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Sample records for thalassiosira pseudonoana hustedt

  1. Thalassiosira mala (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thalassiosira malaitalic> (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine diatom from Chilka Lake and other coastal localities of Odisha, India: Nomenclature, ... Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306–4370, USA; Department of Biology, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA ...

  2. Thalassiosira spp. community composition shifts in response to chemical and physical forcing in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoebe Dreux Chappell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are genetically diverse unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes that are key primary producers in the ocean. Many of the over 100 extant diatom species in the cosmopolitan genus Thalassiosira are difficult to distinguish in mixed populations using light microscopy. Here we examine shifts in Thalassiosira spp. composition along a coastal to open ocean transect that encountered a three-month-old Haida eddy in the northeast Pacific Ocean. To quantify shifts in Thalassiosira species composition, we developed a targeted automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA method to identify Thalassiosira spp. in environmental samples. As many specific fragment lengths are indicative of individual Thalassiosira spp., the ARISA method is a useful screening tool to identify changes in the relative abundance and distribution of specific species. The method also enabled us to assess changes in Thalassiosira community composition in response to chemical and physical forcing. Thalassiosira spp. community composition in the core of a three-month-old Haida eddy remained largely (>80% similar over a two-week period, despite moving 24 km southwestward. Shifts in Thalassiosira species correlated with changes in dissolved iron (Fe and temperature throughout the sampling period. Simultaneously tracking community composition and relative abundance of Thalassiosira species within the physical and chemical context they occurred allowed us to identify quantitative linkages between environmental conditions and community response.

  3. Steady-state growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.J.; SooHoo, J.B.; Kiefer, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Seasonal studies of the vertical distribution of nitrate, nitrite, and phytoplankton in the oceans and studies using 15 N as a tracer of nitrate metabolism indicate that the reduction of nitrate by phytoplankton is a source of nitrite in the upper waters of the ocean. To better understand this process, the relationship between nitrate uptake and nitrite production has been examined with continuous cultures of the small marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. In a turbidostat culture, the rates of nitrite production by T. Pseudonana increase with light intensity. This process is only loosely coupled to rates of nitrate assimilation since the ratio of net nitrite production to total nitrate assimilation increases with increased rates of growth. In continuous cultures where steady-state concentrations of nitrate and nitrite were varied, T. pseudonana produced nitrite at rates which increased with increasing concentrations of nitrate. Again, the rates of nitrite production were uncoupled from rates of nitrate assimilation. The study was used to derive a mathematical description of nitrate and nitrite metabolism by T. pseudonana. The validity of this model was supported by the results of a study in which 15 N-labeled nitrite was introduced into the continuous culture, and the model was used to examine patterns in distribution of nitrite in the Antarctic Ocean and the Sargasso Sea

  4. Response of the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii to iron stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, G.I.; Morel, F.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The coastal diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii responds to iron limitation with decreasing growth rate, decreasing quotas of cellular iron, and increasing rates of maximum short term uptake. Growth response to steady iron limitation can be modeled according to the equations of Droop and Monod. The cellular iron quota varies from about 2 to 25 x 10 -1 mol iron per liter-cell with increasing iron; the half-saturation constant for growth, Kμ, is 1.1 x 10 -21 M (free ferric ion). In contrast, the half-saturation constant for 59 I iron uptake, K/sub rho/ is about 3 x 10 -19 M; the maximum iron uptake rate (rho/sub max/) is increased several-fold under iron limitation, resulting in a potential short term uptake rate that is a few hundred times the steady state rate. At a fixed concentration of free manganese ion, the cellular manganese quota is increased several-fold in iron-limited cultures compared to iron-sufficient cultures

  5. Response of the Ubiquitous Pelagic Diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii i>to Darkness and Anoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Knappe, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Thalassiosira weissflogii, an abundant, nitrate-storing, bloom-forming diatom in the world's oceans, can use its intracellular nitrate pool for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) after sudden shifts to darkness and anoxia, most likely as a survival mechanism. T. weissflogii cells ...

  6. The genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana: ecology, evolution, and metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Armbrust, E. V.; Berges, J. A.; Bowler, C.; Green, B. R.; Martinez, D.; Putnam, N. H.; Zhou, S.; Allen, A. E.; Apt, K. E.; Bechner, M.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Chaal, B. K.; Chiovitti, A.; Davis, A. K.; Demarest, M. S.; Detter, J. C.; Glavina, T.; Goodstein, D.; Hadi, M. Z.; Hellsten, U.; Hildebrand, M.; Jenkins, B. D.; Jurka, J.; Kapitonov, V. V.; Kröger, N.; Lau, W. W. Y.; Lane, T. W.; Larimer, F. W.; Lippmeier, J. C.; Lucas, S.; Medina, M.; Montsant, A.; Oborník, Miroslav; Schnitzler Parker, M.; Palenik, B.; Pazour, G. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rynearson, T. A.; Saito, M. A.; Schwartz, D. C.; Thamatrakoln, K.; Valentin, K.; Vardi, A.; Wilkerson, F. P.; Rokhsar, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 5693 (2004), s. 79-86 ISSN 0036-8075 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : diatom * genome * Thalassiosira Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 31.853, year: 2004

  7. Effect of Bombay high crude oil and its water-soluble fraction on growth and metabolism of diatom Thalassiosira sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parab, S.R.; Pandit, R.A.; Kadam, A.N.; Indap, M.M.

    Effect of Bombay high crude oil (BHC) and its water-soluble fraction (WSF) on growth and metabolism of the phytoplankton, Thalassiosira sp. was assessed. The study revealed the signs of acute toxicity at higher concentrations of crude oil (0...

  8. Preparation and characteristics of biosilica derived from marine diatom biomass of Nitzschia closterium and Thalassiosira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yarong; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Jay Jiayang

    2017-05-01

    In this study, biosilica of high purity was successfully prepared from marine diatom ( Nitzschia closterium and Thalassiosira) biomass using an optimized novel method with acid washing treatment followed by thermal treatment of the biomass. The optimal condition of the method was 2% diluted HCl washing and baking at 600°C. The SiO2 contents of N. closterium biosilica and Thalassiosira biosilica were 92.23% and 91.52%, respectively, which were both higher than that of diatomite biosilica. The SiO2 morphologies of both biosilica are typical amorphous silica. Besides, N. closterium biosilica possessed micropores and fibers with a surface area of 59.81m2/g. And Thalassiosira biosilica possessed a mesoporous hierarchical skeleton with a surface area of 9.91m2/g. The results suggest that the biosilica samples obtained in this study present highly porous structures. The prepared porous biosilica material possesses great potential to be used as drug delivery carrier, biosensor, biocatalyst as well as adsorbent in the future.

  9. BIO-OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DINOFLAGELLATE GYMNODINIUM BREVE AND THE DIATOM THALASSIOSIRA WEISSFLOGII IN OUTDOOR TANKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bio-optical signatures of harmful algal blooms can be used to define ocean color satellite algorithms. We characterized the bio-optical properties of nutrient-replete cultures of the red tide dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve and the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We cultur...

  10. Growth and silica conten of the diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Navicula salinarum at different salinities and enrichments with aluminium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, E.G.; Poort, L.; Beelen, T.P.M.; Gieskes, W.W.C.

    1999-01-01

    The dependence of the cellular (biogenic) and frustule-associated (mineralized) silica content of the diatoms Navicula salinarum and Thalassiosira weissflogii on salinity and aluminium conditions was studied in order to make it possible to manipulate silicification in vitro and maximize it to levels

  11. Evaluation of diatomea algae Thalassiosira weissflogii sensitivity to chloride mercury and methylmercury by chlorophyll fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graevskaya, E. E.; Antal, T. K.; Matorin, D. N.; Voronova, E. N.; Pogosyan, S. I.; Rubin, A. B.

    2003-05-01

    Measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence has been shown to be a rapid, non-invasive, and reliable method to assess photosynthetic performance in a changing environment. In our study, the pulseamplitude-modulation (PAM) - fluorometric method was used to evaluate the sensitivity to chloride mercury and methylmercury chloride of diatomea microalgae Thalassiosira weissflogii. We found that 10^{-6} and 10^{-7} M MeHg led to a slow decrease in the PS II activity following for prolonged lag phase, whereas the algae was not sensitive to the same concentrations of HgCl2. However observed PS II inactivation by methylmercury was not complete and about 10 percents ofthe cells kept the high level of PS II activity as it was shown by microfluorometric analysis. These cells could determine adaptation of algae to methylmercury effect. Both toxicants decreased the rate of PS II reparation, as well as increased a heat pathway of excitation dissipation in PS II antennae complex.

  12. Indications for chlororespiration in relation to light regime in the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Nicole A; Kroon, Bernd M A

    2002-04-01

    The marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii was cultured under a light regime simulating the daily rise and fall of the sun. The light regime caused a daily cycle in non-photochemical quenching. Remarkable were the changes in fluorescence directly after a light-to-dark transition that occurred in addition to the changes induced by non-photochemical quenching. A transient non-photochemical reduction of PQ and of Q(A) was indicated by a transient increase in apparent F(o) and by changes in the shape of the fluorescence induction curve. The observed changes developed approximately the first 100-120 s after a light-to-dark transition and could be reversed by the application of far-red illumination. Chlororespiration is thought to cause the reduction of PQ and, as the PQ-pool is in equilibrium with Q(A), also a reduction of Q(A). The function and ecological relevance of chlororespiration are discussed.

  13. Use of secondary sewage water as a culture medium for Chaetoceros gracilis and Thalassiosira Sp (Chrysophyceae in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauquírio André Albuquerque Marinho da Costa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in order to test the efficiency of additions of secondary sewage as a culture medium for Chaetoceros gracilis and Thalassiosira sp (Chrysophyceae under laboratory conditions. These algae were cultivated in sea water with concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of wastewater. The results were compared with those obtained by the nutritive medium f2 of Guillard (1975. The best results in terms of cellular densities were observed at 40% additions. There were significant differences (significance levels of 5% between the nutritive medium f2 and the 40% additions for both the species. Maximum cellular densities observed for all additions tested were, 4,125.00 x 10³ cells/ml for Chaetoceros gracilis on the ninth day and 834.00 x 10³ cells/ml for Thalassiosira sp on the fifth day. Biomass was higher in the nutritive medium f2 than in the other treatments, reaching average values of 2,363μg/ml for Chaetoceros gracilis. At all experimental units, the best results were registered at 40% addition for Chaetoceros gracilis, where average values of 0.768μg/ml were observed on the fifth day, and at 30% additions for Thalassiosira sp where 0.883μg/ml were observed on the thirteenth day. It was concluded that secondary sewage could be used as a culture medium for the species tested here, after large scale tests.

  14. The influence of light on copper-limited growth of an oceanic diatom, Thalassiosira oceanica (Coscinodiscophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Woo; Price, Neil M

    2017-10-01

    Thalassiosira oceanica (CCMP 1005) was grown over a range of copper concentrations at saturating and subsaturating irradiance to test the hypothesis that Cu and light were interacting essential resources. Growth was a hyperbolic function of irradiance in Cu-replete medium (263 fmol Cu' · L -1 ) with maximum rates achieved at 200 μmol photons · m -2  · s -1 . Lowering the Cu concentration at this irradiance to 30.8 fmol Cu' · L -1 decreased cellular Cu quota by 7-fold and reduced growth rate by 50%. Copper-deficient cells had significantly slower (P light, low-Cu concentration was no longer limiting to growth: Cu concentration and light interacted strongly to affect growth rate of T. oceanica (P light-dependent, suggesting that faster growth of T. oceanica under high light and low Cu was a result of light-stimulated Cu uptake. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  15. Response of the ubiquitous pelagic diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii to darkness and anoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kamp

    Full Text Available Thalassiosira weissflogii, an abundant, nitrate-storing, bloom-forming diatom in the world's oceans, can use its intracellular nitrate pool for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA after sudden shifts to darkness and anoxia, most likely as a survival mechanism. T. weissflogii cells that stored 4 mM (15N-nitrate consumed 1.15 (±0.25 fmol NO3 (- cell(-1 h(-1 and simultaneously produced 1.57 (±0.21 fmol (15NH4 (+ cell(-1 h(-1 during the first 2 hours of dark/anoxic conditions. Ammonium produced from intracellular nitrate was excreted by the cells, indicating a dissimilatory rather than assimilatory pathway. Nitrite and the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide were produced at rates 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than the ammonium production rate. While DNRA activity was restricted to the first few hours of darkness and anoxia, the subsequent degradation of photopigments took weeks to months, supporting the earlier finding that diatoms resume photosynthesis even after extended exposure to darkness and anoxia. Considering the high global abundance of T. weissflogii, its production of ammonium and nitrous oxide might be of ecological importance for oceanic oxygen minimum zones and the atmosphere, respectively.

  16. Response of the ubiquitous pelagic diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii to darkness and anoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Knappe, Jan; de Beer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Thalassiosira weissflogii, an abundant, nitrate-storing, bloom-forming diatom in the world's oceans, can use its intracellular nitrate pool for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) after sudden shifts to darkness and anoxia, most likely as a survival mechanism. T. weissflogii cells that stored 4 mM (15)N-nitrate consumed 1.15 (±0.25) fmol NO3 (-) cell(-1) h(-1) and simultaneously produced 1.57 (±0.21) fmol (15)NH4 (+) cell(-1) h(-1) during the first 2 hours of dark/anoxic conditions. Ammonium produced from intracellular nitrate was excreted by the cells, indicating a dissimilatory rather than assimilatory pathway. Nitrite and the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide were produced at rates 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than the ammonium production rate. While DNRA activity was restricted to the first few hours of darkness and anoxia, the subsequent degradation of photopigments took weeks to months, supporting the earlier finding that diatoms resume photosynthesis even after extended exposure to darkness and anoxia. Considering the high global abundance of T. weissflogii, its production of ammonium and nitrous oxide might be of ecological importance for oceanic oxygen minimum zones and the atmosphere, respectively.

  17. Genetic indicators of iron limitation in wild populations of Thalassiosira oceanica from the northeast Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, P Dreux; Whitney, LeAnn P; Wallace, Joselynn R; Darer, Adam I; Jean-Charles, Samua; Jenkins, Bethany D

    2015-03-01

    Assessing the iron (Fe) nutritional status of natural diatom populations has proven challenging as physiological and molecular responses can differ in diatoms of the same genus. We evaluated expression of genes encoding flavodoxin (FLDA1) and an Fe-starvation induced protein (ISIP3) as indicators of Fe limitation in the marine diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. The specificity of the response to Fe limitation was tested in cultures grown under Fe- and macronutrient-deficient conditions, as well as throughout the diurnal light cycle. Both genes showed a robust and specific response to Fe limitation in laboratory cultures and were detected in small volume samples collected from the northeast Pacific, demonstrating the sensitivity of this method. Overall, FLDA1 and ISIP3 expression was inversely related to Fe concentrations and offered insight into the Fe nutritional health of T. oceanica in the field. As T. oceanica is a species tolerant to low Fe, indications of Fe limitation in T. oceanica populations may serve as a proxy for severe Fe stress in the overall diatom community. At two shallow coastal locations, FLD1A and ISIP3 expression revealed Fe stress in areas where dissolved Fe concentrations were high, demonstrating that this approach may be powerful for identifying regions where Fe supply may not be biologically available.

  18. The transcriptome and proteome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana reveal a diverse phosphorus stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya T Dyhrman

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is a critical driver of phytoplankton growth and ecosystem function in the ocean. Diatoms are an abundant class of marine phytoplankton that are responsible for significant amounts of primary production. With the control they exert on the oceanic carbon cycle, there have been a number of studies focused on how diatoms respond to limiting macro and micronutrients such as iron and nitrogen. However, diatom physiological responses to P deficiency are poorly understood. Here, we couple deep sequencing of transcript tags and quantitative proteomics to analyze the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana grown under P-replete and P-deficient conditions. A total of 318 transcripts were differentially regulated with a false discovery rate of <0.05, and a total of 136 proteins were differentially abundant (p<0.05. Significant changes in the abundance of transcripts and proteins were observed and coordinated for multiple biochemical pathways, including glycolysis and translation. Patterns in transcript and protein abundance were also linked to physiological changes in cellular P distributions, and enzyme activities. These data demonstrate that diatom P deficiency results in changes in cellular P allocation through polyphosphate production, increased P transport, a switch to utilization of dissolved organic P through increased production of metalloenzymes, and a remodeling of the cell surface through production of sulfolipids. Together, these findings reveal that T. pseudonana has evolved a sophisticated response to P deficiency involving multiple biochemical strategies that are likely critical to its ability to respond to variations in environmental P availability.

  19. Editing of the urease gene by CRISPR-Cas in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Hopes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR-Cas is a recent and powerful addition to the molecular toolbox which allows programmable genome editing. It has been used to modify genes in a wide variety of organisms, but only two alga to date. Here we present a methodology to edit the genome of Thalassiosira pseudonana, a model centric diatom with both ecological significance and high biotechnological potential, using CRISPR-Cas. Results A single construct was assembled using Golden Gate cloning. Two sgRNAs were used to introduce a precise 37 nt deletion early in the coding region of the urease gene. A high percentage of bi-allelic mutations (≤61.5% were observed in clones with the CRISPR-Cas construct. Growth of bi-allelic mutants in urea led to a significant reduction in growth rate and cell size compared to growth in nitrate. Conclusions CRISPR-Cas can precisely and efficiently edit the genome of T. pseudonana. The use of Golden Gate cloning to assemble CRISPR-Cas constructs gives additional flexibility to the CRISPR-Cas method and facilitates modifications to target alternative genes or species.

  20. Grazing rates of Calanus finmarchicus on Thalassiosira weissflogii cultured under different levels of ultraviolet radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Fields

    Full Text Available UVB alters photosynthetic rate, fatty acid profiles and morphological characteristics of phytoplankton. Copepods, important grazers of primary production, select algal cells based upon their size, morphological traits, nutritional status, and motility. We investigated the grazing rates of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus on the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii cultured under 3 levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR only (4 kJ-m(-2/day, and PAR supplemented with UVR radiation at two intensities (24 kJ-m(-2/day and 48 kJ-m(-2/day. There was no significant difference in grazing rates between the PAR only treatment and the lower UVR treatment. However, grazing rates were significantly (∼66% higher for copepods feeding on cells treated with the higher level of UVR. These results suggest that a short-term increase in UVR exposure results in a significant increase in the grazing rate of copepods and, thereby, potentially alters the flow rate of organic matter through this component of the ecosystem.

  1. Characteristics of picoplankton abundances during a Thalassiosira diporocyclus bloom in the Taiwan Bank in late winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Li, Jiajun; Ke, Zhixin; Xiang, Chenhui; Tan, Yehui; Huang, Liangmin

    2017-04-15

    To understand the variations of picoplankton (Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, picoeukaryotes, and heterotrophic bacteria) abundances during diatom bloom, the distribution of picoplankton in the Taiwan Bank, South China Sea was investigated using flow cytometry during a Thalassiosira diporocyclus bloom in March 2016. The results indicated an abrupt abundance decrease for Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, and picoeukaryotes within the bloom area while the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria showed no significant difference between the bloom and non-bloom areas. We found two sub-groups of heterotrophic bacteria: high- and low-nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) bacteria with HNA dominated in the bloom area whereas LNA dominated in the non-bloom area. Among the picoplankton components, HNA represented the highest (61.1%) carbon biomass in the bloom area while picoeukaryotes represented the highest (37.6%) in the non-bloom area. Our findings implied that heterotrophic bacteria, especially HNA, played an essential role during the diatom bloom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. FRET Response of a Modified Ribose Receptor Expressed in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Hanna

    2011-08-26

    The ability to insert complex proteins into silica has many applications including biosensing. Previous research has demonstrated how to direct proteins to the biosilica of diatoms [1]. Here, we show that a complex fusion protein that includes an enzyme, a bacterial ribose periplasmic binding protein, flanked by fluorescent proteins constituting a FRET pair can remain functional in the frustules of living diatoms. A Sil3 tag is attached to the N-terminal end to localize the fusion protein to frustules of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. When ribose was applied, a larger decrease in FRET response was seen in transformed cells than in untransformed cells. Multiple forms of the expression vector were tested to find the optimal system; specifically, a one-vector system was compared to a two-vector system and the gDNA version of the Sil3 localization tag was compared to the cDNA version. The optimal system was found to be a one-vector system with the genomic version of the Sil3 tag to direct the protein to the frustules. Localization of the enzyme to the frustules was further confirmed through cell fluorescence imaging.

  3. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles derived from consumer products on the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletti, Andrea; Seo, Seokju; Joo, Sung Hee; Su, Chunming; Blackwelder, Pat

    2016-10-01

    Increased manufacture of TiO 2 nanoproducts has caused concern about the potential toxicity of these products to the environment and in public health. Identification and confirmation of the presence of TiO 2 nanoparticles derived from consumer products as opposed to industrial TiO 2 NPs warrant examination in exploring the significance of their release and resultant impacts on the environment. To this end, we examined the significance of the release of these particles and their toxic effect on the marine diatom algae Thalassiosira pseudonana. Our results indicate that nano-TiO 2 sunscreen and toothpaste exhibit more toxicity in comparison to industrial TiO 2 and inhibited the growth of the marine diatom T. pseudonana. This inhibition was proportional to the exposure time and concentrations of nano-TiO 2 . Our findings indicate a significant effect, and therefore, further research is warranted in evaluation and assessment of the toxicity of modified nano-TiO 2 derived from consumer products and their physicochemical properties.

  4. The genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana: Ecology,evolution, and metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrust, E.V.; Berges, J.; Bowler, C.; Green, B.; Martinez, D.; Putnam, N.; Zhou, S.; Allen, A.; Apt, K.; Bechner, M.; Brzezinski, M.; Chaal, B.; Chiovitti, A.; Davis, A.; Goodstein, D.; Hadi, M.; Hellsten,U.; Hildebrand, M.; Jenkins, B.; Jurka, J.; Kapitonov, V.; Kroger, N.; Lau, W.; Lane, T.; Larimer, F.; Lippmeier, J.; Lucas, S.; Medina, M.; Montsant, A.; Obornik, M.; Parker, M. Schnitzler; Palenik, B.; Pazour,G.; Richardson, P.; Rynearson, T.; Saito, M.; Schwartz, D.; Thamatrakoln,K.; Valentin, K.; Vardi, A.; Wilkerson, F.; Rokhsar, D.; Vardi, A.; Wilkerson, F.P.; Rokhsar, D.S.

    2004-09-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae with plastids acquired by secondary endosymbiosis. They are responsible for {approx}20% of global carbon fixation. We report the 34 Mbp draft nuclear genome of the marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana and its 129 Kbp plastid and 44 Kbp mitochondrial genomes. Sequence and optical restriction mapping revealed 24 diploid nuclear chromosomes. We identified novel genes for silicic acid transport and formation of silica-based cell walls, high-affinity iron uptake, biosynthetic enzymes for several types of polyunsaturated fatty acids, utilization of a range of nitrogenous compounds and a complete urea cycle, all attributes that allow diatoms to prosper in the marine environment. Diatoms are unicellular, photosynthetic, eukaryotic algae found throughout the world's oceans and freshwater systems. They form the base of short, energetically-efficient food webs that support large-scale coastal fisheries. Photosynthesis by marine diatoms generates as much as 40% of the 45-50 billion tonnes of organic carbon produced each year in the sea (1), and their role in global carbon cycling is predicted to be comparable to that of all terrestrial rainforests combined (2, 3). Over geological time, diatoms may have influenced global climate by changing the flux of atmospheric carbon dioxide into the oceans (4). A defining feature of diatoms is their ornately patterned silicified cell wall or frustule, which displays species-specific nano-structures of such fine detail that diatoms have long been used to test the resolution of optical microscopes. Recent attention has focused on biosynthesis of these nano-structures as a paradigm for future silica nanotechnology (5). The long history (over 180 million years) and dominance of diatoms in the oceans is reflected by their contributions to vast deposits of diatomite, most cherts and a significant fraction of current petroleum reserves (6). As photosynthetic heterokonts, diatoms reflect a fundamentally

  5. ELEVATED CARBON DIOXIDE DIFFERENTIALLY ALTERS THE PHOTOPHYSIOLOGY OF THALASSIOSIRA PSEUDONANA (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE) AND EMILIANIA HUXLEYI (HAPTOPHYTA)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avery; Rogers, Susan P; Duffy, Stephen J; Campbell, Douglas A

    2012-06-01

    Increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide is causing changes to ocean chemistry, which will continue in a predictable manner. Dissolution of additional atmospheric carbon dioxide leads to increased concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide and bicarbonate and decreased pH in ocean water. The concomitant effects on phytoplankton ecophysiology, leading potentially to changes in community structure, are now a focus of concern. Therefore, we grew the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Lohmann) W. W. Hay et H. Mohler and the diatom strains Thalassiosira pseudonana (Hust.) Hasle et Heimdal CCMP 1014 and T. pseudonana CCMP 1335 under low light in turbidostat photobioreactors bubbled with air containing 390 ppmv or 750 ppmv CO2 . Increased pCO2 led to increased growth rates in all three strains. In addition, protein levels of RUBISCO increased in the coastal strains of both species, showing a larger capacity for CO2 assimilation at 750 ppmv CO2 . With increased pCO2 , both T. pseudonana strains displayed an increased susceptibility to PSII photoinactivation and, to compensate, an augmented capacity for PSII repair. Consequently, the cost of maintaining PSII function for the diatoms increased at increased pCO2 . In E. huxleyi, PSII photoinactivation and the counter-acting repair, while both intrinsically larger than in T. pseudonana, did not change between the current and high-pCO2 treatments. The content of the photosynthetic electron transport intermediary cytochrome b6/f complex increased significantly in the diatoms under elevated pCO2 , suggesting changes in electron transport function. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  6. Biochemical Composition and Assembly of Biosilica-associated Insoluble Organic Matrices from the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzsch, Alexander; Pawolski, Damian; Milentyev, Alexander; Shevchenko, Anna; Scheffel, André; Poulsen, Nicole; Shevchenko, Andrej; Kröger, Nils

    2016-03-04

    The nano- and micropatterned biosilica cell walls of diatoms are remarkable examples of biological morphogenesis and possess highly interesting material properties. Only recently has it been demonstrated that biosilica-associated organic structures with specific nanopatterns (termed insoluble organic matrices) are general components of diatom biosilica. The model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana contains three types of insoluble organic matrices: chitin meshworks, organic microrings, and organic microplates, the latter being described in the present study for the first time. To date, little is known about the molecular composition, intracellular assembly, and biological functions of organic matrices. Here we have performed structural and functional analyses of the organic microrings and organic microplates from T. pseudonana. Proteomics analysis yielded seven proteins of unknown function (termed SiMat proteins) together with five known silica biomineralization proteins (four cingulins and one silaffin). The location of SiMat1-GFP in the insoluble organic microrings and the similarity of tyrosine- and lysine-rich functional domains identifies this protein as a new member of the cingulin protein family. Mass spectrometric analysis indicates that most of the lysine residues of cingulins and the other insoluble organic matrix proteins are post-translationally modified by short polyamine groups, which are known to enhance the silica formation activity of proteins. Studies with recombinant cingulins (rCinY2 and rCinW2) demonstrate that acidic conditions (pH 5.5) trigger the assembly of mixed cingulin aggregates that have silica formation activity. Our results suggest an important role for cingulins in the biogenesis of organic microrings and support the hypothesis that this type of insoluble organic matrix functions in biosilica morphogenesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The effects of EDTA (Ethylenediaminetetraacetate on the growth of Thalassiosira weissflogii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Sayın

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Demir (Fe biyolojik olaylarda görev yapan önemli bir eser metaldir ve pek çok organizma için hayatidir. Fe’in biyolojik olaylarda hala tam olarak bilinmeyen işlevleri, sudaki kullanılabilir formları ve alımını etkileyen faktörlerin belirlenmesi konularına katkıda bulunmak amacıyla yürütülen çalışmada, 10 nM demir (Fe içeren modifiye F/2 ortamında, suni ligand EDTA (Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (100µM nın, Thalassiosira weissflogii’nin büyümesine etkileri araştırılmıştır. Denemenin yürütüldüğü ortamda, 18 ± 2 °C sıcaklık ve 80µmol m-2 s-1 aydınlanma şiddeti sürekli olacak şekilde sağlanmıştır. Denemede kullanılan deniz suyu, makro besleyiciler ve EDTA, Chelex-100 reçinesinden geçirilmiş, kullanılan bütün malzemeler ise asit ile yıkanarak eser metallerinden arındırılmıştır. Denemenin sonunda, EDTA nın, T. weissflogii kültürlerinde, hücre yoğunluğu, klorofil-a miktarı, büyüme hızı ve büyümeye paralel olarak artan pH değerlerini etkilemediği (p>0.05 saptanırken hücresel Fe miktarları arasında farklılık olduğu (p

  8. Molecular Characterization of CTR-type Copper Transporters in an Oceanic Diatom, Thalassiosira oceanica 1005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L.; Price, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for phytoplankton growth because of its role as a redox cofactor in electron transfer proteins in photosynthesis and respiration, and a potentially limiting resource in parts of the open sea. Thalassiosira oceanica 1005 can grow at inorganic copper concentrations varying from 10 fmol/L to 10 nmol/L by regulating copper uptake across plasma membrane. Four putative CTR-type copper transporter genes (ToCTR1, ToCTR2, ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2) were identified by BLASTP search against the T. oceanica genome. Predicted gene models were revised by assembled mRNA sequencing transcripts and updated gene models contained all conserved features of characterized CTR-type copper transporters. ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2 may arise from one another by gene duplication as they shared a sequence similarity of 97.6% with a peptide insertion of 5 amino acids at N-terminus of ToCTR3.1. The expression of ToCTR1, ToCTR2 and ToCTR3.1/3.2 was upregulated in low copper concentrations, but only ToCTR3.1/3.2 showed a significant increase (2.5 fold) in copper-starved cells. Both ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2 restored growth of a yeast double mutant, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ctr1Δctr3Δ, in copper deficient medium. GFP-fused ToCTR expression showed that some ToCTR3.1 localized to the plasma membrane but a large portion was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Inefficient targeting of ToCTR3.1 to the yeast outer membrane may explain poorer growth compared to the Saccharomyces native ScCTR1 transformant. Thus, diatom CTR genes encoding CTR-type copper transporters show high-affinity copper uptake and their regulation may enable diatoms to survive in ocean environments containing a wide range of copper concentrations.

  9. Photosynthetic and molecular responses of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana to triphenyltin exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Andy Xianliang; Leung, Priscilla T.Y.; Leung, Kenneth M.Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the responses of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana upon waterborne exposure to triphenyltin chloride (TPTCl) through determining their photosynthetic response, growth performance, and expressions of genes and proteins. Based on the growth inhibition test, the 96-h IC 50 (i.e., median inhibition concentration) was found to be 1.09 μg/L (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89–1.34 μg/L). According to photosynthetic parameters, the 96-h EC 50 s (i.e., median effect concentrations) were estimated at 1.54 μg/L (95% CI: 1.40–1.69 μg/L) and 1.51 μg/L (95% CI: 1.44–1.58 μg/L) for the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (Φ Po ) and the effective quantum yield of photochemical energy conversion in PSII (Φ 2 ), respectively. Non-photochemical quenching in the algae was increased at low concentrations of TPTCl (0.5–1.0 μg/L) but it decreased gradually when the TPTCl concentration further increased from 1.0 to 2.5 μg/L. Results of gene expressions showed that lipid metabolism related genes were not influenced by TPTCl at 0.5 or 1.0 μg/L, while silica shell formation genes were down-regulated at 0.5 μg/L. Photosynthesis related genes were up-regulated at 0.5 μg/L TPTCl but were down-regulated at 1.0 μg/L TPTCl. Proteomics analysis revealed that relatively less proteins could be detected after exposure to 1.0 μg/L TPTCl (only about 50–60 spots) compared with that observed in the 0.5 μg/L TPTCl treatment and two control groups (each with about 290–300 protein spots). At 0.5 μg/L TPTCl, five proteins were differentially expressed when compared with the seawater control and solvent control, and most of these proteins are involved in defence function to protect the biological systems from reactive oxygen species that generated by TPTCl. These proteins include oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 1 precursor, fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c protein – LI818 clade, and mitochondrial manganese

  10. Photosynthetic and molecular responses of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana to triphenyltin exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Andy Xianliang; Leung, Priscilla T.Y.; Leung, Kenneth M.Y., E-mail: kmyleung@hku.hk

    2014-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the responses of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana upon waterborne exposure to triphenyltin chloride (TPTCl) through determining their photosynthetic response, growth performance, and expressions of genes and proteins. Based on the growth inhibition test, the 96-h IC{sub 50} (i.e., median inhibition concentration) was found to be 1.09 μg/L (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89–1.34 μg/L). According to photosynthetic parameters, the 96-h EC{sub 50}s (i.e., median effect concentrations) were estimated at 1.54 μg/L (95% CI: 1.40–1.69 μg/L) and 1.51 μg/L (95% CI: 1.44–1.58 μg/L) for the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (Φ{sub Po}) and the effective quantum yield of photochemical energy conversion in PSII (Φ{sub 2}), respectively. Non-photochemical quenching in the algae was increased at low concentrations of TPTCl (0.5–1.0 μg/L) but it decreased gradually when the TPTCl concentration further increased from 1.0 to 2.5 μg/L. Results of gene expressions showed that lipid metabolism related genes were not influenced by TPTCl at 0.5 or 1.0 μg/L, while silica shell formation genes were down-regulated at 0.5 μg/L. Photosynthesis related genes were up-regulated at 0.5 μg/L TPTCl but were down-regulated at 1.0 μg/L TPTCl. Proteomics analysis revealed that relatively less proteins could be detected after exposure to 1.0 μg/L TPTCl (only about 50–60 spots) compared with that observed in the 0.5 μg/L TPTCl treatment and two control groups (each with about 290–300 protein spots). At 0.5 μg/L TPTCl, five proteins were differentially expressed when compared with the seawater control and solvent control, and most of these proteins are involved in defence function to protect the biological systems from reactive oxygen species that generated by TPTCl. These proteins include oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 1 precursor, fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c protein – LI818 clade, and mitochondrial

  11. Data from two different culture conditions of Thalassiosira weissflogii diatom and from cleaning procedures for obtaining monodisperse nanostructured biosilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Vona

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms microalgae produce biosilica nanoporous rigid outershells called frustules that exhibit an intricate nanostructured pore pattern. In this paper two specific Thalassiosira weissflogii culture conditions and size control procedures during the diatoms growth are described. Data from white field and fluorescence microscopy, evaluation of cell densities and cell parameters (k value and R value according to cell culture conditions are listed. Different cleaning procedures for obtaining bare frustules are described. In addition, FTIR and spectrofluorimetric analyses of cleaned biosilica are shown.The data are related to the research article “Chemically Modified Diatoms Biosilica for Bone Cell Growth with Combined Drug-Delivery and Antioxidant Properties” [1]. Keywords: Biosilica, Diatoms, Cell growth, Biomaterials

  12. Effects of flocculants on lipid extraction and fatty acid composition of the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata and Thalassiosira weissflogii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Lucelia; Moron-Villarreyes, Joaquin A.; D'Oca, Marcelo G. Montes; Abreu, Paulo Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible interference of anionic and cationic flocculants in the lipid extraction and fatty acid profiles of two species of marine microalgae: Nannochloropsis oculata and Thalassiosira weissflogii. Cells were grown in batch cultures (f/2 medium, salinity of 28, temperature of 20 o C, light intensity of 40 μmol photons m -2 s -1 and 12/12 h L/D photoperiod) and concentrated using sodium hydroxide (control), sodium hydroxide and the anionic polyacrylamide flocculant Magnafloc ® LT-25 (APF treatment) and sodium hydroxide plus the cationic polyacrylamide flocculant Flopam ® (CPF treatment). There were no statistically significant differences among treatments with respect to lipid extraction for both species. However, N. oculata which presented higher percentages of C16:0, C16:1 and C20:5 fatty acids showed an increase of C14:0 and a decrease of C20:5 with the use of anionic flocculant. Additionally, T. weissflogii which had high percentages of C16:0, C16:1, C16:3 and C20:5, showed a decrease of C18:0 and C18:1n9c when both flocculants were used and a small decrease of C16:0 in the APF treatment. The results indicate that the choice of flocculant should be based on the level of saturation desirable, i.e., if the goal is to produce more stable biodiesel, with low percentage unsaturated fatty acids, then anionic flocculants should be used. On the other hand, if the aim is to produce unsaturated fatty acids for commercial uses in the pharmacy or food industries, then anionic polymers should be avoided. -- Highlights: → Interference of flocculants on biochemical of two marine microalgae. → Lipids extraction and fatty acids profile from Nannochloropsis oculata and Thalassiosira weissflogii. → No differences in the lipids but some differences on fatty acids profile.

  13. Mercury effects on Thalassiosira weissflogii: Applications of two-photon excitation chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging and flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yun; Zeng Yan; Qu, Jianan Y.; Wang Wenxiong

    2012-01-01

    The toxic effects of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] and methylmercury (MeHg) on the photosynthesis and population growth in a marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii were investigated using two methods: two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and flow cytometry (FCM). For photosynthesis, Hg(II) exposure increased the average chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime, whereas such increment was not found under MeHg stress. This may be caused by the inhibitory effect of Hg(II) instead of MeHg on the electron transport chain. For population growth, modeled specific growth rate data showed that the reduction in population growth by Hg(II) mainly resulted from an increased number of injured cells, while the live cells divided at the normal rates. However, MeHg inhibitory effects on population growth were contributed by the reduced division rates of all cells. Furthermore, the cell images and the FCM data reflected the morphological changes of diatom cells under Hg(II)/MeHg exposure vividly and quantitatively. Our results demonstrated that the toxigenicity mechanisms between Hg(II) and MeHg were different in the algal cells.

  14. [Growth and biochemical composition of thalassiosira pseudonana (Thalassiosirales: Thalassiosiraceae) cultivated in semicontinuous system at different culture media and irradiances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Suárez, Aleikar; Guevara, Miguel; González, Mayelys; Cortez, Roraysi; Arredondo-Vega, Bertha

    2013-09-01

    Thalassiosira pseudonana is a marine Bacillariophyta commonly used as live feed in mariculture. The growth rate and biochemical composition of microalgae are highly influenced by environmental factors such as, irradiance and nutrient availability. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of three irradiances (60, 120 and 180 microE/m2.s) and two culture media (Algal and Humus) on growth and biochemical composition of this diatom. The microalga was grown semicontinuously at a daily renewal rate of fresh media of 30%, 37 per thousand salinity, 25 +/- 1 degree C and constant aeration (200 mL/min). The cell densities (cel/mL) and contents of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, chlorophyll a, total carotenoids, and fatty acids, showed significant differences (p media, the fatty acids unsaturation degree was lower with increasing irradiance, being eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5 n-3 (EPA) most represented (6.20%) in Algal medium at 60 microE/m2.s. This strain of T. pseudonana showed multiple physiological responses to changes in culture conditions, and may be cultivated with an alternative medium, which reduced the operating costs and allowed a high nutritional biomass production value for animals under culture.

  15. Effect of different CO2 concentrations on biomass, pigment content, and lipid production of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Alessandra; Clavero, Esther; Pancaldi, Simonetta; Salvadó Rovira, Joan

    2018-02-01

    The marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana grown under air (0.04% CO 2 ) and 1 and 5% CO 2 concentrations was evaluated to determine its potential for CO 2 mitigation coupled with biodiesel production. Results indicated that the diatom cultures grown at 1 and 5% CO 2 showed higher growth rates (1.14 and 1.29 div day -1 , respectively) and biomass productivities (44 and 48 mg AFDW L -1  day -1 ) than air grown cultures (with 1.13 div day -1 and 26 mg AFDW L -1  day -1 ). The increase of CO 2 resulted in higher cell volume and pigment content per cell of T. pseudonana. Interestingly, lipid content doubled when air was enriched with 1-5% CO 2 . Moreover, the analysis of the fatty acid composition of T. pseudonana revealed the predominance of monounsaturated acids (palmitoleic-16:1 and oleic-18:1) and a decrease of the saturated myristic acid-14:0 and polyunsaturated fatty acids under high CO 2 levels. These results suggested that T. pseudonana seems to be an ideal candidate for biodiesel production using flue gases.

  16. Diuron causes sinking retardation and physiochemical alteration in marine diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Skeletonema marinoi-dohrnii complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Mst Ruhina Margia; Shimasaki, Yohei; Hosain, Md Zahangir; Mukai, Koki; Tsuyama, Michito; Qiu, Xuchun; Tasmin, Rumana; Goto, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    The present research investigated the effect of diuron on sinking rate and the physiochemical changes in two marine diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana (single-celled species) and Skeletonema marinoi-dohrnii complex (chain-forming species). The results revealed that the sinking rate of both diatoms exposed to diuron at a level of 50% effective concentration for growth (EC50) decreased significantly compared with the control. Photosynthetic performance (Fv/Fm and PI ABS ) of both diatoms also decreased significantly with diuron exposure. The number of cells per chain in S. marinoi-dohrnii decreased significantly with diuron treatment, but T. pseudonana cell diameter remained stable. Neutral lipid concentration per cell was significantly higher compared with control at 72 h in both diatom species exposed to EC50 level diuron. And water-soluble protein concentration per cell at 72 h was lower than control in the T. pseudonana EC50 group only. These biochemical changes may decrease specific gravity of cells and seems to cause a decreased sinking rate in diatoms. The positive significant correlation between the numbers of cells per chain and sinking rate in S. marinoi-dohrnii indicated that chain length is also an important factor in sinking rate regulation for chain-forming diatoms. Thus, our present study suggested that suppression of photosynthetic performance and the resultant physiochemical changes induced the decreased sinking rate that may inhibit the normal survival strategy (avoidance from the surface layer where strong light either causes photo-inhibition or interrupts resting cell formation). Therefore, the use of antifouling agents should be considered for the sustainable marine environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of UV radiation on photosynthesis in an Antarctic diatom (Thalassiosira sp.): does vertical mixing matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernando, Marcelo P.; Ferreyra, Gustavo A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The reduction of the Antarctic stratospheric ozone resulted in significant increases in ultraviolet B radiation (UVBR, 280-320 nm) reaching the surface of the ocean. A series of laboratory and field experiments were conducted at Potter Cove (25 de Mayo Is., South Shetland Is., Antarctica) to study the effects of UVBR on photosynthesis of a typical Antarctic bloom forming diatom (Thalassiosira sp.) in fixed and moving incubations. There were three irradiance treatments: PART (with only photosynthetic active radiation, PAR, 400- 700 nm), UVAT (with PAR and ultraviolet A radiation, UVAR, 320-400 nm) and UVBT (with PAR, UVAR and UVBR). The three treatments were incubated in the field and laboratory with a solar simulator (SOLSI) in fixed frames at 0.5 and 5 m depth (S fix and B fix , respectively), while for the moving incubations were done within 6 h cycles (Mix). Considering the field and laboratory pooled data, results suggest an overall 45-50 % photosynthesis inhibition of S fix incubations in relation with Mix ones. During SOLSI experiments no significant differences were found between irradiance treatments under normal and medium ozone concentrations. Under low ozone conditions, a 40 % reduction in photosynthesis was observed in the UVBT for S fix . In contrast, no significant differences were observed between the irradiance treatments for Mix. Field experiment showed results similar to the laboratory ones, but in this case not only S fix but Mix incubations presented a significant reduction in photosynthesis under low ozone. The differences between laboratory and field experiments are discussed in terms of the relative significance of UVBR dose and dose rate on both types of experiments. (author)

  18. Effect of light on 2H/1H fractionation in lipids from continuous cultures of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Julian P.; Maloney, Ashley E.; Gregersen, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    Continuous cultures of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana were grown at irradiances between 6 and 47 μmol m-2 s-1 in order to evaluate the effect of light on hydrogen isotope fractionation in lipids. δ2H values increased with irradiance in phytol by 1.1‰ (μmol m-2 s-1)-1 and by 0.3‰ (μmol m-2 s-1)-1 in the C14:0 fatty acid, but decreased by 0.8‰ (μmol m-2 s-1)-1 in the sterol 24-methyl-cholesta-5,24(28)-dien-3β-ol (C28Δ5,24(28)). The anticorrelation between δ2H values in C28Δ5,24(28) and irradiance is attributed to enhanced sterol precursor synthesis via the plastidic methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway at high irradiance, relative to the cytosolic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway, and the supposition that MEP precursors are 2H-depleted compared to MVA precursors because they incorporate a greater proportion of hydrogen from photosynthetically produced NADPH. Increasing δ2H values of phytol and C14:0 with irradiance is attributed to a greater proportion of pyruvate, the last common precursor to both lipids, being sourced from glycolysis in the mitochondria and cytosol, where enhanced incorporation of metabolic NADPH and further hydrogen exchange with cell water can enrich pyruvate with 2H relative to pyruvate from the chloroplast. Irrespective of the biosynthetic mechanisms responsible for the 2H/1H fractionation response to light, the high sensitivity of lipid δ2H values in T. pseudonana continuous cultures would result in -30‰ to +40‰ variations in δ2H over a 40 μmol m-2 s-1 range in sub-saturating irradiance if expressed in the environment, depending on the lipid.

  19. Ameliorating effects of extracellular polymeric substances excreted by Thalassiosira pseudonana on algal toxicity of CdSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Saijin, E-mail: zhangs@tamug.edu [Department of Marine Science, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Jiang Yuelu, E-mail: jyuelu@gmail.com [Department of Marine Biology, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Chen, Chi-Shuo, E-mail: chen.chishuo@gmail.com [School of Engineering, University of California - Merced, Merced, CA 95344 (United States); Creeley, Danielle [Department of Marine Science, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Schwehr, Kathleen A., E-mail: schwerhk@tamug.edu [Department of Marine Science, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Quigg, Antonietta, E-mail: quigga@tamug.edu [Department of Marine Biology, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Department of Oceanography, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Chin, Wei-Chun, E-mail: wchin2@ucmerced.edu [School of Engineering, University of California - Merced, Merced, CA 95344 (United States); Santschi, Peter H., E-mail: santschi@tamug.edu [Department of Marine Science, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Department of Oceanography, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles (ENs) that have found increasing applications and shown great potential in drug delivery, biological imaging and industrial products. Knowledge of their stability, fate and transport in the aquatic environment is still lacking, including details of how these nanomaterials interact with marine phytoplankton. Here, we examined the toxicity of functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs (amine- and carboxyl-) by exposing them for five days to Thalassiosira pseudonana (marine diatom) grown under different nutrient-conditions (enriched versus nitrogen-limited media). The released polysaccharides and proteins, the major components of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured to assess their potential effects on the interactions between QDs and T. pseudonana. The partitioning of QDs was analyzed by monitoring the concentration of Cd in different size fractions of the cultures (i.e., filtrate, <0.22 {mu}m and permeate, <3 kDa). We found that the Cd release of QDs in the T. pseudonana culture was dependent on the nutrient conditions and nature of QDs' surface coating. Both amine- and carboxyl-functionalized QDs exhibited higher rates of Cd release in N-limited cultures than in nutrient enriched cultures. The results also showed that amine-functionalized QDs aggregate with minimal Cd release, independent of nutrient conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images confirmed that aggregates are composed of QDs and the culture matrix (EPS). In addition, both types of QDs showed limited toxicity to T. pseudonana. The increasing production of proteins induced by QDs suggests that extracellular proteins might be involved in the detoxification of QDs to T. pseudonana via the Cd release of QDs. Our results here demonstrated that EPS can play an ameliorating role in QD toxicity, fate and transport in the aquatic environment.

  20. Uncoupling of silicon compared with carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and the role of the cell cycle in continuous cultures of Thalassiosira pseudonana (Bacillariophyceae) under light, nitrogen and phosphorus control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claquin, P.; Martin-Jézéquel, V.R.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Veldhuis, M.; Kraay, G.W.

    2002-01-01

    The elemental composition and the cell cycle stages of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana Hasle and Heimdal were studied in continuous cultures over a range of different light- (E), nitrogen- (N), and phosphorus- (P) limited growth rates. In all growth conditions investigated, the decrease

  1. A comparison of morphological and molecular-based surveys to estimate the species richness of Chaetoceros and Thalassiosira (bacillariophyta, in the Bay of Fundy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Hamsher

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to compare the ability of morphology and molecular-based surveys to estimate species richness for two species-rich diatom genera, Chaetoceros Ehrenb. and Thalassiosira Cleve, in the Bay of Fundy. Phytoplankton tows were collected from two sites at intervals over two years and subsampled for morphology-based surveys (2010, 2011, a culture-based DNA reference library (DRL; 2010, and a molecular-based survey (2011. The DRL and molecular-based survey utilized the 3' end of the RUBISCO large subunit (rbcL-3P to identify genetic species groups (based on 0.1% divergence in rbcL-3P, which were subsequently identified morphologically to allow comparisons to the morphology-based survey. Comparisons were compiled for the year (2011 by site (n = 2 and by season (n = 3. Of the 34 taxa included in the comparisons, 50% of taxa were common to both methods, 35% were unique to the molecular-based survey, and 12% were unique to the morphology-based survey, while the remaining 3% of taxa were unidentified genetic species groups. The morphology-based survey excelled at identifying rare taxa in individual tow subsamples, which were occasionally missed with the molecular approach used here, while the molecular methods (the DRL and molecular-based survey, uncovered nine cryptic species pairs and four previously overlooked species. The last mentioned were typically difficult to identify and were generically assigned to Thalassiosira spp. during the morphology-based survey. Therefore, for now we suggest a combined approach encompassing routine morphology-based surveys accompanied by periodic molecular-based surveys to monitor for cryptic and difficult to identify taxa. As sequencing technologies improve, molecular-based surveys should become routine, leading to a more accurate representation of species composition and richness in monitoring programs.

  2. Rising CO2 interacts with growth light and growth rate to alter photosystem II photoinactivation of the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available We studied the interactive effects of pCO(2 and growth light on the coastal marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP 1335 growing under ambient and expected end-of-the-century pCO(2 (750 ppmv, and a range of growth light from 30 to 380 µmol photons·m(-2·s(-1. Elevated pCO(2 significantly stimulated the growth of T. pseudonana under sub-saturating growth light, but not under saturating to super-saturating growth light. Under ambient pCO(2 susceptibility to photoinactivation of photosystem II (σ(i increased with increasing growth rate, but cells growing under elevated pCO(2 showed no dependence between growth rate and σ(i, so under high growth light cells under elevated pCO(2 were less susceptible to photoinactivation of photosystem II, and thus incurred a lower running cost to maintain photosystem II function. Growth light altered the contents of RbcL (RUBISCO and PsaC (PSI protein subunits, and the ratios among the subunits, but there were only limited effects on these and other protein pools between cells grown under ambient and elevated pCO(2.

  3. Coupled effects of light and nitrogen source on the urea cycle and nitrogen metabolism over a diel cycle in the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Sara J; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-03-01

    Diatoms are photoautotrophic organisms capable of growing on a variety of inorganic and organic nitrogen sources. Discovery of a complete urea cycle in diatoms was surprising, as this pathway commonly functions in heterotrophic organisms to rid cells of waste nitrogen. To determine how the urea cycle is integrated into cellular nitrogen metabolism and energy management, the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was maintained in semi-continuous batch cultures on nitrate, ammonium, or urea as the sole nitrogen source, under a 16: 8 light: dark cycle and at light intensities that were low, saturating, or high for growth. Steady-state transcript levels were determined for genes encoding enzymes linked to the urea cycle, urea hydrolysis, glutamine synthesis, pyrimidine synthesis, photorespiration, and energy storage. Transcript abundances were significantly affected by nitrogen source, light intensity and a diel cycle. The impact of N source on differential transcript accumulation was most apparent under the highest light intensity. Models of cellular metabolism under high light were developed based on changes in transcript abundance and predicted enzyme localizations. We hypothesize that the urea cycle is integrated into nitrogen metabolism through its connection to glutamine and in the eventual production of urea. These findings have important implications for nitrogen flow in the cell over diel cycles at surface ocean irradiances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of a variable intracellular acid-labile carbon pool in Thalassiosira weissflogii (Heterokontophyta) and Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) in response to changes in the seawater carbon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isensee, Kirsten; Erez, Jonathan; Stoll, Heather M

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of an intracellular pool of carbon (C(i) pool) is one strategy by which marine algae overcome the low abundance of dissolved CO2 (CO2 (aq) ) in modern seawater. To identify the environmental conditions under which algae accumulate an acid-labile C(i) pool, we applied a (14) C pulse-chase method, used originally in dinoflagellates, to two new classes of algae, coccolithophorids and diatoms. This method measures the carbon accumulation inside the cells without altering the medium carbon chemistry or culture cell density. We found that the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii [(Grunow) G. Fryxell & Hasle] and a calcifying strain of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi [(Lohmann) W. W. Hay & H. P. Mohler] develop significant acid-labile C(i) pools. C(i) pools are measureable in cells cultured in media with 2-30 µmol l(-1) CO2 (aq), corresponding to a medium pH of 8.6-7.9. The absolute C(i) pool was greater for the larger celled diatoms. For both algal classes, the C(i) pool became a negligible contributor to photosynthesis once CO2 (aq) exceeded 30 µmol l(-1) . Combining the (14) C pulse-chase method and (14) C disequilibrium method enabled us to assess whether E. huxleyi and T. weissflogii exhibited thresholds for foregoing accumulation of DIC or reduced the reliance on bicarbonate uptake with increasing CO2 (aq) . We showed that the C(i) pool decreases with higher CO2 :HCO3 (-) uptake rates. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  5. Iron Availability Influences Silicon Isotope Fractionation in Two Southern Ocean Diatoms (Proboscia inermis and Eucampia antarctica and a Coastal Diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Meyerink

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The fractionation of silicon (Si isotopes was measured in two Southern Ocean diatoms (Proboscia inermis and Eucampia Antarctica and a coastal diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana that were grown under varying iron (Fe concentrations. Varying Fe concentrations had no effect on the Si isotope enrichment factor (ε in T. pseudonana, whilst E. Antarctica and P. inermis exhibited significant variations in the value of ε between Fe-replete and Fe-limited conditions. Mean ε values in P. inermis and E. Antarctica decreased from (± 1SD −1.11 ± 0.15‰ and −1.42 ± 0.41 ‰ (respectively under Fe-replete conditions, to −1.38 ± 0.27 ‰ and −1.57 ± 0.5 ‰ (respectively under Fe-limiting conditions. These variations likely arise from adaptations in diatoms arising from the nutrient status of their environment. T. pseudonana is a coastal clone typically accustomed to low Si but high Fe conditions whereas E. Antarctica and P. inermis are typically accustomed to High Si, High nitrate low Fe conditions. Growth induced variations in silicic acid (Si(OH4 uptake arising from Fe-limitation is the likely mechanism leading to Si-isotope variability in E. Antarctica and P. inermis. The multiplicative effects of species diversity and resource limitation (e.g., Fe on Si-isotope fractionation in diatoms can potentially alter the Si-isotope composition of diatom opal in diatamaceous sediments and sea surface Si(OH4. This work highlights the need for further in vitro studies into intracellular mechanisms involved in Si(OH4 uptake, and the associated pathways for Si-isotope fractionation in diatoms.

  6. Contrasting Physiological and Proteomic Adaptations to Iron and/or Copper Limitation in Two Strains of the Same Open Ocean Diatom Thalassiosira oceanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuback, N.; Hippmann, A.; Maldonado, M. T.; Allen, A. E.; McCrow, J.; Foster, L. J.; Green, B. R.; Alami, M.

    2016-02-01

    Iron plays a significant role in controlling marine primary productivity. Despite that extremely low dissolved iron (Fe) concentrations are found in Fe-limited regions, some phytoplankton are able to survive and thrive. Two strains of the model oceanic diatom Thalassiosira oceanica, TO 1003 and TO 1005, have both been used in previous studies to characterize adaptations to iron limitation. These studies have shown that T. oceanica has lowered its Fe requirements and increased its Fe acquisition efficiency compared to coastal counterparts. Both strategies may impose a higher cellular copper (Cu) demand. However, the underlying biochemical adaptations in these oceanic diatoms remain unknown. Recently, the genome, as well as the first proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of T. oceanica 1005 grown under different Fe levels, were published. To further our understanding of the interplay between Fe- and Cu- physiology in open ocean diatoms, we examined an array of physiological responses to varying degrees of Fe-, Cu- and Fe/Cu co-limitation in both strains. We also determined the differential expression of proteins using stable isotope labeling and LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis. The two strains, TO 1003 and TO 1005, need markedly different metal concentrations in the media. TO1003 requires 30% less Cu to sustain its optimal growth and less than 1/10th of the minimum Cu that is needed by TO 1005 to survive. In contrast, TO 1005 is able to grow with less Fe available in the media. The physiological and proteomic responses of these two strains when acclimated to low Fe and/or Cu concentrations will be presented. The evolutionary implications will be discussed.

  7. Influence of thylakoid membrane lipids on the structure of aggregated light-harvesting complexes of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and the green alga Mantoniella squamata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller-Laudel, Susann; Latowski, Dariusz; Jemioła-Rzemińska, Małgorzata; Strzałka, Kazimierz; Daum, Sebastian; Bacia, Kirsten; Wilhelm, Christian; Goss, Reimund

    2017-07-01

    The study investigated the effect of the thylakoid membrane lipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulphoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) on the structure of two algal light-harvesting complexes (LHCs). In contrast to higher plants whose thylakoid membranes are characterized by an enrichment of the neutral galactolipids MGDG and DGDG, both the green alga Mantoniella squamata and the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana contain membranes with a high content of the negatively charged lipids SQDG and PG. The algal thylakoids do not show the typical grana-stroma differentiation of higher plants but a regular arrangement. To analyze the effect of the membrane lipids, the fucoxanthin chlorophyll protein (FCP) complex of T. pseudonana and the LHC of M. squamata (MLHC) were prepared by successive cation precipitation using Triton X-100 as detergent. With this method, it is possible to isolate LHCs with a reduced amount of associated lipids in an aggregated state. The results from 77 K fluorescence and photon correlation spectroscopy show that neither the neutral galactolipids nor the negatively charged lipids are able to significantly alter the aggregation state of the FCP or the MLHC. This is in contrast to higher plants where SQDG and PG lead to a strong disaggregation of the LHCII whereas MGDG and DGDG induce the formation of large macroaggregates. The results indicate that LHCs which are integrated into thylakoid membranes with a high amount of negatively charged lipids and a regular arrangement are less sensitive to lipid-induced structural alterations than their counterparts in membranes enriched in neutral lipids with a grana-stroma differentiation. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Effect of salinity on growth and chemical composition of the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii at three culture phases Efecto de la salinidad en el crecimiento y composición química de la diatomea Thalassiosira weissflogii en tres fases de cultivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma García

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The estuarine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii (Fryxell & Hasle, 1977 has been widely used as live feed in aquaculture. The growth rate and biochemical composition of microalgae are highly influenced by environmental factors such as, light, salinity and nutrient availability. Salinity is difficult to control in some shrimp laboratories specialized in larvae production, because these laboratories depend upon the levels measured in estuaries or coastal lagoons, which are the water sources for larvae culture. The present study evaluated the effect of different salinities (25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 psu, on the growth and chemical composition of T. weisflogii at three culture phases, under laboratory conditions. The highest growth rate and maximum cell density were found at 25 psu. Decrease in size and striking changes in morphology of the cells were observed at the higher salinities and drastic changes occurred at 50 psu. Protein and carbohydrate content were higher at low salinities (25 and 30 psu during the stationary phase. The lipid production was higher at low salinities, but diminished as the phase changes occurred; in contrast, the lipid content was unaffected by the growth phase at higher salinities (≥ 35 psu. The higher growth rate and better biochemical composition were obtained at 25 and 30 psu.La diatomea estuarina Thalassiosira weissflogii (Fryxell & Hasle, 1977 ha sido utilizada como alimento vivo en acuacultura. La composición bioquímica del alimento vivo afecta la nutrición de los organismos durante su cultivo. La tasa de crecimiento y composición bioquímica de las microalgas están altamente influenciadas por factores ambientales como luz, salinidad y disponibilidad de nutrientes. En algunos laboratorios productores de larvas de camarón, es difícil controlar la salinidad, debido a que éstos dependen de los niveles presentes en estuarios o lagunas costeras, los cuales son la fuente de agua para el cultivo larvario. El

  9. Fotoprotección antioxidante no-enzimática contra el potencial daño inducido por UVBR en una diatomea antártica (Thalassiosira sp. Non-enzymatic antioxidant photoprotection against potential UVBR-induced damage in an Antarctic diatom (Thalassiosira sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Hernando

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In January 1999, unialgal cultures of the diatom Thalassiosira sp., solate from natural phyto-plankton assemblages from Potter Cove, Antarctica, were exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280400 nm in order to study the long-term acclimation of this species. Ultraviolet radiation B (UVBR, 280-315 nm inhibited the growth rate during the first and second days of exposure. No UVBR inhibition was observed on the third day. The initial content of α-tocopherol (13 pmol (10(4 cell-1 showed a marked decrease during the exponential growth phase (4 pmol (10(4 cell-1 by day 3. The initial content of β-carotene (3 pmol (10(4 cell-1 did not show significant differences over time in cells exposed to UVBR. Two mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs were identified: porphyra-334 and shinorine. Cellular concentrations of MAAs increased significantly on days 2 and 3, and exposure of the algae to UVBR significantly enhanced this value. The relative importance of MAAs concentration was significant (P Durante enero 1999, cultivos unialgales de una diatomea Thalassiosira sp., aislada de poblaciones fitoplanctónicas naturales de Caleta Carlos Potter, Antártida, fueron expuestos a radiación solar ultravioleta (UVR, 280-400 nm con el objetivo de estudiar su aclimatación a largo plazo. La radiación ultravioleta B (UVBR, 280-315 nm inhibió la tasa de crecimiento durante el primer y segundo día de exposición. No se observó inhibición por UVBR durante el tercer día. El contenido inicial de α-tocopherol (13 pmol (10(4 cel-1 mostró una marcada disminución durante la fase de crecimiento exponencial (4 pmol (10(4 cel-1 al día 3. El contenido inicial de β-caroteno (3 pmol (10(4 cel-1 no mostró diferencias significativas entre días en células expuestas a UVBR. Se identificaron dos aminoácidos parecidos a micosporina (MAAs, porfira-334 y shinorina. Las concentraciones celulares de MAAs mostraron aumentos significativos en los días 2 y 3, que resultaron

  10. Thalassiosira mala (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akshinthala K S K Prasad

    2018-01-18

    Jan 18, 2018 ... Professor T. V. Desikachary and his research group pub- lished the ... the complete absence of fultoportulae in Coscinodiscaceae, features that can only .... English version of Takano's description is reproduced here for reference. ...... Bacillariophyceae in Chile between 18°28' S and 58° S. Bibl. Diatomol.

  11. The Life Cycle of the Centric Diatom Thalassiosira Weissflogii: Control of Gametogenesis and Cell Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    require vitamin B12, the number of bacteria-free clones of diatoms maintained in culture increased dramatically during the fifties and sixties (Lewin...t333hlo444135 iit341333433 the vell k3 4c41 Ntoie h thel 314 331tfl IN~k A o n pe433 t 33 11111 highe3r1 ti’r On~% 34443433343333333 4111 111013 In~3

  12. Biosilica from Living Diatoms: Investigations on Biocompatibility of Bare and Chemically Modified Thalassiosira weissflogii Silica Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Roberta Cicco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs with a large surface area and pore volume have attracted considerable attention for their application in drug delivery and biomedicine. Here we propose biosilica from diatoms as an alternative source of mesoporous materials in the field of multifunctional supports for cell growth: the biosilica surfaces were chemically modified by traditional silanization methods resulting in diatom silica microparticles functionalized with 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS and 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that the –SH or –NH2 were successfully grafted onto the biosilica surface. The relationship among the type of functional groups and the cell viability was established as well as the interaction of the cells with the nanoporosity of frustules. These results show that diatom microparticles are promising natural biomaterials suitable for cell growth, and that the surfaces, owing to the mercapto groups, exhibit good biocompatibility.

  13. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles derived from consumer products on the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased manufacture of TiO2 nano-products has caused concern about the potential toxicity of these products to the environment and in public health. Identification and confirmation of the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles derived from consumer products as opposed to industrial TiO...

  14. Interactive effects of temperature and light during deep convection: a case study on growth and condition of the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, B.; Peters, J.; van Beusekom, J. E. E.

    2015-01-01

    pulses of a higher light intensity (120 mmol m22 s21, 2/22 hlight/dark). Both experimental light conditions offered the same daily light dose. No growth was observed at temperatures below 88C. Above 88C, growth rates were significantly higher under low light conditions compared with those of short pulsed...... light exposures, indicating a higher efficiency of light utilization. This could be related to (i) a higher content of Chl a per cell in the lowlight trial and/or (ii) a more efficient transfer of light energy into growth as indicated by constantly low carbohydrate levels.In contrast, pulsed intense...... did not provide sufficient light to reach full light saturation. In general, photosynthesis was more strongly affected by temperature under pulsed light than under low light conditions. Our results indicate that model estimates of primary production in relation to deep convection, which are based...

  15. The Influence of Growth Rate on 2H/1H Fractionation in Continuous Cultures of the Coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi and the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Julian P; Kawka, Orest E

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope (2H/1H) ratio of lipids from phytoplankton is a powerful new tool for reconstructing hydroclimate variations in the geologic past from marine and lacustrine sediments. Water 2H/1H changes are reflected in lipid 2H/1H changes with R2 > 0.99, and salinity variations have been shown to cause about a 1‰ change in lipid δ2H values per unit (ppt) change in salinity. Less understood are the effects of growth rate, nutrient limitation and light on 2H/1H fractionation in phytoplankton. Here we present the first published study of growth rate effects on 2H/1H fractionation in the lipids of coccolithophorids grown in continuous cultures. Emiliania huxleyi was cultivated in steady state at four growth rates and the δ2H value of individual alkenones (C37:2, C37:3, C38:2, C38:3), fatty acids (C14:0, C16:0, C18:0), and 24-methyl cholest-5,22-dien-3β-ol (brassicasterol) were measured. 2H/1H fractionation increased in all lipids as growth rate increased by 24‰ to 79‰ (div d-1)-1. We attribute this response to a proportional increase in the fraction of NADPH from Photosystem I (PS1) of photosynthesis relative to NADPH from the cytosolic oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway in the synthesis of lipids as growth rate increases. A 3-endmember model is presented in which lipid hydrogen comes from NADPH produced in PS1, NADPH produced by OPP, and intracellular water. With published values or best estimates of the fractionation factors for these sources (αPS1 = 0.4, αOPP = 0.75, and αH2O = 0) and half of the hydrogen in a lipid derived from water the model indicates αlipid = 0.79. This value is within the range measured for alkenones (αalkenone = 0.77 to 0.81) and fatty acids (αFA = 0.75 to 0.82) in the chemostat cultures, but is greater than the range for brassicasterol (αbrassicasterol = 0.68 to 0.72). The latter is attributed to a greater proportion of hydrogen from NADPH relative to water in isoprenoid lipids. The model successfully explains the increase in 2H/1H fractionation in the sterol 24-methyl-cholesta-5,24(28)-dien-3β-ol from marine centric diatom T. pseudonana chemostat cultures as growth rate increases. Insensitivity of αFA in those same cultures may be attributable to a larger fraction of hydrogen in fatty acids sourced from intracellular water at the expense of NADPH as growth rate increases. The high sensitivity of α to growth rate in E. huxleyi lipids and a T. pseudonana sterol implies that any change in growth rate larger than ~0.15 div d-1 can cause a change in δ2Hlipid that is larger than the analytical error of the measurement (~5‰), and needs to be considered when interpreting δ2Hlipid variations in sediments.

  16. Photosynthetic and transcriptional responses of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana to the combined effect of temperature stress and copper exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leung, Priscilla T. Y.; Yi, Andy Xianliang; Ip, Jack C. H.

    2017-01-01

    ) was positively modulated by increasing temperatures. Hsp 90, hsp90-2 and sit1 (related to silica shell formation) were highly expressed at 30°C under 1000μg/L Cu, while the genes encoding light harvesting proteins (3HfcpA and 3HfcpB) and silaffin precursor sil3 were significantly up-regulated at 15°C under 200μg...

  17. Diatomaceous Fungal and Bacterial Building Blocks for Material Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-08

    Thalassiosira-templated metallic microshells. Thalassiosira, only 1mM rhodamine 6G (d) lmM, (e) I piM ,(f 100 nM R6G. 4 concentrations gave detectable...hybridized with a 27-mer 7 oligonucleotide containing a 7-mer TAG GAA TAG TTA TA AT OTT ATT AGO complementary region 2, which produces TAIOATCCTTA TACAATAATCC

  18. Microalgae respond differently to nitrogen availability during culturing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-17

    Apr 17, 2015 ... mechanisms to overcome stress due to N limitation. The representatives of ... ing higher plants, Thalassiosira weissflogii. (Heterokontophyta) ..... agreement with increased oxidative stress under N starva- tion, the activity of ...

  19. Diatom genomics: genetic acquisitions and mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, R Ellen R; Kilian, Oliver; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2004-12-29

    Diatom algae arose by two-step endosymbiosis. The complete genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has now been sequenced, allowing us to reconstruct the remarkable intracellular gene transfers that occurred during this convoluted cellular evolution.

  20. Herbivory in the soft coral Sinularia flexibilis (Alcyoniidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piccinetti, C.C.; Ricci, R.; Pennesi, C.; Radaelli, G.; Totti, C.; Norici, A.; Giordano, Mario; Olivotto, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, MAR 8 (2016), s. 22679 ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : DIATOM THALASSIOSIRA-PSEUDONANA * STYLOPHORA-PISTILLATA * SCLERACTINIAN CORALS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. Macrobenthic community structure of coastal Arabian Sea during the fall intermonsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Gaonkar, U.V.; Deshmukh, A.; Mukherjee, I.; Sivadas, S.K.; Gophane, A.

    that the FIM period is critical in structuring the coastal benthic community Results indicated Coscinodiscus sp and Thalassiosira sp were dominant in the phytoplankton and the microphytobenthos community Zooplankton was dominated by small sized calanoid...

  2. Impact of the antifouling agent Irgarol 1051 on marine phytoplankton species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buma, Anita G. J.; Sjollema, Sascha B.; van de Poll, Willem H.; Klamer, Hans J. C.; Bakker, Joop F.

    In the present study we tested the hypothesis that environmental concentrations of the antifouling agent Irgarol 1051, as measured in coastal Western European waters, affect marine phytoplankton performance. The impact of Irgarol was investigated in the phytoplankton species Thalassiosira

  3. Using biodiversity of diatoms to identify hydrological connectivity in the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, C. E.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Ector, L.; Hlubikova, D.; Frentress, J.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hoffmann, L.; Pfister, L.

    2012-04-01

    very intense rainfall events cause a single-tailed rather small rise of the hydrograph in the Weierbach. Mixing diagrams suggest a very brief and intense switch from groundwater to soil water contribution. Almost simultaneously to incoming precipitation, terrestrial diatom abundance increases to 20-30% inside the stream. Species composition was also seasonally structured. During winter season (November 2010 and January 2011 events) the diatom drift was characterized and dominated by colony forming species (e.g. Fragilaria nevadensis Linares-Cuesta & Sánchez-Castillo and Fragilariforma virescens (Ralfs) Williams & Round), while summer events were characterized by a large number of small aerophytic species (i.e. Chamaepinnularia evanida (Hustedt) Lange-Bertalot, Eolimna tantula (Hustedt) Lange-Bertalot, Navicula obsoleta Hustedt, Navicula parsura Hustedt and Stauroneis thermicola (Petersen) Lund). Chemical tracers suggest a substantial role of soil water contributions to storm hydrographs in the Weierbach, regardless of the season, with overland flow playing no prominent role at all. Meanwhile, terrestrial diatom abundance in drift samples strongly increases during precipitation events, suggesting a rapid onset of connectivity between the soil surface and the stream. We assume the terrestrial diatoms to be mobilized during precipitation and eventually flushed to the stream through a subsurface network of macropores in the shallow soils and cracks in the fractured and weathered schistose bedrock.

  4. Potential effects of climate change on the distribution range of the main silicate sinker of the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkernell, Stefan; Beszteri, Bánk

    2014-08-01

    Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, a dominant diatom species throughout the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, is coined to be one of the main drivers of the biological silicate pump. Here, we study the distribution of this important species and expected consequences of climate change upon it, using correlative species distribution modeling and publicly available presence-only data. As experience with SDM is scarce for marine phytoplankton, this also serves as a pilot study for this organism group. We used the maximum entropy method to calculate distribution models for the diatom F. kerguelensis based on yearly and monthly environmental data (sea surface temperature, salinity, nitrate and silicate concentrations). Observation data were harvested from GBIF and the Global Diatom Database, and for further analyses also from the Hustedt Diatom Collection (BRM). The models were projected on current yearly and seasonal environmental data to study current distribution and its seasonality. Furthermore, we projected the seasonal model on future environmental data obtained from climate models for the year 2100. Projected on current yearly averaged environmental data, all models showed similar distribution patterns for F. kerguelensis. The monthly model showed seasonality, for example, a shift of the southern distribution boundary toward the north in the winter. Projections on future scenarios resulted in a moderately to negligibly shrinking distribution area and a change in seasonality. We found a substantial bias in the publicly available observation datasets, which could be reduced by additional observation records we obtained from the Hustedt Diatom Collection. Present-day distribution patterns inferred from the models coincided well with background knowledge and previous reports about F. kerguelensis distribution, showing that maximum entropy-based distribution models are suitable to map distribution patterns for oceanic planktonic organisms. Our scenario projections indicate

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the later part of the intermonsoon (InterM) phase, an abrupt decline in salinity led to a surge in phytoplankton biomass (Chlorophyll ∼14 mg m−3), of a population that was dominated by Thalassiosira eccentricus. As the southwest monsoon (SWM) progressed and the estuary freshened salinity and Chlorophyll  ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. LOCHNER. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 59-74 Article. Thalassiosira mala italic> (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine diatom from Chilka Lake and other coastal localities of Odisha, India: Nomenclature, frustule morphology ...

  7. Enhancement of the reactive iron pool by marine diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Fischer, Astrid C.; Kroon, Koos J.; Buma, Anita G. J.; Wolterbeek, Bert Th.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Short term (2 days) laboratory experiments were performed to study the change in irradiance induced production of Fe(II) in seawater in the presence of two open oceanic Southern Ocean diatom species, Thalassiosira sp. and Chaetoceros brevis. Three irradiance conditions were applied: 1) UVB+UVA+VIS,

  8. Effect of Engineered Nanoparticles on Exopolymeric Substances Release from Marine Phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Khan, Zafir A.; Garcia, Santiago G.; Le, Andre D.; Kagiri, Agnes; Ramos, Javier; Tsai, Shih-Ming; Drobenaire, Hunter W.; Santschi, Peter H.; Quigg, Antonietta; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), products from modern nanotechnologies, can potentially impact the marine environment to pose serious threats to marine ecosystems. However, the cellular responses of marine phytoplankton to ENPs are still not well established. Here, we investigate four different diatom species (Odontella mobiliensis, Skeletonema grethae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Thalassiosira pseudonana) and one green algae (Dunaliella tertiolecta) for their extracellular polymeric substance...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JAMES A NIENOW. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 59-74 Article. Thalassiosira mala italic> (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine diatom from Chilka Lake and other coastal localities of Odisha, India: Nomenclature, frustule ...

  10. Bioaccumulation of Cs-137 and Co-57 by marine phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heldal, H.E.; Stupakoff, I.; Fisher, N.S.

    1999-01-01

    Under controlled laboratory conditions we have examined the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 and Co-57 in three prymnesiophytes, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi and the non-calcareous species Isochrysis galbana and Phaeocystis globosa, and two diatoms Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. We measured uptake in growing and non-growing cells, and determined concentration factors on both volume and dry weight basis. For Co-57 uptake in non-growing cells, volume concentration factors (VCF) at equilibrium ranged from 0.2 * 10 3 for Emiliana huxleyi to 4 * 10 3 for the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. For Cs-137 uptake in non-growing cells the VCFs were close to zero. The results suggest that, in contrast to Co, the cycling and bioaccumulation in animals of Cs in marine systems is unlikely to be affected by primary producers. (au)

  11. Late Pliocene diatoms in a diatomite from Prydz Bay, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahood, A.D.; Barron, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Very well-preserved Pliocene diatoms from a diatomite unit interbedded within glacial sediments at Ocean Drilling Program Site 742 in Prydz Bay, Antarctica are documented and illustrated. The presence of Thalassiosira kolbei, T. torokina, Actinocyclus actinochilus, A. karstenii and the absence of Nitzschia interfrigidaria. T. insigna and T. vulnifica in Sample 119-742A-15R-4, 44-46cm constrain its age to ca. 2.2-1.8 Ma (late Pliocene). Diatoms associated with sea ice constitute 35% of the Pliocene diatom assemblage, compared with 71% of the modern sediment assemblage at the site, suggesting that sea ice was present during the late Pliocene period of deposition of the sample, although it probably was not the significant feature it is today. Thalassiosira ellitipora (Donahue) Fenner is described and illustrated in detail and is validly published. An expanded description and numerous illustrations are also presented for T. torokina Brady.

  12. Effects of light and temperature on the growth rate of potentially ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thalassiosira allenii is a potentially harmful marine diatom distributed along the Northern Aegean and Southern Black Sea coasts of Turkey. In order to better understand the effect of environmental factors on T. allenii, the effects of 6 different light intensities (6.5, 38.7, 77.5, 116.2, 15 and 193.7 mmol/m2s (PAR)) and 4 ...

  13. A Gene in the Process of Endosymbiotic Transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroutová, Kateřina; Kořený, Luděk; Bowler, Ch.; Oborník, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 10 (2010), e13234 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA601410907 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : MINO-ACID REPLACEMENT * DIATOM THALASSIOSIRA-PSEUDONANA * PHAEODACTYLUM-TRICORNUTUM * PHOTOSYSTEM-II * NUCLEOTIDE-SEQUENCE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2010

  14. AcEST: BP917517 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TQQFPNQPASIQGNHHTM 1898 >tr|Q98SV6|Q98SV6_SCOCA Myostatin (Fragment) OS=Scomberom...ant alignments: (bits) Value tr|B8CGK5|B8CGK5_THAPS Predicted protein OS=Thalassiosira pseudo... 34 3.2 tr|Q98SV6|Q98SV6_SCOCA Myosta...tin (Fragment) OS=Scomberomorus cav... 33 5.4 tr|Q4UAA3|Q4UAA3_THEAN Putative uncha

  15. Growth of microalgae in autotrophic stationary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cunha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the growth of nine marine microalgae species (Nannochloropsis oculata, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Isochrysis galbana, Tetraselmis suecica, Tetraselmis chuii, Chaetoceros muelleri, Thalassiosira fluviatilis and Isochrysis sp. and one freshwater species (Chlorella vulgaris under stationary autotrophy conditions, using erlenmeyers fl asks with 800mL of culture medium exposed to constant light intensities providing a photon flux density of about 150μmol.m-2.s-1 and 25±2oC temperature and constant air flow. The experiment was carried out in a controlled environment considering a block delineating randomized over time with three replicates. The Nannochloropsis oculata showed the highest value of maximum cellular density, but with a longer period of time and a lower growth rate. This was probably due to its tiny cell size, demanding a large number of cells per volume to attain its optimum conditions for light, nutrients, water and atmospheric carbon dioxide. In addition, in spite of showing one of the lowest values of maximum cellular density, Thalassiosira fluviatilis was the species that reached its maximum in a short period of time at the highest growth rate. Chlorella vulgaris was the only freshwater species tested and it showed the poorest performance for all the variables analyzed in the current study.

  16. Application of MSSIP-2 nutrient in marine phytoplankton culture to support the production of biomass for biofuel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba, Paulina; Kasim, S.; Raya, I.

    2018-03-01

    A research on the application of MSSIP-2 nutrient in marine phytoplankton culture has been conducted to produce biomass to be used as raw material for biofuel. Marine phytoplankton was cultivated using the nutrient media and the growth rates were studied by measuring the cell solidity at various growth times. Seven phytoplanktons; Isochrysis aff galbana, Spirulina sp., Thalassiosira sp., and Nitzchia sp., Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros calcitrans and Isochrysis tahiti were used in the research. The experimental temperature, salinity, and pH of the media were measured and the specific growth rates of phytoplanktons were determined using the first order rate equation. Results showed that the highest specific growth rate was given by Chlorella vulgaris (0.0322 cells/hour) and the lowest one was by Thalassiosira sp. (0.0277 cells/hour). The highest biomass weight was obtained from Isochrysis aff galbana (0.329 g), whereas the lowest one (0.27 g) was from Nitzchia sp. The carbohydrate content was various, the highest content was 34.07% found in Isochrysis aff galbana and the lowest was 28.16% in Thalassiosira sp.

  17. A new diatom growth inhibition assay using the XTT colorimetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weina; Akagi, Takuya; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Takimoto, Ayaka; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Marine biofouling, which leads to significant operational stress and economic damage on marine infrastructures, is a major problem in marine related industries. Currently, the most common way to avoid marine biofouling involves the use of biocidal products in surface coatings. However, the need for environmentally friendly antibiofouling compounds has increased rapidly with the recent global prohibition of harmful antifoulants, such as tributyltin (TBT). In particular, periphytic diatoms have been shown to contribute significantly to biofilms, which play an important role in biofouling. Therefore, inhibiting the proliferation of fouling diatoms is a very important step in the prevention of marine biofouling. In this study, we developed a new, rapid, accurate, and convenient growth inhibition assay using the XTT colorimetric method to prevent the growth of the fouling periphytic diatom, Nitzschia amabilis Hidek. Suzuki (replaced synonym, Nitzschia laevis Hustedt). The feasibility of this method was verified by determining the growth inhibition activities of two standard photosynthetic inhibitors, DCMU and CuSO4. However, neither inhibitor had any cytotoxic activities at the range of concentrations tested. Moreover, this method was applied by screening and purification of herbicidic but non-cytotoxic compounds from cyanobacteria extracts. Our results demonstrate the utility of this newly established growth inhibition assay for the identification of marine anti-biofouling compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Seasonal changes in nutrients, chlorophyll a and the phytoplankton assemblage of the western subarctic gyre in the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Mamiko; Shiga, Naonobu; Saito, Masaru; Imai, Keiri; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    The standing stock and species composition of phytoplankton (>10 μm) were studied using monthly water samples collected at Stn KNOT (Kyodo North Pacific Ocean Time Series; 44°N, 155°E) in the western subarctic gyre in the Pacific Ocean through June 1998 to June 1999 (except for January-April 1999) and January-February 2000. One-liter water samples were preserved in 1% neutrally buffered formalin. Identification and enumeration of phytoplankton were made with an inverted microscope. Nutrients did not appear to be depleted for phytoplakton growth during any season. The vertical distribution of phytoplankton was primarily restricted by the pycnocline, and the bulk of phytoplankton assemblage existed within the surface mixed layer. In July, however, some senescent cells were observed at 200 m. Phytoplankton abundance clearly showed a spring maximum (i.e. spring bloom) in May. The seasonal change in cell numbers, however, did not coincide closely with the change in chlorophyll a concentration. Centric diatoms, which were composed of Thalassiosira, Chaetoceros, and Coscinodiscus, dominated all year round, and showed temporal succession. Pennate diatoms (mostly Neodenticula seminae and Fragilariopsis) increased only during the spring bloom. Dinoflagellates (mostly Gymnodinium and Prorocentrum) were low in abundance, although they increased in summer when the phytoplankton standing stock was low. Silicoflagellate abundance was extremely low. Comparing the annual species composition of phytoplankton between Stn KNOT and Stn P (50°N, 145°W) in the Alaskan Gyre, there was a remarkable difference between the two sites. The phytoplankton assemblage at Stn P is characterized by a high abundance of Rhizosolenia alata and low abundance of Thalassiosira. In contrast, Thalassiosira dominates at Stn KNOT during most seasons.

  19.  Serial replacement of diatom endosymbiont in two freshwater dinoflagellates, Peridiniopsis spp., (Peridiniales, Dinophyceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takano, Y.; Hansen, Gert; Fujita, D.

    2008-01-01

    Two freshwater armoured dinoflagellates, Peridiniopsis cf. kevei from Japan and Peridiniopsis penardii from Japan and Italy, were examined by means of light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Morphological studies indicated that the two dinoflagellates had similar type of cellular......-harbouring dinoflagellates. On the contrary, the phylogenetic analyses based on plastid-encoded rbcL and nuclear-encoded SSU rDNA of the endosymbionts included the endosymbiont of these two freshwater dinoflagellates in the Thalassiosira/Skeletonema-clade (Centrales), whereas the endosymbionts of other diatom...

  20. Phylogenetic distribution of roseobacticides in the Roseobacter group and their effect on microalgae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Phippen, Christopher Broughton William; Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    not produce roseobacticides, possibly due to a transposable element. TDA-producing Ruegeria and Pseudovibrio did not produce roseobacticides. Addition of roseobacticide-containing bacterial extracts affected the growth of the microalgae Rhodomonas salina, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Emiliania huxleyi, while...... growth of Tetraselmis suecica was unaffected. During co-cultivation, growth of E. huxleyi was initially stimulated by the roseobacticide producer DSM 17395, while the subsequent decline in algal cell numbers during senescence was enhanced. Strain 27-4 that does not produce roseobacticides had no effect...

  1. The fate of lipids during development and cold-storage of eggs in the laboratory-reared calanoid copepod, Acartia tonsa Dana, and in response to different algal diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støttrup, Josianne; Bell, J.G.; Sargent, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    : the cryptophyte Rhodomonas baltica, the haptophyte Isochrysis galbana clone T- iso, the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii and the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra. Further, the effect of cold storage of eggs on the lipid composition of the newly hatched nauplii was examined. During development, the fatty acid...... composition changes from a tendency towards high levels of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the early developmental stages towards a tendency to accumulate more saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids in the later developmental stages. However, the content and composition of polyunsaturated fatty...

  2. Influence of algal diet on feeding and egg-production of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa Dana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støttrup, Josianne; Jensen, Johanne

    1990-01-01

    Threshold concentration, retention efficiency and egg-production in the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa Dana were examined using the algal species Isochrysis galbana clone T-iso, Dunalietta tertiolecta Butcher, Rhodomonas baltica Karsten, Ditylum brightwellii Grunow and Thalassiosira weissflogii...... Grun. Feeding and egg-production in A. tonsa was shown to be influenced by the size, quantity and quality of the food particles. The small I. galbana (4.8 μm) were inefficiently retained by A. tonsa and maximum ingestion rates on this species were first obtained at algal concentrations s> 1 μg C · ml−1...

  3. Can we use laboratory reared copepods for experiments - a comparison of feeding behavior and reproduction between a field and a laboratory population of Acartia tonsa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiselius, P.; Hansen, B.; Jonsson, P.

    1995-01-01

    Motility patterns and egg production were investigated in two populations of Acartia tonsa, field animals from the Oresund and laboratory animals from a 12-year-old (approximate to 120 generations) culture. When observed in aquaria with a layer of Thalassiosira weissflogii in the middle, laboratory...... differed considerably from held-caught A. tonsa from the eastern United States, where both behaviour and egg production changed consistently and in accordance with a strong aggregation in food patches. (C) 1995 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea...

  4. Grazers and phytoplankton growth in the oceans: an experimental and evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, Simona; Knoll, Andrew H; Giordano, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The taxonomic composition of phytoplankton responsible for primary production on continental shelves has changed episodically through Earth history. Geological correlations suggest that major changes in phytoplankton composition correspond in time to changes in grazing and seawater chemistry. Testing hypotheses that arise from these correlations requires experimentation, and so we carried out a series of experiments in which selected phytoplankton species were grown in treatments that differed with respect to the presence or absence of grazers as well as seawater chemistry. Both protistan (Euplotes sp.) and microarthropod (Acartia tonsa) grazers changed the growth dynamics and biochemical composition of the green alga Tetraselmis suecica, the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp., increasing the specific growth rate and palatability of the eukaryotic algae, while decreasing or leaving unchanged both parameters in the cyanobacteria. Synechococcus (especially) and Thalassiosira produced toxins effective against the copepod, but ciliate growth was unaffected. Acartia induced a 4-6 fold increase of Si cell quota in the diatom, but Euplotes had no similar effect. The differential growth responses of the eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria to ciliate grazing may help to explain the apparently coeval radiation of eukaryophagic protists and rise of eukaryotes to ecological prominence as primary producers in Neoproterozoic oceans. The experimental results suggest that phytoplankton responses to the later radiation of microarthropod grazers were clade-specific, and included changes in growth dynamics, toxin synthesis, encystment, and (in diatoms) enhanced Si uptake.

  5. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles derived from ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased manufacture of TiO2 nano-products has caused concern about the potential toxicity of these products to the environment and in public health. Identification and confirmation of the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles derived from consumer products as opposed to industrial TiO2 NPs warrants examination in exploring the significance of their release and resultant impacts on the environment. To this end we examined the significance of the release of these particles and their toxic effect on the marine diatom algae Thalassiosira pseudonana. Our results indicate that nano-TiO2 sunscreen and toothpaste exhibit more toxicity in comparison to industrial TiO2, and inhibited the growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. This inhibition was proportional to the exposure time and concentrations of nano-TiO2. Our findings indicate a significant effect, and therefore further research is warranted in evaluation and assessment of the toxicity of modified nano-TiO2 derived from consumer products and their physicochemical properties. Submit to journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research.

  6. Plutonium uptake by marine phytoplankton in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, N.S.; Olson, B.L.; Bowen, V.T.

    1980-01-01

    At environmentally realistic atom concentrations 237 Pu tracer was used to examine Pu uptake by unialgla cultures of Thalassiosira pseudonana (live and dead), Thalassiosira sp., and Platymonas sp., as well as by glass particles. Live or dead cells and glass particles accumulated Pu at similar rates, indicating that initial uptake was a passive phenomenon. Uptake was strongly affected by the nature of particle surfaces, but much less by composition of the media. Cells from rapidly growing cultures took up more Pu, than did those from late log or senescent cultures. Acid-washed glass took up more Pu, faster, than did unwashed glass. Cells accumulated more Pu from uv-treated seawater than from seawater untreated or enriched with f/50-level EDTA or f/50 vitamins; from complete f/50 medium uptake was even less, as with f/50 trace metals + EDTA. After a shot uptake Pu was 25% removable in tracer-free media, but after 3 days of uptake none was removable in seawater or exometabolite media, and only 15% in f/50-level EDTA. The data support the hypothesis that Pu in marine environments associates with suspended particles that could act as vertical vectors for this element

  7. Transformation research for a sustainable energy system. Contributions; Transformationsforschung fuer ein nachhaltiges Energiesystem. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadermann, Gerd; Szczepanski, Petra; Wunschick, Franziska; Martin, Niklas (comps.)

    2012-03-15

    Within the 2011 annual meeting of the Renewable Energy Research Association (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) from 12th to 13th October 2011, the following lectures were held: (1) Environmentally safe and socially compatible transformation of energy systems (G. Schuette); (2) Open questions on the transformation of energy systems (E. Weber); (3) System analysis on the transformation of energy systems up to 2050 (J. Schmid); (4) Economic aspects: Chances, markets and workplaces (F. Staiss); (5) Perspectives for an interplay of energy efficiency and renewable energy resources as well as their implementation in the energy system (A. Bett); (6) New accents of research promotion for a more rapid development of renewable energy sources (K. Deller); (7) The 6th Energy Research Program of the Federal Government (R. Tryfonidou); (8) Recommendations of the FVEE for the research policy of the Research Government (G. Sadermann); (9) How can research and politics promote the system transformation (M. Hustedt); (10) The energy system of tomorrow - Strategies and research for the transformation of high amounts of renewable energy resources (W. Duerrschmidt); (11) Long-term strategies for the development of renewable energies in Germany (J. Nitsch); (12) Development of storage capacities for an efficient power generation by renewable energy resources in Germany and Europe by 2050 (Y. Scholz); (13) Prognoses of temporal and spatial variability of renewable energy resources (B. Lange); (14) Smart Grids - Transformation of our electrical energy supply (G. Ebert); (15) Model regions for intelligently networked energy systems; (16) Cities and concepts of neighbourhood - model cities (D. Schmidt); (17) Transformation of the German power system to a decentral regenerative economy (U. Leprich); (18) Alteration of the general conditions for new incentive models, heat acts, restoration of buildings (M. Schmidt); (19) Acceptance and participation research on energy sustainability (P

  8. Recent findings regarding non-native or poorly known diatom taxa in north-western Italian rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Falasco

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms of the major rivers of North-Western Italy were investigated to highlight the presence of species of particular ecological interest but not as yet recorded. The survey area included streams belonging to seven different hydroecoregions (HERs with a wide range of physical characteristics. Between 2008 and 2010, 200 samples were taken for the study of the diatom community composition, while a larger set of samples was examined to determine the presence or absence of the nuisance diatom species Didymosphenia geminata (Lyngbye Schmidt. A specific field study was performed in two rivers characterized by persistent blooms of this species to evaluate the effects of its proliferation on the benthic communities. D. geminata was present in almost 20% of the samples. From a comparison with published data, we can confirm that D. geminata has recently been expanding its ecological range, as it has been found also in mesotrophic lowlands water. In some instances the formation of massive proliferation has been recorded. The calculation of autecological values confirmed its preference for oligotrophic waters with low mineral content and organic loading, although with a wider ecological amplitude than recorded in the first studies on this species. Another four taxa of particular interest were detected: Achnanthidium subhudsonis (Hustedt Kobayasi (in 15 sites, Cymbella tropica Krammer (11 sites, Mayamaea cahabaensis Morales and Manoylov (2 sites and Reimeria uniseriata Sala, Guerrero and Ferrario (18 sites. The first three species must be considered new records for Northern Italy. A. subhudsonis and C. tropica reached up to 20% relative abundance. From the analysis of their distribution and autecological values, we can assert that A. subhudsonis and M. cahabaensis show a preference for high values of nitrogen, this latter preferring also quite high values of total phosphorus. C. tropica prefers intermediate values of nitrogen nutrients and R. uniseriata is

  9. Carbon content and C:N ratio of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) produced by bubbling exudates of diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mari, Xavier

    1999-01-01

    The carbon content of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) was measured in the laboratory in particles produced by bubbling exudates of the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, grown under nitrogen non-limited conditions (N:P = 7). The carbon content of these particles (TEP-C) appears to vary...... a coastal area (Kattegat, Denmark), TEP carbon concentration in the surface mixed layer was on the order of 230 ± 150 µg C l-1. This is high relative to other sources of particulate organic carbon (e.g. phytoplankton) and depending on TEP turnover rates, suggests that TEP is an important pathway...... for dissolved organic carbon in coastal seas. The carbon to nitrogen ratio of TEP was measured from particles formed by bubbling exudates of the diatoms T. weissflogii, Skeletonema costatum, Chaetoceros neogracile and C. affinis. Each of these diatom species was grown under various N:P ratios, from N...

  10. Produção de biomassa e teores de carbono, hidrogênio, nitrogênio e proteína em microalgas Production of biomass and carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and protein contents in microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Ohse

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O aumento da emissão de CO2 e de outros gases efeito estufa tem gerado debates em nível mundial sobre alterações climáticas e estimulado o desenvolvimento de estratégias mitigadoras. Trabalhos nessa área incluem sequestro de CO2 por meio da produção de microalgas aquáticas. Por essa razão, desenvolveu-se um estudo visando determinar os teores de carbono, hidrogênio, nitrogênio e proteína e a produção de biomassa seca de nove espécies de microalgas marinhas (Nannochloropsis oculata, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Isochrysis galbana, Tetraselmis suecica, Tetraselmis chuii Chaetoceros muelleri, Thalassiosira fluviatilis e Isochrysis sp. e uma de água doce (Chlorella vulgaris, em cultivo autotrófico estacionário com objetivo de identificar as mais produtivas e com maior capacidade de fixação de carbono. O experimento foi desenvolvido em sala de cultivo, na Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, com iluminação contínua e radiação em torno de 150µmol m-2 s-1, temperatura de 25±2°C, suplementação de ar constante, sendo utilizados erlenmeyers com 800mL de meio de cultura. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos casualizados no tempo com três repetições. As espécies C. vulgaris e T. suecica são menos produtivas. Quando se visa à suplementação alimentar, as espécies C. vulgaris e T. Chuii são consideradas interessantes, uma vez que apresentam altos teores de C, N, H e proteína. As espécies N. Oculata, T. pseudonana e C. vulgaris apresentam altos teores de C, demonstrando alta capacidade de fixação de carbono.The increase of CO2 emission and other gases greenhouse effect, caused global debates about climatic alterations and stimulated the development of mitigative strategies. Researches in this area includes CO2 kidnapping through the aquatic microalgae production. For this reason, a study was developed aiming to determine the production of dry biomass, carbon content, hydrogen

  11. Phytoplankton from Tvaeren, a Bay of the Baltic, 1961-1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willen, Torbjoern [Inst. of Limnology, Univ of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1968-09-15

    The investigation of the qualitative and quantitative composition of the phytoplankton in Tvaeren (Locality 7), a bay of the Baltic, was carried out during the period April 1961 to October 1963. Comprehensive data exist concerning physical and chemical conditions; some of them are included in this paper. A low number of species occur in brackish water; most of them belong to the groups Diatomeae and Peridineae. The total volumes of phytoplankton are low and show peaks only in spring, with some genera, Sceletonema, Thalassiosira and Gonyaulax, predominating. The vertical and seasonal distribution of different groups is discussed. With the exception of the periods of circulation the total volumes showed a marked decrease from c. 25 m and deeper. At 50-70 m the occurrence of some Peridineae often caused a marked increase in total volumes. A comparison with corresponding values from another locality, situated at Bergoe south of Locality 7 in Tvaeren, did not show any great difference.

  12. Bioaccumulation of 137Cs and 57Co by five marine phytoplankton species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heldal, H.E.; Stupakoff, I.; Fisher, N.S.

    2001-01-01

    Under controlled laboratory conditions, we have examined the bioaccumulation of 137 Cs and 57 Co in three prymnesiophytes, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi and the non-calcareous species Isochrysis galbana and Phaeocystis globosa, and two diatoms Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. We measured the uptake in growing and non-growing cells and determined concentration factors on both volume and dry weight bases. For uptake of 57 Co in non-growing cells, volume concentration factors (VCF) at equilibrium ranged from 0.2x10 3 for E. huxleyi to 4x10 3 for T. pseudonana. For uptake of 137 Cs in non-growing cells, the VCFs were low for all species and the uptake pattern seemed unsystematic. The results suggest that, in contrast to Co, the cycling and bioaccumulation of Cs in marine animals are unlikely to be affected by Cs accumulation in primary producers

  13. Feeding traits of the European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, and the invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vismann, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Two oysters, the native flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, and the non-indigenous Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, have partially overlapping distributions in European waters. Relatively little is known about particle selection by O. edulis, and the goal of the present study was to establish baselines...... for particle selection by both oyster species under controlled conditions in the laboratory. The study was carried out with adult oysters of similar shell size collected in the Limfjord estuary, Denmark (56°47′N, 08°51′E), in November 2011. The feeding traits of both species [clearance rate (CR), retention...... efficiency (RE) and lower threshold for clearance (LTC)] were compared using five algal species with different cell sizes (5−32 µm ESD) (Isochrysis galbana, Rhodomonas salina, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Prorocentrum micans and Akashiwo sanguinea). Oysters were acclimated to an experimental temperature of 22...

  14. The functional biology and trophic role of krill (Thysanoessa raschii) in a Greenlandic fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Munk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Despite being a key zooplankton group, knowledge on krill biology from the Arctic is inadequate. The present study examine the functional biology and evaluate the trophic role of krill in the GodthAyenbsfjord (64 degrees N, 51 degrees W) SW Greenland, through a combination of fieldwork...... and laboratory experiments. Krill biomass was highest in the middle fjord and inner fjord, whereas no krill was found offshore. The dominating species Thysanoessa raschii revealed a type III functional response when fed with the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. At food saturation, T. raschii exhibited a daily...... ration of 1% body C d(-1). Furthermore, T. raschii was capable of exploiting plankton cells from 5 to 400 mu m, covering several trophic levels of the pelagic food web. The calculated grazing impact by T. raschii on the fjord plankton community was negligible. However, the schooling and migratory...

  15. Phytoplankton from Tvaeren, a Bay of the Baltic, 1961-1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, Torbjoern

    1968-09-01

    The investigation of the qualitative and quantitative composition of the phytoplankton in Tvaeren (Locality 7), a bay of the Baltic, was carried out during the period April 1961 to October 1963. Comprehensive data exist concerning physical and chemical conditions; some of them are included in this paper. A low number of species occur in brackish water; most of them belong to the groups Diatomeae and Peridineae. The total volumes of phytoplankton are low and show peaks only in spring, with some genera, Sceletonema, Thalassiosira and Gonyaulax, predominating. The vertical and seasonal distribution of different groups is discussed. With the exception of the periods of circulation the total volumes showed a marked decrease from c. 25 m and deeper. At 50-70 m the occurrence of some Peridineae often caused a marked increase in total volumes. A comparison with corresponding values from another locality, situated at Bergoe south of Locality 7 in Tvaeren, did not show any great difference

  16. Nutritional quality of two cyanobacteria : How rich is 'poor' food?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, K.; Jonasdottir, Sigrun

    1997-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have often been described to be nutritionally inadequate and to interfere with zooplankton feeding. In laboratory experiments we offered 2 cyanobacteria, a unicellular Microcystis aeruginosa strain and the filamentous Nodularia sprumigena, to the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa...... as the sole diet and in food mixtures with the nutritious diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. Egg production was used as criterion of food quality. The use of cyanobacteria alone was an insufficient diet. However, with increasing additions of M. aeruginosa and N. spumigena to the diatom, different effects were...... observed. Large additions of cyanobacteria resulted in lower egg production and often in elevated mortality of the females, but small additions of M. aeruginosa caused an increase of about 25 % in egg production compared to a pure diatom diet. The influence of similar low concentrations of N. spumigena...

  17. Copepod guts as biogeochemical hotspots in the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Kam W.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Glud, Anni

    2011-01-01

    The environmental conditions inside the gut of Calanus hyperboreus and C. glacialis were measured with microelectrodes. An acidic potential hydrogen (pH) gradient was present in the gut of C. hyperboreus, and the lowest pH recorded was 5.40. The gut pH of a starved copepod decreased by 0.53 after...... the copepod resumed feeding for a few hours, indicating the secretion of acidic digestive fluid. A copepod feeding on Thalassiosira weissflogii (diatom) had slightly lower pH than that feeding on Rhodomonas salina (cryptophyte). Oxygen was undersaturated in the gut of both C. hyperboreus and C. glacialis......, with a steep gradient from the anal opening to the metasome region. The central metasome region was completely anoxic. Food remains in the gut led to a lower oxygen level, and a diatom diet induced a stronger oxygen gradient than a cryptophyte diet. The acidic and suboxic–anoxic environments of the copepod gut...

  18. Effects of silicon deficiency on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in the diatom Cyclotella cryptica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that silicon deficiency induces lipid accumulation in certain diatom species. The nature of the lipids produced under these conditions was not investigated, however, and the biochemical mechanisms which underlie this phenomenon were not determined. Research was carried out in order to increase our knowledge concerning the aspects of lipid accumulation in diatoms. The first phase of this project indicated that the diatoms C. cryptica, Cylindrotheca fusiformis, and Thalassiosira pseudonana accumulated storage lipids when grown under silicon-limiting conditions. The ratio of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids to polyunsaturated fatty acids in C. cryptica cells increased markedly after 24 hours of silicon deficiency. Tracer experiments with [ 14 C]bicarbonate suggested that lipid accumulation in silicon-limited C. cryptica cells was due to two distinct processes: (1) an increase in the amount of newly photoassimilated carbon partitioned into lipids, and (2) a slow conversion of non-lipid compounds (carbohydrates and presumably proteins) into lipids

  19. Interactions between marine snow and heterotrophic bacteria: aggregate formation and microbial dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, K.W.

    2006-01-01

    as well as abundance, colonization behaviour, and community composition of bacteria during the growth of 2 marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Navicula sp.) under axenic and non-axenic conditions. Community composition of free-living and attached bacteria during phytoplankton growth...... and aggregation was studied by amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results show that the presence of bacteria was a prerequisite for aggregation of T. weissflogii but not of Navicula sp. Occurrences of distinct populations of free-living and attached...... bacteria depended on phytoplankton growth and aggregation dynamics. The community composition of especially attached bacteria significantly differed between the 2 algal cultures. Our study suggests that phytoplankton aggregation and vertical fluxes are closely linked to interactions between the marine...

  20. Coagulation efficiency and aggregate formation in marine phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Andersen, K.P.; Dam, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    , and even nutrient replete cells are significantly sticky. Stickiness is highest (> 10-1) for S. costatum cells in the transition between the exponential and the stationary growth phase. The implications for phytoplankton aggregate formation and subsequent sedimentation in the sea of these two different......Flocculation of phytoplankters into large, rapidly sinking aggregates has been implicated as a mechanism of vertical transport of phytoplankton to the sea floor which could have global significance. The formation rate of phytoplankton aggregates depends on the rate at which single cells collide...... and demonstrate that three species of diatoms grown in the laboratory (Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Skeletonema costatum) are indeed significantly sticky and form aggregates upon collison. The dependency of stickiness on nutrient limitation and growth was studied in the two latter species...

  1. Diatom production in the marine environment : implications for larval fish growth and condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St. John, Michael; Clemmesen, C.; Lund, T.

    2001-01-01

    To test the effects of diatom production on larval fish growth and condition. laboratory experiments were performed with larval North Sea cod reared on different algal food chains. These food chains were based on cultures of (a) the diatoms Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira weissflogii: (b....../omega6 fatty acids in the algal source had no significant effect. The highest and lowest growth rates were observed in food chains based on H. triquetra and T. weissflogii. respectively (means for days 14-16 of 4.0 and - 4.7). The mixed diatom/dinoflagellate diet resulted in inter- mediate growth rates...... and condition. Regressions of growth rates against EPA and DHA content indicated no inhibitory effect of diatom production on growth in larval cod...

  2. Modified Ribose Receptor Response in Isolated Diatom Frustules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, Carly R.

    2011-08-26

    Diatoms are a distinctive group of microalgae with the unique ability to produce a highly-ordered biosilica matrix, known as the frustule. Diatoms hold significant potential in the biotechnology field as a silica scaffold for embedding proteins. In this study, we analyzed the funtionalization of biosilica with a receptor complex through genetic modification of the diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana. Through the use of Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), the receptor was shown to remain active in transformed frustules after the inner cellular contents were removed. In addition to protein functionality, growth conditions for T. pseudonana were optimized. Untransformed cultures receiving aeration grew more rapidly than stagnant untransformed cultures. Surprisingly, transformed cultures grew more quickly than untransformed cultures. This study demonstrates isolated diatom frustules provide an effective scaffold for embedded receptor complexes. Through this research, we provide the groundwork for the development of new biosensors for use in diagnostics and environmental remediation.

  3. Oceanographic and Biogeochemical Insights from Diatom Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Chris; Vardi, Assaf; Allen, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    Diatoms are the most successful group of eukaryotic phytoplankton in the modern ocean and have risen to dominance relatively quickly over the last 100 million years. Recently completed whole genome sequences from two species of diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, have revealed a wealth of information about the evolutionary origins and metabolic adaptations that have led to their ecological success. A major finding is that they have incorporated genes both from their endosymbiotic ancestors and by horizontal gene transfer from marine bacteria. This unique melting pot of genes encodes novel capacities for metabolic management, for example, allowing the integration of a urea cycle into a photosynthetic cell. In this review we show how genome-enabled approaches are being leveraged to explore major phenomena of oceanographic and biogeochemical relevance, such as nutrient assimilation and life histories in diatoms. We also discuss how diatoms may be affected by climate change-induced alterations in ocean processes.

  4. Collection and cultivation methods of Acartia tonsa for toxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, C.A.; Mayo, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    Acartia tonsa were located and collected from Galveston Bay, Texas in June 1995, using plankton nets and transported to the laboratory for culture. After literature searching and laboratory experimentation. A simple reliable method was designed to culture A. tonsa. This method requires a minimum of glassware and supplies. Adult A. tonsa are placed in one gallon bell jars filled with natural seawater. The jars are then maintained in a water bath at a constant temperature. Water changes are conducted twice weekly and organisms are fed daily with a mixture of algae, Skeletonema costatum, isocrysis galbana, and Thalassiosira sp. Gravid females are then isolated in generators for 24 hours to obtain known age neonates. The neonates are maintained up to a specific age and then are used in toxicity tests such as the ''Determination of the Acute Lethal Toxicity to Marine Copepods,'' required in the United Kingdom for all chemicals used for offshore drilling fluid applications

  5. Probing the evolutionary history of epigenetic mechanisms: what can we learn from marine diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Rastogi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress made on epigenetic studies revealed the conservation of epigenetic features in deep diverse branching species including Stramenopiles, plants and animals. This suggests their fundamental role in shaping species genomes across different evolutionary time scales. Diatoms are a highly successful and diverse group of phytoplankton with a fossil record of about 190 million years ago. They are distantly related from other super-groups of Eukaryotes and have retained some of the epigenetic features found in mammals and plants suggesting their ancient origin. Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, pennate and centric diatoms, respectively, emerged as model species to address questions on the evolution of epigenetic phenomena such as what has been lost, retained or has evolved in contemporary species. In the present work, we will discuss how the study of non-model or emerging model organisms, such as diatoms, helps understand the evolutionary history of epigenetic mechanisms with a particular focus on DNA methylation and histone modifications.

  6. Coscinodiscophyceae, Fragilariophyceae e Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthales dos rios Ivaí, São João e dos Patos, bacia hidrográfica do rio Ivaí, município de Prudentópolis, PR, Brasil Coscinodiscophyceae, Fragilariophyceae and Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthales of the Ivaí, São João and Patos rivers in the Ivaí basin, Prudentópolis, Paraná State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ferrari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se o levantamento florístico das Coscinodiscophyceae, Fragilariophyceae e Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthales dos rios Ivaí, São João e dos Patos, pertencentes à bacia hidrográfica do rio Ivaí, município de Prudentópolis, Paraná. Quarenta e uma amostras foram coletadas em março, junho e julho/2002 e janeiro/2003, e analisadas. As coletas fitoplanctônicas foram feitas através de arrasto superficial com rede de plâncton (25 µm e as perifíticas através da coleta de porções submersas de macrófitas aquáticas, rochas, cascalho, sedimento ou substrato arenoso. Foram identificados, nove táxons pertencentes à classe Coscinodiscophyceae, oito à classe Fragilariophyceae e quinze à ordem Achnanthales (Bacillariophyceae. Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow Fryxell & Hasle, Achnanthidium sp., Planothidium biporomum (Hohn & Hellerman Lange-Bertalot e Cocconeis placentula var. pseudolineata Geitler consistiram em novas citações para o estado do Paraná.A floristic study of Coscinodiscophyceae, Fragilariophyceae and Bacillariophyceae (Achnanthales in the Ivaí, São João and Patos rivers from the upper Ivaí river basin, located at Prudentópolis, Paraná State, Brazil is presented. Forty-one samples were collected in March, June and July/2002 and January/2003, and analysed. Phytoplankton samples were collected with a plankton net (25 µm mesh; periphyton was collected by removing the attached material from submerged portions of aquatic macrophytes, rocks, sediment or the sandy substratum. Nine species of the class Coscinodiscophyceae, eight of the class Fragilariophyceae and fourteen of the order Achnanthales were identified. Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow Fryxell & Hasle, Achnanthidium sp., Planothidium biporomum (Hohn & Hellerman Lange-Bertalot and Cocconeis placentula var. pseudolineata Geitler were new diatom records for Paraná State.

  7. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta. Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine

  8. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  9. Bioavailability of organically bound Fe to model phytoplankton of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Hassler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is known to be mostly bound to organic ligands and to limit primary productivity in the Southern Ocean. It is thus important to investigate the bioavailability of organically bound Fe. In this study, we used four phytoplankton species of the Southern Ocean (Phaeocystis sp., Chaetoceros sp., Fragilariopsis kerguelensis and Thalassiosira antarctica Comber to measure the influence of various organic ligands on Fe solubility and bioavailability. Short-term uptake Fe:C ratios were inversely related to the surface area to volume ratios of the phytoplankton. The ratio of extracellular to intracellular Fe is used to discuss the relative importance of diffusive supply and uptake to control Fe bioavailability. The effect of excess organic ligands on Fe bioavailability cannot be solely explained by their effect on Fe solubility. For most strains studied, the bioavailability of Fe can be enhanced relative to inorganic Fe in the presence of porphyrin, catecholate siderophore and saccharides whereas it was decreased in presence of hydroxamate siderophore and organic amine. For Thalassiosira, iron bioavailability was not affected by the presence of porphyrin, catecholate siderophore and saccharides. The enhancement of Fe bioavailability in presence of saccharides is presented as the result from both the formation of bioavailable (or chemically labile organic form of Fe and the stabilisation of Fe within the dissolved phase. Given the ubiquitous presence of saccharides in the ocean, these compounds might represent an important factor to control the basal level of soluble and bioavailable Fe. Results show that the use of model phytoplankton is promising to improve mechanistic understanding of Fe bioavailability and primary productivity in HNLC regions of the ocean.

  10. Fatty acids composition of 10 microalgal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thidarat Noiraksar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids composition of 10 species of microalgae was determined at the exponential phase and the stationary phase. The microalgae consist of two species of diatoms, Bacillariophyceae, (Nitzschia cf. ovalis, Thalassiosira sp. five species of green microalgae, Prasinophyceae (Tetraselmis sp. and Chlorophyceae, (Dictyosphaerium pulchellum, Stichococcus sp., Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus falcatus and three species of blue green microalgae, Cyanophyceae (Anacystis sp., Synechococcus sp., Synechocystis sp..Medium for culture diatoms and green microalgae was F/2, and BG-11 media was used for Cyanophyceae. The microalgae were cultured beneath light intensity 143 μEm-2s-1, light: dark illustration 12:12 hrs., temperature 28ºC, and salinities 8-30 psu. The microalgae were harvested for analyzing fatty acid by centrivugal machine at 3500 rpm. for 5 min. at temperature 20ºC and stored at -80ºC prior to analysis.Fatty acids composition of microalgae differed from species to species. The majority fatty acids composition of diatoms at the exponential phase and the stationary phase were C16:1n-7 (17.12-31.47% and 28.22-42.02%, C16:0 (13.25-19.61% and 18.83-20.67%, C20:5 n-3 (16.65-26.67% and 11.32-23.68% respectively. The principle fatty acids composition of green microalgae, Prasinophyceae, Tetraselmis sp. were C18:3n-3 (16.17-16.67%, C16:0 (15.33-17.45%, C18:1n-9 (12.25-15.43%, C18:2n-6 (9.66-19.97%. The fatty acids composition of green microalgae, Chlorophyceae, were C18:3 n-3 (20.02-26.49% and 15.35- 30.63%, C16:0 (5.76-17.61% and 11.41-20.03%, C18:2n-6 (4.67-17.54% and 7.48-20.61% respectively. The major amounts of fatty acids content of blue green microalgae were C16:1n-7 (9.28-34.91% and 34.48- 35.04%, C14:0 (13.34-25.96% and 26.69-28.24%, C16:0 (5.89-29.15% and 5.70-16.81% except for Anacystis sp.which had a high amount of C18:3 n-3 (23.18-27.98% but low amount of C14:0 (3.66-4.98%.Bacillariophyceae contained the highest amount of highly unsaturated

  11. Ecological and geographical characteristics of algal communities on gastropod shells of the river Uzh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Korniichuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater molluscs serve as test objects in the ecological monitoring of the environment, because they are able to extract in indicator quantity from the environment and accumulate in their bodies radionuclides, various macro- and micronutrients, toxic substances of inorganic and organic origin, and so on. The gastropods are a taxonomically diverse, ecologically plastic and rather widespread group of aquatic organisms, whose role in the life of freshwater ecosystems is very important. Molluscs often have various interactions in biogeocenoses that determines their trophic net. As a rule, these interactions occur in the form of ectocommensalism, endocommensalism, supercrescence, predation or parasitism. The latter type of interaction is the subject of many studies, but the epibionts of gastropods and bivalves have practically not been studied and this research is an effort towards filling this gap. Species composition of algal epibionts identifies specific sensitivity to the effects of certain environmental factors and reflects the processes occurring in their ecosystem water bodies. This determines their efficient use for analyzing changes of water bodies as aquatic habitat, particularly in terms of complex anthropogenic pressure on aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the research was to determine the ecological characteristics of algal communities on gastropod shells: Lymnaea stagnalis, L. auricularia and Viviparus viviparus (the Uzh river, Korosten district, Zhytomyr region. Identified microalgae communities were grouped and studied according to such indices as: confinedness to the habitat (substrate, temperature, fluidity and water oxygenating, saprobiological characteristics according to the Pantle-Buck system in the modification of Sladecek and Watanabe, salinity according to Kolbe’s system, pH at Hustedt scale in the interpretation of M. M. Davydova and geographical limitations of the objects of study. Algal fouling on the shells L. stagnalis

  12. Proteomic amino-termini profiling reveals targeting information for protein import into complex plastids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitter F Huesgen

    Full Text Available In organisms with complex plastids acquired by secondary endosymbiosis from a photosynthetic eukaryote, the majority of plastid proteins are nuclear-encoded, translated on cytoplasmic ribosomes, and guided across four membranes by a bipartite targeting sequence. In-depth understanding of this vital import process has been impeded by a lack of information about the transit peptide part of this sequence, which mediates transport across the inner three membranes. We determined the mature N-termini of hundreds of proteins from the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, revealing extensive N-terminal modification by acetylation and proteolytic processing in both cytosol and plastid. We identified 63 mature N-termini of nucleus-encoded plastid proteins, deduced their complete transit peptide sequences, determined a consensus motif for their cleavage by the stromal processing peptidase, and found evidence for subsequent processing by a plastid methionine aminopeptidase. The cleavage motif differs from that of higher plants, but is shared with other eukaryotes with complex plastids.

  13. The Omics Dashboard for interactive exploration of gene-expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Suzanne; Parker, Karen; Spaulding, Aaron; Tomb, Jean-Francois; O'Maille, Paul; Karp, Peter D

    2017-12-01

    The Omics Dashboard is a software tool for interactive exploration and analysis of gene-expression datasets. The Omics Dashboard is organized as a hierarchy of cellular systems. At the highest level of the hierarchy the Dashboard contains graphical panels depicting systems such as biosynthesis, energy metabolism, regulation and central dogma. Each of those panels contains a series of X-Y plots depicting expression levels of subsystems of that panel, e.g. subsystems within the central dogma panel include transcription, translation and protein maturation and folding. The Dashboard presents a visual read-out of the expression status of cellular systems to facilitate a rapid top-down user survey of how all cellular systems are responding to a given stimulus, and to enable the user to quickly view the responses of genes within specific systems of interest. Although the Dashboard is complementary to traditional statistical methods for analysis of gene-expression data, we show how it can detect changes in gene expression that statistical techniques may overlook. We present the capabilities of the Dashboard using two case studies: the analysis of lipid production for the marine alga Thalassiosira pseudonana, and an investigation of a shift from anaerobic to aerobic growth for the bacterium Escherichia coli. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Uptake and biotransformation of 2,2‧,4,4‧-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in four marine microalgae species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po, Beverly H. K.; Ho, Ka-Lok; Lam, Michael H. W.; Giesy, John P.; Chiu, Jill M. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxylated- and methoxylated- polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs) are more toxic than PBDEs and occur widely in the marine environment, and yet their origins remain controversial. In this study, four species of microalgae (Isochrysis galbana, Prorocentrum minimum, Skeletonema grethae and Thalassiosira pseudonana) were exposed to BDE-47, which is synthetic and is the predominant congener of PBDEs in the environment. By chemical analysis after incubation of 2 to 6 days, the efficiency of uptake of BDE-47 and, more importantly, the potential of undergoing biotransformation to form OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs by the microalgae were investigated. Growth rates of these axenic microalgae were not affected upon exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations (0.2-20 μg BDE-47 L-1), and accumulation ranged from 0.772 ± 0.092 μg BDE-47 g-1 lipid to 215 ± 54 μg BDE-47 g-1 lipid within 2 days. Debromination of BDE-47 and formation of BDE-28 occurred in all microalgae species (0.01 to 0.87%), but biotransformation to OH-PBDEs was only found in I. galbana upon exposure to extremely high concentration. The results of this study showed that biotransformation of microalgae species is unlikely an explanation for the OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs found in the marine environment.

  15. Distribution and sea-to-air flux of isoprene in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea during summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Long; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Yang, Gui-Peng

    2017-07-01

    Spatial distribution and sea-to-air flux of isoprene in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea in July 2013 were investigated. This study is the first to report the concentrations of isoprene in the China marginal seas. Isoprene concentrations in the surface seawater during summer ranged from 32.46 to 173.5 pM, with an average of 83.62 ± 29.22 pM. Distribution of isoprene in the study area was influenced by the diluted water from the Yangtze River, which stimulated higher in-situ phytoplankton production of isoprene rather than direct freshwater input. Variations in isoprene concentrations were found to be diurnal, with high values observed during daytime. A significant correlation was observed between isoprene and chlorophyll a in the study area. Relatively higher isoprene concentrations were recorded at stations where the phytoplankton biomass was dominated by Chaetoceros, Skeletonema, Pennate-nitzschia, and Thalassiosira. Positive correlation was observed between isoprene and methyl iodide. In addition, sea-to-air fluxes of isoprene approximately ranged from 22.17 nmol m -2  d -1 -537.2 nmol m -2  d -1 , with an average of 161.5 ± 133.3 nmol m -2  d -1 . These results indicate that the coastal and shelf areas may be important sources of atmospheric isoprene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The influence of marine microbial activities on aerosol production: A laboratory mesocosm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Peter A.; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Bothe, Dylan W.; Radway, JoAnn C.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    The oceans cover most of the Earth's surface, contain nearly half the total global primary biomass productivity, and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. Here we experimentally investigate links between biological activity in seawater and sea spray aerosol (SSA) flux, a relationship of potential significance for organic aerosol loading and cloud formation over the oceans and thus for climate globally. Bubbles were generated in laboratory mesocosm experiments either by recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Experiments were conducted with Atlantic Ocean seawater collected off the eastern end of Long Island, NY, and with artificial seawater containing cultures of bacteria and phytoplankton Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Changes in SSA size distributions occurred during all phases of bacterial and phytoplankton growth, as characterized by cell concentrations, dissolved organic carbon, total particulate carbon, and transparent exopolymer particles (gel-forming polysaccharides representing a major component of biogenic exudate material). Over a 2 week growth period, SSA particle concentrations increased by a factor of less than 2 when only bacteria were present and by a factor of about 3 when bacteria and phytoplankton were present. Production of jet-generated SSA particles of diameter less than 200 nm increased with time, while production of all particle diameters increased with time when frits were used. The implications of a marine biological activity dependent SSA flux are discussed.

  17. Bioaccumulation of technetium by marine phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, N.S.

    1982-01-01

    /sup 95m/Tc, in the IV and VII oxidation states, was added in picomolar quantities to monocultures of seven species of marine phytoplankton, including a green algae (Dunaliella tertiolecta), a diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana), a blue-green alga (Oscillatoria woronichinii), a prasinophyte (Testraselmis chuii), two haptophytes (Emiliania huxleyi and Cricosphaera carterae), and a dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa pygmaea). Cultures were incubated for 4 days, and uptake of Tc was periodically determined by ν spectroscopy of filtered and unfiltered samples. All the Tc remained in the water column in all flasks, but none of the species appreciably concentrated the element in either oxidation state. Mean uptake (measured as the fraction retained on filters) for all species was 0.029% for Tc(IV) and 0.023% for Tc(VII), neither of which was significantly different from the uninoculated control cultures. Wet weight concentration factors never exceeded 20 for any species, 3 orders of magnitude lower than previously reported for phytoplankton and Tc. The results indicate that phytoplankton are likely to have negligble influence on the cycling of Tc in marine systems

  18. Composition and Quantitation of Microalgal Lipids by ERETIC 1H NMR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Fontana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of biomass constituents is a crucial aspect of research in the biotechnological application of natural products. Here we report an efficient, fast and reproducible method for the identification and quantitation of fatty acids and complex lipids (triacylglycerols, glycolipids, phospholipids in microalgae under investigation for the development of functional health products (probiotics, food ingredients, drugs, etc. or third generation biofuels. The procedure consists of extraction of the biological matrix by modified Folch method and direct analysis of the resulting material by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR. The protocol uses a reference electronic signal as external standard (ERETIC method and allows assessment of total lipid content, saturation degree and class distribution in both high throughput screening of algal collection and metabolic analysis during genetic or culturing studies. As proof of concept, the methodology was applied to the analysis of three microalgal species (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Cyclotella cryptica and Nannochloropsis salina which drastically differ for the qualitative and quantitative composition of their fatty acid-based lipids.

  19. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Iwan Setiabudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of this study was to determine  the plankton communities and its relationship with the chemical and physical condition in seagrass ecosystem at Pegametan Bay. The composition and abundance of plankton were observed in the sea water underneath the surface and were identified based on the guideline of Illustration of the Marine Plankton of Japan. The water quality was measured in situ using WQC HI 9829. The water sample was measured using closed reflux spectrometry for COD, TOC analyzer for DOC and APHA 2102 (4500 method for Nt and Pt. There are 27 species of plankton identified, which can be classified into three groups. Diatom group consists of 18 species with a 74.56% abundance. The non-litoral group consists of 6 species with a 23.35% abundance. Moreover, dinoflagellate group consist of 3 species with a 2.09% abundance. An abundance of plankton greater than 104 cell.L-1 was found in diatome group (Nitzschia sp., Thalassiosira sp., Chaetoceros sp., Flagillaria sp., Thalassiothrix sp., and Melosira sp. and non-litoral group (Oscillatoria sp. and Spirogyra sp.. The abundance of those species indicated the algae bloom phenomenon. Dinophysis sp. was also identified, which was harmful algal blooms.How to CiteSetiabudi, G. I., Bengen, D. G., Effendi, H., & Radjasa, O. K. (2016. The Community Structure of Phytoplankton in Seagrass Ecosystem and its Relationship with Environmental Characterstics. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 257-269.

  20. Effect of UV-B radiation on biomass production, pigmentation and protein content of marine diatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doehler, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several species of marine diatoms were grown at + 18 0 C and + 22 0 C under normal air conditions (0.035 vol.% CO 2 ) at a light/dark alteration of 14.8 h. Intensity of white light was 1 mW (approx.= 5000 lux). An artifical nutrient solution of 35per mille salinity was used. Algae - harvested during exponential growth - were exposed to different intensities of UV-B radiation (439, 717 and 1230 J m -2 m -1 ) for 2 days. UV-B radiation depressed the growth of all tested marine diatoms. Low levels of UV-B resulted in a slight increase of the biomass production (dry weight) compared to not UV-B treated cells. Enhanced UV-B doses caused a diminution of the primary productivity in all species. Algae exposed to UV-B stress showed a marked decrease in the protein and pigment content (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c 1 + c 2 and carotenoids). In + 22 0 C grown cells of Lauderia annulata and Thalassiosira rotula were more sensitive to UV-B radiation than those cultures grown at + 18 0 C. Bellerochea yucatanensis cells grown at + 22 0 C were less affected after UV-B exposure than at + 18 0 C grown algae. The UV-B sensibility and growth of the individual species varied in a mixture of several marine diatoms. Results were discussed with reference to the UV-B effect on metabolic processes. (orig.)

  1. Identification of the meiotic toolkit in diatoms and exploration of meiosis-specific SPO11 and RAD51 homologs in the sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shrikant; Moeys, Sara; von Dassow, Peter; Huysman, Marie J J; Mapleson, Daniel; De Veylder, Lieven; Sanges, Remo; Vyverman, Wim; Montresor, Marina; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2015-11-14

    Sexual reproduction is an obligate phase in the life cycle of most eukaryotes. Meiosis varies among organisms, which is reflected by the variability of the gene set associated to the process. Diatoms are unicellular organisms that belong to the stramenopile clade and have unique life cycles that can include a sexual phase. The exploration of five diatom genomes and one diatom transcriptome led to the identification of 42 genes potentially involved in meiosis. While these include the majority of known meiosis-related genes, several meiosis-specific genes, including DMC1, could not be identified. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses supported gene identification and revealed ancestral loss and recent expansion in the RAD51 family in diatoms. The two sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta were used to explore the expression of meiosis-related genes: RAD21, SPO11-2, RAD51-A, RAD51-B and RAD51-C were upregulated during meiosis, whereas other paralogs in these families showed no differential expression patterns, suggesting that they may play a role during vegetative divisions. An almost identical toolkit is shared among Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Fragilariopsis cylindrus, as well as two species for which sex has not been observed, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that these two may retain a facultative sexual phase. Our results reveal the conserved meiotic toolkit in six diatom species and indicate that Stramenopiles share major modifications of canonical meiosis processes ancestral to eukaryotes, with important divergences in each Kingdom.

  2. The role of diatom nanostructures in biasing diffusion to improve uptake in a patchy nutrient environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Mitchell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diatoms are important single-celled autotrophs that dominate most lit aquatic environments and are distinguished by surficial frustules with intricate designs of unknown function. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that some frustule designs constrain diffusion to positively alter nutrient uptake. In nutrient gradients of 4 to 160 times over <5 cm, the screened-chambered morphology of Coscincodiscus sp. biases the nutrient diffusion towards the cell by at least 3.8 times the diffusion to the seawater. In contrast, the open-chambers of Thalassiosira eccentrica produce at least a 1.3 times diffusion advantage to the membrane over Coscincodiscus sp. when nutrients are homogeneous. SIGNIFICANCE: Diffusion constraint explains the success of particular diatom species at given times and the overall success of diatoms. The results help answer the unresolved question of how adjacent microplankton compete. Furthermore, diffusion constraint by supramembrane nanostructures to alter molecular diffusion suggests that microbes compete via supramembrane topology, a competitive mechanism not considered by the standard smooth-surface equations used for nutrient uptake nor in microbial ecology and cell physiology.

  3. Interactions of marine plankton with transuranic elements. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, N.S.; Bjerregaard, P.; Huynh-Ngoc, L.; Harvey, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    To assess the significance of naturally occurring dissolved organic matter (DOM) on complexation of transuranic elements in seawater, a series of bioassay experiments was conducted in which the effect of DOM on the accumulation of 241 Am, 237 Pu(III-IV), and 237 Pu(V-VI) by the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was measured. EDTA at 0.3 μM complexed both metals substantially, resulting in reduced radio-isotope uptake by the diatom; the greatest effect was on Pu(III-IV). In contrast, there was no apparent complexation of either element by equimolar concentrations of marine fulvic (MFA) or humic acids (MHA), naturally occurring photooxidizable DOM (uncharacterized), or diatom exudates, as none of these materials reduced isotope uptake; on the contrary, there were indications that some of this DOM enhanced transuranic bioaccumulation in the diatom slightly. Subsequent experiments showed this enhancement was probably due to complexation of transition metals by the DOM, leading to fewer ambient ions 'competing' for binding sites on the cells; 241 Am uptake rates were negatively correlated (r = -0.846, P<.01) with ΣASV-labile Cu + Zn + Cd + Pb. These experiments suggest that naturally occurring DOM may not appreciably complex Am or Pu or greatly affect their bioavailability in the sea. (Auth.)

  4. Ship traffic and the introduction of diatoms and dinoflagellates via ballast water in the port of Annaba, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheniti, Radhia; Rochon, André; Frihi, Hocine

    2018-03-01

    We present here the first study on the role of ship traffic in the introduction of potentially harmful and/or non-indigenous species in the port of Annaba (Algeria). A total of 25 ships of two different types (general cargo and bulk carriers) were sampled and separated into two categories: oceanic and Mediterranean ships. We estimated propagule pressure of high-risk coastal phytoplankton delivered in ballast water to the port of Annaba. We identified 40 diatom and 38 dinoflagellate taxa, among which, 11 harmful/toxic taxa: Pseudo-nitzschia spp., Alexandrium tamarense, Alexandrium sp., Dinophysis acuminata, Dinophysis rotundata, Dinophysis sp., Gonyaulax spinifera, Gymnodinium catenatum, Lingulodinium polyedrum, Protoceratium reticulatum and cyst of Alexandrium sp. In addition, 8 taxa (5 diatoms, 1 dinoflagellate and 2 dinoflagellate cysts) never observed in the Annaba region were considered as potentially non-indigenous: Actinoptychus splendens, Coscinodiscus asteromphalus, Coscinodiscus lineatus, Odentella granulata, Thalassiosira cf. decipiens, Prorocentrum scutellum, cyst of Polykrikos kofoidii and Islandinium minutum. Several factors were examined, including ship routes, ballast water age and the volume of ballast water discharged. Our analyses revealed that diatom and dinoflagellate abundances decreased with ballast water age, possibly as a result of mortality of species due to voyage length and lack of light in ballast tanks. Estimates of actual propagule pressure, diatoms and dinoflagellates abundances varied from 1 to 4 × 108 cells/ship. The results of this study could serve as the baseline for the development and implementation of monitoring and ballast water management programs in ports of Algeria.

  5. Impact of UV-B (290-320 nm) radiation on photosynthesis-mediated uptake of 15N-ammonia and 15N-nitrate of several marine diatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doehler, G.; Stolter, H.

    1986-01-01

    The marine diatoms Ditylum brigthwellii, Lithodesmium variabile, Odontella sinensis, Synedra planctonica and Thalassiosira rotula grown at 18 0 C under normal air conditions (0.035 vol.% CO 2 ) were exposed to different levels (439 and 717 J m -2 d -1 , weighted) of UV-B radiation for 2 d (5 h/d). Pigmentation, protein and total nitrogen content were reduced linearly to the dose of UV-B radiation. Photosynthesis-mediated uptake of 15 N-ammonia was more affected by UV-B irradiance in all tested diatoms than that of 15 N-nitrate. A species-dependent behavior in the assimilation of inorganic nitrogenous compounds has been observed: Synedra was a very sensitive species to UV-B radiation whereas the same UV-B doses had no effect on the assimilation rate of ammonia and nitrate of the Lithodesmium cells. The results were discussed with reference to the inhibition of the enzymes of the nitrogen metabolism. (author)

  6. Distribution and abundance of diatom species from coastal waters of Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhar, F. N.; Burhan, Z.; Iqbal, P.; Abbasi, J.; Siddiqui, P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive study on the distribution and abundance of diatom species from the coastal and nearshore waters of Karachi, Pakistan, bordering northern Arabian Sea. A total of 20 genera are recorded in high abundance (Cerataulina, Chaetoceros, Coscinodiscus, Cylindrotheca, Eucampia, Guinardia, Haslea, Hemiaulus, Lauderia, Lennoxia, Leptocylindrus, Navicula, Nitzschia, Trieres, Planktoniella, Pleurosigma, Pseudo-nitzschia, Rhizosolenia, Thalassionema and Thalassiosira). The most abundant genera were observed Guinardia, Chaetoceros, Leptocylindrus, Nitzschia and Lennoxia at all stations. Manora coastal station (MI-1) had high abundance corresponding with high Chlorophyll a (130 meu gL- l) values. Minimum abundance and low chlorophyll a value (0.05μgL-l) were observed at Mubarak Village coastal station (MV-1). Diatom abundance showed significant correlation with Chlorophyll a. In present study 12 centric and 8 pennate forms were recorded and similarly high diversity of centric taxa was observed compared to pennate forms. A total of 134 species are recorded of which 40 species were observed at four stations, 31species at three stations, 23 at two stations and 40 species only at one station. The total phytoplankton and diatom peak abundance was observed during NE monsoon (winter season) associated with nutrient loading through up-sloping of nutrient rich water upwelled off of Oman during South West monsoon. Overall higher diversity was observed at Manora coastal and nearshore stations (MI-1, MI-2) indicating the influence of organic pollution loading from Layari and Malir rivers. (author)

  7. Toxicity of polyunsaturated aldehydes of diatoms to Indo-Pacific bioindicator organism Echinometra mathaei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Davide; Gaion, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known suitability of early developmental stages of sea urchin as recommended model for pollutant toxicity testing, little is known about the sensitivity of Indo-Pacific species Echinometra mathaei to polyunsaturated aldehydes. In this study, the effect of three short chain aldehydes, 2,4-decadienal (DD), 2,4-octadienal (OD) and 2,4-heptadienal (HD), normally found in many diatoms, such as Skeletonema costatum, Skeletonema marinoi and Thalassiosira rotula, was evaluated on larval development of E. mathaei embryos. Aldehydes affected larval development in a dose-dependent manner, in particular HD>OD>DD; the results of this study highlighted the higher sensitivity of this species toward aldehydes compared with data registered for other sea urchin species. In comparison with studies reported in the literature, contrasting results were observed during our tests; therefore, an increasing toxic effect was registered with decreasing the chain length of aldehydes. This work could provide new insights in the development of new toxicological assays toward most sensitive species.

  8. Diatom assemblages as guides to flow conditions during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami at Phra Thong Island, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Y.; Jankaew, K.; Martin, M. E.; Choowong, M.; Charoentitirat, T.; Prendergast, A.

    2008-12-01

    Diatom assemblages in the 2004 tsunami deposits of Phra Thong Island, Thailand represent flow conditions during the tsunami. The tsunami deposit consists of single or multiple graded beds. Diatom assemblages in the lowermost part of the deposit predominantly comprise beach and subtidal species. In the middle part of the deposit, the assemblages are dominated by marine plankton with increasing finer fractions. A mixed assemblage of freshwater, brackish, and marine species occupies the uppermost part of the deposit. Changes in flow conditions during the tsunami can explain these diatom assemblage variations. During fast current velocities, medium sand is deposited; only beach and subtidal diatoms that live attached to the sand can be incorporated into the tsunami deposit under these flow conditions. It is difficult for diatoms in suspension to settle out under fast current velocities. With decreasing current velocities, marine plankton can settle out of the water column .Finally, during the suspension stage (calm currents) between tsunami waves, the entrained freshwater, brackish, and marine species settle out with mud and plant trash. Fewer broken valves in the lowermost part of the deposit is probably a results of rapid entrainment, whilst selective breakage of marine plankton (Thalassionema nitzschioides, and Thalassiosira and Coscinodiscus spp.) in the middle part of the deposit probably results from abrasion by turbulent current before their deposition.

  9. The importance of uptake from food for the bioaccumulation of PCB and PBDE in the marine planktonic copepod Acartia clausi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.magnusson@marecol.gu.se [Department of Marine Ecology-Kristineberg, University of Gothenburg, Kristineberg 566, SE 45034 Fiskebaeckskil (Sweden); Tiselius, Peter [Department of Marine Ecology-Kristineberg, University of Gothenburg, Kristineberg 566, SE 45034 Fiskebaeckskil (Sweden)

    2010-07-15

    The accumulation of {sup 14}C-labelled PCB 31, PCB 101, PCB 153 and PBDE 99 was investigated at the two lowest trophic levels of the pelagic food web. Accumulation was measured in the small phytoplankter Thalassiosira weissflogii (Coscinodiscophyceae: Thalassiosirales) and in the neritic zooplankter Acartia clausi (Copepoda: Calanoida) exposed to the substance either only via water or through ingestion of contaminated T. weissflogii. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for all four compounds were significantly higher in A. clausi feeding on contaminated phytoplankton than in animals exposed only via water. The log BAF for the PCBs increased linearly with the octanol-water partitioning coefficients (log K{sub OW}) in both the algae and the copepods, but with steeper slopes for feeding than non-feeding animals. Reported values for K{sub OW} for PBDEs vary by almost an order of magnitude and it was therefore not meaningful to calculate a log BAF - log K{sub OW} ratio for PBDE 99. It is clear that the nutritional status of the zooplankton affects the uptake of the compounds and that the bioaccumulation cannot be modelled as a passive partitioning between the organisms and the surrounding water. Small copepods are typical of coastal waters and point sources (both temporal and spatial) may be the rule for HOC releases into the sea. Thus, the pathways shown in this study are important and realistic.

  10. The importance of uptake from food for the bioaccumulation of PCB and PBDE in the marine planktonic copepod Acartia clausi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, Kerstin; Tiselius, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation of 14 C-labelled PCB 31, PCB 101, PCB 153 and PBDE 99 was investigated at the two lowest trophic levels of the pelagic food web. Accumulation was measured in the small phytoplankter Thalassiosira weissflogii (Coscinodiscophyceae: Thalassiosirales) and in the neritic zooplankter Acartia clausi (Copepoda: Calanoida) exposed to the substance either only via water or through ingestion of contaminated T. weissflogii. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for all four compounds were significantly higher in A. clausi feeding on contaminated phytoplankton than in animals exposed only via water. The log BAF for the PCBs increased linearly with the octanol-water partitioning coefficients (log K OW ) in both the algae and the copepods, but with steeper slopes for feeding than non-feeding animals. Reported values for K OW for PBDEs vary by almost an order of magnitude and it was therefore not meaningful to calculate a log BAF - log K OW ratio for PBDE 99. It is clear that the nutritional status of the zooplankton affects the uptake of the compounds and that the bioaccumulation cannot be modelled as a passive partitioning between the organisms and the surrounding water. Small copepods are typical of coastal waters and point sources (both temporal and spatial) may be the rule for HOC releases into the sea. Thus, the pathways shown in this study are important and realistic.

  11. Feeding behaviour of the nauplii of the marine calanoid copepod Paracartia grani Sars: Functional response, prey size spectrum, and effects of the presence of alternative prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Helenius

    Full Text Available Laboratory feeding experiments were conducted to study the functional response and prey size spectrum of the young naupliar stages of the calanoid copepod Paracartia grani Sars. Experiments were conducted on a range of microalgal prey of varying sizes and motility patterns. Significant feeding was found in all prey of a size range of 4.5-19.8 μm, with Holling type III functional responses observed for most prey types. The highest clearance rates occurred when nauplii fed on the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa sp. and the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii (respectively, 0.61 and 0.70 mL ind-1 d-1, suggesting an optimal prey:predator ratio of 0.09. Additional experiments were conducted to examine the effects of the presence of alternative prey (either Heterocapsa sp. or Gymnodinium litoralis on the functional response to the haptophyte Isochrysis galbana. In the bialgal mixtures, clearance and ingestion rates of I. galbana along the range of the functional response were significantly reduced as a result of selectivity towards the larger, alternative prey. Paradoxically, relatively large prey trigger a perception response in the nauplii, but most likely such prey cannot be completely ingested and a certain degree of sloppy feeding may occur. Our results are further evidence of the complex prey-specific feeding interactions that are likely to occur in natural assemblages with several available prey types.

  12. Short-term changes in the plankton of a highly homogeneous Basin of the Straits of Magellan (Paso Ancho during spring 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcisio Antezana

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in nutrients, chlorophyll and zooplankton were followed for 11 d in a basin of the Straits of Magellan (Paso Ancho, characterized by a homogeneous water column during a spring event defined by a drastic change in wind stress and direction. Conditions hardly seemed conducive to a phytoplankton bloom. Initial conditions were characterized by SW gales, low nutrients as well as by Chaetoceros spp. and Thalassiosira spp. dominated phytoplankton. Wind switched abruptly to calm-weak northerlies by the middle of the study period, a subsurface chlorophyll peak developed and extended to the end of the study while nitrates decreased. Zooplankton was dominated by copepods, nauplii and a diverse meroplankton assemblage. Zooplankton composition was rather uniform, except for diel changes in some taxa. Gut contents of zooplankton size fractions (including Euphausia vallentini as the largest fraction were measured. Grazing rates accounted for 0.5 % of the available chlorophyll. Phytoplankton blooming may be explained by transient water stratification resulting from the relaxation of wind stress and eventual retention of the phytoplankton in the photic layer. Minor variability in zooplankton implied the existence of a permanent and distinct assemblage in a strongly homogeneous environment.

  13. Succession of phytoplankton assemblages in relation to estuarine hydrodynamics in the Ría de Vigo: a box-model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Martín Miguez

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Two phytoplankton succession events (September-October 1993 and March 1994 in the Ría de Vigo were studied in relation to their hydrodynamic context. By means of a circulation box model we calculated horizontal and vertical residual fluxes as well as budgets of phytoplankton associated with them. This allowed us to assess the importance of the two factors involved in the selection processes: one hydrodynamic (dependent upon physical dispersion and one biogeochemical (involving all other processes such as growth, mortality and grazing. The first period was characterised by a downwelling event which produced a reversal of the estuarine circulation pattern (horizontal velocity = 4 km d-1 and downward velocities up to 9 m d-1. This provided suitable conditions for the blooming of Gymnodinium catenatum favoured by its capacity to swim, while the diatom community almost disappeared. The second period corresponded to an upwelling Æ relaxation sequence. During upwelling (horizontal velocity = 6 km d-1; upward velocities up to 12 m d-1, Thalassiosira spp. was dominant. It is suggested that the less energetic conditions associated with the relaxation event (horizontal velocity=1 km d-1; upward velocities < 1 m d-1 favoured the selection of Chatoceros spp. due to its lower sinking rate.

  14. Application of a laser fluorometer for discriminating phytoplankton species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Pan, Delu; Mao, Zhihua

    2015-04-01

    A portable laser-induced fluorescence system for discriminating phytoplankton species has been developed. It consists of a high pulsed repetition frequency (10-kHz) microchip laser at 405 nm, a reflective fluorescent probe and a broadband micro spectrometer. The measured fluorescent spectra were overlapped by various fluorescent components, and were then decomposed by a bi-Gaussian mixture model. A spectral shape description index was designed to characterize fluorescent spectral shapes for descriminating the phytoplankton species cultured in our laboratory. Using clustering analysis, the samples of eight phytoplankton species belonging to two divisions of Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta were divided into six categories: 1) Chaetoceros debilis, Thalassiosira rotula; 2) Prorocentrum donghaiense, Prorocentrum dentatum; 3) Gymnodinium simplex; 4) Alexandrium tamarense; 5) Karenia mikimotoi; and 6) Akashiwo sanguinea. The phytoplankton species belonging to Bacillariophyta were well separated from those belonging to Dinophyta. In addition, the phytoplankton species belonging to Dinophyta were successfully distinguished from each other at genus level. The portable system is expected to be used both in vivo and in the field.

  15. Effects of Phytoplankton Growth Phase on the Formation and Properties of Marine Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Q. W.; Proctor, K. W.; Prairie, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Marine snow aggregates often dominate carbon export from the upper mixed layer to the deep ocean. Thus, understanding the formation and the properties of these aggregates is essential to the study of the biological pump. Aggregate formation is determined by both the encounter rate and the stickiness of the particles that they are composed of. Stickiness of phytoplankton has been linked to production of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), which has been previously shown to vary in concentration throughout different parts of the phytoplankton growth cycle. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of the growth phase of the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii to both TEP production and the properties of the resulting aggregates produced. Cultures of T. weissflogii were stopped at separate phases of the phytoplankton growth curve and incubated in rotating cylindrical tanks to form aggregates. Aggregate properties such as size, density, and porosity were measured at the end of each period of roller incubation. Preliminary results describe little variation in the size of the aggregates formed from different parts of the growth phase, but show a significant effect of growth phase on aggregate density. Density is an important factor in the settling of marine aggregates. Therefore, variations in aggregate density during different growth phases may have large implications for the efficiency of the biological pump during different stages of a phytoplankton bloom. Further examination will be performed on the potential effects of TEP abundance on the properties of the aggregates formed at separate growth phases and the resulting implications for carbon flux.

  16. Estimation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and photosynthetic activity of estuarine phytoplankton using a multiple-fixed-wavelength spectral fluorometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Emily A; Smith, Erik M; Richardson, Tammi L

    2013-03-15

    The utility of a multiple-fixed-wavelength spectral fluorometer, the Algae Online Analyser (AOA), as a means of quantifying chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and phytoplankton photosynthetic activity was tested using algal cultures and natural communities from North Inlet estuary, South Carolina. Comparisons of AOA measurements of CDOM to those by spectrophotometry showed a significant linear relationship, but increasing amounts of background CDOM resulted in progressively higher over-estimates of chromophyte contributions to a simulated mixed algal community. Estimates of photosynthetic activity by the AOA at low irradiance (≈ 80 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)) agreed well with analogous values from the literature for the chlorophyte, Dunaliella tertiolecta, but were substantially lower than previous measurements of the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)) in Thalassiosira weissflogii (a diatom) and Rhodomonas salina (a cryptophyte). When cells were exposed to high irradiance (1500 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)), declines in photosynthetic activity with time measured by the AOA mirrored estimates of cellular fluorescence capacity using the herbicide 3'-(3, 4-dichlorophenyl)-1',1'-dimethyl urea (DCMU). The AOA shows promise as a tool for the continuous monitoring of phytoplankton community composition, CDOM, and the group-specific photosynthetic activity of aquatic ecosystems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Design scenarios for flat panel photobioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slegers, P.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Straten, G. van; Boxtel, A.J.B. van

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of the potential of algae production for biofuel and other products at various locations throughout the world requires assessment of algae productivity under varying light conditions and different reactor layouts. A model was developed to predict algae biomass production in flat panel photobioreactors using the interaction between light and algae growth for the algae species Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The effect of location, variable sunlight and reactor layout on biomass production in single standing and parallel positioned flat panels was considered. Three latitudes were studied representing the Netherlands, France and Algeria. In single standing reactors the highest yearly biomass production is achieved in Algeria. During the year biomass production fluctuates the most in the Netherlands, while it is almost constant in Algeria. Several combinations of path lengths and biomass concentrations can result in the same optimal biomass production. The productivity in parallel place flat panels is strongly influenced by shading and diffuse light penetration between the panels. Panel orientation has a large effect on productivity and at higher latitudes the difference between north-south and east-west orientation may go up to 50%.

  18. Ecotoxicology of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Ana R.; Richardson, Tammi L.; Pinckney, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Bromoacetic acid is formed when effluent containing chlorine residuals react with humics in natural waters containing bromide. The objective of this research was to quantify the effects of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton as a proxy for ecosystem productivity. Bioassays were used to measure the EC 50 for growth in cultured species and natural marine communities. Growth inhibition was estimated by changes in chlorophyll a concentrations measured by fluorometry and HPLC. The EC 50 s for cultured Thalassiosira pseudonana were 194 mg L −1 , 240 mg L −1 for Dunaliella tertiolecta and 209 mg L −1 for Rhodomonas salina. Natural phytoplankton communities were more sensitive to contamination with an EC 50 of 80 mg L −1 . Discriminant analysis suggested that bromoacetic acid additions cause an alteration of phytoplankton community structure with implications for higher trophic levels. A two-fold EC 50 decrease in mixed natural phytoplankton populations affirms the importance of field confirmation for establishing water quality criteria. - Highlights: • Bromoacetic acid exposure resulted in lethal impacts to estuarine phytoplankton. • Cultured phytoplankton were less sensitive to bromoacetic acid than natural communities. • Lab results should be confirmed with field experiments whenever possible. - The toxicology of haloacetic acids has been studied in freshwater ecosystems, and urbanization of the coastal zone is making effects in marine ecosystems equally relevant.

  19. Ecotoxicology of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ana R; Richardson, Tammi L; Pinckney, James L

    2015-11-01

    Bromoacetic acid is formed when effluent containing chlorine residuals react with humics in natural waters containing bromide. The objective of this research was to quantify the effects of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton as a proxy for ecosystem productivity. Bioassays were used to measure the EC50 for growth in cultured species and natural marine communities. Growth inhibition was estimated by changes in chlorophyll a concentrations measured by fluorometry and HPLC. The EC50s for cultured Thalassiosira pseudonana were 194 mg L(-1), 240 mg L(-1) for Dunaliella tertiolecta and 209 mg L(-1) for Rhodomonas salina. Natural phytoplankton communities were more sensitive to contamination with an EC50 of 80 mg L(-1). Discriminant analysis suggested that bromoacetic acid additions cause an alteration of phytoplankton community structure with implications for higher trophic levels. A two-fold EC50 decrease in mixed natural phytoplankton populations affirms the importance of field confirmation for establishing water quality criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: Exposure to cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mengjiao; Wang Wenxiong

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the changes in the Cd tolerance of a marine diatom after exposure under different Cd concentrations for various durations and (2) to explore the potential subcellular and biochemical mechanisms underlying these changes. The 72-h toxicity, short-term Cd uptake, subcellular Cd distribution, as well as the synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) were measured in a marine diatom Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii after exposure to a range of free Cd ion concentrations ([Cd 2+ ], 0.01-84 nM) for 1-15 days. Surprisingly, the diatoms did not acquire higher resistance to Cd after exposure; instead their sensitivity to Cd increased with a higher exposed [Cd 2+ ] and a longer exposure period. The underlying mechanisms could be traced to the responses of Cd cellular accumulation and the intrinsic detoxification ability of the preconditioned diatoms. Generally, exposure to a higher [Cd 2+ ] and for a longer period increased the Cd uptake rate, cellular accumulation, as well as the Cd concentration in metal-sensitive fraction (MSF) in these diatoms. In contrast, although PCs were induced by the environmental Cd stress (with PC 2 being the most affected), the increased intracellular Cd to PC-SH ratio implied that the PCs' detoxification ability had reduced after Cd exposure. All these responses resulted in an elevated Cd sensitivity as exposed [Cd 2+ ] and duration increased. This study shows that the physiological/biochemical and kinetic responses of phytoplankton upon metal exposure deserve further investigation.

  1. Effect of vertical mixing on short-term mycosporine-like amino acid synthesis in the Antarctic diatom, Thalasiossira sp.

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    Marcelo Pablo Hernando

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the adaptations whereby phytoplankton can alleviate damage induced by ultraviolet radiation (280-400 nm is the synthesis of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs. The synthesis of MAAs was studied after exposure of the Antarctic diatom Thalassiosira sp. isolated from Potter Cove (South Shetland Is., Antarctica to 2 treatments with a solar simulator: surface (Sfix and vertical mixing (Mix irradiance conditions. Light exposure was simulated in daily cycles with maximum irradiance at noon. Only 2 MAAs, Porphyra-334 (82-85% and Shinorine (15-18%, were identified. The concentration of the two compounds increased during experimental light exposure (50-55% and declined in the dark (10-15%. During the light period the synthesis rate of MAAs per unit of chlorophyll a was higher in the Sfix treatment (µ=0.17 h-1 than in the Mix treatment (µ=0.05 h-1. In spite of the higher MAA levels, low cell numbers were observed in the Sfix treatment, suggesting that the algae synthesized photoprotective compounds at the expense of growth. Our results document overlapping effects of both daily light cycles and vertical mixing affecting the synthesis of MAAs. This, and the high thermal dissipation of the ultraviolet B radiation energy (280-320 nm absorbed by these substances, suggest a rapid photoadaptive response of Thalasiossira sp. upon exposure to elevated irradiance in a stratified water column, as well as the complementary role of vertical mixing in photo-protection.

  2. Effect of Engineered Nanoparticles on Exopolymeric Substances Release from Marine Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Khan, Zafir A.; Garcia, Santiago G.; Le, Andre D.; Kagiri, Agnes; Ramos, Javier; Tsai, Shih-Ming; Drobenaire, Hunter W.; Santschi, Peter H.; Quigg, Antonietta; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2017-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), products from modern nanotechnologies, can potentially impact the marine environment to pose serious threats to marine ecosystems. However, the cellular responses of marine phytoplankton to ENPs are still not well established. Here, we investigate four different diatom species ( Odontella mobiliensis, Skeletonema grethae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Thalassiosira pseudonana) and one green algae ( Dunaliella tertiolecta) for their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) release under model ENP treatments: 25 nm titanium dioxide (TiO2), 10-20 nm silicon dioxide (SiO2), and 15-30 nm cerium dioxide (CeO2). We found SiO2 ENPs can significantly stimulate EPS release from these algae (200-800%), while TiO2 ENP exposure induced the lowest release. Furthermore, the increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration can be triggered by ENPs, suggesting that the EPS release process is mediated through Ca2+ signal pathways. With better understanding of the cellular mechanism mediated ENP-induced EPS release, potential preventative and safety measures can be developed to mitigate negative impact on the marine ecosystem.

  3. Effect of the Silica Content of Diatoms on Protozoan Grazing

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    Shuwen Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect that silica content in diatom cells has on the behavior of protists. The diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and T. pseudonana were cultured in high or low light conditions to achieve low and high silica contents, respectively. These cells were then fed to a heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans and a ciliate Euplotes sp. in single and mixed diet experiments. Our results showed that in general, N. scintillans and Euplotes sp. both preferentially ingested the diatoms with a low silica content rather than those with a high silica content. However, Euplotes sp. seemed to be less influenced by the silica content than was N. scintillans. In the latter case, the clearance and ingestion rate of the low silica diatoms were significantly higher, both in the short (6-h and long (1-d duration grazing experiments. Our results also showed that N. scintillans required more time to digest the high silica-containing cells. As the high silica diatoms are harder to digest, this might explain why N. scintillans exhibits a strong preference for the low silica prey. Thus, the presence of high silica diatoms might limit the ability of the dinoflagellate to feed. Our findings suggest that the silica content of diatoms affects their palatability and digestibility and, consequently, the grazing activity and selectivity of protozoan grazers.

  4. The annual planktonic protist community structure in an ice-free high Arctic fjord (Adventfjorden, West Spitsbergen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiszyn, A. M.; Wiktor, J. M.; Wiktor, J. M.; Griffiths, C.; Kristiansen, S.; Gabrielsen, T. M.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the size and trophic structure of the annual planktonic protist community structure in the ice-free Adventfjorden in relation to environmental factors. Our high-resolution (weekly to monthly) study was conducted in 2012, when warm Atlantic water was advected into the fjord in winter and summer. We observed a distinct seasonality in the protist communities. The winter protist community was characterised by extremely low levels of protist abundance and biomass (primarily Dinophyceae, Ciliophora and Bacillariophyceae) in a homogenous water column. In the second half of April, the total protist abundance and biomass rapidly increased, thus initiating the spring bloom in a still well-mixed water column. The spring bloom was initially dominated by the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis pouchetii and Bacillariophyceae (primarily from the genera Thalassiosira, Fragilariopsis and Chaetoceros) and was later strictly dominated by Phaeocystis colonies. When the bloom terminated in mid-June, the community shifted towards flagellates (Dinophyceae, Ciliophora, Cryptophyceae and nanoflagellates 3-7 μm in size) in a stratified, nutrient-depleted water column. Decreases in the light intensity decreased the protist abundance and biomass, and the fall community (Dinophyceae, Cryptophyceae and Bacillariophyceae) was followed by the winter community.

  5. Current trends to comprehend lipid metabolism in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulu, Nodumo Nokulunga; Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; Vollheyde, Katharina; Feussner, Ivo

    2018-04-01

    Diatoms are the most dominant phytoplankton species in oceans and they continue to receive a great deal of attention because of their significant contributions in ecosystems and the environment. Due to triacylglycerol (TAG) profiles that are abundant in medium-chain fatty acids, diatoms have emerged to be better feed stocks for biofuel production, in comparison to the commonly studied green microalgal species (chlorophytes). Importantly, diatoms are also known for their high levels of the essential ω3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and are considered to be a promising alternative source of these components. The two most commonly exploited diatoms include Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Although obvious similarities between diatoms and chlorophytes exist, there are some substantial differences in their lipid metabolism. This review provides an overview on lipid metabolism in diatoms, with P. tricornutum as the most explored model. Special emphasis is placed on the synthesis and incorporation of very long chain ω3 fatty acids into lipids. Furthermore, current approaches including genetic engineering and biotechnological methods aimed at improving and maximizing lipid production in P. tricornutum are also discussed. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial patterns in abundance, taxonomic composition and carbon biomass of nano- and microphytoplankton in Subarctic and Arctic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, David W.; Cefarelli, Adrián O.; Wrohan, Ian A.; Wyatt, Shea N.; Varela, Diana E.

    2018-03-01

    In the summers of 2007 and 2008, we studied assemblages of nano- and microphytoplankton from the subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) across five broad oceanographic domains in the seas surrounding northern North America. These domains are the eastern Subarctic North Pacific (ESNP), Bering and Chukchi Seas (BE-CH), Beaufort Sea and Canada Basin (BS-CB), Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), and Baffin Bay and Labrador Sea (BB-LS). Average abundance and total carbon biomass (C) of phytoplankton (>2 μm) varied ∼10-fold and ∼20-fold, respectively, across the five domains. In the BE-CH, CAA and BB-LS, diatoms averaged 35-70% and dinoflagellates 11-45% of total phytoplankton C (>2 μm), whereas in the ESNP and BS-CB, unidentified flagellates/coccoids (2-8 μm) represented a greater proportion of total C (27% and 39% respectively) than in the other domains. In the BE-CH and BB-LS, phytoplankton C (>2 μm) was dominated by dinoflagellates of the genus Gymnodinium, centric diatoms including Thalassiosira spp. and Chaetoceros spp., unidentified flagellates/coccoids (2-8 μm), and cryptomonads. In contrast, diatoms such as Thalassiosira spp. and its resting spores dominated C in the CAA, with dinoflagellates being less significant than in the BE-CH and BB-LS. Unidentified flagellates/coccoids (2-8 μm), Gymnodinium spp., and cryptomonads dominated in the ESNP, and particularly in the BS-CB, where diatoms contributed only 18% of the very low levels of total phytoplankton C (>2 μm). Phytoplankton C (>2 μm) to chlorophyll a ratios (phyto C:chl a) averaged only 31 g C g chl a-1 in the oligotrophic BS-CB domain, and 51-150 g C g chl a-1 in the other domains, whereas ratios of biogenic silica to phytoplankton C (>2 μm) (bSi:phyto C) were lowest in the eastern domains. Estimates of phytoplankton C were highly sensitive to the choice of C to cell volume equations (C:vol) adopted in the calculations, particularly in diatom-rich areas. This study highlights how diatoms and

  7. Microfitoplâncton de águas costeiras amazônicas: Ilha Canela (Bragança, PA, Brasil Microphytoplankton of Amazon coastal waters: Canela Island (Bragança, Pará State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Brabo de Sousa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Variações sazonal e nictemeral do microfitoplâncton foram estudadas em uma estação fixa (00º46'37,2''S-046º43'24,5''W, localizada em uma área costeira próxima à ilha Canela (Norte do Brasil, durante os meses de setembro e dezembro/2004 (período seco e março e junho/2005 (período chuvoso. As amostras destinadas à análise qualitativa do fitoplâncton foram obtidas a partir da filtragem de 400 L de água, através de uma rede planctônica (65 μm de abertura de malha, durante marés de sizígia, em intervalos regulares de três horas, por um período de 24 horas. O material coletado foi fixado com formol neutro a 4%. Paralelamente a essas coletas foi medida a salinidade da superfície da água. A salinidade apresentou variação significativa ao longo do período de estudo, variando entre 26,1 (junho/2005 e 39,0 (dezembro/2004, caracterizando o ambiente como eualino-polialino. Foram identificados 130 táxons incluídos nas divisões Cyanophyta (dois táxons, Bacillariophyta (115 táxons e Dinophyta (13 táxons. As diatomáceas dominaram o microfitoplâncton da área, sendo Asterionellopsis glacialis, Dimeregramma minor, Skeletonema sp. e Thalassiosira subtilis os táxons mais freqüentes e abundantes. Os altos valores de salinidade condicionaram a maior representatividade das espécies marinhas neríticas, polialóbias. Os processos de ressuspensão provocados pelos ventos e arrebentação das ondas promoveram intercâmbios entre as populações planctônicas e ticoplanctônicas, dentre as quais as espécies Dimeregramma minor, Triceratium biquadratum e T. pentacrinus representaram novas ocorrências para as águas costeiras do litoral amazônico.Seasonal and nyctemeral variations of the microphytoplankton were studied at a fixed station (00º46'37.2''S-046º43'24.5''W on Canela Island (North Brazil in September and December/2004 (dry season and in March and June/2005 (rainy season. Samples for qualitative phytoplankton studies were

  8. KETERKAITAN SPASIAL KUALITAS LINGKUNGAN DAN KEBERADAAN FITOPLANKTON BERPOTENSI HABs PADA TAMBAK EKSTENSIF DI KECAMATAN LOSARI KABUPATEN CIREBON, JAWA BARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarunamulia Tarunamulia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs dapat memberikan dampak negatif secara ekologis, ekonomis dan kesehatan.  Kejadian dapat bervariasi menurut faktor lingkungan lokal pemicu serta kemampuan adaptasi spesies.  Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keterkaitan antara karakteristik kualitas lingkungan dengan keberadaan fitoplankton berpotensi HABs pada tambak ekstensif di Kecamatan Losari Kabupaten Cirebon, Jawa Barat.  Sebanyak masing-masing 45 contoh air dan tanah diambil pada total luas petakan tambak ±2300 ha dengan metode transek yang dimodifikasi. Peubah kualitas air yang diukur meliputi; Total Amonia Nitrogen (TAN, Nitrit (NO2-N, Nitrat (NO3-N, Fosfat (PO4-P, Bahan Organik Total (BOT dan Plankton.  Sedangkan peubah kualitas tanah tambak meliputi pH, total nitrogen (NTOT, fosfat (PO4-P dan BOT. Analisis keterkaitan kualitas lingkungan dengan keberadaan fitoplankton berpotensi HABs dilakukan dengan BIO-ENV analysis, Cluster analysis, dan analisis spasial dengan software PRIMER 5.0 dan ArcGIS 10.0.  Dari  23 spesies yang diidentifikasi terdapat 5 spesies (21% yang potensial sebagai HABs meliputi Prorocentrum sp, Ceratium sp, Gymnodinium sp, Thalassiosira sp dan Nitzchia sp.   Prorocentrum sp ditemukan pada 21 stasiun  dari total 45 stasiun dengan kepadatan tertinggi (508 ind/L. Hasil analisis selanjutnya menunjukkan bahwa distribusi spasial spesies berkaitan erat dengan distribusi nilai TAN dan BOT air serta nilai N-Total tanah. Jika tidak ada upaya pengelolaan dan mitigasi sehubungan keberadaan HABs tersebut maka dikhawatirkan dapat mempengaruhi produktivitas dan keberlanjutan kegiatan budidaya di lokasi penelitian. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs can cause serious negative ecological, economical and human health impacts. The occurrence of HABs may vary according to local environmental factors and the adaptability level of the causative species. This study aims to determine the relationship between environmental quality and the presence of

  9. Time series monitoring of water quality and microalgal diversity in a tropical bay under intense anthropogenic interference (SW coast of the Bay of Bengal, India)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaik, Aziz ur Rahman [CSIR — National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, 176 Lawson' s Bay Colony, Visakhapatnam, AP 530017 (India); Biswas, Haimanti, E-mail: haimanti.biswas@nio.org [CSIR — National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, 176 Lawson' s Bay Colony, Visakhapatnam, AP 530017 (India); Reddy, N.P.C.; Srinivasa Rao, V. [CSIR — National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, 176 Lawson' s Bay Colony, Visakhapatnam, AP 530017 (India); Bharathi, M.D. [Present address: ICMAM Project Directorate, 2nd Floor, NIOT Campus, Velacherry-Tambaram Main Road, Pallikkaranai, Chennai 600100 (India); Subbaiah, Ch.V. [CSIR — National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, 176 Lawson' s Bay Colony, Visakhapatnam, AP 530017 (India)

    2015-11-15

    In recent decades, material fluxes to coastal waters from various land based anthropogenic activities have significantly been enhanced around the globe which can considerably impact the coastal water quality and ecosystem health. Hence, there is a critical need to understand the links between anthropogenic activities in watersheds and its health. Kakinada Bay is situated at the SW part of the Bay of Bengal, near to the second largest mangrove cover in India with several fertilizer industries along its bank and could be highly vulnerable to different types of pollutants. However, virtually, no data is available so far reporting its physicochemical status and microalgal diversity at this bay. In order to fill this gap, we conducted three time series observations at a fixed station during January, December and June 2012, at this bay measuring more than 15 physical, chemical and biological parameters in every 3 h over a period of 36 h in both surface (0 m) and subsurface (4.5 m) waters. Our results clearly depict a strong seasonality between three sampling months; however, any abnormal values of nutrients, biological oxygen demand or dissolved oxygen level was not observed. A Skeletonema costatum bloom was observed in December which was probably influenced by low saline, high turbid and high Si input through the river discharge. Otherwise, smaller diatoms like Thalassiosira decipiens, Thalassiothrix frauenfeldii, and Thalassionema nitzschioides dominated the bay. It is likely that the material loading can be high at the point sources due to intense anthropogenic activities, however, gets diluted with biological, chemical and physical processes in the offshore waters. - Highlights: • No signature of enormous nutrient loading was observed over the diel cycle • Dissolved oxygen and BOD concentrations did not show any exceptional trend • Diatoms dominated more than 90% of the total phytoplankton communities • A Skeletonema Costatum (a centric diatom) bloom was

  10. In vivo exposure to northern diatoms arrests sea urchin embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudimova, Elena; Eilertsen, Hans C; Jørgensen, Trond Ø; Hansen, Espen

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous reports indicating that marine diatoms may act harmful to early developmental stages of invertebrates. It is believed that the compounds responsible for these detrimental effects are oxylipins resulting from oxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids, and that they may function as grazing deterrents. Most studies reporting these effects have exposed test organisms to diatom extracts or purified toxins, but data from in vivo exposure to intact diatoms are scarce. We have conducted sea urchin egg incubation and plutei feeding experiments to test if intact diatom cells affected sea urchin embryo development and survival. This was done by exposing the common northern sea urchins Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and Echinus acutus to northern strains of the diatoms Chaetoceros socialis, Skeletonema marinoi, Chaetoceros furcellatus, Attheya longicornis, Thalassiosira gravida and Porosira glacialis. The intact diatom cell suspensions were found to inhibit sea urchin egg hatching and embryogenesis. S. marinoi was the most potent one as it caused acute mortality in S. droebachiensis eggs after only four hours exposure to high (50 μg/L Chla) diatom concentrations, as well as 24 h exposure to normal (20 μg/L Chla) and high diatom concentrations. The second most potent species was T. gravida that caused acute mortality after 24 h exposure to both diatom concentrations. A. longicornis was the least harmful of the diatom species in terms of embryo development arrestment, and it was the species that was most actively ingested by S. droebachiensis plutei. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Quantification of Zooplankton Gut Content: The Case For qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischer, M. E.; Walters, T. L.; Gibson, D. M.; Nejstgaard, J. C.; Troedsson, C.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to obtain information about feeding selectivity and rates in situ for zooplankton is vital for understanding the mechanisms structuring marine ecosystems. However, directly estimating feeding selection and rates of zooplankton, without bias, associated with culturing conditions has been notoriously difficult. A potential approach for addressing this problem is to target prey-specific DNA as a marker for prey ingestion and selection. In this study we report the development of a differential length amplification quantitative PCR (dla-qPCR) assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene to validate the use of a DNA-based approach to quantify consumption of specific plankton prey by the pelagic tunicate (doliolid) Dolioletta gegenbauri. Compared to copepods and other marine animals, the digestion of prey genomic DNA inside the gut of doliolids is low. This method minimizes potential underestimations, and therefore allows prey DNA to be used as an effective indicator of prey consumption. We also present an initial application of a qPCR-assay to estimate consumption of specific prey species on the southeastern continental shelf of the U.S., where doliolids stochastically bloom in response to upwelling events. Estimated feeding rates, based on qPCR, were in the same range as those estimated from clearance rates in laboratory feeding studies. In the field, consumption of specific prey, including the centric diatom Thalassiosira spp. was detected in the gut of wild caught D. gegenbauri at the levels consistent with their abundance in the water column at the time of collection. Thus, both experimental and field investigations support the hypothesis that a qPCR approach will be useful for the quantitative investigation of the in situ diet of D. gegenbauri without introduced bias' associated with cultivation.

  12. Diatoms as Proxies for Abrupt Events in the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorski, W.; Abbott, D. H.; Recasens, C.; Breger, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Hudson River estuary has been subject to many abrupt events throughout its history including hurricanes, droughts and pluvials. Hurricanes in particular are rare, discrete events that if fingerprinted can be used to develop better age models for Hudson River sediments. Proxies use observed physical characteristics or biological assemblages (e.g. diatom and foraminiferal assemblages) as tools to reconstruct past conditions prior to the modern instrumental record. Using a sediment core taken from the Hudson River (CDO2-29A), in New York City, drought and pluvial layers were selected based on Cs-137 dating while hurricane layers were determined from occurrences of tropical to subtropical foraminifera. Contrary to previous studies (Weaver, 1970, Weiss et al, 1978), more than sixty different diatom species have been identified using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cosmopolitan, hurricane and drought assemblages have begun to be identified after observing multiple layers (Table 1). Tropical foraminifera dominated by Globigerinoides ruber pink were also found in a hurricane layer that we infer was deposited during Hurricane Belle in 1976. More diatom abundance analyses and cataloged SEM pictures will provide further insight into these proxies. Table 1 Diatom Genera and Species Environment Clarification Cyclotella caspia Planktonic, marine-brackish Cosmopolitan Karayevia clevei Freshwater Cosmopolitan Melosira sp Planktonic, marine Cosmopolitan Thalassiosira sp Marine, brackish Cosmopolitan Staurosirella leptostauron Benthic, freshwater Cosmopolitan Actinoptychus senarius Planktonic or benthic, freshwater to brackish Hurricane and pluvial layers Amphora aff. sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Nitzschia sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Gomphonema sp Freshwater Hurricane layers only Surirella sp Marine-brackish Drought layer only Triceratium sp Marine Drought layer only Other Genera and species Environment Clarification

  13. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  14. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  15. Diatom Transcriptional and Physiological Responses to Changes in Iron Bioavailability across Ocean Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R. Cohen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in iron (Fe bioavailability influence diatom physiology and community composition, and thus have a profound impact on primary productivity and ecosystem dynamics. Iron limitation of diatom growth rates has been demonstrated in both oceanic and coastal waters of the Northeast Pacific Ocean and is predicted to become more pervasive in future oceans. However, it is unclear how the strategies utilized by phytoplankton to cope with low Fe bioavailability and resupply differ across these ocean provinces. We investigated the response of diatom communities to variable Fe conditions through incubation experiments performed in the Fe mosaic of the California Upwelling Zone and along a natural Fe gradient in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Through coupling gene expression of two dominant diatom taxa (Pseudo-nitzschia and Thalassiosira with biological rate process measurements, we provide an in-depth examination of the physiological and molecular responses associated with varying Fe status. Following Fe enrichment, oceanic diatoms showed distinct differential expression of gene products involved in nitrogen assimilation, photosynthetic carbon fixation, and vitamin production compared to diatoms from low-Fe coastal sites, possibly driven by the chronic nature of Fe stress at the oceanic site. Genes of interest involved in Fe and N metabolism additionally exhibited divergent expression patterns between the two diatom taxa investigated, demonstrating that diverse diatoms may invoke alternative strategies when dealing with identical changes in their environment. We report here several mechanisms used distinctly by coastal or oceanic diatom communities as well as numerous taxa-specific strategies for coping with Fe stress and rearranging nutrient metabolism following Fe enrichment.

  16. Quantification of phosphorus in single cells using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez-Milland, Daliángelis R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Baines, Stephen B. [Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11755 (United States); Vogt, Stefan [Experimental Facilities Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Twining, Benjamin S., E-mail: btwining@bigelow.org [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Phosphorus abundance was quantified in individual phytoplankton cells by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and compared with bulk spectrophotometric measurements to confirm accuracy of quantification. Figures of merit for P quantification on three different types of transmission electron microscopy grids are compared to assess possible interferences. Phosphorus is required for numerous cellular compounds and as a result can serve as a useful proxy for total cell biomass in studies of cell elemental composition. Single-cell analysis by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) enables quantitative and qualitative analyses of cell elemental composition with high elemental sensitivity. Element standards are required to convert measured X-ray fluorescence intensities into element concentrations, but few appropriate standards are available, particularly for the biologically important element P. Empirical P conversion factors derived from other elements contained in certified thin-film standards were used to quantify P in the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, and the measured cell quotas were compared with those measured in bulk by spectrophotometry. The mean cellular P quotas quantified with SXRF for cells on Au, Ni and nylon grids using this approach were not significantly different from each other or from those measured spectrophotometrically. Inter-cell variability typical of cell populations was observed. Additionally, the grid substrates were compared for their suitability to P quantification based on the potential for spectral interferences with P. Nylon grids were found to have the lowest background concentrations and limits of detection for P, while background concentrations in Ni and Au grids were 1.8- and 6.3-fold higher. The advantages and disadvantages of each grid type for elemental analysis of individual phytoplankton cells are discussed.

  17. Cadmium toxicity to two marine phytoplankton under different nutrient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, A.-J.; Wang, W.-X.

    2006-01-01

    Cd accumulation and toxicity in two marine phytoplankton (diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum) under different nutrient conditions (nutrient-enriched, N- and P-starved conditions) were examined in this study. Strong interactions between the nutrients and Cd uptake by the two algal species were found. Cd accumulation as well as N and P starvation themselves inhibited the assimilation of N, P, and Si by the phytoplankton. Conversely, N starvation strongly inhibited Cd accumulation but no influence was observed under P starvation. However, the Cd accumulation difference between nutrient-enriched and N-starved cells was smaller when [Cd 2+ ] was increased in the medium, indicating that net Cd accumulation was less dependent on the N-containing ligands at high-Cd levels. As for the subcellular distribution of the accumulated Cd, most was distributed in the insoluble fraction of T. weissflogii while it was evenly distributed in the soluble and insoluble fractions of P. minimum at low-Cd levels. A small percentage of cellular Cd ( 2+ ], which increased when the [Cd 2+ ] increased. Cd toxicity in phytoplankton was quantified as depression of growth and maximal photosynthetic system II quantum yield, and was correlated with the [Cd 2+ ], intracellular Cd concentration, and Cd concentrations in the cell-surface-adsorbed, soluble, and insoluble fractions. According to the estimated median inhibition concentration (IC50) based on the different types of Cd concentration, the toxicity difference among the different nutrient-conditioned cells was the smallest when the Cd concentration in the soluble fraction was used, suggesting that it may be the best predictor of Cd toxicity under different nutrient conditions

  18. Sinking towards destiny: High throughput measurement of phytoplankton sinking rates through time-resolved fluorescence plate spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Catherine C; Campbell, Douglas A

    2017-01-01

    Diatoms are marine primary producers that sink in part due to the density of their silica frustules. Sinking of these phytoplankters is crucial for both the biological pump that sequesters carbon to the deep ocean and for the life strategy of the organism. Sinking rates have been previously measured through settling columns, or with fluorimeters or video microscopy arranged perpendicularly to the direction of sinking. These side-view techniques require large volumes of culture, specialized equipment and are difficult to scale up to multiple simultaneous measures for screening. We established a method for parallel, large scale analysis of multiple phytoplankton sinking rates through top-view monitoring of chlorophyll a fluorescence in microtitre well plates. We verified the method through experimental analysis of known factors that influence sinking rates, including exponential versus stationary growth phase in species of different cell sizes; Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP1335, chain-forming Skeletonema marinoi RO5A and Coscinodiscus radiatus CCMP312. We fit decay curves to an algebraic transform of the decrease in fluorescence signal as cells sank away from the fluorometer detector, and then used minimal mechanistic assumptions to extract a sinking rate (m d-1) using an RStudio script, SinkWORX. We thereby detected significant differences in sinking rates as larger diatom cells sank faster than smaller cells, and cultures in stationary phase sank faster than those in exponential phase. Our sinking rate estimates accord well with literature values from previously established methods. This well plate-based method can operate as a high throughput integrative phenotypic screen for factors that influence sinking rates including macromolecular allocations, nutrient availability or uptake rates, chain-length or cell size, degree of silification and progression through growth stages. Alternately the approach can be used to phenomically screen libraries of mutants.

  19. Insights into global diatom distribution and diversity in the world’s ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Malviya, Shruti; Scalco, Eleonora; Audic, Sté phane; Vincent, Flora; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Iudicone, Daniele; de Vargas, Colomban; Bittner, Lucie; Zingone, Adriana; Bowler, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyta) constitute one of the most diverse and ecologically important groups of phytoplankton. They are considered to be particularly important in nutrient-rich coastal ecosystems and at high latitudes, but considerably less so in the oligotrophic open ocean. The Tara Oceans circumnavigation collected samples from a wide range of oceanic regions using a standardized sampling procedure. Here, a total of ∼12 million diatom V9-18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) ribotypes, derived from 293 sizefractionated plankton communities collected at 46 sampling sites across the global ocean euphotic zone, have been analyzed to explore diatom global diversity and community composition. We provide a new estimate of diversity of marine planktonic diatoms at 4,748 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Based on the total assigned ribotypes, Chaetoceros was the most abundant and diverse genus, followed by Fragilariopsis, Thalassiosira, and Corethron. We found only a few cosmopolitan ribotypes displaying an even distribution across stations and high abundance, many of which could not be assigned with confidence to any known genus. Three distinct communities from South Pacific, Mediterranean, and Southern Ocean waters were identified that share a substantial percentage of ribotypes within them. Sudden drops in diversity were observed at Cape Agulhas, which separates the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, and across the Drake Passage between the Atlantic and Southern Oceans, indicating the importance of these ocean circulation choke points in constraining diatom distribution and diversity. We also observed high diatom diversity in the open ocean, suggesting that diatoms may be more relevant in these oceanic systems than generally considered.

  20. GROWTH AND PHOTOPROTECTION IN THREE DINOFLAGELLATES (INCLUDING TWO STRAINS OF ALEXANDRIUM TAMARENSE) AND ONE DIATOM EXPOSED TO FOUR WEEKS OF NATURAL AND ENHANCED ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurion, Isabelle; Roy, Suzanne

    2009-02-01

    Long-term growth response to natural solar radiation with enhanced ultraviolet-B (UVB) exposure was examined in two species of dinoflagellates [Alexandrium tamarense (M. Lebour) Balech, At, and Heterocapsa triquetra (Ehrenb.) F. Stein, Ht], including two strains of A. tamarense, one from Spain and another from UK, and one diatom species (Thalassiosira pseudonana Hasle et Heimdal). We examined whether variable photoprotection (mycosporine-like amino acids [MAAs] and xanthophyll-cycle pigments) affected photosynthetic performance, phytoplankton light absorption, and growth. Growth rate was significantly reduced under enhanced UVB for the UK strain of At and for Ht (both grew very little) as well as for the diatom (that maintained high growth rates), but there was no effect for the Spanish strain of At. MAA concentration was high in the dinoflagellates, but undetectable in the diatom, which instead used the xanthophyll cycle for photoprotection. The highest cell concentrations of MAAs and photoprotective pigments were observed in the UK strain of At, along with lowest growth rates and Fv /Fm , indicating high stress levels. In contrast, the Spanish strain showed progressive acclimation to the experimental conditions, with no significant difference in growth between treatments. Increase in total MAAs followed linearly the cumulative UVB of the preceding day, and both total and primary MAAs were maintained at higher constitutive levels in this strain. Acclimation to enhanced UVB in the diatom resulted in an increase in PSII activity and reduction in nonphotochemical quenching, indicating an increased resistance to photoinhibition after a few weeks. All four species showed increased phytoplankton light absorption under enhanced UVB. Large intrastrain differences suggest a need to consider more closely intraspecific variability in UV studies. © 2009 Phycological Society of America.

  1. Rates of ingestion and their variability between individual calanoid copepods: Direct observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Lewis, K.D. [Skidaway Inst. of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States); Bundy, M.H. [Skidaway Inst. of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States)]|[Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany). Inst. fuer Fernerkundung (IFE); Metz, C. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany). Inst. fuer Fernerkundung (IFE)

    1995-12-01

    The goals of this study were to determine rates of ingestion and fecal pellet release, and their variability, for individual planktonic copepods over extended periods of time (>20 min). Ingestions and rejections of individual cells of the diatom Thalassiosira eccentrica by a adult females of the calanoid Paracalanus aculeatus were directly quantified by observing individual copepods continuously at cell concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.2 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. Average ingestion rates increased with increasing food concentration, but were not significantly different between 0.3 and 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1} (9.8 and 32.7 {mu}g Cl{sup {minus}1}) of T.eccentrica. Rates of cell rejections were low and similar at 0.1 and 0.3. but were significantly higher at 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. The coefficients of variation for average ingestion rates of individual copepods hardly differed between food concentrations, ranging from 17 to 22%, and were close to those for average fecal pellet release intervals which ranged from 15 to 21%. A comparison between individuals at each food concentration found no significant differences at 1.0; at 0.1 and 0.3 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}, respectively, ingestion rates of four out of five females did not differ significantly from each other. Average intervals between fecal pellet releases were similar at 0.3 and 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. Fecal pellet release intervals between individuals were significantly different at each food concentration; these significant differences were attributed to rather narrow ranges of pellet release intervals of each individual female. Potential sources/causes of variability in the sizes and rates of copepods in the ocean are evaluated.

  2. Risk assessment of excessive CO{sub 2} emission on diatom heavy metal consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fengjiao; Li, Shunxing, E-mail: shunxing_li@aliyun.com; Zheng, Fengying; Huang, Xuguang

    2016-10-01

    Diatoms are the dominant group of phytoplankton in the modern ocean, accounting for approximately 40% of oceanic primary productivity and critical foundation of coastal food web. Rising dissolution of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in seawater may directly/indirectly cause ocean acidification and desalination. However, little is known about dietary diatom-associated changes, especially for diatom heavy metal consumption sensitivity to these processes, which is important for seafood safety and nutrition assessment. Here we show some links between ocean acidification/desalination and heavy metal consumption by Thalassiosira weissflogii. Excitingly, under desalination stress, the relationships between Cu, Zn, and Cd were all positively correlated, especially between Cu and Zn (r = 0.989, total intracellular concentration) and between Zn and Cd (r = 0.962, single-cell intracellular concentration). Heavy metal consumption activity in decreasing order was acidification < acidification + desalination < desalination for Zn, acidification < desalination < acidification + desalination for Cu and Cd, i.e., heavy metal uptake (or release) were controlled by environmental stress. Our findings showed that heavy metal uptake (or release) was already responded to ongoing excessive CO{sub 2} emission-driven acidification and desalination, which was important for risk assessment of climate change on diatom heavy metal consumption, food web and then seafood safety in future oceans. - Highlights: • Excessive CO{sub 2} in seawater may causes ocean acidification and desalination. • The relationships between Cu, Zn, and Cd were all positively correlated by desalination. • Significant effects of salinity on intracellular concentration of Cu and Cd • Cu and Cd in marine phytoplankton could be regulated by metal excretion. • Heavy metal consumption was affect by excessive CO{sub 2}.

  3. Copper-containing plastocyanin used for electron transport by an oceanic diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Graham; Price, Neil M

    2006-05-18

    The supply of some essential metals to pelagic ecosystems is less than the demand, so many phytoplankton have slow rates of photosynthetic production and restricted growth. The types and amounts of metals required by phytoplankton depends on their evolutionary history and on their adaptations to metal availability, which varies widely among ocean habitats. Diatoms, for example, need considerably less iron (Fe) to grow than chlorophyll-b-containing taxa, and the oceanic species demand roughly one-tenth the amount of coastal strains. Like Fe, copper (Cu) is scarce in the open sea, but notably higher concentrations of it are required for the growth of oceanic than of coastal isolates. Here we report that the greater Cu requirement in an oceanic diatom, Thalassiosira oceanica, is entirely due to a single Cu-containing protein, plastocyanin, which--until now--was only known to exist in organisms with chlorophyll b and cyanobacteria. Algae containing chlorophyll c, including the closely related coastal species T. weissflogii, are thought to lack plastocyanin and contain a functionally equivalent Fe-containing homologue, cytochrome c6 (ref. 9). Copper deficiency in T. oceanica inhibits electron transport regardless of Fe status, implying a constitutive role for plastocyanin in the light reactions of photosynthesis in this species. The results suggest that selection pressure imposed by Fe limitation has resulted in the use of a Cu protein for photosynthesis in an oceanic diatom. This biochemical switch reduces the need for Fe and increases the requirement for Cu, which is relatively more abundant in the open sea.

  4. Red and green algal origin of diatom membrane transporters: insights into environmental adaptation and cell evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheong Xin Chan

    Full Text Available Membrane transporters (MTs facilitate the movement of molecules between cellular compartments. The evolutionary history of these key components of eukaryote genomes remains unclear. Many photosynthetic microbial eukaryotes (e.g., diatoms, haptophytes, and dinoflagellates appear to have undergone serial endosymbiosis and thereby recruited foreign genes through endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer (E/HGT. Here we used the diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum as models to examine the evolutionary origin of MTs in this important group of marine primary producers. Using phylogenomics, we used 1,014 diatom MTs as query against a broadly sampled protein sequence database that includes novel genome data from the mesophilic red algae Porphyridium cruentum and Calliarthron tuberculosum, and the stramenopile Ectocarpus siliculosus. Our conservative approach resulted in 879 maximum likelihood trees of which 399 genes show a non-lineal history between diatoms and other eukaryotes and prokaryotes (at the bootstrap value ≥70%. Of the eukaryote-derived MTs, 172 (ca. 25% of 697 examined phylogenies have members of both red/green algae as sister groups, with 103 putatively arising from green algae, 19 from red algae, and 50 have an unresolved affiliation to red and/or green algae. We used topology tests to analyze the most convincing cases of non-lineal gene history in which red and/or green algae were nested within stramenopiles. This analysis showed that ca. 6% of all trees (our most conservative estimate support an algal origin of MTs in stramenopiles with the majority derived from green algae. Our findings demonstrate the complex evolutionary history of photosynthetic eukaryotes and indicate a reticulate origin of MT genes in diatoms. We postulate that the algal-derived MTs acquired via E/HGT provided diatoms and other related microbial eukaryotes the ability to persist under conditions of fluctuating ocean chemistry, likely

  5. Risk assessment of excessive CO_2 emission on diatom heavy metal consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fengjiao; Li, Shunxing; Zheng, Fengying; Huang, Xuguang

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are the dominant group of phytoplankton in the modern ocean, accounting for approximately 40% of oceanic primary productivity and critical foundation of coastal food web. Rising dissolution of anthropogenic CO_2 in seawater may directly/indirectly cause ocean acidification and desalination. However, little is known about dietary diatom-associated changes, especially for diatom heavy metal consumption sensitivity to these processes, which is important for seafood safety and nutrition assessment. Here we show some links between ocean acidification/desalination and heavy metal consumption by Thalassiosira weissflogii. Excitingly, under desalination stress, the relationships between Cu, Zn, and Cd were all positively correlated, especially between Cu and Zn (r = 0.989, total intracellular concentration) and between Zn and Cd (r = 0.962, single-cell intracellular concentration). Heavy metal consumption activity in decreasing order was acidification < acidification + desalination < desalination for Zn, acidification < desalination < acidification + desalination for Cu and Cd, i.e., heavy metal uptake (or release) were controlled by environmental stress. Our findings showed that heavy metal uptake (or release) was already responded to ongoing excessive CO_2 emission-driven acidification and desalination, which was important for risk assessment of climate change on diatom heavy metal consumption, food web and then seafood safety in future oceans. - Highlights: • Excessive CO_2 in seawater may causes ocean acidification and desalination. • The relationships between Cu, Zn, and Cd were all positively correlated by desalination. • Significant effects of salinity on intracellular concentration of Cu and Cd • Cu and Cd in marine phytoplankton could be regulated by metal excretion. • Heavy metal consumption was affect by excessive CO_2.

  6. Phytoplankton blooms in estuarine and coastal waters: Seasonal patterns and key species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Jacob; Klais, Riina; Cloern, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are dynamic phenomena of great importance to the functioning of estuarine and coastal ecosystems. We analysed a unique (large) collection of phytoplankton monitoring data covering 86 coastal sites distributed over eight regions in North America and Europe, with the aim of investigating common patterns in the seasonal timing and species composition of the blooms. The spring bloom was the most common seasonal pattern across all regions, typically occurring early (February–March) at lower latitudes and later (April–May) at higher latitudes. Bloom frequency, defined as the probability of unusually high biomass, ranged from 5 to 35% between sites and followed no consistent patterns across gradients of latitude, temperature, salinity, water depth, stratification, tidal amplitude or nutrient concentrations. Blooms were mostly dominated by a single species, typically diatoms (58% of the blooms) and dinoflagellates (19%). Diatom-dominated spring blooms were a common feature in most systems, although dinoflagellate spring blooms were also observed in the Baltic Sea. Blooms dominated by chlorophytes and cyanobacteria were only common in low salinity waters and occurred mostly at higher temperatures. Key bloom species across the eight regions included the diatoms Cerataulina pelagica and Dactyliosolen fragilissimus and dinoflagellates Heterocapsa triquetra and Prorocentrum cordatum. Other frequent bloom-forming taxa were diatom genera Chaetoceros, Coscinodiscus, Skeletonema, and Thalassiosira. Our meta-analysis shows that these 86 estuarine-coastal sites function as diatom-producing systems, the timing of that production varies widely, and that bloom frequency is not associated with environmental factors measured in monitoring programs. We end with a perspective on the limitations of conclusions derived from meta-analyses of phytoplankton time series, and the grand challenges remaining to understand the wide range of bloom patterns and

  7. Using an interlaboratory study to revise methods for conducting 10-d to 42-d water or sediment toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Chris D.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Hammer, Edward J.; Mount, David R.; Hockett, J. Russell; Norberg-King, Teresa J.; Soucek, Dave; Taylor, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to refine US Environmental Protection Agency, ASTM International, and Environment Canada standard methods for conducting 42-d reproduction tests with Hyalella azteca in water or in sediment. Modifications to the H. azteca method include better-defined ionic composition requirements for exposure water (i.e., >15 mg/L of chloride and >0.02 mg/L of bromide) and improved survival, growth, and reproduction with alternate diets provided as increased rations over time in water-only or whole-sediment toxicity tests. A total of 24 laboratories volunteered to participate in the present interlaboratory study evaluating the performance of H. azteca in 42-d studies in control sand or control sediment using the refined methods. Improved growth and reproduction of H. azteca was observed with 2 alternate diets of 1) ramped diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii) + ramped Tetramin or 2) yeast–cerophyll–trout chow (YCT) + ramped Tetramin, especially when compared with results from the traditional diet of 1.8 mg YCT/d. Laboratories were able to meet proposed test acceptability criteria and in most cases had lower variation in growth or reproduction compared with previous interlaboratory studies using the traditional YCT diet. Laboratory success in conducting 42-d H. azteca exposures benefited from adherence to several key requirements of the detailed testing, culturing, and handling methods. Results from the present interlaboratory study are being used to help revise standard methods for conducting 10-d to 42-d water or sediment toxicity exposures with H. azteca.

  8. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: Recovery from cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mengjiao [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-25

    Studies in the recovery from metal stress and the tolerance development to metal exposure of aquatic organisms are important for the understanding of epidemic pollution. In this study, the responses of a marine diatom, Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii, following recovery from environmental cadmium (Cd) stress were investigated. The diatoms were exposed to different concentrations of Cd for 7 days, and were then allowed different periods of time to recover. The Cd sensitivity increased after recovery from Cd stress, followed by a gradual restoration. The extent of restoration depended on both the recovery time and the environmental Cd stress during the exposure period. A complete restoration of Cd tolerance proved to be impossible for cells pre-exposed to High-Cd. The Cd cellular burden and subcellular Cd concentration decreased to the control level within the first day of recovery, indicating that the elevated sensitivity may have been due to the accumulation of functional damage caused by Cd exposure instead of a result of physical Cd accumulation. The rapid change in phytochelatins (PC) to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress made it a good quantitative bioindicator of environmental Cd contamination. However, the relationships between Cd distribution in the metal sensitive fraction (MSF-Cd) or intracellular Cd to thiol ratio (intra-Cd/PC-SH) and the relative change in the median inhibition [Cd{sup 2+}] ([Cd{sup 2+}]-based-IC{sub 50}, i.e., Cd sensitivity) differed for the various exposure and recovery periods tested. Our study suggests that more attention should be given to the recovery of aquatic organisms from episodic metal exposure.

  9. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  10. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Accumulation, subcellular distribution and toxicity of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in marine phytoplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yun [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-10-15

    We examined the accumulation, subcellular distribution, and toxicity of Hg(II) and MeHg in three marine phytoplankton (the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, the green alga Chlorella autotrophica, and the flagellate Isochrysis galbana). For MeHg, the inter-species toxic difference could be best interpreted by the total cellular or intracellular accumulation. For Hg(II), both I. galbana and T. pseudonana exhibited similar sensitivity, but they each accumulated a different level of Hg(II). A higher percentage of Hg(II) was bound to the cellular debris fraction in T. pseudonana than in I. galbana, implying that the cellular debris may play an important role in Hg(II) detoxification. Furthermore, heat-stable proteins were a major binding pool for MeHg, while the cellular debris was an important binding pool for Hg(II). Elucidating the different subcellular fates of Hg(II) and MeHg may help us understand their toxicity in marine phytoplankton at the bottom of aquatic food chains. - Highlights: > The inter-species toxic difference of methylmercury in marine phytoplankton can be explained by its total cellular or intracellular accumulation. > The inter-species toxic difference of inorganic mercury in marine phytoplankton can be explained by its subcellular distribution. > Heat-stable protein was a major binding pool for MeHg, while the cellular debris was an important binding pool for Hg(II). - The inter-species difference in methylmercury and inorganic mercury toxicity in phytoplankton can be explained by cellular accumulation and subcellular distribution.

  12. Understanding the sub-cellular dynamics of silicon transportation and synthesis in diatoms using population-level data and computational optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narjes Javaheri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Controlled synthesis of silicon is a major challenge in nanotechnology and material science. Diatoms, the unicellular algae, are an inspiring example of silica biosynthesis, producing complex and delicate nano-structures. This happens in several cell compartments, including cytoplasm and silica deposition vesicle (SDV. Considering the low concentration of silicic acid in oceans, cells have developed silicon transporter proteins (SIT. Moreover, cells change the level of active SITs during one cell cycle, likely as a response to the level of external nutrients and internal deposition rates. Despite this topic being of fundamental interest, the intracellular dynamics of nutrients and cell regulation strategies remain poorly understood. One reason is the difficulties in measurements and manipulation of these mechanisms at such small scales, and even when possible, data often contain large errors. Therefore, using computational techniques seems inevitable. We have constructed a mathematical model for silicon dynamics in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana in four compartments: external environment, cytoplasm, SDV and deposited silica. The model builds on mass conservation and Michaelis-Menten kinetics as mass transport equations. In order to find the free parameters of the model from sparse, noisy experimental data, an optimization technique (global and local search, together with enzyme related penalty terms, has been applied. We have connected population-level data to individual-cell-level quantities including the effect of early division of non-synchronized cells. Our model is robust, proven by sensitivity and perturbation analysis, and predicts dynamics of intracellular nutrients and enzymes in different compartments. The model produces different uptake regimes, previously recognized as surge, externally-controlled and internally-controlled uptakes. Finally, we imposed a flux of SITs to the model and compared it with previous classical kinetics

  13. Accumulation, subcellular distribution and toxicity of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in marine phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yun; Wang Wenxiong

    2011-01-01

    We examined the accumulation, subcellular distribution, and toxicity of Hg(II) and MeHg in three marine phytoplankton (the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, the green alga Chlorella autotrophica, and the flagellate Isochrysis galbana). For MeHg, the inter-species toxic difference could be best interpreted by the total cellular or intracellular accumulation. For Hg(II), both I. galbana and T. pseudonana exhibited similar sensitivity, but they each accumulated a different level of Hg(II). A higher percentage of Hg(II) was bound to the cellular debris fraction in T. pseudonana than in I. galbana, implying that the cellular debris may play an important role in Hg(II) detoxification. Furthermore, heat-stable proteins were a major binding pool for MeHg, while the cellular debris was an important binding pool for Hg(II). Elucidating the different subcellular fates of Hg(II) and MeHg may help us understand their toxicity in marine phytoplankton at the bottom of aquatic food chains. - Highlights: → The inter-species toxic difference of methylmercury in marine phytoplankton can be explained by its total cellular or intracellular accumulation. → The inter-species toxic difference of inorganic mercury in marine phytoplankton can be explained by its subcellular distribution. → Heat-stable protein was a major binding pool for MeHg, while the cellular debris was an important binding pool for Hg(II). - The inter-species difference in methylmercury and inorganic mercury toxicity in phytoplankton can be explained by cellular accumulation and subcellular distribution.

  14. Electrophoretic protein profiles of mid-sized copepod Calanoides patagoniensis steadily fed bloom-forming diatoms

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    Victor M Aguilera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent field and experimental evidence collected in the southern upwelling region off Concepción (36°5'S, 73°3'W showed an abrupt reduction (<72 h in the egg production rates (EPR of copepods when they were fed steadily and solely with the local bloom-forming diatom Thalassiosira rotula. Because diatoms were biochemically similar to dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum, a diet which supported higher reproductive outcomes, the fecundity reduction observed in copepod females fed with the diatom may have obeyed to post-ingestive processes, giving rise to resources reallocation. This hypothesis was tested by comparing feeding (clearance and ingestion rates, reproduction (EPR and hatching success and the structure of protein profiles (i.e., number and intensity of electrophoretic bands of copepods (adults and eggs incubated during 96 h with the two food conditions. The structure of protein profiles included molecular sizes that were calculated from the relative mobility of protein standards against the logarithm of their molecular sizes. After assessing the experimental conditions, feeding decreased over time for those females fed with T. rotula, while reproduction was higher in females fed with P. minimum. Electrophoretic profiles resulted similar mostly at a banding region of 100 to 89-kDa, while they showed partial differences around the region of 56-kDa band, especially in those females fed and eggs produced with T. rotula. Due to reproductive volume was impacted while larvae viability, a physiological processes with specific and high nutritional requirements, was independent on food type; post-ingestive processes, such as expression of stress-related proteins deviating resources to metabolic processes others than reproduction, are discussed under framework of nutritional-toxic mechanisms mediating copepod-diatoms relationships in productive upwelling areas.

  15. Ocean acidification-induced food quality deterioration constrains trophic transfer.

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    Dennis Rossoll

    Full Text Available Our present understanding of ocean acidification (OA impacts on marine organisms caused by rapidly rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2 concentration is almost entirely limited to single species responses. OA consequences for food web interactions are, however, still unknown. Indirect OA effects can be expected for consumers by changing the nutritional quality of their prey. We used a laboratory experiment to test potential OA effects on algal fatty acid (FA composition and resulting copepod growth. We show that elevated CO(2 significantly changed the FA concentration and composition of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, which constrained growth and reproduction of the copepod Acartia tonsa. A significant decline in both total FAs (28.1 to 17.4 fg cell(-1 and the ratio of long-chain polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids (PUFA:SFA of food algae cultured under elevated (750 µatm compared to present day (380 µatm pCO(2 was directly translated to copepods. The proportion of total essential FAs declined almost tenfold in copepods and the contribution of saturated fatty acids (SFAs tripled at high CO(2. This rapid and reversible CO(2-dependent shift in FA concentration and composition caused a decrease in both copepod somatic growth and egg production from 34 to 5 eggs female(-1 day(-1. Because the diatom-copepod link supports some of the most productive ecosystems in the world, our study demonstrates that OA can have far-reaching consequences for ocean food webs by changing the nutritional quality of essential macromolecules in primary producers that cascade up the food web.

  16. Ocean acidification-induced food quality deterioration constrains trophic transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoll, Dennis; Bermúdez, Rafael; Hauss, Helena; Schulz, Kai G; Riebesell, Ulf; Sommer, Ulrich; Winder, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Our present understanding of ocean acidification (OA) impacts on marine organisms caused by rapidly rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) concentration is almost entirely limited to single species responses. OA consequences for food web interactions are, however, still unknown. Indirect OA effects can be expected for consumers by changing the nutritional quality of their prey. We used a laboratory experiment to test potential OA effects on algal fatty acid (FA) composition and resulting copepod growth. We show that elevated CO(2) significantly changed the FA concentration and composition of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, which constrained growth and reproduction of the copepod Acartia tonsa. A significant decline in both total FAs (28.1 to 17.4 fg cell(-1)) and the ratio of long-chain polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids (PUFA:SFA) of food algae cultured under elevated (750 µatm) compared to present day (380 µatm) pCO(2) was directly translated to copepods. The proportion of total essential FAs declined almost tenfold in copepods and the contribution of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) tripled at high CO(2). This rapid and reversible CO(2)-dependent shift in FA concentration and composition caused a decrease in both copepod somatic growth and egg production from 34 to 5 eggs female(-1) day(-1). Because the diatom-copepod link supports some of the most productive ecosystems in the world, our study demonstrates that OA can have far-reaching consequences for ocean food webs by changing the nutritional quality of essential macromolecules in primary producers that cascade up the food web.

  17. Are algal genes in nonphotosynthetic protists evidence of historical plastid endosymbioses?

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    Tian Jing

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How photosynthetic organelles, or plastids, were acquired by diverse eukaryotes is among the most hotly debated topics in broad scale eukaryotic evolution. The history of plastid endosymbioses commonly is interpreted under the "chromalveolate" hypothesis, which requires numerous plastid losses from certain heterotrophic groups that now are entirely aplastidic. In this context, discoveries of putatively algal genes in plastid-lacking protists have been cited as evidence of gene transfer from a photosynthetic endosymbiont that subsequently was lost completely. Here we examine this evidence, as it pertains to the chromalveolate hypothesis, through genome-level statistical analyses of similarity scores from queries with two diatoms, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, and two aplastidic sister taxa, Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae. Results Contingency tests of specific predictions of the chromalveolate model find no evidence for an unusual red algal contribution to Phytophthora genomes, nor that putative cyanobacterial sequences that are present entered these genomes through a red algal endosymbiosis. Examination of genes unrelated to plastid function provide extraordinarily significant support for both of these predictions in diatoms, the control group where a red endosymbiosis is known to have occurred, but none of that support is present in genes specifically conserved between diatoms and oomycetes. In addition, we uncovered a strong association between overall sequence similarities among taxa and relative sizes of genomic data sets in numbers of genes. Conclusion Signal from "algal" genes in oomycete genomes is inconsistent with the chromalveolate hypothesis, and better explained by alternative models of sequence and genome evolution. Combined with the numerous sources of intragenomic phylogenetic conflict characterized previously, our results underscore the potential to be mislead by a posteriori

  18. A fast Na+/Ca2+-based action potential in a marine diatom.

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    Alison R Taylor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Electrical impulses in animals play essential roles in co-ordinating an array of physiological functions including movement, secretion, environmental sensing and development. Underpinning many of these electrical signals is a fast Na+-based action potential that has been fully characterised only in cells associated with the neuromuscular systems of multicellular animals. Such rapid action potentials are thought to have evolved with the first metazoans, with cnidarians being the earliest representatives. The present study demonstrates that a unicellular protist, the marine diatom Odontella sinensis, can also generate a fast Na+/Ca2+ based action potential that has remarkably similar biophysical and pharmacological properties to invertebrates and vertebrate cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The kinetic, ionic and pharmacological properties of the rapid diatom action potential were examined using single electrode current and voltage clamp techniques. Overall, the characteristics of the fast diatom currents most closely resemble those of vertebrate and invertebrate muscle Na+/Ca2+ currents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first demonstration of voltage-activated Na+ channels and the capacity to generate fast Na+-based action potentials in a unicellular photosynthetic organism. The biophysical and pharmacological characteristics together with the presence of a voltage activated Na+/Ca2+ channel homologue in the recently sequenced genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, provides direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that this rapid signalling mechanism arose in ancestral unicellular eukaryotes and has been retained in at least two phylogenetically distant lineages of eukaryotes; opisthokonts and the stramenopiles. The functional role of the fast animal-like action potential in diatoms remains to be elucidated but is likely involved in rapid environmental sensing of these widespread and

  19. Ammonium production off central Chile (36°S by photodegradation of phytoplankton-derived and marine dissolved organic matter.

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    Angel Rain-Franco

    Full Text Available We investigated the production of ammonium by the photodegradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM in the coastal upwelling system off central Chile (36°S. The mean penetration of solar radiation (Z1% between April 2011 and February 2012 was 9.4 m, 4.4 m and 3.2 m for Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm, UV-A (320-400 nm and UV-B (280-320 nm, respectively. Ammonium photoproduction experiments were carried out using exudates of DOM obtained from cultured diatom species (Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira minuscule as well as natural marine DOM. Diatom exudates showed net photoproduction of ammonium under exposure to UVR with a mean rate of 0.56±0.4 µmol L(-1 h(-1 and a maximum rate of 1.49 µmol L(-1 h(-1. Results from natural marine DOM showed net photoproduction of ammonium under exposure to PAR+UVR ranging between 0.06 and 0.2 µmol L(-1 h(-1. We estimated the potential contribution of photochemical ammonium production for phytoplankton ammonium demand. Photoammonification of diatom exudates could support between 117 and 453% of spring-summer NH4(+ assimilation, while rates obtained from natural samples could contribute to 50-178% of spring-summer phytoplankton NH4(+ requirements. These results have implications for local N budgets, as photochemical ammonium production can occur year-round in the first meters of the euphotic zone that are impacted by full sunlight.

  20. EST analysis of the scaly green flagellate Mesostigma viride (Streptophyta: Implications for the evolution of green plants (Viridiplantae

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    Melkonian Michael

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Viridiplantae (land plants and green algae consist of two monophyletic lineages, the Chlorophyta and the Streptophyta. The Streptophyta include all embryophytes and a small but diverse group of freshwater algae traditionally known as the Charophyceae (e.g. Charales, Coleochaete and the Zygnematales. The only flagellate currently included in the Streptophyta is Mesostigma viride Lauterborn. To gain insight into the genome evolution in streptophytes, we have sequenced 10,395 ESTs from Mesostigma representing 3,300 independent contigs and compared the ESTs of Mesostigma with available plant genomes (Arabidopsis, Oryza, Chlamydomonas, with ESTs from the bryophyte Physcomitrella, the genome of the rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon, the ESTs from the rhodophyte Porphyra, and the genome of the diatom Thalassiosira. Results The number of expressed genes shared by Mesostigma with the embryophytes (90.3 % of the expressed genes showing similarity to known proteins is higher than with Chlamydomonas (76.1 %. In general, cytosolic metabolic pathways, and proteins involved in vesicular transport, transcription, regulation, DNA-structure and replication, cell cycle control, and RNA-metabolism are more conserved between Mesostigma and the embryophytes than between Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas. However, plastidic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways, cytoskeletal proteins and proteins involved in protein folding are more conserved between Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas than between Mesostigma and the embryophytes. Conclusion Our EST-analysis of Mesostigma supports the notion that this organism should be a suitable unicellular model for the last flagellate common ancestor of the streptophytes. Mesostigma shares more genes with the embryophytes than with the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although both organisms are flagellate unicells. Thus, it seems likely that several major physiological changes (e.g. in the regulation of photosynthesis

  1. Insights into global diatom distribution and diversity in the world’s ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Malviya, Shruti

    2016-03-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyta) constitute one of the most diverse and ecologically important groups of phytoplankton. They are considered to be particularly important in nutrient-rich coastal ecosystems and at high latitudes, but considerably less so in the oligotrophic open ocean. The Tara Oceans circumnavigation collected samples from a wide range of oceanic regions using a standardized sampling procedure. Here, a total of ∼12 million diatom V9-18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) ribotypes, derived from 293 sizefractionated plankton communities collected at 46 sampling sites across the global ocean euphotic zone, have been analyzed to explore diatom global diversity and community composition. We provide a new estimate of diversity of marine planktonic diatoms at 4,748 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Based on the total assigned ribotypes, Chaetoceros was the most abundant and diverse genus, followed by Fragilariopsis, Thalassiosira, and Corethron. We found only a few cosmopolitan ribotypes displaying an even distribution across stations and high abundance, many of which could not be assigned with confidence to any known genus. Three distinct communities from South Pacific, Mediterranean, and Southern Ocean waters were identified that share a substantial percentage of ribotypes within them. Sudden drops in diversity were observed at Cape Agulhas, which separates the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, and across the Drake Passage between the Atlantic and Southern Oceans, indicating the importance of these ocean circulation choke points in constraining diatom distribution and diversity. We also observed high diatom diversity in the open ocean, suggesting that diatoms may be more relevant in these oceanic systems than generally considered.

  2. Time series monitoring of water quality and microalgal diversity in a tropical bay under intense anthropogenic interference (SW coast of the Bay of Bengal, India)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaik, Aziz ur Rahman; Biswas, Haimanti; Reddy, N.P.C.; Srinivasa Rao, V.; Bharathi, M.D.; Subbaiah, Ch.V.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, material fluxes to coastal waters from various land based anthropogenic activities have significantly been enhanced around the globe which can considerably impact the coastal water quality and ecosystem health. Hence, there is a critical need to understand the links between anthropogenic activities in watersheds and its health. Kakinada Bay is situated at the SW part of the Bay of Bengal, near to the second largest mangrove cover in India with several fertilizer industries along its bank and could be highly vulnerable to different types of pollutants. However, virtually, no data is available so far reporting its physicochemical status and microalgal diversity at this bay. In order to fill this gap, we conducted three time series observations at a fixed station during January, December and June 2012, at this bay measuring more than 15 physical, chemical and biological parameters in every 3 h over a period of 36 h in both surface (0 m) and subsurface (4.5 m) waters. Our results clearly depict a strong seasonality between three sampling months; however, any abnormal values of nutrients, biological oxygen demand or dissolved oxygen level was not observed. A Skeletonema costatum bloom was observed in December which was probably influenced by low saline, high turbid and high Si input through the river discharge. Otherwise, smaller diatoms like Thalassiosira decipiens, Thalassiothrix frauenfeldii, and Thalassionema nitzschioides dominated the bay. It is likely that the material loading can be high at the point sources due to intense anthropogenic activities, however, gets diluted with biological, chemical and physical processes in the offshore waters. - Highlights: • No signature of enormous nutrient loading was observed over the diel cycle • Dissolved oxygen and BOD concentrations did not show any exceptional trend • Diatoms dominated more than 90% of the total phytoplankton communities • A Skeletonema Costatum (a centric diatom) bloom was

  3. Late winter coccolithophore bloom off central Portugal in response to river discharge and upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Catarina; Oliveira, Anabela; de Stigter, Henko; Cachão, Mário; Sá, Carolina; Borges, Carlos; Cros, Lluϊsa; Santos, Ana; Fortuño, José-Manuel; Rodrigues, Aurora

    2013-05-01

    Coccolithophore communities collected during late winter (9-19 March of 2010) over the central Portuguese margin showed a major change in species abundance and composition within a few days' time, closely related to the highly transient meteorological and oceanographic conditions. Particularly favourable conditions for coccolithophore growth resulted from late winter continental runoff combined with northerly winds prevailing over the shelf, under clear sky conditions. A nutrient-rich Buoyant Plume (BP) resulting from intense river water runoff prior to and during the start of the cruise, was observed to spread out over the denser winter mixed layer water beneath, and extend equatorwards and offshore under influence of Ekman superficial dynamics. Stabilization of buoyancy, settling of suspended sediment from the BP and the prevailing clear sky conditions in the transition to the 2nd leg of the cruise resulted in optimum conditions for coccolithophores to develop, at the expense of nutrient availability in the superficial sunlit layer. Within a few days, coccolithophore cell densities and associated phytoplankton biomass more than tripled, reaching maximum values of 145,000 cells/l and ~13 µg/l Chl-a, respectively. Often considered as a uniform functional group of calcifying phytoplankton thriving in low-turbulence, low-nutrients and high-light environments, results presented in this study clearly show that coccolithophore life strategies are much more diverse than expected. The increase of cell densities was mainly due to the bloom of Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica in the coastal region west off Cape Carvoeiro, together with other opportunistic phytoplankton genera (Chaetoceros s.l., Thalassiosira s.l and Skeletonema s.l.). This confirms their role as early succession r-selected taxa, capable of rapid growth within nutrient-rich environments. On the contrary, Syracosphaera spp. and Ophiaster spp. displayed the characteristics of K-selected species

  4. Photosynthetic epibionts and endobionts of Pacific oyster shells from oyster reefs in rocky versus mudflat shores.

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    Laurent Barillé

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, is the main bivalve species cultivated in the world. With global warming enabling its reproduction and larval survival at higher latitudes, this species is now recognized as invasive and creates wild oyster reefs globally. In this study, the spatial distribution of photosynthetic assemblages colonizing the shells of wild C. gigas was investigated on both a large scale (two contrasting types of reefs found in mudflats and rocky areas and a small scale (within individual shells using a hyperspectral imager. The microspatial distribution of all phototrophs was obtained by mapping the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI. Second derivative (δδ analyses of hyperspectral images at 462, 524, 571 and 647 nm were subsequently applied to map diatoms, cyanobacteria, rhodophytes and chlorophytes, respectively. A concomitant pigment analysis was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography and completed by taxonomic observations. This study showed that there was high microalgal diversity associated with wild oyster shells and that there were differences in the structure of the phototropic assemblages depending on the type of reef. Namely, vertically-growing oysters in mudflat areas had a higher biomass of epizoic diatoms (hyperspectral proxy at δδ462 nm and were mainly colonized by species of the genera Navicula, Nitzschia and Hippodonta, which are epipelic or motile epipsammic. The assemblages on the horizontal oysters contained more tychoplanktonic diatoms (e.g. Thalassiosira pseudonana, T. proschkinae and Plagiogrammopsis vanheurckii. Three species of boring cyanobacteria were observed for both types of reef: Mastigocoleus testarum, Leptolyngbya terrebrans, and Hyella caespistosa, but the second derivative analysis at 524 nm showed a significantly higher biomass for the horizontally-growing oysters. There was no biomass difference for the boring chlorophyte assemblages (δδ647 nm, with

  5. Examining the impact of grazing on iron remineralization: effect of prey type on digestive vacuole pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, K. R.; Nuester, J.; Twining, B.

    2012-12-01

    Most of the iron available to phytoplankton in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas is regenerated by zooplankton grazers. The extent to which the bioavailability of this regenerated iron is a function of prey-type and the chemical conditions within digestive systems of zooplankton is unknown. The chemical composition of the prey, including silica frustules of diatoms and calcium carbonate coccoliths of cocolithophores, might buffer the acidity within a digestive vacuole and thereby influencing the resulting speciation and bioavailability of regenerated iron. In order to test the effect of prey-type on the chemical condition in the digestive vacuole of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, we used the ratiometric fluorescent dye Lysosensor Yellow/Blue DND-160 in conjunction with confocal microscopy to measure and compare digestive vacuole acidity after feeding O. marina with either the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, the coccolithophore Emiliana huxleyi, or the chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta. After feeding and loading O. marina with the Lysosensor dye, we recorded the total fluorescence (f) of the wavelength regions λ1=500-555 nm and λ2=410-490 nm using an excitation wavelength of 405 nm, and calculated the Lysosensor fluorescence ratio r=f(λ1)/f(λ2). External calibration curves show that this ratio (r) is inversely related to pH. In addition, we also measured the emission of chlorophyll fluorescence above 640 nm in order to identify prey within the grazers and study the timing chlorophyll degradation in conjunction with vacuole pH. After the initial addition of either prey, O. marina consumed 10 times and 2 times more D. tertiolecta cells than E. huxleyi and T. pseudonana cells, respectively. The clearance of the digestive vacuole measured as the disappearance of chlorophyll fluorescence is ca. twice as long for O. marina feeding on D. tertiolecta than on E. huxleyi or T. pseudonana. Initial r was inversely proportional to prey preference

  6. Silicon Utilizing Microbial Bioactivities in the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, M. M.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Diatoms are unicellular eukaryotic algae and an important member of the silicon utilizing organisms, that generate ~20% of the ~100 billion metric tons of organic carbon produced through photosynthesis on Earth each year. Fragilariopsis is a dominating psychrophilic diatom genus in polar sea ice. The two species Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Fragilariopsis curta are able to grow and divide below freezing temperature. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), involved in cold adaptation in several psychrophilic organisms, are widespread in this two polar species. Achanthes minutissima isolated as dominant diatom has degradable effects involving petroleum hydocarbons. Phaeodactylum tricornutum, have antibacterial activity and the fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), has been identified as one compound responsible for this activity. Other antibacterial compounds are monounsaturated fatty acid (9Z)-hexadecenoic acid (palmitoleic acid; C16:1 n-7) and the relatively unusual polyunsaturated fatty acid (6Z, 9Z, 12Z)-hexadecatrienoic acid (HTA; C16:3 n-4). Both are active against Gram-positive bacteria and many Gram-negative pathogen. Palmitoleic acid is active at micro-molar concentrations, kills bacteria rapidly, and is highly active against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Domoic acid -a neurotoxin produced by Pseudo-nitzschia accumulates in marine invertebrates. Evidences of sea lion (Zalophus californianus) and human poisoning following consumption of contaminated blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) is mainly due to this toxin. Among the most prominent features described in human beings was memory impairment which led to the name Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning [ASP]. Silicon utilizing organisms can act as a bioindicator of environmental contamination, thus a rapid change in phytochelatins to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress was found in Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii. Some of them also can produce biofuels particularly diatoms have significant

  7. Environmental controls on spatial variability of summer phytoplankton structure and biomass in the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Xiang, Peng; Kang, Jian-hua; Ye, You-yin; Lin, Geng-ming; Yang, Qing-liang; Lin, Mao

    2018-01-01

    the community was mainly dominated by Thalassiosira nordenskiöldii, Leptocylindrus danicus, Chaetoceros socialis, Chaetoceros debilis, Fragilariopsis oceanica, Nitzschia closterium and Chaetoceros furcellatus. A diatom bloom was observed near the Bering Strait in the summer of 2010 induced by high availability of nitrate particularly in the Bering Shelf, while water mass transportation mainly influenced communities in the Bering Basin and Slope. The observed fluctuation in both biomass and summer phytoplankton communities in the Bering Sea were mostly influenced by events related to the spring sea ice retreat in 2010.

  8. A First Look at Oxygen and Silicon Isotope Variations in Diatom Silica from a Pliocene Antarctic Marine Sediment Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, T.; Dodd, J. P.; Hackett, H.; Scherer, R. P.

    2016-02-01

    Coupled oxygen (δ18O) and silicon (δ30Si) isotope variations in diatom silica (opal-A) are increasingly used as a proxy to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions (water temperatures, water mass mixing, nutrient cycling) in marine environments. Diatom silica is a particularly significant paleoenvironmental proxy in high latitude environments, such as the Southern Ocean, where diatom blooms are abundant and diatom frustules are well preserved in the sediment. The Andrill-1B (AND-1B) sediment core from the Ross Sea (Antarctica) preserves several Pliocene ( 4.5 Ma) age diatomite units. Here we present preliminary δ18O and δ30Si values for a diatomite subunit in the AND-1B sediment core. Initial isotope values for the AND-1B diatoms silica record relatively high variability (range δ18O: 36.3‰ to 39.9‰) that could be interpreted as large-scale changes in the water temperature and/or freshwater mixing in the Ross Sea; however, a significant concern with marine sediment of this age is isotope fractionation during diagenesis and the potential formation of opal-CT lepispheres. The effects of clay contamination on the diatom silica δ18O values have been addressed through sample purification and quantified through chemical and physical analyses of the diatom silica. The isotopic effects of opal-CT are not as clearly understood and more difficult to physically separate from the primary diatom silica. In order to better understand the isotope variations in the AND-1B diatoms, we also evaluated silicon and oxygen isotope fractionation during the transition from opal-A to opal-CT in a controlled laboratory experiment. Opal-A from cultured marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii) was subjected to elevated temperatures (150°C) in acid digestion vessels for 4 weeks to initiate opal-CT precipitation. Quantifying the effects of opal-CT formation on δ18O and δ30Si variations in biogenic silica improves our understanding of the use of diatom silica isotope values a

  9. Proliferaciones de Pseudo-nitzschia spp. (Bacillariophyceae y otras especies del microplancton en la Bahía de Mazatlán, México

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    Samuel Gómez-Aguirre

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Observaciones previas sobre el microplancton de la Bahía de Mazatlán, en el otoño de 1996, revelaron la existencia de altas densidades de Pseudo-nitzschia spp. Este mismo fenómeno se encontró en noviembre 1998 y un mes después se había desplazado al sur de la Bahía de Mazatlán, mientras que por esas mismas fechas, en California, EUA, se registraban accidentes de envenenamiento de mamíferos marinos, accidentes que en el noroeste de México se aprecian entre enero y marzo. Mensualmente se recolectaron muestras de agua superficial (Observations on microplankton in the autumn of 1996 revealed the existence of high densities of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. A similar phenomenon was found in November 1998 and November 1999 and a month later it shifted to the southern Mazatlán Bay while in California, USA, incidents of the poisoning of sea mammals were being recorded; this also happened on the Mexican Pacific coasts from January to March. Water samples collected at surface (<0.5 m deep and subsurface (10 m deep monthly, from November 1998 to January 1999 and every week from February 1999 to May 2000, were analyzed by the Utermöhl technique at 400 enlargements. Phytoplankton quantification showed winter and summer pulses; the 1998-1999 period was higher than the 1999-2000 period. Five species of Pseudo-nitzschia were identified by electron microscopy (TEM and SEM; a new study has revealed other species. High values of Pseudo-nitzschia were observed: 730 P-n/ml (Dec. 1999, 610 P-n/ml (Dec. 1998, 335 P-n/ml (Jul. 1999, 198 P-n/ml (Feb. 1999, 170 P-n/ml (Nov. 1998, 123 P-n/ml (Mar. 1999, 108 P-n/ml (Aug. 1999. The blooms of other species of diatoms (Thalassiosira spp., Asterionellopsis glacialis, Chaetoceros spp., Skeletonema costatum, dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum spp., Scripsiella trochoidea and ciliates (Myrionecta rubra were also observed

  10. Assessing the potential of amino acid 13C patterns as a carbon source tracer in marine sediments: effects of algal growth conditions and sedimentary diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T.; Bach, L. T.; Salvatteci, R.; Wang, Y. V.; Andersen, N.; Ventura, M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2015-08-01

    Burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has a profound influence in marine biogeochemical cycles and provides a sink for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. However, tracing organic carbon from primary production sources as well as its transformations in the sediment record remains challenging. Here we examine a novel but growing tool for tracing the biosynthetic origin of amino acid carbon skeletons, based on naturally occurring stable carbon isotope patterns in individual amino acids (δ13CAA). We focus on two important aspects for δ13CAA utility in sedimentary paleoarchives: first, the fidelity of source diagnostic of algal δ13CAA patterns across different oceanographic growth conditions, and second, the ability of δ13CAA patterns to record the degree of subsequent microbial amino acid synthesis after sedimentary burial. Using the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we tested under controlled conditions how δ13CAA patterns respond to changing environmental conditions, including light, salinity, temperature, and pH. Our findings show that while differing oceanic growth conditions can change macromolecular cellular composition, δ13CAA isotopic patterns remain largely invariant. These results emphasize that δ13CAA patterns should accurately record biosynthetic sources across widely disparate oceanographic conditions. We also explored how δ13CAA patterns change as a function of age, total nitrogen and organic carbon content after burial, in a marine sediment core from a coastal upwelling area off Peru. Based on the four most informative amino acids for distinguishing between diatom and bacterial sources (i.e., isoleucine, lysine, leucine and tyrosine), bacterially derived amino acids ranged from 10 to 15 % in the sediment layers from the last 5000 years, and up to 35 % during the last glacial period. The greater bacterial contributions in older sediments indicate that bacterial activity and amino acid resynthesis progressed, approximately as a

  11. Assessing the potential of amino acid δ13C patterns as a carbon source tracer in marine sediments: effects of algal growth conditions and sedimentary diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T.; Bach, L. T.; Salvatteci, R.; Wang, Y. V.; Andersen, N.; Ventura, M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has a profound influence in marine biogeochemical cycles, and provides a sink for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. However, tracing organic carbon from primary production sources as well as its transformations in the sediment record remains challenging. Here we examine a novel but growing tool for tracing biosynthetic origin of amino acid carbon skeletons, based on natural occurring stable carbon isotope patterns in individual amino acids (δ13CAA). We focus on two important aspects for δ13CAA utility in sedimentary paleoarchives: first, the fidelity of source diagnostic of algal δ13CAA patterns across different oceanographic growth conditions; and second, the ability of δ13CAA patterns to record the degree of subsequent microbial amino acid synthesis after sedimentary burial. Using the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we tested under controlled conditions how δ13CAA patterns respond to changing environmental conditions, including light, salinity, temperature, and pH. Our findings show that while differing oceanic growth conditions can change macromolecular cellular composition, δ13CAA isotopic patterns remain largely invariant. These results underscore that δ13CAA patterns should accurately record biosynthetic sources across widely disparate oceanographic conditions. We also explored how δ13CAA patterns change as a function of age, total nitrogen and organic carbon content after burial, in a marine sediment core from a coastal upwelling area off Peru. Based on the four most informative amino acids for distinguishing between diatom and bacterial sources (i.e. isoleucine, lysine, leucine and tyrosine), bacterial derived amino acids ranged from 10-15% in the sediment layers from the last 5000 years to 35% during the last glacial period. The larger bacterial fractions in older sediments indicate that bacterial activity and amino acid resynthesis progressed, approximately as a function of sediment age, to

  12. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles cloud formation and potential

  13. Diatom stratigraphy and long-term dissolved silica concentrations in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olli, Kalle; Clarke, Annemarie; Danielsson, Åsa; Aigars, Juris; Conley, Daniel J.; Tamminen, Timo

    2008-10-01

    In many parts of the world coastal waters with anthropogenic eutrophication have experienced a gradual depletion of dissolved silica (DSi) stocks. This could put pressure on spring bloom diatom populations, e.g. by limiting the intensity of blooms or by causing shifts in species composition. In addition, eutrophication driven enhanced diatom growth is responsible for the redistribution of DSi from the water phase to the sediments, and changes in the growth conditions may be reflected in the sediment diatom stratigraphy. To test for changes in diatom communities we have analyzed four sediment cores from the Baltic Sea covering approximately the last 100 years. The sediment cores originate from the western Gulf of Finland, the Kattegat, the Baltic Proper and the Gulf of Riga. Three out of the four cores reveal only minor changes in composition of diatom assemblages, while the Gulf of Riga core contains major changes, occurring after the second World War. This area is set apart from the other Baltic Sea basins by a high frequency of low after spring bloom DSi concentrations (< 2 µmol L - 1 ) during a relatively well defined time period from 1991-1998. In 1991 to 1993 a rapid decline of DSi spring concentrations and winter stocks (down to 5 µmol L - 1 ) in the Gulf was preceded by exceptionally intense diatom spring blooms dominated by the heavily silicified species Thalassiosira baltica (1991-1992; up to 5.5 mg ww L - 1 ). T. baltica has been the principal spring bloom diatom in the Gulf of Riga since records began in 1975. DSi consumption and biomass yield experiments with cultured T. baltica suggest that intense blooms can potentially exhaust the DSi stock of the water column and exceed the annual Si dissolution in the Gulf of Riga. The phytoplankton time series reveals another exceptional T. baltica bloom period in 1981-1983 (up to 8 mg L - 1 ), which, however, took place before the regular DSi measurements. These periods may be reflected in the conspicuous

  14. Scattering of phytoplankton cells from cytometry during a microcosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutier, W.; Duforêt-Gaurier, L.; Loisel, H.; Thyssen, M.; Mériaux, X.; Desailly, D.; Courcot, L.; Dugenne, M.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents an application of the CytoSense flow cytometer (CytoBuoy b.v., NL) as a powerful tool to analyze optical properties of phytoplankton cells. Recently, Duforêt et al., (2015) developed a methodology to derive the forward, sideward and backward cross section (σFWS, σSWS and σbb, respectively) of individual particles from the CytoSense. For the first time, this methodology was applied to phytoplankton cultures. A 20 day microcosm experiment was conducted on two phytoplankton species (Chlamydomonas concordia and Thalassiosira pseudonana). We realized daily sampling for biogeochemical and flow cytometer analysis and carried out optical measurements. Scanning electron migrographs (SEM) were performed at different life stages to investigate the cells morphology.First, CytoSense estimates were tested against radiative transfer computations. The comparison exercise, is based on radiative transfer simulations because for phytoplankton cultures, in situ measurements of σFWS and σSWS, particle by particle, are not available in literature. For that purpose, we build a database of 590,000 simulations, considering homogeneous and multi-layered spheres, to represent the optical properties of a large diversity of phytoplankton cells. Comparison showed that the CytoSense estimates for the cultures are consistent with values predicted by the theory. Second, the flow cytometer was used to analyze the temporal course of the forward and the sideward efficiency during the entire life-cycle. Results showed differences between the two species. From an ACP analysis, the variation of the optical properties were associated with the chlorophyll-a concentration by living cell, the thickness of the frustule and the aggregate formation. To finish, the bulk backscattering coefficient was rebuilt from σbb of individual cells and compare with the bb measured by a WET Labs ECO-BB9. Relative errors (RE) were between 0.3 and 0.47 and the mean RE was of 0.36. A such work shows

  15. Influence of gametal release method and larval initial density in the culture of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus

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    Sílvia C. Gonçalves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The gonads of sea urchins have increased interest for human consumption, as a culinary delicacy worldwide. In Europe, the species Paracentrotus lividus was identified as an ideal candidate to meet the growing demand for this product, due to its high gonadosomatic index and easy access. However, the current commercial model, based on the exploitation its natural populations, may be unsustainable. Therefore, its production in aquaculture would be beneficial to avoid depletion of natural stocks of these organisms. The present study sought to develop a culture system for Paracentrotus lividus in aquaculture, which would allow maintaining the early embryonic and larval stages of this animal. A trial was set using 3 gametal release methods (due to stress induced by capture and by injecting 0.125M and 0.250M of potassium chloride and 3 densities of sea urchin embryos (530 embryos/L, 1000 embryos/L and 2000 embryos/L, using 5 replicate individual culture tanks for each combined factor. The embryos were obtained by adding gametes to sea water, in a proportion 1 egg : 100 spermatozoids, and by discarding unfertilized floating eggs by decantation. Afterwards, the embryos were transferred to a culture system composed by cylindrical-conical plastic tanks of 2L. These were decontaminated and filled with 0.750L of sea water, continuously aerated through a sterile pipette of 3mL. These tanks were placed on metal shelves, artificially illuminated with daylight fluorescent lamps (18w/765, 400Lux and maintained at 22°C. The larvae were fed each 2 days, with a mixture of microalgae Tetraselmis chuii, Phaeodactylum tricornumtum and Thalassiosira weliflogii at a concentration of 800-1000 microalgae/mL, adding 15µL, 50µL and 30µL to each individual tank, respectively for each of the initial larval densities introduced. There was an influence of the factor initial larval density in the mortality rate, wherein the number of larvae that died during the trial was much

  16. Proliferaciones algales de la diatomea toxigénica Pseudo-Nitzschia (Bacillariophyceae en el Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica

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    Maribelle Vargas-Montero

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available En el mes de noviembre de 2001, se aisló de una marea roja cerca de la Isla San Lucas, las diatomeas Pseudo-Nitzschia pungens f. pungens seguida por Skeletonema costatum, Chaetoceros lorenzianus y en menor concentración Thalassiosira spp. las cuales fueron caracterizadas por microscopía electrónica de rastreo y transmisión, siendo esta la primera vez que se describe la presencia de estas especies produciendo proliferaciones en Costa Rica. Actualmente existe un aumento en el reporte de mareas rojas donde predominan las diatomeas, y los conteos celulares indican el aumento en el número de las especies conocidas como Pseudo-nitzschia pungens f. multiseries. A estas se les atribuye la producción del ácido domóico, un aminoácido de bajo peso molecular. Las intoxicaciones amnésicas por mariscos (IAM que afectan a los humanos, se producen por la ingesta de mariscos contaminados con este ácido. En Costa Rica, hasta la fecha, solo se han reportado casos de intoxicación paralítica por mariscos contaminados por los dinoflagelados Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum y Gymnodinium catenatum, sin embargo existe la posibilidad de producirse intoxicaciones humanas por la ingesta de mariscos y peces contaminados con toxinas amnésicas las cuales son hidrosolubles y termoestables. Debe entonces considerarse el peligro potencial de aparición de casos de intoxicaciones amnésicas y se sugiere la inclusión de estas especies en los programas de monitoreo permanente para tomar las medidas preventivas de salud públicaWater samples were collected during a red tide event in November 2001, near San Lucas Island (Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica. Superficial temperature was 27ºC and water was turbid, with no fetid smell. One sample was treated with negative staining and observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM; another sample was observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Samples had high concentrations of the diatom Pseudo

  17. A Southern Ocean Diatom Record of the Mid-Pleistocene Transition from the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konfirst, M. A.; Scherer, R. P.

    2010-12-01

    In 2001 an 18.49m core was collected aboard Polarstern (cruise ANT-XVIII/5a) from the upper continental rise offshore from Pine Island Bay in the Amundsen Sea (69°19’S, 108°27’W) at 4014 m water depth. This location is important because it is one of the three main discharge locations for the WAIS and it is expected that IRD from melting icebergs would be concentrated in this region. Hillenbrand et al. (2009) collected data on magnetic susceptibility, wet bulk density, water content, biogenic opal, Ba/Al ratios (as a proxy for paleoproductivity), clay mineral content, and sand/ gravel fractions. To complement this data set, a high-resolution record (sample spacing 10cm) of the siliceous microfossil assemblages (diatoms and silicoflagellates) present in the core has been generated. Data include both relative abundance of individual diatom species and genera and absolute diatom abundance. Species composition in the upper 1004 cm is dominated by Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, which consistently composes 80-90% of the assemblage. Below 1004 cm the assemblage is more diverse, with Actinocyclus ingens, Thalassiothrix antarctica and F. kerguelensis consistently comprising the bulk of the assemblage. Additionally, the occurrence of A. ingens, Thalassiosira elliptipora and T. fasciculata can be used to confirm and further refine the age model established by Hillenbrand et al. (2009). Absolute abundance of diatom frustules varies from samples completely barren fossils to those with concentrations >4 x 107 valves/ g sediment and follows the biogenic opal measurements of Hillenbrand et al. (2009). A clear relationship between diatom abundance and glacial/interglacial variability is apparent in the upper 1004 cm and has been documented in the geochemical measurements of Hillenbrand et al. (2009). Significantly lower absolute abundance is observed below ~1004 cm; however, intervals with samples barren of fossils continue to alternate with those containing low concentrations

  18. Molecular fossils of diatoms. Applications in petroleum geochemistry and palaeoenvironmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampen, S.W.

    2009-06-11

    Diatoms are one of the major groups of algae which originated relatively recently and evolved in the Late Jurassic/Cretaceous. This thesis presents the results of a comprehensive study of diatom lipids in cultures and in the environment and their applications in the age determination of petroleum and in palaeoenvironmental studies. Diatom DNA sequences were analyzed in order to relate the phylogenetic positions of diatoms to the lipid chemotaxonomy. Forty four different sterols were identified in diatoms, with 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28)-dien-3-beta-ol being most common. 24-Methylcholesta-5,22E-dien-3-beta-ol, previously described as a diatom biomarker, was only the fifth most common sterol and absent in some major diatom groups. All identified sterols have been reported in other algae, but within the diatoms, some sterols and sterol compositions seem to be specific for specific phylogenetic clusters. Sterol compositions confirmed the separate phylogenetic position of the genus Attheya, as also indicated by molecular phylogeny and microscopy. 23-Methyl and 23,24-dimethyl sterols, often associated with dinoflagellate algae, were present in a substantial number of diatoms, suggesting that diatoms may also be a major source. Their phylogenetic position suggests that these diatoms originated from a single common ancestor which evolved in the late Jurassic. In addition to 23-methyl and 23,24-dimethyl sterols, the unusual sterol gorgosterol was found in two diatom cultures of the genus Delphineis. 24-Norsterols were found in the diatom species Thalassiosira aff. antarctica and in dinoflagellate cultures. The evolutionary history of dinoflagellates and diatoms explains the stepwise increases of 24-norsterane concentrations, diagenetic products of 24-norsterols, in petroleum. Long-chain 1,14-diols and 12-hydroxy methyl alkanoates were detected in Proboscia diatoms and may be used as indicators for high-nutrient conditions and upwelling. Their distributions varied between

  19. Comunidades microplanctônicas no Oceano Atlântico Sul Ocidental: biomassa e distribuição em novembro de 1992 Microplankton communities in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: biomass and distribution in November/1992

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano F. Fernandes

    1999-01-01

    .a/l. Adjacent waters showed low biomass indicating low productivity, with similar average values for Antarctic Water (0.18 J.1g/l and 8ubtropical Water (0.27 J.1g11, where a bloom of Trichodesmium erythraeum was detected. 8ubantarctic waters over the oceanic province around the Patagonian shelf represented a notable exception, with peaks in phytoplankton biomass (up to 2.46 J.1g Chl.a/l. Those areas of enhanced biomass were diatom-dominated; the Prymnesiophyceae Phaeocystis was abundant in some stations. Both fronts presented similar values of chlorophyll-a, indicating that environments with distinctive characteristics could support blooms of the same magnitude. Weakly silicified diatoms (Hemiaulus, Leptocylindrus, Thalassiosira dominated to the north of the BMCZ, while heavily silicified species (Asteromphalus, Chaetoceros aff.neglectus, Fragillariopsis kerguelensis, Proboscia, Pseudonitzschia sp., Rhizosolenia formed the buIk of phytoplankton at the PF, reflecting the different chemical characteristics of the water masses. The diatoms occurring in the PF appear to be recurrent and widely distributed along different longitudes over the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Ciliates and heterotrophic dinoflagellates were dominant at 8ubtropical Water and to the north ofBMCZ, and seemed to respond quickly to the increasing phytoplankton biomass.