of FMRP S499 permits phosphorylation of additional, nearby residues. Evidence suggests that these nearby residues are modulated by mGluR-I and PP2A pathways. These data support an alternative phosphodynamic model of FMRP that is harmonious with prior studies and serves as a framework for further investigation.

  12. AraPheno: a public database for Arabidopsis thaliana phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seren, Ümit; Grimm, Dominik; Fitz, Joffrey; Weigel, Detlef; Nordborg, Magnus; Borgwardt, Karsten; Korte, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Natural genetic variation makes it possible to discover evolutionary changes that have been maintained in a population because they are advantageous. To understand genotype–phenotype relationships and to investigate trait architecture, the existence of both high-resolution genotypic and phenotypic data is necessary. Arabidopsis thaliana is a prime model for these purposes. This herb naturally occurs across much of the Eurasian continent and North America. Thus, it is exposed to a wide range of environmental factors and has been subject to natural selection under distinct conditions. Full genome sequencing data for more than 1000 different natural inbred lines are available, and this has encouraged the distributed generation of many types of phenotypic data. To leverage these data for meta analyses, AraPheno (https://arapheno.1001genomes.org) provide a central repository of population-scale phenotypes for A. thaliana inbred lines. AraPheno includes various features to easily access, download and visualize the phenotypic data. This will facilitate a comparative analysis of the many different types of phenotypic data, which is the base to further enhance our understanding of the genotype–phenotype map. PMID:27924043

  13. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  14. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism are coordina......Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  15. Protists are an integral part of the Arabidopsis thaliana microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Melanie; Ploch, Sebastian; Fiore-Donno, Anna M; Bonkowski, Michael; Rose, Laura E

    2018-01-01

    Although protists occupy a vast range of habitats and are known to interact with plants among other things via disease suppression, competition or growth stimulation, their contributions to the 'phytobiome' are not well described. To contribute to a more comprehensive picture of the plant holobiont, we examined cercozoan and oomycete taxa living in association with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana grown in two different soils. Soil, roots, leaves and wooden toothpicks were analysed before and after surface sterilization. Cercozoa were identified using 18S rRNA gene metabarcoding, whereas the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 was used to determine oomycetes. Subsequent analyses revealed strong spatial structuring of protist communities between compartments, although oomycetes appeared more specialized than Cercozoa. With regards to oomycetes, only members of the Peronosporales and taxa belonging to the genus Globisporangium were identified as shared members of the A. thaliana microbiome. This also applied to cercozoan taxa belonging to the Glissomonadida and Cercomonadida. We identified a strong influence by edaphic factors on the rhizosphere, but not for the phyllosphere. Distinct differences of Cercozoa found preferably in wood or fresh plant material imply specific niche adaptations. Our results highlight the importance of micro-eukaryotes for the plant holobiont. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, F. J.; Ynsa, M. D.; Domínguez-Solís, J. R.; López-Martín, M. C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications.

  17. Novel Ribonuclease Activity Differs between Fibrillarins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Rodriguez-Corona

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillarin is one of the most important nucleolar proteins that have been shown as essential for life. Fibrillarin localizes primarily at the periphery between fibrillar center and dense fibrillar component as well as in Cajal bodies. In most plants there are at least two different genes for fibrillarin. In Arabidopsis thaliana both genes show high level of expression in transcriptionally active cells. Here, we focus on two important differences between A. thaliana fibrillarins. First and most relevant is the enzymatic activity by AtFib2. The AtFib2 shows a novel ribonuclease activity that is not seen with AtFib1. Second is a difference in the ability to interact with phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid between both proteins. We also show that the novel ribonuclease activity as well as the phospholipid binding region of fibrillarin is confine to the GAR domain. The ribonuclease activity of fibrillarin reveals in this study represents a new role for this protein in rRNA processing.

  18. Cell wall proteome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana mature stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duruflé, Harold; Clemente, Hélène San; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Plant stems carry flowers necessary for species propagation and need to be adapted to mechanical disturbance and environmental factors. The stem cell walls are different from other organs and can modify their rigidity or viscoelastic properties for the integrity and the robustness required to withstand mechanical impacts and environmental stresses. Plant cell wall is composed of complex polysaccharide networks also containing cell wall proteins (CWPs) crucial to perceive and limit the environmental effects. The CWPs are fundamental players in cell wall remodeling processes, and today, only 86 have been identified from the mature stems of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. With a destructive method, this study has enlarged its coverage to 302 CWPs. This new proteome is mainly composed of 27.5% proteins acting on polysaccharides, 16% proteases, 11.6% oxido-reductases, 11% possibly related to lipid metabolism and 11% of proteins with interacting domains with proteins or polysaccharides. Compared to stem cell wall proteomes already available (Brachypodium distachyon, Sacharum officinarum, Linum usitatissimum, Medicago sativa), that of A. thaliana stems has a higher proportion of proteins acting on polysaccharides and of proteases, but a lower proportion of oxido-reductases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-07-08

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana's roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes.

  20. Photosynthetic entrainment of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Michael J; Mielczarek, Olga; Robertson, Fiona C; Hubbard, Katharine E; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-10-31

    Circadian clocks provide a competitive advantage in an environment that is heavily influenced by the rotation of the Earth, by driving daily rhythms in behaviour, physiology and metabolism in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. Circadian clocks comprise transcription-translation feedback loops, which are entrained by environmental signals such as light and temperature to adjust the phase of rhythms to match the local environment. The production of sugars by photosynthesis is a key metabolic output of the circadian clock in plants. Here we show that these rhythmic, endogenous sugar signals can entrain circadian rhythms in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating the gene expression of circadian clock components early in the photoperiod, thus defining a 'metabolic dawn'. By inhibiting photosynthesis, we demonstrate that endogenous oscillations in sugar levels provide metabolic feedback to the circadian oscillator through the morning-expressed gene PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 7 (PRR7), and we identify that prr7 mutants are insensitive to the effects of sucrose on the circadian period. Thus, photosynthesis has a marked effect on the entrainment and maintenance of robust circadian rhythms in A. thaliana, demonstrating that metabolism has a crucial role in regulation of the circadian clock.

  1. Casein kinase 1delta activates human recombinant deoxycytidine kinase by Ser-74 phosphorylation, but is not involved in the in vivo regulation of its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smal, Caroline; Vertommen, Didier; Amsailale, Rachid; Arts, Angélique; Degand, Hervé; Morsomme, Pierre; Rider, Mark H; Neste, Eric Van Den; Bontemps, Françoise

    2010-10-01

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a key enzyme in the salvage of deoxynucleosides and in the activation of several anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. We recently showed that dCK was activated in vivo by phosphorylation of Ser-74. However, the protein kinase responsible was not identified. Ser-74 is located downstream a Glu-rich region, presenting similarity with the consensus phosphorylation motif of casein kinase 1 (CKI), and particularly of CKI delta. We showed that recombinant CKI delta phosphorylated several residues of bacterially overexpressed dCK: Ser-74, but also Ser-11, Ser-15, and Thr-72. Phosphorylation of dCK by CKI delta correlated with increased activity reaching at least 4-fold. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that only Ser-74 phosphorylation was involved in dCK activation by CKI delta, strengthening the key role of this residue in the control of dCK activity. However, neither CKI delta inhibitors nor CKI delta siRNA-mediated knock-down modified Ser-74 phosphorylation or dCK activity in cultured cells. Moreover, these approaches did not prevent dCK activation induced by treatments enhancing Ser-74 phosphorylation. Taken together, the data preclude a role of CKI delta in the regulation of dCK activity in vivo. Nevertheless, phosphorylation of dCK by CKI delta could be a useful tool for elucidating the influence of Ser-74 phosphorylation on the structure-activity relationships in the enzyme. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ginsenoside Rd attenuates tau protein phosphorylation via the PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway after transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Shi, Ming; Ye, Ruidong; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xuedong; Zhang, Guangyun; Han, Junliang; Zhang, Yunxia; Wang, Bing; Zhao, Jun; Hui, Juan; Xiong, Lize; Zhao, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Phosphorylated tau was found to be regulated after cerebral ischemia and linked to high risk for the development of post-stroke dementia. Our previous study showed that ginsenoside Rd (Rd), one of the main active ingredients in Panax ginseng, decreased tau phosphorylation in Alzheimer model. As an extending study, here we investigated whether Rd could reduce tau phosphorylation and sequential cognition impairment after ischemic stroke. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia. The tau phosphorylation of rat brains were analyzed following ischemia by Western blot and animal cognitive functions were examined by Morris water maze and Novel object recognition task. Ischemic insults increased the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at Ser199/202 and PHF-1 sites and caused animal memory deficits. Rd treatment attenuated ischemia-induced enhancement of tau phosphorylation and ameliorated behavior impairment. Furthermore, we revealed that Rd inhibited the activity of Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), the most important kinase involving tau phosphorylation, but enhanced the activity of protein kinase B (PKB/AKT), a key kinase suppressing GSK-3β activity. Moreover, we found that LY294002, an antagonist for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway, abolished the inhibitory effect of Rd on GSK-3β activity and tau phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings provide the first evidence that Rd may reduce cerebral ischemia-induced tau phosphorylation via the PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway.

  3. Non-Genomic Action of Androgens is Mediated by Rapid Phosphorylation and Regulation of Androgen Receptor Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Deng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testosterone is critical for maintaining spermatogenesis and male fertility. The accomplishment of these processes requires the synergistic actions of the classical and non-classical signaling pathways of androgens. Methods: A murine testicular Sertoli cell line, TM4 cell was used to examine androgen actions in Sertoli cells. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay were employed to study the testosterone-induced Androgen receptor (AR translocation. Protein phosphorylation antibody array was applied to identify the phosphorylation sites under testosterone treatment, and these findings were verified by Western blot analysis. Results: We found that a physiological dose of testosterone induced fast membrane association of AR. By using a phosphorylation antibody array, several phosphorylation sites, such as MEK1/2 (Ser217/221, Akt (Ser473, and Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204 were rapidly phosphorylated within 5 min of testosterone treatment. Inhibition of the MEK and Akt signaling pathways prevented AR trafficking. Blocking of AR by flutamide eliminated the stimulation effect of testosterone on kinase phosphorylation. Testosterone induced kinase Src phosphorylation, and inhibition of Src restricted AR translocation to the membrane and the nucleus. Conclusion: Findings suggested that the membrane association of AR was mediated by the MEK and Akt phosphorylation signaling pathways, which resulted in Src activation and was initiated by testosterone binding to the membrane-localized AR. This study provides new insights into the testosterone signaling pathway in Sertoli cells, which mediate spermatogenesis. In addition, the study can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility caused by disorders in spermatogenesis.

  4. Transcriptional regulatory networks in Arabidopsis thaliana during single and combined stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barah, Pankaj; B N, Mahantesha Naika; Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Shameer, Khader; Bones, Atle M.

    2016-01-01

    Differentially evolved responses to various stress conditions in plants are controlled by complex regulatory circuits of transcriptional activators, and repressors, such as transcription factors (TFs). To understand the general and condition-specific activities of the TFs and their regulatory relationships with the target genes (TGs), we have used a homogeneous stress gene expression dataset generated on ten natural ecotypes of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, during five single and six combined stress conditions. Knowledge-based profiles of binding sites for 25 stress-responsive TF families (187 TFs) were generated and tested for their enrichment in the regulatory regions of the associated TGs. Condition-dependent regulatory sub-networks have shed light on the differential utilization of the underlying network topology, by stress-specific regulators and multifunctional regulators. The multifunctional regulators maintain the core stress response processes while the transient regulators confer the specificity to certain conditions. Clustering patterns of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) have reflected the combinatorial nature of transcriptional regulation, and suggested the putative role of the homotypic clusters of TFBS towards maintaining transcriptional robustness against cis-regulatory mutations to facilitate the preservation of stress response processes. The Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the TGs reflected sequential regulation of stress response mechanisms in plants. PMID:26681689

  5. Crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana provides insights into its product specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Wenhe; Liu, Zihe; Xie, Yongchao; Wang, Hao; Mu, Yajuan; Huang, Yao; Feng, Yue

    2016-09-16

    Specifier proteins are important components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, which mediate plant defense against herbivory and pathogen attacks. Upon tissue disruption, glucosinolates are hydrolyzed to instable aglucones by myrosinases, and then aglucones will rearrange to form defensive isothiocyanates. Specifier proteins can redirect this reaction to form other products, such as simple nitriles, epithionitriles and organic thiocyanates instead of isothiocyanates based on the side chain structure of glucosinolate and the type of the specifier proteins. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying the different product spectrums of various specifier proteins was not fully understood. Here in this study, we solved the crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtESP) at 2.3 Å resolution. Structural comparisons with the previously solved structure of thiocyanate forming protein, TFP from Thlaspi arvense (TaTFP) reveal that AtESP shows a dimerization pattern different from TaTFP. Moreover, AtESP harbors a slightly larger active site pocket than TaTFP and several residues around the active site are different between the two proteins, which might account for the different product spectrums of the two proteins. Together, our structural study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms of specifier proteins and shed light on the basis of their different product spectrums. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A critical function for Ser-282 in cardiac Myosin binding protein-C phosphorylation and cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Barefield, David; Cuello, Friederike; Avkiran, Metin; Lasko, Valerie M; Lorenz, John N; Maillet, Marjorie; Martin, Jody L; Brown, Joan Heller; Bers, Donald M; Molkentin, Jeffery D; James, Jeanne; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2011-07-08

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation at Ser-273, Ser-282, and Ser-302 regulates myocardial contractility. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggest the nonequivalence of these sites and the potential importance of Ser-282 phosphorylation in modulating the protein's overall phosphorylation and myocardial function. To determine whether complete cMyBP-C phosphorylation is dependent on Ser-282 phosphorylation and to define its role in myocardial function. We hypothesized that Ser-282 regulates Ser-302 phosphorylation and cardiac function during β-adrenergic stimulation. Using recombinant human C1-M-C2 peptides in vitro, we determined that protein kinase A can phosphorylate Ser-273, Ser-282, and Ser-302. Protein kinase C can also phosphorylate Ser-273 and Ser-302. In contrast, Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated kinase II targets Ser-302 but can also target Ser-282 at nonphysiological calcium concentrations. Strikingly, Ser-302 phosphorylation by Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated kinase II was abolished by ablating the ability of Ser-282 to be phosphorylated via alanine substitution. To determine the functional roles of the sites in vivo, three transgenic lines, which expressed cMyBP-C containing either Ser-273-Ala-282-Ser-302 (cMyBP-C(SAS)), Ala-273-Asp-282-Ala-302 (cMyBP-C(ADA)), or Asp-273-Ala-282-Asp-302 (cMyBP-C(DAD)), were generated. Mutant protein was completely substituted for endogenous cMyBP-C by breeding each mouse line into a cMyBP-C null (t/t) background. Serine-to-alanine substitutions were used to ablate the abilities of the residues to be phosphorylated, whereas serine-to-aspartate substitutions were used to mimic the charged state conferred by phosphorylation. Compared to control nontransgenic mice, as well as transgenic mice expressing wild-type cMyBP-C, the transgenic cMyBP-C(SAS(t/t)), cMyBP-C(ADA(t/t)), and cMyBP-C(DAD(t/t)) mice showed no increases in morbidity and mortality and partially rescued the cMyBP-C((t/t)) phenotype. The loss of c

  7. Endothelial NO synthase phosphorylated at SER635 produces NO without requiring intracellular calcium increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Sorescu, George P; Bauer, Philip M; Fulton, David; Kemp, Bruce E; Harrison, David G; Sessa, William C; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-10-01

    Shear stress stimulates NO production involving the Ca2+-independent mechanisms in endothelial cells. We have shown that exposure of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) to shear stress stimulates phosphorylation of eNOS at S635 and S1179 by the protein kinase A- (PKA-) dependent mechanisms. We examined whether phosphorylation of S635 of eNOS induced by PKA stimulates NO production in a calcium-independent manner. Expression of a constitutively active catalytic subunit of PKA (Cqr) in BAEC induced phosphorylation of S635 and S1179 residues and dephosphorylation of T497. Additionally, Cqr expression stimulated NO production, which could not be prevented by treating cells with the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM. To determine the role of each eNOS phosphorylation site in NO production, HEK-293 cells transfected with eNOS point mutants whereby S116, T497, S635, and S1179 were mutated to either A or D. Maximum NO production from S635D-expressing cells was significantly higher than that of either wild type or S635A in both basal and elevated [Ca2+]i conditions. More interestingly, S635D cells produced NO even when [Ca2+]i was nearly depleted by BAPTA-AM. We confirmed these results obtained in HEK-293 cells in BAEC transfected with S635D, S635A, or wild-type eNOS vector. These findings suggest that, once phosphorylated at S635 residue, eNOS produces NO without requiring any changes in [Ca2+]i. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS S635 and subsequent basal NO production in a Ca2+-independent manner may play an important role in regulating vascular biology and pathophysiology.

  8. Dynamic phosphorylation of VE-cadherin Y685 throughout mouse estrous cycle in ovary and uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibé, Adama; Polena, Helena; Razanajatovo, Jeremy; Mannic, Tiphaine; Chaumontel, Nicolas; Bama, Soumalamaya; Maréchal, Irène; Huber, Philippe; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle; Bouillet, Laurence; Vilgrain, Isabelle

    2014-08-01

    We previously reported that vascular endothelial growth factor induced vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation at Y685 in a Src-dependent manner in vitro. Here, we studied the occurrence of Y685 phosphorylation in vivo in the female reproductive tract because it is a unique model of physiological vascular remodeling dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor. We first developed and characterized an anti-phospho-specific antibody against the site Y685 of VE-cadherin to monitor VE-cadherin phosphorylation along the four phases of mouse estrous cycle, termed proestrus, estrus, metestrus, and diestrus. A dynamic profile of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins was observed in both uterus and ovary throughout mouse estrous cycle, including kinase Src, which was found highly active at the estrus phase. The extent of tyrosine phosphorylated VE-cadherin was low at proestrus but strongly increased at estrus and returned to baseline at metestrus and diestrus, suggesting a potent hormonal regulation of this specific process. Indeed, C57Bl/6 female mice treatment with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin confirmed a significant increase in phosphoY685-VE-cadherin compared with that in untreated mice. These results demonstrate that VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation at Y685 is a physiological and hormonally regulated process in female reproductive organs. In addition, this process was concomitant with the early steps of vascular remodeling taking place at estrus stage, suggesting that phosphoY685-VE-cadherin is a biomarker of endothelial cell activation in vivo. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Phosphorylation of the retinoic acid receptor alpha induces a mechanical allosteric regulation and changes in internal dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassmine Chebaro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor proteins constitute a superfamily of proteins that function as ligand dependent transcription factors. They are implicated in the transcriptional cascades underlying many physiological phenomena, such as embryogenesis, cell growth and differentiation, and apoptosis, making them one of the major signal transduction paradigms in metazoans. Regulation of these receptors occurs through the binding of hormones, and in the case of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR, through the binding of retinoic acid (RA. In addition to this canonical scenario of RAR activity, recent discoveries have shown that RAR regulation also occurs as a result of phosphorylation. In fact, RA induces non-genomic effects, such as the activation of kinase signaling pathways, resulting in the phosphorylation of several targets including RARs themselves. In the case of RARα, phosphorylation of Ser369 located in loop L9-10 of the ligand-binding domain leads to an increase in the affinity for the protein cyclin H, which is part of the Cdk-activating kinase complex of the general transcription factor TFIIH. The cyclin H binding site in RARα is situated more than 40 Å from the phosphorylated serine. Using molecular dynamics simulations of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the receptor RARα, we analyzed the structural implications of receptor phosphorylation, which led to the identification of a structural mechanism for the allosteric coupling between the two remote sites of interest. The results show that phosphorylation leads to a reorganization of a local salt bridge network, which induces changes in helix extension and orientation that affects the cyclin H binding site. This results in changes in conformation and flexibility of the latter. The high conservation of the residues implicated in this signal transduction suggests a mechanism that could be applied to other nuclear receptor proteins.

  10. Constitutive cyclic GMP accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana compromises systemic acquired resistance induced by an avirulent pathogen by modulating local signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Jamshaid; Chen, Jian; Locato, Vittoria; Sabetta, Wilma; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Cimini, Sara; Griggio, Francesca; Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Graf, Alexander; Bouneb, Mabrouk; Pachaiappan, Raman; Fincato, Paola; Blanco, Emanuela; Costa, Alex; De Gara, Laura; Bellin, Diana; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Vandelle, Elodie

    2016-11-04

    The infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with avirulent pathogens causes the accumulation of cGMP with a biphasic profile downstream of nitric oxide signalling. However, plant enzymes that modulate cGMP levels have yet to be identified, so we generated transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the rat soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) to increase genetically the level of cGMP and to study the function of cGMP in plant defence responses. Once confirmed that cGMP levels were higher in the GC transgenic lines than in wild-type controls, the GC transgenic plants were then challenged with bacterial pathogens and their defence responses were characterized. Although local resistance was similar in the GC transgenic and wild-type lines, differences in the redox state suggested potential cross-talk between cGMP and the glutathione redox system. Furthermore, large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic analysis highlighted the significant modulation of both gene expression and protein abundance at the infection site, inhibiting the establishment of systemic acquired resistance. Our data indicate that cGMP plays a key role in local responses controlling the induction of systemic acquired resistance in plants challenged with avirulent pathogens.

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 acyl acid amido synthetase mediates metabolic crosstalk in auxin and salicylic acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Corey S; Sherp, Ashley M; Zubieta, Chloe; Alvarez, Sophie; Schraft, Evelyn; Marcellin, Romain; Ramirez, Loren; Jez, Joseph M

    2016-11-29

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl acid amido synthetase Gretchen Hagen 3.5 (AtGH3.5) conjugates both indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and salicylic acid (SA) to modulate auxin and pathogen response pathways. To understand the molecular basis for the activity of AtGH3.5, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with IAA and AMP. Biochemical analysis demonstrates that the substrate preference of AtGH3.5 is wider than originally described and includes the natural auxin phenylacetic acid (PAA) and the potential SA precursor benzoic acid (BA). Residues that determine IAA versus BA substrate preference were identified. The dual functionality of AtGH3.5 is unique to this enzyme although multiple IAA-conjugating GH3 proteins share nearly identical acyl acid binding sites. In planta analysis of IAA, PAA, SA, and BA and their respective aspartyl conjugates were determined in wild-type and overexpressing lines of A thaliana This study suggests that AtGH3.5 conjugates auxins (i.e., IAA and PAA) and benzoates (i.e., SA and BA) to mediate crosstalk between different metabolic pathways, broadening the potential roles for GH3 acyl acid amido synthetases in plants.

  12. The structure of arabidopsis thaliana OST1 provides insights into the kinase regulation mechanism in response to osmotic stress

    KAUST Repository

    Yunta, Cristina

    2011-11-01

    SnRK [SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1)-related protein kinase] 2.6 [open stomata 1 (OST1)] is well characterized at molecular and physiological levels to control stomata closure in response to water-deficit stress. OST1 is a member of a family of 10 protein kinases from Arabidopsis thaliana (SnRK2) that integrates abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent and ABA-independent signals to coordinate the cell response to osmotic stress. A subgroup of protein phosphatases type 2C binds OST1 and keeps the kinase dephosphorylated and inactive. Activation of OST1 relies on the ABA-dependent inhibition of the protein phosphatases type 2C and the subsequent self-phosphorylation of the kinase. The OST1 ABA-independent activation depends on a short sequence motif that is conserved among all the members of the SnRK2 family. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation. The crystallographic structure of OST1 shows that ABA-independent regulation motif stabilizes the conformation of the kinase catalytically essential α C helix, and it provides the basis of the ABA-independent regulation mechanism for the SnRK2 family of protein kinases. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. NIMA-related kinases regulate directional cell growth and organ development through microtubule function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motose, Hiroyasu; Takatani, Shogo; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Taku

    2012-12-01

    NIMA-related kinase 6 (NEK6) regulates cellular expansion and morphogenesis through microtubule organizaiton in Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss-of-function mutations in NEK6 (nek6/ibo1) cause ectopic outgrowth and microtubule disorganization in epidermal cells. We recently found that NEK6 forms homodimers and heterodimers with NEK4 and NEK5 to destabilize cortical microtubules possibly by direct binding to microtubules and the β-tubulin phosphorylation. Here, we identified a new allele of NEK6 and further analyzed the morphological phenotypes of nek6/ibo1 mutants, along with alleles of nek4 and nek5 mutants. Phenotypic analysis demonstrated that NEK6 is required for the directional growth of roots and hypocotyls, petiole elongation, cell file formation, and trichome morphogenesis. In addition, nek4, nek5, and nek6/ibo1 mutants were hypersensitive to microtubule inhibitors such as propyzamide and taxol. These results suggest that plant NEKs function in directional cell growth and organ development through the regulation of microtubule organization.

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation of 3BP2 is indispensable for the interaction with VAV3 in chicken DT40 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chihara, Kazuyasu [Division of Genome Science and Microbiology, Department of Pathological Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Organization for Life Science Advancement Programs, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Kimura, Yukihiro [Division of Genome Science and Microbiology, Department of Pathological Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Division of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Sensory and Locomotor Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Honjoh, Chisato [Division of Genome Science and Microbiology, Department of Pathological Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Third Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yamauchi, Shota; Takeuchi, Kenji [Division of Genome Science and Microbiology, Department of Pathological Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Organization for Life Science Advancement Programs, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Sada, Kiyonao, E-mail: ksada@u-fukui.ac.jp [Division of Genome Science and Microbiology, Department of Pathological Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Organization for Life Science Advancement Programs, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2014-03-10

    Adaptor protein c-Abl SH3 domain-binding protein-2 (3BP2) is known to play regulatory roles in immunoreceptor-mediated signal transduction. We have previously demonstrated that Tyr{sup 174}, Tyr{sup 183} and Tyr{sup 446} in mouse 3BP2 are predominantly phosphorylated by Syk, and the phosphorylation of Tyr{sup 183} and the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of mouse 3BP2 are critical for B cell receptor (BCR)-induced activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in human B cells. In this report, we have shown that Syk, but not Abl family protein-tyrosine kinases, is critical for BCR-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of 3BP2 in chicken DT40 cells. Mutational analysis showed that Tyr{sup 174}, Tyr{sup 183} and Tyr{sup 426} of chicken 3BP2 are the major phosphorylation sites by Syk and the SH2 domain of 3BP2 is critical for tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, phosphorylation of Tyr{sup 426} is required for the inducible interaction with the SH2 domain of Vav3. Moreover, the expression of the mutant form of 3BP2 in which Tyr{sup 426} was substituted to Phe resulted in the reduction in BCR-mediated Rac1 activation, when compared with the case of wild-type. Altogether, these data suggest that 3BP2 is involved in the activation of Rac1 through the regulation of Vav3 by Syk-dependent phosphorylation of Tyr{sup 426} following BCR stimulation. - Highlights: • 3BP2 is phosphorylated by Syk, but not Abl family kinases in BCR signaling. • Tyr183 and Tyr426 in chicken 3BP2 are the major phosphorylation sites by Syk. • The SH2 domain of 3BP2 is critical for tyrosine phosphorylation of 3BP2. • Phosphorylation of Tyr426 in 3BP2 is required for the inducible binding with Vav3. • 3BP2 is involved in the regulation of BCR-mediated Rac1 activation.

  15. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  16. Flux control through protein phosphorylation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms regulating metabolism as it can directly modify metabolic enzymes by the addition of phosphate groups. Attributed to such a rapid and reversible mechanism, cells can adjust metabolism rapidly in response to temporal changes. The yeast...... describe the development of phosphoproteomics in yeast as well as approaches to analysing the phosphoproteomics data. Finally, we focus on integrated analyses with other omics data sets and genome-scale metabolic models. Despite the advances, future studies improving both experimental technologies...

  17. Structure, function, and evolution of plant NIMA-related kinases: implication for phosphorylation-dependent microtubule regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Shogo; Otani, Kento; Kanazawa, Mai; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules are highly dynamic structures that control the spatiotemporal pattern of cell growth and division. Microtubule dynamics are regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation involving both protein kinases and phosphatases. Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinases (NEKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases that regulate microtubule-related mitotic events in fungi and animal cells (e.g. centrosome separation and spindle formation). Although plants contain multiple members of the NEK family, their functions remain elusive. Recent studies revealed that NEK6 of Arabidopsis thaliana regulates cell expansion and morphogenesis through β-tubulin phosphorylation and microtubule destabilization. In addition, plant NEK members participate in organ development and stress responses. The present phylogenetic analysis indicates that plant NEK genes are diverged from a single NEK6-like gene, which may share a common ancestor with other kinases involved in the control of microtubule organization. On the contrary, another mitotic kinase, polo-like kinase, might have been lost during the evolution of land plants. We propose that plant NEK members have acquired novel functions to regulate cell growth, microtubule organization, and stress responses.

  18. The effector AvrRxo1 phosphorylates NAD in planta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teja Shidore

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of plants and animals employ type III secreted effectors to suppress innate immunity. Most characterized effectors work through modification of host proteins or transcriptional regulators, although a few are known to modify small molecule targets. The Xanthomonas type III secreted avirulence factor AvrRxo1 is a structural homolog of the zeta toxin family of sugar-nucleotide kinases that suppresses bacterial growth. AvrRxo1 was recently reported to phosphorylate the central metabolite and signaling molecule NAD in vitro, suggesting that the effector might enhance bacterial virulence on plants through manipulation of primary metabolic pathways. In this study, we determine that AvrRxo1 phosphorylates NAD in planta, and that its kinase catalytic sites are necessary for its toxic and resistance-triggering phenotypes. A global metabolomics approach was used to independently identify 3'-NADP as the sole detectable product of AvrRxo1 expression in yeast and bacteria, and NAD kinase activity was confirmed in vitro. 3'-NADP accumulated upon transient expression of AvrRxo1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and in rice leaves infected with avrRxo1-expressing strains of X. oryzae. Mutation of the catalytic aspartic acid residue D193 abolished AvrRxo1 kinase activity and several phenotypes of AvrRxo1, including toxicity in yeast, bacteria, and plants, suppression of the flg22-triggered ROS burst, and ability to trigger an R gene-mediated hypersensitive response. A mutation in the Walker A ATP-binding motif abolished the toxicity of AvrRxo1, but did not abolish the 3'-NADP production, virulence enhancement, ROS suppression, or HR-triggering phenotypes of AvrRxo1. These results demonstrate that a type III effector targets the central metabolite and redox carrier NAD in planta, and that this catalytic activity is required for toxicity and suppression of the ROS burst.

  19. Phosphorylation-mediated control of histone chaperone ASF1 levels by tousled-like kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Maxim Pilyugin; Jeroen Demmers; Peter Verrijzer, C.; Francois Karch; Moshkin, Yuri M.

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHistone chaperones are at the hub of a diverse interaction networks integrating a plethora of chromatin modifying activities. Histone H3/H4 chaperone ASF1 is a target for cell-cycle regulated Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) and both proteins cooperate during chromatin replication. However, the precise role of post-translational modification of ASF1 remained unclear. Here, we identify the TLK phosphorylation sites for both Drosophila and human ASF1 proteins. Loss of TLK- mediated phosp...

  20. Phosphorylation-Dependent Activation of the ESCRT Function of ALIX in Cytokinetic Abscission and Retroviral Budding

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Sheng; Sun, Le; Zhou, Xi; Wu, Chuanfen; Wang, Ruoning; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The modular adaptor protein ALIX is a key player in multiple ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling processes. ALIX is normally present in a closed conformation due to an intramolecular interaction that renders ALIX unable to perform its ESCRT functions. Here we demonstrate that M phase-specific phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site within the proline-rich domain (PRD) of ALIX transforms cytosolic ALIX from closed to open conformation. Defining the role of this mechanism of A...

  1. The Dictyostelium prestalk inducer DIF-1 directs phosphorylation of a bZIP transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoko; Kubohara, Yuzuru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Wang, Hong-Yu; Ross, Susan; Williams, Jeffrey G

    2013-01-01

    DIF-1, a chlorinated hexaphenone produced by developing Dictyostelium cells, induces prestalk differentiation. DimB is a bZIP transcription factor that accumulates in the nucleus upon exposure to DIF-1, where it directly activates transcription of DIF-responsive genes. The signaling steps upstream of DimB and downstream of DIF-1 are entirely unknown. Analysis by mass spectrometry shows that incubation with DIF-1 rapidly stimulates phosphorylation at several sites in DimB. We characterize the most highly responsive site, S590, which is located very close to the C terminus. A point mutation in this site, S590A, does not inhibit DimB nuclear accumulation in response to DIF. However, this seems likely to reflect functional redundancy with other sites; because a panel of chemical variants on the structure of DIF-1 show a correlation between their potencies as inducers of DimB nuclear accumulation and their potencies as inducers of phosphorylation at S590. Furthermore, the S590A mutant is fully active in mutant rescue of a dimB null strain, arguing against an alternative role in transcriptional activation of target genes. We conclude that i) DIF-1 directs phosphorylation at S590, ii) although it is not essential for nuclear accumulation in response to DIF-1 correlative evidence, based upon a panel of DIF-1 related molecules, suggests that this modification may play a redundant role in the process. iii) We also present evidence that the kinase activity, which phosphorylates S590, is non-nuclear and that this signalling pathway is, in part at least, independent of the DIF-regulated STATc activation pathway.

  2. Prebiotic Phosphorylation Reactions on the Early Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheen Gull

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is an essential element for life. It occurs in living beings in the form of phosphate, which is ubiquitous in biochemistry, chiefly in the form of C-O-P (carbon, oxygen and phosphorus, C-P, or P-O-P linkages to form life. Within prebiotic chemistry, several key questions concerning phosphorus chemistry have developed: what were the most likely sources of P on the early Earth? How did it become incorporated into the biological world to form the P compounds that life employs today? Can meteorites be responsible for the delivery of P? What were the most likely solvents on the early Earth and out of those which are favorable for phosphorylation? Or, alternatively, were P compounds most likely produced in relatively dry environments? What were the most suitable temperature conditions for phosphorylation? A route to efficient formation of biological P compounds is still a question that challenges astrobiologists. This article discusses these important issues related to the origin of biological P compounds.

  3. Modelling the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Kalyani; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2014-01-01

    The Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation are the two most important sets of reactions in a eukaryotic cell that meet the major part of the total energy demands of a cell. In this paper, we present a computer simulation of the coupled reactions using open source tools for simulation. We also show that it is possible to model the Krebs cycle with a simple black box with a few inputs and outputs. However, the kinetics of the internal processes has been modelled using numerical tools. We also show that the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation together can be combined in a similar fashion - a black box with a few inputs and outputs. The Octave script is flexible and customisable for any chosen set-up for this model. In several cases, we had no explicit idea of the underlying reaction mechanism and the rate determining steps involved, and we have used the stoichiometric equations that can be easily changed as and when more detailed information is obtained. The script includes the feedback regulation of the various enzymes of the Krebs cycle. For the electron transport chain, the pH gradient across the membrane is an essential regulator of the kinetics and this has been modelled empirically but fully consistent with experimental results. The initial conditions can be very easily changed and the simulation is potentially very useful in a number of cases of clinical importance.

  4. Phosphorylation regulates coilin activity and RNA association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna J. Broome

    2013-02-01

    The Cajal body (CB is a domain of concentrated components found within the nucleus of cells in an array of species that is functionally important for the biogenesis of telomerase and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The CB is a dynamic structure whose number and size change during the cell cycle and is associated with other nuclear structures and gene loci. Coilin, also known as the marker protein for the CB, is a phosphoprotein widely accepted for its role in maintaining CB integrity. Recent studies have been done to further elucidate functional activities of coilin apart from its structural role in the CB in an attempt to explore the rationale for coilin expression in cells that have few CBs or lack them altogether. Here we show that the RNA association profile of coilin changes in mitosis with respect to that during interphase. We provide evidence of transcriptional and/or processing dysregulation of several CB-related RNA transcripts as a result of ectopic expression of both wild-type and phosphomutant coilin proteins. We also show apparent changes in transcription and/or processing of these transcripts upon coilin knockdown in both transformed and primary cell lines. Additionally, we provide evidence of specific coilin RNase activity regulation, on both U2 and hTR transcripts, by phosphorylation of a single residue, serine 489. Collectively, these results point to additional functions for coilin that are regulated by phosphorylation.

  5. Predicting the Catalytic Sites of DACS and CAS2 Exploiting DAOCS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chinhs

    possible to predict the catalytic sites of protein that shared a structural resemblance. ... 16 β-strands. 8 of these β-strands are then folded into a jelly-roll motif. Crystallography study revealed that the active binding sites of IPNS are buried within this jelly- .... Arabidopsis thaliana G20O structure was simulated using homology.

  6. Site and plant species are important determinants of the Methylobacterium community composition in the plant phyllosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knief, Claudia; Ramette, Alban; Frances, Lisa; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Vorholt, Julia A

    2010-06-01

    The plant phyllosphere constitutes a habitat for numerous microorganisms; among them are members of the genus Methylobacterium. Owing to the ubiquitous occurrence of methylobacteria on plant leaves, they represent a suitable target for studying plant colonization patterns. The influence of the factor site, host plant species, time and the presence of other phyllosphere bacteria on Methylobacterium community composition and population size were evaluated in this study. Leaf samples were collected from Arabidopsis thaliana or Medicago truncatula plants and from the surrounding plant species at several sites. The abundance of cultivable Methylobacterium clearly correlated with the abundance of other phyllosphere bacteria, suggesting that methylobacteria constitute a considerable and rather stable fraction of the phyllosphere microbiota under varying environmental conditions. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was applied to characterize the Methylobacterium community composition and showed the presence of similar communities on A. thaliana plants at most sites in 2 consecutive years of sampling. A substantial part of the observed variation in the community composition was explained by site and plant species, especially in the case of the plants collected at the Arabidopsis sites (50%). The dominating ARISA peaks that were detected on A. thaliana plants were found on other plant species grown at the same site, whereas some different peaks were detected on A. thaliana plants from other sites. This indicates that site-specific factors had a stronger impact on the Methylobacterium community composition than did plant-specific factors and that the Methylobacterium-plant association is not highly host plant species specific.

  7. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Weronika E.; Groocock, Lynda M.; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation ‘switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation. PMID:26243668

  8. Characterization Of Laccase T-DNA Mutants In Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe R; Asp, Torben; Mansfield, Shawn

    Laccases (P-diphenol:O2 oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2), also termed laccase-like multicopper oxidases, are blue copper-containing oxidases which comprise multigene families in plants. In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 17 laccase genes (LAC1 to LAC17) have been annotated. To identify laccases...... involved in cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis primary stems we have developed homozygous T-DNA mutants for 14 individual laccases. Six laccases are highly expressed in the wild type primary stem, four of which (LAC2, LAC4, LAC12, and LAC17) show correlated gene expression with one to several genes (e...... different and distinct biochemical pathways and that laccases might be involved in polymerization of both polysaccharides and monolignols in the Arabidopsis cell wall....

  9. A Regulatory Network Analysis of Orphan Genes in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pramesh; Chen, Tianlong; Arendsee, Zebulun; Wurtele, Eve S.; Bassler, Kevin E.

    Orphan genes, which are genes unique to each particular species, have recently drawn significant attention for their potential usefulness for organismal robustness. Their origin and regulatory interaction patterns remain largely undiscovered. Recently, methods that use the context likelihood of relatedness to infer a network followed by modularity maximizing community detection algorithms on the inferred network to find the functional structure of regulatory networks were shown to be effective. We apply improved versions of these methods to gene expression data from Arabidopsis thaliana, identify groups (clusters) of interacting genes with related patterns of expression and analyze the structure within those groups. Focusing on clusters that contain orphan genes, we compare the identified clusters to gene ontology (GO) terms, regulons, and pathway designations and analyze their hierarchical structure. We predict new regulatory interactions and unravel the structure of the regulatory interaction patterns of orphan genes. Work supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1507371 and IOS-1546858.

  10. Multimodal nonlinear imaging of arabidopsis thaliana root cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bumjoon; Lee, Sung-Ho; Woo, Sooah; Park, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Myeong Min; Park, Seung-Han

    2017-07-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy has enabled the possibility to explore inside the living organisms. It utilizes ultrashort laser pulse with long wavelength (greater than 800nm). Ultrashort pulse produces high peak power to induce nonlinear optical phenomenon such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and harmonic generations in the medium while maintaining relatively low average energy pre area. In plant developmental biology, confocal microscopy is widely used in plant cell imaging after the development of biological fluorescence labels in mid-1990s. However, fluorescence labeling itself affects the sample and the sample deviates from intact condition especially when labelling the entire cell. In this work, we report the dynamic images of Arabidopsis thaliana root cells. This demonstrates the multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy is an effective tool for long-term plant cell imaging.

  11. Arabinose Kinase-Deficient Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Olan; Cobbett, Christopher S.

    1991-01-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is sensitive to exogenous l-arabinose has been isolated. Comparisons of growth of the wild type, mutant, and F1 and F2 progeny of crosses showed the arabinose-sensitive phenotype is semidominant and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed the mutation is linked to the eceriferum-2 locus on chromosome 4. In vivo incorporation of exogenous labeled l-arabinose into ethanol-insoluble polysaccharides was greatly reduced in the mutant with a concomitant accumulation of free labeled arabinose. Enzyme assays of crude plant extracts demonstrated a defect in arabinose kinase activity in the mutant. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668327

  12. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third fun