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Sample records for thaliana det1 mutants

  1. The phenotype of Arabidopsis thaliana det1 mutants suggest a role for cytokinins in greening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, J.; Aguilar, N.; Peto, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    When grown in the absence of light, the det1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana develop characteristics of light-grown plants by morphological, cellular, and molecular criteria. Further, in light-grown plants, mutations in the DET1 gene affect cell-type-specific expression of light-regulated genes and the chloroplast developmental program. Here we show that the addition of exogenously added cytokinins (either 2-isopentenyl adenine, kinetin, or benzyladenine) to the growth medium of dark-germinated wild-type seedlings results in seedlings that resemble det1 mutants, instead of having the normal etiolated morphology. Like det1 mutants, these dark-grown seedlings now contain chloroplasts and have high levels of expression of genes that are normally light''-regulated. These results suggest an important role for cytokinins during greening of Arabidopsis, and may implicate cytokinin levels or an increased sensitivity to cytokinins as explanations for some of the observed phenotypes of det1 mutants.

  2. The phenotype of Arabidopsis thaliana det1 mutants suggest a role for cytokinins in greening. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, J.; Aguilar, N.; Peto, C.A.

    1990-12-31

    When grown in the absence of light, the det1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana develop characteristics of light-grown plants by morphological, cellular, and molecular criteria. Further, in light-grown plants, mutations in the DET1 gene affect cell-type-specific expression of light-regulated genes and the chloroplast developmental program. Here we show that the addition of exogenously added cytokinins (either 2-isopentenyl adenine, kinetin, or benzyladenine) to the growth medium of dark-germinated wild-type seedlings results in seedlings that resemble det1 mutants, instead of having the normal etiolated morphology. Like det1 mutants, these dark-grown seedlings now contain chloroplasts and have high levels of expression of genes that are normally ``light``-regulated. These results suggest an important role for cytokinins during greening of Arabidopsis, and may implicate cytokinin levels or an increased sensitivity to cytokinins as explanations for some of the observed phenotypes of det1 mutants.

  3. Cadmium-Sensitive Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, R; Cobbett, C S

    1992-09-01

    A screening procedure for identifying Cd-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is described. With this procedure, two Cd-sensitive mutants were isolated. These represent independent mutations in the same locus, referred to as CAD1. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed that the mutation is closely linked to the tt3 locus on chromosome 5. In addition to Cd, the mutants are also significantly more sensitive to mercuric ions and only slightly more sensitive to Cu and Zn, while being no more sensitive than the wild type to Mn, thus indicating a degree of specificity in the mechanism affected by the mutation. Undifferentiated callus tissue is also Cd sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. Both wild-type and mutant plants showed increased sensitivity to Cd in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of the cadmium-binding (gamma-glutamylcysteine)(n)-glycine peptides, suggesting that the mutant is still able to synthesize these peptides. However, the effects of a cad1 mutation and buthionine sulfoximine together on cadmium sensitivity are essentially nonadditive, indicating that they may affect different aspects of the same detoxification mechanism. Assays of Cd uptake by intact plants indicate that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester Cd.

  4. Genetic interactions between DET1 and intermediate genes in Arabidopsis ABA signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, V C Dilukshi; Schroeder, Dana F

    2015-10-01

    Seed germination is regulated positively by light and negatively by the dormancy-promoting phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). DE-ETIOLATED 1 (DET1) is a negative regulator of light signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana. In contrast, the bZIP transcription factor LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) is a positive regulator of light signalling. HY5 also positively regulates ABA signalling by promoting the expression of ABA INSENSITIVE 5 (ABI5), a dormancy promoting transcription factor. Here we show that germination in det1 mutants is sensitive to ABA. Double mutant analysis indicates that det1 ABA sensitive germination requires HY5 and ABI5. DET1 forms a complex with DAMAGED DNA BINDING protein 1A/B (DDB1A/B). Another DDB1 complex containing DWA1 and 2 (DWD hypersensitive to ABA 1/2) has also been shown to negatively regulate ABA response. Double mutant analysis indicates that DWA1, DWA2, DDB1A, and DDB1B are also required for the det1 ABA sensitive germination phenotype. We also examined water loss in adult plants and found that the det1 rapid water loss phenotype is independent of HY5, ABI5, DWA1, DWA2, and DDB1B. These findings provide insight into interactions between ABA and light signalling in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Copper-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, C; Anderson, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-11-01

    A Cu-sensitive mutant, cup1-1, of Arabidopsis thaliana has a pattern of heavy-metal sensitivity different from that of the cad1 and cad2 mutants, which are deficient in phytochelatin biosynthesis. The latter are significantly sensitive to Cd and Hg and only slightly sensitive to Cu, whereas the cup1-1 mutant is significantly sensitive to Cu, slightly sensitive to Cd, and not more sensitive to Hg, compared to the wild type. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus, which has been mapped to chromosome 1. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that the cup1-1 mutant is not affected in phytochelatin biosynthesis or function. The sensitive phenotype of the cup1-1 mutant is associated with, and probably due to, increased accumulation of higher levels of Cd and Cu compared with the wild type. Consistent with this, a Cu-inducible, root-specific metallothionein gene, MT2a, is expressed in cup1-1 roots under conditions in which it is not expressed in the wild type. Undifferentiated cup1-1 callus tissue did not show the Cu-sensitive phenotype, suggesting that the mutant phenotype, in contrast to cad1 and cad2, is not expressed at the cellular level.

  6. Arabinose Kinase-Deficient Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, O; Cobbett, C S

    1991-08-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is sensitive to exogenous l-arabinose has been isolated. Comparisons of growth of the wild type, mutant, and F1 and F2 progeny of crosses showed the arabinose-sensitive phenotype is semidominant and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed the mutation is linked to the eceriferum-2 locus on chromosome 4. In vivo incorporation of exogenous labeled l-arabinose into ethanol-insoluble polysaccharides was greatly reduced in the mutant with a concomitant accumulation of free labeled arabinose. Enzyme assays of crude plant extracts demonstrated a defect in arabinose kinase activity in the mutant.

  7. Arabinose Kinase-Deficient Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Olan; Cobbett, Christopher S.

    1991-01-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is sensitive to exogenous l-arabinose has been isolated. Comparisons of growth of the wild type, mutant, and F1 and F2 progeny of crosses showed the arabinose-sensitive phenotype is semidominant and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed the mutation is linked to the eceriferum-2 locus on chromosome 4. In vivo incorporation of exogenous labeled l-arabinose into ethanol-insoluble polysaccharides was greatly reduced in the mutant with a concomitant accumulation of free labeled arabinose. Enzyme assays of crude plant extracts demonstrated a defect in arabinose kinase activity in the mutant. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668327

  8. Cadmium-Sensitive Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Ross; Cobbett, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    A screening procedure for identifying Cd-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is described. With this procedure, two Cd-sensitive mutants were isolated. These represent independent mutations in the same locus, referred to as CAD1. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed that the mutation is closely linked to the tt3 locus on chromosome 5. In addition to Cd, the mutants are also significantly more sensitive to mercuric ions and only slightly more sensitive to Cu and Zn, while being no more sensitive than the wild type to Mn, thus indicating a degree of specificity in the mechanism affected by the mutation. Undifferentiated callus tissue is also Cd sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. Both wild-type and mutant plants showed increased sensitivity to Cd in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of the cadmium-binding (γ-glutamylcysteine)n-glycine peptides, suggesting that the mutant is still able to synthesize these peptides. However, the effects of a cad1 mutation and buthionine sulfoximine together on cadmium sensitivity are essentially nonadditive, indicating that they may affect different aspects of the same detoxification mechanism. Assays of Cd uptake by intact plants indicate that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester Cd. Images Figure 1 Figure 7 PMID:16652930

  9. Characterization of tryptophan synthase alpha subunit mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanski, E R; Barczak, A J; Last, R L

    1996-12-13

    Three mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase were isolated by selection for resistance to 5-methylanthranilate or 5-fluoroindole, toxic analogs of tryptophan pathway intermediates. Plants homozygous for trp3-1 and trp3-2 are light-conditional tryptophan auxotrophs, while trp3-100 is a more leaky mutant. Genetic complementation crosses demonstrated that the three mutations are allelic to each other, and define a new complementation group. All three mutants have decreased steady-state levels of tryptophan synthase alpha protein, and the trp3-100 polypeptide exhibits altered electrophoretic mobility. All three mutations were shown to be in the TSA1 (tryptophan synthase alpha subunit) structural gene by several criteria. Firstly, the trp3-1 mutation is linked to TSA1 on the bottom of chromosome 3. Secondly, the trp3-1 mutation was complemented when transformed with the wild-type TSA1 gene. Finally, DNA sequence analysis of the TSA1 gene revealed a single transition mutation in each trp3 mutant.

  10. Characterization Of Laccase T-DNA Mutants In Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe R; Asp, Torben; Mansfield, Shawn

    Laccases (P-diphenol:O2 oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2), also termed laccase-like multicopper oxidases, are blue copper-containing oxidases which comprise multigene families in plants. In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 17 laccase genes (LAC1 to LAC17) have been annotated. To identify laccases...... involved in cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis primary stems we have developed homozygous T-DNA mutants for 14 individual laccases. Six laccases are highly expressed in the wild type primary stem, four of which (LAC2, LAC4, LAC12, and LAC17) show correlated gene expression with one to several genes (e...... different and distinct biochemical pathways and that laccases might be involved in polymerization of both polysaccharides and monolignols in the Arabidopsis cell wall....

  11. Inverse polymerase chain reaction for rapid gene isolation in Arabidopsis thaliana insertion mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderhaeghen, R.; Scheres, B.J.G.; Montagu, M. van; Lijsebetten, M. van

    1992-01-01

    Recently, many mutants have been isolated in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana by the insertion of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA into the plant genome. Instead of applying Southern analysis on these insertion mutants and to avoid the construction of mutant- derived genomic libraries,

  12. Uv- and Gamma-Radiation Sensitive Mutants of Arabidopsis Thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, C Z; Yen, C. N.; Cronin, K; Mitchell, D.; Britt, A B

    1997-01-01

    Arabidopsis seedlings repair UV-induced DNA damage via light-dependent and -independent pathways. The mechanism of the ``dark repair'' pathway is still unknown. To determine the number of genes required for dark repair and to investigate the substrate-specificity of this process we isolated mutants with enhanced sensitivity to UV radiation in the absence of photoreactivating light. Seven independently derived UV sensitive mutants were isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population. These fell in...

  13. Cadmium-sensitive, cad1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana are phytochelatin deficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, R; Goldsbrough, P B; Andersen, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-04-01

    An allelic series of cad1, cadmium-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, was isolated. These mutants were sensitive to cadmium to different extents and were deficient in their ability to form cadmium-peptide complexes as detected by gel-filtration chromatography. Each mutant was deficient in its ability to accumulate phytochelatins (PCs) as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and the amount of PCs accumulated by each mutant correlated with its degree of sensitivity to cadmium. The mutants had wild-type levels of glutathione, the substrate for PC biosynthesis, and in vitro assays demonstrated that each of the mutants was deficient in PC synthase activity. These results demonstrate conclusively the importance of PCs for cadmium tolerance in plants.

  14. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY MUTANT INDUCED BY HEAVY-ION BEAM IRRADIATION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kok Song Lai; Takehisa Masatsugu

    2013-01-01

    .... We show that the AtC24 SI mutant exhibits breakdown of SI, with pollen hydration, pollen tube growth and seed set resembling the corresponding processes in wild-type (self-fertile) A. thaliana...

  15. Effect of plant growth regulators on leaf anatomy of the has mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosević, D; Uzelac, B; Budimir, S

    2008-12-01

    In this study, the effect of plant growth regulators on leaf morphogenesis of the recessive T-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed. The morpho-anatomical analysis revealed that leaves of the has mutant are small and narrow, with lobed blades and disrupted tissue organization. When has plants were grown on the medium supplied with plant growth regulators: benzylaminopurine (BAP) or ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the leaf anatomy was partially restored to the wild type, although plants still exhibited morphological abnormalities.

  16. Effect of abscisic acid on stomatal opening in isolated epidermal strips of abi mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfsema, MRG; Prins, HBA

    1995-01-01

    Abscisic acid-insensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana L. var. Landsberg erecta were selected for their decreased sensitivity to ABA during germination. Two of these mutants, abi-1 and abi-2, display a wilty phenotype as adult plants, indicating disturbed water relations. Experiments were

  17. DELLA proteins restrain germination and elongation growth in Arabidopsis thaliana COP9 signalosome mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmann, Esther Mirjam Natascha; Nill, Carola; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is an evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complex with an essential role in the development of higher eukaryotes. CSN deconjugates the ubiquitin-related modifier NEDD8 from the cullin subunit of cullin-RING type E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs), and CSN-mediated cullin deneddylation is required for full CRL activity. Although several plant E3 CRL functions have been shown to be compromised in Arabidopsis csn mutants, none of these functions have so far been shown to limit growth in these mutants. Here, we examine the role of CSN in the context of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(SLEEPY1 (SLY1)), which promotes gibberellic acid (GA)-dependent responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that csn mutants are impaired in GA- and SCF(SLY1)-dependent germination and elongation growth, and we show that these defects correlate with an accumulation and reduced turnover of an SCF(SLY1)-degradation target, the DELLA protein REPRESSOR-OF-ga1-3 (RGA). Genetic interaction studies between csn mutants and loss-of-function alleles of RGA and its functional homologue GIBBERELLIC ACID INSENSITIVE (GAI) further reveal that RGA and GAI repress defects of germination in strong csn mutants. In addition, we find that these two DELLA proteins are largely responsible for the elongation defects of a weak csn5 mutant allele. We thus conclude that an impairment of SCF(SLY1) is at least in part causative for the germination and elongation defects of csn mutants, and suggest that DELLA proteins are major growth repressors in these mutants. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. A cadmium-sensitive, glutathione-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, R; Andersen, C R; Goldsbrough, P B; Cobbett, C S

    1995-04-01

    The roots of the cadmium-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, cad1-1, become brown in the presence of cadmium. A new cadmium-sensitive mutant affected at a second locus, cad2, has been identified using this phenotype. Genetic analysis has grown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Assays of cadmium accumulation by intact plants indicated that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester cadmium. Undifferentiated callus tissue was also cadmium sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. The level of cadmium-binding complexes formed in vivo was decreased compared with the wild type and accumulation of phytochelatins was about 10% of that in the wild type. The level of glutathione, the substrate for phytochelatin biosynthesis, in tissues of the mutant was decreased to about 15 to 30% of that in the wild type. Thus, the deficiency in phytochelatin biosynthesis can be explained by a deficiency in glutathione.

  19. In Vitro Root Development in Arabidopsis Thaliana Wild-Type and scr Mutants under Clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E. L.; Sarnatska, V. V.; Talalaiev, A. S.; Ovcharenko, Y. V.

    2008-06-01

    A task of our experiments was to study in vitro rhizogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and scr mutants under slow horizontal clinorotation as a convenient model to clear up a question, whether root morphogenesis de novo will occur normally in simulated microgravity. Two methods for obtaining A. thaliana roots in vitro were used: 1) from the primary callus of leaf origin and 2) directly from leaf explants. Light and electron microscopy and RT-PCR were used for an analysis of the experimental materials. Graviperceptive cells differentiated in roots formed de novo from callus and leaf explants of wild type and scr mutants but did not function under clinorotation. Tissue and cell type patterning in a root proper as well as gene expression in all variants in the control and under clinorotation were similar that gives new evidence on normal morphogenesis in altered gravity. We proposed such model for performing the experiments on board the ISS to study morphogenesis in vitro, including differentiation of graviperceptive cells.

  20. LHC II protein phosphorylation in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in non-photochemical quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitholtz, Hanna-Leena; Srivastava, Renu; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2005-06-01

    Phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex II (LHC II) proteins is induced in light via activation of the LHC II kinase by reduction of cytochrome b(6)f complex in thylakoid membranes. We have recently shown that, besides this activation, the LHC II kinase can be regulated in vitro by a thioredoxin-like component, and H2O2 that inserts an inhibitory loop in the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation in the chloroplast. In order to disclose the complex network for LHC II protein phosphorylation in vivo, we studied phosphorylation of LHC II proteins in the leaves of npq1-2 and npq4-1 mutants of Arabidopis thaliana. In comparison to wild-type, these mutants showed reduced non-photochemical quenching and increased excitation pressure of Photosystem II (PS II) under physiological light intensities. Peculiar regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation was observed in mutant leaves under illumination. The npq4-1 mutant was able to maintain a high amount of phosphorylated LHC II proteins in thylakoid membranes at light intensities that induced inhibition of phosphorylation in wild-type leaves. Light intensity-dependent changes in the level of LHC II protein phosphorylation were smaller in the npq1-2 mutant compared to the wild-type. No significant differences in leaf thickness, dry weight, chlorophyll content, or the amount of LHC II proteins were observed between the two mutant and wild-type lines. We propose that the reduced capacity of the mutant lines to dissipate excess excitation energy induces changes in the production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which consequently affects the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation.

  1. The aba mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is impaired in epoxy-carotenoid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rock, C.D.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-09-01

    The three mutant alleles of the ABA locus of Arabidopsis thaliana result in plants that are deficient in the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA). The authors have used {sup 18}O{sub 2} to label ABA in water-stressed leaves of mutant and wild-type Arabidopsis. Analysis by selected ion monitoring and tandem mass spectrometry of ({sup 18}O)ABA and its catabolites, phaseic acid and ABA-glucose ester ({beta}-D-glucopyranosyl abscisate), indicates that the aba genotypes are impaired in ABA biosynthesis and have a small ABA precursor pool of compounds that contain oxygens on the rings, presumably oxygenated carotenoids (xanthophylls). Quantitation of the carotenoids form mutant and wild-type leaves establishes that the aba alleles cause a deficiency of the epoxy-carotenoids violaxanthin and neoxanthin and an accumulation of their biosynthetic precursor, zeaxanthin. These results provide evidence that ABA is synthesized by oxidative cleavage of epoxy-carotenoids (the indirect pathway). Furthermore the carotenoid mutant they describe undergoes normal greening. Thus the aba alleles provide an opportunity to study the physiological roles of epoxy-carotenoids in photosynthesis in a higher plants.

  2. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  3. Structure and development of somatic embryos formed in Arabidopsis thaliana pt mutant callus cultures derived from seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recklinghausen, von I.R.; Iwanowska, A.; Kieft, H.; Mordhorst, A.P.; Schel, J.H.N.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Seeds of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant primordia timing (pt) were germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid- containing liquid medium. The seedlings formed somatic embryos and nonembryogenic and embryogenic callus in vitro in a time period of approximately two to three weeks. Embryogenesis and

  4. Exaggerated root respiration accounts for growth retardation in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner, Katrin; Hörmiller, Imke; Nägele, Thomas; Heyer, Arnd G

    2014-07-01

    The knock-out mutation of plastidial phosphoglucomutase (pgm) causes a starchless phenotype in Arabidopsis thaliana, and results in a severe growth reduction of plants cultivated under diurnal conditions. It has been speculated that high soluble sugar levels accumulating during the light phase in leaf mesophyll might cause a reduction of photosynthetic activity or that shortage of reduced carbon during the night is the reason for the slow biomass gain of pgm. Separate simultaneous measurements of leaf net photosynthesis and root respiration demonstrate that photosynthetic activity per unit fresh weight is not reduced in pgm, whereas root respiration is strongly elevated. Comparison with a mutant defective in the dominating vacuolar invertase (AtβFruct4) revealed that high sucrose concentration in the cytosol, but not in the vacuole, of leaf cells is responsible for elevated assimilate transport to the root. Increased sugar supply to the root, as observed in pgm mutants, forces substantial respiratory losses. Because root respiration accounts for 80% of total plant respiration under long-day conditions, this gives rise to retarded biomass formation. In contrast, reduced vacuolar invertase activity leads to reduced net photosynthesis in the shoot and lowered root respiration, and affords an increased root/shoot ratio. The results demonstrate that roots have very limited capacity for carbon storage but exert rigid control of supply for their maintenance metabolism. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of mutations in mutant lineages selected following fast-neutron irradiation mutagenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Belfield, E.J.

    2012-04-12

    Ionizing radiation has long been known to induce heritable mutagenic change in DNA sequence. However, the genome-wide effect of radiation is not well understood. Here we report the molecular properties and frequency of mutations in phenotypically selected mutant lines isolated following exposure of the genetic model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana to fast neutrons (FNs). Previous studies suggested that FNs predominantly induce deletions longer than a kilobase in A. thaliana. However, we found a higher frequency of single base substitution than deletion mutations. While the overall frequency and molecular spectrum of fast-neutron (FN)-induced single base substitutions differed substantially from those of "background" mutations arising spontaneously in laboratory-grown plants, G:C>A:T transitions were favored in both. We found that FN-induced G:C>A:T transitions were concentrated at pyrimidine dinucleotide sites, suggesting that FNs promote the formation of mutational covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine residues. In addition, we found that FNs induced more single base than large deletions, and that these single base deletions were possibly caused by replication slippage. Our observations provide an initial picture of the genome-wide molecular profile of mutations induced in A. thaliana by FN irradiation and are particularly informative of the nature and extent of genome-wide mutation in lines selected on the basis of mutant phenotypes from FN-mutagenized A. thaliana populations.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of mutations in mutant lineages selected following fast-neutron irradiation mutagenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Eric J; Gan, Xiangchao; Mithani, Aziz; Brown, Carly; Jiang, Caifu; Franklin, Keara; Alvey, Elizabeth; Wibowo, Anjar; Jung, Marko; Bailey, Kit; Kalwani, Sharan; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Mott, Richard; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2012-07-01

    Ionizing radiation has long been known to induce heritable mutagenic change in DNA sequence. However, the genome-wide effect of radiation is not well understood. Here we report the molecular properties and frequency of mutations in phenotypically selected mutant lines isolated following exposure of the genetic model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana to fast neutrons (FNs). Previous studies suggested that FNs predominantly induce deletions longer than a kilobase in A. thaliana. However, we found a higher frequency of single base substitution than deletion mutations. While the overall frequency and molecular spectrum of fast-neutron (FN)-induced single base substitutions differed substantially from those of "background" mutations arising spontaneously in laboratory-grown plants, G:C>A:T transitions were favored in both. We found that FN-induced G:C>A:T transitions were concentrated at pyrimidine dinucleotide sites, suggesting that FNs promote the formation of mutational covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine residues. In addition, we found that FNs induced more single base than large deletions, and that these single base deletions were possibly caused by replication slippage. Our observations provide an initial picture of the genome-wide molecular profile of mutations induced in A. thaliana by FN irradiation and are particularly informative of the nature and extent of genome-wide mutation in lines selected on the basis of mutant phenotypes from FN-mutagenized A. thaliana populations.

  7. Effects of salt stress on wild type and vte4 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana: Model plant to engineer tolerance towards salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalatbari Amir Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major environmental constraints impairing plant distribution and yield is believed to be salt stress. Additionally, engineered abiotic stress resistance or/and tolerance is considered as an indispensable target in order to enhance plant productivity. In this study, the effects of salinity on physiological and morphological of wild type (Columbia-0 and vte4 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated under different NaCl concentrations. These salt treatments, including control condition, 50mM and 100mM NaCl were imposed on the plants. Each salt treatment was replicated three times in a complete randomized design with factorial arrangement. Wild type and mutant A.thaliana plants were subjected to the abiotic stress (salinity for up to 11 days to evaluate the parameters of growth, development and water relations. As a result, the performance of wild type plants was stronger than vte4 mutant under different salt treatments. Under control condition, rosette dry weight, maximum quantum efficiency (PSII and specific leaf area obtained the highest values of 13.85 mg, considered, wild type A.thaliana recorded higher value of 0.82 gW/gFW for relative water content (RWC under 50mM NaCl whereas mutant plants gained the value of 0.78 gW/gFW under the same condition. However, root mass fraction indicated an increase for both wild type and vte4 mutant plants after 11 days of salt stress onset. The reduction of water potential was observed for wild type and mutant A.thaliana where it scored -1.3 MPa and -1.4, respectively. As a conclusion, these findings implied that under different salt treatments morphological and physiological responses of wild type and vte4 mutant were affected in which wild type plants showed more tolerance. Lack of γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ -TMT gene in vte4 seemed to impair defence mechanism of this mutant against salinity.

  8. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  9. Leaf hydraulic conductance varies with vein anatomy across Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and leaf vein mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caringella, Marissa A; Bongers, Franca J; Sack, Lawren

    2015-12-01

    Leaf venation is diverse across plant species and has practical applications from paleobotany to modern agriculture. However, the impact of vein traits on plant performance has not yet been tested in a model system such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies analysed cotyledons of A. thaliana vein mutants and identified visible differences in their vein systems from the wild type (WT). We measured leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf ), vein traits, and xylem and mesophyll anatomy for A. thaliana WT (Col-0) and four vein mutants (dot3-111 and dot3-134, and cvp1-3 and cvp2-1). Mutant true leaves did not possess the qualitative venation anomalies previously shown in the cotyledons, but varied quantitatively in vein traits and leaf anatomy across genotypes. The WT had significantly higher mean Kleaf . Across all genotypes, there was a strong correlation of Kleaf with traits related to hydraulic conductance across the bundle sheath, as influenced by the number and radial diameter of bundle sheath cells and vein length per area. These findings support the hypothesis that vein traits influence Kleaf , indicating the usefulness of this mutant system for testing theory that was primarily established comparatively across species, and supports a strong role for the bundle sheath in influencing Kleaf . © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis on wild type and nitric oxide-overproducing mutant (nox1) of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Jun; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Wang, Wen-Hua; He, Jun-Xian; Xiao, Qiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a ubiquitous signal molecule plays an important role in plant development and growth. Here, we compared the proteomic changes between NO-overproducing mutant (nox1) and wild-type (WT) of Arabidopsis thaliana using two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF MS. We successfully identified 59 differentially expressed proteins in nox1 mutant, which are predicted to play potential roles in specific cellular processes, such as post-translational modification, energy production and conversion, metabolism, transcription and signal transduction, cell rescue and defense, development and differentiation. Particularly, expression levels of five anti-oxidative enzymes were altered by the mutation; and assays of their respective enzymatic activities indicated an enhanced level of oxidative stress in nox1 mutant. Finally, some important proteins were further confirmed at transcriptional level using quantitative real-time PCR revealing the systemic changes between WT and nox1. The result suggests that obvious morphological changes in the nox1 mutant may be regulated by different mechanisms and factors, while excess endogenous NO maybe one of the possible reasons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-08-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant air1 implicates SOS3 in the regulation of anthocyanins under salt stress

    KAUST Repository

    Van Oosten, Michael James

    2013-08-08

    The accumulation of anthocyanins in plants exposed to salt stress has been largely documented. However, the functional link and regulatory components underlying the biosynthesis of these molecules during exposure to stress are largely unknown. In a screen of second site suppressors of the salt overly sensitive3-1 (sos3-1) mutant, we isolated the anthocyanin-impaired-response-1 (air1) mutant. air1 is unable to accumulate anthocyanins under salt stress, a key phenotype of sos3-1 under high NaCl levels (120 mM). The air1 mutant showed a defect in anthocyanin production in response to salt stress but not to other stresses such as high light, low phosphorous, high temperature or drought stress. This specificity indicated that air1 mutation did not affect anthocyanin biosynthesis but rather its regulation in response to salt stress. Analysis of this mutant revealed a T-DNA insertion at the first exon of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding for a basic region-leucine zipper transcription factor. air1 mutants displayed higher survival rates compared to wild-type in oxidative stress conditions, and presented an altered expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes such as F3H, F3′H and LDOX in salt stress conditions. The results presented here indicate that AIR1 is involved in the regulation of various steps of the flavonoid and anthocyanin accumulation pathways and is itself regulated by the salt-stress response signalling machinery. The discovery and characterization of AIR1 opens avenues to dissect the connections between abiotic stress and accumulation of antioxidants in the form of flavonoids and anthocyanins. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  13. A vacuolar carboxypeptidase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is degraded by the ERAD pathway independently of its N-glycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoko; Endo, Toshiya [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi, E-mail: shuh@biochem.chem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2010-03-12

    Misfolded proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are degraded by a mechanism, the ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here we report establishment of the experimental system to analyze the ERAD in plant cells. Carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is a vacuolar enzyme and its mutant CPY* is degraded by the ERAD in yeast. Since Arabidopsis thaliana has AtCPY, an ortholog of yeast CPY, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of AtCPY and GFP and of AtCPY*, which carries a mutation homologous to yeast CPY*, and GFP in A. thaliana cells. While AtCPY-GFP was efficiently transported to the vacuole, AtCPY*-GFP was retained in the ER to be degraded in proteasome- and Cdc48-dependent manners. We also found that AtCPY*-GFP was degraded by the ERAD in yeast cells, but that its single N-glycan did not function as a degradation signal in yeast or plant cells. Therefore, AtCPY*-GFP can be used as a marker protein to analyze the ERAD pathway, likely for nonglycosylated substrates, in plant cells.

  14. Developmental defects in mutants of the PsbP domain protein 5 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Johnna L Roose

    Full Text Available Plants contain an extensive family of PsbP-related proteins termed PsbP-like (PPL and PsbP domain (PPD proteins, which are localized to the thylakoid lumen. The founding member of this family, PsbP, is an established component of the Photosystem II (PS II enzyme, and the PPL proteins have also been functionally linked to other photosynthetic processes. However, the functions of the remaining seven PPD proteins are unknown. To elucidate the function of the PPD5 protein (At5g11450 in Arabidopsis, we have characterized a mutant T-DNA insertion line (SALK_061118 as well as several RNAi lines designed to suppress the expression of this gene. The functions of the photosynthetic electron transfer reactions are largely unaltered in the ppd5 mutants, except for a modest though significant decrease in NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH activity. Interestingly, these mutants show striking plant developmental and morphological defects. Relative to the wild-type Col-0 plants, the ppd5 mutants exhibit both increased lateral root branching and defects associated with axillary bud formation. These defects include the formation of additional rosettes originating from axils at the base of the plant as well as aerial rosettes formed at the axils of the first few nodes of the shoot. The root-branching phenotype is chemically complemented by treatment with the synthetic strigolactone, GR24. We propose that the developmental defects observed in the ppd5 mutants are related to a deficiency in strigolactone biosynthesis.

  15. Stomatal function, density and pattern, and CO2 assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana tmm1 and sdd1-1 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vráblová, M; Vrábl, D; Hronková, M; Kubásek, J; Šantrůček, J

    2017-09-01

    Stomata modulate the exchange of water and CO2 between plant and atmosphere. Although stomatal density is known to affect CO2 diffusion into the leaf and thus photosynthetic rate, the effect of stomatal density and patterning on CO2 assimilation is not fully understood. We used wild types Col-0 and C24 and stomatal mutants sdd1-1 and tmm1 of Arabidopsis thaliana, differing in stomatal density and pattern, to study the effects of these variations on both stomatal and mesophyll conductance and CO2 assimilation rate. Anatomical parameters of stomata, leaf temperature and carbon isotope discrimination were also assessed. Our results indicate that increased stomatal density enhanced stomatal conductance in sdd1-1 plants, with no effect on photosynthesis, due to both unchanged photosynthetic capacity and decreased mesophyll conductance. Clustering (abnormal patterning formed by clusters of two or more stomata) and a highly unequal distribution of stomata between the adaxial and abaxial leaf sides in tmm1 mutants also had no effect on photosynthesis. Except at very high stomatal densities, stomatal conductance and water loss were proportional to stomatal density. Stomatal formation in clusters reduced stomatal dynamics and their operational range as well as the efficiency of CO2 transport. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. Quenching in Arabidopsis thaliana Mutants Lacking Monomeric Antenna Proteins of Photosystem II*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavina, Yuliya; de Bianchi, Silvia; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    2011-01-01

    The minor light-harvesting complexes CP24, CP26, and CP29 have been proposed to play a key role in the zeaxanthin (Zx)-dependent high light-induced regulation (NPQ) of excitation energy in higher plants. To characterize the detailed roles of these minor complexes in NPQ and to determine their specific quenching effects we have studied the ultrafast fluorescence kinetics in knockout (ko) mutants koCP26, koCP29, and the double mutant koCP24/CP26. The data provide detailed insight into the quenching processes and the reorganization of the Photosystem (PS) II supercomplex under quenching conditions. All genotypes showed two NPQ quenching sites. Quenching site Q1 is formed by a light-induced functional detachment of parts of the PSII supercomplex and a pronounced quenching of the detached antenna parts. The antenna remaining bound to the PSII core was also quenched substantially in all genotypes under NPQ conditions (quenching site Q2) as compared with the dark-adapted state. The latter quenching was about equally strong in koCP26 and the koCP24/CP26 mutants as in the WT. Q2 quenching was substantially reduced, however, in koCP29 mutants suggesting a key role for CP29 in the total NPQ. The observed quenching effects in the knockout mutants are complicated by the fact that other minor antenna complexes do compensate in part for the lack of the CP24 and/or CP29 complexes. Their lack also causes some LHCII dissociation already in the dark. PMID:21844190

  17. Structure and Biosynthesis of Branched Wax Compounds on Wild Type and Wax Biosynthesis Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busta, Lucas; Jetter, Reinhard

    2017-06-01

    The cuticle is a waxy composite that protects the aerial organs of land plans from non-stomatal water loss. The chemical make-up of the cuticular wax mixture plays a central role in defining the water barrier, but structure-function relationships have not been established so far, in part due to gaps in our understanding of wax structures and biosynthesis. While wax compounds with saturated, linear hydrocarbon tails have been investigated in detail, very little is known about compounds with modified aliphatic tails, which comprise substantial portions of some plant wax mixtures. This study aimed to investigate the structures, abundances and biosynthesis of branched compounds on the species for which wax biosynthesis is best understood: Arabidopsis thaliana. Microscale derivatization, mass spectral interpretation and organic synthesis identified homologous series of iso-alkanes and iso-alcohols on flowers and leaves, respectively. These comprised approximately 10-15% of wild type wax mixtures. The abundances of both branched wax constituents and accompanying unbranched compounds were reduced on the cer6, cer3 and cer1 mutants but not cer4, indicating that branched compounds are in part synthesized by the same machinery as unbranched compounds. In contrast, the abundances of unbranched, but not branched, wax constituents were reduced on the cer2 and cer26 mutants, suggesting that the pathways to both types of compounds deviate in later steps of chain elongation. Finally, the abundances of branched, but not unbranched, wax compounds were reduced on the cer16 mutant, and the (uncharacterized) CER16 protein may therefore be controlling the relative abundances of iso-alkanes and iso-alcohols on Arabidopsis surfaces. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein (FLA mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, fla1, shows defects in shoot regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim L Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-proteins (FLAs are an enigmatic class of 21 members within the larger family of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Located at the cell surface, in the cell wall/plasma membrane, they are implicated in many developmental roles yet their function remains largely undefined. Fasciclin (FAS domains are putative cell-adhesion domains found in extracellular matrix proteins of organisms from all kingdoms, but the juxtaposition of FAS domains with highly glycosylated AGP domains is unique to plants. Recent studies have started to elucidate the role of FLAs in Arabidopsis development. FLAs containing a single FAS domain are important for the integrity and elasticity of the plant cell wall matrix (FLA11 and FLA12 and FLA3 is involved in microspore development. FLA4/SOS5 with two FAS domains and two AGP domains has a role in maintaining proper cell expansion under salt stressed conditions. The role of other FLAs remains to be uncovered. METHOD/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe the characterisation of a T-DNA insertion mutant in the FLA1 gene (At5g55730. Under standard growth conditions fla1-1 mutants have no obvious phenotype. Based on gene expression studies, a putative role for FLA1 in callus induction was investigated and revealed that fla1-1 has a reduced ability to regenerate shoots in an in vitro shoot-induction assay. Analysis of FLA1p:GUS reporter lines show that FLA1 is expressed in several tissues including stomata, trichomes, the vasculature of leaves, the primary root tip and in lateral roots near the junction of the primary root. CONCLUSION: The results of the developmental expression of FLA1 and characterisation of the fla1 mutant support a role for FLA1 in the early events of lateral root development and shoot development in tissue culture, prior to cell-type specification.

  19. A fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein (FLA) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, fla1, shows defects in shoot regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kim L; Kibble, Natalie A J; Bacic, Antony; Schultz, Carolyn J

    2011-01-01

    The fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-proteins (FLAs) are an enigmatic class of 21 members within the larger family of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Located at the cell surface, in the cell wall/plasma membrane, they are implicated in many developmental roles yet their function remains largely undefined. Fasciclin (FAS) domains are putative cell-adhesion domains found in extracellular matrix proteins of organisms from all kingdoms, but the juxtaposition of FAS domains with highly glycosylated AGP domains is unique to plants. Recent studies have started to elucidate the role of FLAs in Arabidopsis development. FLAs containing a single FAS domain are important for the integrity and elasticity of the plant cell wall matrix (FLA11 and FLA12) and FLA3 is involved in microspore development. FLA4/SOS5 with two FAS domains and two AGP domains has a role in maintaining proper cell expansion under salt stressed conditions. The role of other FLAs remains to be uncovered. Here we describe the characterisation of a T-DNA insertion mutant in the FLA1 gene (At5g55730). Under standard growth conditions fla1-1 mutants have no obvious phenotype. Based on gene expression studies, a putative role for FLA1 in callus induction was investigated and revealed that fla1-1 has a reduced ability to regenerate shoots in an in vitro shoot-induction assay. Analysis of FLA1p:GUS reporter lines show that FLA1 is expressed in several tissues including stomata, trichomes, the vasculature of leaves, the primary root tip and in lateral roots near the junction of the primary root. The results of the developmental expression of FLA1 and characterisation of the fla1 mutant support a role for FLA1 in the early events of lateral root development and shoot development in tissue culture, prior to cell-type specification.

  20. Cellular differentiation regulated by gibberellin in the Arabidopsis thaliana pickle mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogas, J.; Somerville, C. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States); Cheng, Jin-Chen; Sung, R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-07-04

    The plant growth regulator gibberellin (GA) has a profound effect on shoot development and promotes developmental transitions such as flowering. Little is known about any analogous effect GA might have on root development. In a screen for mutants, Arabi-dopsis plants carrying a mutation designated pickle (pkl) were isolated in which the primary root meristem retained characteristics of embryonic tissue. Expression of this aberrant differentiation state was suppressed by GA. Root tissue from plants carrying the pkl mutation spontaneously regenerated new embryos and plants. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Stromal protein degradation is incomplete in Arabidopsis thaliana autophagy mutants undergoing natural senescence

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    Lee Travis A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degradation of highly abundant stromal proteins plays an important role in the nitrogen economy of the plant during senescence. Lines of evidence supporting proteolysis within the chloroplast and outside the chloroplast have been reported. Two extra-plastidic degradation pathways, chlorophagy and Rubisco Containing Bodies, rely on cytoplasmic autophagy. Results In this work, levels of three stromal proteins (Rubisco large subunit, chloroplast glutamine synthetase and Rubisco activase and one thylakoid protein (the major light harvesting complex protein of photosystem II were measured during natural senescence in WT and in two autophagy T-DNA insertion mutants (atg5 and atg7. Thylakoid-localized protein decreased similarly in all genotypes, but stromal protein degradation was incomplete in the two atg mutants. In addition, degradation of two stromal proteins was observed in chloroplasts isolated from mid-senescence leaves. Conclusions These data suggest that autophagy does contribute to the complete proteolysis of stromal proteins, but does not play a major degenerative role. In addition, support for in organello degradation is provided.

  2. Proteome readjustments in the apoplastic space of Arabidopsis thaliana ggt1 mutant leaves exposed to UV-B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita eTrentin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet-B radiation acts as an environmental stimulus, but in high doses it has detrimental effects on plant metabolism. Plasma membranes represent a major target for ROS generated by this harmful radiation. Oxidative reactions occurring in the apoplastic space are counteracted by antioxidative systems mainly involving ascorbate and, to some extent, glutathione. The occurrence of the latter and its exact role in the extracellular space are not well documented, however. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the gamma-glutamyl transferase isoform GGT1 bound to the cell wall takes part in the so-called gamma-glutamyl cycle for extracellular glutathione degradation and recovery, and may be implicated in redox sensing and balance.In this work, oxidative conditions were imposed with UV-B and studied in redox altered ggt1 mutants. The response of ggt1 knockout Arabidopsis leaves to UV-B radiation was assessed by investigating changes in extracellular glutathione and ascorbate content and their redox state, and in apoplastic protein composition. Our results show that, on UV-B exposure, soluble antioxidants respond to the oxidative conditions in both genotypes. Rearrangements occur in their apoplastic protein composition, suggesting an involvement of H2O2, which may ultimately act as a signal. Other important changes relating to hormonal effects, cell wall remodeling, and redox activities are discussed. We argue that oxidative stress conditions imposed by UV-B and disruption of the gamma-glutamyl cycle result in similar stress-induced responses, to some degree at least.

  3. Leaf hydraulic conductance varies with vein anatomy across A rabidopsis thaliana wild-type and leaf vein mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caringella, M.A.; Bongers, F.J.; Sack, L.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf venation is diverse across plant species and has practical applications from paleobotany to modern agriculture. However, the impact of vein traits on plant performance has not yet been tested in a model system such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies analysed cotyledons of A. thaliana

  4. Combined transgenic expression of Punica granatum conjugase (FADX) and FAD2 desaturase in high linoleic acid Arabidopsis thaliana mutant leads to increased accumulation of punicic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Miles, Robin; Wickramarathna, Aruna; Sahibollah, Ariff Firman; Greer, Michael S; Chen, Guanqun; Weselake, Randall J

    2014-09-01

    Arabidopsis was engineered to produce 21.2 % punicic acid in the seed oil. Possible molecular factors limiting further accumulation of the conjugated fatty acid were investigated. Punicic acid (18:3Δ(9cis,11trans,13cis) ) is a conjugated linolenic acid isomer and is a main component of Punica granatum (pomegranate) seed oil. Medical studies have shown that punicic acid is a nutraceutical with anti-cancer and anti-obesity properties. It has been previously demonstrated that the conjugated double bonds in punicic acid are produced via the catalytic action of fatty acid conjugase (FADX), which is a homolog of the oleate desaturase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of the Δ(12)-double bond of linoleic acid (18:2Δ(9cis,12cis) ) into conjugated Δ(11trans) and Δ(13cis) -double bonds. Previous attempts to produce punicic acid in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seeds overexpressing P. granatum FADX resulted in a limited accumulation of punicic acid of up to 4.4 %, accompanied by increased accumulation of oleic acid (18:1∆(9cis) ), suggesting that production of punicic acid in some way inhibits the activity of oleate desaturase (Iwabuchi et al. 2003). In the current study, we applied a new strategy to enhance the production of punicic acid in a high linoleic acid A. thaliana fad3/fae1 mutant background using the combined expression of P. granatum FADX and FAD2. This approach led to the accumulation of punicic acid at the level of 21 % of total fatty acids and restored the natural proportion of oleic acid observed in the A. thaliana fad3/fae1 mutant. In addition, we provide new insights into the high oleate phenotype and describe factors limiting the production of punicic acid in genetically engineered plants.

  5. Characterization of the snowy cotyledon 1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana: the impact of chloroplast elongation factor G on chloroplast development and plant vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Verónica; Ingenfeld, Anke; Apel, Klaus

    2006-03-01

    During seedling development chloroplast formation marks the transition from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth. The development and activity of chloroplasts may differ in cotyledons that initially serve as a storage organ and true leaves whose primary function is photosynthesis. A genetic screen was used for the identification of genes that affect selectively chloroplast function in cotyledons of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several mutants exhibiting pale cotyledons and green true leaves were isolated and dubbed snowy cotyledon (sco). One of the mutants, sco1, was characterized in more detail. The mutated gene was identified using map-based cloning. The mutant contains a point mutation in a gene encoding the chloroplast elongation factor G, leading to an amino acid exchange within the predicted 70S ribosome-binding domain. The mutation results in a delay in the onset of germination. At this early developmental stage embryos still contain undifferentiated proplastids, whose proper function seems necessary for seed germination. In light-grown sco1 seedlings the greening of cotyledons is severely impaired, whereas the following true leaves develop normally as in wild-type plants. Despite this apparent similarity of chloroplast development in true leaves of mutant and wild-type plants various aspects of mature plant development are also affected by the sco1 mutation such as the onset of flowering, the growth rate, and seed production. The onset of senescence in the mutant and the wild-type plants occurs, however, at the same time, suggesting that in the mutant this particular developmental step does not seem to suffer from reduced protein translation efficiency in chloroplasts.

  6. Phosphorylation of the 12 S globulin cruciferin in wild-type and abi1-1 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lianglu; Ross, Andrew R. S.; Yang, Jingyi; Hegedus, Dwayne D.; Kermode, Allison R.

    2007-01-01

    Cruciferin (a 12 S globulin) is the most abundant storage protein in the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) and other crucifers, sharing structural similarity with the cupin superfamily of proteins. Cruciferin is synthesized as a precursor in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Subunit assembly is accompanied by structural rearrangements involving proteolysis and disulfide-bond formation prior to deposition in protein storage vacuoles. The A. thaliana cv. Columbia genome contains four cruciferin loci, two of which, on the basis of cDNA analysis, give rise to three alternatively spliced variants. Using MS, we confirmed the presence of four variants encoded by genes At4g28520.1, At5g44120.3, At1g03880.1 and At1g3890.1 in A. thaliana seeds. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, along with immunological detection using anti-cruciferin antiserum and antibodies against phosphorylated amino acid residues, revealed that cruciferin was the major phosphorylated protein in Arabidopsis seeds and that polymorphism far exceeded that predicted on the basis of known isoforms. The latter may be attributed, at least in part, to phosphorylation site heterogeneity. A total of 20 phosphorylation sites, comprising nine serine, eight threonine and three tyrosine residues, were identified by MS. Most of these are located on the IE (interchain disulfide-containing) face of the globulin trimer, which is involved in hexamer formation. The implications of these findings for cruciferin processing, assembly and mobilization are discussed. In addition, the protein phosphatase 2C-impaired mutant, abi1-1, was found to exhibit increased levels of cruciferin phosphorylation, suggesting either that cruciferin may be an in vivo target for this enzyme or that abi1-1 regulates the protein kinase/phosphatase system required for cruciferin phosphorylation. PMID:17313365

  7. Reactive oxygen species and transcript analysis upon excess light treatment in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana vs a photosensitive mutant lacking zeaxanthin and lutein

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    Roncaglia Enrica

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS are unavoidable by-products of oxygenic photosynthesis, causing progressive oxidative damage and ultimately cell death. Despite their destructive activity they are also signalling molecules, priming the acclimatory response to stress stimuli. Results To investigate this role further, we exposed wild type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and the double mutant npq1lut2 to excess light. The mutant does not produce the xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin, whose key roles include ROS scavenging and prevention of ROS synthesis. Biochemical analysis revealed that singlet oxygen (1O2 accumulated to higher levels in the mutant while other ROS were unaffected, allowing to define the transcriptomic signature of the acclimatory response mediated by 1O2 which is enhanced by the lack of these xanthophylls species. The group of genes differentially regulated in npq1lut2 is enriched in sequences encoding chloroplast proteins involved in cell protection against the damaging effect of ROS. Among the early fine-tuned components, are proteins involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chlorophyll catabolism, protein import, folding and turnover, synthesis and membrane insertion of photosynthetic subunits. Up to now, the flu mutant was the only biological system adopted to define the regulation of gene expression by 1O2. In this work, we propose the use of mutants accumulating 1O2 by mechanisms different from those activated in flu to better identify ROS signalling. Conclusions We propose that the lack of zeaxanthin and lutein leads to 1O2 accumulation and this represents a signalling pathway in the early stages of stress acclimation, beside the response to ADP/ATP ratio and to the redox state of both plastoquinone pool. Chloroplasts respond to 1O2 accumulation by undergoing a significant change in composition and function towards a fast acclimatory response. The physiological implications of this signalling specificity are

  8. Transcriptome analysis of Carica papaya embryogenic callus upon De-etiolated 1 (DET1 gene suppression

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    Diyana Jamaluddin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Papaya is considered to be one of the most nutritional fruits. It is rich in vitamins, carotenoids, flavonoids and other phytonutrient which function as antioxidant in our body [1]. Previous studies revealed that the suppression of a negative regulator gene in photomorphogenesis, De-etiolated 1 (DET1 can improve the phytonutrient in tomato and canola without affecting the fruit quality [2,3]. This report contains the experimental data on high-throughput 3′ mRNA sequencing of transformed papaya callus upon DET1 gene suppression.

  9. Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA Integration and Gene Targeting in Arabidopsis thaliana Non-Homologous End-Joining Mutants

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    Qi Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the role of AtKu70 and AtKu80 in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and gene targeting, plant lines with a T-DNA insertion in AtKu80 or AtKu70 genes were functionally characterized. Such plant lines lacked both subunits, indicating that heterodimer formation between AtKu70 and AtKu80 is needed for the stability of the proteins. Homozygous mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants and were fertile. However, they were hypersensitive to the genotoxic agent bleomycin, resulting in more DSBs as quantified in comet assays. They had lower end-joining efficiency, suggesting that NHEJ is a critical pathway for DSB repair in plants. Both Atku mutants and a previously isolated Atmre11 mutant were impaired in Agrobacterium T-DNA integration via floral dip transformation, indicating that AtKu70, AtKu80, and AtMre11 play an important role in T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis. The frequency of gene targeting was not significantly increased in the Atku80 and Atku70 mutants, but it was increased at least 10-fold in the Atmre11 mutant compared with the wild type.

  10. Rapid Phosphoproteomic Effects of Abscisic Acid (ABA) on Wild-Type and ABA Receptor-Deficient A. thaliana Mutants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Stecker, Kelly E.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)1 is a plant hormone that controls many aspects of plant growth, including seed germination, stomatal aperture size, and cellular drought response. ABA interacts with a unique family of 14 receptor proteins. This interaction leads to the activation of a family of protein kinases, SnRK2s, which in turn phosphorylate substrates involved in many cellular processes. The family of receptors appears functionally redundant. To observe a measurable phenotype, four of the fourteen receptors have to be mutated to create a multilocus loss-of-function quadruple receptor (QR) mutant, which is much less sensitive to ABA than wild-type (WT) plants. Given these phenotypes, we asked whether or not a difference in ABA response between the WT and QR backgrounds would manifest on a phosphorylation level as well. We tested WT and QR mutant ABA response using isotope-assisted quantitative phosphoproteomics to determine what ABA-induced phosphorylation changes occur in WT plants within 5 min of ABA treatment and how that phosphorylation pattern is altered in the QR mutant. We found multiple ABA-induced phosphorylation changes that occur within 5 min of treatment, including three SnRK2 autophosphorylation events and phosphorylation on SnRK2 substrates. The majority of robust ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed were partially diminished in the QR mutant, whereas many smaller ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed in the WT were not responsive to ABA in the mutant. A single phosphorylation event was increased in response to ABA treatment in both the WT and QR mutant. A portion of the discovery data was validated using selected reaction monitoring-based targeted measurements on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. These data suggest that different subsets of phosphorylation events depend upon different subsets of the ABA receptor family to occur. Altogether, these data expand our understanding of the model by which the family of ABA receptors directs

  11. A genetic screen for mutants defective in IAA1-LUC degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals an important requirement for TOPOISOMERASE6B in auxin physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkerson, Jonathan; Callis, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Many plant growth and developmental processes are modulated by the hormone auxin. Auxin-modulated proteolysis of Aux/IAAs, a family of transcriptional repressors, represents a major mode of auxin action. Auxin facilitates the interaction of Aux/IAAs with TIR1/AFB F-box proteins, promoting their ubiquitination by the SCF(TIR1/AFB) ubiquitin E3 ligase leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. To identify new genes regulating Aux/IAA proteolysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, we took a genetic approach, identifying individuals with altered degradation of an IAA1-luciferase fusion protein (IAA1-LUC). A mutant with 2-fold slower IAA1-LUC degradation rate compared with wild-type was isolated. Positional cloning identified the mutant as an allele of TOPOISOMERASE6B, named top6b-7. TOP6B encodes a subunit of a plant and archea-specific enzyme regulating endoreduplication, DNA damage repair and transcription in plants. T-DNA insertion alleles (top6b-8 and top6b-9) were also analyzed. top6b-7 seedlings are less sensitive to exogenous auxin than wild-type siblings in primary root growth assays, and experiments with DR5:GUS. Additionally, top6b-7 seedlings have a 40% reduction in the amount of endogenous IAA. These data suggest that increased IAA1-LUC half-life in top6b-7 probably results from a combination of both lower endogenous IAA levels and reduced sensitivity to auxin.

  12. Selected Components of the Shade-Avoidance Syndrome Are Displayed in a Normal Manner in Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa Deficient in Phytochrome B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, PRH.; Whitelam, G. C.; Smith, H.

    1993-08-01

    Several growth parameters associated with the phytochrome-mediated shade avoidance syndrome have been measured in seedlings and mature plants of a wild-type and a hy3 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in phytochrome B. Growth parameters were compared in plants grown in either white light (high red:far-red [R:FR] ratio) or white light plus added far-red (FR) light (low R:FR ratio). Wild-type Arabidopsis exhibited increased hypocotyl and petiole extension under a low, compared with a high, R:FR ratio. The hy3 mutant did not respond to low R:FR ratio by increase in hypocotyl or petiole length. Extension growth of wild-type plants was stimulated by brief end-of-day FR pulses, but similar treatment had no effect on extension growth of hy3 mutant plants. However, some responses to low R:FR ratio seen in the wild-type plants were also evident in the hy3 mutants. The number of days to bolting, the developmental stage at bolting, the leaf area, and the specific stem weight (weight per unit of length) all decreased in the wild-type and hy3 seedlings in response to low R:FR ratio. Low R:FR ratio caused a larger decrease in leaf area and specific stem weight in the mutant seedlings than in wild-type seedlings. The effects of low R:FR ratio on leaf area and specific stem weight were opposite to those of the hy3 lesion, which resulted in increased leaf area and specific stem weight in comparison with the wild type. Both leaf area and specific stem weight responses to low R:FR ratio also were unchanged in the ein mutant of Brassica rapa, known to be deficient in phytochrome B. These responses represent components of the shade-avoidance syndrome, and, consequently, the results indicate that phytochrome B cannot be solely responsible for the perception of R:FR ratio and the induction of shade-avoidance responses. The hypothesis is proposed that different phytochromes may be responsible for the regulation of extension growth and the regulation of lateral or radial expansion.

  13. An Arabidopsis thaliana knock-out mutant of the chloroplast triose phosphate/phosphate translocator is severely compromised only when starch synthesis, but not starch mobilisation is abolished

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Anja; Häusler, Rainer E; Kolukisaoglu, Uner

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana tpt-1 mutant which is defective in the chloroplast triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (TPT) was isolated by reverse genetics. It contains a T-DNA insertion 24 bp upstream of the start ATG of the TPT gene. The mutant lacks TPT transcripts and triose phosphate (TP......,6-bisphosphatase. Despite its regulatory role in the feed-forward control of sucrose biosynthesis, variations in the fructose 2,6-bisphosphate content upon illumination were similar in the mutant and the wild type. Crosses of tpt-1 with mutants unable to mobilise starch (sex1) or to synthesise starch (adg1......-1) revealed that growth and photosynthesis of the double mutants was severely impaired only when starch biosynthesis, but not its mobilisation, was affected. For tpt-1/sex1 combining a lack in the TPT with a deficiency in starch mobilisation, an additional compensatory mechanism emerged, i.e. the formation...

  14. A collection of Ds insertional mutants associated with defects in male gametophyte development and function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boavida, Leonor C; Shuai, Bin; Yu, Hee-Ju; Pagnussat, Gabriela C; Sundaresan, Venkatesan; McCormick, Sheila

    2009-04-01

    Functional analyses of the Arabidopsis genome require analysis of the gametophytic generation, since approximately 10% of the genes are expressed in the male gametophyte and approximately 9% in the female gametophyte. Here we describe the genetic and molecular characterization of 67 Ds insertion lines that show reduced transmission through the male gametophyte. About half of these mutations are male gametophytic-specific mutations, while the others also affect female transmission. Genomic sequences flanking both sides of the Ds element were recovered for 39 lines; for 16 the Ds elements were inserted in or close to coding regions, while 7 were located in intergenic/unannotated regions of the genome. For the remaining 16 lines, chromosomal rearrangements such as translocations or deletions, ranging between 30 and 500 kb, were associated with the transposition event. The mutants were classified into five groups according to the developmental processes affected; these ranged from defects in early stages of gametogenesis to later defects affecting pollen germination, pollen tube growth, polarity or guidance, or pollen tube-embryo sac interactions or fertilization. The isolated mutants carry Ds insertions in genes with diverse biological functions and potentially specify new functions for several unannotated or unknown proteins.

  15. A Role for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Plants: Pathogen Responses Are Induced in Arabidopsis thaliana NMD Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayson, Samantha; Arciga-Reyes, Luis; Wootton, Lucie; De Torres Zabala, Marta; Truman, William; Graham, Neil; Grant, Murray; Davies, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved mechanism that targets aberrant mRNAs for destruction. NMD has also been found to regulate the expression of large numbers of genes in diverse organisms, although the biological role for this is unclear and few evolutionarily conserved targets have been identified. Expression analyses of three Arabidopsis thaliana lines deficient in NMD reveal that the vast majority of NMD-targeted transcripts are associated with response to pathogens. Congruently, NMD mutants, in which these transcripts are elevated, confer partial resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. These findings suggest a biological rationale for the regulation of gene expression by NMD in plants and suggest that manipulation of NMD could offer a new approach for crop protection. Amongst the few non-pathogen responsive NMD-targeted genes, one potential NMD targeted signal, the evolutionarily conserved upstream open reading frame (CuORF), was found to be hugely over-represented, raising the possibility that this feature could be used to target specific physiological mRNAs for control by NMD. PMID:22384098

  16. Expression of HMA4 cDNAs of the zinc hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens from endogenous NcHMA4 promoters does not complement the zinc-deficiency phenotype of the Arabidopsis thaliana hma2hma4 double mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar eIqbal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Noccaea caerulescens (Nc exhibits a very high constitutive expression of the heavy metal transporting ATPase, HMA4, as compared to the non-hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana (At, due to copy number expansion and altered cis-regulation. We screened a BAC library for HMA4 and found that HMA4 is triplicated in the genome of a N. caerulescens accession from a former Zn mine near La Calamine (LC, Belgium. We amplified multiple HMA4 promoter sequences from three calamine N. caerulescens accessions, and expressed AtHMA4 and different NcHMA4 cDNAs under At and Nc HMA4 promoters in the A. thaliana (Col hma2hma4 double mutant. Transgenic lines expressing HMA4 under the At promoter were always fully complemented for root-to-shoot Zn translocation and developed normally at a 2- µM Zn supply, whereas the lines expressing HMA4 under Nc promoters usually showed only slightly enhanced root to shoot Zn translocation rates in comparison with the double mutant, probably owing to ectopic expression in the roots, respectively. When expression of the Zn deficiency responsive marker gene ZIP4 was tested, the transgenic lines expressing AtHMA4 under an NcHMA4-1-LC promoter showed on average a 7-fold higher expression in the leaves, in comparison with the double hma2hma4 mutant, showing that this construct aggravated, rather than alleviated the severity of foliar Zn deficiency in the mutant, possible owing to expression in the leaf mesophyll.

  17. The Arabidopsis thaliana Knockout Mutant for Phytochelatin Synthase1 (cad1-3 Is Defective in Callose Deposition, Bacterial Pathogen Defense and Auxin Content, But Shows an Increased Stem Lignification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria De Benedictis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme phytochelatin synthase (PCS has long been studied with regard to its role in metal(loid detoxification in several organisms, i.e., plants, yeasts, and nematodes. It is in fact widely recognized that PCS detoxifies a number of heavy metals by catalyzing the formation of thiol-rich oligomers, namely phytochelatins, from glutathione and related peptides. However, recent investigations have highlighted other possible roles played by the PCS enzyme in the plant cell, e.g., the control of pathogen-triggered callose deposition. In order to examine novel aspects of Arabidopsis thaliana PCS1 (AtPCS1 functions and to elucidate its possible roles in the secondary metabolism, metabolomic data of A. thaliana wild-type and cad1-3 mutant were compared, the latter lacking AtPCS1. HPLC-ESI-MS analysis showed differences in the relative levels of metabolites from the glucosinolate and phenylpropanoid pathways between cad1-3 and wild-type plants. Specifically, in control (Cd-untreated plants, higher levels of 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate were found in cad1-3 plants vs. wild-type. Moreover, the cad1-3 mutant showed to be impaired in the deposit of callose after Cd exposure, suggesting that AtPCS1 protects the plant against the toxicity of heavy metals not only by synthesizing PCs, but also by contributing to callose deposition. In line with the contribution of callose in counteracting Cd toxicity, we found that another callose-defective mutant, pen2-1, was more sensitive to high concentrations of Cd than wild-type plants. Moreover, cad1-3 plants were more susceptible than wild-type to the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The metabolome also revealed differences in the relative levels of hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonols, with consequences on cell wall properties and auxin content, respectively. First, increased lignification in the cad1-3 stems was found, probably aimed at counteracting the entry of Cd into the inner

  18. Fitness analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants depleted of FtsH metalloproteases and characterization of three FtsH6 deletion mutants exposed to high light stress, senescence and chilling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raik Wagner; Harald Aigner; Adriana Pružinská; Hanna Johansson Jänkänpää; Stefan Jansson; Christiane Funk

    2011-01-01

    ...) and a Zn 2+ metalloprotease domain (reviewed by Ito & Akiyama, 2005 ). FtsH proteases are found in eubacteria, animals and plants; however, they are apparently absent in Archaebacteria. In Arabidopsis thaliana , 12 FtsH family members are present (FtsH1–12) and, given the prokaryotic evolutionary origin of FtsH proteases, it is not surprising that ...

  19. Gravity-dependent differentiation and root coils in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and phospholipase-A-I knockdown mutant grown on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, G F E; Pietrzyk, P

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis roots on 45° tilted agar in 1-g grow in wave-like figures. In addition to waves, formation of root coils is observed in several mutants compromised in gravitropism and/or auxin transport. The knockdown mutant ppla-I-1 of patatin-related phospholipase-A-I is delayed in root gravitropism and forms increased numbers of root coils. Three known factors contribute to waving: circumnutation, gravisensing and negative thigmotropism. In microgravity, deprivation of wild type (WT) and mutant roots of gravisensing and thigmotropism and circumnutation (known to slow down in microgravity, and could potentially lead to fewer waves or increased coiling in both WT and mutant). To resolve this, mutant ppla-I-1 and WT were grown in the BIOLAB facility in the International Space Station. In 1-g, roots of both types only showed waving. In the first experiment in microgravity, the mutant after 9 days formed far more coils than in 1-g but the WT also formed several coils. After 24 days in microgravity, in both types the coils were numerous with slightly more in the mutant. In the second experiment, after 9 days in microgravity only the mutant formed coils and the WT grew arcuated roots. Cell file rotation (CFR) on the mutant root surface in microgravity decreased in comparison to WT, and thus was not important for coiling. Several additional developmental responses (hypocotyl elongation, lateral root formation, cotyledon expansion) were found to be gravity-influenced. We tentatively discuss these in the context of disturbances in auxin transport, which are known to decrease through lack of gravity. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. A novel mutant allele of SSI2 confers a better balance between disease resistance and plant growth inhibition on Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Dong, Ran; Liu, Li; Hu, Zhubing; Li, Jing; Wang, Yong; Ding, Xinhua; Chu, Zhaohui

    2016-09-26

    Resistance and growth are opposing characteristics in plants. SA INSENSITIVITY OF npr1-5 (SSI2) encodes a stearoyl-ACP desaturase (S-ACP DES) that has previously been reported to simultaneously enhance resistance and repress growth. Here, we characterize ssi2-2, a novel mutant allele of SSI2 that has two amino acid substitutions. Compared with wild-type and two other mutants of SSI2, ssi2-2 showed intermediate phenotypes in growth size, punctate necrosis, resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000, salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related (PR) gene levels and 18:1 content. These results indicate that ssi2-2 is a weak mutant of SSI2. Additionally, by using ssi2-2 as an intermediate control, a number of differentially expressed genes were identified in transcriptome profiling analysis. These results suggest that constitutive expression of defense-related genes and repression of IAA signaling-associated genes is present in all SSI2 mutants. Taken together, our results suggest that the weak ssi2-2 mutant maintains a better balance between plant immunity and vegetative growth than other mutants, consequently providing a basis to genetically engineer disease resistance in crop plants.

  1. The glutathione-deficient, cadmium-sensitive mutant, cad2-1, of Arabidopsis thaliana is deficient in gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbett, C S; May, M J; Howden, R; Rolls, B

    1998-10-01

    This paper reports that the glutathione (GSH)-deficient mutant, cad2-1, of Arabidopsis is deficient in the first enzyme in the pathway of GSH biosynthesis, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS). The mutant accumulates a substrate of GCS, cysteine, and is deficient in the product, gamma-glutamylcysteine. In vitro enzyme assays showed that the cad2-1 mutant has 40% of wild-type levels of GCS activity but is unchanged in the activity of the second enzyme in the pathway, GSH synthetase. The CAD2 locus maps to chromosome 4 and is tightly linked to a gene, GSHA, identified by a previously isolated cDNA. A genomic clone of GSHA complements both the phenotypic and biochemical deficiencies of the cad2-1 mutant. The nucleotide sequence of the gene has been determined and, in the mutant, this gene contains a 6 bp deletion within an exon. These data demonstrate that the CAD2 gene encodes GCS. The cad2-1 mutation is close to the conserved cysteine which is believed to bind the substrate glutamate and the specific inhibitor L-buthionine-[S,R] sulfoximine (BSO). Both root growth and GCS activity of the cad2-1 mutant was less sensitive than the wild-type to inhibition by BSO, indicating that the mutation may alter the affinity of the inhibitor binding site.

  2. Analysis of a Partial Male-Sterile Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana Isolated from a Low-Energy Argon Ion Beam Mutagenized Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-04-01

    A screen for Arabidopsis fertility mutants, mutagenized by low-energy argon ion beam, yielded two partial male-sterile mutants tc243-1 and tc243-2 which have similar phenotypes. tc243-2 was investigated in detail. The segregation ratio of the mutant phenotypes in the M2 pools suggested that mutation behaved as single Mendelian recessive mutations. tc243 showed a series of mutant phenotypes, among which partial male-sterile was its striking mutant characteristic. Phenotype analysis indicates that there are four factors leading to male sterility. a. Floral organs normally develop inside the closed bud, but the anther filaments do not elongate sufficiently to position the locules above the stigma at anthesis. b. The anther locules do not dehisce at the time of flower opening (although limited dehiscence occurs later). c. Pollens of mutant plants develop into several types of pollens at the trinucleated stage, as determined by staining with DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), which shows a variable size, shape and number of nucleus. d. The viability of pollens is lower than that of the wild type on the germination test in vivo and vitro.

  3. Analysis of the Plant bos1 Mutant Highlights Necrosis as an Efficient Defence Mechanism during D. dadantii/Arabidospis thaliana Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrit, Oriane; Simond-Côte, Elizabeth; Hermand, Victor; Van Gijsegem, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a broad host range phytopathogenic bacterium provoking soft rot disease on many plants including Arabidopsis. We showed that, after D. dadantii infection, the expression of the Arabidopsis BOS1 gene was specifically induced by the production of the bacterial PelB/C pectinases able to degrade pectin. This prompted us to analyze the interaction between the bos1 mutant and D. dadantii. The phenotype of the infected bos1 mutant is complex. Indeed, maceration symptoms occurred more rapidly in the bos1 mutant than in the wild type parent but at a later stage of infection, a necrosis developed around the inoculation site that provoked a halt in the progression of the maceration. This necrosis became systemic and spread throughout the whole plant, a phenotype reminiscent of that observed in some lesion mimic mutants. In accordance with the progression of maceration symptoms, bacterial population began to grow more rapidly in the bos1 mutant than in the wild type plant but, when necrosis appeared in the bos1 mutant, a reduction in bacterial population was observed. From the plant side, this complex interaction between D. dadantii and its host includes an early plant defence response that comprises reactive oxygen species (ROS) production accompanied by the reinforcement of the plant cell wall by protein cross-linking. At later timepoints, another plant defence is raised by the death of the plant cells surrounding the inoculation site. This plant cell death appears to constitute an efficient defence mechanism induced by D. dadantii during Arabidopsis infection. PMID:21533045

  4. A novel mutant allele of SSI2 confers a better balance between disease resistance and plant growth inhibition on Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wei; Dong, Ran; Liu, Li; Hu, Zhubing; Li, Jing; Wang, Yong; Ding, Xinhua; Chu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance and growth are opposing characteristics in plants. SA INSENSITIVITY OF npr1-5 (SSI2) encodes a stearoyl-ACP desaturase (S-ACP DES) that has previously been reported to simultaneously enhance resistance and repress growth. Results Here, we characterize ssi2-2, a novel mutant allele of SSI2 that has two amino acid substitutions. Compared with wild-type and two other mutants of SSI2, ssi2-2 showed intermediate phenotypes in growth size, punctate necrosis, resistance to the ...

  5. Top-down phenomics of Arabidopsis thaliana: metabolic profiling by one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transcriptome analysis of albino mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chunjie; Chikayama, Eisuke; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Kuromori, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Jun; Hirayama, Takashi

    2007-06-22

    Elucidating the function of each gene in a genome is important for understanding the whole organism. We previously constructed 4000 disruptant mutants of Arabidopsis by insertion of Ds transposons. Here, we describe a top-down phenomics approach based on metabolic profiling that uses one-dimensional 1H and two-dimensional 1H,13C NMR analyses and transcriptome analysis of albino mutant lines of Arabidopsis. One-dimensional 1H NMR metabolic fingerprinting revealed global metabolic changes in the albino mutants, notably a decrease in aromatic metabolites and changes in aliphatic metabolites. NMR measurements of plants fed with 13C6-glucose showed that the albino lines had dramatically different 13C-labeling patterns and increased levels of several amino acids, especially Asn and Gln. Microarray analysis of one of the albino lines revealed a unique expression profile and showed that changes in the expression of genes encoding metabolic enzymes did not correspond with changes in the levels of metabolites. Collectively, these results suggest that albino mutants lose the normal carbon/nitrogen balance, presumably mainly through lack of photosynthesis. Our study offers an idea of how much the metabolite network is affected by chloroplast function in plants and shows the effectiveness of NMR-based metabolic analysis for metabolite profiling. On the basis of these findings, we propose that future investigations of plant systems biology combine transcriptomic, metabolomic, and phenomic analyses of gene disruptant lines.

  6. Transcriptional mechanisms associated with seed dormancy and dormancy loss in the gibberellin-insensitive sly1-2 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    While widespread transcriptome changes have been previously observed with seed dormancy loss, this study specifically characterized transcriptional changes associated with the increased seed dormancy and dormancy loss of the gibberellin (GA) hormone-insensitive sleepy1-2 (sly1-2) mutant. The SLY1 g...

  7. A proteomic approach to analyzing responses of Arabidopsis thaliana root cells to different gravitational conditions using an agravitropic mutant, pin2 and its wild type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Root gravitropsim has been proposed to require the coordinated, redistribution of the plant signaling molecule auxin within the root meristem, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unknown. PIN proteins are membrane transporters that mediate the efflux of auxin from cells. The PIN2 is important for the basipetal transport of auxin in roots and plays a critical role in the transmission of gravity signals perceived in the root cap to the root elongation zone. The loss of function pin2 mutant exhibits a gravity-insensitive root growth phenotype. By comparing the proteomes of wild type and the pin2 mutant root tips under different gravitational conditions, we hope to identify proteins involved in the gravity-related signal transduction. Results To identify novel proteins involved in the gravity signal transduction pathway we have carried out a comparative proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis pin2 mutant and wild type (WT roots subjected to different gravitational conditions. These conditions included horizontal (H and vertical (V clinorotation, hypergravity (G and the stationary control (S. Analysis of silver-stained two-dimensional SDS-PAGE gels revealed 28 protein spots that showed significant expression changes in altered gravity (H or G compared to control roots (V and S. Whereas the majority of these proteins exhibited similar expression patterns in WT and pin2 roots, a significant number displayed different patterns of response between WT and pin2 roots. The latter group included 11 protein spots in the H samples and two protein spots in the G samples that exhibited an altered expression exclusively in WT but not in pin2 roots. One of these proteins was identified as annexin2, which was induced in the root cap columella cells under altered gravitational conditions. Conclusions The most interesting observation in this study is that distinctly different patterns of protein expression were found in WT and pin2 mutant

  8. The novel Arabidopsis thaliana svt2 suppressor of the ascorbic acid-deficient mutant vtc1-1 exhibits phenotypic and genotypic instability [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/o2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase F Kempinski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid is a potent antioxidant that detoxifies reactive oxygen species when plants are exposed to unfavorable environmental conditions. In addition to its antioxidant properties, ascorbic acid and its biosynthetic precursors fulfill a variety of other physiological and molecular functions. A mutation in the ascorbic acid biosynthesis gene VTC1, which encodes GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase, results in conditional root growth inhibition in the presence of ammonium. To isolate suppressors of vtc1-1, which is in the Arabidopsis Columbia-0 background, seeds of the mutant were subjected to ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis. A suppressor mutant of vtc1-1 2, svt2, with wild-type levels of ascorbic acid and root growth similar to the wild type in the presence of ammonium was isolated. Interestingly, svt2 has Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta features, although svt2 is delayed in flowering and has an enlarged morphology. Moreover, the svt2 genotype shares similarities with Ler polymorphism markers and sequences, despite the fact that the mutant derived from mutagenesis of Col-0 vtc1-1 seed. We provide evidence that svt2 is not an artifact of the experiment, a contamination of Ler seed, or a result of outcrossing of the svt2 mutant with Ler pollen. Instead, our results show that svt2 exhibits transgenerational genotypic and phenotypic instability, which is manifested in a fraction of svt2 progeny, producing revertants that have Col-like phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. Some of those Col-like revertants then revert back to svt2-like plants in the subsequent generation. Our findings have important implications for undiscovered phenomena in transmitting genetic information in addition to the Mendelian laws of inheritance. Our results suggest that stress can trigger a genome restoration mechanism that could be advantageous for plants to survive environmental changes for which the ancestral genes were better adapted.

  9. Recherche d'enzymes impliquées dans la voie de biosynthèse de la carnitine chez Arabidopsis thaliana et étude préliminaire de mutants à teneur réduite en carnitine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yingjuan

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine, a crucial amino acid for the intacellular transfer of fatty acids in animals and microorganisms, is present in plants but its mode of implication in lipid metabolism and development remains to be determined. In order to investigate the biological function of carnitine in Arabidopsis, we initiated a bioinformatic search for enzymes that could be involved in its synthesis in order to obtain mutants with a reduced carnitine content. Serine hydroxymethyl transferases (SHMT), threonine ...

  10. Highlights of meiotic genes in Arabidopsis thaliana | Consiglio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meiosis is a fascinating and complex phenomenon and, despite its central role in sexual plant reproduction, little is known on the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. We review the progress made in recent years using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for isolating meiotic genes. In particular, emphasis is given on ...

  11. Antioxidant compounds and their bioaccessibility in tomato fruit and puree obtained from a DETIOLATED-1 (DET-1) down-regulated genetically modified genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talens, P; Mora, L; Bramley, Peter M; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-12-15

    The economic value, the ease of cultivation and processing, and the well-known health-promoting properties of tomato fruit, make the tomato an important target for genetic manipulation to increase its nutritional content. A transgenic variety, down-regulated in the DETIOLATED-1 (DET-1) gene, has been studied in comparison with the parental line, for antioxidant levels in fresh and hot break fruit, as well as the bioaccessibility of antioxidants from puree. Differences in the concentrations of antioxidants between the wild-type and the genetically modified raw tomatoes were confirmed, but antioxidant levels were maintained to a greater extent in the GM puree than in the parent. The bioaccessibility of the compounds, tested using an in vitro digestion model, showed an increase in the genetically modified samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Discovery of New 2-[(4,6-Dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)oxy]-6-(substituted phenoxy)benzoic Acids as Flexible Inhibitors of Arabidopsis thaliana Acetohydroxyacid Synthase and Its P197L Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ren-Yu; Yang, Jing-Fang; Devendar, Ponnam; Kang, Wei-Ming; Liu, Yu-Chao; Chen, Qiong; Niu, Cong-Wei; Xi, Zhen; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2017-12-27

    In the search for new antiresistance acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, EC 2.2.1.6) inhibitors to combat weed resistance associated with AHAS mutations, a series of 2-[(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)oxy]-6-(substituted phenoxy)benzoic acids 11-38 were designed and synthesized via the strategy of conformational flexibility analysis. Compounds 21, 22, 26, 33, 36, and 38 with high potency against both wild-type AtAHAS and its P197L mutant were identified as promising candidates with low resistance factors (RF, defined as the ratio between the ki values toward P197L mutant and wild-type AHAS) ranging from 0.73 to 6.32. Especially, compound 22 (RF = 0.73) was further identified as the most potent antiresistance AHAS inhibitor because of its significantly reduced resistance level compared with that of tribenuron-methyl (RF = 2650) and bispyribac (RF = 4.57). Furthermore, compounds 26, 33, 36, and 38 also displayed promising herbicidal activities against sensitive and resistant (P197L) Descurainia sophia at the dosage of 75-150 g of active ingredient (ai)/ha. Notably, compounds 33 and 38 still maintained over 60% herbicidal activity toward the resistant weed even at much lower dosages (37.5 g ai/ha). Therefore, the designed scaffold has the great potential to discover new candidate compounds for the control of weed resistance associated with AHAS mutation.

  13. CB5C affects the glucosinolate profile in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vik, Daniel; Crocoll, Christoph; Andersen, Tonni Grube

    2016-01-01

    proteins support the cytochrome P450 enzymes of plant specialized metabolism and found CB5C from Arabidopsis thaliana to co-express with glucosinolate biosynthetic genes. We characterized the glucosinolate profiles of two T-DNA insertion mutants of CB5C, and found that long-chained aliphatic glucosinolates...... were reduced in one of the mutant lines - a phenotype that was exaggerated upon methyl-jasmonate treatment. These results support the hypothesis, that CB5C influences glucosinolate biosynthesis, however, the mode of action remains unknown. Furthermore, the mutants differed in their biomass response...

  14. ATM mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. ATM mutants. ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated). AT2BE and AT5B1 cells – fibroblast cell lines from Ataxia telangiectasia patients. Deletion mutants expressing truncated ATM protein which is inactive. Have been used in studies looking at the role of ATM in DNA damage ...

  15. Functional detection of chemopreventive glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross; Dalebout; Grubb; Abel

    2000-11-06

    Natural isothiocyanates, derived from glucosinolates by myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis, are potent chemopreventive agents that favorably modify carcinogen metabolism in mammals by inhibiting metabolic activation of carcinogens and/or by inducing carcinogen-detoxifying enzymes. Methylsulfinylalkyl isothiocyanates are potent selective inducers of mammalian Phase 2 detoxification enzymes such as quinone reductase [NADP(H):quinone-acceptor oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.99.2]. Members of the Cruciferae family, including the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heyhn, synthesize methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. We have adapted a colorimetric bioassay for quinone reductase activity in Hepa 1c1c7 murine hepatoma cells as a versatile tool to rapidly monitor methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate content in A. thaliana leaf extracts. Using wild type plants and mutant plants defective in the synthesis of 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate (glucoraphanin), we have demonstrated that A. thaliana (ecotype Columbia) is a rich source of Phase 2 enzyme inducers and that methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, predominantly glucoraphanin, account for about 80% of the quinone reductase inducer potency of Columbia leaf extracts. We have optimized leaf extraction conditions and the quinone reductase bioassay to allow for screening of large numbers of plant extracts in a molecular genetic approach to dissecting glucosinolate biosynthesis in A. thaliana.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  17. The late flowering phenotype of fwa mutants is caused by gain-of-function epigenetic alleles of a homeodomain gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soppe, W.J.J.; Jacobsen, S.E.; Alonso-Blanco, C.; Jackson, J.P.; Kakutani, T.; Koornneef, M.; Peeters, A.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The transition to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana is delayed in fwa mutant plants. FWA was identified by loss-of-function mutations in normally flowering revertants of the fwa mutant, and it encodes a homeodomain-containing transcription factor. The DNA sequence of wild-type and fwa mutant alleles

  18. The genetics of some planthormones and photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the isolation and characterization in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. of induced mutants, deficient for gibberellins (GA's), abscisic acid (ABA) and photoreceptors.

    These compounds are known to regulate various facets of plant growth and

  19. Human GLTP and mutant forms of ACD11 suppress cell death in the Arabidopsis acd11 mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; McKinney, Lea V; Pike, Helen

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis acd11 mutant exhibits runaway, programmed cell death due to the loss of a putative sphingosine transfer protein (ACD11) with homology to mammalian GLTP. We demonstrate that transgenic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of human GLTP partially suppressed the phenotype of the acd11...

  20. Functional diversification of thylakoidal processing peptidases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chi Hsu

    Full Text Available Thylakoidal processing peptidase (TPP is responsible for removing amino-terminal thylakoid-transfer signals from several proteins in the thylakoid lumen. Three TPP isoforms are encoded by the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies showed that one of them termed plastidic type I signal peptidase 1 (Plsp1 was necessary for processing three thylakoidal proteins and one protein in the chloroplast envelope in vivo. The lack of Plsp1 resulted in seedling lethality, apparently due to disruption of proper thylakoid development. The physiological roles of the other two TPP homologs remain unknown. Here we show that the three A. thaliana TPP isoforms evolved to acquire diverse functions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TPP may have originated before the endosymbiotic event, and that there are two groups of TPP in seed plants: one includes Plsp1 and another comprises the other two A. thaliana TPP homologs, which are named as Plsp2A and Plsp2B in this study. The duplication leading to the two groups predates the gymnosperm-angiosperm divergence, and the separation of Plsp2A and Plsp2B occurred after the Malvaceae-Brassicaceae diversification. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed that the two PLSP2 genes were co-expressed in both photosynthetic tissues and roots, whereas the PLSP1 transcript accumulated predominantly in photosynthetic tissues. Both PLSP2 genes were expressed in the aerial parts of the plsp1-null mutant at levels comparable to those in wild-type plants. The seedling-lethal phenotype of the plsp1-null mutant could be rescued by a constitutive expression of Plsp1 cDNA but not by that of Plsp2A or Plsp2B. These results indicate that Plsp1 and Plsp2 evolved to function differently, and that neither of the Plsp2 isoforms is necessary for proper thylakoid development in photosynthetic tissues.

  1. Transposon diversity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang Hien; Wright, Stephen; Yu, Zhihui; Bureau, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Recent availability of extensive genome sequence information offers new opportunities to analyze genome organization, including transposon diversity and accumulation, at a level of resolution that was previously unattainable. In this report, we used sequence similarity search and analysis protocols to perform a fine-scale analysis of a large sample (≈17.2 Mb) of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia) genome for transposons. Consistent with previous studies, we report that the A. thaliana genome harbors diverse representatives of most known superfamilies of transposons. However, our survey reveals a higher density of transposons of which over one-fourth could be classified into a single novel transposon family designated as Basho, which appears unrelated to any previously known superfamily. We have also identified putative transposase-coding ORFs for miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), providing clues into the mechanism of mobility and origins of the most abundant transposons associated with plant genes. In addition, we provide evidence that most mined transposons have a clear distribution preference for A + T-rich sequences and show that structural variation for many mined transposons is partly due to interelement recombination. Taken together, these findings further underscore the complexity of transposons within the compact genome of A. thaliana. PMID:10861007

  2. Constitutive overexpression of the pollen specific gene SKS13 in leaves reduces aphid performance on Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhao; Visser, Richard G F; Vosman, Ben; Broekgaarden, Colette

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plants have developed a variety of mechanisms to counteract aphid attacks. They activate their defences by changing the expression of specific genes. Previously we identified an activation tag mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana on which Myzus persicae population development was reduced.

  3. Blue light-induced apoplastic acidification of Arabidopsis thaliana guard cells : Inhibition by ABA is mediated through protein phosphatases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfsema, MRG; Staal, M; Prins, HBA

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits blue light-induced apoplastic acidification of guard cells. The signal transduction pathway of ABA, mediating this response, was studied using ABA-insensitive (abi) mutants of Arapidopsis thaliana. Apoplastic acidification was monitored with a flat

  4. Root hair defective4 encodes a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate phosphatase required for proper root hair development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.M.; Vermeer, J.E.M.; Zhang, Y.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Nielsen, E.

    2008-01-01

    Polarized expansion of root hair cells in Arabidopsis thaliana is improperly controlled in root hair-defective rhd4-1 mutant plants, resulting in root hairs that are shorter and randomly form bulges along their length. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy in rhd4-1 root hairs, we analyzed

  5. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  6. Photosynthetic entrainment of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Michael J; Mielczarek, Olga; Robertson, Fiona C; Hubbard, Katharine E; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-10-31

    Circadian clocks provide a competitive advantage in an environment that is heavily influenced by the rotation of the Earth, by driving daily rhythms in behaviour, physiology and metabolism in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. Circadian clocks comprise transcription-translation feedback loops, which are entrained by environmental signals such as light and temperature to adjust the phase of rhythms to match the local environment. The production of sugars by photosynthesis is a key metabolic output of the circadian clock in plants. Here we show that these rhythmic, endogenous sugar signals can entrain circadian rhythms in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating the gene expression of circadian clock components early in the photoperiod, thus defining a 'metabolic dawn'. By inhibiting photosynthesis, we demonstrate that endogenous oscillations in sugar levels provide metabolic feedback to the circadian oscillator through the morning-expressed gene PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 7 (PRR7), and we identify that prr7 mutants are insensitive to the effects of sucrose on the circadian period. Thus, photosynthesis has a marked effect on the entrainment and maintenance of robust circadian rhythms in A. thaliana, demonstrating that metabolism has a crucial role in regulation of the circadian clock.

  7. The Arabidopsis male-sterile mutant dde2-2 is defective in the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE gene encoding one of the key enzymes of the jasmonic acid biosynthesis pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Malek, Bernadette; van der Graaff, Eric; Schneitz, Kay

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. mutant delayed-dehiscence2-2 (dde2-2) was identified in an En1/Spm1 transposon-induced mutant population screened for plants showing defects in fertility. The dde2-2 mutant allele is defective in the anther dehiscence process and filament elongation and thus e...

  8. Cadmium-induced changes in vacuolar aspects of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shanti S; Yamamoto, Kotaro; Hamaji, Kohei; Ohnishi, Miwa; Anegawa, Aya; Sharma, Shashi; Thakur, Sveta; Kumar, Vijay; Uemura, Tomohiro; Nakano, Akihiko; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2017-05-01

    We have examined the changes due to Cd treatment in the vacuolar form in root tip cortical cells in Arabidopsis thaliana employing a transformant with GFP fused to a tonoplast protein. A Cd-induced enhancement in complexity with general expansion of vacuolar system within 24 h was evident. The changes in the vacuolar form were dependent on the applied Cd concentrations. Concomitantly, as revealed through dithizone staining, Cd accumulated in the seedling roots exhibiting abundance of Cd-dithizone complexes in root tip, root hairs and vasculature. To get insight into the involvement of SNARE protein-mediated vesicle fusion in Cd detoxification, the magnitude of Cd toxicity in a couple of knock out mutants of the vacuolar Qa-SNARE protein VAM3/SYP22 was compared with that in the wild type. The Cd toxicity appeared to be comparable in the mutants and the wild type. In order to analyze the Cd effects at cellular level, we treated the Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells with Cd. Cd, however, did not induce a change in the vacuolar form in suspension-cultured cells although Cd measured with ICP-MS was obviously taken up into the cell. The V-ATPase activity in the microsomal fractions from vacuoles isolated from A. thaliana suspension cultured cells remained unaffected by Cd. Changes in the levels of certain metabolites of Cd-treated cells were also not so distinct except for those of glutathione. The significance of findings is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Variation of 45S rDNA intergenic spacers in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlová, Kateřina; Dvořáčková, Martina; Peiro, Ramon; Abia, David; Mozgová, Iva; Vansáčová, Lenka; Gutierrez, Crisanto; Fajkus, Jiří

    2016-11-01

    Approximately seven hundred 45S rRNA genes (rDNA) in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are organised in two 4 Mbp-long arrays of tandem repeats arranged in head-to-tail fashion separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS). These arrays make up 5 % of the A. thaliana genome. IGS are rapidly evolving sequences and frequent rearrangements inside the rDNA loci have generated considerable interspecific and even intra-individual variability which allows to distinguish among otherwise highly conserved rRNA genes. The IGS has not been comprehensively described despite its potential importance in regulation of rDNA transcription and replication. Here we describe the detailed sequence variation in the complete IGS of A. thaliana WT plants and provide the reference/consensus IGS sequence, as well as genomic DNA analysis. We further investigate mutants dysfunctional in chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) (fas1 and fas2 mutants), which are known to have a reduced number of rDNA copies, and plant lines with restored CAF-1 function (segregated from a fas1xfas2 genetic background) showing major rDNA rearrangements. The systematic rDNA loss in CAF-1 mutants leads to the decreased variability of the IGS and to the occurrence of distinct IGS variants. We present for the first time a comprehensive and representative set of complete IGS sequences, obtained by conventional cloning and by Pacific Biosciences sequencing. Our data expands the knowledge of the A. thaliana IGS sequence arrangement and variability, which has not been available in full and in detail until now. This is also the first study combining IGS sequencing data with RFLP analysis of genomic DNA.

  10. Comparison of lignin deposition in three ectopic lignification mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Louisa A; Dubos, Christian; Surman, Christine; Willment, Janet; Cullis, Ian F; Mansfield, Shawn D; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2005-10-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana mutants de-etiolated3 (det3), pom-pom1 (pom1) and ectopic lignification1 (eli1) all deposit lignins in cells where these polymers would not normally be found. Comparison of these mutants provides an opportunity to determine if the shared mutant phenotype arose by perturbing a common regulatory mechanism in each of the mutants. The mutants were compared using a combination of genetics, histochemistry, chemical profiling, transcript profiling using both Northern blots and microarrays, and bioinformatics. The subset of cells that ectopically lignified was shared between all three mutants, but clear differences in cell wall chemistry were evident between the mutants. Northern blot analysis of lignin biosynthetic genes over diurnal and circadian cycles revealed that transcript abundance of several key genes was clearly altered in all three mutants. Microarray analysis suggests that changes in the expression of specific members of the R2R3-MYB and Dof transcription factor families may contribute to the ectopic lignification phenotypes. This comparative analysis provides a suite of hypotheses that can be tested to examine the control of lignin biosynthesis.

  11. Clearance of mutant huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, He; Li, Shihua

    2010-07-01

    Mutant huntingtin (htt) carries an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat (> 36 glutamines) in its N-terminal region, which leads htt to become misfolded and kill neuronal cells in Huntington disease (HD). The cytotoxicity of N-terminal mutant htt fragments is evident by severe neurological phenotypes of transgenic mice that express these htt fragments. Clearance of mutant htt is primarily mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasomal sysmtem (UPS) and autophagy. However, the relative efficiency of these two systems to remove toxic forms of mutant htt has not been rigorously compared. Using cellular and mouse models of HD, we found that inhibiting the UPS leads to a greater accumulation of mutant htt than inhibiting autophagy. Moreover, N-terminal mutant htt fragments, but not full-length mutant htt, accumulate in the HD mouse brains after inhibiting the UPS. These findings suggest that the UPS is more efficient than autophagy to remove N-terminal mutant htt.

  12. Expression and developmental function of the 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase2 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakozaki, Hirokazu; Park, Jong-In; Endo, Makoto; Takada, Yoshinobu; Kazama, Tomohiko; Takeda, Yoshimitsu; Suzuki, Go; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, Makiko; Watanabe, Masao

    2008-04-01

    The 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) II is a fatty-acid-related enzyme which catalyzes the elongation of 16:0-acyl carrier protein (ACP) to 18:0-ACP in plastids. The fatty acid biosynthesis 1-1 (fab1-1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is partially deficient in its activity of Arabidopsis thaliana 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase 2 (AtKAS2), and its phenotype has been intensively studied in connection with the chilling resistance and fatty acid composition. In this study, we used the T-DNA insertion mutant of AtKAS2 to examine its possible role in plant development. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR showed that the AtKAS2 gene was expressed in various plant organs, except for roots, and was highly expressed in siliques. The fusion of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) to the AtKAS2 promoter demonstrated that the promoter was active in various tissues such as embryos, stomatal guard cells, inflorescences and pollen grains. We were not able to identify atkas2 homozygous mutant adult plants in heterozygous mutant progeny. Phenotypic and genetic analyses showed that disruption of the AtKAS2 by T-DNA insertion caused embryo lethality, and the development of the embryos was arrested at the globular stage. Taken together, our results suggest that AtKAS2 is required for embryo development in Arabidopsis during the transition from the globular to the heart stage.

  13. A Simple and Powerful Approach for Isolation of Arabidopsis Mutants with Increased Tolerance to H2O2-Induced Cell Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko; Mehterov, Nikolay; Denev, Iliya; Hille, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A genetic approach is described to isolate mutants more tolerant to oxidative stress. A collection of T-DNA activation tag Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines was screened for survivors under conditions that trigger H2O2-induced cell death. Oxidative stress was induced by applying the catalase (CAT)

  14. Isolation of mutations affecting the development of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, G; McKown, R; Marin, A L; Teutonico, R

    1996-08-01

    We screened for mutations deleterious to the freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. ecotype Columbia. Tolerance was assayed by the vigor and regrowth of intact plants after cold acclimation and freezing. From a chemically mutagenized population, we obtained 13 lines of mutants with highly penetrant phenotypes. In 5 of these, freezing sensitivity was attributable to chilling injury sustained during cold acclimation, but in the remaining 8 lines, the absence of injury prior to freezing suggested that they were affected specifically in the development of freezing tolerance. In backcrosses, freezing sensitivity from each line segregated as a single nuclear mutation. Complementation tests indicated that the 8 lines contained mutations in 7 different genes. The mutants' freezing sensitivity was also detectable in the leakage of electrolytes from frozen leaves. However, 1 mutant line that displayed a strong phenotype at the whole-plant level showed a relatively weak phenotype by the electrolyte leakage assay.

  15. Responses to Iron-Deficiency in Arabidopsis-Thaliana - The Turbo Iron Reductase does not depend on the Formation of Root Hairs and Transfer Cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moog, P.R.; Van der Kooij, T.A.W.; Bruggemann, W.; Schiefelbein, J.W.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia wild type and a root hair-less mutant RM57 were grown on iron-containing and iron-deficient nutrient solutions. In both genotypes, ferric chelate reductase (FCR) of intact roots was induced upon iron deficiency and followed a Michaelis-Menten kinetic with a

  16. Overexpression of IRM1 enhances resistance to aphids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhao; Visser, Richard G F; Broekgaarden, Colette; Vosman, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Aphids are insects that cause direct damage to crops by the removal of phloem sap, but more importantly they spread devastating viruses. Aphids use their sophisticated mouthpart (i.e. stylet) to feed from the phloem sieve elements of the host plant. To identify genes that affect host plant resistance to aphids, we previously screened an Arabidopsis thaliana activation tag mutant collection. In such mutants, tagged genes are overexpressed by a strong 35S enhancer adjacent to the natural promoter, resulting in a dominant gain-of-function phenotype. We previously identified several of these mutants on which the aphid Myzus persicae showed a reduced population development compared with wild type. In the present study we show that the gene responsible for the phenotype of one of the mutants is At5g65040 and named this gene Increased Resistance to Myzus persicae 1 (IRM1). Overexpression of the cloned IRM1 gene conferred a phenotype identical to that of the original mutant. Conversely, an IRM1 knockout mutant promoted aphid population development compared to the wild type. We performed Electrical Penetration Graph analysis to investigate how probing and feeding behaviour of aphids was affected on plants that either overexpressed IRM1 or contained a knockout mutation in this gene. The EPG results indicated that the aphids encounter resistance factors while reaching for the phloem on the overexpressing line. This resistance mechanism also affected other aphid species and is suggested to be of mechanical nature. Interestingly, genetic variation for IRM1 expression in response to aphid attack was observed. Upon aphid attack the expression of IRM1 was initially (after 6 hours) induced in ecotype Wassilewskija followed by suppression. In Columbia-0, IRM1 expression was already suppressed six hours after the start of the infestation. The resistance conferred by the overexpression of IRM1 in A. thaliana trades off with plant growth.

  17. Overexpression of IRM1 enhances resistance to aphids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    Full Text Available Aphids are insects that cause direct damage to crops by the removal of phloem sap, but more importantly they spread devastating viruses. Aphids use their sophisticated mouthpart (i.e. stylet to feed from the phloem sieve elements of the host plant. To identify genes that affect host plant resistance to aphids, we previously screened an Arabidopsis thaliana activation tag mutant collection. In such mutants, tagged genes are overexpressed by a strong 35S enhancer adjacent to the natural promoter, resulting in a dominant gain-of-function phenotype. We previously identified several of these mutants on which the aphid Myzus persicae showed a reduced population development compared with wild type. In the present study we show that the gene responsible for the phenotype of one of the mutants is At5g65040 and named this gene Increased Resistance to Myzus persicae 1 (IRM1. Overexpression of the cloned IRM1 gene conferred a phenotype identical to that of the original mutant. Conversely, an IRM1 knockout mutant promoted aphid population development compared to the wild type. We performed Electrical Penetration Graph analysis to investigate how probing and feeding behaviour of aphids was affected on plants that either overexpressed IRM1 or contained a knockout mutation in this gene. The EPG results indicated that the aphids encounter resistance factors while reaching for the phloem on the overexpressing line. This resistance mechanism also affected other aphid species and is suggested to be of mechanical nature. Interestingly, genetic variation for IRM1 expression in response to aphid attack was observed. Upon aphid attack the expression of IRM1 was initially (after 6 hours induced in ecotype Wassilewskija followed by suppression. In Columbia-0, IRM1 expression was already suppressed six hours after the start of the infestation. The resistance conferred by the overexpression of IRM1 in A. thaliana trades off with plant growth.

  18. Accumulation of the coumarin scopolin under abiotic stress conditions is mediated by the Arabidopsis thaliana THO/TREX complex

    KAUST Repository

    Döll, Stefanie

    2017-12-09

    Secondary metabolites are involved in the plant stress response. Among these are scopolin and its active form scopoletin, which are coumarin derivatives associated with reactive oxygen species scavenging and pathogen defence. Here we show that scopolin accumulation can be induced in the root by osmotic stress and in the leaf by low-temperature stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. A genetic screen for altered scopolin levels in A. thaliana revealed a mutant compromised in scopolin accumulation in response to stress; the lesion was present in a homologue of THO1 coding for a subunit of the THO/TREX complex. The THO/TREX complex contributes to RNA silencing, supposedly by trafficking precursors of small RNAs. Mutants defective in THO, AGO1, SDS3 and RDR6 were impaired with respect to scopolin accumulation in response to stress, suggesting a mechanism based on RNA silencing such as the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway, which requires THO/TREX function.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldol...

  20. Epistasis × environment interactions among Arabidopsis thaliana glucosinolate genes impact complex traits and fitness in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerwin, Rachel E.; Feusier, Julie; Muok, Alise

    2017-01-01

    (GSL) defense chemistry, leaf damage, and relative fitness using mutant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana varying at pairs of causal aliphatic GSL defense genes to test the impact of epistatic and epistasis × environment interactions on adaptive trait variation. We found that aliphatic GSL accumulation......Despite the growing number of studies showing that genotype × environment and epistatic interactions control fitness, the influences of epistasis × environment interactions on adaptive trait evolution remain largely uncharacterized. Across three field trials, we quantified aliphatic glucosinolate...

  1. The powdery mildew-resistant Arabidopsis mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant displays altered infection phenotypes with diverse types of phytopathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo-Garcia, Johanna; Gruner, Katrin; Kusch, Stefan; Kuhn, Hannah Randi; Panstruga, Ralph; Reinstädler, Anja; Kemen, Ariane; Kemen, Eric; Cao, Lingxue; Frank L.W. Takken; Reitz, Marco U.; Schäfer, Patrick; O’Connell, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant plants exhibit complete immunity against infection by otherwise virulent obligate biotrophic powdery mildew fungi such as Golovinomyces orontii. While this phenotype is well documented, the interaction profile of the triple mutant with other microbes is underexplored and incomplete. Here, we thoroughly assessed and quantified the infection phenotypes of two independent powdery mildew-resistant triple mutant lines with a range of microbes. The...

  2. Low Temperature Induces the Accumulation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase mRNA in Arabidopsis thaliana, a Chilling-Tolerant Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, J. A.; Leyva, A.; Salinas, J.; Martinez-Zapater, J. M.

    1993-03-01

    mRNA encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) increases in etiolated seedlings and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. upon exposure to low temperature. The analysis of this response after water stress and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments in Arabidopsis wild type and ABA-deficient and -insensitive mutants indicates that cold accumulation of ADH mRNA could be induced by both anaerobic metabolism and increase of ABA concentration resulting from low temperature exposure. By using one Arabidopsis ADH null mutant, we show that ADH activity is not required for successful development of freezing tolerance in this species.

  3. Exogenous auxin-induced NO synthesis is nitrate reductase-associated in Arabidopsis thaliana root primordia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Bartha, Bernadett; Erdei, László

    2008-06-16

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions in various physiological and developmental processes in plants. However, the source of this signaling molecule in the diversity of plant responses is not well understood. It is known that NO mediates auxin-induced adventitious and lateral root (LR) formation. In this paper, we provide genetic and pharmacological evidence that the production of NO is associated with the nitrate reductase (NR) enzyme during indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-induced lateral root development in Arabidopsis thaliana L. NO production was detected using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) in the NR-deficient nia1, nia2 and Atnoa1 (former Atnos1) mutants of A. thaliana. An inhibitor for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) was applied. Our data clearly show that IBA increased LR frequency in the wild-type plant and the LR initials emitted intensive NO-dependent fluorescence of the triazol product of NO and DAF-2DA. Increased levels of NO were restricted only to the LR initials in contrast to primary root (PR) sections, where NO remained at the control level. The mutants had different NO levels in their control state (i.e. without IBA treatment): nia1, nia2 showed lower NO fluorescence than Atnoa1 or the wild-type plant. The role of NR in IBA-induced NO formation in the wild type was shown by the zero effects of the NOS inhibitors l-NMMA. Finally, it was clearly demonstrated that IBA was able to induce NO generation in both the wild-type and Atnoa1 plants, but failed to induce NO in the NR-deficient mutant. It is concluded that the IBA-induced NO production is nitrate reductase-associated during lateral root development in A. thaliana.

  4. Ozone-Sensitive Arabidopsis Mutants with Deficiencies in Photorespiratory Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Shoko; Bathula, Srinivas; Kubo, Akihiro; Tamaoki, Masanori; Aono, Mitsuko; Sano, Tomoharu; Tobe, Kazuo; Timm, Stefan; Bauwe, Hermann; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Saji, Hikaru

    2017-05-01

    An ozone-sensitive mutant was isolated from T-DNA-tagged lines of Arabidopsis thaliana. The T-DNA was inserted at a locus on chromosome 3, where two genes encoding glycolate oxidases, GOX1 and GOX2, peroxisomal enzymes involved in photorespiration, reside contiguously. The amounts of the mutant's foliar transcripts for these genes were reduced, and glycolate oxidase activity was approximately 60% of that of the wild-type plants. No difference in growth and appearance was observed between the mutant and the wild-type plants under normal conditions with ambient air under a light intensity of 100 µmol photons m-2 s-1. However, signs of severe damage, such as chlorosis and ion leakage from the tissue, rapidly appeared in mutant leaves in response to ozone treatment at a concentration of 0.2 µl l-1 under a higher light intensity of 350 µmol photons m-2 s-1 that caused no such symptoms in the wild-type plant. The mutant also exhibited sensitivity to sulfur dioxide and long-term high-intensity light. Arabidopsis mutants with deficiencies in other photorespiratory enzymes such as glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase and hydroxypyruvate reductase also exhibited ozone sensitivities. Therefore, photorespiration appears to be involved in protection against photooxidative stress caused by ozone and other abiotic factors under high-intensity light. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Functional loss of GABA transaminase (GABA-T expressed early leaf senescence under various stress conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Syed Uzma Jalil

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available GABA-transaminase (GABA-T involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism during the plant development process via GABA shunt and GABA-T mutant, which is defective in GABA catabolism, is ideal model to examine the role of GABA-T in plant development and leaf senescence of plant. We have characterized GABA transaminase knock out mutant pop2-1 that is transition and pop2-3 which is T-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana during various stress conditions.The GABA-T knockout mutant plants displayed precocious leaf senescence, which was accompanied by the assays of physiological parameters of leaf senescence during various stress conditions. Furthermore, our physiological evidence indicates that pop2-1 and pop2-3 mutations rapidly decreased the efficiency of leaf photosynthesis, chlorophyll content, GABA content, GABA-T, and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD activity and on the other hand increases membrane ion leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA level in stress induced leaves. However, cell viability assay by trypan blue and insitu Hydrogen peroxidation assay by 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB in stress induced leaves also display that pop2-1 and pop2-3 mutant leaves show oversensitivity in response to different stress conditions as compared to wild type. These results strongly indicate that the loss-of-function of GABA transaminase gene induces early leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana during various stress conditions.

  6. The REIL1 and REIL2 Proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana Are Required for Leaf Growth in the Cold1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stefanie; Dethloff, Frederik; Beine-Golovchuk, Olga; Kopka, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved proteins REI1-LIKE (REIL1) and REIL2 have four conserved zinc finger domains and are Arabidopsis thaliana homologs of the cytosolic 60S ribosomal maturation factor Rei1p (for Required for isotropic bud growth1 protein) from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and its paralog Reh1p (for REI1 homologue1 protein). The yeast and A. thaliana paralogs result from independent gene duplications. The A. thaliana REIL paralogs are required specifically in the cold (10°C) but not for growth at optimal temperature (20°C). A reil1-1 reil2-1 double mutant is arrested at 10°C prior to the emergence of the first rosette leaf. Two allelic reil2 mutants, reil2-1 and reil2-2, form small spoon-shaped leaves at 10°C. This phenomenon reverts after emergence of the inflorescence in the cold or upon shift to 20°C. Except for a slightly delayed germination, a reil1-1 mutant shows no further growth phenotype under the currently investigated conditions. A comparative analysis demonstrates conserved coexpression of orthologous genes from yeast and A. thaliana that are coregulated with yeast rei1 or with A. thaliana REIL2, respectively. The conserved correlations point to a role of A. thaliana REIL proteins in the maturation of the eukaryotic ribosomal 60S subunit. We support this conclusion by heterologous complementation of the cold-induced growth defect of the yeast Δrei1 deletion. PMID:24038679

  7. The Arabidopsis defence response mutant esa1 as a tool to discover novel resistance traits against Fusarium diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemelrijck, van W.; Wouters, P.F.J.; Brouwer, M.; Windelinckx, A.; Goderis, I.J.W.M.; Bolle, De M.F.C.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Cammue, B.P.A.; Delauré, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant esa1 was previously shown to exhibit enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Alternaria brassicicola, Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina. In this work, we tried to elaborate on this susceptibility by investigating whether the esa1

  8. Human Norovirus and Its Surrogates Induce Plant Immune Response in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markland, Sarah M; Bais, Harsh; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2017-08-01

    Human norovirus is the leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide with the majority of outbreaks linked to fresh produce and leafy greens. It is essential that we thoroughly understand the type of relationship and interactions that take place between plants and human norovirus to better utilize control strategies to reduce transmission of norovirus in the field onto plants harvested for human consumption. In this study the expression of gene markers for the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) plant defense pathways was measured and compared in romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants that were inoculated with Murine Norovirus-1, Tulane Virus, human norovirus GII.4, or Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (control). Genes involving both the SA and JA pathways were expressed in both romaine lettuce and A. thaliana for all three viruses, as well as controls. Studies, including gene expression of SA- and JA-deficient A. thaliana mutant lines, suggest that the JA pathway is more likely involved in the plant immune response to human norovirus. This research provides the first pieces of information regarding how foodborne viruses interact with plants in the preharvest environment.

  9. PARVUS affects aluminium sensitivity by modulating the structure of glucuronoxylan in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Wan, Jiang Xue; Wu, Qi; Zhao, Xu Sheng; Zheng, Shao Jian; Shen, Ren Fang

    2017-09-01

    Glucuronoxylan (GX), an important component of hemicellulose in the cell wall, appears to affect aluminium (Al) sensitivity in plants. To investigate the role of GX in cell-wall-localized xylan, we examined the Arabidopsis thaliana parvus mutant in detail. This mutant lacks α-D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains in GX and has greater resistance to Al stress than wild-type (WT) plants. The parvus mutant accumulated lower levels of Al in its roots and cell walls than WT despite having cell wall pectin content and pectin methylesterase (PME) activity similar to those of WT. Our results suggest that the altered properties of hemicellulose in the mutant contribute to its decreased Al accumulation. Although we observed almost no differences in hemicellulose content between parvus and WT under control conditions, less Al was retained in parvus hemicellulose than in WT. This observation is consistent with the finding that GlcA substitutions in WT GX, but not mutant GX, were increased under Al stress. Taken together, these results suggest that the modulation of GlcA levels in GX affects Al resistance by influencing the Al binding capacity of the root cell wall in Arabidopsis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Long-chain base kinase1 affects freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Yiting

    2017-06-01

    Long-chain base kinases (LCBKs) phosphorylate sphingolipid-derived long-chain base lipids and participate in the regulation of stress responses in plants. Here, we isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, lcbk1-2, which was extremely sensitive to freezing temperatures with or without cold acclimation. Physiological assays revealed that concentrations of osmolytes (proline and soluble sugars) and the activity of superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased in the lcbk1-2 mutant, compared with wild type. Also, the balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was disrupted in the lcbk1-2 mutant with or without cold treatment and, consistent with this, gene expression profiling analysis showed that the expression of cold-responsive ROS-scavenging genes was substantially decreased in the lcbk1-2 mutant. The expression of membrane lipid-related genes, which are linked to freezing tolerance in plants, was also impaired in the lcbk1-2 mutant. Furthermore, transgenic lines overexpressing LCBK1 showed enhanced freezing tolerance with over-accumulation of osmolytes. Collectively, our results suggested that LCBK1 functions as a novel positive regulator of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis and may participate in the accumulation of osmolytes, the regulation of ROS homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Loss of Necrotic Spotted Lesions 1 associates with cell death and defense responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Kuromori, Takashi; Wada, Takuji; Hirayama, Takashi; Kamiya, Asako; Imura, Yuko; Yasuda, Michiko; Nakashita, Hideo; Shirasu, Ken; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2006-09-01

    We isolated a lesion mimic mutant, necrotic spotted lesions 1 (nsl1), from Ds-tagged Arabidopsis thaliana accession No-0. The nsl1 mutant exhibits a growth retardation phenotype and develops spotted necrotic lesions on its rosette and cauline leaves. These phenotypes occur in the absence of pathogens indicating that nsl1 mutants may constitutively express defense responses. Consistent with this idea, nsl1 accumulates high levels of callose and autofluorescent phenolic compounds localized to the necrotic lesions. Furthermore RNA gel blot analysis revealed that genes associated with disease resistance activation are upregulated in the nsl1 mutants and these plants contain elevated levels of salicylic acid (SA). Crossing nsl1 with an SA deficient mutant, eds16-1, revealed that the nsl1 lesions and growth retardation are dependent upon SA. The nsl1 phenotypes are not suppressed under either the rar1-10 or sgt1b-1 genetic background. NSL1 encodes a novel 612aa protein which contains a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain, which is conserved in bacteria, fungi, mammals and plants. The possible modes of action of NSL1 protein in negative regulation of cell death programs and defense responses are discussed.

  12. A New Anti-Aging Lysophosphatidic Acid from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujuan; Wang, Yanhui; Wang, Guangfa; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2017-02-09

    Aging is a risk factor of age-related diseases. With the increasing number of patients, serious consequences, and heavy economic burden, demands for drugs used to treat age-related diseases have increased. As such, anti-aging substances should be isolated to develop drugs for the prevention and treatment of age-related diseases. In this study, a methanol extract of immature Arabidopsis thaliana seeds with coat was separated by using a K6001 yeast bioassay system. In order to investigate the action mechanism, four mutants, namely, Δuth1, Δskn7, Δsod1, and Δsod2 with K6001 background were employed and the anti-oxidative stress assay was performed. One new anti-aging lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was obtained, and its structural and stereochemical characteristics were elucidated through spectroscopy and chemical derivatization. LPA can extend the replicative lifespan of K6001 at 10 and 30 µM (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). This finding was comparable to the effect of resveratrol, a well-known anti-aging substance. However, the anti-aging activity of the compound on the four mutants was diminished. In the anti-oxidative stress assay, LPA improved the oxidative resistance of yeast cells. The new LPA may exert its anti-aging effect by improving the anti-oxidative ability of yeast cells. The genes of UTH1, SKN7, and SOD may also be involved in the action. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. A CMP-sialic acid transporter cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Hans; Routier, Françoise; Ashikov, Angel; Neumann, Detlef; Bosch, Dirk; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita

    2008-08-11

    Sialylation of glycans is ubiquitous in vertebrates, but was believed to be absent in plants, arthropods, and fungi. However, recently evidence has been provided for the presence of sialic acid in these evolutionary clades. In addition, homologs of mammalian genes involved in sialylation can be found in the genomes of these taxa and for some Drosophila enzymes, involvement in sialic acid metabolism has been documented. In plant genomes, homologs of sialyltransferase genes have been identified, but there activity could not be confirmed. Several mammalian cell lines exist with defects in the sialylation pathway. One of these is the Chinese hamster ovary cell line Lec2, deficient in CMP-sialic acid transport to the Golgi lumen. These mutants provide the possibility to clone genes by functional complementation. Using expression cloning, we have identified an Arabidopsis thaliana nucleotide sugar transporter that is able to complement the CMP-sialic acid transport deficiency of Lec2 cells. The isolated gene (At5g41760) is a member of the triose-phosphate/nucleotide sugar transporter gene family. Recombinant expression of the gene in yeast and testing in vitro confirmed its ability to transport CMP-sialic acid.

  14. Regulation of floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Ki; Larue, Clayton T; Chevalier, David; Wang, Huachun; Jinn, Tsung-Luo; Zhang, Shuqun; Walker, John C

    2008-10-07

    Abscission is a developmental program that results in the active shedding of infected or nonfunctional organs from a plant body. Here, we establish a signaling pathway that controls abscission in Arabidopsis thaliana from ligand, to receptors, to downstream effectors. Loss of function mutations in Inflorescence Deficient in Abscission (IDA), which encodes a predicted secreted small protein, the receptor-like protein kinases HAESA (HAE) and HAESA-like 2 (HSL2), the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4 (MKK4) and MKK5, and a dominant-negative form of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 6 (MPK6) in a mpk3 mutant background all have abscission-defective phenotypes. Conversely, expression of constitutively active MKKs rescues the abscission-defective phenotype of hae hsl2 and ida plants. Additionally, in hae hsl2 and ida plants, MAP kinase activity is reduced in the receptacle, the part of the stem that holds the floral organs. Plants overexpressing IDA in a hae hsl2 background have abscission defects, indicating HAE and HSL2 are epistatic to IDA. Taken together, these results suggest that the sequential action of IDA, HAE and HSL2, and a MAP kinase cascade regulates the programmed separation of cells in the abscission zone.

  15. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development, growth and defense. Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors, cysteine, glutamate, glycine and γ-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis. The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense. The aim of this study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0), plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant, wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine), and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis. Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine, glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol. A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments. These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) – the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis – causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells. PMID:22050910

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana gonidialess A/Zuotin related factors (GlsA/ZRF) are essential for maintenance of meristem integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-López, José Alfredo; Abraham-Juárez, María Jazmín; Lozano-Sotomayor, Paulina; de Folter, Stefan; Simpson, June

    2016-05-01

    Observation of a differential expression pattern, including strong expression in meristematic tissue of an Agave tequilana GlsA/ZRF ortholog suggested an important role for this gene during bulbil formation and developmental changes in this species. In order to better understand this role, the two GlsA/ZFR orthologs present in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana were functionally characterized by analyzing expression patterns, double mutant phenotypes, promoter-GUS fusions and expression of hormone related or meristem marker genes. Patterns of expression for A. thaliana show that GlsA/ZFR genes are strongly expressed in SAMs and RAMs in mature plants and developing embryos and double mutants showed multiple changes in morphology related to both SAM and RAM tissues. Typical double mutants showed stunted growth of aerial and root tissue, formation of multiple ectopic meristems and effects on cotyledons, leaves and flowers. The KNOX genes STM and BP were overexpressed in double mutants whereas CLV3, WUSCHEL and AS1 were repressed and lack of AtGlsA expression was also associated with changes in localization of auxin and cytokinin. These results suggest that GlsA/ZFR is an essential component of the machinery that maintains the integrity of SAM and RAM tissue and underline the potential to identify new genes or gene functions based on observations in non-model plants.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum models demonstrate that root colonization is an intrinsic trait of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Quist, J Cristian; O'Sullivan, Louise A; Desert, Annaëlle; Fivian-Hughes, Amanda S; Millet, Coralie; Jones, T Hefin; Weightman, Andrew J; Rogers, Hilary J; Berry, Colin; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-02-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria possess biotechnologically useful properties that contrast with their opportunistic pathogenicity. The rhizosphere fitness of Bcc bacteria is central to their biocontrol and bioremediation activities. However, it is not known whether this differs between species or between environmental and clinical strains. We investigated the ability of 26 Bcc strains representing nine different species to colonize the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum (pea). Viable counts, scanning electron microscopy and bioluminescence imaging were used to assess root colonization, with Bcc bacteria achieving mean (±sem) levels of 2.49±0.23×10(6) and 5.16±1.87×10(6) c.f.u. per centimetre of root on the A. thaliana and P. sativum models, respectively. The A. thaliana rhizocompetence model was able to reveal loss of colonization phenotypes in Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 transposon mutants that had only previously been observed in competition experiments on the P. sativum model. Different Bcc species colonized each plant model at different rates, and no statistical difference in root colonization was observed between isolates of clinical or environmental origin. Loss of the virulence-associated third chromosomal replicon (>1 Mb DNA) did not alter Bcc root colonization on A. thaliana. In summary, Bcc bacteria possess intrinsic root colonization abilities irrespective of their species or source. As Bcc rhizocompetence does not require their third chromosomal replicon, the possibility of using synthetic biology approaches to engineer virulence-attenuated biotechnological strains is tractable.

  18. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

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    Mari Narusaka

    Full Text Available Housaku Monogatari (HM is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods.

  19. Induction of Nickel Accumulation in Response to Zinc Deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Sho Nishida

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive accumulation of nickel (Ni can be toxic to plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Fe2+ transporter, iron (Fe-regulated transporter1 (IRT1, mediates Fe uptake and also implicates in Ni2+ uptake at roots; however, the underlying mechanism of Ni2+ uptake and accumulation remains unelucidated. In the present study, we found that zinc (Zn deficient conditions resulted in increased accumulation of Ni in plants, particularly in roots, in A. thaliana. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Ni uptake correlating zinc condition, we traced 63Ni isotope in response to Zn and found that (i Zn deficiency induces short-term Ni2+ absorption and (ii Zn2+ inhibits Ni2+ uptake, suggesting competitive uptake between Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the Zrt/Irt-like protein 3 (ZIP3-defective mutant with an elevated Zn-deficient response exhibited higher Ni accumulation than the wild type, further supporting that the response to Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation. Previously, expression profile study demonstrated that IRT1 expression is not inducible by Zn deficiency. In the present study, we found increased Ni accumulation in IRT1-null mutant under Zn deficiency in agar culture. These suggest that Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation in an IRT1-independen manner. The present study revealed that Ni accumulation is inducible in response to Zn deficiency, which may be attributable to a Zn uptake transporter induced by Zn deficiency.

  20. From dusk till dawn: the Arabidopsis thaliana sugar starving responsive network

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    Maria Cecilia Arias

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth and development are tightly controlled by photosynthetic carbon availability. The understanding of mechanisms governing carbon partitioning in plants will be a valuable tool in order to satisfy the rising global demand for food and biofuel. The goal of this study was to determine if sugar starvation responses were transcriptionally coordinated in Arabidopsis thaliana. A set of sugar-starvation responsive (SSR genes was selected to perform a co-expression network analysis. Posteriorly, a guided-gene approach was used to identify the SSR-network from public data and to discover candidate regulators of this network. In order to validate the SSR network, a global transcriptome analysis was realized on three A. thaliana starch-deficient mutants. The starch-deficient phenotype in leaves induces sugar starvation syndrome at the end of the night due to the absence of photosynthesis. Promoter sequences of genes belonging to the SSR-network were analyzed in silico reveling over-represented motifs implicated in light, abscisic acid and sugar responses. A small cluster of protein encoding genes belonging to different metabolic pathways, including three regulatory proteins, a protein kinase, a transcription factor and a blue light receptor, were identified as the cornerstones of the SSR co-expression network. In summary, a large transcriptionally coordinated SSR network was identified and was validated with transcriptional data from three starch-deficient mutant lines. Candidate master regulators of this network were point out.

  1. Induction of Nickel Accumulation in Response to Zinc Deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Sho; Kato, Aki; Tsuzuki, Chisato; Yoshida, Junko; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of nickel (Ni) can be toxic to plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Fe2+ transporter, iron (Fe)-regulated transporter1 (IRT1), mediates Fe uptake and also implicates in Ni2+ uptake at roots; however, the underlying mechanism of Ni2+ uptake and accumulation remains unelucidated. In the present study, we found that zinc (Zn) deficient conditions resulted in increased accumulation of Ni in plants, particularly in roots, in A. thaliana. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Ni uptake correlating zinc condition, we traced 63Ni isotope in response to Zn and found that (i) Zn deficiency induces short-term Ni2+ absorption and (ii) Zn2+ inhibits Ni2+ uptake, suggesting competitive uptake between Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the Zrt/Irt-like protein 3 (ZIP3)-defective mutant with an elevated Zn-deficient response exhibited higher Ni accumulation than the wild type, further supporting that the response to Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation. Previously, expression profile study demonstrated that IRT1 expression is not inducible by Zn deficiency. In the present study, we found increased Ni accumulation in IRT1-null mutant under Zn deficiency in agar culture. These suggest that Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation in an IRT1-independen manner. The present study revealed that Ni accumulation is inducible in response to Zn deficiency, which may be attributable to a Zn uptake transporter induced by Zn deficiency. PMID:25923075

  2. Carpeloidy in flower evolution and diversification: a comparative study in Carica papaya and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronse De Craene, Louis; Tréhin, Christophe; Morel, Patrice; Negrutiu, Ioan

    2011-06-01

    Bisexual flowers of Carica papaya range from highly regular flowers to morphs with various fusions of stamens to the ovary. Arabidopsis thaliana sup1 mutants have carpels replaced by chimeric carpel-stamen structures. Comparative analysis of stamen to carpel conversions in the two different plant systems was used to understand the stage and origin of carpeloidy when derived from stamen tissues, and consequently to understand how carpeloidy contributes to innovations in flower evolution. Floral development of bisexual flowers of Carica was studied by scanning electron microscopy and was compared with teratological sup mutants of A. thaliana. In Carica development of bisexual flowers was similar to wild (unisexual) forms up to locule initiation. Feminization ranges from fusion of stamen tissue to the gynoecium to complete carpeloidy of antepetalous stamens. In A. thaliana, partial stamen feminization occurs exclusively at the flower apex, with normal stamens forming at the periphery. Such transformations take place relatively late in development, indicating strong developmental plasticity of most stamen tissues. These results are compared with evo-devo theories on flower bisexuality, as derived from unisexual ancestors. The Arabidopsis data highlight possible early evolutionary events in the acquisition of bisexuality by a patchy transformation of stamen parts into female parts linked to a flower axis-position effect. The Carica results highlight tissue-fusion mechanisms in angiosperms leading to carpeloidy once bisexual flowers have evolved. We show two different developmental routes leading to stamen to carpel conversions by late re-specification. The process may be a fundamental aspect of flower development that is hidden in most instances by developmental homeostasis.

  3. The Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein FBL17 is essential for progression through the second mitosis during pollen development.

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    Andi Gusti

    Full Text Available In fungi and metazoans, the SCF-type Ubiquitin protein ligases (E3s play a critical role in cell cycle regulation by degrading negative regulators, such as cell cycle-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs at the G1-to-S-phase checkpoint. Here we report that FBL17, an Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein, is involved in cell cycle regulation during male gametogenesis. FBL17 expression is strongly enhanced in plants co-expressing E2Fa and DPa, transcription factors that promote S-phase entry. FBL17 loss-of-function mutants fail to undergo pollen mitosis II, which generates the two sperm cells in mature A. thaliana pollen. Nonetheless, the single sperm cell-like cell in fbl17 mutants is functional but will exclusively fertilize the egg cell of the female gametophyte, giving rise to an embryo that will later abort, most likely due to the lack of functional endosperm. Seed abortion can, however, be overcome by mutations in FIE, a component of the Polycomb group complex, overall resembling loss-of-function mutations in the A. thaliana cyclin-dependent kinase CDKA;1. Finally we identified ASK11, as an SKP1-like partner protein of FBL17 and discuss a possible mechanism how SCF(FBL17 may regulate cell division during male gametogenesis.

  4. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuelin; Tabata, Daisuke; Imai, Ryozo

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3), which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C), both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  5. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelin Liu

    Full Text Available DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3, which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C, both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  6. The pattern of polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We resequenced 876 short fragments in a sample of 96 individuals of Arabidopsis thaliana that included stock center accessions as well as a hierarchical sample from natural populations. Although A. thaliana is a selfing weed, the pattern of polymorphism in general agrees with what is expected for a widely distributed, sexually reproducing species. Linkage disequilibrium decays rapidly, within 50 kb. Variation is shared worldwide, although population structure and isolation by distance are evident. The data fail to fit standard neutral models in several ways. There is a genome-wide excess of rare alleles, at least partially due to selection. There is too much variation between genomic regions in the level of polymorphism. The local level of polymorphism is negatively correlated with gene density and positively correlated with segmental duplications. Because the data do not fit theoretical null distributions, attempts to infer natural selection from polymorphism data will require genome-wide surveys of polymorphism in order to identify anomalous regions. Despite this, our data support the utility of A. thaliana as a model for evolutionary functional genomics.

  7. Gγ1 + Gγ2 ≠ Gβ: Heterotrimeric G Protein Gγ-Deficient Mutants Do Not Recapitulate All Phenotypes of Gβ-Deficient Mutants1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusov, Yuri; Zhang, Wei; Assmann, Sarah M.; Botella, José Ramón

    2008-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are signaling molecules ubiquitous among all eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome contains one Gα (GPA1), one Gβ (AGB1), and two Gγ subunit (AGG1 and AGG2) genes. The Gβ requirement of a functional Gγ subunit for active signaling predicts that a mutant lacking both AGG1 and AGG2 proteins should phenotypically resemble mutants lacking AGB1 in all respects. We previously reported that Gβ- and Gγ-deficient mutants coincide during plant pathogen interaction, lateral root development, gravitropic response, and some aspects of seed germination. Here, we report a number of phenotypic discrepancies between Gβ- and Gγ-deficient mutants, including the double mutant lacking both Gγ subunits. While Gβ-deficient mutants are hypersensitive to abscisic acid inhibition of seed germination and are hyposensitive to abscisic acid inhibition of stomatal opening and guard cell inward K+ currents, none of the available Gγ-deficient mutants shows any deviation from the wild type in these responses, nor do they show the hypocotyl elongation and hook development defects that are characteristic of Gβ-deficient mutants. In addition, striking discrepancies were observed in the aerial organs of Gβ- versus Gγ-deficient mutants. In fact, none of the distinctive traits observed in Gβ-deficient mutants (such as reduced size of cotyledons, leaves, flowers, and siliques) is present in any of the Gγ single and double mutants. Despite the considerable amount of phenotypic overlap between Gβ- and Gγ-deficient mutants, confirming the tight relationship between Gβ and Gγ subunits in plants, considering the significant differences reported here, we hypothesize the existence of new and as yet unknown elements in the heterotrimeric G protein signaling complex. PMID:18441222

  8. Transcriptional regulation of male-sterility in 7B-1 male-sterile tomato mutant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Omidvar, Vahid; Mohorianu, I.; Dalmay, T.; Zheng, Y.; Fei, Z.; Pucci, A.; Mazzucato, E.; Večeřová, R.; Sedlářová, M.; Fellner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2017), č. článku e0170715. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : tapetum-degeneration-retardation * male reproductive development * early anther development * differential expression * lycopersicon-esculentum * stamenless-2 mutant * abscisic-acid * arabidopsis-thaliana * brassica-napus * cell-wall Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  9. Arabidopsis mutants lacking phenolic sunscreens exhibit enhanced ultraviolet-B injury and oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, L.G.; Last, R.L. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Chapple, C.C.S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-12-01

    We have assessed ultraviolet-B (UV-B)-induced injury in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and two mutants with altered aromatic secondary product biosynthesis. Arabidopsis mutants defective in the ability to synthesize UV-B-absorbing compounds (flavonoids in transparent testa 5 [tt5] and sinapate esters in ferulic acid hydroxylase 1 [fah 1]) are more sensitive to UV-B than is the wild-type Landsberg erecta. Despite its ability to accumulate UV-absorptive flavonoid compounds, the ferulic acid hydroxylase mutant fah1 exhibits more physiological injury (growth inhibition and foliar lesions) than either wild type or tt5. The extreme UV-B sensitivity of fah1 demonstrates the importance of hydroxycinnamate esters as UV-B protectants. Consistent with the whole-plant response, the highest levels of lipid and protein oxidation products were seen in fah1. Ascorbate peroxidase enzyme activity was also increased in the leaves of UV-B-treated plants in a dose- and genotype-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that, in A. thaliana, hydryoxycinnamates are more effective UV-B protectants than flavonoids. The data also indicate that A. thaliana responds to UV-B as an oxidative stress, and sunscreen compounds reduce the oxidative damage caused by UV-B. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Ethylene signalling is mediating the early cadmium-induced oxidative challenge in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellingen, Kerim; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Keunen, Els; Cuypers, Ann

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stimulates ethylene biosynthesis. The phytohormone ethylene is a regulator of many developmental and physiological plant processes as well as stress responses. Previous research indicated various links between ethylene signalling and oxidative stress. Our results support a correlation between the Cd-induced oxidative challenge and ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. The effects of 24 or 72 h exposure to 5 μM Cd on plant growth and several oxidative stress-related parameters were compared between wild-type (WT) and ethylene insensitive mutants (etr1-1, ein2-1, ein3-1). Cadmium-induced responses observed in WT plants were mainly affected in etr1-1 and ein2-1 mutants, of which the growth was less inhibited by Cd exposure as compared to WT and ein3-1 mutants. Both etr1-1 and ein2-1 showed a delayed response in the glutathione (GSH) metabolism, including GSH levels and transcript levels of GSH synthesising and recycling enzymes. Furthermore, the expression of different oxidative stress marker genes was significantly lower in Cd-exposed ein2-1 mutants, evidencing that ethylene signalling is involved in early responses to Cd stress. A model for the cross-talk between ethylene signalling and oxidative stress is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Flavonoids are determinants of freezing tolerance and cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Elisa; Tohge, Takayuki; Zuther, Ellen; Fernie, Alisdair R; Hincha, Dirk K

    2016-09-23

    In plants from temperate climates such as Arabidopsis thaliana low, non-freezing temperatures lead to increased freezing tolerance in a process termed cold acclimation. This process is accompanied by massive changes in gene expression and in the content of primary metabolites and lipids. In addition, most flavonols and anthocyanins accumulate upon cold exposure, along with most transcripts encoding transcription factors and enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. However, no evidence for a functional role of flavonoids in plant freezing tolerance has been shown. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis using qRT-PCR for transcript, LC-MS for flavonoid and GC-MS for primary metabolite measurements, and an electrolyte leakage assay to determine freezing tolerance of 20 mutant lines in two Arabidopsis accessions that are affected in different steps of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. This analysis provides evidence for a functional role of flavonoids in plant cold acclimation. The accumulation of flavonoids in the activation tagging mutant line pap1-D improved, while reduced flavonoid content in different knock-out mutants impaired leaf freezing tolerance. Analysis of the different knock-out mutants suggests redundancy of flavonoid structures, as the lack of flavonols or anthocyanins could be compensated by other compound classes.

  12. Identification of An Arsenic Tolerant Double Mutant With a Thiol-Mediated Component And Increased Arsenic Tolerance in PhyA Mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, D.Y.; Lee, D.; Harris, H.; Raab, A.; Feldmann, J.; Meharg, A.; Kumabe, B.; Komives, E.A.; Schroeder, J.I.; /SLAC, SSRL /Sydney U. /Aberdeen U. /UC, San Diego

    2007-04-06

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  13. Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant uncouples the constitutive activation of salicylic acid signalling from growth defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swain, S.; Roy, S.; Shah, J.; Wees, S.C.M. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Nandi, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis genotypes with a hyperactive salicylic acidmediated signalling pathway exhibit enhanced disease resistance, which is often coupled with growth and developmental defects, such as dwarfing and spontaneous necrotic lesions on the leaves, resulting in reduced biomass yield. In this article,

  14. The conserved PFT1 tandem repeat is crucial for proper flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Pauline; Press, Maximilian O; Bale, Jacob; Grancharova, Tanya; Undurraga, Soledad F; Queitsch, Christine

    2014-10-01

    It is widely appreciated that short tandem repeat (STR) variation underlies substantial phenotypic variation in organisms. Some propose that the high mutation rates of STRs in functional genomic regions facilitate evolutionary adaptation. Despite their high mutation rate, some STRs show little to no variation in populations. One such STR occurs in the Arabidopsis thaliana gene PFT1 (MED25), where it encodes an interrupted polyglutamine tract. Although the PFT1 STR is large (∼270 bp), and thus expected to be extremely variable, it shows only minuscule variation across A. thaliana strains. We hypothesized that the PFT1 STR is under selective constraint, due to previously undescribed roles in PFT1 function. We investigated this hypothesis using plants expressing transgenic PFT1 constructs with either an endogenous STR or synthetic STRs of varying length. Transgenic plants carrying the endogenous PFT1 STR generally performed best in complementing a pft1 null mutant across adult PFT1-dependent traits. In stark contrast, transgenic plants carrying a PFT1 transgene lacking the STR phenocopied a pft1 loss-of-function mutant for flowering time phenotypes and were generally hypomorphic for other traits, establishing the functional importance of this domain. Transgenic plants carrying various synthetic constructs occupied the phenotypic space between wild-type and pft1 loss-of-function mutants. By varying PFT1 STR length, we discovered that PFT1 can act as either an activator or repressor of flowering in a photoperiod-dependent manner. We conclude that the PFT1 STR is constrained to its approximate wild-type length by its various functional requirements. Our study implies that there is strong selection on STRs not only to generate allelic diversity, but also to maintain certain lengths pursuant to optimal molecular function. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Expression of the dspA/E gene of Erwinia amylovora in non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Murat Aksoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Erwinia amylovora genome, the hrp gene cluster containing the dspA/E/EB/F operon plays a crucial role in mediating the pathogenicity and the hypersensitive response (HR in the host plant. The role of the dspA/E gene derived from E. amylovora was investigated by monitoring the expression of the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter system in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana cv. Pri-Gus seedlings. A mutant ΔdspA/E strain of E. amylovora was generated to contain a deletion of the dspA/E gene for the purpose of this study. Two-week-old seedlings of GUS transgenic Arabidopsis were vacuum-infiltrated with the wild-type and the mutant (ΔdspA/E E. amylovora strains. The Arabidopsis seedlings were fixed and stained for GUS activity after 3–5 days following infiltration. The appearance of dense spots with blue staining on the Arabidopsis leaves indicated the typical characteristic of GUS activity. This observation indicated that the wild-type E. amylovora strain had induced a successful and efficient infection on the A. thaliana Pri-Gus leaves. In contrast, there was no visible GUS expression on leaf tissues which were inoculated with the ΔdspA/E mutant E. amylovora strain. These results indicate that the dspA/E gene is required by the bacterial cells to induce HR in non-host plants.

  16. Morphological mutants of garlic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, A.D.; Dnyansagar, V.R. (Nagpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Botany)

    1982-01-01

    Cloves of garlic (Allium sativuum Linn.) were exposed to gamma rays with various doses and different concentrations of ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (dES) and ethylene imine (EI). In the second and third generations, 16 types of morphological mutants were recorded with varied frequencies. Of all the mutagens used, gamma rays were found to be the most effective in inducing the maximum number of mutations followed EI, EMS and dES in that order.

  17. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  18. Evaluation of glyphosate resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana expressing an altered target site EPSPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, R Douglas; You, Jinsong; Qi, Youlin; Flasinski, Stanislaw; Kavanaugh, Christina; Washam, Jeannie; Ostrander, Elizabeth; Wang, Dafu; Heck, Greg

    2017-07-05

    Glyphosate-resistant goosegrass has recently evolved and is homozygous for the double mutant of EPSPS (T102 I, P106 S or TIPS). These same mutations combined with EPSPS overexpression, have been used to create transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops. Arabidopsis thaliana (Wt EPSPS Ki  ∼ 0.5 μM) was engineered to express a variant AtEPSPS-T102 I, P106 A (TIPA Ki  = 150 μM) to determine the resistance magnitude for a more potent variant EPSPS that might evolve in weeds. Transgenic A. thaliana plants, homozygous for one, two or four copies of AtEPSPS-TIPA, had resistance (IC50 values, R/S) as measured by seed production ranging from 4.3- to 16-fold. Plants treated in reproductive stage were male sterile with a range of R/S from 10.1- to 40.6-fold. A significant hormesis (∼ 63% gain in fresh weight) was observed for all genotypes when treated at the initiation of reproductive stage with 0.013 kg ha-1 . AtEPSPS-TIPA enzyme activity was proportional to copy number and correlated with resistance magnitude. A. thaliana, as a model weed expressing one copy of AtEPSPS-TIPA (300-fold more resistant), had only 4.3-fold resistance to glyphosate for seed production. Resistance behaved as a single dominant allele. Vegetative tissue resistance was 4.7-fold greater than reproductive tissue resistance and was linear with gene copy number. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Ethylene response factor AtERF72 negatively regulates Arabidopsis thaliana response to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Qiwei; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ting; Yang, Yafei; Zhang, Xinzhong; Han, Zhenhai; Xu, Xuefeng

    2017-09-23

    Ethylene regulates the plant's response to stress caused by iron (Fe) deficiency. However, specific roles of ERF proteins in response to Fe deficiency remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of ERF72 in response to iron deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the levels of the ethylene response factor AtERF72 increased in leaves and roots induced under the iron deficient conditions. erf72 mutant plants showed increased growth compared to wild type (WT) when grown in iron deficient medium for 5 d. erf72 mutants had increased root H(+) velocity and the ferric reductase activity, and increase in the expression of the iron deficiency response genes iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) and H(+)-ATPase (HA2) levels in iron deficient conditions. Compared to WT plants, erf72 mutants retained healthy chloroplast structure with significantly higher Fe and Mg content, and decreased chlorophyll degradation gene pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO) and chlorophyllase (CLH1) expression when grown in iron deficient media. Yeast one-hybrid analysis showed that ERF72 could directly bind to the promoter regions of iron deficiency responses genes IRT1, HA2 and CLH1. Based on our results, we suggest that ethylene released from plants under iron deficiency stress can activate the expression of ERF72, which responds to iron deficiency in the negative regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gibberellic acid and cGMP-dependent transcriptional regulation in arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Bastian, René

    2010-03-01

    An ever increasing amount of transcriptomic data and analysis tools provide novel insight into complex responses of biological systems. Given these resources we have undertaken to review aspects of transcriptional regulation in response to the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) and its second messenger guanosine 3\\',5\\'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, both wild type and selected mutants. Evidence suggests enrichment of GA-responsive (GARE) elements in promoters of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in response to cGMP but downregulated in a GA insensitive mutant (ga1-3). In contrast, in the genes upregulated in the mutant, no enrichment in the GARE is observed suggesting that GARE motifs are diagnostic for GA-induced and cGMP-dependent transcriptional upregulation. Further, we review how expression studies of GA-dependent transcription factors and transcriptional networks based on common promoter signatures derived from ab initio analyses can contribute to our understanding of plant responses at the systems level. © 2010 Landes Bioscience.

  1. Strigolactones as an auxiliary hormonal defence mechanism against leafy gall syndrome in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stes, Elisabeth; Depuydt, Stephen; De Keyser, Annick; Matthys, Cedrick; Audenaert, Kris; Yoneyama, Koichi; Werbrouck, Stefaan; Goormachtig, Sofie; Vereecke, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Leafy gall syndrome is the consequence of modified plant development in response to a mixture of cytokinins secreted by the biotrophic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. The similarity of the induced symptoms with the phenotype of plant mutants defective in strigolactone biosynthesis and signalling prompted an evaluation of the involvement of strigolactones in this pathology. All tested strigolactone-related Arabidopsis thaliana mutants were hypersensitive to R. fascians. Moreover, treatment with the synthetic strigolactone mixture GR24 and with the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase inhibitor D2 illustrated that strigolactones acted as antagonistic compounds that restricted the morphogenic activity of R. fascians. Transcript profiling of the MORE AXILLARY GROWTH1 (MAX1), MAX2, MAX3, MAX4, and BRANCHED1 (BRC1) genes in the wild-type Columbia-0 accession and in different mutant backgrounds revealed that upregulation of strigolactone biosynthesis genes was triggered indirectly by the bacterial cytokinins via host-derived auxin and led to the activation of BRC1 expression, inhibiting the outgrowth of the newly developing shoots, a typical hallmark of leafy gall syndrome. Taken together, these data support the emerging insight that balances are critical for optimal leafy gall development: the long-lasting biotrophic interaction is possible only because the host activates a set of countermeasures—including the strigolactone response—in reaction to bacterial cytokinins to constrain the activity of R. fascians. PMID:26136271

  2. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  3. The Arabidopsis thaliana elongator complex subunit 2 epigenetically affects root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuebin; Tian, Huiyu; Li, Hongjiang; Yu, Qianqian; Wang, Lei; Friml, Jiri; Ding, Zhaojun

    2015-08-01

    The elongator complex subunit 2 (ELP2) protein, one subunit of an evolutionarily conserved histone acetyltransferase complex, has been shown to participate in leaf patterning, plant immune and abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, its role in root development was explored. Compared to the wild type, the elp2 mutant exhibited an accelerated differentiation of its root stem cells and cell division was more active in its quiescent centre (QC). The key transcription factors responsible for maintaining root stem cell and QC identity, such as AP2 transcription factors PLT1 (PLETHORA1) and PLT2 (PLETHORA2), GRAS transcription factors such as SCR (SCARECROW) and SHR (SHORT ROOT) and WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX5 transcription factor WOX5, were all strongly down-regulated in the mutant. On the other hand, expression of the G2/M transition activator CYCB1 was substantially induced in elp2. The auxin efflux transporters PIN1 and PIN2 showed decreased protein levels and PIN1 also displayed mild polarity alterations in elp2, which resulted in a reduced auxin content in the root tip. Either the acetylation or methylation level of each of these genes differed between the mutant and the wild type, suggesting that the ELP2 regulation of root development involves the epigenetic modification of a range of transcription factors and other developmental regulators. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. ACR11 is an Activator of Plastid-Type Glutamine Synthetase GS2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Otsuki, Hitomi; Saito, Kazuki; Yokota Hirai, Masami

    2017-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an important enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, and GS2, encoded by GLN2, is the only plastid-type GS in Arabidopsis thaliana. A co-expression analysis suggested that the expression level of the gene encoding a uridylyltransferase-like protein, ACR11, is strongly correlated with GLN2 expression levels. Here we showed that the recombinant ACR11 protein increased GS2 activity in vitro by reducing the Km values of its substrate glutamine. A T-DNA insertion mutant of ACR11 exhibited a reduced GS activity under low nitrate conditions and reduced glutamine levels. Biochemical analyses revealed that ACR11 and GS2 interacted both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that ACR11 is an activator of GS2, giving it a mechanistic role in the nitrogen assimilation of A. thaliana. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The novel elicitor AsES triggers a defense response against Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hael-Conrad, V; Abou-Mansour, E; Díaz-Ricci, J-C; Métraux, J-P; Serrano, M

    2015-12-01

    AsES (Acremonium strictum Elicitor and Subtilisin) is a novel extracellular elicitor protein produced by the avirulent isolate SS71 of the opportunist strawberry fungal pathogen A. strictum. Here we describe the activity of AsES in the plant-pathogen system Arabidopsis thaliana-Botrytis cinerea. We show that AsES renders A. thaliana plants resistant to the necrotrophic pathogen B. cinerea, both locally and systemically and the defense response observed is dose-dependent. Systemic, but not local resistance is dependent on the length of exposure to AsES. The germination of the spores in vitro was not inhibited by AsES, implying that protection to B. cinerea is due to the induction of the plant defenses. These results were further supported by the findings that AsES differentially affects mutants impaired in the response to salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene, suggesting that AsES triggers the defense response through these three signaling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers.

  7. Identification of Polyadenylation Sites within Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal

    2011-09-01

    Machine Learning (ML) is a field of artificial intelligence focused on the design and implementation of algorithms that enable creation of models for clustering, classification, prediction, ranking and similar inference tasks based on information contained in data. Many ML algorithms have been successfully utilized in a variety of applications. The problem addressed in this thesis is from the field of bioinformatics and deals with the recognition of polyadenylation (poly(A)) sites in the genomic sequence of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. During the RNA processing, a tail consisting of a number of consecutive adenine (A) nucleotides is added to the terminal nucleotide of the 3’- untranslated region (3’UTR) of the primary RNA. The process in which these A nucleotides are added is called polyadenylation. The location in the genomic DNA sequence that corresponds to the start of terminal A nucleotides (i.e. to the end of 3’UTR) is known as a poly(A) site. Recognition of the poly(A) sites in DNA sequence is important for better gene annotation and understanding of gene regulation. In this study, we built an artificial neural network (ANN) for the recognition of poly(A) sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Our study demonstrates that this model achieves improved accuracy compared to the existing predictive models for this purpose. The key factor contributing to the enhanced predictive performance of our ANN model is a distinguishing set of features used in creation of the model. These features include a number of physico-chemical characteristics of relevance, such as dinucleotide thermodynamic characteristics, electron-ion interaction potential, etc., but also many of the statistical properties of the DNA sequences from the region surrounding poly(A) site, such as nucleotide and polynucleotide properties, common motifs, etc. Our ANN model was compared in performance with several other ML models, as well as with the PAC tool that is specifically developed for

  8. Arabidopsis mutant bik1 exhibits strong resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis-induced kinase1 (BIK1, a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, plays an important role in resistance against pathogens and insects in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions against Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate biotrophic protist that attacks cruciferous plants and induces gall formation on roots. Here, we investigated the potential roles of receptors FLS2, BAK1 and BIK1 in the infection of P. brassicae cruciferous plants. Wild-type plants, fls2 and bak1 mutants showed typical symptom on roots, and the galls were filled with large quantities of resting spores, while bik1 mutant plants exhibited strong resistance to P. brassicae. Compared with that of the wild-type plants, the root hair and cortical infection rate of bik1 mutant were significantly reduced by about 40-50%. A considerable portion of bik1 roots failed to form typical galls. Even if some small galls were formed, they were filled with multinucleate secondary plasmodia. The bik1 plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS at infected roots than other mutants and wild-type plants. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA treatment alleviated the clubroot symptoms in wild-type plants, and the expression of the SA signaling marker gene PR1 was significantly increased in bik1. Both sid2 (salicylic acid induction-deficient 2 and npr1-1 (non-expresser of PR genes that regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR mutants showed increased susceptibility to P. brassicae compared with wild-type plants. These results suggest that the resistance of bik1 to P. brassicae is possibly mediated by SA inducible mechanisms enhance the resistance to clubroot disease.

  9. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

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    Yu Song

    Full Text Available In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  10. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Gao, Jie; Yang, Fengxi; Kua, Chai-Shian; Liu, Jingxin; Cannon, Charles H

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL) proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana) and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds) and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  11. Functional Analysis of Jasmonates in Rice through Mutant Approaches

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    Rohit Dhakarey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonic acid, one of the major plant hormones, is, unlike other hormones, a lipid-derived compound that is synthesized from the fatty acid linolenic acid. It has been studied intensively in many plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana, in which most of the enzymes participating in its biosynthesis were characterized. In the past 15 years, mutants and transgenic plants affected in the jasmonate pathway became available in rice and facilitate studies on the functions of this hormone in an important crop. Those functions are partially conserved compared to other plant species, and include roles in fertility, response to mechanical wounding and defense against herbivores. However, new and surprising functions have also been uncovered by mutant approaches, such as a close link between light perception and the jasmonate pathway. This was not only useful to show a phenomenon that is unique to rice but also helped to establish this role in plant species where such links are less obvious. This review aims to provide an overview of currently available rice mutants and transgenic plants in the jasmonate pathway and highlights some selected roles of jasmonate in this species, such as photomorphogenesis, and abiotic and biotic stress.

  12. Sphingolipids in the Root Play an Important Role in Regulating the Leaf Ionome in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Dai-Yin; Gable, Kenneth; Chen, Ming; Baxter, Ivan; Dietrich, Charles R.; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lahner, Brett; Lü, Shiyou; Markham, Jonathan E.; Morrissey, Joe; Han, Gongshe; Gupta, Sita D.; Harmon, Jeffrey M.; Jaworski, Jan G.; Dunn, Teresa M.; Salt, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipid synthesis is initiated by condensation of Ser with palmitoyl-CoA producing 3-ketodihydrosphinganine (3-KDS), which is reduced by a 3-KDS reductase to dihydrosphinganine. Ser palmitoyltransferase is essential for plant viability. Arabidopsis thaliana contains two genes (At3g06060/TSC10A and At5g19200/TSC10B) encoding proteins with significant similarity to the yeast 3-KDS reductase, Tsc10p. Heterologous expression in yeast of either Arabidopsis gene restored 3-KDS reductase activity to the yeast tsc10Δ mutant, confirming both as bona fide 3-KDS reductase genes. Consistent with sphingolipids having essential functions in plants, double mutant progeny lacking both genes were not recovered from crosses of single tsc10A and tsc10B mutants. Although the 3-KDS reductase genes are functionally redundant and ubiquitously expressed in Arabidopsis, 3-KDS reductase activity was reduced to 10% of wild-type levels in the loss-of-function tsc10a mutant, leading to an altered sphingolipid profile. This perturbation of sphingolipid biosynthesis in the Arabidopsis tsc10a mutant leads an altered leaf ionome, including increases in Na, K, and Rb and decreases in Mg, Ca, Fe, and Mo. Reciprocal grafting revealed that these changes in the leaf ionome are driven by the root and are associated with increases in root suberin and alterations in Fe homeostasis. PMID:21421810

  13. The impact of the absence of aliphatic glucosinolates on water transport under salt stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Mcarmen eMartinez-Ballesta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Brassicaceae are known for their contents of nutrients and health-promoting phytochemicals, including glucosinolatesExposure to salinity increases the levels of several of these compounds, but their role in abiotic stress response is unclear. The effect of aliphatic glucosinolates on plant water balance and growth under salt stress, involving aquaporins, was investigated by means of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants impaired in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which is controlled by two transcription factors: Myb28 and Myb29. The double mutant myb28myb29, completely lacking aliphatic glucosinolates, was compared to wild type Col-0 (WT and the single mutant myb28. A greater reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of myb28myb29 was observed under salt stress, when compared to the WT and myb28; this correlated with the abundance of both PIP1 and PIP2 aquaporin subfamilies. Also, changes in root architecture in response to salinity were genotype dependent. Treatment with NaCl altered glucosinolates biosynthesis in a similar way in WT and the single mutant and differently in the double mutant. The results indicate that short-chain aliphatic glucosinolates may contribute to water saving under salt stress

  14. The alphabet of galactolipids in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Amina eIbrahim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Galactolipids constitute the major lipid class in plants. In recent years oxygenated derivatives of galactolipids have been detected. They are discussed as signal molecules during leaf damage, since they accumulate in wounded leaves in high levels. Using different analytical methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance, infra-red spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS earlier reports focused on the analysis of either oxidized or non-oxidized species and needed high levels of analytes. Here, we report on the analysis of the galactolipid subfraction of the Arabidopsis leaf lipidome by an improved HPLC/MS2-based method that is fast, robust and comparatively simple in its performance. Due to a combination of phase partitioning, solid phase fractionation, liquid chromatography and MS2 experiments this method has high detection sensitivity and requires only low amounts of plant material. With this method 167 galactolipid species were detected in leaves of A. thaliana. Out of these 79 being newly described species. From all species the head group and acyl side chains were identified via MS2 experiments. Moreover, the structural identification was supported by HPLC/time-of-flight (TOF-MS and gas chromatography (GC/MS analysis. The quantification of different galactolipid species that accumulated 30 min after a mechanical wounding in A. thaliana leaves showed that the oxidized acyl side chains in galactolipids are divided into 65 % cyclopentenones, 27 % methyl-branched ketols, 3.8 % hydroperoxides/straight-chain ketols, 2.0 % hydroxides and 2.6 % phytoprostanes. In comparison to the free cyclopentenon derivatives, the esterifed forms occur in a 149-fold excess supporting the hypothesis that galactolipids might function as storage compounds for cyclopentenones. Additional analysis of the ratio of non-oxidized to oxidized galactolipid species in leaves of wounded plants was performed resulting in a ratio of 2.0 in

  15. Metallochaperone-like genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehseen, Muhammad; Cairns, Narelle; Sherson, Sarah; Cobbett, Christopher S

    2010-08-01

    A complete inventory of metallochaperone-like proteins containing a predicted HMA domain in Arabidopsis revealed a large family of 67 proteins. 45 proteins, the HIPPs, have a predicted isoprenylation site while 22 proteins, the HPPs, do not. Sequence comparisons divided the proteins into seven major clusters (I-VII). Cluster IV is notable for the presence of a conserved Asp residue before the CysXXCys, metal binding motif, analogous to the Zn binding motif in E. coli ZntA. HIPP20, HIPP21, HIPP22, HIPP26 and HIPP27 in Cluster IV were studied in more detail. All but HIPP21 could rescue the Cd-sensitive, ycf1 yeast mutant but failed to rescue the growth of zrt1zrt2, zrc1cot1 and atx1 mutants. In Arabidopsis, single and double mutants did not show a phenotype but the hipp20/21/22 triple mutant was more sensitive to Cd and accumulated less Cd than the wild-type suggesting the HIPPs can have a role in Cd-detoxification, possibly by binding Cd. Promoter-GUS reporter expression studies indicated variable expression of these HIPPs. For example, in roots, HIPP22 and HIPP26 are only expressed in lateral root tips while HIPP20 and HIPP25 show strong expression in the root vasculature.

  16. Three-dimensional visualization of membrane phospholipid distributions in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds: A spatial perspective of molecular heterogeneity.

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    Sturtevant, Drew; Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Lee, Young-Jin; Chapman, Kent D

    2017-02-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana has been widely used as a model plant to study acyl lipid metabolism. Seeds of A. thaliana are quite small (approximately 500×300μm and weigh ~20μg), making lipid compositional analyses of single seeds difficult to achieve. Here we have used matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) to map and visualize the three-dimensional spatial distributions of two common membrane phospholipid classes, phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), in single A. thaliana seeds. The 3D images revealed distinct differences in distribution of several molecular species of both phospholipids among different seed tissues. Using data from these 3D reconstructions, the PC and PI mol% lipid profiles were calculated for the embryonic axis, cotyledons, and peripheral endosperm, and these data agreed well with overall quantification of these lipids in bulk seed extracts analyzed by conventional electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition, MALDI-MSI was used to profile PC and PI molecular species in seeds of wild type, fad2-1, fad3-2, fad6-1, and fae1-1 acyl lipid mutants. The resulting distributions revealed previously unobserved changes in spatial distribution of several lipid molecular species, and were used to suggest new insights into biochemical heterogeneity of seed lipid metabolism. These studies highlight the value of mass spectrometry imaging to provide unprecedented spatial and chemical resolution of metabolites directly in samples even as small as a single A. thaliana seeds, and allow for expanded imaging of plant metabolites to improve our understanding of plant lipid metabolism from a spatial perspective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. SNOWY COTYLEDON 2 Promotes Chloroplast Development and Has a Role in Leaf Variegation in Both Lotus japonicus and Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Zagari, Nicola; Sandoval-Ibañez, Omar; Sandal, Niels; Su, Junyi; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel; Stougaard, Jens; Pribil, Mathias; Leister, Dario; Pulido, Pablo

    2017-05-01

    Plants contain various factors that transiently interact with subunits or intermediates of the thylakoid multiprotein complexes, promoting their stable association and integration. Hence, assembly factors are essential for chloroplast development and the transition from heterotrophic to phototrophic growth. Snowy cotyledon 2 (SCO2) is a DNAJ-like protein involved in thylakoid membrane biogenesis and interacts with the light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding protein LHCB1. In Arabidopsis thaliana, SCO2 function was previously reported to be restricted to cotyledons. Here we show that disruption of SCO2 in Lotus japonicus results not only in paler cotyledons but also in variegated true leaves. Furthermore, smaller and pale-green true leaves can also be observed in A. thaliana sco2 (atsco2) mutants under short-day conditions. In both species, SCO2 is required for proper accumulation of PSII-LHCII complexes. In contrast to other variegated mutants, inhibition of chloroplastic translation strongly affects L. japonicus sco2 mutant development and fails to suppress their variegated phenotype. Moreover, inactivation of the suppressor of variegation AtClpR1 in the atsco2 background results in an additive double-mutant phenotype with variegated true leaves. Taken together, our results indicate that SCO2 plays a distinct role in PSII assembly or repair and constitutes a novel factor involved in leaf variegation. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Heterotrimeric G Protein-Regulated Ca2+ Influx and PIN2 Asymmetric Distribution Are Involved in Arabidopsis thaliana Roots' Avoidance Response to Extracellular ATP

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    Ruojia Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular ATP (eATP has been reported to be involved in plant growth as a primary messenger in the apoplast. Here, roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings growing in jointed medium bent upon contact with ATP-containing medium to keep away from eATP, showing a marked avoidance response. Roots responded similarly to ADP and bz-ATP but did not respond to AMP and GTP. The eATP avoidance response was reduced in loss-of-function mutants of heterotrimeric G protein α subunit (Gα (gpa1-1 and gpa1-2 and enhanced in Gα-over-expression (OE lines (wGα and cGα. Ethylenebis(oxyethylenenitrilo tetraacetic acid (EGTA and Gd3+ remarkably suppressed eATP-induced root bending. ATP-stimulated Ca2+ influx was impaired in Gα null mutants and increased in its OE lines. DR5-GFP and PIN2 were asymmetrically distributed in ATP-stimulated root tips, this effect was strongly suppressed by EGTA and diminished in Gα null mutants. In addition, some eATP-induced genes' expression was also impaired in Gα null mutants. Based on these results, we propose that heterotrimeric Gα-regulated Ca2+ influx and PIN2 distribution may be key signaling events in eATP sensing and avoidance response in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

  19. The rhizobacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2, containing ACC deaminase, promotes growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana via an ethylene-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Dodd, Ian C; Theobald, Julian C; Belimov, Andrey A; Davies, William J

    2013-04-01

    Many plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) associated with plant roots contain the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase and can metabolize ACC, the immediate precursor of the plant hormone ethylene, thereby decreasing plant ethylene production and increasing plant growth. However, relatively few studies have explicitly linked ethylene emission and/or action to growth promotion in these plant-microbe interactions. This study examined effects of the PGPR Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 containing ACC deaminase on the growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana using wild-type (WT) plants and several ethylene-related mutants (etr1-1, ein2-1, and eto1-1). Soil inoculation with V. paradoxus 5C-2 promoted growth (leaf area and shoot biomass) of WT plants and the ethylene-overproducing mutant eto1-1, and also enhanced floral initiation of WT plants by 2.5 days. However, these effects were not seen in ethylene-insensitive mutants (etr1-1 and ein2-1) even though bacterial colonization of the root system was similar. Furthermore, V. paradoxus 5C-2 decreased ACC concentrations of rosette leaves of WT plants by 59% and foliar ethylene emission of both WT plants and eto1-1 mutants by 42 and 37%, respectively. Taken together, these results demonstrate that a fully functional ethylene signal transduction pathway is required for V. paradoxus 5C-2 to stimulate leaf growth and flowering of A. thaliana.

  20. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

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    Yanjun Zan; Xia Shen; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Örjan Carlborg

    2016-01-01

    An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least o...

  1. Unbiased characterization of genotype-dependent metabolic regulations by metabolomic approach in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Kusano Miyako

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolites are not only the catalytic products of enzymatic reactions but also the active regulators or the ultimate phenotype of metabolic homeostasis in highly complex cellular processes. The modes of regulation at the metabolome level can be revealed by metabolic networks. We investigated the metabolic network between wild-type and 2 mutant (methionine-over accumulation 1 [mto1] and transparent testa4 [tt4] plants regarding the alteration of metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results In the GC-TOF/MS analysis, we acquired quantitative information regarding over 170 metabolites, which has been analyzed by a novel score (ZMC, z-score of metabolite correlation describing a characteristic metabolite in terms of correlation. Although the 2 mutants revealed no apparent morphological abnormalities, the overall correlation values in mto1 were much lower than those of the wild-type and tt4 plants, indicating the loss of overall network stability due to the uncontrolled accumulation of methionine. In the tt4 mutant, a new correlation between malate and sinapate was observed although the levels of malate, sinapate, and sinapoylmalate remain unchanged, suggesting an adaptive reconfiguration of the network. Gene-expression correlations presumably responsible for these metabolic networks were determined using the metabolite correlations as clues. Conclusion Two Arabidopsis mutants, mto1 and tt4, exhibited the following changes in entire metabolome networks: the overall loss of metabolic stability (mto1 or the generation of a metabolic network of a backup pathway for the lost physiological functions (tt4. The expansion of metabolite correlation to gene-expression correlation provides detailed insights into the systemic understanding of the plant cellular process regarding metabolome and transcriptome.

  2. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  3. Different sets of ER-resident J-proteins regulate distinct polar nuclear-membrane fusion events in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masaya; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Angiosperm female gametophytes contain a central cell with two polar nuclei. In many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, the polar nuclei fuse during female gametogenesis. We previously showed that BiP, an Hsp70 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), was essential for membrane fusion during female gametogenesis. Hsp70 function requires partner proteins for full activity. J-domain containing proteins (J-proteins) are the major Hsp70 functional partners. A. thaliana ER contains three soluble J-proteins, AtERdj3A, AtERdj3B, and AtP58(IPK). Here, we analyzed mutants of these proteins and determined that double-mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A or AtERdj3B were defective in polar nuclear fusion. Electron microscopy analysis identified that polar nuclei were in close contact, but no membrane fusion occurred in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A. The polar nuclear outer membrane appeared to be connected via the ER remaining at the inner unfused membrane in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3B. These results indicate that ER-resident J-proteins, AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3A and AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3B, function at distinct steps of polar nuclear-membrane fusion. Similar to the bip1 bip2 double mutant female gametophytes, the aterdj3a atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the outer polar nuclear membrane displayed aberrant endosperm proliferation after fertilization with wild-type pollen. However, endosperm proliferated normally after fertilization of the aterdj3b atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the inner membrane. Our results indicate that the polar nuclear fusion defect itself does not cause an endosperm proliferation defect. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Light-Induced Acclimation of the Arabidopsis chlorina1 Mutant to Singlet Oxygen[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramel, Fanny; Ksas, Brigitte; Akkari, Elsy; Mialoundama, Alexis S.; Monnet, Fabien; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Mueller, Martin J.; Bouvier, Florence; Havaux, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is a reactive oxygen species that can function as a stress signal in plant leaves leading to programmed cell death. In microalgae, 1O2-induced transcriptomic changes result in acclimation to 1O2. Here, using a chlorophyll b–less Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (chlorina1 [ch1]), we show that this phenomenon can also occur in vascular plants. The ch1 mutant is highly photosensitive due to a selective increase in the release of 1O2 by photosystem II. Under photooxidative stress conditions, the gene expression profile of ch1 mutant leaves very much resembled the gene responses to 1O2 reported in the Arabidopsis mutant flu. Preexposure of ch1 plants to moderately elevated light intensities eliminated photooxidative damage without suppressing 1O2 formation, indicating acclimation to 1O2. Substantial differences in gene expression were observed between acclimation and high-light stress: A number of transcription factors were selectively induced by acclimation, and contrasting effects were observed for the jasmonate pathway. Jasmonate biosynthesis was strongly induced in ch1 mutant plants under high-light stress and was noticeably repressed under acclimation conditions, suggesting the involvement of this hormone in 1O2-induced cell death. This was confirmed by the decreased tolerance to photooxidative damage of jasmonate-treated ch1 plants and by the increased tolerance of the jasmonate-deficient mutant delayed-dehiscence2. PMID:23590883

  5. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  6. Gene networks controlling Arabidopsis thaliana flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid Seosamh; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The formation of flowers is one of the main models for studying the regulatory mechanisms that underlie plant development and evolution. Over the past three decades, extensive genetic and molecular analyses have led to the identification of a large number of key floral regulators and to detailed insights into how they control flower morphogenesis. In recent years, genome-wide approaches have been applied to obtaining a global view of the gene regulatory networks underlying flower formation. Furthermore, mathematical models have been developed that can simulate certain aspects of this process and drive further experimentation. Here, we review some of the main findings made in the field of Arabidopsis thaliana flower development, with an emphasis on recent advances. In particular, we discuss the activities of the floral organ identity factors, which are pivotal for the specification of the different types of floral organs, and explore the experimental avenues that may elucidate the molecular mechanisms and gene expression programs through which these master regulators of flower development act. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Telomere-binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, U

    1995-02-01

    The nucleoprotein structure of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres was investigated. A protein specifically binding to telomeric sequences was characterized by gel mobility shift assays with synthetic oligonucleotides consisting of four 7 bp telomeric repeats of Arabidopsis (TTTAGGG) and crude nuclear protein extracts of Arabidopsis leaves. These DNA-protein binding studies revealed that the binding affinity of this telomere-binding protein to the G-rich single-strand as well as to the double-stranded telomeric DNA is much higher than to the C-rich single-strand. The molecular mass of the protein was identified by SDS-PAGE to be 67 kDa. The isoelectric points were determined to be 5.0, 4.85 and 4.7, respectively, indicating that either one protein with different modifications or three slightly different proteins have been isolated. An RNA component, possibly serving as a template for reverse transcription of a plant telomerase, does not mediate the DNA-protein contact because the DNA-protein interactions were not RNAse-sensitive.

  8. Spontaneous deleterious mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, S T; Lynch, M; Willis, J H

    1999-09-28

    The frequency and selective impact of deleterious mutations are fundamental parameters in evolutionary theory, yet they have not been directly measured in a plant species. To estimate these quantities, we allowed spontaneous mutations to accumulate for 10 generations in 1,000 inbred lines of the annual, self-fertilizing plant Arabidopsis thaliana and assayed fitness differences between generations 0 and 10 in a common garden. Germination rate, fruit set, and number of seeds per fruit each declined by less than 1% per generation in the mutation lines, and total fitness declined by 0.9% per generation. Among-line variances increased in the mutation lines for all traits. Application of an equal-effects model suggests a downwardly biased genomic deleterious mutation rate of 0.1 and a upwardly biased effect of individual mutations on total fitness of 20%. This genomic deleterious mutation rate is consistent with estimates of nucleotide substitution rates in flowering plants, the genome size of Arabidopsis, and the equilibrium inbreeding depression observed in this highly selfing plant species.

  9. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na+, (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na+/K+ homeostasis and hormonal balance. PMID:23299430

  10. A rapid total reflection X-ray fluorescence protocol for micro analyses of ion profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhner, Ricarda; Tabatabaei, Samaneh; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Fittschen, Ursula

    2016-11-01

    The ion homeostasis of macro and micronutrients in plant cells and tissues is a fundamental requirement for vital biochemical pathways including photosynthesis. In nature, ion homeostasis is affected mainly by three processes: 1. Environmental stress factors, 2. Developmental effects, and 3. Loss or gain-of-function mutations in the plant genome. Here we present a rapid total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) protocol that allows for simultaneous quantification of several elements such as potassium (K), calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), manganese (Mn) and strontium (Sr) in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf specimens. Our procedure is cost-efficient and enables precise, robust and highly reproducible measurements on tissue samples as small as 0.3 mg dry weight. As shown here, we apply the TXRF procedure to detect accurately the early replacement of K by Na ions in leaves of plants exposed to soil salinity, a globally increasing abiotic stress factor. Furthermore, we were able to prove the existence of a leaf development-dependent ion gradient for K, Ca, and other divalent ions in A. thaliana; i.e. old leaves contain significantly lower K but higher Ca than young leaves. Lastly, we show that our procedure can be readily applied to reveal subtle differences in tissue-specific ion contents of plant mutants. We employed independent A. thaliana kea1kea2 loss-of-function mutants that lack KEA1 and KEA2, two highly active chloroplast K exchange proteins. We found significantly increased K levels specifically in kea1kea2 mutants, i.e. 55 mg ∗ g- 1 dry weight, compared to 40 mg ∗ g- 1 dry weight in wild type plants. The TXRF procedure can be supplemented with Flame atomic absorption (FAAS) and emission spectrometry (FAES) to expand the detection range to sodium (Na) and magnesium (Mg). Because of the small sample amounts required, this method is especially suited to probe individual leaves in single plants or even specific leaf areas. Therefore, TXRF represents a powerful method to

  11. The Roles of β-Oxidation and Cofactor Homeostasis in Peroxisome Distribution and Function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Mauro A; Patel, Ashish B; Park, Jaeseok; Lee, Koeun; Strader, Lucia C; Bartel, Bonnie

    2016-11-01

    Key steps of essential metabolic pathways are housed in plant peroxisomes. We conducted a microscopy-based screen for anomalous distribution of peroxisomally targeted fluorescence in Arabidopsis thaliana This screen uncovered 34 novel alleles in 15 genes affecting oil body mobilization, fatty acid β-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, peroxisome fission, and pexophagy. Partial loss-of-function of lipid-mobilization enzymes conferred peroxisomes clustered around retained oil bodies without other notable defects, suggesting that this microscopy-based approach was sensitive to minor perturbations, and that fatty acid β-oxidation rates in wild type are higher than required for normal growth. We recovered three mutants defective in PECTIN METHYLESTERASE31, revealing an unanticipated role in lipid mobilization for this cytosolic enzyme. Whereas mutations reducing fatty acid import had peroxisomes of wild-type size, mutations impairing fatty acid β-oxidation displayed enlarged peroxisomes, possibly caused by excess fatty acid β-oxidation intermediates in the peroxisome. Several fatty acid β-oxidation mutants also displayed defects in peroxisomal matrix protein import. Impairing fatty acid import reduced the large size of peroxisomes in a mutant defective in the PEROXISOMAL NAD(+) TRANSPORTER (PXN), supporting the hypothesis that fatty acid accumulation causes pxn peroxisome enlargement. The diverse mutants isolated in this screen will aid future investigations of the roles of β-oxidation and peroxisomal cofactor homeostasis in plant development. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Dynamic Acclimation to High Light in Arabidopsis thaliana Involves Widespread Reengineering of the Leaf Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. E. Miller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana transferred from low to high light increase their capacity for photosynthesis, a process of dynamic acclimation. A mutant, gpt2, lacking a chloroplast glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator, is deficient in its ability to acclimate to increased light. Here, we have used a label-free proteomics approach, to perform relative quantitation of 1993 proteins from Arabidopsis wild type and gpt2 leaves exposed to increased light. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006598. Acclimation to light is shown to involve increases in electron transport and carbon metabolism but no change in the abundance of photosynthetic reaction centers. The gpt2 mutant shows a similar increase in total protein content to wild type but differences in the extent of change of certain proteins, including in the relative abundance of the cytochrome b6f complex and plastocyanin, the thylakoid ATPase and selected Benson-Calvin cycle enzymes. Changes in leaf metabolite content as plants acclimate can be explained by changes in the abundance of enzymes involved in metabolism, which were reduced in gpt2 in some cases. Plants of gpt2 invest more in stress-related proteins, suggesting that their reduced ability to acclimate photosynthetic capacity results in increased stress.

  13. Light, temperature and tocopherol status influence foliar vascular anatomy and leaf function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jared J; Polutchko, Stephanie K; Adams, William W; Cohu, Christopher M; Wenzl, Coleman A; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    This study addressed whether the winter annual Arabidopsis thaliana can adjust foliar phloem and xylem anatomy both differentially and in parallel. In plants acclimated to hot vs cool temperature, foliar minor vein xylem-to-phloem ratio was greater, whereas xylem and phloem responded concomitantly to growth light intensity. Across all growth conditions, xylem anatomy correlated with transpiration rate, while phloem anatomy correlated with photosynthetic capacity for two plant lines (wild-type Col-0 and tocopherol-deficient vte1 mutant) irrespective of tocopherol status. A high foliar vein density (VD) was associated with greater numbers and cross-sectional areas of both xylem and phloem cells per vein as well as higher rates of both photosynthesis and transpiration under high vs low light intensities. Under hot vs cool temperature, high foliar VD was associated with a higher xylem-to-phloem ratio and greater relative rates of transpiration to photosynthesis. Tocopherol status affected development of foliar vasculature as dependent on growth environment. The most notable impact of tocopherol deficiency was seen under hot growth temperature, where the vte1 mutant exhibited greater numbers of tracheary elements (TEs) per vein, a greater ratio of TEs to sieve elements, with smaller individual sizes of TEs, and resulting similar total areas of TEs per vein and transpiration rates compared with Col-0 wild-type. These findings illustrate the plasticity of foliar vascular anatomy acclimation to growth environment resulting from independent adjustments of the vasculature's components. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. Inference of the genetic network regulating lateral root initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Daniele; Voβ, Ute; Wilson, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm; Byrne, Helen; De Smet, Ive; Hodgman, Charlie; King, John

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is crucial for organism growth, and it is one of the challenges in systems biology to reconstruct the underlying regulatory biological networks from transcriptomic data. The formation of lateral roots in Arabidopsis thaliana is stimulated by a cascade of regulators of which only the interactions of its initial elements have been identified. Using simulated gene expression data with known network topology, we compare the performance of inference algorithms, based on different approaches, for which ready-to-use software is available. We show that their performance improves with the network size and the inclusion of mutants. We then analyze two sets of genes, whose activity is likely to be relevant to lateral root initiation in Arabidopsis, and assess causality of their regulatory interactions by integrating sequence analysis with the intersection of the results of the best performing methods on time series and mutants. The methods applied capture known interactions between genes that are candidate regulators at early stages of development. The network inferred from genes significantly expressed during lateral root formation exhibits distinct scale free, small world and hierarchical properties and the nodes with a high out-degree may warrant further investigation.

  15. Two thymidine kinases and one multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase salvage DNA precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders R.; Girandon, Lenart; Ali, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleotides are the building blocks of DNA and can be synthesized via de novo and salvage pathways. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (EC 2.7.1.145) salvage deoxyribonucleosides by transfer of a phosphate group to the 5′ of a deoxyribonucleoside. This salvage pathway is well characterized....... Deoxyribonucleoside kinase activities were present in all tissues during all growth stages. In the A. thaliana genome, we identified two types of genes that could encode enzymes which are involved in the salvage of deoxyribonucleosides. Thymidine kinase activity was encoded by two thymidine kinase 1 (EC 2.......7.1.21)‐like genes (AtTK1a and AtTK1b). Deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine and deoxycytidine kinase activities were encoded by a single AtdNK gene. T‐DNA insertion lines of AtTK1a and AtTK1b mutant genes had normal growth, although AtTK1a AtTK1b double mutants died at an early stage, which indicates that AtTK1a...

  16. Two thymidine kinases and one multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase salvage DNA precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anders Ranegaard Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Girandon, Lenart; Ali, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleotides are the building blocks of DNA and can be synthesized via de novo and salvage pathways. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (EC 2.7.1.145) salvage deoxyribonucleosides by transfer of a phosphate group to the 5' of a deoxyribonucleoside. This salvage pathway is well characterized....... Deoxyribonucleoside kinase activities were present in all tissues during all growth stages. In the A. thaliana genome, we identified two types of genes that could encode enzymes which are involved in the salvage of deoxyribonucleosides. Thymidine kinase activity was encoded by two thymidine kinase 1 (EC 2.......7.1.21)-like genes (AtTK1a and AtTK1b). Deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine and deoxycytidine kinase activities were encoded by a single AtdNK gene. T-DNA insertion lines of AtTK1a and AtTK1b mutant genes had normal growth, although AtTK1a AtTK1b double mutants died at an early stage, which indicates that AtTK1a...

  17. Inference of the Genetic Network Regulating Lateral Root Initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Muraro, D.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is crucial for organism growth, and it is one of the challenges in systems biology to reconstruct the underlying regulatory biological networks from transcriptomic data. The formation of lateral roots in Arabidopsis thaliana is stimulated by a cascade of regulators of which only the interactions of its initial elements have been identified. Using simulated gene expression data with known network topology, we compare the performance of inference algorithms, based on different approaches, for which ready-to-use software is available. We show that their performance improves with the network size and the inclusion of mutants. We then analyze two sets of genes, whose activity is likely to be relevant to lateral root initiation in Arabidopsis, and assess causality of their regulatory interactions by integrating sequence analysis with the intersection of the results of the best performing methods on time series and mutants. The methods applied capture known interactions between genes that are candidate regulators at early stages of development. The network inferred from genes significantly expressed during lateral root formation exhibits distinct scale free, small world and hierarchical properties and the nodes with a high out-degree may warrant further investigation. © 2004-2012 IEEE.

  18. Redirection of auxin flow in Arabidopsis thaliana roots after infection by root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Tina; Goverse, Aska; Haegeman, Annelies; Warmerdam, Sonja; Wanjau, Cecilia; Jahani, Mona; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2016-08-01

    Plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes induce the formation of giant cells within the plant root, and it has been recognized that auxin accumulates in these feeding sites. Here, we studied the role of the auxin transport system governed by AUX1/LAX3 influx proteins and different PIN efflux proteins during feeding site development in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Data generated via promoter-reporter line and protein localization analyses evoke a model in which auxin is being imported at the basipetal side of the feeding site by the concerted action of the influx proteins AUX1 and LAX3, and the efflux protein PIN3. Mutants in auxin influx proteins AUX1 and LAX3 bear significantly fewer and smaller galls, revealing that auxin import into the feeding sites is needed for their development and expansion. The feeding site development in auxin export (PIN) mutants was only slightly hampered. Expression of some PINs appears to be suppressed in galls, probably to prevent auxin drainage. Nevertheless, a functional PIN4 gene seems to be a prerequisite for proper nematode development and gall expansion, most likely by removing excessive auxin to stabilize the hormone level in the feeding site. Our data also indicate a role of local auxin peaks in nematode attraction towards the root. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS D is required for systemic acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijayata; Roy, Shweta; Giri, Mrunmay Kumar; Chaturvedi, Ratnesh; Chowdhury, Zulkarnain; Shah, Jyoti; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Localized infection in plants often induces systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides long-term protection against subsequent infections. A signal originating in the SAR-inducing organ is transported to the distal organs, where it stimulates salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and priming, a mechanism that results in more robust activation of defenses in response to subsequent pathogen infection. In recent years, several metabolites that promote long-distance SAR signaling have been identified. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to the SAR signals are largely obscure. Here, we show that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, the FLOWERING LOCUS D (FLD) is required for responding to the SAR signals leading to the systemic accumulation of SA and enhancement of disease resistance. Although the fld mutant was competent in accumulating the SAR-inducing signal, it was unable to respond to the SAR signal that accumulates in petiole exudates of wild-type leaves inoculated with a SAR-inducing pathogen. Supporting FLD's role in systemic SAR signaling, we observed that dehydroabietinal and azelaic acid, two metabolites that, in wild-type plants, promote SAR-associated systemic accumulation of SA and priming, respectively, were unable to promote SAR in the fld mutant. FLD also participates in flowering, where it functions to repress expression of the flowering repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). However, epistasis analysis indicates that FLD's function in SAR is independent of FLC.

  20. Jasmonic acid and glucose synergistically modulate the accumulation of glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rongfang; Shen, Wangshu; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lihong; Wang, Qiaomei

    2013-12-01

    The interplay of plant hormones and glucose (Glu) in regulating glucosinolate accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated in this study. Glucose-induced glucosinolate biosynthesis was enhanced significantly by the addition of jasmonic acid (JA), whereas the synergistic effect of salicylic acid (SA) and Glu was less obvious. The enhanced glucosinolate accumulation is associated with elevated expression of genes in glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway, as well as the transcription factors involved in their regulation, such as MYB28, MYB29, MYB34, and MYB122. The induction of indolic and aliphatic glucosinolates after treatment with JA and Glu in JA-insensitive mutants, coi1, jar1, and jin1, was compromised. Moreover, the effect of JA and Glu on glucosinolate contents was dramatically reduced in Glu-insensitive mutants, rgs1-2 and abi5-7. These results indicate a crosstalk between JA and Glu signalling in the regulation of glucosinolate biosynthesis. JA signalling, RGS1 (the putative membrane receptor of Glu signalling), and ABI5, are involved in the synergistic effect of JA and Glu on glucosinolate accumulation.

  1. Ultraviolet-B radiation stimulates downward leaf curling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Ana Carolina; Leroux, Olivier; De Coninck, Barbara; Cammue, Bruno P A; Marchal, Kathleen; Prinsen, Els; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Vandenbussche, Filip

    2015-08-01

    Plants are very well adapted to growth in ultraviolet-B (UV-B) containing light. In Arabidopsis thaliana, many of these adaptations are mediated by the UV-B receptor UV resistance locus 8 (UVR8). Using small amounts of supplementary UV-B light, we observed changes in the shape of rosette leaf blades. Wild type plants show more pronounced epinasty of the blade edges, while this is not the case in uvr8 mutant plants. The UVR8 effect thus mimics the effect of phytochrome (phy) B in red light. In addition, a meta-analysis of transcriptome data indicates that the UVR8 and phyB signaling pathways have over 70% of gene regulation in common. Moreover, in low levels of supplementary UV-B light, mutant analysis revealed that phyB signaling is necessary for epinasty of the blade edges. Analysis of auxin levels and the auxin signal reporter DR5::GUS suggest that the epinasty relies on altered auxin distribution, keeping auxin at the leaf blade edges in the presence of UV-B. Together, our results suggest a co-action of phyB and UVR8 signaling, with auxin as a downstream factor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Combined Low Glutathione with Mild Oxidative and Low Phosphorus Stress on the Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Fukushima

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants possess highly sensitive mechanisms that monitor environmental stress levels for a dose-dependent fine-tuning of their growth and development. Differences in plant responses to severe and mild abiotic stresses have been recognized. Although many studies have revealed that glutathione can contribute to plant tolerance to various environmental stresses, little is known about the relationship between glutathione and mild abiotic stress, especially the effect of stress-induced altered glutathione levels on the metabolism. Here, we applied a systems biology approach to identify key pathways involved in the gene-to-metabolite networks perturbed by low glutathione content under mild abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. We used glutathione synthesis mutants (cad2-1 and pad2-1 and plants overexpressing the gene encoding γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, the first enzyme of the glutathione biosynthetic pathway. The plants were exposed to two mild stress conditions—oxidative stress elicited by methyl viologen and stress induced by the limited availability of phosphate. We observed that the mutants and transgenic plants showed similar shoot growth as that of the wild-type plants under mild abiotic stress. We then selected the synthesis mutants and performed multi-platform metabolomics and microarray experiments to evaluate the possible effects on the overall metabolome and the transcriptome. As a common oxidative stress response, several flavonoids that we assessed showed overaccumulation, whereas the mild phosphate stress resulted in increased levels of specific kaempferol- and quercetin-glycosides. Remarkably, in addition to a significant increased level of sugar, osmolytes, and lipids as mild oxidative stress-responsive metabolites, short-chain aliphatic glucosinolates over-accumulated in the mutants, whereas the level of long-chain aliphatic glucosinolates and specific lipids decreased. Coordinated gene expressions related to glucosinolate and

  3. The Early-Acting Peroxin PEX19 Is Redundantly Encoded, Farnesylated, and Essential for Viability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M McDonnell

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are single-membrane bound organelles that are essential for normal development in plants and animals. In mammals and yeast, the peroxin (PEX proteins PEX3 and PEX19 facilitate the early steps of peroxisome membrane protein (PMP insertion and pre-peroxisome budding from the endoplasmic reticulum. The PEX3 membrane protein acts as a docking site for PEX19, a cytosolic chaperone for PMPs that delivers PMPs to the endoplasmic reticulum or peroxisomal membrane. PEX19 is farnesylated in yeast and mammals, and we used immunoblotting with prenylation mutants to show that PEX19 also is fully farnesylated in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants. We examined insertional alleles disrupting either of the two Arabidopsis PEX19 isoforms, PEX19A or PEX19B, and detected similar levels of PEX19 protein in the pex19a-1 mutant and wild type; however, PEX19 protein was nearly undetectable in the pex19b-1 mutant. Despite the reduction in PEX19 levels in pex19b-1, both pex19a-1 and pex19b-1 single mutants lacked notable peroxisomal β-oxidation defects and displayed normal levels and localization of peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. The pex19a-1 pex19b-1 double mutant was embryo lethal, indicating a redundantly encoded critical role for PEX19 during embryogenesis. Expressing YFP-tagged versions of either PEX19 isoform rescued this lethality, confirming that PEX19A and PEX19B act redundantly in Arabidopsis. We observed that pex19b-1 enhanced peroxisome-related defects of a subset of peroxin-defective mutants, supporting a role for PEX19 in peroxisome function. Together, our data indicate that Arabidopsis PEX19 promotes peroxisome function and is essential for viability.

  4. Analysis of Stomatal Patterning in Selected Mutants of MAPK Pathways

    KAUST Repository

    Felemban, Abrar

    2016-05-01

    Stomata are cellular valves in plants that play an essential role in the regulation of gas exchange and are distributed in the epidermis of aerial organs. In Arabidopsis thaliana, stomatal production and development are coordinated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, which modulates a variety of other processes, including cell proliferation, regulation of cytokinesis, programed cell death, and response to abiotic and biotic stress. The environment also plays a role in stomatal development, by influencing the frequency at which stomata develop in leaves. This thesis presents an analysis of stomatal development in Arabidopsis mutants in two MAPK pathways: MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4, and MAP3K17/18-MKK3. Obtained results demonstrate the effect of stress conditions on stomatal development and specify the involvement of analysed MAPK in stomatal patterning. First, both analysed pathways modulate stomatal patterning in Arabidopsis cotyledons. Second, plant growth-promoting bacteria tested enhance stomatal density and affect guard cell morphology. Third, the sucrose or mannitol treatment increases defects in stomatal patterning. Finally, salt stress or high temperature can suppress stomatal defects in mutants of the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 pathway.

  5. Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, X.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. I studied numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The large genomic changes are important for

  6. Sinapic acid or its derivatives interfere with abscisic acid homeostasis during Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Baodi; Tang, Jingliang; Han, Shuang; Guo, Jinggong; Miao, Yuchen

    2017-06-06

    Sinapic acid and its esters have broad functions in different stages of seed germination and plant development and are thought to play a role in protecting against ultraviolet irradiation. To better understand the interactions between sinapic acid esters and seed germination processes in response to various stresses, we analyzed the role of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in the regulation of sinapic acid esters involved in seed germination and early seedling growth. We found that exogenous sinapic acid promotes seed germination in a dose-dependent manner in Arabidopsis thaliana. High-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis showed that exogenous sinapic acid increased the sinapoylcholine content of imbibed seeds. Furthermore, sinapic acid affected ABA catabolism, resulting in reduced ABA levels and increased levels of the ABA-glucose ester. Using mutants deficient in the synthesis of sinapate esters, we showed that the germination of mutant sinapoylglucose accumulator 2 (sng2) and bright trichomes 1 (brt1) seeds was more sensitive to ABA than the wild-type. Moreover, Arabidopsis mutants deficient in either abscisic acid deficient 2 (ABA2) or abscisic acid insensitive 3 (ABI3) displayed increased expression of the sinapoylglucose:choline sinapoyltransferase (SCT) and sinapoylcholine esterase (SCE) genes with sinapic acid treatment. This treatment also affected the accumulation of sinapoylcholine and free choline during seed germination. We demonstrated that sinapoylcholine, which constitutes the major phenolic component in seeds among various minor sinapate esters, affected ABA homeostasis during seed germination and early seedling growth in Arabidopsis. Our findings provide insights into the role of sinapic acid and its esters in regulating ABA-mediated inhibition of Arabidopsis seed germination in response to drought stress.

  7. Demographic history of european populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier François

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana is successful at colonizing land that has recently undergone human-mediated disturbance. To investigate the prehistoric spread of A. thaliana, we applied approximate Bayesian computation and explicit spatial modeling to 76 European accessions sequenced at 876 nuclear loci. We find evidence that a major migration wave occurred from east to west, affecting most of the sampled individuals. The longitudinal gradient appears to result from the plant having spread in Europe from the east approximately 10,000 years ago, with a rate of westward spread of approximately 0.9 km/year. This wave-of-advance model is consistent with a natural colonization from an eastern glacial refugium that overwhelmed ancient western lineages. However, the speed and time frame of the model also suggest that the migration of A. thaliana into Europe may have accompanied the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic transition.

  8. Cleaning the GenBank Arabidopsis thaliana data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korning, Peter G.; Hebsgaard, Stefan M.; Rouze, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    Data driven computational biology relies on the large quantities of genomic data stored in international sequence data banks. However, the possibilities are drastically impaired if the stored data is unreliable. During a project aiming to predict splice sites in the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana, we...... extracted a data set from the A. thaliana entries in GenBank. A number of simple `sanity' checks, based on the nature of the data, revealed an alarmingly high error rate. More than 15% of the most important entries extracted did contain erroneous information. In addition, a number of entries had directly...... common. It is proposed that the level of error correction should be increased and that gene structure sanity checks should be incorporated - also at the submitter level - to avoid or reduce the problem in the future. A non-redundant and error corrected subset of the data for A. thaliana is made available...

  9. Transcriptional and metabolomic analysis of Ascophyllum nodosum mediated freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that lipophilic components (LPC) of the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ANE) improved freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanism(s) of this induced freezing stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here, we investigated LPC induced changes in the transcriptome and metabolome of A. thaliana undergoing freezing stress. Results Gene expression studies revealed that the accumulation of proline was mediated by an increase in the expression of the proline synthesis genes P5CS1 and P5CS2 and a marginal reduction in the expression of the proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) gene. Moreover, LPC application significantly increased the concentration of total soluble sugars in the cytosol in response to freezing stress. Arabidopsis sfr4 mutant plants, defective in the accumulation of free sugars, treated with LPC, exhibited freezing sensitivity similar to that of untreated controls. The 1H NMR metabolite profile of LPC-treated Arabidopsis plants exposed to freezing stress revealed a spectrum dominated by chemical shifts (δ) representing soluble sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids and lipophilic components like fatty acids, as compared to control plants. Additionally, 2D NMR spectra suggested an increase in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids in LPC treated plants under freezing stress. These results were supported by global transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis revealed that LPC treatment altered the expression of 1113 genes (5%) in comparison with untreated plants. A total of 463 genes (2%) were up regulated while 650 genes (3%) were down regulated. Conclusion Taken together, the results of the experiments presented in this paper provide evidence to support LPC mediated freezing tolerance enhancement through a combination of the priming of plants for the increased accumulation of osmoprotectants and alteration of cellular fatty acid composition. PMID:23171218

  10. Transcriptional and metabolomic analysis of Ascophyllum nodosum mediated freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Prasanth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that lipophilic components (LPC of the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ANE improved freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanism(s of this induced freezing stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here, we investigated LPC induced changes in the transcriptome and metabolome of A. thaliana undergoing freezing stress. Results Gene expression studies revealed that the accumulation of proline was mediated by an increase in the expression of the proline synthesis genes P5CS1 and P5CS2 and a marginal reduction in the expression of the proline dehydrogenase (ProDH gene. Moreover, LPC application significantly increased the concentration of total soluble sugars in the cytosol in response to freezing stress. Arabidopsis sfr4 mutant plants, defective in the accumulation of free sugars, treated with LPC, exhibited freezing sensitivity similar to that of untreated controls. The 1H NMR metabolite profile of LPC-treated Arabidopsis plants exposed to freezing stress revealed a spectrum dominated by chemical shifts (δ representing soluble sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids and lipophilic components like fatty acids, as compared to control plants. Additionally, 2D NMR spectra suggested an increase in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids in LPC treated plants under freezing stress. These results were supported by global transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis revealed that LPC treatment altered the expression of 1113 genes (5% in comparison with untreated plants. A total of 463 genes (2% were up regulated while 650 genes (3% were down regulated. Conclusion Taken together, the results of the experiments presented in this paper provide evidence to support LPC mediated freezing tolerance enhancement through a combination of the priming of plants for the increased accumulation of osmoprotectants and alteration of cellular fatty acid composition.

  11. CYP85A1 is required for the initiation of female gametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-España, Victor Hugo; Sánchez-León, Nidia; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid-like hormones essential for plant growth and development. The most active forms of brassinosteroids are Brassinolide (BL) and Castasterone (CS), which are catalyzed by members of the CYP85A family of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are two CYP85A gene members: CYP85A1 and CYP85A2. Unlike CYP85A1, CYP85A2 mediates the conversion of CS to BL. In contrast to mutations in CYP85A2 that result in severe dwarfism, cyp85a1 mutants do not show any obvious morphological phenotype during vegetative or floral development. By analyzing large-scale transcriptional activity in the ovule of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), we determined that CYP85A1 is abundantly expressed in wild-type but not in sporocyteless (spl) ovules lacking a female gametophyte. Insertional T-DNA lines defective in the activity of CYP85A1 exhibit a semi-sterile phenotype, suggesting a role for the corresponding enzyme acting at the gametophytic level. The CYP85A1 mRNA is localized in the female gametophyte and its neighboring sporophytic cells; however, translational fusions of the CYP85A1 promoter to uidA (GUS) showed GUS expression restricted to the female gametophyte, suggesting that within the ovule the corresponding protein is mostly active in gametophytic cells. A cytological analysis of heterozygous cyp85a1/+ individuals showed that close to 50% of female gametophytes are arrested before the first nuclear mitotic division of the haploid functional megaspore. Our results indicate that BR biosynthesis is required for the initiation of megagametogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  12. Involvement of Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of proline catabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie eLeprince

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant adaptation to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity involves complex regulatory processes. Deciphering the signalling components that are involved in stress signal transduction and cellular responses is of importance to understand how plants cope with salt stress. Accumulation of osmolytes such as proline is considered to participate in the osmotic adjustment of plant cells to salinity. Proline accumulation results from a tight regulation between its biosynthesis and catabolism. Lipid signal components such as phospholipases C and D have previously been shown to be involved in the regulation of proline metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we demonstrate that proline metabolism is also regulated by class-III Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, VPS34, which catalyses the formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P from phosphatidylinositol. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we show that the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, affects PI3P levels in vivo and that it triggers a decrease in proline accumulation in response to salt treatment of A. thaliana seedlings. The lower proline accumulation is correlated with a lower transcript level of Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase 1 biosynthetic enzyme and higher transcript and protein levels of Proline dehydrogenase 1 (ProDH1, a key-enzyme in proline catabolism. We also found that the ProDH1 expression is induced in a pi3k-hemizygous mutant, further demonstrating that PI3K is involved in the regulation of proline catabolism through transcriptional regulation of ProDH1. A broader metabolomic analysis indicates that LY294002 also reduced other metabolites, such as hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids and sugars like raffinose.

  13. Aequorin mutants with increased thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaoge; Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Ensor, Mark; Daunert, Sylvia

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescent labels can be especially useful for in vivo and live animal studies due to the negligible bioluminescence background in cells and most animals, and the non-toxicity of bioluminescent reporter systems. Significant thermal stability of bioluminescent labels is essential, however, due to the longitudinal nature and physiological temperature conditions of many bioluminescent-based studies. To improve the thermostability of the bioluminescent protein aequorin, we employed random and rational mutagenesis strategies to create two thermostable double mutants, S32T/E156V and M36I/E146K, and a particularly thermostable quadruple mutant, S32T/E156V/Q168R/L170I. The double aequorin mutants, S32T/E156V and M36I/E146K, retained 4 and 2.75 times more of their initial bioluminescence activity than wild-type aequorin during thermostability studies at 37 °C. Moreover, the quadruple aequorin mutant, S32T/E156V/Q168R/L170I, exhibited more thermostability at a variety of temperatures than either double mutant alone, producing the most thermostable aequorin mutant identified thus far.

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana-Alternaria brassicicola pathosystem: A model interaction for investigating seed transmission of necrotrophic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochon Stephanie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed transmission constitutes a major component of the parasitic cycle for several fungal pathogens. However, very little is known concerning fungal or plant genetic factors that impact seed transmission and mechanisms underlying this key biological trait have yet to be clarified. Such lack of available data could be probably explained by the absence of suitable model pathosystem to study plant-fungus interactions during the plant reproductive phase. Results Here we report on setting up a new pathosystem that could facilitate the study of fungal seed transmission. Reproductive organs of Arabidopsis thaliana were inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola conidia. Parameters (floral vs fruit route, seed collection date, plant and silique developmental stages that could influence the seed transmission efficiency were tested to define optimal seed infection conditions. Microscopic observations revealed that the fungus penetrates siliques through cellular junctions, replum and stomata, and into seed coats either directly or through cracks. The ability of the osmosensitive fungal mutant nik1Δ3 to transmit to A. thaliana seeds was analyzed. A significant decrease in seed transmission rate was observed compared to the wild-type parental strain, confirming that a functional osmoregulation pathway is required for efficient seed transmission of the fungus. Similarly, to test the role of flavonoids in seed coat protection against pathogens, a transparent testa Arabidopsis mutant (tt4-1 not producing any flavonoid was used as host plant. Unexpectedly, tt4-1 seeds were infected to a significantly lower extent than wild-type seeds, possibly due to over-accumulation of other antimicrobial metabolites. Conclusions The Arabidopsis thaliana-Alternaria brassicicola pathosystem, that have been widely used to study plant-pathogen interactions during the vegetative phase, also proved to constitute a suitable model pathosystem for detailed analysis

  15. Utilisation des mutations induites pour l'étude de l'embryogenèse chez le haricot Phaseolus vulgaris L. et deux plantes modèles Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. et Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silué, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of induced mutations in embryogenesis study in bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. and Zea mays L.. Breeding of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., through interspecific hybridizations with the species Phaseolus coccineus L. and Phaseolus polyanthus Greenm. as female parents leads to the abortion of immature embryos. Identification of genes required for embryo development could partly explain the abortion of hybrid embryos; induced mutations could thus be an alternative to identify key genes involved in Phaseolus embryogenesis. This paper is a review which shows a few examples of the use of induced mutations in the identification of essential genes for embryogenesis in two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heyhn. for dicots and Zea mays L. for monocots. In these two species, embryo development mutants have been isolated using insertional mutagenesis and chemical mutagenesis with Ethyl Methane Sulfonate (EMS. Arabidopsis embryo mutants are affected in apical-basal axis polarity, radial pattern and in post-embryonic stages. Some Arabidopsis embryo mutants are defected in auxin signalisation. In maize, defective kernel (dek mutants are affected in the embryo and the endosperm, while in embryo specific (emb mutants, only the embryo is affected. In common bean, plants deficient in seed development were isolated using EMS mutagenesis. Embryos inside the seeds fail to growth at different stages of development and show abnormalities mainly in the suspensor and the cotyledons.

  16. Etude de la stabilité de la méthylation ADN chez Arabidopsis thaliana et impact sur la transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Rigal, Mélanie

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of DNA methylation at CG sites is crucial for silencing of transposable element (TE) and proper expression of genes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, met1-3 mutant, deficient in CG methylation, shows ectopic appearance of CHG methylation at numerous genes, as well as relocation of H3K9me2, from heterochromatin towards euchromatin. We have shown that this is due to a defect of the transcription of the large intron of the gene encoding the IBM1 H3K9me2 demethylase. We also found that, in th...

  17. Regulation of Seed Vigor by Manipulation of Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides in Maize and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Yumin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Ying; Dirk, Lynnette M A; Goodman, Jack; Downie, A Bruce; Wang, Jianmin; Wang, Guoying; Zhao, Tianyong

    2017-12-04

    Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) accumulate in seeds during maturation desiccation in many plant species. However, it remains unclear whether RFOs have a role in establishing seed vigor. GALACTINOL SYNTHASE (GOLS), RAFFINOSE SYNTHASE (RS), and STACHYOSE SYNTHASE (STS) are the enzymes responsible for RFO biosynthesis in plants. Interestingly, only raffinose is detected in maize seeds, and a unique maize RS gene (ZmRS) was identified. In this study, we found that two independent mutator (Mu)-interrupted zmrs lines, containing no raffinose but hyperaccumulating galactinol, have significantly reduced seed vigor, compared with null segregant controls. Unlike maize, Arabidopsis thaliana seeds contain several RFOs (raffinose, stachyose, and verbascose). Manipulation of A. thaliana RFO content by overexpressing ZmGOLS2, ZmRS, or AtSTS demonstrated that co-overexpression of ZmGOLS2 and ZmRS, or overexpression of ZmGOLS2 alone, significantly increased the total content of RFOs and enhanced Arabidopsis seed vigor. Surprisingly, while overexpression of ZmRS increased seed raffinose content, its overexpression dramatically decreased seed vigor and reduced the seed amounts of galactinol, stachyose, and verbascose. In contrast, the atrs5 mutant seeds are similar to those of the wild type with regard to seed vigor and RFO content, except for stachyose, which accumulated in atrs5 seeds. Total RFOs, RFO/sucrose ratio, but not absolute individual RFO amounts, positively correlated with A. thaliana seed vigor, to which stachyose and verbascose contribute more than raffinose. Taken together, these results provide new insights into regulatory mechanisms of seed vigor and reveal distinct requirement for RFOs in modulating seed vigor in a monocot and a dicot. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of surface structure mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana on the polarization of reflections from virus-infected leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D J; Partridge, J C; Roberts, N W; Boonham, N; Foster, G D

    2017-01-01

    The way in which light is polarized when reflected from leaves can be affected by infection with plant viruses. This has the potential to influence viral transmission by insect vectors due to altered visual attractiveness of infected plants. The optical and topological properties of cuticular waxes and trichomes are important determinants of how light is polarized upon reflection. Changes in expression of genes involved in the formation of surface structures have also been reported following viral infection. This paper investigates the role of altered surface structures in virus-induced changes to polarization reflection from leaves. The percentage polarization of reflections from Arabidopsis thaliana cer5, cer6 and cer8 wax synthesis mutants, and the gl1 leaf hair mutant, was compared to those from wild-type (WT) leaves. The cer5 mutant leaves were less polarizing than WT on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces; gl1 leaves were more polarizing than WT on the adaxial surfaces. The cer6 and cer8 mutations did not significantly affect polarization reflection. The impacts of Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV) infection on the polarization of reflected light were significantly affected by cer5 mutation, with the reflections from cer5 mutants being higher than those from WT leaves, suggesting that changes in CER5 expression following infection could influence the polarization of the reflections. There was, however, no significant effect of the gl1 mutation on polarization following TVCV infection. The cer5 and gl1 mutations did not affect the changes in polarization following Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) infection. The accumulation of TVCV and CMV did not differ significantly between mutant and WT leaves, suggesting that altered expression of surface structure genes does not significantly affect viral titres, raising the possibility that if such regulatory changes have any adaptive value it may possibly be through impacts on viral transmission.

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana VOZ (Vascular plant One-Zinc finger transcription factors are required for proper regulation of flowering time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Celesnik

    2013-03-01

    Transition to flowering in plants is tightly controlled by environmental cues, which regulate the photoperiod and vernalization pathways, and endogenous signals, which mediate the autonomous and gibberellin pathways. In this work, we investigated the role of two Zn2+-finger transcription factors, the paralogues AtVOZ1 and AtVOZ2, in Arabidopsis thaliana flowering. Single atvoz1-1 and atvoz2-1 mutants showed no significant phenotypes as compared to wild type. However, atvoz1-1 atvoz2-1 double mutant plants exhibited several phenotypes characteristic of flowering-time mutants. The double mutant displayed a severe delay in flowering, together with additional pleiotropic phenotypes. Late flowering correlated with elevated expression of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, which encodes a potent floral repressor, and decreased expression of its target, the floral promoter FD. Vernalization rescued delayed flowering of atvoz1-1 atvoz2-1 and reversed elevated FLC levels. Accumulation of FLC transcripts in atvoz1-1 atvoz2-1 correlated with increased expression of several FLC activators, including components of the PAF1 and SWR1 chromatin-modifying complexes. Additionally, AtVOZs were shown to bind the promoter of MOS3/SAR3 and directly regulate expression of this nuclear pore protein, which is known to participate in the regulation of flowering time, suggesting that AtVOZs exert at least some of their flowering regulation by influencing the nuclear pore function. Complementation of atvoz1-1 atvoz2-1 with AtVOZ2 reversed all double mutant phenotypes, confirming that the observed morphological and molecular changes arise from the absence of functional AtVOZ proteins, and validating the functional redundancy between AtVOZ1 and AtVOZ2.

  20. LLM-Domain B-GATA Transcription Factors Promote Stomatal Development Downstream of Light Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana Hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranftl, Quirin L.; Diener, Julia; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Richter, René

    2016-01-01

    Stomata are pores that regulate the gas and water exchange between the environment and aboveground plant tissues, including hypocotyls, leaves, and stems. Here, we show that mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana LLM-domain B-GATA genes are defective in stomata formation in hypocotyls. Conversely, stomata formation is strongly promoted by overexpression of various LLM-domain B-class GATA genes, most strikingly in hypocotyls but also in cotyledons. Genetic analyses indicate that these B-GATAs act upstream of the stomata formation regulators SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, and SCREAM/SCREAM2 and downstream or independent of the patterning regulators TOO MANY MOUTHS and STOMATAL DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION1. The effects of the GATAs on stomata formation are light dependent but can be induced in dark-grown seedlings by red, far-red, or blue light treatments. PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) mutants form stomata in the dark, and in this genetic background, GATA expression is sufficient to induce stomata formation in the dark. Since the expression of the LLM-domain B-GATAs GNC (GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED) and GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 as well as that of SPCH is red light induced but the induction of SPCH is compromised in a GATA gene mutant background, we hypothesize that PIF- and light-regulated stomata formation in hypocotyls is critically dependent on LLM-domain B-GATA genes. PMID:26917680

  1. Transgenerational changes in plant physiology and in transposon expression in response to UV-C stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migicovsky, Zoe; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Stress has a negative impact on crop yield by altering a gain in biomass and affecting seed set. Recent reports suggest that exposure to stress also influences the response of the progeny. In this paper, we analyzed seed size, leaf size, bolting time and transposon expression in 2 consecutive generations of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to moderate UV-C stress. Since previous reports suggested a potential role of Dicer-like (DCL) proteins in the establishment of transgenerational response, we used dcl2, dcl3 and dcl4 mutants in parallel with wild-type plants. These studies revealed that leaf number decreased in the progeny of UV-C stressed plants, and bolting occurred later. Transposons were also re-activated in the progeny of stressed plants. Changes in the dcl mutants were less prominent than in wild-type plants. DCL2 and DCL3 appeared to be more important in the transgenerational stress memory than DCL4 because transgenerational changes were less profound in the dcl2 and dcl3 mutants.

  2. S-methylmethionine is involved in the salinity tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants at germination and early growth stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Saori; Mitsuya, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    Methionine (Met) is biosynthesized by the activated methyl cycle and S-methylmethionine (SMM) cycle in one-carbon (C1) metabolism in plants. It is converted to S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) which serves as a precursor for many metabolites including glycinebetaine, methylated polyols, polyamines and ethylene which accumulate in plants in response to salinity. We have investigated how the Met biosynthetic pathway is regulated under saline conditions at the transcriptional level in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Within Met biosynthesis-related genes, the expression of homocysteine methyltransferase (HMT) and methionine methyltransferase (MMT) genes in SMM cycle had altered toward increasing Met production by the presence of NaCl. We have determined the salinity tolerance of an Arabidopsis mmt mutant with an insertional mutation in the single copy of the AtMMT gene. Although the mmt mutant showed comparable germination and shoot growth with wild type under normal conditions, NaCl treatment caused severe repression of germination rate and shoot growth in the mmt mutant compared with in the wild type. These results indicate that the utilization of SMM is important for the salinity tolerance of Arabidopsis plants at the germination and early growth stages. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  3. NIMA-related kinases regulate directional cell growth and organ development through microtubule function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motose, Hiroyasu; Takatani, Shogo; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Taku

    2012-12-01

    NIMA-related kinase 6 (NEK6) regulates cellular expansion and morphogenesis through microtubule organizaiton in Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss-of-function mutations in NEK6 (nek6/ibo1) cause ectopic outgrowth and microtubule disorganization in epidermal cells. We recently found that NEK6 forms homodimers and heterodimers with NEK4 and NEK5 to destabilize cortical microtubules possibly by direct binding to microtubules and the β-tubulin phosphorylation. Here, we identified a new allele of NEK6 and further analyzed the morphological phenotypes of nek6/ibo1 mutants, along with alleles of nek4 and nek5 mutants. Phenotypic analysis demonstrated that NEK6 is required for the directional growth of roots and hypocotyls, petiole elongation, cell file formation, and trichome morphogenesis. In addition, nek4, nek5, and nek6/ibo1 mutants were hypersensitive to microtubule inhibitors such as propyzamide and taxol. These results suggest that plant NEKs function in directional cell growth and organ development through the regulation of microtubule organization.

  4. Metabolic changes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing chalcone synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dao, Thi Thanh Hien

    2010-01-01

    The study has shown that it is possible to introduce the heterologous CHS gene in Arabidopsis thaliana and common multicopies of transgenes containing plants were obtained. Analysis of the change in metabolome of CHS transgenic plants, high expression transgenic lines can be identified by markers

  5. Multi-element bioimaging of Arabidopsis thaliana roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persson, Daniel Pergament; Chen, Anle; Aarts, Mark G.M.; Salt, David E.; Schjoerring, Jan K.; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of root function is central for the development of plants with more efficient nutrient uptake and translocation. We here present a method for multielement bioimaging at the cellular level in roots of the genetic model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using

  6. The influences of Hygromycin B on growth of Arabidopsis thaliana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling cotyledon and leaf were evidently affected by Hygromycin B. As compared to the control, cotyledon of seedling on Murashige and Skoog (MS) with Hygromycin B was very small and its leaf was not formed. Along with increase in culture time, cells in the ...

  7. Human intrinsic factor expressed in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Laursen, Niels B; Nexø, Ebba

    2003-01-01

    and contamination by other B12 binders. We tested the use of recombinant plants for large-scale production of pathogen-free human recombinant IF. Human IF was successfully expressed in the recombinant plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Extract from fresh plants possessed high B12-binding capacity corresponding to 70 mg...

  8. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Zan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least one accession. Thousands of genes had high transcript levels in some accessions, but no transcripts at all in others, and this pattern was correlated with the genome-wide genotype. In total, 2669 eQTL were mapped in the largest population, and 717 of them were replicated in the other population. A total of 646 cis-eQTL-regulated genes that lacked detectable transcripts in some accessions was found, and for 159 of these we identified one, or several, common structural variants in the populations that were shown to be likely contributors to the lack of detectable RNA transcripts for these genes. This study thus provides new insights into the overall genetic regulation of global gene expression diversity in the leaf of natural A. thaliana accessions. Further, it also shows that strong cis-acting polymorphisms, many of which are likely to be structural variations, make important contributions to the transcriptional variation in the worldwide A. thaliana population.

  9. Experimental and genetic analysis of root development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.; McKhann, H.; Berg, C. van den; Willemsen, V.; Wolkenfelt, H.; Vrieze, G. de; Weisbeek, P.

    1996-01-01

    The cellular organisation of the Arabidopsis thaliana root is remarkably regular. A fate map of the primary root and root meristem that predicts the developmental destinies of cells within the embryonic root primordium has been constructed. Nevertheless, laser ablation experiments demonstrate that

  10. Transcriptional regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana chalcone synthase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinbaum, R.L.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1988-05-01

    The authors cloned an Arabiodpsis thaliana chalcone synthase (CHS) gene on the basis of cross-hybridization with a Petroselinum hortense CHS cDNA clone. The protein sequence deduced from the A. thaliana CHS DNA sequence is at least 85% homologous to the CHS sequences from P. hortense, Antirrhinum majus, and Petunia hybrida. Southern blot analysis indicated that CHS is a single-copy gene in A. thaliana. High-intensity light treatment of A. thaliana plants for 24 h caused a 50-fold increase in CHS enzyme activity and an accumulation of visibly detectable levels of anthocyanin pigments in the vegetative structures of these plants. A corresponding increase in the steady-state level of CHS mRNA was detected after high-intensity light treatment for the same period of time. The accumulation of CHS mRNA in response to high-intensity light was due, at least in part, to an increased rate of transcription of the CHS gene as demonstrated by nuclear runoff experiment.

  11. Key components of different plant defense pathways are dispensable for powdery mildew resistance of the Arabidopsis mlo2 mlo6 mlo12  triple mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Hannah; Lorek, Justine; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Consonni, Chiara; Becker, Katia; Micali, Cristina; van Themaat, Emiel Ver Loren; Bednarek, Pawel; Raaymakers, Tom M.; Appiano, Michela; Bai, Yuling; Meldau, Dorothea; Baum, Stephani; Conrath, Uwe; Feussner, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of particular plant MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O (MLO) genes confer durable and broad-spectrum penetration resistance against powdery mildew fungi. Here, we combined genetic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the defense mechanisms in the fully resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant. We found that this genotype unexpectedly overcomes the requirement for indolic antimicrobials and defense-related secretion, which are critical for i...

  12. Key Components of Different Plant Defense Pathways Are Dispensable for Powdery Mildew Resistance of the Arabidopsis mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 Triple Mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah Kuhn; Justine Lorek; Mark Kwaaitaal; Chiara Consonni; Katia Becker; Cristina Micali; Emiel Ver Loren van Themaat; Paweł Bednarek; Raaymakers, Tom M.; Michela Appiano; Yuling Bai; Dorothea Meldau; Stephani Baum; Uwe Conrath; Ivo Feussner

    2017-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of particular plant MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O (MLO) genes confer durable and broad-spectrum penetration resistance against powdery mildew fungi. Here, we combined genetic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the defense mechanisms in the fully resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant. We found that this genotype unexpectedly overcomes the requirement for indolic antimicrobials and defense-related secretion, which are critical for i...

  13. The NADPH-oxidase AtRbohI plays a positive role in drought-stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huan; Yan, Jingwei; Yu, Xiaoyun; Liang, Yan; Fang, Lin; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Zhang, Aying

    2017-09-23

    As the major resource of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the NADPH oxidases (Rbohs) have been shown to play important roles in plant cells under normal growth and stress conditions. Although many family members of Rbohs were studied, little is known about the function of RbohI in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that exogenous ABA application decreases RbohI expression and mannitol significantly increases RbohI expression at transcript level. The RbohI transcripts were strongly detected in dry seeds and roots. The loss-of-function mutant rbohI exhibited sensitivity to ABA and mannitol stress during germination. Furthermore, the lateral root growth of rbohI was severely inhibited after treatment with mannitol stress. Overexpression of RbohI in Arabidopsis significantly improves the drought tolerance. Moreover, more H2O2 accumulated in RbohI overexpressors than in wild type plants in response to mannitol stress. Our conclusion is that AtRbohI functions in drought-stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The NADPH-oxidase AtRbohI plays a positive role in drought-stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Huan [Nanjing Agricultural Univ. (China); Yan, Jingwei [Nanjing Agricultural Univ. (China); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yu, Xiaoyun [Nanjing Agricultural Univ. (China); Liang, Yan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fang, Lin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Scheller, Henrik Vibe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhang, Aying [Nanjing Agricultural Univ. (China)

    2017-05-27

    As the major resource of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the NADPH oxidases (Rbohs) have been shown to play important roles in plant cells under normal growth and stress conditions. Although many family members of Rbohs were studied, little is known about the function of RbohI in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that exogenous ABA application decreases RbohI expression and mannitol significantly increases RbohI expression at transcript level. The RbohI transcripts were strongly detected in dry seeds and roots. The loss-of-function mutant rbohI exhibited sensitivity to ABA and mannitol stress during germination. Furthermore, the lateral root growth of rbohI was severely inhibited after treatment with mannitol stress. Overexpression of RbohI in Arabidopsis significantly improves the drought tolerance. Moreover, more H2O2 accumulated in RbohI overexpressors than in wild type plants in response to mannitol stress. Our conclusion is that AtRbohI functions in drought-stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  15. Nucleolin is required for DNA methylation state and the expression of rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Pontvianne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1. Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre-rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis.

  16. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Jülke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana.

  17. AGO6 functions in RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Eun

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM is a small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated epigenetic modification that contributes to transposon silencing in plants. RdDM requires a complex transcriptional machinery that includes specialized RNA polymerases, named Pol IV and Pol V, as well as chromatin remodelling proteins, transcription factors, RNA binding proteins, and other plant-specific proteins whose functions are not yet clarified. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DICER-LIKE3 and members of the ARGONAUTE4 group of ARGONAUTE (AGO proteins are involved, respectively, in generating and using 24-nt siRNAs that trigger methylation and transcriptional gene silencing of homologous promoter sequences. AGO4 is the main AGO protein implicated in the RdDM pathway. Here we report the identification of the related AGO6 in a forward genetic screen for mutants defective in RdDM and transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root apical meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identification of AGO6, and not AGO4, in our screen is consistent with the primary expression of AGO6 in shoot and root growing points.

  18. Sustained exposure to abscisic acid enhances the colonization potential of the mutualist fungus Piriformospora indica on Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskan-Berghöfer, Tatjana; Vilches-Barro, Amaya; Müller, Teresa M; Glawischnig, Erich; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Root colonization by the beneficial fungus Piriformospora indica is controlled by plant innate immunity, but factors that channel this interaction into a mutualistic relationship are not known. We have explored the impact of abscisic acid (ABA) and osmotic stress on the P. indica interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana. The activation of plant innate immunity in roots was determined by measuring the concentration of the phytoalexin camalexin and expression of transcription factors regulating the biosynthesis of tryptophan-related defence metabolites. Furthermore, the impact of the fungus on the content of ABA, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid (JA) and JA-related metabolites was examined. We demonstrated that treatment with exogenous ABA or the ABA analogue pyrabactin increased fungal colonization efficiency without impairment of plant fitness. Concomitantly, ABA-deficient mutants of A. thaliana (aba1-6 and aba2-1) were less colonized, while plants exposed to moderate stress were more colonized than corresponding controls. Sustained exposure to ABA attenuated expression of transcription factors MYB51, MYB122 and WRKY33 in roots upon P. indica challenge or chitin treatment, and prevented an increase in camalexin content. The results indicate that ABA can strengthen the interaction with P. indica as a consequence of its impact on plant innate immunity. Consequently, ABA will be relevant for the establishment and outcome of the symbiosis under stress conditions. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Heat Stress Phenotypes of Arabidopsis Mutants Implicate Multiple Signaling Pathways in the Acquisition of Thermotolerance1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkindale, Jane; Hall, Jennifer D.; Knight, Marc R.; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the importance of different processes to heat stress tolerance, 45 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants and one transgenic line were tested for basal and acquired thermotolerance at different stages of growth. Plants tested were defective in signaling pathways (abscisic acid, salicylic acid, ethylene, and oxidative burst signaling) and in reactive oxygen metabolism (ascorbic acid or glutathione production, catalase) or had previously been found to have temperature-related phenotypes (e.g. fatty acid desaturase mutants, uvh6). Mutants were assessed for thermotolerance defects in seed germination, hypocotyl elongation, root growth, and seedling survival. To assess oxidative damage and alterations in the heat shock response, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, heat shock protein 101, and small heat shock protein levels were determined. Fifteen mutants showed significant phenotypes. Abscisic acid (ABA) signaling mutants (abi1 and abi2) and the UV-sensitive mutant, uvh6, showed the strongest defects in acquired thermotolerance of root growth and seedling survival. Mutations in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase homolog genes (atrbohB and D), ABA biosynthesis mutants (aba1, aba2, and aba3), and NahG transgenic lines (salicylic acid deficient) showed weaker defects. Ethylene signaling mutants (ein2 and etr1) and reactive oxygen metabolism mutants (vtc1, vtc2, npq1, and cad2) were more defective in basal than acquired thermotolerance, especially under high light. All mutants accumulated wild-type levels of heat shock protein 101 and small heat shock proteins. These data indicate that, separate from heat shock protein induction, ABA, active oxygen species, and salicylic acid pathways are involved in acquired thermotolerance and that UVH6 plays a significant role in temperature responses in addition to its role in UV stress. PMID:15923322

  20. The CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON2 and 3 genes have a post-meristematic effect on Arabidopsis thaliana phyllotaxis

    KAUST Repository

    Burian, Agata

    2015-02-12

    Background and Aims: The arrangement of flowers in inflorescence shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana represents a regular spiral Fibonacci phyllotaxis. However, in the cuc2 cuc3 double mutant, flower pedicels are fused to the inflorescence stem, and phyllotaxis is aberrant in the mature shoot regions. This study examined the causes of this altered development, and in particular whether the mutant phenotype is a consequence of defects at the shoot apex, or whether post-meristematic events are involved. Methods: The distribution of flower pedicels and vascular traces was examined in cross-sections of mature shoots; sequential replicas were used to investigate the phyllotaxis and geometry of shoot apices, and growth of the young stem surface. The expression pattern of CUC3 was analysed by examining its promoter activity. Key Results: Phyllotaxis irregularity in the cuc2 cuc3 double mutant arises during the post-meristematic phase of shoot development. In particular, growth and cell divisions in nodes of the elongating stem are not restricted in the mutant, resulting in pedicel-stem fusion. On the other hand, phyllotaxis in the mutant shoot apex is nearly as regular as that of the wild type. Vascular phyllotaxis, generated almost simultaneously with the phyllotaxis at the apex, is also much more regular than pedicel phyllotaxis. The most apparent phenotype of the mutant apices is a higher number of contact parastichies. This phenotype is associated with increased meristem size, decreased angular width of primordia and a shorter plastochron. In addition, the appearance of a sharp and deep crease, a characteristic shape of the adaxial primordium boundary, is slightly delayed and reduced in the mutant shoot apices. Conclusions: The cuc2 cuc3 double mutant displays irregular phyllotaxis in the mature shoot but not in the shoot apex, thus showing a post-meristematic effect of the mutations on phyllotaxis. The main cause of this effect is the formation of pedicel-stem fusions

  1. Control of genic DNA methylation by a jmjC domain-containing protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saze, Hidetoshi; Shiraishi, Akiko; Miura, Asuka; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2008-01-25

    Differential cytosine methylation of repeats and genes is important for coordination of genome stability and proper gene expression. Through genetic screen of mutants showing ectopic cytosine methylation in a genic region, we identified a jmjC-domain gene, IBM1 (increase in bonsai methylation 1), in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition to the ectopic cytosine methylation, the ibm1 mutations induced a variety of developmental phenotypes, which depend on methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9. Paradoxically, the developmental phenotypes of the ibm1 were enhanced by the mutation in the chromatin-remodeling gene DDM1 (decrease in DNA methylation 1), which is necessary for keeping methylation and silencing of repeated heterochromatin loci. Our results demonstrate the importance of chromatin remodeling and histone modifications in the differential epigenetic control of repeats and genes.

  2. Next-Gen Sequencing-Based Mapping and Identification of Ethyl Methanesulfonate-Induced Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves; Ausubel, Frederick M; Borowsky, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Forward genetic analysis using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis has proven to be a powerful tool in biological research, but identification and cloning of causal mutations by conventional genetic mapping approaches is a painstaking process. Recent advances in next-gen sequencing have greatly invigorated the process of identifying EMS-induced mutations corresponding to a specific phenotype in model genetic hosts, including the plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Next-gen sequencing of bulked F2 mutant recombinants produces a wealth of high-resolution genetic data, provides enhanced delimitation of the genomic location of mutations, and greatly reduces hands-on time while maintaining high accuracy and reproducibility. In this unit, a detailed procedure to simultaneously map and identify EMS mutations in Arabidopsis is described. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. The role of cysteine residues in redox regulation and protein stability of Arabidopsis thaliana starch synthase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences...... its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated...... is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis...

  4. The Arabidopsis thalianaK+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas

    2015-11-27

    Adenylate Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognized as an important signaling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP71-100 is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP71-100 generates cAMP in vitro.

  5. Brassinosteroid-regulated GSK3/Shaggy-like Kinases Phosphorylate Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Kinases, Which Control Stomata Development in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mamoona; Rozhon, Wilfried; Bigeard, Jean; Pflieger, Delphine; Husar, Sigrid; Pitzschke, Andrea; Teige, Markus; Jonak, Claudia; Hirt, Heribert; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid hormones that coordinate fundamental developmental programs in plants. In this study we show that in addition to the well established roles of BRs in regulating cell elongation and cell division events, BRs also govern cell fate decisions during stomata development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In wild-type A. thaliana, stomatal distribution follows the one-cell spacing rule; that is, adjacent stomata are spaced by at least one intervening pavement cell. This rule is interrupted in BR-deficient and BR signaling-deficient A. thaliana mutants, resulting in clustered stomata. We demonstrate that BIN2 and its homologues, GSK3/Shaggy-like kinases involved in BR signaling, can phosphorylate the MAPK kinases MKK4 and MKK5, which are members of the MAPK module YODA-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 that controls stomata development and patterning. BIN2 phosphorylates a GSK3/Shaggy-like kinase recognition motif in MKK4, which reduces MKK4 activity against its substrate MPK6 in vitro. In vivo we show that MKK4 and MKK5 act downstream of BR signaling because their overexpression rescued stomata patterning defects in BR-deficient plants. A model is proposed in which GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of MKK4 and MKK5 enables for a dynamic integration of endogenous or environmental cues signaled by BRs into cell fate decisions governed by the YODA-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 module. PMID:23341468

  6. The Mechanism of the Silencing of a Transgene, NCED3‐LUC, in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junsong

    2011-06-20

    The Arabidopsis thaliana NCED3‐LUC transgenic line was constructed by several groups to study the regulatory network of the NCED3 gene, the protein of which catalyzes the rate‐limiting step of ABA biosynthesis under drought. The transgenic luciferase gene is expressed when the plants encounter drought stress. Intriguingly, this transgenic luciferase gene is silenced after propagation for several generations. To determine the mechanism of this gene silencing, we used a forward genetics approach. The seeds of NCED3‐LUC (referred as the ‘wild type’) were mutagenized by ethane methyl sulfonate (EMS). One mutant line, denoted as #73, with recovered luciferase activity was selected for further study. Analysis of the methylation status by bisulfite sequencing revealed that the transgenic NCED3 promoter in the #73 mutant had less methylation than the wild type. Demethylation was also evident for the endogenous NCED3 promoter and retrotransposon AtSN1 in the #73 mutant. The phenotype of #73 mutant includes small size, rapid dehydration rate, altered morphology, and a thin epicuticular wax layer. By use of map‐based cloning, the region containing the mutated gene was delimited to a contig of two BAC clones, F11F19 and F9C22, on chromosome 2. Our results indicate that NCED3‐LUC gene silencing results from hypermethylation of its promoter region, but additional study is required to determine the exact position of the mutated gene and to fully understand the mechanism of NCED3‐LUC silencing. 4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to take this opportunity to thank my committee chair, Professor Jian‐Kang Zhu, who is also the supervisor of my master’s thesis, for his guidance throughout the course of this research. I also would like to thank my committee members, Professor Liming Xiong and Professor Samir Hamdan, for their patience and support in reviewing my thesis. My appreciation also goes to Dr. Zhenyu Wang for taking time to teach me basic experimental skills and

  7. Cadmium-induced ethylene production and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana rely on ACS2 and ACS6 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellingen, Kerim; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Vandenbussche, Filip; Prinsen, Els; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2014-08-01

    Anthropogenic activities cause metal pollution worldwide. Plants can absorb and accumulate these metals through their root system, inducing stress as a result of excess metal concentrations inside the plant. Ethylene is a regulator of multiple plant processes, and is affected by many biotic and abiotic stresses. Increased ethylene levels have been observed after exposure to excess metals but it remains unclear how the increased ethylene levels are achieved at the molecular level. In this study, the effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure on the production of ethylene and its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), and on the expression of the ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) multigene families were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Increased ethylene release after Cd exposure was directly measurable in a system using rockwool-cultivated plants; enhanced levels of the ethylene precursor ACC together with higher mRNA levels of ethylene responsive genes: ACO2, ETR2 and ERF1 also indicated increased ethylene production in hydroponic culture. Regarding underlying mechanisms, it was found that the transcript levels of ACO2 and ACO4, the most abundantly expressed members of the ACO multigene family, were increased upon Cd exposure. ACC synthesis is the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and transcript levels of both ACS2 and ACS6 showed the highest increase and became the most abundant isoforms after Cd exposure, suggesting their importance in the Cd-induced increase of ethylene production. Cadmium induced the biosynthesis of ACC and ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants mainly via the increased expression of ACS2 and ACS6. This was confirmed in the acs2-1acs6-1 double knockout mutants, which showed a decreased ethylene production, positively affecting leaf biomass and resulting in a delayed induction of ethylene responsive gene expressions without significant differences in Cd contents between wild-type and mutant plants.

  8. Cadmium-induced ethylene production and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana rely on ACS2 and ACS6 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic activities cause metal pollution worldwide. Plants can absorb and accumulate these metals through their root system, inducing stress as a result of excess metal concentrations inside the plant. Ethylene is a regulator of multiple plant processes, and is affected by many biotic and abiotic stresses. Increased ethylene levels have been observed after exposure to excess metals but it remains unclear how the increased ethylene levels are achieved at the molecular level. In this study, the effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure on the production of ethylene and its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), and on the expression of the ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) multigene families were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Increased ethylene release after Cd exposure was directly measurable in a system using rockwool-cultivated plants; enhanced levels of the ethylene precursor ACC together with higher mRNA levels of ethylene responsive genes: ACO2, ETR2 and ERF1 also indicated increased ethylene production in hydroponic culture. Regarding underlying mechanisms, it was found that the transcript levels of ACO2 and ACO4, the most abundantly expressed members of the ACO multigene family, were increased upon Cd exposure. ACC synthesis is the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and transcript levels of both ACS2 and ACS6 showed the highest increase and became the most abundant isoforms after Cd exposure, suggesting their importance in the Cd-induced increase of ethylene production. Conclusions Cadmium induced the biosynthesis of ACC and ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants mainly via the increased expression of ACS2 and ACS6. This was confirmed in the acs2-1acs6-1 double knockout mutants, which showed a decreased ethylene production, positively affecting leaf biomass and resulting in a delayed induction of ethylene responsive gene expressions without significant differences in Cd contents between wild-type and

  9. Signal molecules mediate the impact of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa on growth, development and defence of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Puga-Freitas

    Full Text Available Earthworms have generally a positive impact on plant growth, which is often attributed to a trophic mechanism: namely, earthworms increase the release of mineral nutrients from soil litter and organic matter. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed since the discovery of a signal molecule (Indole Acetic Acid in earthworm faeces. In this study, we used methodologies developed in plant science to gain information on ecological mechanisms involved in plant-earthworm interaction, by looking at plant response to earthworm presence at a molecular level. First, we looked at plant overall response to earthworm faeces in an in vitro device where only signal molecules could have an effect on plant growth; we observed that earthworms were inducing positive or negative effects on different plant species. Then, using an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with an impaired auxin transport, we demonstrated the potential of earthworms to stimulate root growth and to revert the dwarf mutant phenotype. Finally, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence and absence of earthworms; we found that genes modulated in the presence of earthworms are known to respond to biotic and abiotic stresses, or to the application of exogenous hormones. A comparison of our results with other studies found in databases revealed strong analogies with systemic resistance, induced by signal molecules emitted by Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and/or elicitors emitted by non-virulent pathogens. Signal molecules such as auxin and ethylene, which are considered as major in plant-microorganisms interactions, can also be of prior importance to explain plant-macroinvertebrates interactions. This could imply revisiting ecological theories which generally stress on the role of trophic relationships.

  10. Aberrant temporal growth pattern and morphology of root and shoot caused by a defective circadian clock in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruts, Tom; Matsubara, Shizue; Wiese-Klinkenberg, Anika; Walter, Achim

    2012-10-01

    Circadian clocks synchronized with the environment allow plants to anticipate recurring daily changes and give a fitness advantage. Here, we mapped the dynamic growth phenotype of leaves and roots in two lines of Arabidopsis thaliana with a disrupted circadian clock: the CCA1 over-expressing line (CCA1ox) and the prr9 prr7 prr5 (prr975) mutant. We demonstrate leaf growth defects due to a disrupted circadian clock over a 24 h time scale. Both lines showed enhanced leaf growth compared with the wild-type during the diurnal period, suggesting increased partitioning of photosynthates for leaf growth. Nocturnal leaf growth was reduced and growth inhibition occurred by dawn, which may be explained by ineffective starch degradation in the leaves of the mutants. However, this growth inhibition was not caused by starch exhaustion. Overall, these results are consistent with the notion that the defective clock affects carbon and energy allocation, thereby reducing growth capacity during the night. Furthermore, rosette morphology and size as well as root architecture were strikingly altered by the defective clock control. Separate analysis of the primary root and lateral roots revealed strong suppression of lateral root formation in both CCA1ox and prr975, accompanied by unusual changes in lateral root growth direction under light-dark cycles and increased lateral extension of the root system. We conclude that growth of the whole plant is severely affected by improper clock regulation in A. thaliana, resulting not only in altered timing and capacity for growth but also aberrant development of shoot and root architecture. © 2012 Forschungszentrum Jülich. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. NADPH oxidase-dependent H2O2 production is required for salt-induced antioxidant defense in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Rejeb, Kilani; Benzarti, Maâli; Debez, Ahmed; Bailly, Christophe; Savouré, Arnould; Abdelly, Chedly

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase) in the antioxidant defense system was assessed in salt-challenged Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. In the wild-type, short-term salt exposure led to a transient and significant increase of H2O2 concentration, followed by a marked increase in catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.16), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) activities. Pre-treatment with either a chemical trap for H2O2 (dimethylthiourea) or two widely used NADPH oxidase inhibitors (imidazol and diphenylene iodonium) significantly decreased the above-mentioned enzyme activities under salinity. Double mutant atrbohd/f plants failed to induce the antioxidant response under the culture conditions. Under long-term salinity, the wild-type was more salt-tolerant than the mutant based on the plant biomass production. The better performance of the wild-type was related to a significantly higher photosynthetic activity, a more efficient K(+) selective uptake, and to the plants' ability to deal with the salt-induced oxidative stress as compared to atrbohd/f. Altogether, these data suggest that the early H2O2 generation by NADPH oxidase under salt stress could be the beginning of a reaction cascade that triggers the antioxidant response in A. thaliana in order to overcome the subsequent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, thereby mitigating the salt stress-derived injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Signal Molecules Mediate the Impact of the Earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa on Growth, Development and Defence of the Plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga-Freitas, Ruben; Barot, Sébastien; Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Blouin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Earthworms have generally a positive impact on plant growth, which is often attributed to a trophic mechanism: namely, earthworms increase the release of mineral nutrients from soil litter and organic matter. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed since the discovery of a signal molecule (Indole Acetic Acid) in earthworm faeces. In this study, we used methodologies developed in plant science to gain information on ecological mechanisms involved in plant-earthworm interaction, by looking at plant response to earthworm presence at a molecular level. First, we looked at plant overall response to earthworm faeces in an in vitro device where only signal molecules could have an effect on plant growth; we observed that earthworms were inducing positive or negative effects on different plant species. Then, using an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with an impaired auxin transport, we demonstrated the potential of earthworms to stimulate root growth and to revert the dwarf mutant phenotype. Finally, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence and absence of earthworms; we found that genes modulated in the presence of earthworms are known to respond to biotic and abiotic stresses, or to the application of exogenous hormones. A comparison of our results with other studies found in databases revealed strong analogies with systemic resistance, induced by signal molecules emitted by Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and/or elicitors emitted by non-virulent pathogens. Signal molecules such as auxin and ethylene, which are considered as major in plant-microorganisms interactions, can also be of prior importance to explain plant-macroinvertebrates interactions. This could imply revisiting ecological theories which generally stress on the role of trophic relationships. PMID:23226498

  13. Two WD-repeat genes from cotton are functional homologues of the Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, John A; Walker, Amanda R; Timmis, Jeremy N; Orford, Sharon J

    2005-01-01

    Cotton fibres are single, highly elongated cells derived from the outer epidermis of ovules, and are developmentally similar to the trichomes of Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify genes involved in the molecular control of cotton fibre initiation, we isolated four putative homologues of the Arabidopsis trichome-associated gene TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1). All four WD-repeat genes are derived from the ancestral D diploid genome of tetraploid cotton and are expressed in many tissues throughout the plant, including ovules and growing fibres. Two of the cotton genes were able to restore trichome formation in ttg1 mutant Arabidopsis plants. Both these genes also complemented the anthocyanin defect in a white-flowered Matthiola incana ttg1 mutant. These results demonstrate parallels in differentiation between trichomes in cotton and Arabidopsis, and indicate that these cotton genes may be functional homologues of AtTTG1.

  14. Wild Accessions and Mutant Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Lotus japonicus, Lotus burttii, and Lotus filicaulis are species of Lotus genus that are utilized for molecular genetic analysis such as the construction of a linkage map and QTL analysis. Among them, a number of mutants have been isolated from two wild accessions: L. japonicus Gifu B-129 and Miy...

  15. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant

    KAUST Repository

    Hudik, Elodie

    2014-07-18

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  16. The Mutant crispa Reveals Multiple Roles for PHANTASTICA in Pea Compound Leaf DevelopmentW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Alexander D.; Turner, Lynda; Knox, Margaret R.; Ambrose, Michael J.; Ellis, T.H. Noel; Hofer, Julie M.I.

    2005-01-01

    Pinnate compound leaves have laminae called leaflets distributed at intervals along an axis, the rachis, whereas simple leaves have a single lamina. In simple- and compound-leaved species, the PHANTASTICA (PHAN) gene is required for lamina formation. Antirrhinum majus mutants lacking a functional gene develop abaxialized, bladeless adult leaves. Transgenic downregulation of PHAN in the compound tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaf results in an abaxialized rachis without leaflets. The extent of PHAN gene expression was found to be correlated with leaf morphology in diverse compound-leaved species; pinnate leaves had a complete adaxial domain of PHAN gene expression, and peltate leaves had a diminished domain. These previous studies predict the form of a compound-leaved phan mutant to be either peltate or an abaxialized rachis. Here, we characterize crispa, a phan mutant in pea (Pisum sativum), and find that the compound leaf remains pinnate, with individual leaflets abaxialized, rather than the whole leaf. The mutant develops ectopic stipules on the petiole-rachis axis, which are associated with ectopic class 1 KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) gene expression, showing that the interaction between CRISPA and the KNOX gene PISUM SATIVUM KNOTTED2 specifies stipule boundaries. KNOX and CRISPA gene expression patterns indicate that the mechanism of pea leaf initiation is more like Arabidopsis thaliana than tomato. PMID:15749758

  17. YUCCA6 over-expression demonstrates auxin function in delaying leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Jeong Im

    2011-04-21

    The Arabidopsis thaliana YUCCA family of flavin monooxygenase proteins catalyses a rate-limiting step in de novo auxin biosynthesis. A YUCCA6 activation mutant, yuc6-1D, has been shown to contain an elevated free IAA level and to display typical high-auxin phenotypes. It is reported here that Arabidopsis plants over-expressing YUCCA6, such as the yuc6-1D activation mutant and 35S:YUC6 transgenic plants, displayed dramatic longevity. In addition, plants over-expressing YUCCA6 exhibited classical, delayed dark-induced and hormone-induced senescence in assays using detached rosette leaves. However, plants over-expressing an allele of YUCCA6, that carries mutations in the NADPH cofactor binding site, exhibited neither delayed leaf senescence phenotypes nor phenotypes typical of auxin overproduction. When the level of free IAA was reduced in yuc6-1D by conjugation to lysine, yuc6-1D leaves senesced at a rate similar to the wild-type leaves. Dark-induced senescence in detached leaves was accompanied by a decrease in their free IAA content, by the reduced expression of auxin biosynthesis enzymes such as YUCCA1 and YUCCA6 that increase cellular free IAA levels, and by the increased expression of auxin-conjugating enzymes encoded by the GH3 genes that reduce the cellular free auxin levels. Reduced transcript abundances of SAG12, NAC1, and NAC6 during senescence in yuc6-1D compared with the wild type suggested that auxin delays senescence by directly or indirectly regulating the expression of senescence-associated genes. 2011 The Author(s).

  18. Simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ting; Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-11-01

    The photosystem I/II ratio increased when antenna size was enlarged by transient induction of CAO in chlorophyll b -less mutants, thus indicating simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry. Regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry is an indispensable strategy for plants to acclimate to changes to light environments. When plants grown in high-light conditions are transferred to low-light conditions, the peripheral antennae of photosystems are enlarged. A change in the photosystem I/II ratio is also observed under the same light conditions. However, our knowledge of the correlation between antenna size modulation and variation in photosystem I/II stoichiometry remains limited. In this study, chlorophyll a oxygenase was transiently induced in Arabidopsis thaliana chlorophyll b-less mutants, ch1-1, to alter the antenna size without changing environmental conditions. In addition to the accumulation of chlorophyll b, the levels of the peripheral antenna complexes of both photosystems gradually increased, and these were assembled to the core antenna of both photosystems. However, the antenna size of photosystem II was greater than that of photosystem I. Immunoblot analysis of core antenna proteins showed that the number of photosystem I increased, but not that of photosystem II, resulting in an increase in the photosystem I/II ratio. These results clearly indicate that antenna size adjustment was coupled with changes in photosystem I/II stoichiometry. Based on these results, the physiological importance of simultaneous regulation of antenna size and photosystem I/II stoichiometry is discussed in relation to acclimation to light conditions.

  19. Inferring Hypotheses on Functional Relationships of Genes: Analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana Subtilase Gene Family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The gene family of subtilisin-like serine proteases (subtilases in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises 56 members, divided into six distinct subfamilies. Whereas the members of five subfamilies are similar to pyrolysins, two genes share stronger similarity to animal kexins. Mutant screens confirmed 144 T-DNA insertion lines with knockouts for 55 out of the 56 subtilases. Apart from SDD1, none of the confirmed homozygous mutants revealed any obvious visible phenotypic alteration during growth under standard conditions. Apart from this specific case, forward genetics gave us no hints about the function of the individual 54 non-characterized subtilase genes. Therefore, the main objective of our work was to overcome the shortcomings of the forward genetic approach and to infer alternative experimental approaches by using an integrative bioinformatics and biological approach. Computational analyses based on transcriptional co-expression and co-response pattern revealed at least two expression networks, suggesting that functional redundancy may exist among subtilases with limited similarity. Furthermore, two hubs were identified, which may be involved in signalling or may represent higher-order regulatory factors involved in responses to environmental cues. A particular enrichment of co-regulated genes with metabolic functions was observed for four subtilases possibly representing late responsive elements of environmental stress. The kexin homologs show stronger associations with genes of transcriptional regulation context. Based on the analyses presented here and in accordance with previously characterized subtilases, we propose three main functions of subtilases: involvement in (i control of development, (ii protein turnover, and (iii action as downstream components of signalling cascades. Supplemental material is available in the Plant Subtilase Database (PSDB (http://csbdb.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/psdb.html , as well as from the CSB.DB (http://csbdb.mpimp-golm.mpg.de.

  20. Inferring hypotheses on functional relationships of genes: Analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana subtilase gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Rautengarten

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The gene family of subtilisin-like serine proteases (subtilases in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises 56 members, divided into six distinct subfamilies. Whereas the members of five subfamilies are similar to pyrolysins, two genes share stronger similarity to animal kexins. Mutant screens confirmed 144 T-DNA insertion lines with knockouts for 55 out of the 56 subtilases. Apart from SDD1, none of the confirmed homozygous mutants revealed any obvious visible phenotypic alteration during growth under standard conditions. Apart from this specific case, forward genetics gave us no hints about the function of the individual 54 non-characterized subtilase genes. Therefore, the main objective of our work was to overcome the shortcomings of the forward genetic approach and to infer alternative experimental approaches by using an integrative bioinformatics and biological approach. Computational analyses based on transcriptional co-expression and co-response pattern revealed at least two expression networks, suggesting that functional redundancy may exist among subtilases with limited similarity. Furthermore, two hubs were identified, which may be involved in signalling or may represent higher-order regulatory factors involved in responses to environmental cues. A particular enrichment of co-regulated genes with metabolic functions was observed for four subtilases possibly representing late responsive elements of environmental stress. The kexin homologs show stronger associations with genes of transcriptional regulation context. Based on the analyses presented here and in accordance with previously characterized subtilases, we propose three main functions of subtilases: involvement in (i control of development, (ii protein turnover, and (iii action as downstream components of signalling cascades. Supplemental material is available in the Plant Subtilase Database (PSDB (http://csbdb.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/psdb.html, as well as from the CSB.DB (http://csbdb.mpimp-golm.mpg.de.

  1. Uric Acid Accumulation in an Arabidopsis Urate Oxidase Mutant Impairs Seedling Establishment by Blocking Peroxisome Maintenance[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Oliver K.; Scharnberg, Jana; Escobar, Nieves Medina; Wanner, Gerhard; Giavalisco, Patrick; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purine nucleotides can be fully catabolized by plants to recycle nutrients. We have isolated a urate oxidase (uox) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that accumulates uric acid in all tissues, especially in the developing embryo. The mutant displays a reduced germination rate and is unable to establish autotrophic growth due to severe inhibition of cotyledon development and nutrient mobilization from the lipid reserves in the cotyledons. The uox mutant phenotype is suppressed in a xanthine dehydrogenase (xdh) uox double mutant, demonstrating that the underlying cause is not the defective purine base catabolism, or the lack of UOX per se, but the elevated uric acid concentration in the embryo. Remarkably, xanthine accumulates to similar levels in the xdh mutant without toxicity. This is paralleled in humans, where hyperuricemia is associated with many diseases whereas xanthinuria is asymptomatic. Searching for the molecular cause of uric acid toxicity, we discovered a local defect of peroxisomes (glyoxysomes) mostly confined to the cotyledons of the mature embryos, which resulted in the accumulation of free fatty acids in dry seeds. The peroxisomal defect explains the developmental phenotypes of the uox mutant, drawing a novel link between uric acid and peroxisome function, which may be relevant beyond plants. PMID:25052714

  2. Topoisomerase 3alpha and RMI1 suppress somatic crossovers and are essential for resolution of meiotic recombination intermediates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Frank Hartung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases are enzymes with crucial functions in DNA metabolism. They are ubiquitously present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes and modify the steady-state level of DNA supercoiling. Biochemical analyses indicate that Topoisomerase 3alpha (TOP3alpha functions together with a RecQ DNA helicase and a third partner, RMI1/BLAP75, in the resolution step of homologous recombination in a process called Holliday Junction dissolution in eukaryotes. Apart from that, little is known about the role of TOP3alpha in higher eukaryotes, as knockout mutants show early lethality or strong developmental defects. Using a hypomorphic insertion mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (top3alpha-2, which is viable but completely sterile, we were able to define three different functions of the protein in mitosis and meiosis. The top3alpha-2 line exhibits fragmented chromosomes during mitosis and sensitivity to camptothecin, suggesting an important role in chromosome segregation partly overlapping with that of type IB topoisomerases. Furthermore, AtTOP3alpha, together with AtRECQ4A and AtRMI1, is involved in the suppression of crossover recombination in somatic cells as well as DNA repair in both mammals and A. thaliana. Surprisingly, AtTOP3alpha is also essential for meiosis. The phenotype of chromosome fragmentation, bridges, and telophase I arrest can be suppressed by AtSPO11 and AtRAD51 mutations, indicating that the protein is required for the resolution of recombination intermediates. As Atrmi1 mutants have a similar meiotic phenotype to Attop3alpha mutants, both proteins seem to be involved in a mechanism safeguarding the entangling of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. The requirement of AtTOP3alpha and AtRMI1 in a late step of meiotic recombination strongly hints at the possibility that the dissolution of double Holliday Junctions via a hemicatenane intermediate is indeed an indispensable step of meiotic recombination.

  3. Composition of secondary alcohols, ketones, alkanediols, and ketols in Arabidopsis thaliana cuticular waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Miao; Jetter, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis wax components containing secondary functional groups were examined (i) to test the biosynthetic relationship between secondary alcohols and ketols and (ii) to determine the regiospecificity and substrate preference of the enzyme involved in ketol biosynthesis. The stem wax of Arabidopsis wild type contained homologous series of C27 to C31 secondary alcohols (2.4 μg cm−2) and C28 to C30 ketones (6.0 μg cm−2) dominated by C29 homologues. In addition, compound classes containing two secondary functional groups were identified as C29 diols (∼0.05 μg cm−2) and ketols (∼0.16 μg cm−2). All four compound classes showed characteristic isomer distributions, with functional groups located between C-14 and C-16. In the mah1 mutant stem wax, diols and ketols could not be detected, while the amounts of secondary alcohols and ketones were drastically reduced. In two MAH1-overexpressing lines, equal amounts of C29 and C31 secondary alcohols were detected. Based on the comparison of homologue and isomer compositions between the different genotypes, it can be concluded that biosynthetic pathways lead from alkanes to secondary alcohols, and via ketones or diols to ketols. It seems plausible that MAH1 is the hydroxylase enzyme involved in all these conversions in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:19346242

  4. Chloroplast behaviour and interactions with other organelles in Arabidopsis thaliana pavement cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Kiah A; Wozny, Michael R; Mathur, Neeta; Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Mathur, Jaideep

    2017-03-20

    Chloroplasts are a characteristic feature of green plants. Mesophyll cells possess the majority of chloroplasts and it is widely believed that, with the exception of guard cells, the epidermal layer in most higher plants does not contain chloroplasts. However, recent observations on Arabidopsis thaliana have shown a population of chloroplasts in pavement cells that are smaller than mesophyll chloroplasts and have a high stroma to grana ratio. Here, using stable transgenic lines expressing fluorescent proteins targeted to the plastid stroma, plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, tonoplast, nucleus, mitochondria, peroxisomes, F-actin and microtubules, we characterize the spatiotemporal relationships between the pavement cell chloroplasts (PCCs) and their subcellular environment. Observations on the PCCs suggest a source-sink relationship between the epidermal and the mesophyll layers, and experiments with the Arabidopsis mutants glabra2 (gl2) and immutans (im), which show altered epidermal plastid development, underscored their developmental plasticity. Our findings lay down the foundation for further investigations aimed at understanding the precise role and contributions of PCCs in plant interactions with the environment. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. The relationship between leaf area growth and biomass accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weraduwage, Sarathi M; Chen, Jin; Anozie, Fransisca C; Morales, Alejandro; Weise, Sean E; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    Leaf area growth determines the light interception capacity of a crop and is often used as a surrogate for plant growth in high-throughput phenotyping systems. The relationship between leaf area growth and growth in terms of mass will depend on how carbon is partitioned among new leaf area, leaf mass, root mass, reproduction, and respiration. A model of leaf area growth in terms of photosynthetic rate and carbon partitioning to different plant organs was developed and tested with Arabidopsis thaliana L. Heynh. ecotype Columbia (Col-0) and a mutant line, gigantea-2 (gi-2), which develops very large rosettes. Data obtained from growth analysis and gas exchange measurements was used to train a genetic programming algorithm to parameterize and test the above model. The relationship between leaf area and plant biomass was found to be non-linear and variable depending on carbon partitioning. The model output was sensitive to the rate of photosynthesis but more sensitive to the amount of carbon partitioned to growing thicker leaves. The large rosette size of gi-2 relative to that of Col-0 resulted from relatively small differences in partitioning to new leaf area vs. leaf thickness.

  6. Genome wide association mapping for the tolerance to the polyamine oxidase inhibitor guazatine in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Kostadin Evgeniev eAtanasov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guazatine is a potent inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO activity. In agriculture, guazatine is used as non-systemic contact fungicide efficient in the protection of cereals and citrus fruits against disease. The composition of guazatine is complex, mainly constituted by a mixture of synthetic guanidated polyamines (polyaminoguanidines. Here we have studied the effects from exposure to guazatine in the weed Arabidopsis thaliana. We report that micromolar concentrations of guazatine are sufficient to inhibit growth of Arabidopsis seedlings and induce chlorosis, whereas germination is barely affected. We observed the occurrence of quantitative variation in the response to guazatine between 107 randomly chosen Arabidopsis accessions. This enabled us to undertake genome-wide association (GWA mapping that identified a locus on chromosome one associated with guazatine tolerance. CHLOROPHYLLASE 1 (CLH1 within this locus was studied as candidate gene, together with its paralog (CLH2. The analysis of independent clh1-2, clh1-3, clh2-3, clh2-2 and double clh1-2 clh2-3 mutant alleles indicated that CLH1 and/or CLH2 loss-of-function or expression down-regulation promote guazatine tolerance in Arabidopsis. We report a natural mechanism by which Arabidopsis populations can overcome toxicity by the fungicide guazatine.

  7. DEWAX Transcription Factor Is Involved in Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Seulgi; Go, Young Sam; Choi, Hyo Ju; Park, Jeong Mee; Suh, Mi Chung

    2017-01-01

    The cuticle of land plants is the first physical barrier to protect their aerial parts from biotic and abiotic stresses. DEWAX, an AP2/ERF-type transcription factor, negatively regulates cuticular wax biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa overexpressing DEWAX and in Arabidopsis dewax mutant. Compared to wild type (WT) leaves, Arabidopsis DEWAX OX and dewax leaves were more and less permeable to toluidine blue dye, respectively. The ROS levels increased in DEWAX OX leaves, but decreased in dewax relative to WT leaves. Compared to WT, DEWAX OX was more resistant, while dewax was more sensitive to B. cinerea; however, defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000:GFP were inversely modulated. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses indicated that the expression of defense-related genes was upregulated in DEWAX OX, but downregulated in dewax relative to WT. Transactivation assay showed that DEWAX upregulated the expression of PDF1.2a, IGMT1, and PRX37. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that DEWAX directly interacts with the GCC-box motifs of PDF1.2a promoter. In addition, ectopic expression of DEWAX increased the tolerance to B. cinerea in C. sativa. Taken together, we suggest that increased ROS accumulation and DEWAX-mediated upregulation of defense-related genes are closely associated with enhanced resistance to B. cinerea in Arabidopsis and C. sativa.

  8. Glutathione-Indole-3-Acetonitrile Is Required for Camalexin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tongbing; Xu, Juan; Li, Yuan; Lei, Lei; Zhao, Luo; Yang, Hailian; Feng, Jidong; Liu, Guoqin; Ren, Dongtao

    2011-01-01

    Camalexin, a major phytoalexin in Arabidopsis thaliana, consists of an indole ring and a thiazole ring. The indole ring is produced from Trp, which is converted to indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) by CYP79B2/CYP79B3 and CYP71A13. Conversion of Cys(IAN) to dihydrocamalexic acid and subsequently to camalexin is catalyzed by CYP71B15. Recent studies proposed that Cys derivative, not Cys itself, is the precursor of the thiazole ring that conjugates with IAN. The nature of the Cys derivative and how it conjugates to IAN and subsequently forms Cys(IAN) remain obscure. We found that protein accumulation of multiple glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), elevation of GST activity, and consumption of glutathione (GSH) coincided with camalexin production. GSTF6 overexpression increased and GSTF6-knockout reduced camalexin production. Arabidopsis GSTF6 expressed in yeast cells catalyzed GSH(IAN) formation. GSH(IAN), (IAN)CysGly, and γGluCys(IAN) were determined to be intermediates within the camalexin biosynthetic pathway. Inhibitor treatments and mutant analyses revealed the involvement of γ-glutamyl transpeptidases (GGTs) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS) in the catabolism of GSH(IAN). The expression of GSTF6, GGT1, GGT2, and PCS1 was coordinately upregulated during camalexin biosynthesis. These results suggest that GSH is the Cys derivative used during camalexin biosynthesis, that the conjugation of GSH with IAN is catalyzed by GSTF6, and that GGTs and PCS are involved in camalexin biosynthesis. PMID:21239642

  9. Cloning, Expression in Escherichia coli, and Characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana UMP/CMP Kinase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lan; Lacroute, François; Thornburg, Robert

    1998-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the Arabidopsis thaliana uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP)/cytidine 5′-monophosphate (CMP) kinase was isolated by complementation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura6 mutant. The deduced amino acid sequence of the plant UMP/CMP kinase has 50% identity with other eukaryotic UMP/CMP kinase proteins. The cDNA was subcloned into pGEX-4T-3 and expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. Following proteolytic digestion, the plant UMP/CMP kinase was purified and analyzed for its structural and kinetic properties. The mass, N-terminal sequence, and total amino acid composition agreed with the sequence and composition predicted from the cDNA sequence. Kinetic analysis revealed that the UMP/CMP kinase preferentially uses ATP (Michaelis constant [Km] = 29 μm when UMP is the other substrate and Km = 292 μm when CMP is the other substrate) as a phosphate donor. However, both UMP (Km = 153 μm) and CMP (Km = 266 μm) were equally acceptable as the phosphate acceptor. The optimal pH for the enzyme is 6.5. P1, P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate was found to be a competitive inhibitor of both ATP and UMP. PMID:9576794

  10. Metabolome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots identifies a key metabolic pathway for iron acquisition.

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    Holger Schmidt

    Full Text Available Fe deficiency compromises both human health and plant productivity. Thus, it is important to understand plant Fe acquisition strategies for the development of crop plants which are more Fe-efficient under Fe-limited conditions, such as alkaline soils, and have higher Fe density in their edible tissues. Root secretion of phenolic compounds has long been hypothesized to be a component of the reduction strategy of Fe acquisition in non-graminaceous plants. We therefore subjected roots of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under Fe-replete and Fe-deplete conditions to comprehensive metabolome analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Scopoletin and other coumarins were found among the metabolites showing the strongest response to two different Fe-limited conditions, the cultivation in Fe-free medium and in medium with an alkaline pH. A coumarin biosynthesis mutant defective in ortho-hydroxylation of cinnamic acids was unable to grow on alkaline soil in the absence of Fe fertilization. Co-cultivation with wild-type plants partially rescued the Fe deficiency phenotype indicating a contribution of extracellular coumarins to Fe solubilization. Indeed, coumarins were detected in root exudates of wild-type plants. Direct infusion mass spectrometry as well as UV/vis spectroscopy indicated that coumarins are acting both as reductants of Fe(III and as ligands of Fe(II.

  11. Metabolome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots identifies a key metabolic pathway for iron acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Holger; Günther, Carmen; Weber, Michael; Spörlein, Cornelia; Loscher, Sebastian; Böttcher, Christoph; Schobert, Rainer; Clemens, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Fe deficiency compromises both human health and plant productivity. Thus, it is important to understand plant Fe acquisition strategies for the development of crop plants which are more Fe-efficient under Fe-limited conditions, such as alkaline soils, and have higher Fe density in their edible tissues. Root secretion of phenolic compounds has long been hypothesized to be a component of the reduction strategy of Fe acquisition in non-graminaceous plants. We therefore subjected roots of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under Fe-replete and Fe-deplete conditions to comprehensive metabolome analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Scopoletin and other coumarins were found among the metabolites showing the strongest response to two different Fe-limited conditions, the cultivation in Fe-free medium and in medium with an alkaline pH. A coumarin biosynthesis mutant defective in ortho-hydroxylation of cinnamic acids was unable to grow on alkaline soil in the absence of Fe fertilization. Co-cultivation with wild-type plants partially rescued the Fe deficiency phenotype indicating a contribution of extracellular coumarins to Fe solubilization. Indeed, coumarins were detected in root exudates of wild-type plants. Direct infusion mass spectrometry as well as UV/vis spectroscopy indicated that coumarins are acting both as reductants of Fe(III) and as ligands of Fe(II).

  12. Biochemical and structural properties of cyanases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dan; Jiang, Lin; Lu, Lu; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2011-03-31

    Cyanate is toxic to all organisms. Cyanase converts cyanate to CO₂ and NH₃ in a bicarbonate-dependent reaction. The biophysical functions and biochemical characteristics of plant cyanases are poorly studied, although it has been investigated in a variety of proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi. In this study, we characterised plant cyanases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (AtCYN and OsCYN). Prokaryotic-expressed AtCYN and OsCYN both showed cyanase activity in vitro. Temperature had a similar influence on the activity of both cyanases, but pH had a differential impact on AtCYN and OsCYN activity. Homology modelling provided models of monomers of AtCYN and OsCYN, and a coimmunoprecipitation assay and gel filtration indicated that AtCYN and OsCYN formed homodecamers. The analysis of single-residue mutants of AtCYN indicated that the conserved catalytic residues also contributed to the stability of the homodecamer. KCNO treatment inhibited Arabidopsis germination and early seedling growth. Plants containing AtCYN or OsCYN exhibited resistance to KCNO stress, which demonstrated that one role of cyanases in plants is detoxification. Transcription level of AtCYN was higher in the flower than in other organs of Arabidopsis. AtCYN transcription was not significantly affected by KCNO treatment in Arabidopsis, but was induced by salt stress. This research broadens our knowledge on plant detoxification of cyanate via cyanase.

  13. DEWAX Transcription Factor Is Involved in Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulgi Ju

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle of land plants is the first physical barrier to protect their aerial parts from biotic and abiotic stresses. DEWAX, an AP2/ERF-type transcription factor, negatively regulates cuticular wax biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa overexpressing DEWAX and in Arabidopsis dewax mutant. Compared to wild type (WT leaves, Arabidopsis DEWAX OX and dewax leaves were more and less permeable to toluidine blue dye, respectively. The ROS levels increased in DEWAX OX leaves, but decreased in dewax relative to WT leaves. Compared to WT, DEWAX OX was more resistant, while dewax was more sensitive to B. cinerea; however, defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000:GFP were inversely modulated. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses indicated that the expression of defense-related genes was upregulated in DEWAX OX, but downregulated in dewax relative to WT. Transactivation assay showed that DEWAX upregulated the expression of PDF1.2a, IGMT1, and PRX37. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that DEWAX directly interacts with the GCC-box motifs of PDF1.2a promoter. In addition, ectopic expression of DEWAX increased the tolerance to B. cinerea in C. sativa. Taken together, we suggest that increased ROS accumulation and DEWAX-mediated upregulation of defense-related genes are closely associated with enhanced resistance to B. cinerea in Arabidopsis and C. sativa.

  14. Growth, differentiation and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under microgravity conditions (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, E. P.; Briarty, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this set of experiments is to quantify the structural and behavioral changes taking place in germinating seeds of the small plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The protocol to be used will involve germination of the seeds in orbit. Their growth will be followed by fixing and photographing samples of microgravity grown and 1 g control seedlings at intervals over 4 days. The different studies which will then be performed can be classified in relation to the parts of the plants involved. The first study will be an examination of the ultrastructure of the root statocytes, the cells containing gravity sensors, to determine whether their development proceeds normally under microgravity conditions. A second study will examine the differences in root and shoot development and orientation between normal wild type seedlings and those of an agravitropic mutant (aux-1) - one that does not respond normally to gravity. A third set of observations will be made on the structural changes occurring during reserve breakdown and utilization in the cells of the cotyledons, the storage organs of the seed. The fourth part of the work will be an examination of the statocytes present in the shoot and their development in microgravity. The final part of the study will give an answer to the debated question of whether the formation of the hypocotyl hook in seedlings is gravity dependent.

  15. Uptake and conversion of D-amino acids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gördes, Dirk; Kolukisaoglu, Üner; Thurow, Kerstin

    2011-02-01

    The D-enantiomers of proteinogenic amino acids fulfill essential functions in bacteria, fungi and animals. Just in the plant kingdom, the metabolism and role of D-amino acids (D-AAs) still remains unclear, although plants have to cope with significant amounts of these compounds from microbial decay in the rhizosphere. To fill this gap of knowledge, we tested the inhibitory effects of D-AAs on plant growth and established a method to quantitate 16 out of 19 proteinogenic amino acids and their D-enantiomers in plant tissue extracts. Therefore, the amino acids in the extracts were derivatized with Marfey's reagent and separated by HPLC-MS. We used two ecotypes (Col-0 and C24) and a mutant (lht1) of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to determine the influence and fate of exogenously applied D-AAs. All of them were found in high concentrations in the plant extracts after application, even in lht1, which points to additional transporters facilitating the import of D-AAs. The addition of particular amino acids (D-Trp, D-Phe, D-Met and D-His) led to the accumulation of the corresponding L-amino acid. In almost all cases, the application of a D-AA resulted in the accumulation of D-Ala and D-Glu. The presented results indicate that soil borne D-AAs can actively be taken up and metabolized via central metabolic routes.

  16. Biochemical and structural properties of cyanases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Qian

    Full Text Available Cyanate is toxic to all organisms. Cyanase converts cyanate to CO₂ and NH₃ in a bicarbonate-dependent reaction. The biophysical functions and biochemical characteristics of plant cyanases are poorly studied, although it has been investigated in a variety of proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi. In this study, we characterised plant cyanases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (AtCYN and OsCYN. Prokaryotic-expressed AtCYN and OsCYN both showed cyanase activity in vitro. Temperature had a similar influence on the activity of both cyanases, but pH had a differential impact on AtCYN and OsCYN activity. Homology modelling provided models of monomers of AtCYN and OsCYN, and a coimmunoprecipitation assay and gel filtration indicated that AtCYN and OsCYN formed homodecamers. The analysis of single-residue mutants of AtCYN indicated that the conserved catalytic residues also contributed to the stability of the homodecamer. KCNO treatment inhibited Arabidopsis germination and early seedling growth. Plants containing AtCYN or OsCYN exhibited resistance to KCNO stress, which demonstrated that one role of cyanases in plants is detoxification. Transcription level of AtCYN was higher in the flower than in other organs of Arabidopsis. AtCYN transcription was not significantly affected by KCNO treatment in Arabidopsis, but was induced by salt stress. This research broadens our knowledge on plant detoxification of cyanate via cyanase.

  17. Agrobacterium tumefaciens promotes tumor induction by modulating pathogen defense in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chil-Woo; Efetova, Marina; Engelmann, Julia C; Kramell, Robert; Wasternack, Claus; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Hedrich, Rainer; Deeken, Rosalia

    2009-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease by transferring and integrating bacterial DNA (T-DNA) into the plant genome. To examine the physiological changes and adaptations during Agrobacterium-induced tumor development, we compared the profiles of salicylic acid (SA), ethylene (ET), jasmonic acid (JA), and auxin (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) with changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome. Our data indicate that host responses were much stronger toward the oncogenic strain C58 than to the disarmed strain GV3101 and that auxin acts as a key modulator of the Arabidopsis-Agrobacterium interaction. At initiation of infection, elevated levels of IAA and ET were associated with the induction of host genes involved in IAA, but not ET signaling. After T-DNA integration, SA as well as IAA and ET accumulated, but JA did not. This did not correlate with SA-controlled pathogenesis-related gene expression in the host, although high SA levels in mutant plants prevented tumor development, while low levels promoted it. Our data are consistent with a scenario in which ET and later on SA control virulence of agrobacteria, whereas ET and auxin stimulate neovascularization during tumor formation. We suggest that crosstalk among IAA, ET, and SA balances pathogen defense launched by the host and tumor growth initiated by agrobacteria.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of the Genes Encoding Basic and Acidic Chitinase in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samac, Deborah A.; Hironaka, Cathy M.; Yallaly, Peter E.; Shah, Dilip M.

    1990-01-01

    Plants synthesize a number of antimicrobial proteins in response to pathogen invasion and environmental stresses. These proteins include two classes of chitinases that have either basic or acidic isoelectric points and that are capable of degrading fungal cell wall chitin. We have cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of the genes encoding the acidic and basic chitinases from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia wild type. Both chitinases are encoded by single copy genes that contain introns, a novel feature in chitinase genes. The basic chitinase has 73% amino acid sequence similarity to the basic chitinase from tobacco, and the acidic chitinase has 60% amino acid sequence similarity to the acidic chitinase from cucumber. Expression of the basic chitinase is organ-specific and age-dependent in Arabidopsis. A high constitutive level of expression was observed in roots with lower levels in leaves and flowering shoots. Exposure of plants to ethylene induced high levels of systemic expression of basic chitinase with expression increasing with plant age. Constitutive expression of basic chitinase was observed in roots of the ethylene insensitive mutant (etr) of Arabidopsis, demonstrating that root-specific expression is ethylene independent. Expression of the acidic chitinase gene was not observed in normal, untreated Arabidopsis plants or in plants treated with ethylene or salicylate. However, a transient expression assay indicated that the acidic chitinase promoter is active in Arabidopsis leaf tissue. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:16667600

  19. Lack of phosphoserine phosphatase activity alters pollen and tapetum development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tornero, M; Anoman, A D; Rosa-Téllez, S; Ros, R

    2015-06-01

    Formation of mature pollen grain, an essential process for the reproduction of higher plants, is affected in lines that are deficient in the enzymes of the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis (PPSB). Mutants of phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), the enzyme that catalyses the last step of PPSB, are embryo-lethal. When they are complemented with a construct carrying PSP1 cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter (psp1.1 35S:PSP1), which is poorly expressed in anther tissues, plants display a wild-type phenotype, but are male-sterile. The pollen from the psp1.1 35S:PSP1 lines are shrunken and unviable. Here we report the morphological alterations that appear in the psp1.1 35S:PSP1 lines during microspore development. We show that the pollen wall from these lines presents a normal exine layer, but a shrunken and collapsed shape. Lack of PSP activity also affects oil bodies formation in the tapetosomes of tapetal cells which, in turn, may influence microspore pollen coat formation. All these results highlight the important role of the PPSB in the normal development of microspores in Arabidopsis thaliana. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genomic stability in response to high versus low linear energy transfer radiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eHuefner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Low linear energy transfer (LET gamma rays and high LET HZE (high atomic weight, high energy particles act as powerful mutagens in both plants and animals. DNA damage generated by HZE particles is more densely clustered than that generated by gamma rays. To understand the genetic requirements for resistance to high vs. low LET radiation, a series of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants were exposed to either 1GeV Fe nuclei or gamma radiation. A comparison of effects on the germination and subsequent growth of seedlings led us to conclude that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE of the two types of radiation (HZE vs. gamma are roughly 3:1. Similarly, in wild-type lines, loss of somatic heterozygosity was induced at an RBE of about a 2:1 (HZE vs. gamma. Checkpoint and repair defects, as expected, enhanced sensitivity to both agents. The replication fork checkpoint, governed by ATR, played a slightly more important role in resistance to HZE-induced mutagenesis than in resistance to gamma induced mutagenesis.

  1. REIL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana interact in yeast-2-hybrid assays with homologs of the yeast Rlp24, Rpl24A, Rlp24B, Arx1, and Jjj1 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stefanie; Dethloff, Frederik; Beine-Golovchuk, Olga; Kopka, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The REIL1 and REIL2 proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana are evolutionarily conserved homologs of the cytosolic 60S ribosomal maturation factors Rei1 and its paralog Reh1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We previously demonstrated that the REIL proteins like the yeast homologs are required for the growth of both organisms at suboptimal temperatures. In addition, the cold sensitivity of the yeast Δrei1 mutant was almost fully rescued by heterologous expression of the REIL1 protein. These phenomena and conservation of co-expressed genes linked the function of REIL proteins to the maturation of the eukaryotic ribosome in A. thaliana. Here we demonstrate that REIL proteins interact in yeast-2-hybrid assays with A. thaliana homologs of the yeast proteins, Rlp24, Rpl24A, Rlp24B, Arx1, and Jjj1. These proteins take part in the cytosolic 60S ribosomal maturation process within yeast and physically interact with Rei1. Our study does not provide proof but is consistent with a conserved role of the A. thaliana REIL proteins in ribosomal maturation and demonstrates the potential of future investigations that aim to unravel the protein interactions of REIL proteins in planta. PMID:24603461

  2. AaMYB1 and its orthologue AtMYB61 affect terpene metabolism and trichome development in Artemisia annua and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Hernández, Luis; Jiang, Weimin; Yang, Ke; Tang, Kexuan; Brodelius, Peter E; Pelaz, Soraya

    2017-05-01

    The effective anti-malarial drug artemisinin (AN) isolated from Artemisia annua is relatively expensive due to the low AN content in the plant as AN is only synthesized within the glandular trichomes. Therefore, genetic engineering of A. annua is one of the most promising approaches for improving the yield of AN. In this work, the AaMYB1 transcription factor has been identified and characterized. When AaMYB1 is overexpressed in A. annua, either exclusively in trichomes or in the whole plant, essential AN biosynthetic genes are also overexpressed and consequently the amount of AN is significantly increased. Artemisia AaMYB1 constitutively overexpressing plants displayed a greater number of trichomes. In order to study the role of AaMYB1 on trichome development and other possibly connected biological processes, AaMYB1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. To support our findings in Arabidopsis thaliana, an AaMYB1 orthologue from this model plant, AtMYB61, was identified and atmyb61 mutants characterized. Both AaMYB1 and AtMYB61 affected trichome initiation, root development and stomatal aperture in A. thaliana. Molecular analyses indicated that two crucial trichome activator genes are misexpressed in atmyb61 mutant plants and in plants overexpressing AaMYB1. Furthermore, AaMYB1 and AtMYB61 are also essential for gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis and degradation in both species by positively affecting the expression of the enzymes that convert GA9 into the bioactive GA4 as well as the enzymes involved in the degradation of GA4 . Overall, these results identify AaMYB1/AtMYB61 as a key component of the molecular network that connects important biosynthetic processes, and reveal its potential value for AN production through genetic engineering. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of light and the regulatory Beta subunit composition of protein phosphatase 2A on the susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana to aphid (Myzus persicae infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brwa eRasool

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signalling pathways are complex and poorly understood but protein kinase/phosphatase cascades are potentially important components. Aphid fecundity and susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae infection were determined in the low light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and in mutant lines defective in either the protein phosphatase (PP2A regulatory subunit B’γ (gamma; pp2a-b’γ or B’ζ (zeta; pp2a-b’ζ1-1 and pp2a-b’ζ1-2 and in gamma zeta double mutants (pp2a-b’γζ lacking both subunits. All the mutants except for pp2a-b’ζ1-1 had significantly lower leaf areas than the wild type. Susceptibility to P. syringae was similar in all genotypes. In contrast, aphid fecundity was significantly decreased in the pp2a-b’γ mutant relative to the wild type but not in the pp2a-b’γζ double mutant. A high light pre-treatment, which led to a significant increase in rosette growth in all mutant lines but not in the wild type, led to a significant decrease in aphid fecundity in all genotypes. The high light pre-treatment abolished the differences in aphid resistance observed in the pp2a-b’γ mutant relative to the wild type. The light and CO2 response curves for photosynthesis were changed in response to the high light pre-treatment, but the high light effects were similar in all genotypes. These data demonstrate that a pre-exposure to high light and the composition of subunits on the trimeric PP2A holoenzymes are important in regulating plant resistance to aphids. The functional specificity for the individual regulatory B-subunits may therefore limit aphid colonisation, depending on the prevailing abiotic stress environment.

  4. Evolutionary origins of Brassicaceae specific genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background All sequenced genomes contain a proportion of lineage-specific genes, which exhibit no sequence similarity to any genes outside the lineage. Despite their prevalence, the origins and functions of most lineage-specific genes remain largely unknown. As more genomes are sequenced opportunities for understanding evolutionary origins and functions of lineage-specific genes are increasing. Results This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origins of lineage-specific genes (LSGs) in Arabidopsis thaliana that are restricted to the Brassicaceae family. In this study, lineage-specific genes within the nuclear (1761 genes) and mitochondrial (28 genes) genomes are identified. The evolutionary origins of two thirds of the lineage-specific genes within the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are also identified. Almost a quarter of lineage-specific genes originate from non-lineage-specific paralogs, while the origins of ~10% of lineage-specific genes are partly derived from DNA exapted from transposable elements (twice the proportion observed for non-lineage-specific genes). Lineage-specific genes are also enriched in genes that have overlapping CDS, which is consistent with such novel genes arising from overprinting. Over half of the subset of the 958 lineage-specific genes found only in Arabidopsis thaliana have alignments to intergenic regions in Arabidopsis lyrata, consistent with either de novo origination or differential gene loss and retention, with both evolutionary scenarios explaining the lineage-specific status of these genes. A smaller number of lineage-specific genes with an incomplete open reading frame across different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions are further identified as accession-specific genes, most likely of recent origin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Putative de novo origination for two of the Arabidopsis thaliana-only genes is identified via additional sequencing across accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and closely related sister species

  5. Collection of apoplastic fluids from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Svend Roesen; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    The leaf apoplast comprises the extracellular continuum outside cell membranes. A broad range of processes take place in the apoplast, including intercellular signaling, metabolite transport, and plant-microbe interactions. To study these processes, it is essential to analyze the metabolite conte...... in apoplastic fluids. Due to the fragile nature of leaf tissues, it is a challenge to obtain apoplastic fluids from leaves. Here, methods to collect apoplastic washing fluid and guttation fluid from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves are described....

  6. The structure of the major anthocyanin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloor, Stephen J; Abrahams, Sharon

    2002-02-01

    The major anthocyanin in the leaves and stems of Arabidopsis thaliana has been isolated and shown to be cyanidin 3-O-[2-O(2-O-(sinapoyl)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-6-O-(4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-p-coumaroyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside] 5-O-[6-O-(malonyl) beta-D-glucopyranoside]. This anthocyanin is a glucosylated version of one of the anthocyanins found in the flowers of the closely related Matthiola incana.

  7. Understanding the Biological Roles of Pectins in Plants through Physiological and Functional Characterizations of Plant and Fungal Mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranne, Maria

    wall acetylation (Chapter 2), identification of a candidate gene required for acetylation of pectin (Chapter 3), screening of pectin mutants for susceptibility to the nectrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea (Chapter 4), and identification and functional characterization of an arabinan......-degrading enzyme secreted by B. cinerea during infection of plants (Chapter 5). The results described resulted in valuable new knowledge regarding the role of pectin acetylation and arabinosylation in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana documented in three published research papers, one manuscript and one...

  8. Multiple reference genomes and transcriptomes for Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Xiangchao

    2011-08-28

    Genetic differences between Arabidopsis thaliana accessions underlie the plants extensive phenotypic variation, and until now these have been interpreted largely in the context of the annotated reference accession Col-0. Here we report the sequencing, assembly and annotation of the genomes of 18 natural A. thaliana accessions, and their transcriptomes. When assessed on the basis of the reference annotation, one-third of protein-coding genes are predicted to be disrupted in at least one accession. However, re-annotation of each genome revealed that alternative gene models often restore coding potential. Gene expression in seedlings differed for nearly half of expressed genes and was frequently associated with cis variants within 5 kilobases, as were intron retention alternative splicing events. Sequence and expression variation is most pronounced in genes that respond to the biotic environment. Our data further promote evolutionary and functional studies in A. thaliana, especially the MAGIC genetic reference population descended from these accessions. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  9. The fate of retrotransposed processed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkarim, Basma T M; Maranda, Vincent; Drouin, Guy

    2017-04-20

    Processed genes are functional genes that have arisen as a result of the retrotransposition of mRNA molecules. We found 6 genes that generated processed genes in the common ancestor of five Brassicaceae species (Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, Capsella rubella, Brassica rapa and Thellungiella parvula). These processed genes have therefore been kept for at least 30millionyears. Analyses of the Ka/Ks ratio of these genes, and of those having given rise to them, show that they evolve relatively slowly and suggest that the processed genes maintained the same function as that of their parental gene. There is a significant negative correlation between the number of ESTs and transcripts produced and the Ka/Ks ratios of the parental genes but not of the processed genes. This suggests that selection has not yet adapted the selective pressure the processed genes experience to their expression level. However, the A. thaliana processed genes tend to be expressed in the same tissues as that of their parental genes. Furthermore, most have a CAATT-box, a TATA-box and are located about 1kb from another protein-coding gene. Altogether, our results suggest that the processed genes found in the A. thaliana genome have been kept to produce more of the same product, and in the same tissues, as that encoded by their parental gene. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcriptome response analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana to leafminer (Liriomyza huidobrensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Sufang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants have evolved a complicated resistance system and exhibit a variety of defense patterns in response to different attackers. Previous studies have shown that responses of plants to chewing insects and phloem-feeding insects are significantly different. Less is known, however, regarding molecular responses to leafminer insects. To investigate plant transcriptome response to leafminers, we selected the leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis, which has a special feeding pattern more similar to pathogen damage than that of chewing insects, as a model insect, and Arabidopsis thaliana as a response plant. Results We first investigated local and systemic responses of A. thaliana to leafminer feeding using an Affymetrix ATH1 genome array. Genes related to metabolic processes and stimulus responses were highly regulated. Most systemically-induced genes formed a subset of the local response genes. We then downloaded gene expression data from online databases and used hierarchical clustering to explore relationships among gene expression patterns in A. thaliana damaged by different attackers. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that plant response patterns are strongly coupled to damage patterns of attackers.

  11. Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks Paulo Shakarian1*, J. Kenneth Wickiser2 1 Paulo Shakarian...significantly attacked. Citation: Shakarian P, Wickiser JK (2012) Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks...to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  12. EFFECTS OF KANAMYCIN ON GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA SEEDLING AND ITS ROOT

    OpenAIRE

    Guan Hongying; Ding Xiaosheng; Da Hong; Chune Zhou; Longdou LU

    2008-01-01

    In this article, it was found that growth and development of main root and lateral root of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling were evidently affected by kanamycin, and etiolation of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling was very serious. Compared to the controls, main root of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling on MS with kanamycin was very short, lateral root was not formed, and meristematic zone of root tip diminished and exhibited large intercellular space. Furthermore, effect of kanamycin on roo...

  13. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  14. CENH3-GFP: a visual marker for gametophytic and somatic ploidy determination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Storme, Nico; Keçeli, Burcu Nur; Zamariola, Linda; Angenon, Geert; Geelen, Danny

    2016-01-05

    The in vivo determination of the cell-specific chromosome number provides a valuable tool in several aspects of plant research. However, current techniques to determine the endosystemic ploidy level do not allow non-destructive, cell-specific chromosome quantification. Particularly in the gametophytic cell lineages, which are physically encapsulated in the reproductive organ structures, direct in vivo ploidy determination has been proven very challenging. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model, we here assess the applicability of recombinant CENH3-GFP reporters for the labeling of the cell's chromocenters and for the monitoring of the gametophytic and somatic chromosome number in vivo. By modulating expression of a CENH3-GFP reporter cassette using different promoters, we isolated two reporter lines that allow for a clear and highly specific labeling of centromeric chromosome regions in somatic and gametophytic cells respectively. Using polyploid plant series and reproductive mutants, we demonstrate that the pWOX2-CENH3-GFP recombinant fusion protein allows for the determination of the gametophytic chromosome number in both male and female gametophytic cells, and additionally labels centromeric regions in early embryo development. Somatic centromere labeling through p35S-CENH3-GFP shows a maximum of ten centromeric dots in young dividing tissues, reflecting the diploid chromosome number (2x = 10), and reveals a progressive decrease in GFP foci frequency throughout plant development. Moreover, using chemical and genetic induction of endomitosis, we demonstrate that CENH3-mediated chromosome labeling provides an easy and valuable tool for the detection and characterization of endomitotic polyploidization events. This study demonstrates that the introgression of the pWOX2-CENH3-GFP reporter construct in Arabidopsis thaliana provides an easy and reliable methodology for determining the chromosome number in developing male and female gametes, and during early embryo

  15. The DNA translocase RAD5A acts independently of the other main DNA repair pathways, and requires both its ATPase and RING domain for activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Tobias; Mannuß, Anja; Kobbe, Daniela; Knoll, Alexander; Trapp, Oliver; Dorn, Annika; Puchta, Holger

    2017-08-01

    Multiple pathways exist to repair DNA damage induced by methylating and crosslinking agents in Arabidopsis thaliana. The SWI2/SNF2 translocase RAD5A, the functional homolog of budding yeast Rad5 that is required for the error-free branch of post-replicative repair, plays a surprisingly prominent role in the repair of both kinds of lesions in Arabidopsis. Here we show that both the ATPase domain and the ubiquitination function of the RING domain of the Arabidopsis protein are essential for the cellular response to different forms of DNA damage. To define the exact role of RAD5A within the complex network of DNA repair pathways, we crossed the rad5a mutant line with mutants of different known repair factors of Arabidopsis. We had previously shown that RAD5A acts independently of two main pathways of replication-associated DNA repair defined by the helicase RECQ4A and the endonuclease MUS81. The enhanced sensitivity of all double mutants tested in this study indicates that the repair of damaged DNA by RAD5A also occurs independently of nucleotide excision repair (AtRAD1), single-strand break repair (AtPARP1), as well as microhomology-mediated double-strand break repair (AtTEB). Moreover, RAD5A can partially complement for a deficient AtATM-mediated DNA damage response in plants, as the double mutant shows phenotypic growth defects. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The ribokinases of Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are required for ribose recycling from nucleotide catabolism, which in plants is not essential to survive prolonged dark stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Rebekka Y; Zhu, Anting; Eubel, Holger; Dahncke, Kathleen; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2017-09-18

    Nucleotide catabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to the release of ribose, which requires phosphorylation to ribose-5-phosphate mediated by ribokinase (RBSK). We aimed to characterize RBSK in plants and yeast, to quantify the contribution of plant nucleotide catabolism to the ribose pool, and to investigate whether ribose carbon contributes to dark stress survival of plants. We performed a phylogenetic analysis and determined the kinetic constants of plant-expressed Arabidopsis and yeast RBSKs. Using mass spectrometry, several metabolites were quantified in AtRBSK mutants and double mutants with genes of nucleoside catabolism. Additionally, the dark stress performance of several nucleotide metabolism mutants and rbsk was compared. The plant PfkB family of sugar kinases forms nine major clades likely representing distinct biochemical functions, one of them RBSK. Nucleotide catabolism is the dominant ribose source in plant metabolism and is highly induced by dark stress. However, rbsk cannot be discerned from the wild type in dark stress. Interestingly, the accumulation of guanosine in a guanosine deaminase mutant strongly enhances dark stress symptoms. Although nucleotide catabolism contributes to carbon mobilization upon darkness and is the dominant source of ribose, the contribution appears to be of minor importance for dark stress survival. © 2017 The Authors New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Phytotoxic effects of trichothecenes on the growth and morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daisuke Masuda; Mamoru Ishida; Kazuo Yamaguchi; Isamu Yamaguchi; Makoto Kimura; Takumi Nishiuchi

    2007-01-01

    .... To perform a comparative analysis of the phytotoxic action of representative trichothecenes, the growth and morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana growing on media containing these compounds was investigated...

  18. Salmonella enterica flagellin is recognized via FLS2 and activates PAMP-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ana Victoria; Charrier, Amélie; Schikora, Adam; Bigeard, Jean; Pateyron, Stephanie; de Tauzia-Moreau, Marie-Ludivine; Evrard, Alexandre; Mithöfer, Axel; Martin-Magniette, Marie Laure; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-04-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Recent evidence indicates that plants recognize S. enterica and raise defense responses. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction of S. enterica with plants are still largely unclear. Here, we show that flagellin from S. enterica represents a prominent pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, which induces PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) via the recognition of the flg22 domain by the receptor kinase FLS2. The Arabidopsis fls2 mutant shows reduced though not abolished PTI activation, indicating that plants rely also on recognition of other S. enterica PAMPs. Interestingly, the S. enterica type III secretion system (T3SS) mutant prgH- induced stronger defense gene expression than wild-type bacteria in Arabidopsis, suggesting that T3SS effectors are involved in defense suppression. Furthermore, we observe that S. enterica strains show variation in the flg22 epitope, which results in proteins with reduced PTI-inducing activity. Altogether, these results show that S. enterica activates PTI in Arabidopsis and suggest that, in order to accomplish plant colonization, S. enterica evolved strategies to avoid or suppress PTI.

  19. Exogenous Cellulase Switches Cell Interdigitation to Cell Elongation in an RIC1-dependent Manner in Arabidopsis thaliana Cotyledon Pavement Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Takumi; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Akita, Kae; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Kobayashi, Ryo; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Miura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Pavement cells in cotyledons and true leaves exhibit a jigsaw puzzle-like morphology in most dicotyledonous plants. Among the molecular mechanisms mediating cell morphogenesis, two antagonistic Rho-like GTPases regulate local cell outgrowth via cytoskeletal rearrangements. Analyses of several cell wall-related mutants suggest the importance of cell wall mechanics in the formation of interdigitated patterns. However, how these factors are integrated is unknown. In this study, we observed that the application of exogenous cellulase to hydroponically grown Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledons switched the interdigitation of pavement cells to the production of smoothly elongated cells. The cellulase-induced inhibition of cell interdigitation was not observed in a RIC1 knockout mutant. This gene encodes a Rho-like GTPase-interacting protein important for localized cell growth suppression via microtubule bundling on concave cell interfaces. Additionally, to characterize pavement cell morphologies, we developed a mathematical model that considers the balance between cell and cell wall growth, restricted global cell growth orientation, and regulation of local cell outgrowth mediated by a Rho-like GTPase-cytoskeleton system. Our computational simulations fully support our experimental observations, and suggest that interdigitated patterns form because of mechanical buckling in the absence of Rho-like GTPase-dependent regulation of local cell outgrowth. Our model clarifies the cell wall mechanics influencing pavement cell morphogenesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. N,N-dimethyl hexadecylamine and related amines regulate root morphogenesis via jasmonic acid signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya-González, Javier; Velázquez-Becerra, Crisanto; Barrera-Ortiz, Salvador; López-Bucio, José; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo

    2017-05-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are natural inhabitants of roots, colonize diverse monocot and dicot species, and affect several functional traits such as root architecture, adaptation to adverse environments, and protect plants from pathogens. N,N-dimethyl-hexadecylamine (C16-DMA) is a rhizobacterial amino lipid that modulates the postembryonic development of several plants, likely as part of volatile blends. In this work, we evaluated the bioactivity of C16-DMA and other related N,N-dimethyl-amines with varied length and found that inhibition of primary root growth was related to the length of the acyl chain. C16-DMA inhibited primary root growth affecting cell division and elongation, while promoting lateral root formation and root hair growth and density in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) wild-type (WT) seedlings. Interestingly, C16-DMA induced the expression of the jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive gene marker pLOX2:uidA, while JA-related mutants jar1, coi1-1, and myc2 affected on JA biosynthesis and perception, respectively, are compromised in C16-DMA responses. Comparison of auxin-regulated gene expression, root architectural changes in WT, and auxin-related mutants aux1-7, tir1/afb2/afb3, and arf7-1/arf19-1 to C16-DMA shows that the C16-DMA effects occur independently of auxin signaling. Together, these results reveal a novel class of aminolipids modulating root organogenesis via crosstalk with the JA signaling pathway.

  1. HMA P-type ATPases are the major mechanism for root-to-shoot Cd translocation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chong Kum Edwin; Cobbett, Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    The Zn/Cd-transporting ATPases, HMA2 and HMA4, essential for root-to-shoot Zn translocation, are also able to transport Cd. Phytochelatins (PCs) are a major mechanism of Cd detoxification through the sequestration of PC-Cd complexes in vacuoles. The roles of HMA2 and HMA4 in root-to-shoot Cd translocation and Cd tolerance were investigated in the PC-deficient, cad1-3 mutant and CAD1 backgrounds. Six lines, with all possible combinations of hma2, hma4 and cad1 mutations, were constructed. The lines were tested for Cd-sensitivity on agar medium, and radioactive (109)Cd was used to measure Cd uptake and translocation from root to shoot over periods of up to 6 d. In hma4 and hma2,hma4, but not hma2, root-to-shoot Cd translocation was decreased to about 60 and 2%, respectively, of that in the wild-type. Cd sensitivity increased approximately twofold in the hma2,hma4 mutant in both CAD1 and cad1 backgrounds. PC deficiency resulted in an increase in shoot Cd concentrations. The near-complete abolition of root-to-shoot Cd translocation resulting from the loss of function of HMA2 and HMA4 demonstrates they are the major mechanism for Cd translocation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  2. Iron-sulphur cluster assembly in plants: distinct NFU proteins in mitochondria and plastids from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léon, Sébastien; Touraine, Brigitte; Ribot, Cécile; Briat, Jean-François; Lobréaux, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    Recent results are in favour of a role for NFU-like proteins in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. These polypeptides share a conserved CXXC motif in their NFU domain. In the present study, we have characterized Arabidopsis thaliana NFU1-5 genes. AtNFU proteins are separated into two classes. NFU4 and NFU5 are part of the mitochondrial type, presenting a structural organization similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nfu1p. These proteins complement a Delta isu1 Delta nfu1 yeast mutant and NFU4 mitochondrial localization was confirmed by green fluorescent protein fusion analysis. AtNFU1-3 represent a new class of NFU proteins, unique to plants. These polypeptides are made of two NFU domains, the second having lost its CXXC motif. AtNFU1-3 proteins are more related to Synechocystis PCC6803 NFU-like proteins and are localized to plastids when fused with the green fluorescent protein. NFU2 and/or NFU3 were detected in leaf chloroplasts by immunoblotting. NFU1 and NFU2 are functional NFU capable of restoring the growth of a Delta isu1 Delta nfu1 yeast mutant, when addressed to yeast mitochondria. Furthermore, NFU2 recombinant protein is capable of binding a labile 2Fe-2S cluster in vitro. These results demonstrate the presence of distinct NFU proteins in Arabidopsis mitochondria and plastids. Such results suggest the existence of two different Fe-S assembly machineries in plant cells. PMID:12553879

  3. Spliceosomal protein U1A is involved in alternative splicing and salt stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Jinbao

    2017-12-01

    Soil salinity is a significant threat to sustainable agricultural production worldwide. Plants must adjust their developmental and physiological processes to cope with salt stress. Although the capacity for adaptation ultimately depends on the genome, the exceptional versatility in gene regulation provided by the spliceosome-mediated alternative splicing (AS) is essential in these adaptive processes. However, the functions of the spliceosome in plant stress responses are poorly understood. Here, we report the in-depth characterization of a U1 spliceosomal protein, AtU1A, in controlling AS of pre-mRNAs under salt stress and salt stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. The atu1a mutant was hypersensitive to salt stress and accumulated more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than the wild-type under salt stress. RNA-seq analysis revealed that AtU1A regulates AS of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition of 5′ splice sites. We showed that AtU1A is associated with the pre-mRNA of the ROS detoxification-related gene ACO1 and is necessary for the regulation of ACO1 AS. ACO1 is important for salt tolerance because ectopic expression of ACO1 in the atu1a mutant can partially rescue its salt hypersensitive phenotype. Our findings highlight the critical role of AtU1A as a regulator of pre-mRNA processing and salt tolerance in plants.

  4. Myosin XIK of Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates at the root hair tip and is required for fast root hair growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsook Park

    Full Text Available Myosin motor proteins are thought to carry out important functions in the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity by moving cellular components such as organelles, vesicles, or protein complexes along the actin cytoskeleton. In Arabidopsis thaliana, disruption of the myosin XIK gene leads to reduced elongation of the highly polar root hairs, suggesting that the encoded motor protein is involved in this cell growth. Detailed live-cell observations in this study revealed that xik root hairs elongated more slowly and stopped growth sooner than those in wild type. Overall cellular organization including the actin cytoskeleton appeared normal, but actin filament dynamics were reduced in the mutant. Accumulation of RabA4b-containing vesicles, on the other hand, was not significantly different from wild type. A functional YFP-XIK fusion protein that could complement the mutant phenotype accumulated at the tip of growing root hairs in an actin-dependent manner. The distribution of YFP-XIK at the tip, however, did not match that of the ER or several tip-enriched markers including CFP-RabA4b. We conclude that the myosin XIK is required for normal actin dynamics and plays a role in the subapical region of growing root hairs to facilitate optimal growth.

  5. Mutations in AtPS1 (Arabidopsis thaliana parallel spindle 1 lead to the production of diploid pollen grains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle d'Erfurth

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy has had a considerable impact on the evolution of many eukaryotes, especially angiosperms. Indeed, most--if not all-angiosperms have experienced at least one round of polyploidy during the course of their evolution, and many important crop plants are current polyploids. The occurrence of 2n gametes (diplogametes in diploid populations is widely recognised as the major source of polyploid formation. However, limited information is available on the genetic control of diplogamete production. Here, we describe the isolation and characterisation of the first gene, AtPS1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Parallel Spindle 1, implicated in the formation of a high frequency of diplogametes in plants. Atps1 mutants produce diploid male spores, diploid pollen grains, and spontaneous triploid plants in the next generation. Female meiosis is not affected in the mutant. We demonstrated that abnormal spindle orientation at male meiosis II leads to diplogamete formation. Most of the parent's heterozygosity is therefore conserved in the Atps1 diploid gametes, which is a key issue for plant breeding. The AtPS1 protein is conserved throughout the plant kingdom and carries domains suggestive of a regulatory function. The isolation of a gene involved in diplogamete production opens the way for new strategies in plant breeding programmes and progress in evolutionary studies.

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana PGR7 encodes a conserved chloroplast protein that is necessary for efficient photosynthetic electron transport.

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    Hou-Sung Jung

    Full Text Available A significant fraction of a plant's nuclear genome encodes chloroplast-targeted proteins, many of which are devoted to the assembly and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Using digital video imaging of chlorophyll fluorescence, we isolated proton gradient regulation 7 (pgr7 as an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with low nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ. In pgr7, the xanthophyll cycle and the PSBS gene product, previously identified NPQ factors, were still functional, but the efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport was lower than in the wild type. The pgr7 mutant was also smaller in size and had lower chlorophyll content than the wild type in optimal growth conditions. Positional cloning located the pgr7 mutation in the At3g21200 (PGR7 gene, which was predicted to encode a chloroplast protein of unknown function. Chloroplast targeting of PGR7 was confirmed by transient expression of a GFP fusion protein and by stable expression and subcellular localization of an epitope-tagged version of PGR7. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the PGR7 protein has two domains that are conserved in plants, algae, and bacteria, and the N-terminal domain is predicted to bind a cofactor such as FMN. Thus, we identified PGR7 as a novel, conserved nuclear gene that is necessary for efficient photosynthetic electron transport in chloroplasts of Arabidopsis.

  7. Root hair-specific disruption of cellulose and xyloglucan in AtCSLD3 mutants, and factors affecting the post-rupture resumption of mutant root hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galway, Moira E; Eng, Ryan C; Schiefelbein, John W; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2011-05-01

    The glycosyl transferase encoded by the cellulose synthase-like gene CSLD3/KJK/RHD7 (At3g03050) is required for cell wall integrity during root hair formation in Arabidopsis thaliana but it remains unclear whether it contributes to the synthesis of cellulose or hemicellulose. We identified two new alleles, root hair-defective (rhd) 7-1 and rhd7-4, which affect the C-terminal end of the encoded protein. Like root hairs in the previously characterized kjk-2 putative null mutant, rhd7-1 and rhd7-4 hairs rupture before tip growth but, depending on the growth medium and temperature, hairs are able to survive rupture and initiate tip growth, indicating that these alleles retain some function. At 21°C, the rhd7 tip-growing root hairs continued to rupture but at 5ºC, rupture was inhibited, resulting in long, wild type-like root hairs. At both temperatures, the expression of another root hair-specific CSLD gene, CSLD2, was increased in the rhd7-4 mutant but reduced in the kjk-2 mutant, suggesting that CSLD2 expression is CSLD3-dependent, and that CSLD2 could partially compensate for CSLD3 defects to prevent rupture at 5°C. Using a fluorescent brightener (FB 28) to detect cell wall (1 → 4)-β-glucans (primarily cellulose) and CCRC-M1 antibody to detect fucosylated xyloglucans revealed a patchy distribution of both in the mutant root hair cell walls. Cell wall thickness varied, and immunogold electron microscopy indicated that xyloglucan distribution was altered throughout the root hair cell walls. These cell wall defects indicate that CSLD3 is required for the normal organization of both cellulose and xyloglucan in root hair cell walls.

  8. Carpel, a new Arabidopsis epi-mutant of the SUPERMAN gene: phenotypic analysis and DNA methylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, A; Grunau, C; De Beck, L; Van Montagu, M; Rosenthal, A; Boerjan, W

    1999-09-01

    The carpel (car) mutation affects the morphology of reproductive organs in Arabidopsis thaliana. car flowers have an increased number of carpels, on average 2.7 +/- 0.8 instead of two in the wild type. Through allelism test with fon1-3 and analysis of the methylation state of the SUPERMAN (SUP) gene in car mutants, we show that car is an epi-mutation of SUP. The methylation pattern of car is clearly distinct from that of fon1-3, another epi-mutation of the SUP gene. Methylation was found predominantly in Cp(A/T)p(A/G) triplets and in CpG pairs. We suggest that the extensive SUP methylation in car has arisen from an abundant methylation of a single CpG site that was already present in abscisic acid-insensitive (abi3-4) mutants, from which car was segregating.

  9. Tryptophan mutants in Arabidopsis: the consequences of duplicated tryptophan synthase beta genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, R L; Bissinger, P H; Mahoney, D J; Radwanski, E R; Fink, G R

    1991-01-01

    The cruciferous plant Arabidopsis thaliana has two closely related, nonallelic tryptophan synthase beta genes (TSB1 and TSB2), each containing four introns and a chloroplast leader sequence. Both genes are transcribed, although TSB1 produces greater than 90% of tryptophan synthase beta mRNA in leaf tissue. A tryptophan-requiring mutant, trp2-1, has been identified that has about 10% of the wild-type tryptophan synthase beta activity. The trp2-1 mutation is complemented by the TSB1 transgene and is linked genetically to a polymorphism in the TSB1 gene, strongly suggesting that trp2-1 is a mutation in TSB1. The trp2-1 mutants are conditional: they require tryptophan for growth under standard illumination but not under very low light conditions. Presumably, under low light the poorly expressed gene, TSB2, is capable of supporting growth. Genetic redundancy may be common to many aromatic amino acid biosynthetic enzymes in plants because mutants defective in two other genes (TRP1 and TRP3) also exhibit a conditional tryptophan auxotrophy. The existence of two tryptophan pathways has important consequences for tissue-specific regulation of amino acid and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:1840915

  10. Homeopathic Treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana Plants Infected with Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Shah-Rossi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeopathic basic research is still in the screening phase to identify promising model systems that are adapted to the needs and peculiarities of homeopathic medicine and pharmacy. We investigated the potential of a common plant-pathogen system, Arabidopsis thaliana infected with the virulent bacteria Pseudomonas syringae, regarding its response towards a homeopathic treatment. A. thaliana plants were treated with homeopathic preparations before and after infection. Outcome measure was the number of P. syringae bacteria in the leaves of A. thaliana, assessed in randomized and blinded experiments. After a screening of 30 homeopathic preparations, we investigated the effect of Carbo vegetabilis 30x, Magnesium phosphoricum 30x, Nosode 30x, Biplantol (a homeopathic complex remedy, and Biplantol 30x on the infection rate in five or six independent experiments in total. The screening yielded significant effects for four out of 30 tested preparations. In the repeated experimental series, only the homeopathic complex remedy Biplantol induced a significant reduction of the infection rate (p = 0.01; effect size, d = 0.38. None of the other four repeatedly tested preparations (Carbo vegetabilis 30x, Magnesium phosphoricum 30x, Nosode 30x, Biplantol 30x yielded significant effects in the overall evaluation. This phytopathological model yielded a small to medium effect size and thus might be of interest for homeopathic basic research after further improvement. Compared to Bion (a common SAR inducer used as positive control, the magnitude of the treatment effect of Biplantol was about 50%. Thus, homeopathic formulations might have a potential for the treatment of plant diseases after further optimization. However, the ecological impact should be investigated more closely before widespread application.

  11. Mutations in a plastid-localized elongation factor G alter early stages of plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangarter Roger P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper development of plastids in embryo and seedling tissues is critical for plant development. During germination, plastids develop to perform many critical functions that are necessary to establish the seedling for further growth. A growing body of work has demonstrated that components of the plastid transcription and translation machinery must be present and functional to establish the organelle upon germination. Results We have identified Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in a gene that encodes a plastid-targeted elongation factor G (SCO1 that is essential for plastid development during embryogenesis since two T-DNA insertion mutations in the coding sequence (sco1-2 and sco1-3 result in an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, a point mutation allele (sco1-1 and an allele with a T-DNA insertion in the promoter (sco1-4 of SCO1 display conditional seedling-lethal phenotypes. Seedlings of these alleles exhibit cotyledon and hypocotyl albinism due to improper chloroplast development, and normally die shortly after germination. However, when germinated on media supplemented with sucrose, the mutant plants can produce photosynthetically-active green leaves from the apical meristem. Conclusion The developmental stage-specific phenotype of the conditional-lethal sco1 alleles reveals differences in chloroplast formation during seedling germination compared to chloroplast differentiation in cells derived from the shoot apical meristem. Our identification of embryo-lethal mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis elongation factor G indicates that SCO1 is essential for plant growth, consistent with its predicted role in chloroplast protein translation.

  12. TRANSPARENT TESTA 13 is a tonoplast P3A -ATPase required for vacuolar deposition of proanthocyanidins in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhagen, Ingo; Nordholt, Niclas; Seidel, Thorsten; Spelt, Kees; Koes, Ronald; Quattrochio, Francesca; Sagasser, Martin; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular pH homeostasis is essential for all living cells. In plants, pH is usually maintained by three structurally distinct and differentially localized types of proton pump: P-type H(+) -ATPases in the plasma membrane, and multimeric vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPases (V-ATPases) and vacuolar H(+) -pyrophosphatases (H(+) -PPases) in endomembranes. Here, we show that reduced accumulation of proanthocyanidins (PAs) and hence the diminished brown seed coloration found in the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant transparent testa 13 (tt13) is caused by disruption of the gene encoding the P3A -ATPase AHA10. Identification of the gene encoded by the tt13 locus completes the molecular characterization of the classical set of transparent testa mutants. Cells of the tt13 seed coat endothelium do not contain PA-filled central vacuoles as observed in the wild-type. tt13 phenocopies tt12, a mutant that is defective in vacuolar import of the PA precursor epicatechin. Our data show that vacuolar loading with PA precursors depends on TT13. Consistent with the tt13 phenotype, but in contrast to other isoforms of P-type H(+) -ATPases, TT13 localizes to the tonoplast. PA accumulation in tt13 is partially restored by expression of the tonoplast localized H(+) -PPase VHP1. Our findings indicate that the P3A -ATPase TT13 functions as a proton pump in the tonoplast of seed coat endothelium cells, and generates the driving force for TT12-mediated transport of PA precursors to the vacuole. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of immunophilin-like FKBP42 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhoff, Andreas; Granzin, Joachim [Institut für Biologische Informationsverarbeitung (IBI-2, Biologische Strukturforschung), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Kamphausen, Thilo [Max-Planck-Forschungsstelle für Enzymologie der Proteinfaltung, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Büldt, Georg [Institut für Biologische Informationsverarbeitung (IBI-2, Biologische Strukturforschung), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Schulz, Burkhard [Universität Tübingen, ZMBP, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany); Purdue University, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Weiergräber, Oliver H., E-mail: o.h.weiergraeber@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Biologische Informationsverarbeitung (IBI-2, Biologische Strukturforschung), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The crystallization of FKBP42, a multi-domain member of the FK506-binding protein family, from the plant A. thaliana is reported. Two fragments of FKBP42 from Arabidopsis thaliana covering differing lengths of the molecule have been expressed, purified and crystallized. For each construct, crystals belonging to two different space groups were obtained and subjected to preliminary X-ray analysis.

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana and Thlaspi caerulescens respond comparably to low zinc supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talukdar, S.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to study the response of Arabidopsis thaliana L. and Thlaspi caerulescens J. & C. Presl to different Zn supplies. The A. thaliana plants were exposed to Zn-deficiency (0 and 0.05 ¿M Zn) and compared to the plants grown on media containing standard Zn (2

  15. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Rasmussen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking. RE...

  16. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDb (https://scabusa.org/FgMutantDb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Thomas T; Basenko, Evelina; Harb, Omar; Brown, Neil A; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Bregitzer, Phil P

    2018-02-02

    There is no comprehensive storage for generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or data associated with these mutants. Instead, researchers relied on several independent and non-integrated databases. FgMutantDb was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web that will function as a centralized source of information on F. graminearum mutants. FgMutantDb aids in the maintenance and sharing of mutants within a research community. It will serve also as a platform for disseminating prepublication results as well as negative results that often go unreported. Additionally, the highly curated information on mutants in FgMutantDb will be shared with other databases (FungiDB, Ensembl, PhytoPath, and PHI-base) through updating reports. Here we describe the creation and potential usefulness of FgMutantDb to the F. graminearum research community, and provide a tutorial on its use. This type of database could be easily emulated for other fungal species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Transcriptional profiles of Arabidopsis stomataless mutants reveal developmental and physiological features of life in the absence of stomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marcos, Alberto; Triviño, Magdalena; Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa; Ballesteros, Isabel; Barón, Matilde; Mena, Montaña; Fenoll, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of the positive stomata development regulators SPCH or MUTE in Arabidopsis thaliana renders stomataless plants; spch-3 and mute-3 mutants are extreme dwarfs, but produce cotyledons and tiny leaves, providing a system to interrogate plant life in the absence of stomata. To this end, we compared their cotyledon transcriptomes with that of wild-type plants. K-means clustering of differentially expressed genes generated four clusters: clusters 1 and 2 grouped genes commonly regulated in the mutants, while clusters 3 and 4 contained genes distinctively regulated in mute-3. Classification in functional categories and metabolic pathways of genes in clusters 1 and 2 suggested that both mutants had depressed secondary, nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms, while only a few photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. In situ quenching analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence revealed limited inhibition of photosynthesis. This and other fluorescence measurements matched the mutant transcriptomic features. Differential transcriptomes of both mutants were enriched in growth-related genes, including known stomata development regulators, which paralleled their epidermal phenotypes. Analysis of cluster 3 was not informative for developmental aspects of mute-3. Cluster 4 comprised genes differentially up-regulated in mute-3, 35% of which were direct targets for SPCH and may relate to the unique cell types of mute-3. A screen of T-DNA insertion lines in genes differentially expressed in the mutants identified a gene putatively involved in stomata development. A collection of lines for conditional overexpression of transcription factors differentially expressed in the mutants rendered distinct epidermal phenotypes, suggesting that these proteins may be novel stomatal development regulators. Thus, our transcriptome analysis represents a useful source of new genes for the study of stomata development and for characterizing physiology and growth in the absence of stomata.

  18. New ABA-Hypersensitive Arabidopsis Mutants Are Affected in Loci Mediating Responses to Water Deficit and Dickeya dadantii Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessis, Anne; Cournol, Raphaël; Effroy, Delphine; Silva Pérez, Viridiana; Botran, Lucy; Kraepiel, Yvan; Frey, Anne; Sotta, Bruno; Cornic, Gabriel; Leung, Jeffrey; Giraudat, Jérôme; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M.

    2011-01-01

    On water deficit, abscisic acid (ABA) induces stomata closure to reduce water loss by transpiration. To identify Arabidopsis thaliana mutants which transpire less on drought, infrared thermal imaging of leaf temperature has been used to screen for suppressors of an ABA-deficient mutant (aba3-1) cold-leaf phenotype. Three novel mutants, called hot ABA-deficiency suppressor (has), have been identified with hot-leaf phenotypes in the absence of the aba3 mutation. The defective genes imparted no apparent modification to ABA production on water deficit, were inherited recessively and enhanced ABA responses indicating that the proteins encoded are negative regulators of ABA signalling. All three mutants showed ABA-hypersensitive stomata closure and inhibition of root elongation with little modification of growth and development in non-stressed conditions. The has2 mutant also exhibited increased germination inhibition by ABA, while ABA-inducible gene expression was not modified on dehydration, indicating the mutated gene affects early ABA-signalling responses that do not modify transcript levels. In contrast, weak ABA-hypersensitivity relative to mutant developmental phenotypes suggests that HAS3 regulates drought responses by both ABA-dependent and independent pathways. has1 mutant phenotypes were only apparent on stress or ABA treatments, and included reduced water loss on rapid dehydration. The HAS1 locus thus has the required characteristics for a targeted approach to improving resistance to water deficit. In contrast to has2, has1 exhibited only minor changes in susceptibility to Dickeya dadantii despite similar ABA-hypersensitivity, indicating that crosstalk between ABA responses to this pathogen and drought stress can occur through more than one point in the signalling pathway. PMID:21633512

  19. Gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana: violation of the sine- and resultant-law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Paul

    We investigated the gravitropic bending of hypocotyls and roots of seedlings of Arabidopsis tha-liana in response to long-term centrifugal accelerations in a range of 5 x 10-3 to 4 x g. The so-cal-led resultant law of gravitropism, a corollary of the so called sine law, claims that during centri-fugation a gravitropic organ aligns itself parallel to the resultant stimulus vector. We show here that neither of the two empirical “laws” is apt to describe the complex gravitropic behaviour of seedlings of Arabidopsis. Hypocotyls obey reasonably well the resultant law while roots display a complex behaviour that is clearly at variance with it. Horizontally centrifuged seedlings sense minute accelerations acting parallel to the longitudinal axis. If the centrifugal vector points to-ward the cotyledons, then the bending of hypocotyls and roots is greatly enhanced. If the centri-fugal vector points, however, toward the root tip, then only the bending of roots is enhanced by accelerations as low as 5 x 10-3 x g (positive tonic effect). The absolute gravitropic thresholds were determined for hypocotyls and roots in a clinostat-centrifuge and found to be near 1.5 x 10-2 x g. A behavioural mutant, ehb1-2 (Knauer et al. 2011), displays a lower gravitropic threshold for roots, not however, for hypocotyls. The complex gravitropic behaviour of seedlings of Arabi-dopsis is at odds with the classical sine- as well as the resultant law and can indicates the eminent role that is played by the acceleration vector operating longitudinally to the seedling axis.

  20. A novel blue-light phototropic response is revealed in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbrink, Joshua P; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F Javier; Edelmann, Richard E; Kiss, John Z

    2016-12-01

    Blue-light positive phototropism in roots is masked by gravity and revealed in conditions of microgravity. In addition, the magnitude of red-light positive phototropic curvature is correlated to the magnitude of gravity. Due to their sessile nature, plants utilize environmental cues to grow and respond to their surroundings. Two of these cues, light and gravity, play a substantial role in plant orientation and directed growth movements (tropisms). However, very little is currently known about the interaction between light- (phototropic) and gravity (gravitropic)-mediated growth responses. Utilizing the European Modular Cultivation System on board the International Space Station, we investigated the interaction between phototropic and gravitropic responses in three Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, Landsberg wild type, as well as mutants of phytochrome A and phytochrome B. Onboard centrifuges were used to create a fractional gravity gradient ranging from reduced gravity up to 1g. A novel positive blue-light phototropic response of roots was observed during conditions of microgravity, and this response was attenuated at 0.1g. In addition, a red-light pretreatment of plants enhanced the magnitude of positive phototropic curvature of roots in response to blue illumination. In addition, a positive phototropic response of roots was observed when exposed to red light, and a decrease in response was gradual and correlated with the increase in gravity. The positive red-light phototropic curvature of hypocotyls when exposed to red light was also confirmed. Both red-light and blue-light phototropic responses were also shown to be affected by directional light intensity. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of a positive blue-light phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots, as well as the first description of the relationship between these phototropic responses in fractional or reduced gravities.

  1. Synthesis of oleyl oleate wax esters in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iven, Tim; Hornung, Ellen; Heilmann, Mareike; Feussner, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Seed oil composed of wax esters with long-chain monoenoic acyl moieties represents a high-value commodity for industry. Such plant-derived sperm oil-like liquid wax esters are biodegradable and can have excellent properties for lubrication. In addition, wax ester oil may represent a superior substrate for biodiesel production. In this study, we demonstrate that the low-input oil seed crop Camelina sativa can serve as a biotechnological platform for environmentally benign wax ester production. Two biosynthetic steps catalysed by a fatty alcohol-forming acyl-CoA reductase (FAR) and a wax ester synthase (WS) are sufficient to achieve wax ester accumulation from acyl-CoA substrates. To produce plant-derived sperm oil-like liquid wax esters, the WS from Mus musculus (MmWS) or Simmondsia chinensis (ScWS) were expressed in combination with the FAR from Mus musculus (MmFAR1) or Marinobacter aquaeolei (MaFAR) in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa. The three analysed enzyme combinations Oleo3:mCherry:MmFAR1∆c/Oleo3:EYFP:MmWS, Oleo3:mCherry:MmFAR1∆c/ScWS and MaFAR/ScWS showed differences in the wax ester molecular species profiles and overall biosynthetic performance. By expressing MaFAR/ScWS in Arabidopsis or Camelina up to 59% or 21% of the seed oil TAGs were replaced by wax esters, respectively. This combination also yielded wax ester molecular species with highest content of monounsaturated acyl moieties. Expression of the enzyme combinations in the Arabidopsis fae1 fad2 mutant background high in oleic acid resulted in wax ester accumulation enriched in oleyl oleate (18:1/18:1 > 60%), suggesting that similar values may be obtained with a Camelina high oleic acid line. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. An extensive (co-expression analysis tool for the cytochrome P450 superfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Provart Nicholas J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of the first plant genomes has revealed that cytochromes P450 have evolved to become the largest family of enzymes in secondary metabolism. The proportion of P450 enzymes with characterized biochemical function(s is however very small. If P450 diversification mirrors evolution of chemical diversity, this points to an unexpectedly poor understanding of plant metabolism. We assumed that extensive analysis of gene expression might guide towards the function of P450 enzymes, and highlight overlooked aspects of plant metabolism. Results We have created a comprehensive database, 'CYPedia', describing P450 gene expression in four data sets: organs and tissues, stress response, hormone response, and mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, based on public Affymetrix ATH1 microarray expression data. P450 expression was then combined with the expression of 4,130 re-annotated genes, predicted to act in plant metabolism, for co-expression analyses. Based on the annotation of co-expressed genes from diverse pathway annotation databases, co-expressed pathways were identified. Predictions were validated for most P450s with known functions. As examples, co-expression results for P450s related to plastidial functions/photosynthesis, and to phenylpropanoid, triterpenoid and jasmonate metabolism are highlighted here. Conclusion The large scale hypothesis generation tools presented here provide leads to new pathways, unexpected functions, and regulatory networks for many P450s in plant metabolism. These can now be exploited by the community to validate the proposed functions experimentally using reverse genetics, biochemistry, and metabolic profiling.

  3. A novel high efficiency, low maintenance, hydroponic system for synchronous growth and flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocquin, Pierre; Corbesier, Laurent; Havelange, Andrée; Pieltain, Alexandra; Kurtem, Emile; Bernier, Georges; Périlleux, Claire

    2003-01-30

    Arabidopsis thaliana is now the model organism for genetic and molecular plant studies, but growing conditions may still impair the significance and reproducibility of the experimental strategies developed. Besides the use of phytotronic cabinets, controlling plant nutrition may be critical and could be achieved in hydroponics. The availability of such a system would also greatly facilitate studies dealing with root development. However, because of its small size and rosette growth habit, Arabidopsis is hardly grown in standard hydroponic devices and the systems described in the last years are still difficult to transpose at a large scale. Our aim was to design and optimize an up-scalable device that would be adaptable to any experimental conditions. An hydroponic system was designed for Arabidopsis, which is based on two units: a seed-holder and a 1-L tank with its cover. The original agar-containing seed-holder allows the plants to grow from sowing to seed set, without transplanting step and with minimal waste. The optimum nitrate supply was determined for vegetative growth, and the flowering response to photoperiod and vernalization was characterized to show the feasibility and reproducibility of experiments extending over the whole life cycle. How this equipment allowed to overcome experimental problems is illustrated by the analysis of developmental effects of nitrate reductase deficiency in nia1nia2 mutants. The hydroponic device described in this paper allows to drive small and large scale cultures of homogeneously growing Arabidopsis plants. Its major advantages are its flexibility, easy handling, fast maintenance and low cost. It should be suitable for many experimental purposes.

  4. Regeneration Mechanisms of Arabidopsis thaliana Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases B by Glutaredoxins and Thioredoxins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrago, Lionel; Laugier, Edith; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Marchand, Christophe; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Rouhier, Nicolas; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Rey, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Methionine oxidation leads to the formation of S- and R-diastereomers of methionine sulfoxide (MetSO), which are reduced back to methionine by methionine sulfoxide reductases (MSRs) A and B, respectively. MSRBs are classified in two groups depending on the conservation of one or two redox-active Cys; 2-Cys MSRBs possess a catalytic Cys-reducing MetSO and a resolving Cys, allowing regeneration by thioredoxins. The second type, 1-Cys MSRBs, possess only the catalytic Cys. The biochemical mechanisms involved in activity regeneration of 1-Cys MSRBs remain largely elusive. In the present work we used recombinant plastidial Arabidopsis thaliana MSRB1 and MSRB2 as models for 1-Cys and 2-Cys MSRBs, respectively, to delineate the Trx- and glutaredoxin-dependent reduction mechanisms. Activity assays carried out using a series of cysteine mutants and various reductants combined with measurements of free thiols under distinct oxidation conditions and mass spectrometry experiments show that the 2-Cys MSRB2 is reduced by Trx through a dithiol-disulfide exchange involving both redox-active Cys of the two partners. Regarding 1-Cys MSRB1, oxidation of the enzyme after substrate reduction leads to the formation of a stable sulfenic acid on the catalytic Cys, which is subsequently glutathionylated. The deglutathionylation of MSRB1 is achieved by both mono- and dithiol glutaredoxins and involves only their N-terminal conserved catalytic Cys. This study proposes a detailed mechanism of the regeneration of 1-Cys MSRB activity by glutaredoxins, which likely constitute physiological reductants for this type of MSR. PMID:19457862

  5. Transcriptional consequence and impaired gametogenesis with high-grade aneuploidy in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Lin Lo

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy features a numerical chromosome variant that the number of chromosomes in the nucleus of a cell is not an exact multiple of the haploid number, which may have an impact on morphology and gene expression. Here we report a tertiary trisomy uncovered by characterizing a T-DNA insertion mutant (aur2-1/+ in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana AURORA2 locus. Whole-genome analysis with DNA tiling arrays revealed a chromosomal translocation linked to the aur2-1 allele, which collectively accounted for a tertiary trisomy 2. Morphologic, cytogenetic and genetic analyses of aur2-1 progeny showed impaired male and female gametogenesis to various degrees and a tight association of the aur2-1 allele with the tertiary trisomy that was preferentially inherited. Transcriptome analysis showed overlapping and distinct gene expression profiles between primary and tertiary trisomy 2 plants, particularly genes involved in response to stress and various types of external and internal stimuli. Additionally, transcriptome and gene ontology analyses revealed an overrepresentation of nuclear-encoded organelle-related genes functionally involved in plastids, mitochondria and peroxisomes that were differentially expressed in at least three if not all Arabidopsis trisomics. These observations support a previous hypothesis that aneuploid cells have higher energy requirement to overcome the detrimental effects of an unbalanced genome. Moreover, our findings extend the knowledge of the complex nature of the T-DNA insertion event influencing plant genomic integrity by creating high-grade trisomy. Finally, gene expression profiling results provide useful information for future research to compare primary and tertiary trisomics for the effects of aneuploidy on plant cell physiology.

  6. Meiosis-Specific Loading of the Centromere-Specific Histone CENH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Shibata, Fukashi; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Chen, Changbin; Murata, Minoru; Chan, Simon W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Centromere behavior is specialized in meiosis I, so that sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes are pulled toward the same side of the spindle (through kinetochore mono-orientation) and chromosome number is reduced. Factors required for mono-orientation have been identified in yeast. However, comparatively little is known about how meiotic centromere behavior is specialized in animals and plants that typically have large tandem repeat centromeres. Kinetochores are nucleated by the centromere-specific histone CENH3. Unlike conventional histone H3s, CENH3 is rapidly evolving, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. Here we describe chimeric variants of CENH3 with alterations in the N-terminal tail that are specifically defective in meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana cenh3 mutants expressing a GFP-tagged chimeric protein containing the H3 N-terminal tail and the CENH3 C-terminus (termed GFP-tailswap) are sterile because of random meiotic chromosome segregation. These defects result from the specific depletion of GFP-tailswap protein from meiotic kinetochores, which contrasts with its normal localization in mitotic cells. Loss of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant in meiosis affects recruitment of the essential kinetochore protein MIS12. Our findings suggest that CENH3 loading dynamics might be regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. As further support for our hypothesis, we show that GFP-tailswap protein is recruited back to centromeres in a subset of pollen grains in GFP-tailswap once they resume haploid mitosis. Meiotic recruitment of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant is not restored by removal of the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit REC8. Our results reveal the existence of a specialized loading pathway for CENH3 during meiosis that is likely to involve the hypervariable N-terminal tail. Meiosis-specific CENH3 dynamics may play a role in modulating meiotic centromere behavior. PMID:21695238

  7. A novel high efficiency, low maintenance, hydroponic system for synchronous growth and flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernier Georges

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arabidopsis thaliana is now the model organism for genetic and molecular plant studies, but growing conditions may still impair the significance and reproducibility of the experimental strategies developed. Besides the use of phytotronic cabinets, controlling plant nutrition may be critical and could be achieved in hydroponics. The availability of such a system would also greatly facilitate studies dealing with root development. However, because of its small size and rosette growth habit, Arabidopsis is hardly grown in standard hydroponic devices and the systems described in the last years are still difficult to transpose at a large scale. Our aim was to design and optimize an up-scalable device that would be adaptable to any experimental conditions. Results An hydroponic system was designed for Arabidopsis, which is based on two units: a seed-holder and a 1-L tank with its cover. The original agar-containing seed-holder allows the plants to grow from sowing to seed set, without transplanting step and with minimal waste. The optimum nitrate supply was determined for vegetative growth, and the flowering response to photoperiod and vernalization was characterized to show the feasibility and reproducibility of experiments extending over the whole life cycle. How this equipment allowed to overcome experimental problems is illustrated by the analysis of developmental effects of nitrate reductase deficiency in nia1nia2 mutants. Conclusion The hydroponic device described in this paper allows to drive small and large scale cultures of homogeneously growing Arabidopsis plants. Its major advantages are its flexibility, easy handling, fast maintenance and low cost. It should be suitable for many experimental purposes.

  8. A novel high efficiency, low maintenance, hydroponic system for synchronous growth and flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocquin, Pierre; Corbesier, Laurent; Havelange, Andrée; Pieltain, Alexandra; Kurtem, Emile; Bernier, Georges; Périlleux, Claire

    2003-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis thaliana is now the model organism for genetic and molecular plant studies, but growing conditions may still impair the significance and reproducibility of the experimental strategies developed. Besides the use of phytotronic cabinets, controlling plant nutrition may be critical and could be achieved in hydroponics. The availability of such a system would also greatly facilitate studies dealing with root development. However, because of its small size and rosette growth habit, Arabidopsis is hardly grown in standard hydroponic devices and the systems described in the last years are still difficult to transpose at a large scale. Our aim was to design and optimize an up-scalable device that would be adaptable to any experimental conditions. Results An hydroponic system was designed for Arabidopsis, which is based on two units: a seed-holder and a 1-L tank with its cover. The original agar-containing seed-holder allows the plants to grow from sowing to seed set, without transplanting step and with minimal waste. The optimum nitrate supply was determined for vegetative growth, and the flowering response to photoperiod and vernalization was characterized to show the feasibility and reproducibility of experiments extending over the whole life cycle. How this equipment allowed to overcome experimental problems is illustrated by the analysis of developmental effects of nitrate reductase deficiency in nia1nia2 mutants. Conclusion The hydroponic device described in this paper allows to drive small and large scale cultures of homogeneously growing Arabidopsis plants. Its major advantages are its flexibility, easy handling, fast maintenance and low cost. It should be suitable for many experimental purposes. PMID:12556248

  9. Early cytokinin response proteins and phosphoproteins of Arabidopsis thaliana identified by proteome and phosphoproteome profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Martin; Dyčka, Filip; Bobál'ová, Janette; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2011-01-01

    Cytokinins are plant hormones involved in regulation of diverse developmental and physiological processes in plants whose molecular mechanisms of action are being intensely researched. However, most rapid responses to cytokinin signals at the proteomic and phosphoproteomic levels are unknown. Early cytokinin responses were investigated through proteome-wide expression profiling based on image and mass spectrometric analysis of two-dimensionally separated proteins and phosphoproteins. The effects of 15 min treatments of 7-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings with four main cytokinins representing hydroxyisopentenyl, isopentenyl, aromatic, and urea-derived type cytokinins were compared to help elucidate their common and specific function(s) in regulating plant development. In proteome and phosphoproteome maps, significant differences were reproducibly observed for 53 and 31 protein spots, respectively. In these spots, 96 proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS), providing a snapshot of early links in cytokinin-regulated signalling circuits and cellular processes, including light signalling and photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, the CLAVATA pathway, and protein and gene expression regulation, in accordance with previously described cytokinin functions. Furthermore, they indicate novel links between temperature and cytokinin signalling, and an involvement of calcium ions in cytokinin signalling. Most of the differentially regulated proteins and phosphoproteins are located in chloroplasts, suggesting an as yet uncharacterized direct signalling chain responsible for cytokinin action in chloroplasts. Finally, first insights into the degree of specificity of cytokinin receptors on phosphoproteomic effects were obtained from analyses of cytokinin action in a set of cytokinin receptor double mutants. PMID:20974740

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana RECEPTOR DEAD KINASE1 Functions as a Positive Regulator in Plant Responses to ABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhinesh; Kumar, Ritesh; Baek, Dongwon; Hyun, Tae-Kyung; Chung, Woo Sik; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2017-02-13

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major phytohormone involved in important stress-related and developmental plant processes. Membrane-delimited ABA signal transduction plays an important role in early ABA signaling, but the molecular mechanisms connecting core signaling components to the plasma membrane remain unclear. Plants have evolved a large number of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) to modulate diverse biological processes by perceiving extracellular stimuli and activating downstream signaling responses. In this study, a putative leucine-rich repeat-RLK gene named RECEPTOR DEAD KINASE1 (AtRDK1) was identified and characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana. RDK1 promoter-GUS analysis revealed that RDK1 is expressed ubiquitously in the various tissues in Arabidopsis, and its expression is mainly induced by ABA. In the presence of ABA, RDK1-deficient rdk1-1 and rdk1-2 lines showed significant resistance in cotyledon greening and root growth, whereas RDK1-overexpressing lines showed enhanced sensitivity. Consistently, the expression of ABA-responsive genes was significantly downregulated in rdk1 mutant seedlings, which were also hypersensitive to drought stress with increased water loss. Interestingly, RDK1 was found to be an atypical kinase localized to the plasma membrane and did not require its kinase activity during ABA-mediated inhibition of seedling development. Accordingly, RDK1 interacted in the plasma membrane with type 2C protein phosphatase ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1 (ABI1); this interaction was further enhanced by exogenous application of ABA, suggesting that RDK1-mediated recruitment of ABI1 onto the plasma membrane is important for ABA signaling. Taken together, these results reveal an important role for RDK1 in plant responses to abiotic stress conditions in an ABA-dependent manner. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. AraPheno: a public database for Arabidopsis thaliana phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seren, Ümit; Grimm, Dominik; Fitz, Joffrey; Weigel, Detlef; Nordborg, Magnus; Borgwardt, Karsten; Korte, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Natural genetic variation makes it possible to discover evolutionary changes that have been maintained in a population because they are advantageous. To understand genotype–phenotype relationships and to investigate trait architecture, the existence of both high-resolution genotypic and phenotypic data is necessary. Arabidopsis thaliana is a prime model for these purposes. This herb naturally occurs across much of the Eurasian continent and North America. Thus, it is exposed to a wide range of environmental factors and has been subject to natural selection under distinct conditions. Full genome sequencing data for more than 1000 different natural inbred lines are available, and this has encouraged the distributed generation of many types of phenotypic data. To leverage these data for meta analyses, AraPheno (https://arapheno.1001genomes.org) provide a central repository of population-scale phenotypes for A. thaliana inbred lines. AraPheno includes various features to easily access, download and visualize the phenotypic data. This will facilitate a comparative analysis of the many different types of phenotypic data, which is the base to further enhance our understanding of the genotype–phenotype map. PMID:27924043

  12. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  13. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism are coordina......Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  14. Protists are an integral part of the Arabidopsis thaliana microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Melanie; Ploch, Sebastian; Fiore-Donno, Anna M; Bonkowski, Michael; Rose, Laura E

    2018-01-01

    Although protists occupy a vast range of habitats and are known to interact with plants among other things via disease suppression, competition or growth stimulation, their contributions to the 'phytobiome' are not well described. To contribute to a more comprehensive picture of the plant holobiont, we examined cercozoan and oomycete taxa living in association with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana grown in two different soils. Soil, roots, leaves and wooden toothpicks were analysed before and after surface sterilization. Cercozoa were identified using 18S rRNA gene metabarcoding, whereas the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 was used to determine oomycetes. Subsequent analyses revealed strong spatial structuring of protist communities between compartments, although oomycetes appeared more specialized than Cercozoa. With regards to oomycetes, only members of the Peronosporales and taxa belonging to the genus Globisporangium were identified as shared members of the A. thaliana microbiome. This also applied to cercozoan taxa belonging to the Glissomonadida and Cercomonadida. We identified a strong influence by edaphic factors on the rhizosphere, but not for the phyllosphere. Distinct differences of Cercozoa found preferably in wood or fresh plant material imply specific niche adaptations. Our results highlight the importance of micro-eukaryotes for the plant holobiont. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, F. J.; Ynsa, M. D.; Domínguez-Solís, J. R.; López-Martín, M. C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications.

  16. Novel Ribonuclease Activity Differs between Fibrillarins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Rodriguez-Corona

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillarin is one of the most important nucleolar proteins that have been shown as essential for life. Fibrillarin localizes primarily at the periphery between fibrillar center and dense fibrillar component as well as in Cajal bodies. In most plants there are at least two different genes for fibrillarin. In Arabidopsis thaliana both genes show high level of expression in transcriptionally active cells. Here, we focus on two important differences between A. thaliana fibrillarins. First and most relevant is the enzymatic activity by AtFib2. The AtFib2 shows a novel ribonuclease activity that is not seen with AtFib1. Second is a difference in the ability to interact with phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid between both proteins. We also show that the novel ribonuclease activity as well as the phospholipid binding region of fibrillarin is confine to the GAR domain. The ribonuclease activity of fibrillarin reveals in this study represents a new role for this protein in rRNA processing.

  17. Cell wall proteome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana mature stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duruflé, Harold; Clemente, Hélène San; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Plant stems carry flowers necessary for species propagation and need to be adapted to mechanical disturbance and environmental factors. The stem cell walls are different from other organs and can modify their rigidity or viscoelastic properties for the integrity and the robustness required to withstand mechanical impacts and environmental stresses. Plant cell wall is composed of complex polysaccharide networks also containing cell wall proteins (CWPs) crucial to perceive and limit the environmental effects. The CWPs are fundamental players in cell wall remodeling processes, and today, only 86 have been identified from the mature stems of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. With a destructive method, this study has enlarged its coverage to 302 CWPs. This new proteome is mainly composed of 27.5% proteins acting on polysaccharides, 16% proteases, 11.6% oxido-reductases, 11% possibly related to lipid metabolism and 11% of proteins with interacting domains with proteins or polysaccharides. Compared to stem cell wall proteomes already available (Brachypodium distachyon, Sacharum officinarum, Linum usitatissimum, Medicago sativa), that of A. thaliana stems has a higher proportion of proteins acting on polysaccharides and of proteases, but a lower proportion of oxido-reductases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-07-08

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana's roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes.

  19. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative ...

  20. Assessment of resistance pathways induced in Arabidopsis thaliana by hypovirulent Rhizoctonia spp. isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Michal; Freeman, Stanley; Sneh, Baruch

    2011-07-01

    Certain hypovirulent Rhizoctonia isolates effectively protect plants against well-known important pathogens among Rhizoctonia isolates as well as against other pathogens. The modes of action involved in this protection include resistance induced in plants by colonization with hypovirulent Rhizoctonia isolates. The qualifications of hypovirulent isolates (efficient protection, rapid growth, effective colonization of the plants, and easy application in the field) provide a significant potential for the development of a commercial microbial preparation for application as biological control agents. Understanding of the modes of action involved in protection is important for improving the various aspects of development and application of such preparations. The hypothesis of the present study is that resistance pathways such as systemic acquired resistance (SAR), induced systemic resistance (ISR), and phytoalexins are induced in plants colonized by the protective hypovirulent Rhizoctonia isolates and are involved in the protection of these plants against pathogenic Rhizoctonia. Changes in protection levels of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in defense-related genes (npr1-1, npr1-2, ndr1-1, npr1-2/ndr1-1, cim6, wrky70.1, snc1, and pbs3-1) and colonized with the hypovirulent Rhizoctonia isolates compared with that of the wild type (wt) plants colonized with the same isolates confirmed the involvement of induced resistance in the protection of the plants against pathogenic Rhizoctonia spp., although protection levels of mutants constantly expressing SAR genes (snc1 and cim6) were lower than that of wt plants. Plant colonization by hypovirulent Rhizoctonia isolates induced elevated expression levels of the following genes: PR5 (SAR), PDF1.2, LOX2, LOX1, CORI3 (ISR), and PAD3 (phytoalexin production), which indicated that all of these pathways were induced in the hypovirulent-colonized plants. When SAR or ISR were induced separately in plants after application of the

  1. Pirin1 (PRN1 is a multifunctional protein that regulates quercetin, and impacts specific light and UV responses in the seed-to-seedling transition of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle A Orozco-Nunnelly

    Full Text Available Pirins are cupin-fold proteins, implicated in apoptosis and cellular stress in eukaryotic organisms. Pirin1 (PRN1 plays a role in seed germination and transcription of a light- and ABA-regulated gene under specific conditions in the model plant system Arabidopsis thaliana. Herein, we describe that PRN1 possesses previously unreported functions that can profoundly affect early growth, development, and stress responses. In vitro-translated PRN1 possesses quercetinase activity. When PRN1 was incubated with G-protein-α subunit (GPA1 in the inactive conformation (GDP-bound, quercetinase activity was observed. Quercetinase activity was not observed when PRN1 was incubated with GPA1 in the active form (GTP-bound. Dark-grown prn1 mutant seedlings produced more quercetin after UV (317 nm induction, compared to levels observed in wild type (WT seedlings. prn1 mutant seedlings survived a dose of high-energy UV (254 nm radiation that killed WT seedlings. prn1 mutant seedlings grown for 3 days in continuous white light display disoriented hypocotyl growth compared to WT, but hypocotyls of dark-grown prn1 seedlings appeared like WT. prn1 mutant seedlings transformed with GFP constructs containing the native PRN1 promoter and full ORF (PRN1::PRN1-GFP were restored to WT responses, in that they did not survive UV (254 nm, and there was no significant hypocotyl disorientation in response to white light. prn1 mutants transformed with PRN1::PRN1-GFP were observed by confocal microscopy, where expression in the cotyledon epidermis was largely localized to the nucleus, adjacent to the nucleus, and diffuse and punctate expression occurred within some cells. WT seedlings transformed with the 35S::PRN1-GFP construct exhibited widespread expression in the epidermis of the cotyledon, also with localization in the nucleus. PRN1 may play a critical role in cellular quercetin levels and influence light- or hormonal-directed early development.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of PAPS1-Dependent Polyadenylation Identifies Novel Roles for Functionally Specialized Poly(A Polymerases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kappel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The poly(A tail at 3' ends of eukaryotic mRNAs promotes their nuclear export, stability and translational efficiency, and changes in its length can strongly impact gene expression. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes three canonical nuclear poly(A polymerases, PAPS1, PAPS2 and PAPS4. As shown by their different mutant phenotypes, these three isoforms are functionally specialized, with PAPS1 modifying organ growth and suppressing a constitutive immune response. However, the molecular basis of this specialization is largely unknown. Here, we have estimated poly(A-tail lengths on a transcriptome-wide scale in wild-type and paps1 mutants. This identified categories of genes as particularly strongly affected in paps1 mutants, including genes encoding ribosomal proteins, cell-division factors and major carbohydrate-metabolic proteins. We experimentally verified two novel functions of PAPS1 in ribosome biogenesis and redox homoeostasis that were predicted based on the analysis of poly(A-tail length changes in paps1 mutants. When overlaying the PAPS1-dependent effects observed here with coexpression analysis based on independent microarray data, the two clusters of transcripts that are most closely coexpressed with PAPS1 show the strongest change in poly(A-tail length and transcript abundance in paps1 mutants in our analysis. This suggests that their coexpression reflects at least partly the preferential polyadenylation of these transcripts by PAPS1 versus the other two poly(A-polymerase isoforms. Thus, transcriptome-wide analysis of poly(A-tail lengths identifies novel biological functions and likely target transcripts for polyadenylation by PAPS1. Data integration with large-scale co-expression data suggests that changes in the relative activities of the isoforms are used as an endogenous mechanism to co-ordinately modulate plant gene expression.

  3. A pivotal role of the jasmonic acid signal pathway in mediating radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Xu, Wei; Deng, Chenguang; Xu, Shaoxin; Li, Fanghua; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun; Bian, Po

    Although radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in Arabidopsis thaliana have been well demonstrated in vivo, little is known about their underlying mechanisms, particularly with regard to the participating signaling molecules and signaling pathways. In higher plants, jasmonic acid (JA) and its bioactive derivatives are well accepted as systemic signal transducers that are produced in response to various environmental stresses. It is therefore speculated that the JA signal pathway might play a potential role in mediating radiation-induced bystander signaling of root-to-shoot. In the present study, pretreatment of seedlings with Salicylhydroxamic acid, an inhibitor of lipoxigenase (LOX) in JA biosynthesis, significantly suppressed RIBE-mediated expression of the AtRAD54 gene. After root irradiation, the aerial parts of A. thaliana mutants deficient in JA biosynthesis (aos) and signaling cascades (jar1-1) showed suppressed induction of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes and TSI and 180-bp repeats, which have been extensively used as endpoints of bystander genetic and epigenetic effects in plants. These results suggest an involvement of the JA signal pathway in the RIBE of plants. Using the root micro-grafting technique, the JA signal pathway was shown to participate in both the generation of bystander signals in irradiated root cells and radiation responses in the bystander aerial parts of plants. The over-accumulation of endogenous JA in mutant fatty acid oxygenation up-regulated 2 (fou2), in which mutation of the Two Pore Channel 1 (TPC1) gene up-regulates expression of the LOX and allene oxide synthase (AOS) genes, inhibited RIBE-mediated expression of the AtRAD54 gene, but up-regulated expression of the AtKU70 and AtLIG4 genes in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. Considering that NHEJ is employed by plants with increased DNA damage, the switch from HR to NHEJ suggests that over-accumulation of endogenous JA might enhance the radiosensitivity of plants

  4. Mutation of the Inducible ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA CYTOCHROME P450 REDUCTASE2 Alters Lignin Composition and Improves Saccharification1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Lisa; Vanholme, Ruben; Geerinck, Jan; Goeminne, Geert; Höfer, René; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-01-01

    ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA CYTOCHROME P450 REDUCTASE1 (ATR1) and ATR2 provide electrons from NADPH to a large number of CYTOCHROME P450 (CYP450) enzymes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Whereas ATR1 is constitutively expressed, the expression of ATR2 appears to be induced during lignin biosynthesis and upon stresses. Therefore, ATR2 was hypothesized to be preferentially involved in providing electrons to the three CYP450s involved in lignin biosynthesis: CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE (C4H), p-COUMARATE 3-HYDROXYLASE1 (C3H1), and FERULATE 5-HYDROXYLASE1 (F5H1). Here, we show that the atr2 mutation resulted in a 6% reduction in total lignin amount in the main inflorescence stem and a compositional shift of the remaining lignin to a 10-fold higher fraction of p-hydroxyphenyl units at the expense of syringyl units. Phenolic profiling revealed shifts in lignin-related phenolic metabolites, in particular with the substrates of C4H, C3H1 and F5H1 accumulating in atr2 mutants. Glucosinolate and flavonol glycoside biosynthesis, both of which also rely on CYP450 activities, appeared less affected. The cellulose in the atr2 inflorescence stems was more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis after alkaline pretreatment, making ATR2 a potential target for engineering plant cell walls for biofuel production. PMID:25315601

  5. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The induced mutagenesis method for deriving pigment mutants of a green microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-124 and their pigment composition as well as ability to assess mutability of contaminated aquatic ecosystems were studied. In the present study, 14086 mutants (colonies) were obtained by exposure of the ...

  6. Induced High Lysine Mutants in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Hans; Køie, B.; Eggum, B. O.

    1974-01-01

    Screening of mutagenically treated materials by combined Kjeldahl nitrogen and dye-binding capacity determinations disclosed fourteen barley mutants, which have from a few to about 40 per cent more lysine in the protein and one mutant with 10 per cent less lysine in the protein than the parent...

  7. Los mutantes de la escuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Armando Jaramillo-Ocampo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo muestra los resultados parciales del estudio “Juegos en el recreo escolar: un escenario para la formación ciudadana”, cuya pretensión fue comprender los imaginarios sociales de juego en el recreo escolar y su relación con la convivencia social desde la proximidad del enfoque de complementariedad y el diseño de investigación emergente, planteado por Murcia y Jaramillo (2008. Se presentan los desarrollos logrados en dos categorías centrales del estudio: el patio y el cuerpo; dos categorías que mutan constantemente como entidades vivas en la escuela, hacia la configuración de sujetos que reconocen en el otro y lo otro su posibilidad. La escuela viva, donde es posible “ser en relación con”… se reduce a un espacio temporal y físico, limitado por la campana, “el recreo”. El texto muestra, desde la voz de los actores, esa vida que se da y se quita en la escuela y que se posiciona como una más de las imposiciones normalizadas para controlar. Reconoce, finalmente, una propuesta desde la posibilidad que estos dos mutantes propician para una escuela libre y dinámica.

  8. BiP3 supports the early stages of female gametogenesis in the absence of BiP1 and BiP2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin binding protein (BiP) is an essential heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that functions in various processes including protein translocation, protein folding and quality control. Arabidopsis thaliana harbors ubiquitously expressed genes BIP1 and BIP2, as well as BIP3, which is induced only by ER stress. Recently, we reported that these BIP genes are expressed in male gametophytes and cooperate with each other to support male gametogenesis and pollen competitiveness. Here, we report that the BIP genes cooperate to support female gametogenesis. As reported previously, the bip1 bip2 double mutation causes defects in the fusion of polar nuclei during female gametogenesis. By contrast, the bip triple mutant female gametophytes exhibited defects during the early stages of female gametophyte development, which suggests that BIP3 supports the early stages of female gametophyte development, but not polar nuclear fusion, in the absence of BiP1 and BiP2.

  9. A Regulatory Network Analysis of Orphan Genes in Arabidopsis Thaliana

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    Singh, Pramesh; Chen, Tianlong; Arendsee, Zebulun; Wurtele, Eve S.; Bassler, Kevin E.

    Orphan genes, which are genes unique to each particular species, have recently drawn significant attention for their potential usefulness for organismal robustness. Their origin and regulatory interaction patterns remain largely undiscovered. Recently, methods that use the context likelihood of relatedness to infer a network followed by modularity maximizing community detection algorithms on the inferred network to find the functional structure of regulatory networks were shown to be effective. We apply improved versions of these methods to gene expression data from Arabidopsis thaliana, identify groups (clusters) of interacting genes with related patterns of expression and analyze the structure within those groups. Focusing on clusters that contain orphan genes, we compare the identified clusters to gene ontology (GO) terms, regulons, and pathway designations and analyze their hierarchical structure. We predict new regulatory interactions and unravel the structure of the regulatory interaction patterns of orphan genes. Work supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1507371 and IOS-1546858.

  10. Multimodal nonlinear imaging of arabidopsis thaliana root cell

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    Jang, Bumjoon; Lee, Sung-Ho; Woo, Sooah; Park, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Myeong Min; Park, Seung-Han

    2017-07-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy has enabled the possibility to explore inside the living organisms. It utilizes ultrashort laser pulse with long wavelength (greater than 800nm). Ultrashort pulse produces high peak power to induce nonlinear optical phenomenon such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and harmonic generations in the medium while maintaining relatively low average energy pre area. In plant developmental biology, confocal microscopy is widely used in plant cell imaging after the development of biological fluorescence labels in mid-1990s. However, fluorescence labeling itself affects the sample and the sample deviates from intact condition especially when labelling the entire cell. In this work, we report the dynamic images of Arabidopsis thaliana root cells. This demonstrates the multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy is an effective tool for long-term plant cell imaging.

  11. A Cytosolic Acyltransferase Contributes to Triacylglycerol Synthesis in Sucrose-Rescued Arabidopsis Seed Oil Catabolism Mutants1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M. Luisa; Whitehead, Lynne; He, Zhesi; Gazda, Valeria; Gilday, Alison; Kozhevnikova, Ekaterina; Vaistij, Fabián E.; Larson, Tony R.; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) levels and oil bodies persist in sucrose (Suc)-rescued Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings disrupted in seed oil catabolism. This study set out to establish if TAG levels persist as a metabolically inert pool when downstream catabolism is disrupted, or if other mechanisms, such as fatty acid (FA) recycling into TAG are operating. We show that TAG composition changes significantly in Suc-rescued seedlings compared with that found in dry seeds, with 18:2 and 18:3 accumulating. However, 20:1 FA is not efficiently recycled back into TAG in young seedlings, instead partitioning into the membrane lipid fraction and diacylglycerol. In the lipolysis mutant sugar dependent1and the β-oxidation double mutant acx1acx2 (for acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase), levels of TAG actually increased in seedlings growing on Suc. We performed a transcriptomic study and identified up-regulation of an acyltransferase gene, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE3 (DGAT3), with homology to a peanut (Arachis hypogaea) cytosolic acyltransferase. The acyl-Coenzyme A substrate for this acyltransferase accumulates in mutants that are blocked in oil breakdown postlipolysis. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed involvement in TAG synthesis and specificity toward 18:3 and 18:2 FAs. Double-mutant analysis with the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter mutant peroxisomal ABC transporter1 indicated involvement of DGAT3 in the partitioning of 18:3 into TAG in mutant seedlings growing on Suc. Fusion of the DGAT3 protein with green fluorescent protein confirmed localization to the cytosol of N. benthamiana. This work has demonstrated active recycling of 18:2 and 18:3 FAs into TAG when seed oil breakdown is blocked in a process involving a soluble cytosolic acyltransferase. PMID:22760209

  12. Locational distribution of gene functional classes in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    King Ross D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We are interested in understanding the locational distribution of genes and their functions in genomes, as this distribution has both functional and evolutionary significance. Gene locational distribution is known to be affected by various evolutionary processes, with tandem duplication thought to be the main process producing clustering of homologous sequences. Recent research has found clustering of protein structural families in the human genome, even when genes identified as tandem duplicates have been removed from the data. However, this previous research was hindered as they were unable to analyse small sample sizes. This is a challenge for bioinformatics as more specific functional classes have fewer examples and conventional statistical analyses of these small data sets often produces unsatisfactory results. Results We have developed a novel bioinformatics method based on Monte Carlo methods and Greenwood's spacing statistic for the computational analysis of the distribution of individual functional classes of genes (from GO. We used this to make the first comprehensive statistical analysis of the relationship between gene functional class and location on a genome. Analysis of the distribution of all genes except tandem duplicates on the five chromosomes of A. thaliana reveals that the distribution on chromosomes I, II, IV and V is clustered at P = 0.001. Many functional classes are clustered, with the degree of clustering within an individual class generally consistent across all five chromosomes. A novel and surprising result was that the locational distribution of some functional classes were significantly more evenly spaced than would be expected by chance. Conclusion Analysis of the A. thaliana genome reveals evidence of unexplained order in the locational distribution of genes. The same general analysis method can be applied to any genome, and indeed any sequential data involving classes.

  13. A topological map of the compartmentalized Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolome.

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    Stephan Krueger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The extensive subcellular compartmentalization of metabolites and metabolism in eukaryotic cells is widely acknowledged and represents a key factor of metabolic activity and functionality. In striking contrast, the knowledge of actual compartmental distribution of metabolites from experimental studies is surprisingly low. However, a precise knowledge of, possibly all, metabolites and their subcellular distributions remains a key prerequisite for the understanding of any cellular function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe results for the subcellular distribution of 1,117 polar and 2,804 lipophilic mass spectrometric features associated to known and unknown compounds from leaves of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Using an optimized non-aqueous fractionation protocol in conjunction with GC/MS- and LC/MS-based metabolite profiling, 81.5% of the metabolic data could be associated to one of three subcellular compartments: the cytosol (including the mitochondria, vacuole, or plastids. Statistical analysis using a marker-'free' approach revealed that 18.5% of these metabolites show intermediate distributions, which can either be explained by transport processes or by additional subcellular compartments. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Next to a functional and conceptual workflow for the efficient, highly resolved metabolite analysis of the fractionated Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolome, a detailed survey of the subcellular distribution of several compounds, in the graphical format of a topological map, is provided. This complex data set therefore does not only contain a rich repository of metabolic information, but due to thorough validation and testing by statistical methods, represents an initial step in the analysis of metabolite dynamics and fluxes within and between subcellular compartments.

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana mTERF proteins: evolution and functional classification

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    Tatjana eKleine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Organellar gene expression (OGE is crucial for plant development, photosynthesis and respiration, but our understanding of the mechanisms that control it is still relatively poor. Thus, OGE requires various nucleus-encoded proteins that promote transcription, splicing, trimming and editing of organellar RNAs, and regulate translation. In metazoans, proteins of the mitochondrial Transcription tERmination Factor (mTERF family interact with the mitochondrial chromosome and regulate transcriptional initiation and termination. Sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome led to the identification of a diversified MTERF gene family but, in contrast to mammalian mTERFs, knowledge about the function of these proteins in photosynthetic organisms is scarce. In this hypothesis article, I show that tandem duplications and one block duplication contributed to the large number of MTERF genes in A. thaliana, and propose that the expansion of the family is related to the evolution of land plants. The MTERF genes - especially the duplicated genes - display a number of distinct mRNA accumulation patterns, suggesting functional diversification of mTERF proteins to increase adaptability to environmental changes. Indeed, hypothetical functions for the different mTERF proteins can be predicted using co-expression analysis and gene ontology annotations. On this basis, mTERF proteins can be sorted into five groups. Members of the chloroplast and chloroplast-associated clusters are principally involved in chloroplast gene expression, embryogenesis and protein catabolism, while representatives of the mitochondrial cluster seem to participate in DNA and RNA metabolism in that organelle. Moreover, members of the mitochondrion-associated cluster and the low expression group may act in the nucleus and/or the cytosol. As proteins involved in OGE and presumably nuclear gene expression, mTERFs are ideal candidates for the coordination of the expression of organelle and nuclear

  15. AtPIN: Arabidopsis thaliana Protein Interaction Network

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    Silva-Filho Marcio C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs constitute one of the most crucial conditions to sustain life in living organisms. To study PPI in Arabidopsis thaliana we have developed AtPIN, a database and web interface for searching and building interaction networks based on publicly available protein-protein interaction datasets. Description All interactions were divided into experimentally demonstrated or predicted. The PPIs in the AtPIN database present a cellular compartment classification (C3 which divides the PPI into 4 classes according to its interaction evidence and subcellular localization. It has been shown in the literature that a pair of genuine interacting proteins are generally expected to have a common cellular role and proteins that have common interaction partners have a high chance of sharing a common function. In AtPIN, due to its integrative profile, the reliability index for a reported PPI can be postulated in terms of the proportion of interaction partners that two proteins have in common. For this, we implement the Functional Similarity Weight (FSW calculation for all first level interactions present in AtPIN database. In order to identify target proteins of cytosolic glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (Cyt-gluRS (AT5G26710 we combined two approaches, AtPIN search and yeast two-hybrid screening. Interestingly, the proteins glutamine synthetase (AT5G35630, a disease resistance protein (AT3G50950 and a zinc finger protein (AT5G24930, which has been predicted as target proteins for Cyt-gluRS by AtPIN, were also detected in the experimental screening. Conclusions AtPIN is a friendly and easy-to-use tool that aggregates information on Arabidopsis thaliana PPIs, ontology, and sub-cellular localization, and might be a useful and reliable strategy to map protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis. AtPIN can be accessed at http://bioinfo.esalq.usp.br/atpin.

  16. Reduction of mineral nutrient availability accelerates flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Kolár, Jan; Senková, Jana

    2008-10-09

    The time of flowering is regulated by various environmental cues, and in some plant species, it is known to be affected by abiotic stresses. We investigated the effect of nutrient stress caused by an abrupt reduction of mineral nutrition on flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana. We used a hydroponic culture system that enabled us to precisely control nutrient levels. When plants were grown in full-strength nutrient solution for several weeks and then transferred to a diluted medium, the time from sowing to bud appearance was significantly shortened. This acceleration of flowering was more pronounced in short days than in long days, and stronger in the ecotype Landsberg erecta than in Columbia and San Feliu-2. The response was also affected by the age of plants at the beginning of nutrient stress and by the concentration of the diluted medium: earlier treatment and more diluted solutions strengthened the effect. Flowering was affected by nutrient stress, not by a change in the osmotic potential of the medium: addition of mannitol to a 1000-fold diluted solution had no effect on the promotion of flowering. When 3-week-old Landsberg erecta plants were exposed to 1000-fold diluted nutrient solution in an 8-h day length, flower bud appearance was strongly and reproducibly advanced by 10.8-12.8d compared with control plants (which developed buds 41.1-46.2d after sowing). This treatment can serve as an optimized protocol for future studies concerning physiological, molecular and ecological aspects of flower induction by nutrient stress in A. thaliana.

  17. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Juan Du

    Full Text Available Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin or polymeric form (F-actin. Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1 in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin.

  18. Glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 finely modulates cytokinin responses via cytokinin N-glucosylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Wang, Jun; Ma, Xin-Mei; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Hou, Bing-Kai

    2013-04-01

    Cytokinins are master regulators of plant growth and development. The glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 capable of N-glucosylation of different cytokinins at the N(7)- and N(9)-position was previously identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, but its physiological relevance in plants remains unclear. In the present work, we investigated the physiological characteristics of UGT76C1 mutant (ugt76c1) and its overexpressors. Under normal growth conditions, although ugt76c1 plants and UGT76C1 overexpressors did not display obvious phenotypic alteration, ugt76c1 plants significantly reduced the accumulation of cytokinin N-glucosides, whereas UGT76C1 overexpressors increased cytokinin N-glucosides. Unexpectedly, the concentrations of free forms of cytokinins (mainly trans-zeatin and N(6)-isopentenyladenine) were comparable to those of the wild type. Upon application of exogenous cytokinin, the mutant showed the same tendency of more sensitive cytokinin response in primary root elongation, chlorophyll retention and anthocyanin accumulation. In contrast, overexpressors showed a tendency of less sensitive cytokinin response in most tests. Furthermore, cytokinin-related genes were investigated for their expression; and the expression levels of AHK3, ARR1, CYP735A2 and LOG2 noticeably changed in ugt76c1 plants, suggesting that plants employ a set of cytokinin regulation mechanisms to coordinate the loss-of-function of UGT76C1. Tissue-specific expression of UGT76C1 showed a high level of expression in germinating seeds and young seedlings. Taken together, our data suggest that the glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 could finely modulate cytokinin responses in planta via N-glucosylation of cytokinins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana MCM2 plays role(s) in mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyal, Geetika; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Srivastava, Prem S; Choudhury, Nirupam R

    2013-05-01

    Geminiviruses are plant pathogens with single-stranded (ss) DNA genomes of about 2.7 kb in size. They replicate primarily via rolling-circle replication (RCR) with the help of a few virally encoded factors and various host-cell machineries. The virally encoded replication initiator protein (Rep) is essential for geminivirus replication. In this study, by interaction screening of an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library, we have identified a host factor, MCM2, that interacts with the Rep protein of the geminivirus mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV). Using yeast two-hybrid, β-galactosidase and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated an interaction between MYMIV-Rep and the host factor AtMCM2. We investigated the possible role of AtMCM2 in geminiviral replication using a yeast-based geminivirus DNA replication restoration assay and observed that the AtMCM2 protein complemented the mcm2∆ mutation of S. cerevisiae. Our data suggest the involvement of AtMCM2 in the replication of MYMIV ex vivo. The role of MCM2 in replication was confirmed in planta by a transient replication assay in both wild-type and mutant Arabidopsis plants through agroinoculation. Our data provide evidence for the involvement of AtMCM2 in geminiviral DNA replication, presumably in conjunction with other host factors, and suggest its importance in MYMIV DNA replication.

  20. Epistasis × environment interactions among Arabidopsis thaliana glucosinolate genes impact complex traits and fitness in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwin, Rachel E; Feusier, Julie; Muok, Alise; Lin, Catherine; Larson, Brandon; Copeland, Daniel; Corwin, Jason A; Rubin, Matthew J; Francisco, Marta; Li, Baohua; Joseph, Bindu; Weinig, Cynthia; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Despite the growing number of studies showing that genotype × environment and epistatic interactions control fitness, the influences of epistasis × environment interactions on adaptive trait evolution remain largely uncharacterized. Across three field trials, we quantified aliphatic glucosinolate (GSL) defense chemistry, leaf damage, and relative fitness using mutant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana varying at pairs of causal aliphatic GSL defense genes to test the impact of epistatic and epistasis × environment interactions on adaptive trait variation. We found that aliphatic GSL accumulation was primarily influenced by additive and epistatic genetic variation, leaf damage was primarily influenced by environmental variation and relative fitness was primarily influenced by epistasis and epistasis × environment interactions. Epistasis × environment interactions accounted for up to 48% of the relative fitness variation in the field. At a single field site, the impact of epistasis on relative fitness varied significantly over 2 yr, showing that epistasis × environment interactions within a location can be temporally dynamic. These results suggest that the environmental dependency of epistasis can profoundly influence the response to selection, shaping the adaptive trajectories of natural populations in complex ways, and deserves further consideration in future evolutionary studies. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Alteration in Auxin Homeostasis and Signaling by Overexpression Of PINOID Kinase Causes Leaf Growth Defects in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Kumud Saini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In plants many developmental processes are regulated by auxin and its directional transport. PINOID (PID kinase helps to regulate this transport by influencing polar recruitment of PIN efflux proteins on the cellular membranes. We investigated how altered auxin levels affect leaf growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic plants with altered PID expression levels were used to study the effect on auxin distribution and leaf development. Single knockouts showed small pleiotropic growth defects. Contrastingly, several leaf phenotypes related to changes in auxin concentrations and transcriptional activity were observed in PID overexpression (PIDOE lines. Unlike in the knockout lines, the leaves of PIDOE lines showed an elevation in total indole-3-acetic acid (IAA. Accordingly, enhanced DR5-visualized auxin responses were detected, especially along the leaf margins. Kinematic analysis revealed that ectopic expression of PID negatively affects cell proliferation and expansion rates, yielding reduced cell numbers and small-sized cells in the PIDOE leaves. We used PIDOE lines as a tool to study auxin dose effects on leaf development and demonstrate that auxin, above a certain threshold, has a negative affect on leaf growth. RNA sequencing further showed how subtle PIDOE-related changes in auxin levels lead to transcriptional reprogramming of cellular processes.

  2. The ABORTED MICROSPORES Regulatory Network Is Required for Postmeiotic Male Reproductive Development in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Yang, Caiyun; Yuan, Zheng; Zhang, Dasheng; Gondwe, Martha Y.; Ding, Zhiwen; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing; Wilson, Zoe A.

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS) gene encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is required for tapetal cell development and postmeiotic microspore formation. However, the regulatory role of AMS in anther and pollen development has not been fully defined. Here, we show by microarray analysis that the expression of 549 anther-expressed genes was altered in ams buds and that these genes are associated with tapetal function and pollen wall formation. We demonstrate that AMS has the ability to bind in vitro to DNA containing a 6-bp consensus motif, CANNTG. Moreover, 13 genes involved in transportation of lipids, oligopeptides, and ions, fatty acid synthesis and metabolism, flavonol accumulation, substrate oxidation, methyl-modification, and pectin dynamics were identified as direct targets of AMS by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The functional importance of the AMS regulatory pathway was further demonstrated by analysis of an insertional mutant of one of these downstream AMS targets, an ABC transporter, White-Brown Complex homolog, which fails to undergo pollen development and is male sterile. Yeast two-hybrid screens and pull-down assays revealed that AMS has the ability to interact with two bHLH proteins (AtbHLH089 and AtbHLH091) and the ATA20 protein. These results provide insight into the regulatory role of the AMS network during anther development. PMID:20118226

  3. Cell wall pectic arabinans influence the mechanical properties of Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems and their response to mechanical stress.

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    Verhertbruggen, Yves; Marcus, Susan E; Chen, Jianshe; Knox, J Paul

    2013-08-01

    Little is known of the dynamics of plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides in response to the impact of mechanical stress on plant organs. The capacity of the imposition of a mechanical stress (periodic brushing) to reduce the height of the inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been used to study the role of pectic arabinans in the mechanical properties and stress responsiveness of a plant organ. The arabinan-deficient-1 (arad1) mutation that affects arabinan structures in epidermal cell walls of inflorescence stems is demonstrated to reduce the impact on inflorescence stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The arabinan-deficient-2 (arad2) mutation, that does not have detectable impact on arabinan structures, is also shown to reduce the impact on stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The LM13 linear arabinan epitope is specifically detected in epidermal cell walls of the younger, flexible regions of inflorescence stems and increases in abundance at the base of inflorescence stems in response to an imposed mechanical stress. The strain (percentage deformation) of stem epidermal cells in the double mutant arad1 × arad2 is lower in unbrushed plants than in wild-type plants, but rises to wild-type levels in response to brushing. The study demonstrates the complexity of arabinan structures within plant cell walls and also that their contribution to cell wall mechanical properties is a factor influencing responsiveness to mechanical stress.

  4. A gene family derived from transposable elements during early angiosperm evolution has reproductive fitness benefits in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Zoé Joly-Lopez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of ever-growing numbers of sequenced eukaryotic genomes will not be fully realized until we learn to decipher vast stretches of noncoding DNA, largely composed of transposable elements. Transposable elements persist through self-replication, but some genes once encoded by transposable elements have, through a process called molecular domestication, evolved new functions that increase fitness. Although they have conferred numerous adaptations, the number of such domesticated transposable element genes remains unknown, so their evolutionary and functional impact cannot be fully assessed. Systematic searches that exploit genomic signatures of natural selection have been employed to identify potential domesticated genes, but their predictions have yet to be experimentally verified. To this end, we investigated a family of domesticated genes called MUSTANG (MUG, identified in a previous bioinformatic search of plant genomes. We show that MUG genes are functional. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana MUG genes yield phenotypes with severely reduced plant fitness through decreased plant size, delayed flowering, abnormal development of floral organs, and markedly reduced fertility. MUG genes are present in all flowering plants, but not in any non-flowering plant lineages, such as gymnosperms, suggesting that the molecular domestication of MUG may have been an integral part of early angiosperm evolution. This study shows that systematic searches can be successful at identifying functional genetic elements in noncoding regions and demonstrates how to combine systematic searches with reverse genetics in a fruitful way to decipher eukaryotic genomes.

  5. pKAMA-ITACHI Vectors for Highly Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Knockout in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9) system is widely used as a tool for genome engineering in various organisms. A complex consisting of Cas9 and single guide RNA (sgRNA) induces a DNA double-strand break in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in knockout. Some binary vectors for CRISPR/Cas9 in plants have been reported, but there is a problem with low efficiency. Here, we present a newly developed, highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9 vector for Arabidopsis thaliana, pKAMA-ITACHI Red (pKIR), harboring the RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S5 A (RPS5A) promoter to drive Cas9. The RPS5A promoter maintains high constitutive expression at all developmental stages starting from the egg cell and including meristematic cells. Even in the T1 generation, pKIR induced null phenotypes in some genes: PHYTOENE DESATURASE 3 (PDS3), AGAMOUS (AG) and DUO POLLEN 1 (DUO1). Mutations induced by pKIR were carried in the germ cell line of the T1 generation. Surprisingly, in some lines, 100% of the T2 plants had the adh1 (ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE 1) null phenotype, indicating that pKIR strongly induced heritable mutations. Cas9-free T2 mutant plants were obtained by removing T2 seeds expressing a fluorescent marker in pKIR. Our results suggest that the pKIR system is a powerful molecular tool for genome engineering in Arabidopsis. PMID:27856772

  6. Analysis of UV-induced mutation spectra in Escherichia coli by DNA polymerase {eta} from Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Santiago, Maria Jesus [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain); Alejandre-Duran, Encarna [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain); Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)]. E-mail: ge1rurum@uco.es

    2006-10-10

    DNA polymerase {eta} belongs to the Y-family of DNA polymerases, enzymes that are able to synthesize past template lesions that block replication fork progression. This polymerase accurately bypasses UV-associated cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers in vitro and therefore may contributes to resistance against sunlight in vivo, both ameliorating survival and decreasing the level of mutagenesis. We cloned and sequenced a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana which encodes a protein containing several sequence motifs characteristics of Pol{eta} homologues, including a highly conserved sequence reported to be present in the active site of the Y-family DNA polymerases. The gene, named AtPOLH, contains 14 exons and 13 introns and is expressed in different plant tissues. A strain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deficient in Pol{eta} activity, was transformed with a yeast expression plasmid containing the AtPOLH cDNA. The rate of survival to UV irradiation in the transformed mutant increased to similar values of the wild type yeast strain, showing that AtPOLH encodes a functional protein. In addition, when AtPOLH is expressed in Escherichia coli, a change in the mutational spectra is detected when bacteria are irradiated with UV light. This observation might indicate that AtPOLH could compete with DNA polymerase V and then bypass cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers incorporating two adenylates.

  7. Genetic analyses of interactions among gibberellin, abscisic acid, and brassinosteroids in the control of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Malgorzata A Domagalska

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions between phytohormones in the control of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana have not been extensively studied. Three phytohormones have been individually connected to the floral-timing program. The inductive function of gibberellins (GAs is the most documented. Abscisic acid (ABA has been demonstrated to delay flowering. Finally, the promotive role of brassinosteroids (BRs has been established. It has been reported that for many physiological processes, hormone pathways interact to ensure an appropriate biological response.We tested possible genetic interactions between GA-, ABA-, and BR-dependent pathways in the control of the transition to flowering. For this, single and double mutants deficient in the biosynthesis of GAs, ABA, and BRs were used to assess the effect of hormone deficiency on the timing of floral transition. Also, plants that over-express genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in each biosynthetic pathway were generated and the flowering time of these lines was investigated.Loss-of-function studies revealed a complex relationship between GAs and ABA, and between ABA and BRs, and suggested a cross-regulatory relation between GAs to BRs. Gain-of-function studies revealed that GAs were clearly limiting in their sufficiency of action, whereas increases in BRs and ABA led to a more modest phenotypic effect on floral timing. We conclude from our genetic tests that the effects of GA, ABA, and BR on timing of floral induction are only in partially coordinated action.

  8. High Boron-induced Ubiquitination Regulates Vacuolar Sorting of the BOR1 Borate Transporter in Arabidopsis thaliana*

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    Kasai, Koji; Takano, Junpei; Miwa, Kyoko; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Boron homeostasis is important for plants, as boron is essential but is toxic in excess. Under high boron conditions, the Arabidopsis thaliana borate transporter BOR1 is trafficked from the plasma membrane (PM) to the vacuole via the endocytic pathway for degradation to avoid excess boron transport. Here, we show that boron-induced ubiquitination is required for vacuolar sorting of BOR1. We found that a substitution of lysine 590 with alanine (K590A) in BOR1 blocked degradation. BOR1 was mono- or diubiquitinated within several minutes after applying a high concentration of boron, whereas the K590A mutant was not. The K590A mutation abolished vacuolar transport of BOR1 but did not apparently affect polar localization to the inner PM domains. Furthermore, brefeldin A and wortmannin treatment suggested that Lys-590 is required for BOR1 translocation from an early endosomal compartment to multivesicular bodies. Our results show that boron-induced ubiquitination of BOR1 is not required for endocytosis from the PM but is crucial for the sorting of internalized BOR1 to multivesicular bodies for subsequent degradation in vacuoles. PMID:21148314

  9. The IDA-LIKE peptides IDL6 and IDL7 are negative modulators of stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vie, Ane Kjersti; Najafi, Javad; Winge, Per; Cattan, Ester; Wrzaczek, Michael; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Miller, Gad; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M

    2017-06-15

    Small signalling peptides have emerged as important cell to cell messengers in plant development and stress responses. However, only a few of the predicted peptides have been functionally characterized. Here, we present functional characterization of two members of the IDA-LIKE (IDL) peptide family in Arabidopsis thaliana, IDL6 and IDL7. Localization studies suggest that the peptides require a signal peptide and C-terminal processing to be correctly transported out of the cell. Both IDL6 and IDL7 appear to be unstable transcripts under post-transcriptional regulation. Treatment of plants with synthetic IDL6 and IDL7 peptides resulted in down-regulation of a broad range of stress-responsive genes, including early stress-responsive transcripts, dominated by a large group of ZINC FINGER PROTEIN (ZFP) genes, WRKY genes, and genes encoding calcium-dependent proteins. IDL7 expression was rapidly induced by hydrogen peroxide, and idl7 and idl6 idl7 double mutants displayed reduced cell death upon exposure to extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Co-treatment of the bacterial elicitor flg22 with IDL7 peptide attenuated the rapid ROS burst induced by treatment with flg22 alone. Taken together, our results suggest that IDL7, and possibly IDL6, act as negative modulators of stress-induced ROS signalling in Arabidopsis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  11. Genome-wide characterization of ISR induced in Arabidopsis thaliana by Trichoderma hamatum T382 against Botrytis cinerea infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janick eMathys

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the molecular basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR in Arabidopsis thaliana by the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma hamatum T382 against the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea B05-10 was unraveled by microarray analysis both before (ISR-prime and after (ISR-boost additional pathogen inoculation. The observed high numbers of differentially expressed genes allowed us to classify them according to the biological pathways in which they are involved. By focusing on pathways instead of genes, a holistic picture of the mechanisms underlying ISR emerged. In general, a close resemblance is observed between ISR-prime and systemic acquired resistance (SAR, the systemic defense response that is triggered in plants upon pathogen infection leading to increased resistance towards secondary infections. Treatment with Trichoderma hamatum T382 primes the plant (ISR-prime, resulting in an accelerated activation of the defense response against Botrytis cinerea during ISR-boost and a subsequent moderation of the Botrytis cinerea induced defense response (BIDR. Microarray results were confirmed for representative genes by qRT-PCR, by analysis of transgenic plants expressing relevant promoter-GUS constructs and by phenotypic analysis of mutants affected in various defense-related pathways, thereby proving the validity of our approach.

  12. Effect of estrone on somatic and female gametophyte cell division and differentiation in Arabidospis thaliana cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Żabicki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of the mammalian female sex hormone estrone on differentiation of somatic tissues and on induction of autonomous endosperm in culture of female gametophyte cells of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia (Col-0. In culture, estrone-stimulated development of autonomous endosperm (AE occurred in 14.7% of unpollinated pistils. The AE represented development stages similar to those of young endosperm after fertilization and AE of fis mutants in vivo. In the majority of ovules the AE was in a few-nucleate young stage. Some ovules showed more advanced stages of AE development, with nuclei and cytoplasm forming characteristic nuclear cytoplasmic domains (NCDs. Sporadically, AE was divided into regions characteristic for Arabidopsis endosperm formed after fertilization. Direct organogenesis (caulogenesis, rhizogenesis, callus proliferation and formation of trichome-like structures were observed during in vitro culture of hypocotyls and cotyledons of 3-day-old seedlings cultured on medium supplemented with estrone for 28 days. Histological analysis showed adventitious root formation and changes in explant anatomy caused by estrone.

  13. Partial Purification and Characterization of RNase P from Arabidopsis Thaliana Tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ...) molecules to give mature 5, ends has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana tissue. The RNase P activity was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation of a tissue homogenate and further purified by anion exchange chromatography...

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana STYLISH1 Protein Acts as a Transcriptional Activator Regulating Auxin Biosynthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. Magnus Eklund; Veronika Ståldal; Isabel Valsecchi; Izabela Cierlik; Caitriona Eriksson; Keiichiro Hiratsu; Masaru Ohme-Takagi; Jens F. Sundström; Mattias Thelander; Inés Ezcurra; Eva Sundberg

    2010-01-01

    .... The disruption of normal auxin biosynthesis in mouse-ear cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) leads to severe abnormalities, suggesting that spatiotemporal regulation of auxin biosynthesis is fundamental for normal growth and development...

  15. The glutaredoxin ATGRXS13 is required to facilitate Botrytis cinerea infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    La Camera, Sylvain; L’Haridon, Floriane; Astier, Jérémy; Zander, Mark; Abou‐Mansour, Eliane; Page, Gonzague; Thurow, Corinna; Wendehenne, David; Gatz, Christiane; Métraux, Jean‐Pierre; Lamotte, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    .... Despite basal resistance, virulent strains of B. cinerea can cause disease on Arabidopsis thaliana and virulent pathogens can interfere with the metabolism of the host in a way to facilitate infection of the plant...

  16. Yeast Methylotrophy and Autophagy in a Methanol-Oscillating Environment on Growing Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke Kawaguchi; Hiroya Yurimoto; Masahide Oku; Yasuyoshi Sakai

    2011-01-01

    The yeast Candida boidinii capable of growth on methanol proliferates and survives on the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. The local methanol concentration at the phyllosphere of growing A. thaliana exhibited daily periodicity, and yeast cells responded by altering both the expression of methanol-inducible genes and peroxisome proliferation. Even under these dynamically changing environmental conditions, yeast cells proliferated 3 to 4 times in 11 days. Among the C1-metabolic enzymes, enzymes ...

  17. The plastid-localized pfkB-type carbohydrate kinases FRUCTOKINASE-LIKE 1 and 2 are essential for growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilkerson Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription of plastid-encoded genes requires two different DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, a nuclear-encoded polymerase (NEP and plastid-encoded polymerase (PEP. Recent studies identified two related pfkB-type carbohydrate kinases, named FRUCTOKINASE-LIKE PROTEIN (FLN1 and FLN2, as components of the thylakoid bound PEP complex in both Arabidopsis thaliana and Sinapis alba (mustard. Additional work demonstrated that RNAi-mediated reduction in FLN expression specifically diminished transcription of PEP-dependent genes. Results Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis FLN knockout alleles to examine the contribution of each gene in plant growth, chloroplast development, and in mediating PEP-dependent transcription. We show that fln plants have severe phenotypes with fln1 resulting in an albino phenotype that is seedling lethal without a source of exogenous carbon. In contrast, fln2 plants display chlorosis prior to leaf expansion, but exhibit slow greening, remain autotrophic, can grow to maturity, and set viable seed. fln1 fln2 double mutant analysis reveals haplo-insufficiency, and fln1 fln2 plants have a similar, but more severe phenotype than either single mutant. Normal plastid development in both light and dark requires the FLNs, but surprisingly skotomorphogenesis is unaffected in fln seedlings. Seedlings genetically fln1-1 with dexamethasone-inducible FLN1-HA expression at germination are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type. Induction of FLN-HA after 24 hours of germination cannot rescue the mutant phenotype, indicating that the effects of loss of FLN are not always reversible. Examination of chloroplast gene expression in fln1-1 and fln2-1 by qRT-PCR reveals that transcripts of PEP-dependent genes were specifically reduced compared to NEP-dependent genes in both single mutants. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that each FLN protein contributes to wild type growth, and acting additively are

  18. Transcriptional responses to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced stress in Arabidopsis thaliana reveal the involvement of hormone and defense signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colón-Carmona Adán

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are toxic, widely-distributed, environmentally persistent, and carcinogenic byproducts of carbon-based fuel combustion. Previously, plant studies have shown that PAHs induce oxidative stress, reduce growth, and cause leaf deformation as well as tissue necrosis. To understand the transcriptional changes that occur during these processes, we performed microarray experiments on Arabidopsis thaliana L. under phenanthrene treatment, and compared the results to published Arabidopsis microarray data representing a variety of stress and hormone treatments. In addition, to probe hormonal aspects of PAH stress, we assayed transgenic ethylene-inducible reporter plants as well as ethylene pathway mutants under phenanthrene treatment. Results Microarray results revealed numerous perturbations in signaling and metabolic pathways that regulate reactive oxygen species (ROS and responses related to pathogen defense. A number of glutathione S-transferases that may tag xenobiotics for transport to the vacuole were upregulated. Comparative microarray analyses indicated that the phenanthrene response was closely related to other ROS conditions, including pathogen defense conditions. The ethylene-inducible transgenic reporters were activated by phenanthrene. Mutant experiments showed that PAH inhibits growth through an ethylene-independent pathway, as PAH-treated ethylene-insensitive etr1-4 mutants exhibited a greater growth reduction than WT. Further, phenanthrene-treated, constitutive ethylene signaling mutants had longer roots than the untreated control plants, indicating that the PAH inhibits parts of the ethylene signaling pathway. Conclusions This study identified major physiological systems that participate in the PAH-induced stress response in Arabidopsis. At the transcriptional level, the results identify specific gene targets that will be valuable in finding lead compounds and engineering increased

  19. A leucine-rich repeat protein is required for growth promotion and enhanced seed production mediated by the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahollari, Bationa; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Varma, Ajit; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2007-04-01

    Piriformospora indica, a basidiomycete of the Sebacinaceae family, promotes the growth, development and seed production of a variety of plant species. Arabidopsis plants colonized with the fungus produce 22% more seeds than uncolonized plants. Deactivating the Arabidopsis single-copy gene DMI-1, which encodes an ion carrier required for mycorrihiza formation in legumes, does not affect the beneficial interaction between the two symbiotic partners. We used cellular and molecular responses initiated during the establishment of the interaction between P. indica and Arabidopsis roots to isolate mutants that fail to respond to the fungus. An ethylmethane sulfonate mutant (Piriformospora indica-insensitive-2; pii-2), and a corresponding insertion line, are impaired in a leucine-rich repeat protein (At1g13230). The protein pii-2, which contains a putative endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, is also found in Triton X-100-insoluble plasma membrane microdomains, suggesting that it is present in the endoplasmic reticulum/plasma membrane continuum in Arabidopsis roots. The microdomains also contain an atypical receptor protein (At5g16590) containing leucine-rich repeats, the message of which is transiently upregulated in Arabidopsis roots in response to P. indica. This response is not detectable in At1g13230 mutants, and the protein is not detectable in the At1g13230 mutant microdomains. Partial deactivation of a gene for a sphingosine kinase, which is required for the biosynthesis of sphingolipid found in plasma membrane microdomains, also affects the Arabidopsis/P. indica interaction. Thus, pii-2, and presumably also At5g16590, two proteins present in plasma membrane microdomains, appear to be involved in P. indica-induced growth promotion and enhanced seed production in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  20. Responses to novelty in staggerer mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misslin, R; Cigrang, M; Guastavino, J M

    1986-01-01

    Responses to novelty in normal C57BL/6 and staggerer mutant mice were recorded. The normal mice confronted a novel object in their familiar environment showed avoidance and burying responses while the staggerer mutant mice contacted it. When given the opportunity to move around freely in simultaneously presented novel and familiar environments, the mutant mice more quickly entered the novel areas than normal animals. these data reveal a significant decrease in the neophobic components of the neotic behaviour in the staggerer mice. However, since the mutant mice did not show a locomotor deficit, the impairment of neophobia seems not to be due to the gait abnormalities of these animals. The results support the view that the cerebellum may contribute to the organization of complex behaviours. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Robust mutant strain design by pessimistic optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Meltem; Xu, Liang; Zeng, Bo; Qian, Xiaoning

    2017-10-03

    Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) based mathematical modeling enables in silico prediction of systems behavior for genome-scale metabolic networks. Computational methods have been derived in the FBA framework to solve bi-level optimization for deriving "optimal" mutant microbial strains with targeted biochemical overproduction. The common inherent assumption of these methods is that the surviving mutants will always cooperate with the engineering objective by overproducing the maximum desired biochemicals. However, it has been shown that this optimistic assumption may not be valid in practice. We study the validity and robustness of existing bi-level methods for strain optimization under uncertainty and non-cooperative environment. More importantly, we propose new pessimistic optimization formulations: P-ROOM and P-OptKnock, aiming to derive robust mutants with the desired overproduction under two different mutant cell survival models: (1) ROOM assuming mutants have the minimum changes in reaction fluxes from wild-type flux values, and (2) the one considered by OptKnock maximizing the biomass production yield. When optimizing for desired overproduction, our pessimistic formulations derive more robust mutant strains by considering the uncertainty of the cell survival models at the inner level and the cooperation between the outer- and inner-level decision makers. For both P-ROOM and P-OptKnock, by converting multi-level formulations into single-level Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) problems based on the strong duality theorem, we can derive exact optimal solutions that are highly scalable with large networks. Our robust formulations P-ROOM and P-OptKnock are tested with a small E. coli core metabolic network and a large-scale E. coli iAF1260 network. We demonstrate that the original bi-level formulations (ROOM and OptKnock) derive mutants that may not achieve the predicted overproduction under uncertainty and non-cooperative environment. The knockouts obtained by the

  2. Establishment of an Indirect Genetic Transformation Method for Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulbul AHMED

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana is a small flowering plant belonging to the Brassicaceae family, which is adopted as a model plant for genetic research. Agrobacterium tumifaciensmediated transformation method for A. thaliana ecotype Bangladesh was established. Leaf discs of A. thaliana were incubated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 containing chimeric nos. nptII. nos and intron-GUS genes. Following inoculation and co-cultivation, leaf discs were cultured on selection medium containing 50 mg/l kanamycin + 50 mg/l cefotaxime + 1.5 mg/l NAA and kanamycin resistant shoots were induced from the leaf discs after two weeks. Shoot regeneration was achieved after transferring the tissues onto fresh medium of the same combination. Finally, the shoots were rooted on MS medium containing 50 mg/l kanamycin. Incorporation and expression of the transgenes were confirmed by PCR analysis. Using this protocol, transgenic A. thaliana plants can be obtained and indicates that genomic transformation in higher plants is possible through insertion of desired gene. Although Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation is established for A. thaliana, this study was the conducted to transform A. thaliana ecotype Bangladesh.

  3. Characterization of MarR Superrepressor Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Alekshun, Michael N.; Levy, Stuart B.

    1999-01-01

    MarR negatively regulates expression of the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) locus in Escherichia coli. Superrepressor mutants, generated in order to study regions of MarR required for function, exhibited altered inducer recognition properties in whole cells and increased DNA binding to marO in vitro. Mutations occurred in three areas of the relatively small MarR protein (144 amino acids). It is surmised that superrepression results from increased DNA binding activities of these mutant pr...

  4. Patulin degradation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: Sensitive mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonart, P; Sumbu, Z L; Bechet, J

    1985-03-01

    The present experiments (sensitive mutants and transient inhibition of growth) are compatible with the synthesis of an inductible detoxifying substance in the wild type strain. This substance could be glutathione because glutathione detoxification scheme essentially involves properties of the SH group and it is well known that patulin reacts with sulfhy dril groups.Studies are presently being carried out with sensitive mutants to establish definitively the relation between intracellular pool of glutathone and the resistance mechanism of a yeast to patulin.

  5. Cell wall composition and penetration resistance against the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum are affected by impaired starch turnover in Arabidopsis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsdorf, Timo; Will, Cornelia; Hofmann, Jörg; Schmitt, Christine; Merritt, Brian B; Rieger, Leonie; Frenger, Marc S; Marschall, André; Franke, Rochus B; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Voll, Lars M

    2017-01-01

    Penetration resistance represents the first level of plant defense against phytopathogenic fungi. Here, we report that the starch-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana phosphoglucomutase (pgm) mutant has impaired penetration resistance against the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum. We could not determine any changes in leaf cutin and epicuticular wax composition or indolic glucosinolate levels, but detected complex alterations in the cell wall monosaccharide composition of pgm. Notably, other mutants deficient in starch biosynthesis (adg1) or mobilization (sex1) had similarly affected cell wall composition and penetration resistance. Glycome profiling analysis showed that both overall cell wall polysaccharide extractability and relative extractability of specific pectin and xylan epitopes were affected in pgm, suggesting extensive structural changes in pgm cell walls. Screening of mutants with alterations in content or modification of specific cell wall monosaccharides indicated an important function of pectic polymers for penetration resistance and hyphal growth of C. higginsianum during the biotrophic interaction phase. While mutants with affected pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (mur8) were hypersusceptible, penetration frequency and morphology of fungal hyphae were impaired on pmr5 pmr6 mutants with increased pectin levels. Our results reveal a strong impact of starch metabolism on cell wall composition and suggest a link between carbohydrate availability, cell wall pectin and penetration resistance.

  6. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteome harbors undiscovered multi-domain molecules with functional guanylyl cyclase catalytic centers

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-07-08

    Background: Second messengers link external cues to complex physiological responses. One such messenger, 3\\',5\\'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), has been shown to play a key role in many physiological responses in plants. However, in higher plants, guanylyl cyclases (GCs), enzymes that generate cGMP from guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) have remained elusive until recently. GC search motifs constructed from the alignment of known GCs catalytic centers form vertebrates and lower eukaryotes have led to the identification of a number of plant GCs that have been characterized in vitro and in vivo.Presentation of the hypothesis.Recently characterized GCs in Arabidopsis thaliana contributed to the development of search parameters that can identify novel candidate GCs in plants. We hypothesize that there are still a substantial number (> 40) of multi-domain molecules with potentially functional GC catalytic centers in plants that remain to be discovered and characterized. Testing the hypothesis. The hypothesis can be tested, firstly, by computational methods constructing 3D models of selected GC candidates using available crystal structures as templates. Homology modeling must include substrate docking that can provide support for the structural feasibility of the GC catalytic centers in those candidates. Secondly, recombinant peptides containing the GC domain need to be tested in in vitro GC assays such as the enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and/or in mass spectrometry based cGMP assays. In addition, quantification of in vivo cGMP transients with fluorescent cGMP-reporter assays in wild-type or selected mutants will help to elucidate the biological role of novel GCs.Implications of the hypothesis.If it turns out that plants do harbor a large number of functional GC domains as part of multi-domain enzymes, then major new insights will be gained into the complex signal transduction pathways that link cGMP to fundamental processes such as ion transport

  7. Comparative Analysis of Light-Harvesting Antennae and State Transition in chlorina and cpSRP Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    State transitions in photosynthesis provide for the dynamic allocation of a mobile fraction of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to photosystem II (PSII) in state I and to photosystem I (PSI) in state II. In the state I-to-state II transition, LHCII is phosphorylated by STN7 and associates with PSI to favor absorption cross-section of PSI. Here, we used Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with defects in chlorophyll (Chl) b biosynthesis or in the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) machinery to study the flexible formation of PS-LHC supercomplexes. Intriguingly, we found that impaired Chl b biosynthesis in chlorina1-2 (ch1-2) led to preferentially stabilized LHCI rather than LHCII, while the contents of both LHCI and LHCII were equally depressed in the cpSRP43-deficient mutant (chaos). In view of recent findings on the modified state transitions in LHCI-deficient mutants (Benson et al., 2015), the ch1-2 and chaos mutants were used to assess the influence of varying LHCI/LHCII antenna size on state transitions. Under state II conditions, LHCII-PSI supercomplexes were not formed in both ch1-2 and chaos plants. LHCII phosphorylation was drastically reduced in ch1-2, and the inactivation of STN7 correlates with the lack of state transitions. In contrast, phosphorylated LHCII in chaos was observed to be exclusively associated with PSII complexes, indicating a lack of mobile LHCII in chaos Thus, the comparative analysis of ch1-2 and chaos mutants provides new evidence for the flexible organization of LHCs and enhances our understanding of the reversible allocation of LHCII to the two photosystems. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Feeding on Leaves of the Glucosinolate Transporter Mutant gtr1gtr2 Reduces Fitness of Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Svend Roesen; Kunert, Grit; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2015-11-01

    As aphids are a pest on various crops worldwide, a better understanding of the interaction between aphids and plant host defenses is required. The green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) feeds on a variety of plant species, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), in which glucosinolates function as a major part of the chemical defense. Several studies have shown that glucosinolates play a role in interactions between Arabidopsis and the green peach aphid. In this work, we used a recently identified Arabidopsis glucosinolate transporter mutant (gtr1gtr2 dKO), with altered glucosinolate content in the vasculature, to investigate the role of defense compound transport in aphid infestation. By monitoring aphid performance on caged leaves and analyzing glucosinolates in leaf tissue and phloem sap, as well as inside aphids, we examined if a change in spatial distribution of glucosinolates within a leaf influences aphid performance. Based on reduced glucosinolate content in the phloem sap of the transporter mutant, we hypothesized that aphids would perform better on gtr1gtr2 dKO leaves compared to WT. Unexpectedly, aphids performed poorly on gtr1gtr2 dKO leaves. Our data suggest that higher glucosinolate content in tissues surrounding the phloem of the double transporter mutant may play a role in reducing aphid performance on this genotype.

  9. Protein Degradation Rate in Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J; Trösch, Josua; Castleden, Ian; Huang, Shaobai; Millar, A Harvey

    2017-02-01

    We applied 15N labeling approaches to leaves of the Arabidopsis thaliana rosette to characterize their protein degradation rate and understand its determinants. The progressive labeling of new peptides with 15N and measuring the decrease in the abundance of >60,000 existing peptides over time allowed us to define the degradation rate of 1228 proteins in vivo. We show that Arabidopsis protein half-lives vary from several hours to several months based on the exponential constant of the decay rate for each protein. This rate was calculated from the relative isotope abundance of each peptide and the fold change in protein abundance during growth. Protein complex membership and specific protein domains were found to be strong predictors of degradation rate, while N-end amino acid, hydrophobicity, or aggregation propensity of proteins were not. We discovered rapidly degrading subunits in a variety of protein complexes in plastids and identified the set of plant proteins whose degradation rate changed in different leaves of the rosette and correlated with leaf growth rate. From this information, we have calculated the protein turnover energy costs in different leaves and their key determinants within the proteome. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of melatonin in alleviating cold stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Vikramjit S; Shukla, Mukund R; Sherif, Sherif M; Murch, Susan J; Saxena, Praveen K

    2014-04-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has been implicated in abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in plants. However, information on the effects of melatonin in cold-stress tolerance in vivo is limited. In this study, the effect of melatonin was investigated in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana challenged with a cold stress at 4⁰C for 72 and 120 hr. Melatonin-treated plants (10 and 30 μm) had significantly higher fresh weight, primary root length, and shoot height compared with the nontreated plants. To aid in the understanding of the role of melatonin in alleviating cold stress, we investigated the effects of melatonin treatment on the expression of cold-related genes. Melatonin up-regulated the expression of C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought Response Element Binding factors (DREBs), a cold-responsive gene, COR15a, a transcription factor involved in freezing and drought-stress tolerance CAMTA1 and transcription activators of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related antioxidant genes, ZAT10 and ZAT12, following cold stress. The up-regulation of cold signaling genes by melatonin may stimulate the biosynthesis of cold-protecting compounds and contribute to the increased growth of plants treated with exogenous melatonin under cold stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana dehydroascorbate reductase 2: Conformational flexibility during catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodra, Nandita; Young, David; Astolfi Rosado, Leonardo; Pallo, Anna; Wahni, Khadija; de Proft, Frank; Huang, Jingjing; van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2017-02-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate and plays a direct role in regenerating ascorbic acid, an essential plant antioxidant vital for defense against oxidative stress. DHAR enzymes bear close structural homology to the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily of enzymes and contain the same active site motif, but most GSTs do not exhibit DHAR activity. The presence of a cysteine at the active site is essential for the catalytic functioning of DHAR, as mutation of this cysteine abolishes the activity. Here we present the crystal structure of DHAR2 from Arabidopsis thaliana with GSH bound to the catalytic cysteine. This structure reveals localized conformational differences around the active site which distinguishes the GSH-bound DHAR2 structure from that of DHAR1. We also unraveled the enzymatic step in which DHAR releases oxidized glutathione (GSSG). To consolidate our structural and kinetic findings, we investigated potential conformational flexibility in DHAR2 by normal mode analysis and found that subdomain mobility could be linked to GSH binding or GSSG release.

  12. Lagging adaptation to warming climate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Amity M; Cooper, Martha D; Korves, Tonia M; Schmitt, Johanna

    2014-06-03

    If climate change outpaces the rate of adaptive evolution within a site, populations previously well adapted to local conditions may decline or disappear, and banked seeds from those populations will be unsuitable for restoring them. However, if such adaptational lag has occurred, immigrants from historically warmer climates will outperform natives and may provide genetic potential for evolutionary rescue. We tested for lagging adaptation to warming climate using banked seeds of the annual weed Arabidopsis thaliana in common garden experiments in four sites across the species' native European range: Valencia, Spain; Norwich, United Kingdom; Halle, Germany; and Oulu, Finland. Genotypes originating from geographic regions near the planting site had high relative fitness in each site, direct evidence for broad-scale geographic adaptation in this model species. However, genotypes originating in sites historically warmer than the planting site had higher average relative fitness than local genotypes in every site, especially at the northern range limit in Finland. This result suggests that local adaptive optima have shifted rapidly with recent warming across the species' native range. Climatic optima also differed among seasonal germination cohorts within the Norwich site, suggesting that populations occurring where summer germination is common may have greater evolutionary potential to persist under future warming. If adaptational lag has occurred over just a few decades in banked seeds of an annual species, it may be an important consideration for managing longer-lived species, as well as for attempts to conserve threatened populations through ex situ preservation.

  13. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-07-11

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses.

  14. Metabolic profiling of laser microdissected vascular bundles of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Fiehn Oliver

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laser microdissection is a useful tool for collecting tissue-specific samples or even single cells from animal and plant tissue sections. This technique has been successfully employed to study cell type-specific expression at the RNA, and more recently also at the protein level. However, metabolites were not amenable to analysis after laser microdissection, due to the procedures routinely applied for sample preparation. Using standard tissue fixation and embedding protocols to prepare histological sections, metabolites are either efficiently extracted by dehydrating solvents, or washed out by embedding agents. Results In this study, we used cryosectioning as an alternative method that preserves sufficient cellular structure while minimizing metabolite loss by excluding any solute exchange steps. Using this pre-treatment procedure, Arabidopsis thaliana stem sections were prepared for laser microdissection of vascular bundles. Collected samples were subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS to obtain metabolite profiles. From 100 collected vascular bundles (~5,000 cells, 68 metabolites could be identified. More than half of the identified metabolites could be shown to be enriched or depleted in vascular bundles as compared to the surrounding tissues. Conclusion This study uses the example of vascular bundles to demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to analyze a comprehensive set of metabolites from laser microdissected samples at a tissue-specific level, given that a suitable sample preparation procedure is used.

  15. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Cécile eALBENNE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cells walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last ten years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions.

  16. Insertions/deletions-associated nucleotide polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Changjiang Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although high levels of within-species variation are commonly observed, a general mechanism for the origin of such variation is still lacking. Insertions and deletions (indels are a widespread feature of genomes and we hypothesize that there might be an association between indels and patterns of nucleotide polymorphism. Here, we investigate flanking sequences around 18 indels (>100bp among a large number of accessions of the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We found two distinct haplotypes, i.e. a nucleotide dimorphism, present around each of these indels and dimorphic haplotypes always corresponded to the indel-present/-absent patterns. In addition, the peaks of nucleotide diversity between the two divergent alleles were closely associated with these indels. Thus, there exists a close association between indels and dimorphisms. Further analysis suggests that indel-associated substitutions could be an important component of genetic variation shaping nucleotide polymorphism in Arabidopsis. Finally, we suggest a mechanism by which indels might generate these highly divergent haplotypes. This study provides evidence that nucleotide dimorphisms, which are frequently regarded as evidence of frequency-dependent selection, could be explained simply by structural variation in the genome.

  17. Arsenic uptake and speciation in Arabidopsis thaliana under hydroponic conditions.

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    Park, Jin Hee; Han, Young-Soo; Seong, Hye Jin; Ahn, Joo Sung; Nam, In-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) uptake and species in Arabidopsis thaliana were evaluated under hydroponic conditions. Plant nutrient solutions were treated with arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)], and aqueous As speciation was conducted using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Arabidopsis reduced As(V) to As(III) in the nutrient solution, possibly due to root exudates such as organic acids or the efflux of As(III) from plant roots after in vivo reduction of As(V) to As(III). Arsenic uptake by Arabidopsis was associated with increased levels of Ca and Fe, and decreased levels of K in plant tissues. Arsenic in Arabidopsis mainly occurred as As(III), which was coordinated with oxygen and sulfur based on XANES and EXAFS results. The existence of As(III)O and As(III)S in EXAFS indicates partial biotransformation of As(III)O to a sulfur-coordinated form because of limited amount of glutathione in plants. Further understanding the mechanism of As biotransformation in Arabidopsis may help to develop measures that can mitigate As toxicity via genetic engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein Methionine Sulfoxide Dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana under Oxidative Stress

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    Jacques, Silke; Ghesquière, Bart; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Demol, Hans; Wahni, Khadija; Willems, Patrick; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide can modify proteins via direct oxidation of their sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Methionine oxidation, studied here, is a reversible posttranslational modification that is emerging as a mechanism by which proteins perceive oxidative stress and function in redox signaling. Identification of proteins with oxidized methionines is the first prerequisite toward understanding the functional effect of methionine oxidation on proteins and the biological processes in which they are involved. Here, we describe a proteome-wide study of in vivo protein-bound methionine oxidation in plants upon oxidative stress using Arabidopsis thaliana catalase 2 knock-out plants as a model system. We identified over 500 sites of oxidation in about 400 proteins and quantified the differences in oxidation between wild-type and catalase 2 knock-out plants. We show that the activity of two plant-specific glutathione S-transferases, GSTF9 and GSTT23, is significantly reduced upon oxidation. And, by sampling over time, we mapped the dynamics of methionine oxidation and gained new insights into this complex and dynamic landscape of a part of the plant proteome that is sculpted by oxidative stress. PMID:25693801

  19. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana’s roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes PMID:27399695

  20. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Nadine Strehmel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana’s roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI-QTOFMS and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS, and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes

  1. Profiling of secondary metabolites in root exudates of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehmel, Nadine; Böttcher, Christoph; Schmidt, Stephan; Scheel, Dierk

    2014-12-01

    To explore the chemical composition of root exudates of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana a workflow for nontargeted metabolite profiling of the semipolar fraction of root exudates was developed. It comprises hydroponic plant cultivation and sampling of root exudates under sterile conditions, sample preparation by solid-phase extraction and analysis by reversed-phase UPLC/ESI-QTOFMS. Following the established workflow, root exudates of six-week-old plants were profiled and a set of reproducibly occurring molecular features was compiled. To structurally elucidate the corresponding metabolites, accurate mass tandem mass spectrometry and on-line hydrogen/deuterium exchange were applied. Currently, a total of 103 compounds were detected and annotated by elemental composition of which more than 90 were structurally characterized or classified. Among them, 42 compounds were rigorously identified using an authenticated standard. The compounds identified so far include nucleosides, deoxynucleosides, aromatic amino acids, anabolites and catabolites of glucosinolates, dipeptides, indolics, salicylic and jasmonic acid catabolites, coumarins, mono-, di- and trilignols, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and oxylipins and exemplify the high chemical diversity of plant root exudates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Single-cell and coupled GRN models of cell patterning in the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche

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    Alvarez-Buylla Elena R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental work has uncovered some of the genetic components required to maintain the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche (SCN and its structure. Two main pathways are involved. One pathway depends on the genes SHORTROOT and SCARECROW and the other depends on the PLETHORA genes, which have been proposed to constitute the auxin readouts. Recent evidence suggests that a regulatory circuit, composed of WOX5 and CLE40, also contributes to the SCN maintenance. Yet, we still do not understand how the niche is dynamically maintained and patterned or if the uncovered molecular components are sufficient to recover the observed gene expression configurations that characterize the cell types within the root SCN. Mathematical and computational tools have proven useful in understanding the dynamics of cell differentiation. Hence, to further explore root SCN patterning, we integrated available experimental data into dynamic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN models and addressed if these are sufficient to attain observed gene expression configurations in the root SCN in a robust and autonomous manner. Results We found that an SCN GRN model based only on experimental data did not reproduce the configurations observed within the root SCN. We developed several alternative GRN models that recover these expected stable gene configurations. Such models incorporate a few additional components and interactions in addition to those that have been uncovered. The recovered configurations are stable to perturbations, and the models are able to recover the observed gene expression profiles of almost all the mutants described so far. However, the robustness of the postulated GRNs is not as high as that of other previously studied networks. Conclusions These models are the first published approximations for a dynamic mechanism of the A. thaliana root SCN cellular pattering. Our model is useful to formally show that the data now available are not

  3. Differential disease resistance response in the barley necrotic mutant nec1

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    Kunga Laura

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ion fluxes are considered to be an integral part of signal transduction during responses to pathogens, only a few ion channels are known to participate in the plant response to infection. CNGC4 is a disease resistance-related cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel. Arabidopsis thaliana CNGC4 mutants hlm1 and dnd2 display an impaired hypersensitive response (HR, retarded growth, a constitutively active salicylic acid (SA-mediated pathogenesis-related response and elevated resistance against bacterial pathogens. Barley CNGC4 shares 67% aa identity with AtCNGC4. The barley mutant nec1 comprising of a frame-shift mutation of CNGC4 displays a necrotic phenotype and constitutively over-expresses PR-1, yet it is not known what effect the nec1 mutation has on barley resistance against different types of pathogens. Results nec1 mutant accumulated high amount of SA and hydrogen peroxide compared to parental cv. Parkland. Experiments investigating nec1 disease resistance demonstrated positive effect of nec1 mutation on non-host resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst at high inoculum density, whereas at normal Pst inoculum concentration nec1 resistance did not differ from wt. In contrast to augmented P. syringae resistance, penetration resistance against biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh, the causal agent of powdery mildew, was not altered in nec1. The nec1 mutant significantly over-expressed race non-specific Bgh resistance-related genes BI-1 and MLO. Induction of BI-1 and MLO suggested putative involvement of nec1 in race non-specific Bgh resistance, therefore the effect of nec1on mlo-5-mediated Bgh resistance was assessed. The nec1/mlo-5 double mutant was as resistant to Bgh as Nec1/mlo-5 plants, suggesting that nec1 did not impair mlo-5 race non-specific Bgh resistance. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that nec1 mutation alters activation of systemic acquired resistance

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce growth and infect roots of the non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Veiga, Rita S L; Faccio, Antonella; Genre, Andrea; Pieterse, Corné M J; Bonfante, Paola; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2013-11-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is widespread throughout the plant kingdom and important for plant nutrition and ecosystem functioning. Nonetheless, most terrestrial ecosystems also contain a considerable number of non-mycorrhizal plants. The interaction of such non-host plants with AM fungi (AMF) is still poorly understood. Here, in three complementary experiments, we investigated whether the non-mycorrhizal plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the model organism for plant molecular biology and genetics, interacts with AMF. We grew A. thaliana alone or together with a mycorrhizal host species (either Trifolium pratense or Lolium multiflorum) in the presence or absence of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis. Plants were grown in a dual-compartment system with a hyphal mesh separating roots of A. thaliana from roots of the host species, avoiding direct root competition. The host plants in the system ensured the presence of an active AM fungal network. AM fungal networks caused growth depressions in A. thaliana of more than 50% which were not observed in the absence of host plants. Microscopy analyses revealed that R. irregularis supported by a host plant was capable of infecting A. thaliana root tissues (up to 43% of root length colonized), but no arbuscules were observed. The results reveal high susceptibility of A. thaliana to R. irregularis, suggesting that A. thaliana is a suitable model plant to study non-host/AMF interactions and the biological basis of AM incompatibility. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Arabidopsis thaliana/Myzus persicae model system demonstrates that a single gene can influence the interaction between a plant and a sap-feeding insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, E J; Pritchard, J; Bennett, M J; Zhu, X; Barrett, D A; Allen, T; Bale, Js; Newbury, H J

    2006-11-01

    We have developed an Arabidopsis thaliana/Myzus persicae model system to allow the dissection of plant/insect interactions at a molecular genetic level. This allows the examination of the role of single plant genes in the interaction between the plant and an aphid. Our initial studies have exploited an Arabidopsis genotype in which the function of the amino acid transporter ANT1 has been abolished. This mutation results in a change in the proportions of several amino acids within the phloem sieve elements (SEs) resulting in an increase in the proportion of essential amino acids. This has been measured using aphid stylectomy to collect SE samples, followed by a novel micellar electrokinetic chromatography method for amino acid analysis. The SE content represents the aphid's diet, and use of electrical penetration graph technology and honeydew clocks have demonstrated that this altered diet results in a change in the feeding rate of the aphid. Balance sheets can be produced to show the amount (nmoles/24 h) of each of 18 amino acids taken up and excreted by aphids feeding on wild type and ant1 mutant plants. The data show that aphids feeding on the ant1 mutant take up larger amounts of amino acids. However, we could not detect any effect on the reproductive rate of the aphids. The results show that, under experimental conditions, this model system can be used to identify plant genes that control the behaviour and fecundity of an insect pest.

  6. Uncovering genes and ploidy involved in the high diversity in root hair density, length and response to local scarce phosphate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Markus G Stetter

    Full Text Available Plant root hairs increase the root surface to enhance the uptake of sparingly soluble and immobile nutrients, such as the essential nutrient phosphorus, from the soil. Here, root hair traits and the response to scarce local phosphorus concentration were studied in 166 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana using split plates. Root hair density and length were correlated, but highly variable among accessions. Surprisingly, the well-known increase in root hair density under low phosphorus was mostly restricted to genotypes that had less and shorter root hairs under P sufficient conditions. By contrast, several accessions with dense and long root hairs even had lower hair density or shorter hairs in local scarce phosphorus. Furthermore, accessions with whole-genome duplications developed more dense but phosphorus-insensitive root hairs. The impact of genome duplication on root hair density was confirmed by comparing tetraploid accessions with their diploid ancestors. Genome-wide association mapping identified candidate genes potentially involved in root hair responses tp scarce local phosphate. Knock-out mutants in identified candidate genes (CYR1, At1g32360 and RLP48 were isolated and differences in root hair traits in the mutants were confirmed. The large diversity in root hair traits among accessions and the diverse response when local phosphorus is scarce is a rich resource for further functional analyses.

  7. The exopolysaccharide of Rhizobium sp. YAS34 is not necessary for biofilm formation on Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus roots but contributes to root colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaella, Catherine; Schue, Mathieu; Berge, Odile; Heulin, Thierry; Achouak, Wafa

    2008-01-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPSs) play key roles in plant–microbe interactions, such as biofilm formation on plant roots and legume nodulation by rhizobia. Here, we focused on the function of an EPS produced by Rhizobium sp. YAS34 in the colonization and biofilm formation on non-legume plant roots (Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus). Using random transposon mutagenesis, we isolated an EPS-deficient mutant of strain YAS34 impaired in a glycosyltransferase gene (gta). Wild type and mutant strains were tagged with a plasmid-born GFP and, for the first time, the EPS produced by the wild-type strain was seen in the rhizosphere using selective carbohydrate probing with a fluorescent lectin and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. We show for the fist time that Rhizobium forms biofilms on roots of non-legumes, independently of the EPS synthesis. When produced by strain YAS34 wild type, EPS is targeted at specific parts of the plant root system. Nutrient fluctuations, root exudates and bacterial growth phase can account for such a production pattern. The EPS synthesis in Rhizobium sp. YAS34 is not essential for biofilm formation on roots, but is critical to colonization of the basal part of the root system and increasing the stability of root-adhering soil. Thus, in Rhizobium sp. YAS34 and non-legume interactions, microbial EPS is implicated in root–soil interface, root colonization, but not in biofilm formation. PMID:18507672

  8. Auxin Transport and Ribosome Biogenesis Mutant/Reporter Lines to Study Plant Cell Growth and Proliferation under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Miguel A.; Manzano, Ana I.; van Loon, Jack JWA.; Saez-Vasquez, Julio; Carnero-Diaz, Eugenie; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F. J.

    2013-02-01

    We tested different Arabidopsis thaliana strains to check their availability for space use in the International Space Station (ISS). We used mutants and reporter gene strains affecting factors of cell proliferation and cell growth, to check variations induced by an altered gravity vector. Seedlings were grown either in a Random Positioning Machine (RPM), under simulated microgravity (μg), or in a Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC), under hypergravity (2g). A combination of the two devices (μgRPM+LDC) was also used. Under all gravity alterations, seedling roots were longer than in control 1g conditions, while the levels of the nucleolar protein nucleolin were depleted. Alterations in the pattern of expression of PIN2, an auxin transporter, and of cyclin B1, a cell cycle regulator, were shown. All these alterations are compatible with previous space data, so the use of these strains will be useful in the next experiments in ISS, under real microgravity.

  9. Plasmodium berghei: in vivo generation and selection of karyotype mutants and non-gametocyte producer mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, C. J.; Ramesar, J.; van den Berg, F. M.; Mons, B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously reported that karyotype and gametocyte-producer mutants spontaneously arose during in vivo asexual multiplication of Plasmodium berghei. Here we studied the rate of selection of these mutants in vivo. Gametocyte production and karyotype pattern were established at regular intervals

  10. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; CLARK, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  11. The eta7/csn3-3 auxin response mutant of Arabidopsis defines a novel function for the CSN3 subunit of the COP9 signalosome.

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    He Huang

    Full Text Available The COP9 signalosome (CSN is an eight subunit protein complex conserved in all higher eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the CSN regulates auxin response by removing the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8/RUB1 from the CUL1 subunit of the SCF(TIR1/AFB ubiquitin-ligase (deneddylation. Previously described null mutations in any CSN subunit result in the pleiotropic cop/det/fus phenotype and cause seedling lethality, hampering the study of CSN functions in plant development. In a genetic screen to identify enhancers of the auxin response defects conferred by the tir1-1 mutation, we identified a viable csn mutant of subunit 3 (CSN3, designated eta7/csn3-3. In addition to enhancing tir1-1 mutant phenotypes, the csn3-3 mutation alone confers several phenotypes indicative of impaired auxin signaling including auxin resistant root growth and diminished auxin responsive gene expression. Unexpectedly however, csn3-3 plants are not defective in either the CSN-mediated deneddylation of CUL1 or in SCF(TIR1-mediated degradation of Aux/IAA proteins. These findings suggest that csn3-3 is an atypical csn mutant that defines a novel CSN or CSN3-specific function. Consistent with this possibility, we observe dramatic differences in double mutant interactions between csn3-3 and other auxin signaling mutants compared to another weak csn mutant, csn1-10. Lastly, unlike other csn mutants, assembly of the CSN holocomplex is unaffected in csn3-3 plants. However, we detected a small CSN3-containing protein complex that is altered in csn3-3 plants. We hypothesize that in addition to its role in the CSN as a cullin deneddylase, CSN3 functions in a distinct protein complex that is required for proper auxin signaling.

  12. Targeting mutant NRAS signaling pathways in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Ha Linh; Aplin, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a devastating form of skin cancer and its incidence is increasing faster than any other preventable cancer in the United States. The mutant NRAS subset of melanoma is more aggressive and associated with poorer outcomes compared to non-NRAS mutant melanoma. The aggressive nature and complex molecular signaling conferred by this transformation has evaded clinically effective treatment options. This review examines the major downstream effectors of NRAS relevant in melanoma and the associated advances made in targeted therapies that focus on these effector pathways. We outline the history of MEK inhibition in mutant NRAS melanoma and recent advances with newer MEK inhibitors. Since MEK inhibitors will likely be optimized when combined with other targeted therapies, we focus on recently identified targets that can be used in combination with MEK inhibitors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Heather L Torrey

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection.

  14. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  15. Aging Kit mutant mice develop cardiomyopathy.

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    Lei Ye

    Full Text Available Both bone marrow (BM and myocardium contain progenitor cells expressing the c-Kit tyrosine kinase. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of c-Kit mutations on: i. myocardial c-Kit(+ cells counts and ii. the stability of left ventricular (LV contractile function and structure during aging. LV structure and contractile function were evaluated (echocardiography in two groups of Kit mutant (W/Wv and W41/W42 and in wild type (WT mice at 4 and 12 months of age and the effects of the mutations on LV mass, vascular density and the numbers of proliferating cells were also determined. In 4 month old Kit mutant and WT mice, LV ejection fractions (EF and LV fractional shortening rates (FS were comparable. At 12 months of age EF and FS were significantly decreased and LV mass was significantly increased only in W41/W42 mice. Myocardial vascular densities and c-Kit(+ cell numbers were significantly reduced in both mutant groups when compared to WT hearts. Replacement of mutant BM with WT BM at 4 months of age did not prevent these abnormalities in either mutant group although they were somewhat attenuated in the W/Wv group. Notably BM transplantation did not prevent the development of cardiomyopathy in 12 month W41/W42 mice. The data suggest that decreased numbers and functional capacities of c-Kit(+ cardiac resident progenitor cells may be the basis of the cardiomyopathy in W41/W42 mice and although defects in mutant BM progenitor cells may prove to be contributory, they are not causal.

  16. Ovarian abnormalities in the staggerer mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastavino, Jean-Marie; Boufares, Salima; Crusio, Wim E

    2005-08-24

    Disturbances in several reproductive functions of the staggerer cerebellar mutant mouse have been observed. In this study, reproductive efficiency of staggerer mice was compared to normal mice by recording the number of pups produced and the number of oocytes occurring. It was found that staggerer mothers produced smaller litters than controls and the number of oocytes produced in their ovaries was reduced by the staggerer mutation. These results indicate a pleiotropic effect on fertility of the Rora(sg) gene underlying the cerebellar abnormalities of the staggerer mutant.

  17. Ovarian Abnormalities in the Staggerer Mutant Mouse

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    Jean-Marie Guastavino

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances in several reproductive functions of the staggerer cerebellar mutant mouse have been observed. In this study, reproductive efficiency of staggerer mice was compared to normal mice by recording the number of pups produced and the number of oocytes occurring. It was found that staggerer mothers produced smaller litters than controls and the number of oocytes produced in their ovaries was reduced by the staggerer mutation. These results indicate a pleiotropic effect on fertility of the Rorasg gene underlying the cerebellar abnormalities of the staggerer mutant.

  18. GFP Loss-of-Function Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jason L; Kanno, Tatsuo; Liang, Shih-Chieh; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2015-07-06

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related fluorescent proteins are widely used in biological research to monitor gene expression and protein localization in living cells. The GFP chromophore is generated spontaneously in the presence of oxygen by a multi-step reaction involving cyclization of the internal tripeptide Ser65 (or Thr65)-Tyr66-Gly67, which is embedded in the center of an 11-stranded β-barrel structure. Random and site-specific mutagenesis has been used to optimize GFP fluorescence and create derivatives with novel properties. However, loss-of-function mutations that would aid in understanding GFP protein folding and chromophore formation have not been fully cataloged. Here we report a collection of ethyl methansulfonate-induced GFP loss-of-function mutations in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations that alter residues important for chromophore maturation, such as Arg96 and Ser205, greatly reduce or extinguish fluorescence without dramatically altering GFP protein accumulation. By contrast, other loss-of-fluorescence mutations substantially diminish the amount of GFP protein, suggesting that they compromise protein stability. Many mutations in this category generate substitutions of highly conserved glycine residues, including the following: Gly67 in the chromogenic tripeptide; Gly31, Gly33, and Gly35 in the second β-strand; and Gly20, Gly91, and Gly127 in the lids of the β-barrel scaffold. Our genetic analysis supports conclusions from structural and biochemical studies and demonstrates a critical role for multiple, highly conserved glycine residues in GFP protein stability. Copyright © 2015 Fu et al.

  19. The Hidden Geometries of the Arabidopsis thaliana Epidermis

    KAUST Repository

    Staff, Lee

    2012-09-11

    The quest for the discovery of mathematical principles that underlie biological phenomena is ancient and ongoing. We present a geometric analysis of the complex interdigitated pavement cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana (Col.) adaxial epidermis with a view to discovering some geometric characteristics that may govern the formation of this tissue. More than 2,400 pavement cells from 10, 17 and 24 day old leaves were analyzed. These interdigitated cells revealed a number of geometric properties that remained constant across the three age groups. In particular, the number of digits per cell rarely exceeded 15, irrespective of cell area. Digit numbers per 100 ?m2 cell area reduce with age and as cell area increases, suggesting early developmental programming of digits. Cell shape proportions as defined by length:width ratios were highly conserved over time independent of the size and, interestingly, both the mean and the medians were close to the golden ratio 1.618034. With maturity, the cell area:perimeter ratios increased from a mean of 2.0 to 2.4. Shape properties as defined by the medial axis transform (MAT) were calculated and revealed that branch points along the MAT typically comprise one large and two small angles. These showed consistency across the developmental stages considered here at 140° (± 5°) for the largest angles and 110° (± 5°) for the smaller angles. Voronoi diagram analyses of stomatal center coordinates revealed that giant pavement cells (?500 ?m2) tend to be arranged along Voronoi boundaries suggesting that they could function as a scaffold of the epidermis. In addition, we propose that pavement cells have a role in spacing and positioning of the stomata in the growing leaf and that they do so by growing within the limits of a set of \\'geometrical rules\\'. © 2012 Staff et al.

  20. Functional genetics of intraspecific ecological interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jason B; Mutic, Joshua J; Kover, Paula X

    2011-05-12

    Studying the genetic basis of traits involved in ecological interactions is a fundamental part of elucidating the connections between evolutionary and ecological processes. Such knowledge allows one to link genetic models of trait evolution with ecological models describing interactions within and between species. Previous work has shown that connections between genetic and ecological processes in Arabidopsis thaliana may be mediated by the fact that quantitative trait loci (QTL) with 'direct' effects on traits of individuals also have pleiotropic 'indirect' effects on traits expressed in neighbouring plants. Here, we further explore these connections by examining functional relationships between traits affected directly and indirectly by the same QTL. We develop a novel approach using structural equation models (SEMs) to determine whether observed pleiotropic effects result from traits directly affected by the QTL in focal individuals causing the changes in the neighbours' phenotypes. This hypothesis was assessed using SEMs to test whether focal plant phenotypes appear to mediate the connection between the focal plants' genotypes and the phenotypes of their neighbours, or alternatively, whether the connection between the focal plants' genotypes and the neighbours' phenotypes is mediated by unmeasured traits. We implement this analysis using a QTL of major effect that maps to the well-characterized flowering locus, FRIGIDA. The SEMs support the hypothesis that the pleiotropic indirect effects of this locus arise from size and developmental timing-related traits in focal plants affecting the expression of developmental traits in their neighbours. Our findings provide empirical insights into the genetics and nature of intraspecific ecological interactions. Our technique holds promise in directing future work into the genetic basis and functional relationship of traits mediating and responding to ecological interactions.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Kobayashi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of chlorophyll (Chl involves many enzymatic reactions that share several first steps for biosynthesis of other tetrapyrroles such as heme, siroheme and phycobilins. Chl allows photosynthetic organisms to capture light energy for photosynthesis but with simultaneous threat of photooxidative damage to cells. To prevent photodamage by Chl and its highly photoreactive intermediates, photosynthetic organisms have developed multiple levels of regulatory mechanisms to coordinate tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB with the formation of photosynthetic and photoprotective systems and to fine-tune the metabolic flow with the varying needs of Chl and other tetrapyrroles under various developmental and environmental conditions. Among a wide range of regulatory mechanisms of TPB, this review summarizes transcriptional regulation of TPB genes during plant development,with focusing on several transcription factors characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana.Key TPB genes are tightly coexpressed with other photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes and are induced by light, oscillate in a diurnal and circadian manner, are coordinated with developmental and nutritional status, and are strongly downregulated in response to arrested chloroplast biogenesis. LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 and PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs, which are positive and negative transcription factors with a wide range of light signaling, respectively, target many TPB genes for light and circadian regulation. GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors directly regulate key TPB genes to fine-tune the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus with chloroplast functionality. Some transcription factors such as FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3, REVEILLE1, and scarecrow-like transcription factors may directly regulate some specific TPB genes, whereas other factors such as GATA transcription factors are likely to regulate TPB genes in an indirect manner. Comprehensive transcriptional analyses of TPB genes and detailed

  2. From gene expression to gene regulatory networks in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Chris J; Manfield, Iain W; Bulpitt, Andrew J; Gilmartin, Philip M; Westhead, David R

    2009-09-03

    The elucidation of networks from a compendium of gene expression data is one of the goals of systems biology and can be a valuable source of new hypotheses for experimental researchers. For Arabidopsis, there exist several thousand microarrays which form a valuable resource from which to learn. A novel Bayesian network-based algorithm to infer gene regulatory networks from gene expression data is introduced and applied to learn parts of the transcriptomic network in Arabidopsis thaliana from a large number (thousands) of separate microarray experiments. Starting from an initial set of genes of interest, a network is grown by iterative addition to the model of the gene, from another defined set of genes, which gives the 'best' learned network structure. The gene set for iterative growth can be as large as the entire genome. A number of networks are inferred and analysed; these show (i) an agreement with the current literature on the circadian clock network, (ii) the ability to model other networks, and (iii) that the learned network hypotheses can suggest new roles for poorly characterized genes, through addition of relevant genes from an unconstrained list of over 15,000 possible genes. To demonstrate the latter point, the method is used to suggest that particular GATA transcription factors are regulators of photosynthetic genes. Additionally, the performance in recovering a known network from different amounts of synthetically generated data is evaluated. Our results show that plausible regulatory networks can be learned from such gene expression data alone. This work demonstrates that network hypotheses can be generated from existing gene expression data for use by experimental biologists.

  3. Small RNA-directed epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixian Zhai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in epigenetics has revealed mechanisms that can heritably regulate gene function independent of genetic alterations. Nevertheless, little is known about the role of epigenetics in evolution. This is due in part to scant data on epigenetic variation among natural populations. In plants, small interfering RNA (siRNA is involved in both the initiation and maintenance of gene silencing by directing DNA methylation and/or histone methylation. Here, we report that, in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, a cluster of approximately 24 nt siRNAs found at high levels in the ecotype Landsberg erecta (Ler could direct DNA methylation and heterochromatinization at a hAT element adjacent to the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, a major repressor of flowering, whereas the same hAT element in ecotype Columbia (Col with almost identical DNA sequence, generates a set of low abundance siRNAs that do not direct these activities. We have called this hAT element MPF for Methylated region near Promoter of FLC, although de novo methylation triggered by an inverted repeat transgene at this region in Col does not alter its FLC expression. DNA methylation of the Ler allele MPF is dependent on genes in known silencing pathways, and such methylation is transmissible to Col by genetic crosses, although with varying degrees of penetrance. A genome-wide comparison of Ler and Col small RNAs identified at least 68 loci matched by a significant level of approximately 24 nt siRNAs present specifically in Ler but not Col, where nearly half of the loci are related to repeat or TE sequences. Methylation analysis revealed that 88% of the examined loci (37 out of 42 were specifically methylated in Ler but not Col, suggesting that small RNA can direct epigenetic differences between two closely related Arabidopsis ecotypes.

  4. Multiwall carbon nanotubes modulate paraquat toxicity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoji; Xu, Jiahui; Lavoie, Michel; Peijnenburg, W J G M; Zhu, Youchao; Lu, Tao; Fu, Zhengwei; Zhu, Tingheng; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-11-03

    Carbon nanotubes can be either toxic or beneficial to plant growth and can also modulate toxicity of organic contaminants through surface sorption. The complex interacting toxic effects of carbon nanotubes and organic contaminants in plants have received little attention in the literature to date. In this study, the toxicity of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 50 mg/L) and paraquat (MV, 0.82 mg/L), separately or in combination, were evaluated at the physiological and the proteomic level in Arabidopsis thaliana for 7-14 days. The results revealed that the exposure to MWCNT had no inhibitory effect on the growth of shoots and leaves. Rather, MWCNT stimulated the relative electron transport rate and the effective photochemical quantum yield of PSII value as compared to the control by around 12% and lateral root production up to nearly 4-fold as compared to the control. The protective effect of MWCNT on MV toxicity on the root surface area could be quantitatively explained by the extent of MV adsorption on MWCNT and was related to stimulation of photosynthesis, antioxidant protection and number and area of lateral roots which in turn helped nutrient assimilation. The influence of MWCNT and MV on photosynthesis and oxidative stress at the physiological level was consistent with the proteomics analysis, with various over-expressed photosynthesis-related proteins (by more than 2 folds) and various under-expressed oxidative stress related proteins (by about 2-3 folds). This study brings new insights into the interactive effects of two xenobiotics (MWCNT and MV) on the physiology of a model plant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An Arabidopsis thaliana methyltransferase Capable of Methylating Farnesoic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang,Y.; Yuan, J.; Ross, J.; Noel, J.; Pichersky, E.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of a new family of plant methyltransferases (MTs), named the SABATH family, that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to methylate a carboxyl moiety or a nitrogen-containing functional group on a diverse array of plant compounds. The Arabidopsis genome alone contains 24 distinct SABATH genes. To identify the catalytic specificities of members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we screened recombinantly expressed and purified enzymes with a large number of potential substrates. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g44860 encodes a protein with high catalytic specificity towards farnesoic acid (FA). Under steady-state conditions, this farnesoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (FAMT) exhibits K{sub M} values of 41 and 71 {mu}M for FA and SAM, respectively. A three-dimensional model of FAMT constructed based upon similarity to the experimentally determined structure of Clarkia breweri salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) suggests a reasonable model for FA recognition in the FAMT active site. In plants, the mRNA levels of At3g44860 increase in response to the exogenous addition of several compounds previously shown to induce plant defense responses at the transcriptional level. Although methyl farnesoate (MeFA) has not yet been detected in Arabidopsis, the presence of a FA-specific carboxyl methyltransferase in Arabidopsis capable of producing MeFA, an insect juvenile hormone made by some plants as a presumed defense against insect herbivory, suggests that MeFA or chemically similar compounds are likely to serve as new specialized metabolites in Arabidopsis.

  6. Glucose control of root growth direction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-07-01

    Directional growth of roots is a complex process that is modulated by various environmental signals. This work shows that presence of glucose (Glc) in the medium also extensively modulated seedling root growth direction. Glc modulation of root growth direction was dramatically enhanced by simultaneous brassinosteroid (BR) application. Glc enhanced BR receptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) endocytosis from plasma membrane to early endosomes. Glc-induced root deviation was highly enhanced in a PP2A-defective mutant, roots curl in naphthyl phthalamic acid 1-1 (rcn1-1) suggesting that there is a role of phosphatase in Glc-induced root-growth deviation. RCN1, therefore, acted as a link between Glc and the BR-signalling pathway. Polar auxin transport worked further downstream to BR in controlling Glc-induced root deviation response. Glc also affected other root directional responses such as root waving and coiling leading to altered root architecture. High light intensity mimicked the Glc-induced changes in root architecture that were highly reduced in Glc-signalling mutants. Thus, under natural environmental conditions, changing light flux in the environment may lead to enhanced Glc production/response and is a way to manipulate root architecture for optimized development via integrating several extrinsic and intrinsic signalling cues. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. RAD5A, RECQ4A, and MUS81 Have Specific Functions in Homologous Recombination and Define Different Pathways of DNA Repair in Arabidopsis thaliana[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannuss, Anja; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Suer, Stefanie; Hartung, Frank; Pacher, Michael; Puchta, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Complex DNA structures, such as double Holliday junctions and stalled replication forks, arise during DNA replication and DNA repair. Factors processing these intermediates include the endonuclease MUS81, helicases of the RecQ family, and the yeast SNF2 ATPase RAD5 and its Arabidopsis thaliana homolog RAD5A. By testing sensitivity of mutant plants to DNA-damaging agents, we defined the roles of these factors in Arabidopsis. rad5A recq4A and rad5A mus81 double mutants are more sensitive to cross-linking and methylating agents, showing that RAD5A is required for damage-induced DNA repair, independent of MUS81 and RECQ4A. The lethality of the recq4A mus81 double mutant indicates that MUS81 and RECQ4A also define parallel DNA repair pathways. The recq4A/mus81 lethality is suppressed by blocking homologous recombination (HR) through disruption of RAD51C, showing that RECQ4A and MUS81 are required for processing recombination-induced aberrant intermediates during replication. Thus, plants possess at least three different pathways to process DNA repair intermediates. We also examined HR-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair using recombination substrates with inducible site-specific DSBs: MUS81 and RECQ4A are required for efficient synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) but only to a small extent for single-strand annealing (SSA). Interestingly, RAD5A plays a significant role in SDSA but not in SSA. PMID:20971895

  8. RAD5A, RECQ4A, and MUS81 have specific functions in homologous recombination and define different pathways of DNA repair in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannuss, Anja; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Suer, Stefanie; Hartung, Frank; Pacher, Michael; Puchta, Holger

    2010-10-01

    Complex DNA structures, such as double Holliday junctions and stalled replication forks, arise during DNA replication and DNA repair. Factors processing these intermediates include the endonuclease MUS81, helicases of the RecQ family, and the yeast SNF2 ATPase RAD5 and its Arabidopsis thaliana homolog RAD5A. By testing sensitivity of mutant plants to DNA-damaging agents, we defined the roles of these factors in Arabidopsis. rad5A recq4A and rad5A mus81 double mutants are more sensitive to cross-linking and methylating agents, showing that RAD5A is required for damage-induced DNA repair, independent of MUS81 and RECQ4A. The lethality of the recq4A mus81 double mutant indicates that MUS81 and RECQ4A also define parallel DNA repair pathways. The recq4A/mus81 lethality is suppressed by blocking homologous recombination (HR) through disruption of RAD51C, showing that RECQ4A and MUS81 are required for processing recombination-induced aberrant intermediates during replication. Thus, plants possess at least three different pathways to process DNA repair intermediates. We also examined HR-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair using recombination substrates with inducible site-specific DSBs: MUS81 and RECQ4A are required for efficient synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) but only to a small extent for single-strand annealing (SSA). Interestingly, RAD5A plays a significant role in SDSA but not in SSA.

  9. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  10. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  11. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    The result of bio-test, using the resulting pigment mutant of C. reinhardtii 124y-1 showed that mutagenic activity was observed significantly in both Tekeli River and Pavlodar Oil Refinery in Kazakhstan; the waste water of the. Pavlodar Oil Refinery had high-toxicity while the water of the Tekeli River had medium-toxicity.

  12. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 25; Issue 1. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus fumigatus initiate infection in Phaseolus mungo in the presence of phaseo-linone; levamisole gives protection. Suchandra Sett Santosh K Mishra Kazia I Siddiqui. Articles Volume 25 Issue 1 March ...

  13. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  14. Flocculation phenomenon of a mutant flocculent Saccharomyces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flocculation phenomenon of a mutant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain: Effects of metal ions, sugars, temperature, pH, protein-denaturants and ... was in the early stationary growth phase, which coincided with glucose depletion in the batch fermentation for the production of ethanol from kitchen refuse medium.

  15. Mutant PTEN in Cancer : Worse Than Nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leslie, Nick R; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressors block the development of cancer and are often lost during tumor development. Papa et al. show that partial loss of normal PTEN tumor suppressor function can be compounded by additional disruption caused by the expression of inactive mutant PTEN protein. This has significant

  16. Fumarate and cytosolic pH as modulators of the synthesis or consumption of C(4) organic acids through NADP-malic enzyme in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Cintia Lucía; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Drincovich, María Fabiana; Gerrard Wheeler, Mariel Claudia

    2013-02-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a plant species that accumulates high levels of organic acids and uses them as carbon, energy and reducing power sources. Among the enzymes that metabolize these compounds, one of the most important ones is malic enzyme (ME). A. thaliana contains four malic enzymes (NADP-ME 1-4) to catalyze the reversible oxidative decarboxylation of malate in the presence of NADP. NADP-ME2 is the only one located in the cell cytosol of all Arabidopsis organs providing most of the total NADP-ME activity. In the present work, the regulation of this key enzyme by fumarate was investigated by kinetic assays, structural analysis and a site-directed mutagenesis approach. The final effect of this metabolite on NADP-ME2 forward activity not only depends on fumarate and substrate concentrations but also on the pH of the reaction medium. Fumarate produced an increase in NADP-ME2 activity by binding to an allosteric site. However at higher concentrations, fumarate caused a competitive inhibition, excluding the substrate malate from binding to the active site. The characterization of ME2-R115A mutant, which is not activated by fumarate, confirms this hypothesis. In addition, the reverse reaction (reductive carboxylation of pyruvate) is also modulated by fumarate, but in a different way. The results indicate pH-dependence of the fumarate modulation with opposite behavior on the two activities analyzed. Thereby, the coordinated action of fumarate over the direct and reverse reactions would allow a precise and specific modulation of the metabolic flux through this enzyme, leading to the synthesis or degradation of C(4) compounds under certain conditions. Thus, the physiological context might be exerting an accurate control of ME activity in planta, through changes in metabolite and substrate concentrations and cytosolic pH.

  17. GORDITA (AGL63) is a young paralog of the Arabidopsis thaliana B(sister) MADS box gene ABS (TT16) that has undergone neofunctionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Robert; Gramzow, Lydia; Melzer, Rainer; Theissen, Günter; Becker, Annette

    2010-09-01

    MIKC-type MADS domain proteins are key regulators of flower development in angiosperms. B(sister) genes constitute a clade with a close relationship to class B floral homeotic genes, and have been conserved for more than 300 million years. The loss-of-function phenotype of the A. thaliana B(sister) gene ABS is mild: mutants show reduced seed coloration and defects in endothelium development. This study focuses on GORDITA (GOA, formerly known as AGL63), the most closely related paralog of ABS in A. thaliana, which is thought to act redundantly with ABS. Phylogenetic trees reveal that the duplication leading to ABS and GOA occurred during diversification of the Brassicaceae, and further analyses show that GOA has evolved under relaxed selection pressure. The knockdown phenotype of GOA suggests a role for this gene in fruit longitudinal growth, while over-expression of GOA results in disorganized floral structure and addition of carpel-like features to sepals. Given the phylogeny and function of other B(sister) genes, our data suggest that GOA has evolved a new function as compared to ABS. Protein analysis reveals that the GOA-specific 'deviant' domain is required for protein dimerization, in contrast to other MIKC-type proteins that require the K domain for dimerization. Moreover, no shared protein interaction partners for ABS and GOA could be identified. Our experiments indicate that modification of a protein domain and a shift in expression pattern can lead to a novel gene function in a relatively short time, and highlight the molecular mechanism by which neofunctionalization following gene duplication can be achieved. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking. Results In this study, we report genome-scale transcript response diversity of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes originating from different geographical locations to non-freezing cold stress (10°C). To analyze the transcriptional response diversity, we initially compared transcriptome changes in all 10 ecotypes using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. In total 6061 transcripts were significantly cold regulated (p cold stress regulon genes. Significant numbers of non-synonymous amino acid changes were observed in the coding region of the CBF regulon genes. Considering the limited knowledge about regulatory interactions between transcription factors and their target genes in the model plant A. thaliana, we have adopted a powerful systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA) to construct an in-silico transcriptional regulatory network model during response to cold stress. The resulting regulatory network contained 1,275 nodes and 7,720 connections, with 178 transcription factors and 1,331 target genes. Conclusions A. thaliana ecotypes exhibit considerable variation in transcriptome level responses to non-freezing cold stress treatment. Ecotype specific transcripts and related gene ontology (GO) categories were identified to delineate natural variation of cold stress regulated differential gene expression in the model plant A. thaliana. The predicted regulatory network model was able to identify new ecotype specific transcription factors and their regulatory interactions, which might be crucial for their local geographic adaptation to cold temperature. Additionally, since the approach presented here is general, it could be adapted to study networks regulating

  19. dhm1, an Arabidopsis mutant with increased sensitivity to alkamides shows tumorous shoot development and enhanced lateral root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagio-Flores, Ramón; Ortiz-Castro, Randy; López-Bucio, José

    2013-04-01

    The control of cell division by growth regulators is critical to proper shoot and root development. Alkamides belong to a class of small lipid amides involved in plant morphogenetic processes, from which N-isobutyl decanamide is one of the most active compounds identified. This work describes the isolation and characterization of an N-isobutyl decanamide-hypersensitive (dhm1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). dhm1 seedlings grown in vitro develop disorganized tumorous tissue in petioles, leaves and stems. N-isobutyl decanamide treatment exacerbates the dhm1 phenotype resulting in widespread production of callus-like structures in the mutant. Together with these morphological alterations in shoot, dhm1 seedlings sustained increased lateral root formation and greater sensitivity to alkamides in the inhibition of primary root growth. The mutants also show reduced etiolation when grown in darkness. When grown in soil, adult dhm1 plants were characterized by reduced plant size, and decreased fertility. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutant phenotype segregates as a single recessive Mendelian trait. Developmental alterations in dhm1 were related to an enhanced expression of the cell division marker CycB1-uidA both in the shoot and root system, which correlated with altered expression of auxin and cytokinin responsive gene markers. Pharmacological inhibition of auxin transport decreased LR formation in WT and dhm1 seedlings in a similar manner, indicating that auxin transport is involved in the dhm1 root phenotype. These data show an important role of alkamide signaling in cell proliferation and plant architecture remodeling likely acting through the DHM1 protein.

  20. A Comprehensive Dataset of Genes with a Loss-of-Function Mutant Phenotype in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model plant, a curated dataset of Arabidopsis genes with mutant phenotypes remains to be established. A preliminary list published nine years ago in Plant Physiology is outdated, and genome-wide phenotype information remains difficult to obtain. We describe here a comprehensive dataset of 2,400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. Phenotype descriptions were gathered primarily from manual curation of the scientific literature. Genes were placed into prioritized groups (essential, morphological, cellular-biochemical, and conditional) based on the documented phenotypes of putative knockout alleles. Phenotype classes (e.g. vegetative, reproductive, and timing, for the morphological group) and subsets (e.g. flowering time, senescence, circadian rhythms, and miscellaneous, for the timing class) were also established. Gene identities were classified as confirmed (through molecular complementation or multiple alleles) or not confirmed. Relationships between mutant phenotype and protein function, genetic redundancy, protein connectivity, and subcellular protein localization were explored. A complementary dataset of 401 genes that exhibit a mutant phenotype only when disrupted in combination with a putative paralog was also compiled. The importance of these genes in confirming functional redundancy and enhancing the value of single gene datasets is discussed. With further input and curation from the Arabidopsis community, these datasets should help to address a variety of important biological questions, provide a foundation for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype in angiosperms, enhance the utility of Arabidopsis as a reference plant, and facilitate comparative studies with model genetic organisms. PMID:22247268

  1. Physiological role of AOX1a in photosynthesis and maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis under high light in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Bashyam, Leena; Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian; Scheibe, Renate; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2014-08-01

    As plants are sessile, they often face high light (HL) stress that causes damage of the photosynthetic machinery leading to decreased photosynthesis. The importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) in optimizing photosynthesis is well documented. In the present study, the role of AOX in sustaining photosynthesis under HL was studied using AOX1a knockout mutants (aox1a) of Arabidopsis thaliana. Under growth light (GL; 50 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) conditions, aox1a plants did not show any changes in photosynthetic parameters, NAD(P)/H redox ratios, or respiratory O2 uptake when compared to wild-type (WT). Upon exposure to HL (700 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), respiratory rates did not vary between WT and aox1a. But, photosynthetic parameters related to photosystem II (PSII) and NaHCO3 dependent O2 evolution decreased, while the P700 reduction state increased in aox1a compared to WT. Further, under HL, the redox state of cellular NAD(P)/H pools increased with concomitant rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in aox1a compared to WT. In presence of HL, the transcript levels of several genes related to antioxidant, malate-oxaloacetate (malate-OAA) shuttle, photorespiratory and respiratory enzymes was higher in aox1a compared to WT. Taken together, these results demonstrate that under HL, in spite of significant increase in transcript levels of several genes mentioned above to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and minimize ROS production, Arabidopsis plants deficient in AOX1a were unable to sustain photosynthesis as is the case in WT plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Variation in the Subcellular Localization and Protein Folding Activity among Arabidopsis thaliana Homologs of Protein Disulfide Isomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christen Y. L. Yuen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs catalyze the formation, breakage, and rearrangement of disulfide bonds to properly fold nascent polypeptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Classical animal and yeast PDIs possess two catalytic thioredoxin-like domains (a, a′ and two non-catalytic domains (b, b′, in the order a-b-b′-a′. The model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, encodes 12 PDI-like proteins, six of which possess the classical PDI domain arrangement (AtPDI1 through AtPDI6. Three additional AtPDIs (AtPDI9, AtPDI10, AtPDI11 possess two thioredoxin domains, but without intervening b-b′ domains. C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP fusions to each of the nine dual-thioredoxin PDI homologs localized predominantly to the ER lumen when transiently expressed in protoplasts. Additionally, expression of AtPDI9:GFP-KDEL and AtPDI10: GFP-KDDL was associated with the formation of ER bodies. AtPDI9, AtPDI10, and AtPDI11 mediated the oxidative folding of alkaline phosphatase when heterologously expressed in the Escherichia coli protein folding mutant, dsbA−. However, only three classical AtPDIs (AtPDI2, AtPDI5, AtPDI6 functionally complemented dsbA−. Interestingly, chemical inducers of the ER unfolded protein response were previously shown to upregulate most of the AtPDIs that complemented dsbA−. The results indicate that Arabidopsis PDIs differ in their localization and protein folding activities to fulfill distinct molecular functions in the ER.

  3. pKAMA-ITACHI Vectors for Highly Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Knockout in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hiroki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9) system is widely used as a tool for genome engineering in various organisms. A complex consisting of Cas9 and single guide RNA (sgRNA) induces a DNA double-strand break in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in knockout. Some binary vectors for CRISPR/Cas9 in plants have been reported, but there is a problem with low efficiency. Here, we present a newly developed, highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9 vector for Arabidopsis thaliana, pKAMA-ITACHI Red (pKIR), harboring the RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S5 A (RPS5A) promoter to drive Cas9. The RPS5A promoter maintains high constitutive expression at all developmental stages starting from the egg cell and including meristematic cells. Even in the T1 generation, pKIR induced null phenotypes in some genes: PHYTOENE DESATURASE 3 (PDS3), AGAMOUS (AG) and DUO POLLEN 1 (DUO1). Mutations induced by pKIR were carried in the germ cell line of the T1 generation. Surprisingly, in some lines, 100% of the T2 plants had the adh1 (ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE 1) null phenotype, indicating that pKIR strongly induced heritable mutations. Cas9-free T2 mutant plants were obtained by removing T2 seeds expressing a fluorescent marker in pKIR. Our results suggest that the pKIR system is a powerful molecular tool for genome engineering in Arabidopsis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  4. Clustering and Differential Alignment Algorithm: Identification of Early Stage Regulators in the Arabidopsis thaliana Iron Deficiency Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koryachko, Alexandr; Matthiadis, Anna; Muhammad, Durreshahwar; Foret, Jessica; Brady, Siobhan M; Ducoste, Joel J; Tuck, James; Long, Terri A; Williams, Cranos

    2015-01-01

    Time course transcriptome datasets are commonly used to predict key gene regulators associated with stress responses and to explore gene functionality. Techniques developed to extract causal relationships between genes from high throughput time course expression data are limited by low signal levels coupled with noise and sparseness in time points. We deal with these limitations by proposing the Cluster and Differential Alignment Algorithm (CDAA). This algorithm was designed to process transcriptome data by first grouping genes based on stages of activity and then using similarities in gene expression to predict influential connections between individual genes. Regulatory relationships are assigned based on pairwise alignment scores generated using the expression patterns of two genes and some inferred delay between the regulator and the observed activity of the target. We applied the CDAA to an iron deficiency time course microarray dataset to identify regulators that influence 7 target transcription factors known to participate in the Arabidopsis thaliana iron deficiency response. The algorithm predicted that 7 regulators previously unlinked to iron homeostasis influence the expression of these known transcription factors. We validated over half of predicted influential relationships using qRT-PCR expression analysis in mutant backgrounds. One predicted regulator-target relationship was shown to be a direct binding interaction according to yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) analysis. These results serve as a proof of concept emphasizing the utility of the CDAA for identifying unknown or missing nodes in regulatory cascades, providing the fundamental knowledge needed for constructing predictive gene regulatory networks. We propose that this tool can be used successfully for similar time course datasets to extract additional information and infer reliable regulatory connections for individual genes.

  5. Characterization of a small auxin-up RNA (SAUR-like gene involved in Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Nektarios Markakis

    Full Text Available The root of Arabidopsis thaliana is used as a model system to unravel the molecular nature of cell elongation and its arrest. From a micro-array performed on roots that were treated with aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, the precursor of ethylene, a Small auxin-up RNA (SAUR-like gene was found to be up regulated. As it appeared as the 76th gene in the family, it was named SAUR76. Root and leaf growth of overexpression lines ectopically expressing SAUR76 indicated the possible involvement of the gene in the division process. Using promoter::GUS and GFP lines strong expression was seen in endodermal and pericycle cells at the end of the elongation zone and during several stages of lateral root primordia development. ACC and IAA/NAA were able to induce a strong up regulation of the gene and changed the expression towards cortical and even epidermal cells at the beginning of the elongation zone. Confirmation of this up regulation of expression was delivered using qPCR, which also indicated that the expression quickly returned to normal levels when the inducing IAA-stimulus was removed, a behaviour also seen in other SAUR genes. Furthermore, confocal analysis of protein-GFP fusions localized the protein in the nucleus, cytoplasm and plasma membrane. SAUR76 expression was quantified in several mutants in ethylene and auxin-related pathways, which led to the conclusion that the expression of SAUR76 is mainly regulated by the increase in auxin that results from the addition of ACC, rather than by ACC itself.

  6. ABA signaling is necessary but not sufficient for RD29B transcriptional memory during successive dehydration stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virlouvet, Laetitia; Ding, Yong; Fujii, Hiroaki; Avramova, Zoya; Fromm, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Plants subjected to a prior dehydration stress were seen to have altered transcriptional responses during a subsequent dehydration stress for up to 5 days after the initial stress. The abscisic acid (ABA) inducible RD29B gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was strongly induced after the first stress and displayed transcriptional memory with transcript levels nine-fold higher during the second dehydration stress. These increased transcript levels were due to an increased rate of transcription and are associated with an altered chromatin template during the recovery interval between the dehydration stresses. Here we use a combination of promoter deletion/substitutions, mutants in the trans-acting transcription factors and their upstream protein kinases, and treatments with exogenous ABA or dehydration stress to advance our understanding of the features required for transcriptional memory of RD29B. ABA Response Elements (ABREs) are sufficient to confer transcriptional memory on a minimal promoter, although there is a context effect from flanking sequences. Different mutations in Snf1 Related Protein Kinase 2 (SnRK2) genes positively and negatively affected the response, suggesting that this effect is important for transcriptional memory. Although exogenous ABA treatments could prime transcriptional memory, a second ABA treatment was not sufficient to activate transcriptional memory. Therefore, we concluded that transcriptional memory requires ABA and an ABA-independent factor that is induced or activated by a subsequent dehydration stress and directly or indirectly results in a more active RD29B chromatin template. These results advance our knowledge of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are required for transcriptional memory of RD29B. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  8. A transcriptional analysis of carotenoid, chlorophyll and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis genes during development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallabhaneni Ratnakar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The carotenoids are pure isoprenoids that are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus and are coordinately synthesized with chlorophylls in chloroplasts. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis or the mechanisms that coordinate this synthesis with that of chlorophylls and other plastidial synthesized isoprenoid-derived compounds, including quinones, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Here, a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of individual carotenoid and isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes was performed in order to elucidate the role of transcriptional regulation in the coordinated synthesis of these compounds and to identify regulatory components that may mediate this process in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results A global microarray expression correlation analysis revealed that the phytoene synthase gene, which encodes the first dedicated and rate-limiting enzyme of carotenogenesis, is highly co-expressed with many photosynthesis-related genes including many isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes. Chemical and mutant analysis revealed that induction of the co-expressed genes following germination was dependent on gibberellic acid and brassinosteroids (BR but was inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA. Mutant analyses further revealed that expression of many of the genes is suppressed in dark grown plants by Phytochrome Interacting transcription Factors (PIFs and activated by photoactivated phytochromes, which in turn degrade PIFs and mediate a coordinated induction of the genes. The promoters of PSY and the co-expressed genes were found to contain an enrichment in putative BR-auxin response elements and G-boxes, which bind PIFs, further supporting a role for BRs and PIFs in regulating expression of the genes. In osmotically stressed root tissue, transcription of Calvin cycle, methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and carotenoid biosynthesis genes is induced

  9. Small RNA deep sequencing reveals role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-dependent RNA polymerases in viral siRNA biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Qi

    Full Text Available RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV-Cg and Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, we analyzed the viral small RNA profile in wild-type plants as well as rdr mutants by applying small RNA deep sequencing technology. Over 100,000 TMV-Cg-specific small RNA reads, mostly of 21- (78.4% and 22-nucleotide (12.9% in size and originating predominately (79.9% from the genomic sense RNA strand, were captured at an early infection stage, yielding the first high-resolution small RNA map for a plant virus. The TMV-Cg genome harbored multiple, highly reproducible small RNA-generating hot spots that corresponded to regions with no apparent local hairpin-forming capacity. Significantly, both the rdr1 and rdr6 mutants exhibited globally reduced levels of viral small RNA production as well as reduced strand bias in viral small RNA population, revealing an important role for these host RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis. In addition, an informatics analysis showed that a large set of host genes could be potentially targeted by TMV-Cg-derived siRNAs for posttranscriptional silencing. Two of such predicted host targets, which encode a cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30 and an unknown protein similar to translocon-associated protein alpha (TRAP alpha, respectively, yielded a positive result in cleavage validation by 5'RACE assays. Our data raised the interesting possibility for viral siRNA-mediated virus-host interactions that may contribute to viral pathogenicity and host specificity.

  10. A transcriptional analysis of carotenoid, chlorophyll and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis genes during development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2011-05-19

    Background: The carotenoids are pure isoprenoids that are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus and are coordinately synthesized with chlorophylls in chloroplasts. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis or the mechanisms that coordinate this synthesis with that of chlorophylls and other plastidial synthesized isoprenoid-derived compounds, including quinones, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Here, a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of individual carotenoid and isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes was performed in order to elucidate the role of transcriptional regulation in the coordinated synthesis of these compounds and to identify regulatory components that may mediate this process in Arabidopsis thaliana.Results: A global microarray expression correlation analysis revealed that the phytoene synthase gene, which encodes the first dedicated and rate-limiting enzyme of carotenogenesis, is highly co-expressed with many photosynthesis-related genes including many isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes. Chemical and mutant analysis revealed that induction of the co-expressed genes following germination was dependent on gibberellic acid and brassinosteroids (BR) but was inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA). Mutant analyses further revealed that expression of many of the genes is suppressed in dark grown plants by Phytochrome Interacting transcription Factors (PIFs) and activated by photoactivated phytochromes, which in turn degrade PIFs and mediate a coordinated induction of the genes. The promoters of PSY and the co-expressed genes were found to contain an enrichment in putative BR-auxin response elements and G-boxes, which bind PIFs, further supporting a role for BRs and PIFs in regulating expression of the genes. In osmotically stressed root tissue, transcription of Calvin cycle, methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and carotenoid biosynthesis genes is induced and uncoupled from that of

  11. Generation of a Collection of Mutant Tomato Lines Using Pooled CRISPR Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Thomas B; Zhang, Ning; Patel, Dhruv; Martin, Gregory B

    2017-08-01

    The high efficiency of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-mediated mutagenesis in plants enables the development of high-throughput mutagenesis strategies. By transforming pooled CRISPR libraries into tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ), collections of mutant lines were generated with minimal transformation attempts and in a relatively short period of time. Identification of the targeted gene(s) was easily determined by sequencing the incorporated guide RNA(s) in the primary transgenic events. From a single transformation with a CRISPR library targeting the immunity-associated leucine-rich repeat subfamily XII genes, heritable mutations were recovered in 15 of the 54 genes targeted. To increase throughput, a second CRISPR library was made containing three guide RNAs per construct to target 18 putative transporter genes. This resulted in stable mutations in 15 of the 18 targeted genes, with some primary transgenic plants having as many as five mutated genes. Furthermore, the redundancy in this collection of plants allowed for the association of aberrant T0 phenotypes with the underlying targeted genes. Plants with mutations in a homolog of an Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) boron efflux transporter displayed boron deficiency phenotypes. The strategy described here provides a technically simple yet high-throughput approach for generating a collection of lines with targeted mutations and should be applicable to any plant transformation system. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Fibrinolytic Activity of Recombinant Mutant Streptokinase

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    Mahboobeh Mobarrez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptokinase is a bacterial protein produced by different beta hemolytic streptococci and widely used in thrombolytic treatment. The main disadvantage of using streptokinase is antibody formation which causes allergic reaction to neutralize effects of streptokinase therapy. Aim of this study was investigate of recombinant mutant streptokinase fibrinolytic activity.Materials and Methods: In this study recombinant mutant streptokinase without 42 amino acids from the C terminal region was purified by affinity S-Tag column chromatography and its fibrinolytic activity was studied.Results: The concentration of expressed and purified protein was 10 mg/ml. Its enzyme activity was assayed using zymography, radial caseinolytic activity and fibrin plate test methods and estimated quantitatively by casein digestion method compared to a commercial form.Conclusion: It was found that this product had the more volume and more enzymatic activity.

  13. Characterization of a Legionella micdadei mip mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, W A; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella micdadei is dependent upon its ability to infect alveolar phagocytes. To better understand the basis of intracellular infection by this organism, we examined the importance of its Mip surface protein. In Legionella pneumophila, Mip promotes infection of both human m...... Mip. Although unimpaired in its ability to grow in bacteriologic media, this Mip mutant was defective in its capacity to infect U937 cells, a human macrophage-like cell line. Most significantly, the Mip- organism displayed a 24-fold reduction in survivability immediately after its entry...... into the phagocyte. Similarly, the mutant was less able to parasitize Hartmannella amoebae. Taken together, these data argue that Mip specifically potentiates intracellular growth by L. micdadei....

  14. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Katrin; Bhide, Amey S; Tekleyohans, Dawit G; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J; Becker, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner.

  15. Transcriptome analysis by GeneTrail revealed regulation of functional categories in response to alterations of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenhof Hans-Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput technologies have opened new avenues to study biological processes and pathways. The interpretation of the immense amount of data sets generated nowadays needs to be facilitated in order to enable biologists to identify complex gene networks and functional pathways. To cope with this task multiple computer-based programs have been developed. GeneTrail is a freely available online tool that screens comparative transcriptomic data for differentially regulated functional categories and biological pathways extracted from common data bases like KEGG, Gene Ontology (GO, TRANSPATH and TRANSFAC. Additionally, GeneTrail offers a feature that allows screening of individually defined biological categories that are relevant for the respective research topic. Results We have set up GeneTrail for the use of Arabidopsis thaliana. To test the functionality of this tool for plant analysis, we generated transcriptome data of root and leaf responses to Fe deficiency and the Arabidopsis metal homeostasis mutant nas4x-1. We performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA with eight meaningful pairwise comparisons of transcriptome data sets. We were able to uncover several functional pathways including metal homeostasis that were affected in our experimental situations. Representation of the differentially regulated functional categories in Venn diagrams uncovered regulatory networks at the level of whole functional pathways. Over-Representation Analysis (ORA of differentially regulated genes identified in pairwise comparisons revealed specific functional plant physiological categories as major targets upon Fe deficiency and in nas4x-1. Conclusion Here, we obtained supporting evidence, that the nas4x-1 mutant was defective in metal homeostasis. It was confirmed that nas4x-1 showed Fe deficiency in roots and signs of Fe deficiency and Fe sufficiency in leaves. Besides metal homeostasis, biotic stress, root carbohydrate, leaf

  16. A new neurological rat mutant "mutilated foot".

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, J M; Scaravilli, F; Duchen, L W; Mertin, J

    1981-01-01

    A new autosomal recessive mutant rat (mutilated foot) with a neurological disorder is described. Affected animals become ataxic and the feet, generally of the hind limbs, are mutilated. Quantitative studies show a severe reduction in numbers of sensory ganglion cells and fibres, including unmyelinated fibres. The numbers of ventral root fibres, particularly those of small diameter, are also reduced. Markedly decreased numbers of spindles are found in the limb muscles. These quantitative abnor...

  17. Courtship song analysis of Drosophila muscle mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Samya; Wajda, Mathew P; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2012-01-01

    As part of the mating ritual, males of Drosophila species produce species-specific courtship songs through wing vibrations generated by the thoracic musculature. While previous studies have shown that indirect flight muscles (IFM) are neurally activated during courtship song production, the precise role of these muscles in song production has not been investigated. Fortunately, IFM mutants abound in Drosophila melanogaster and studies spanning several decades have shed light on the role of muscle proteins in IFM-powered flight. Analysis of courtship songs in these mutants offers the opportunity to uncover the role of the IFM in a behavior distinct than flight and subject to different evolutionary selection regimes. Here, we describe protocols for the recording and analysis of courtship behavior and mating song of D. melanogaster muscle transgenic and mutant strains. To record faint acoustic signal of courtship songs, an insulated mating compartment was used inside a recording device (INSECTAVOX) equipped with a modified electret microphone, a low-noise power supply, and noise filters. Songs recorded in the INSECTAVOX are digitized using Goldwave, whose several features enable extraction of critical song parameters, including carrier frequencies for pulse song and sine song. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by showing that deletion of the N-terminal region of the myosin regulatory light chain, a mutation known to decrease wing beat frequency and flight power, affects courtship song parameters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Variation in seed dormancy quantitative trait loci in Arabidopsis thaliana originating from one site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silady, R.A.; Effgen, S.; Koornneef, M.; Reymond, M.

    2011-01-01

    A Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis was performed using two novel Recombinant Inbred Line (RIL) populations, derived from the progeny between two Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes collected at the same site in Kyoto (Japan) crossed with the reference laboratory strain Landsberg erecta (Ler). We

  19. Study of natural variation for Zn deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campos, A.C.A.L.

    2015-01-01

    English summary Zinc is an important structural component and co-factor of proteins in all living organisms. The model plant species for genetic and molecular studies, Arabidopsis thaliana, expresses more than 2,000 proteins with one or more Zn binding domains. Low Zn availability

  20. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation & Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li, Meichao [Research Center of Analysis and Measurement, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Wen, Yuezhong, E-mail: wenyuezhong@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation & Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-04-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides. - Highlights: • It is necessary to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis. • Phytotoxicity of bromacil is investigated in an enantiomeric level. • Bromacil disturbed enantioselectively the photosystem II of Arabidopsis thaliana. • S-bromacil caused severer damage to photosynthesis of Arabidopsis than R-bromacil. • Photosynthesis should be considered for phytotoxicity assessment of herbicides.

  1. A class V chitinase from Arabidopsis thaliana: gene responses, enzymatic properties, and crystallographic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Numata, Tomoyuki; Osawa, Takuo

    2011-01-01

    Expression of a class V chitinase gene (At4g19810, AtChiC) in Arabidopsis thaliana was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and by analyzing microarray data available at Genevestigator. The gene expression was induced by the plant stress-related hormones abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (J...

  2. A composite transcriptional signature differentiates responses towards closely related herbicides in Arabidopsis thaliana and brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, genome-wide expression profiling based on Affymetrix ATH1 arrays was used to identify discriminating responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to five herbicides, which contain active ingredients targeting two different branches of amino acid biosynthesis. One herbicide co...

  3. Supermolecular organization of photosystem II and its associated light-harvesting antenna in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakushevska, AE; Jensen, PE; Keegstra, W; van Roon, H; Scheller, HV; Boekema, EJ; Dekker, JP; Yakushevska, Alevtyna E.; Jensen, Poul E.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Dekker, Jan P.

    2001-01-01

    The organization of Arabidopsis thaliana photosystem II (PSII) and its associated light-harvesting antenna (LHCII) was studied in isolated PSII-LHCII supercomplexes and native membrane-bound crystals by transmission electron microscopy and image analysis. Over 4000 single-particle projections of

  4. In Arabidopsis thaliana codon volatility scores reflect GC3 composition rather than selective pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Mary J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synonymous codon usage bias has typically been correlated with, and attributed to translational efficiency. However, there are other pressures on genomic sequence composition that can affect codon usage patterns such as mutational biases. This study provides an analysis of the codon usage patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana in relation to gene expression levels, codon volatility, mutational biases and selective pressures. Results We have performed synonymous codon usage and codon volatility analyses for all genes in the A. thaliana genome. In contrast to reports for species from other kingdoms, we find that neither codon usage nor volatility are correlated with selection pressure (as measured by dN/dS, nor with gene expression levels on a genome wide level. Our results show that codon volatility and usage are not synonymous, rather that they are correlated with the abundance of G and C at the third codon position (GC3. Conclusions Our results indicate that while the A. thaliana genome shows evidence for synonymous codon usage bias, this is not related to the expression levels of its constituent genes. Neither codon volatility nor codon usage are correlated with expression levels or selective pressures but, because they are directly related to the composition of G and C at the third codon position, they are the result of mutational bias. Therefore, in A. thaliana codon volatility and usage do not result from selection for translation efficiency or protein functional shift as measured by positive selection.

  5. Alleviation of Copper Toxicity in Arabidopsis Thaliana and Zinnia Elegans by Silicon Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the role of silicon in plants has been studied for over 150 years, and this element can mitigate the effects of certain heavy metals, its role in Cu metabolism is unclear. Therefore, the role of Si in plant response to Cu stress was investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heyn) and Zinnia el...

  6. Modelling the molecular interactions in the flower developmental network of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, K.; Nagasaki, M.; Jáuregui., R.

    2010-01-01

    We present a dynamical model of the gene network controlling flower development in Arabidopsis thaliana. The network is centered at the regulation of the floral organ identity genes (AP1, AP2, AP3, PI and AG) and ends with the transcription factor complexes responsible for differentiation of floral

  7. Biochemical and genetic characterization of three molybdenum cofactor hydroxylases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Tine; Frandsen, Gitte Inselmann; Rocher, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases and xanthine dehydrogenases/oxidases belong to the molybdenum cofactor dependent hydroxylase class of enzymes. Zymograms show that Arabidopsis thaliana has at least three different aldehyde oxidases and one xanthine oxidase. Three different cDNA clones encoding putative aldehyde...

  8. Genome-wide analysis of local chromatin packing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congmao; Roqueiro, Damian; Grimm, Dominik; Schwab, Rebecca; Becker, Claude; Lanz, Christa

    2015-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of interphase chromosomes in the nucleus is important for gene expression and genome function in animals and in plants. The recently developed Hi-C technology is an efficacious method to investigate genome packing. Here we present a detailed Hi-C map of the three-dimensional genome organization of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We find that local chromatin packing differs from the patterns seen in animals, with kilobasepair-sized segments that have much higher intrachromosome interaction rates than neighboring regions, representing a dominant local structural feature of genome conformation in A. thaliana. These regions, which appear as positive strips on two-dimensional representations of chromatin interaction, are enriched in epigenetic marks H3K27me3, H3.1, and H3.3. We also identify more than 400 insulator-like regions. Furthermore, although topologically associating domains (TADs), which are prominent in animals, are not an obvious feature of A. thaliana genome packing, we found more than 1000 regions that have properties of TAD boundaries, and a similar number of regions analogous to the interior of TADs. The insulator-like, TAD-boundary-like, and TAD-interior-like regions are each enriched for distinct epigenetic marks and are each correlated with different gene expression levels. We conclude that epigenetic modifications, gene density, and transcriptional activity combine to shape the local packing of the A. thaliana nuclear genome. PMID:25367294

  9. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely...

  10. Subcellular localization and oligomerization of the Arabidopsis thaliana somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase 1 protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, K.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Erp, van H.; Hecht, V.; Vries, de S.C.

    2001-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase 1 (AtSERK1) gene is expressed in developing ovules and early embryos. AtSERK1 is also transiently expressed during somatic embryogenesis. The predicted AtSERK1 protein contains an extracellular domain with a leucine zipper motif followed

  11. Subcellular localization and oligomerization of the Aradopsis thaliana somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase 1 protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, K.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; van Erp, H.; Hecht, V.; de Vries, S.C.

    2001-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase 1 (AtSERK1) gene is expressed in developing ovules and early embryos. AtSERK1 is also transiently expressed during somatic embryogenesis. The predicted AtSERK1 protein contains an extracellular domain with a leucine zipper motif followed

  12. Metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, Elias; Morales Sierra, Alejandro; Harbinson, Jeremy; Heuvelink, Ep; Prinzenberg, Aina E.; Marcelis, Leo F.M.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance can help identify targets for improving crop yields. We used different genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to characterise the importance of Rubisco activase (Rca), stomatal conductance

  13. The regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana lateral root development by redundant PLETHORA transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Y.

    2017-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, lateral roots (LRs) initiate acropetally and their dynamic development forms the basis on which root system architecture is elaborated. This thesis work focuses on revealing the underlying molecular network of how redundant PLETHORA (PLT) genes, encode APETALA2 (AP2)-domain

  14. Differentially expressed genes associated with dormancy or germination of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorop, P.E.; Barroco, R.M.; Engler, G.; Groot, S.P.C.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Differential display analysis using dormant and non-dormant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh seeds resulted in a set of genes that were associated with either dormancy or germination. Expression of the germination-associated genes AtRPL36B and AtRPL27B, encoding two ribosomal proteins, was

  15. Impact of elevated CO2 on growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana L

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, T.A W; De Kok, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    After germination, Arabidopsis thaliana L (cv. Landsberg) was grown at 350 mu l l(-1) (control) or 700 mu l l(-1) (elevated) CO2. Total shoot biomass at the end of the vegetative growth period was increased by 56% due to a short transient stimulation of the relative growth rate by elevated CO2 at

  16. Coronatine-Insensitive 1 (COI1) Mediates Transcriptional Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to External Potassium Supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armengaud, Patrick; Breitling, Rainer; Amtmann, Anna

    The ability to adjust growth and development to the availability of mineral nutrients in the soil is an essential life skill of plants but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In Arabidopsis thaliana, shortage of potassium (K) induces a number of genes related to the phytohormone

  17. Genome-wide computational function prediction of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins by integration of multiple data sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourmpetis, Y.I.A.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Although Arabidopsis thaliana is the best studied plant species, the biological role of one third of its proteins is still unknown. We developed a probabilistic protein function prediction method that integrates information from sequences, protein-protein interactions and gene expression. The method

  18. Contribution of the cytochrome and alternative pathways to growth respiration and maintenance respiration in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florez-Sarasa, I.D.; Bouma, T.J.; Medrano, H.; Azcon-Bieto, J.; Ribas-Carbo, M.

    2007-01-01

    The activities of the cytochrome and alternative respiratory pathways were measured during the growth cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana using a newly developed Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) dual-inlet system that allows very precise measurements of oxygen-isotope fractionation under low oxygen

  19. ATAF1 transcription factor directly regulates abscisic acid biosynthetic gene NCED3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Lindemose, Søren; De Masi, Federico

    2013-01-01

    ATAF1, an Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factor, plays important roles in plant adaptation to environmental stress and development. To search for ATAF1 target genes, we used protein binding microarrays and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP). This identified T[A,C,G]CGT[A,G] and TT...

  20. Downy mildew of Arabidopsis thaliana caused by Hyaloperonospora parasitica (formerly Peronospora parasitica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusarenko, Alan J; Schlaich, Nikolaus L

    2003-05-01

    SUMMARY Downy mildew of Arabidopsis is not a hugely destructive disease of an important crop plant, neither is it of any economic importance. The most obvious symptom, the aerial conidiophores, might, at a glance to the casual observer, be mistaken for the trichomes normally present on the leaves. However, a huge research effort is being devoted to this humble pathosystem which became established as a laboratory model in the 1990s. Since then, enormous progress has been made in cloning and characterizing major genes for resistance (RPP genes) and in defining many of their downstream signalling components, some of them RPP-gene specific. Resistance is generally associated with an oxidative burst and a salicylic acid dependent hypersensitive reaction type of programmed cell death. Biological and chemical induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis protecting against downy mildew were demonstrated early on, and investigations of mutants have contributed fundamentally to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the mechanisms of plant defence. This review will attempt to collate the wealth of information which has accrued with this pathosystem in the last decade and will attempt to predict future research directions by drawing attention to some still unanswered questions. Hyaloperonospora Constant. parasitica (Pers.:Fr) Fr. (formerly Peronospora parasitica), Kingdom Chromista, Phylum Oomycota, Order Peronosporales, Family Peronosporaceae, Genus Hyaloperonospora, of which it is the type species. The taxonomy of the group of organisms causing downy mildew of brassicas has undergone a number of revisions since Corda (1837) originally coined the genus Peronospora. All isolates pathogenic on brassicas were described initially as P. parasitica but Gäumann (1918) classified isolates from different brassicaceous hosts distinctly and thus defined 52 new species based on conidial dimensions and host range. After much debate it was decided to revert

  1. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mutants that fail to bind to plant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, J L; Colby, S; Matthysse, A G

    1990-01-01

    Transposon insertion mutants of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were screened to obtain mutant bacteria that failed to bind to carrot suspension culture cells. A light microscope binding assay was used. The bacterial isolates that were reduced in binding to carrot cells were all avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana leaves and on carrot root disks. The mutants did not appear to be altered in cellulose production. The composition of the medium affected the ability of the parent and mutant bacteria ...

  2. Two Nucleolar Proteins, GDP1 and OLI2, Function As Ribosome Biogenesis Factors and Are Preferentially Involved in Promotion of Leaf Cell Proliferation without Strongly Affecting Leaf Adaxial–Abaxial Patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Kojima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf abaxial–adaxial patterning is dependent on the mutual repression of leaf polarity genes expressed either adaxially or abaxially. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this process is strongly affected by mutations in ribosomal protein genes and in ribosome biogenesis genes in a sensitized genetic background, such as asymmetric leaves2 (as2. Most ribosome-related mutants by themselves do not show leaf abaxialization, and one of their typical phenotypes is the formation of pointed rather than rounded leaves. In this study, we characterized two ribosome-related mutants to understand how ribosome biogenesis is linked to several aspects of leaf development. Previously, we isolated oligocellula2 (oli2 which exhibits the pointed-leaf phenotype and has a cell proliferation defect. OLI2 encodes a homolog of Nop2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a ribosome biogenesis factor involved in pre-60S subunit maturation. In this study, we found another pointed-leaf mutant that carries a mutation in a gene encoding an uncharacterized protein with a G-patch domain. Similar to oli2, this mutant, named g-patch domain protein1 (gdp1, has a reduced number of leaf cells. In addition, gdp1 oli2 double mutants showed a strong genetic interaction such that they synergistically impaired cell proliferation in leaves and produced markedly larger cells. On the other hand, they showed additive phenotypes when combined with several known ribosomal protein mutants. Furthermore, these mutants have a defect in pre-rRNA processing. GDP1 and OLI2 are strongly expressed in tissues with high cell proliferation activity, and GDP1-GFP and GFP-OLI2 are localized in the nucleolus. These results suggest that OLI2 and GDP1 are involved in ribosome biogenesis. We then examined the effects of gdp1 and oli2 on adaxial–abaxial patterning by crossing them with as2. Interestingly, neither gdp1 nor oli2 strongly enhanced the leaf polarity defect of as2. Similar results were obtained with as2 gdp1 oli2

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Sexual Sporulation Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, K.; Heemst, van D.; Slakhorst, M.; Debets, A.J.M.; Heyting, C.

    2001-01-01

    For the genetic dissection of sexual sporulation in Aspergillus nidulans, we started a collection of ascosporeless mutants. After mutagenization of conidiospores with high doses of UV, we isolated 20 mutants with defects in ascospore formation. We crossed these mutants in two successive rounds with

  4. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Contreras, R; Lira-Silva, E; Jasso-Chávez, R; Hernández-González, I.L.; Maeda, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Boogerd, F.C.; Sheng, L; Wood, TK; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed

  5. Strain improvement in dye decolourising mutants of Mucor mucedo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... The amounts of protoplasts obtained in the developed mutants of M. mucedo MMM1 (U.V. irradiated mutant) and MMM2 (ethyl methyl sulfonate treated mutant) which are very effective decolourisers were. 5.23 x 106 and 5.65 x 106 protoplasts/ml respectively. Among the 385 colonies isolated after ...

  6. Characterization of a novel curled-cotyledons mutant in soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... some organelles degradation, and membranous multilamellar appear at different stages. Protein and amino acid contents in seeds of mutant are higher than those of the wild type, especially methionine and cysteine. These results suggest that the curled-cotyledons mutant is a novel cotyledon development mutant, which ...

  7. Gene Regulatory Network for Tapetum Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In flowering plants, male gametophyte development occurs in the anther. Tapetum, the innermost of the four anther somatic layers, surrounds the developing reproductive cells to provide materials for pollen development. A genetic pathway of DYT1-TDF1-AMS-MS188 in regulating tapetum development has been proven. Here we used laser microdissection and pressure catapulting to capture and analyze the transcriptome data for the Arabidopsis tapetum at two stages. With a comprehensive analysis by the microarray data of dyt1, tdf1, ams, and ms188 mutants, we identified possible downstream genes for each transcription factor. These transcription factors regulate many biological processes in addition to activating the expression of the other transcription factor. Briefly, DYT1 may also regulate early tapetum development via E3 ubiquitin ligases and many other transcription factors. TDF1 is likely involved in redox and cell degradation. AMS probably regulates lipid transfer proteins, which are involved in pollen wall formation, and other E3 ubiquitin ligases, functioning in degradating proteins produced in previous processes. MS188 is responsible for most cell wall-related genes, functioning both in tapetum cell wall degradation and pollen wall formation. These results propose a more complex gene regulatory network for tapetum development and function.

  8. Importance of the alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in regulating cellular redox and ROS homeostasis to optimize photosynthesis during restriction of the cytochrome oxidase pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Tetali, Sarada Devi; Selinski, Jennifer; Scheibe, Renate; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2015-09-01

    The importance of the alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway, particularly AOX1A, in optimizing photosynthesis during de-etiolation, under elevated CO2, low temperature, high light or combined light and drought stress is well documented. In the present study, the role of AOX1A in optimizing photosynthesis was investigated when electron transport through the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) pathway was restricted at complex III. Leaf discs of wild-type (WT) and aox1a knock-out mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana were treated with antimycin A (AA) under growth-light conditions. To identify the impact of AOX1A deficiency in optimizing photosynthesis, respiratory O2 uptake and photosynthesis-related parameters were measured along with changes in redox couples, reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation and expression levels of genes related to respiration, the malate valve and the antioxidative system. In the absence of AA, aox1a knock-out mutants did not show any difference in physiological, biochemical or molecular parameters compared with WT. However, after AA treatment, aox1a plants showed a significant reduction in both respiratory O2 uptake and NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution. Chlorophyll fluorescence and P700 studies revealed that in contrast to WT, aox1a knock-out plants were incapable of maintaining electron flow in the chloroplastic electron transport chain, and thereby inefficient heat dissipation (low non-photochemical quenching) was observed. Furthermore, aox1a mutants exhibited significant disturbances in cellular redox couples of NAD(P)H and ascorbate (Asc) and consequently accumulation of ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. By contrast, WT plants showed a significant increase in transcript levels of CSD1, CAT1, sAPX, COX15 and AOX1A in contrast to aox1a mutants. These results suggest that AOX1A plays a significant role in sustaining the chloroplastic redox state and energization to optimize photosynthesis by regulating cellular redox homeostasis and ROS

  9. Distribution of soluble amino acids in maize endosperm mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Alejandro Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available For human nutrition the main source of vegetable proteins are cereal and legume seeds. The content of total soluble amino acids in mature endosperm of wild-type, opaque and floury maize (Zea mays L. mutants were determined by HPLC. The total absolute concentration of soluble amino acids among the mutants varied depending on the mutant. The o11 and o13 mutants exhibited the highest average content, whereas o10, fl3 and fl1 exhibited the lowest average content. In general, the mutants exhibited similar concentrations of total soluble amino acids when compared to the wild-type lines, with the clear exception of mutants o11 and fl1, with the o11 mutant exhibiting a higher concentration of total soluble amino acids when compared to its wild-type counterpart W22 and the fl1 mutant a lower concentration when compared to its wild-type counterpart Oh43. For methionine, the mutants o2 and o11 and wild-type Oh43 exhibited the highest concentrations of this amino acid. Significant differences were not observed between mutants for other amino acids such as lysine and threonine. The high lysine concentrations obtained originally for these mutants may be due to the amino acids incorporated into storage proteins, but not those present in the soluble form.

  10. Using of AFLP to evaluate gamma-irradiated amaranth mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labajová Mária

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine which of several gamma-irradiated mutants of amaranth Ficha cultivar and K-433 hybrid are most genetically similar to their non-irradiated control genotypes, we performed amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP based analysis. A total of 40 selective primer combinations were used in reported analyses. First analyses of gamma-irradiated amaranth mutant lines were done used the AFLP. In the study, primers with the differentiation ability for all analysed mutant lines are reported. The very specific changes in the mutant lines´ non-coding regions based on AFLP length polymorphism were analysed. Mutant lines of the Ficha cultivar (C15, C26, C27, C82, C236 shared a genetic dissimilarity of 0,11 and their ISSR profiles are more similar to the Ficha than those of K-433 hybrid mutant lines. The K-433 mutant lines (D54, D279, D282 shared genetic dissimilarity of 0,534 but are more distinct to their control plant as a whole, as those of the Ficha mutant lines. Different AFLP fingerprints patters of the mutant lines when compared to the Ficha cultivar and K-433 hybrid AFLP profiles may be a consequence of the complex response of the intergenic space of mutant lines to the gamma-radiance. Although a genetic polymorphism was detected within accessions, the AFLP markers successfully identified all the accessions. The AFLP results are discussed by a combination of biochemical characteristics of mutant lines and their control genotypes.

  11. Ribosylurea accumulates in yeast urc4 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnberg, O; Vodnala, M; Domkin, V; Hofer, A; Rasmussen, A; Andersen, G; Piskur, J

    2010-06-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces (Lachancea) kluyveri urc4 mutants, unable to grow on uracil, biotransformed (14)C(2)-uracil into two labeled compounds, as detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These two compounds could also be obtained following organic synthesis of ribosylurea. This finding demonstrates that in the URC pyrimidine degradation pathway, the opening of the uracil ring takes place when uracil is attached to the ribose moiety. Ribosylurea has not been reported in the cell metabolism before and the two observed compounds likely represent an equilibrium mixture of the pyranosyl and furanosyl forms.

  12. MCM8 is required for a pathway of meiotic double-strand break repair independent of DMC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismani, Wayne; Portemer, Virginie; Froger, Nicole; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Horlow, Christine; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Mercier, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    Mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-9 proteins are related helicases. The first six, MCM2-7, are essential for DNA replication in all eukaryotes. In contrast, MCM8 is not always conserved in eukaryotes but is present in Arabidopsis thaliana. MCM8 is required for 95% of meiotic crossovers (COs) in Drosophila and is essential for meiosis completion in mouse, prompting us to study this gene in Arabidopsis meiosis. Three allelic Atmcm8 mutants showed a limited level of chromosome fragmentation at meiosis. This defect was dependent on programmed meiotic double-strand break (DSB) formation, revealing a role for AtMCM8 in meiotic DSB repair. In contrast, CO formation was not affected, as shown both genetically and cytologically. The Atmcm8 DSB repair defect was greatly amplified in the absence of the DMC1 recombinase or in mutants affected in DMC1 dynamics (sds, asy1). The Atmcm8 fragmentation defect was also amplified in plants heterozygous for a mutation in either recombinase, DMC1 or RAD51. Finally, in the context of absence of homologous chromosomes (i.e. haploid), mutation of AtMCM8 also provoked a low level of chromosome fragmentation. This fragmentation was amplified by the absence of DMC1 showing that both MCM8 and DMC1 can promote repair on the sister chromatid in Arabidopsis haploids. Altogether, this establishes a role for AtMCM8 in meiotic DSB repair, in parallel to DMC1. We propose that MCM8 is involved with RAD51 in a backup pathway that repairs meiotic DSB without giving CO when the major pathway, which relies on DMC1, fails.

  13. MCM8 is required for a pathway of meiotic double-strand break repair independent of DMC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Crismani

    Full Text Available Mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM 2-9 proteins are related helicases. The first six, MCM2-7, are essential for DNA replication in all eukaryotes. In contrast, MCM8 is not always conserved in eukaryotes but is present in Arabidopsis thaliana. MCM8 is required for 95% of meiotic crossovers (COs in Drosophila and is essential for meiosis completion in mouse, prompting us to study this gene in Arabidopsis meiosis. Three allelic Atmcm8 mutants showed a limited level of chromosome fragmentation at meiosis. This defect was dependent on programmed meiotic double-strand break (DSB formation, revealing a role for AtMCM8 in meiotic DSB repair. In contrast, CO formation was not affected, as shown both genetically and cytologically. The Atmcm8 DSB repair defect was greatly amplified in the absence of the DMC1 recombinase or in mutants affected in DMC1 dynamics (sds, asy1. The Atmcm8 fragmentation defect was also amplified in plants heterozygous for a mutation in either recombinase, DMC1 or RAD51. Finally, in the context of absence of homologous chromosomes (i.e. haploid, mutation of AtMCM8 also provoked a low level of chromosome fragmentation. This fragmentation was amplified by the absence of DMC1 showing that both MCM8 and DMC1 can promote repair on the sister chromatid in Arabidopsis haploids. Altogether, this establishes a role for AtMCM8 in meiotic DSB repair, in parallel to DMC1. We propose that MCM8 is involved with RAD51 in a backup pathway that repairs meiotic DSB without giving CO when the major pathway, which relies on DMC1, fails.

  14. Characterization of non-CG genomic hypomethylation associated with gamma-ray-induced suppression of CMT3 transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Min Hee; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hong; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2013-12-01

    Ionizing radiation causes various epigenetic changes, as well as a variety of DNA lesions such as strand breaks, cross-links, oxidative damages, etc., in genomes. However, radiation-induced epigenetic changes have rarely been substantiated in plant genomes. The current study investigates whether DNA methylation of Arabidopsis thaliana genome is altered by gamma rays. We found that genomic DNA methylation decreased in wild-type plants with increasing doses of gamma rays (5, 50 and 200 Gy). Irradiation with 200 Gy significantly increased the expression of transcriptionally inactive centromeric 180-bp (CEN) and transcriptionally silent information (TSI) repeats. This increase suggested that there was a substantial release of transcriptional gene silencing by gamma rays, probably by induction of DNA hypomethylation. High expression of the DNA demethylase ROS1 and low expression of the DNA methyltransferase CMT3 supported this hypothesis. Moreover, Southern blot analysis following digestion of genomic DNA with methylation-sensitive enzymes revealed that the DNA hypomethylation occured preferentially at CHG or CHH sites rather than CG sites, depending on the radiation dose. Unlike CEN and TSI repeats, the number of Ta3, AtSN1 and FWA repeats decreased in transcription but increased in non-CG methylation. In addition, the cmt3-11 mutant showed neither DNA hypomethylation nor transcriptional activation of silenced repeats upon gamma irradiation. Furthermore, profiles of genome-wide transcriptomes in response to gamma rays differed between the wild-type and cmt3-11 mutant. These results suggest that gamma irradiation induced DNA hypomethylation preferentially at non-CG sites of transcriptionally inactive repeats in a locus-specific manner, which depends on CMT3 activity.

  15. Pattern Dynamics in Adaxial-Abaxial Specific Gene Expression Are Modulated by a Plastid Retrograde Signal during Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tameshige, Toshiaki; Fujita, Hironori; Watanabe, Keiro; Toyokura, Koichi; Kondo, Maki; Tatematsu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Noritaka; Tsugeki, Ryuji; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Mikio; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance and reformation of gene expression domains are the basis for the morphogenic processes of multicellular systems. In a leaf primordium of Arabidopsis thaliana, the expression of FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL) and the activity of the microRNA miR165/166 are specific to the abaxial side. This miR165/166 activity restricts the target gene expression to the adaxial side. The adaxial and abaxial specific gene expressions are crucial for the wide expansion of leaf lamina. The FIL-expression and the miR165/166-free domains are almost mutually exclusive, and they have been considered to be maintained during leaf development. However, we found here that the position of the boundary between the two domains gradually shifts from the adaxial side to the abaxial side. The cell lineage analysis revealed that this boundary shifting was associated with a sequential gene expression switch from the FIL-expressing (miR165/166 active) to the miR165/166-free (non-FIL-expressing) states. Our genetic analyses using the enlarged fil expression domain2 (enf2) mutant and chemical treatment experiments revealed that impairment in the plastid (chloroplast) gene expression machinery retards this boundary shifting and inhibits the lamina expansion. Furthermore, these developmental effects caused by the abnormal plastids were not observed in the genomes uncoupled1 (gun1) mutant background. This study characterizes the dynamic nature of the adaxial-abaxial specification process in leaf primordia and reveals that the dynamic process is affected by the GUN1-dependent retrograde signal in response to the failure of plastid gene expression. These findings advance our understanding on the molecular mechanism linking the plastid function to the leaf morphogenic processes. PMID:23935517

  16. Ethylene Receptor 1 (ETR1) Is Sufficient and Has the Predominant Role in Mediating Inhibition of Ethylene Responses by Silver in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Brittany K.; Binder, Brad M.

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene influences many processes in Arabidopsis thaliana through the action of five receptor isoforms. All five isoforms use copper as a cofactor for binding ethylene. Previous research showed that silver can substitute for copper as a cofactor for ethylene binding activity in the ETR1 ethylene receptor yet also inhibit ethylene responses in plants. End-point and rapid kinetic analyses of dark-grown seedling growth revealed that the effects of silver are mostly dependent upon ETR1, and ETR1 alone is sufficient for the effects of silver. Ethylene responses in etr1-6 etr2-3 ein4-4 triple mutants were not blocked by silver. Transformation of these triple mutants with cDNA for each receptor isoform under the promoter control of ETR1 revealed that the cETR1 transgene completely rescued responses to silver while the cETR2 transgene failed to rescue these responses. The other three isoforms partially rescued responses to silver. Ethylene binding assays on the binding domains of the five receptor isoforms expressed in yeast showed that silver supports ethylene binding to ETR1 and ERS1 but not the other isoforms. Thus, silver may have an effect on ethylene signaling outside of the ethylene binding pocket of the receptors. Ethylene binding to ETR1 with silver was ∼30% of binding with copper. However, alterations in the Kd for ethylene binding to ETR1 and the half-time of ethylene dissociation from ETR1 do not underlie this lower binding. Thus, it is likely that the lower ethylene binding activity of ETR1 with silver is due to fewer ethylene binding sites generated with silver versus copper. PMID:22692214

  17. Induction of systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to a culture filtrate from a plant growth-promoting fungus, Phoma sp. GS8-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, F; Hossain, Md M; Kubota, M; Hyakumachi, M

    2009-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting fungus (PGPF), Phoma sp. GS8-3, isolated from a zoysia grass rhizosphere, is capable of protecting cucumber plants against virulent pathogens. This fungus was investigated in terms of the underlying mechanisms and ability to elicit systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Root treatment of Arabidopsis plants with a culture filtrate (CF) from Phoma sp. GS8-3 elicited systemic resistance against the bacterial speck pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst), with restricted disease development and inhibited pathogen proliferation. Pathway-specific mutant plants, such as jar1 (jasmonic acid insensitive) and ein2 (ethylene insensitive), and transgenic NahG plants (impaired in salicylate signalling) were protected after application of the CF, demonstrating that these pathways are dispensable (at least individually) in CF-mediated resistance. Similarly, NPR1 interference in npr1 mutants had no effect on CF-induced resistance. Gene expression studies revealed that CF treatment stimulated the systemic expression of both the SA-inducible PR-1 and JA/ET-inducible PDF1.2 genes. However, pathogenic challenge to CF-treated plants was associated with potentiated expression of the PR-1 gene and down-regulated expression of the PDF1.2 gene. The observed down-regulation of the PDF1.2 gene in CF-treated plants indicates that there may be cross-talk between SA- and JA/ET-dependent signalling pathways during the pathogenic infection process. In conclusion, our data suggest that CF of Phoma sp. GS8-3 induces resistance in Arabidopsis in a manner where SA and JA/ET may play a role in defence signalling.

  18. The 21-Nucleotide, but Not 22-Nucleotide, Viral Secondary Small Interfering RNAs Direct Potent Antiviral Defense by Two Cooperative Argonautes in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Bing; Jovel, Juan; Udomporn, Petchthai; Wang, Ying; Wu, Qingfa; Li, Wan-Xiang; Gasciolli, Virginie; Vaucheret, Herve; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana defense against distinct positive-strand RNA viruses requires production of virus-derived secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by multiple RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, little is known about the biogenesis pathway and effector mechanism of viral secondary siRNAs. Here, we describe a mutant of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Δ2b) that is silenced predominantly by the RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6)-dependent viral secondary siRNA pathway. We show that production of the viral secondary siRNAs targeting CMV-Δ2b requires SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3 and DICER-LIKE4 (DCL4) in addition to RDR6. Examination of 25 single, double, and triple mutants impaired in nine ARGONAUTE (AGO) genes combined with coimmunoprecipitation and deep sequencing identifies an essential function for AGO1 and AGO2 in defense against CMV-Δ2b, which act downstream the biogenesis of viral secondary siRNAs in a nonredundant and cooperative manner. Our findings also illustrate that dicing of the viral RNA precursors of primary and secondary siRNA is insufficient to confer virus resistance. Notably, although DCL2 is able to produce abundant viral secondary siRNAs in the absence of DCL4, the resultant 22-nucleotide viral siRNAs alone do not guide efficient silencing of CMV-Δ2b. Possible mechanisms for the observed qualitative difference in RNA silencing between 21- and 22-nucleotide secondary siRNAs are discussed. PMID:21467580

  19. Biochemical responses and ultrastructural changes in ethylene insensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thialiana subjected to bisphenol A exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Jan, Mehmood; Wakeel, Abdul; Azizullah, Azizullah; Liu, Bohan; Islam, Faisal; Ali, Abid; Daud, M K; Liu, Yihua; Gan, Yinbo

    2017-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an important raw material in plastic industry, has become a serious environmental contaminant due to its wide spread use in different products and increasing release into the environment. BPA is known to cause adverse effects in living organisms including plants. Several studies reported that BPA affects growth and development in plants, mainly through oxidative stress. Plants are known to generally cope with stress mainly through hormonal regulation and adaptation, but little is known about the role of plant hormones in plants under BPA stress. The present study was conducted to investigate the role of ethylene in BPA induced oxidative stress in plants using Arabidopsis thaliana as a test plant. The response of ethylene insensitive mutants of Arabidopsis (ein2-1 and etr1-3) to BPA exposure was studied in comparison to the wild type Arabidopsis (WT). In all three genotypes, exposure to BPA adversely affected cellular structures, stomata and light-harvesting pigments. An increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) lipid peroxidation and other oxidative stress markers indicated that BPA induced toxicity through oxidative stress. However, the overall results revealed that WT Arabidopsis had more pronounced BPA induced damages while ein2-1 and etr1-3 mutants withstood the BPA induced stress more efficiently. The activity of antioxidant enzymes and expression of antioxidants related genes revealed that the antioxidant defense system in both mutants was more efficiently activated than in WT against BPA induced oxidative stress, which further evidenced the involvement of ethylene in regulating BPA induced oxidative stress. It is concluded that ethylene perception and signaling may be involved in BPA induced oxidative stress responses in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Photosystem II repair and plant immunity: Lessons learned from Arabidopsis mutant lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari eJärvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425. Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light.