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  1. Inhibition of NMDARs in the nucleus reticularis of the thalamus produces delta frequency bursting

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    Yuchun Zhang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Injection of NMDAR antagonist into the thalamus can produce delta frequency EEG oscillations in the thalamocortical system. It is surprising that an antagonist of an excitatory neurotransmitter should trigger such activity, and the mechanism is unknown. One hypothesis is that the antagonist blocks excitation of GABAergic cells, thus producing disinhibition. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of NMDAR antagonist (APV on cells of the nucleus reticularis (nRT in rat brain slices, a thalamic nucleus that can serve as a pacemaker for thalamocortical delta oscillations and that is composed entirely of GABAergic neurons. We found, unexpectedly, that nRT cells are hyperpolarized by APV. This occurs because these cells have an unusual form of NMDAR (probably NR2C that contributes inward current at resting potential in response to ambient glutamate. The hyperpolarization produced by APV is sufficient to deinactivate T-type calcium channels, and these trigger rhythmic bursting at delta frequency. The APV-induced delta frequency bursting is abolished by dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, indicating that dopamine and NMDAR antagonist work synergistically to stimulate delta frequency bursting. Our results have significant implications concerning the electrophysiological basis of schizophrenia and bring together the NMDAR hypofunction, dopamine, and GABA theories of the disease. Our results suggest that NMDAR hypofunction and dopamine work synergistically on the GABAergic cells of the nRT to generate the delta frequency EEG oscillations, a thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD in the awake state that is an established abnormality in schizophrenia.

  2. The contribution of delta subunit-containing GABAA receptors to phasic and tonic conductance changes in cerebellum, thalamus and neocortex.

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    Stephen G Brickley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have made use of the delta subunit-selective allosteric modulator DS2 (4-chloro-N-[2-(2-thienylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-yl benzamide to assay the contribution of delta-GABAARs to tonic and phasic conductance changes in the cerebellum, thalamus and neocortex. In cerebellar granule cells, an enhancement of the tonic conductance was observed for DS2 and the orthosteric agonist THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol. As expected, DS2 did not alter the properties of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic synaptic currents (IPSCs supporting a purely extrasynaptic role for delta-GABAARs in cerebellar granule cells. DS2 also enhanced the tonic conductance recorded from thalamic relay neurons of the visual thalamus with no alteration in IPSC properties. However, in addition to enhancing the tonic conductance DS2 also slowed the decay of IPSCs recorded from layer II/III neocortical neurons. A slowing of the IPSC decay also occurred in the presence of the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker TTX. Moreover, under conditions of reduced GABA release the ability of DS2 to enhance the tonic conductance was attenuated. These results indicate that delta-GABAARs can be activated following vesicular GABA release onto neocortical neurons and that the actions of DS2 on the tonic conductance may be influenced by the ambient GABA levels present in particular brain regions.

  3. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol produced discrimination in pigeons.

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    Henriksson, B G; Johansson, J O; Järbe, T U

    1975-01-01

    In an operant situation pigeons learned to peck one response key 90 min after an injection of 0.25mg/kg delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and another key when trained nondrugged. When tested with doses of delta9-THC lwer than the training dose the birds disciminated 0.20 mg/kg of the drug from the nondrugged state but not 0.15 mg/kg or lower doses. The animals were able to discriminate the drug state from the nondrugged 180 min but not 360 min after the injection At a shorter interval (45 min) both drug and nondrug responding appeared. Cannabinol and cannabidiol (4.0 - 8.0 mg/kg) did not elicit any drug responses, nor did pentobarbital, ditran or amphetamine. Tests with LSD resulted in both drug and nondrug responding. When administering noncannabinoid drugs in combination with delta9-THC 0.15 mg/kg the birds responded at the key associated with the drug state, suggesting interactional effects.

  4. Environmental Degradation in Oil Producing Areas of Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to oil exploration and other human activities in the Niger Delta region, there is evidence of environmental degradation all over the area (Oronto, 1998). Environmental degradation is occasioned by consistent flow of industrial waste, oil spills, gas flares, fire disaster, acid rain, flooding erosion, etc., which has led to the ...

  5. Spike-wave discharges in WAG/Rij rats are preceded by delta and theta precursor activity in cortex and thalamus

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    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Hramov, A.E.; Sitnikova, E.Y.; Koronovskii, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In order to unravel the mechanisms underlying the "sudden" onset of spontaneous absences in genetically prone subjects, we investigated the immediate precursors of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) produced in cortico-thalamo-cortical neuronal networks. Methods: A time-frequency analysis of

  6. Characteristics of the stimulus produced by the mixture of cannabidiol with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

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    Zuardi, A W; Finkelfarb, E; Bueno, O F; Musty, R E; Karniol, I G

    1981-01-01

    Rats, trained to discriminate between delta 9-THC (5 mg/kg) and a control solution, using a T-maze, were submitted to generalization tests wih delta 9-THC (2.5 and 1.25 mg/kg), CBD (40 mg/kg) and the mixtures of delta 9-THC (5 and 1.25 mg/kg) with CBD (40 mg/kg). Doses of delta 9-THC smaller than the training dose, produced a progressive reduction in the number of correct responses together with a decrease in the running time. The choice made by the animals under the effect of CBD (40 mg/kg) did not differ from that of the animals given the control solution but their running time was significantly longer. The mixtures of CBD (40 mg/kg) with delta 9-THC (5 and 1.25 mg/kg) produced approximately 50% response to both sides of the maze, and with run times greater than those observed with delta 9-THC (5 mg/kg). The results suggest that the simultaneous administration of the two cannabinoids might produce a qualitative stimulus different from that produced by delta 9-THC alone.

  7. Elucidation of the sex-pheromone biosynthesis producing 5,7-dodecadienes in Dendrolimus punctatus (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) reveals Delta 11- and Delta 9-desaturases with unusual catalytic properties.

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    Liénard, Marjorie A; Lassance, Jean-Marc; Wang, Hong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng-Hua; Piskur, Jure; Johansson, Tomas; Löfstedt, Christer

    2010-06-01

    Sex pheromones produced by female moths of the Lasiocampidae family include conjugated 5,7-dodecadiene components with various oxygenated terminal groups. Here we describe the molecular cloning, heterologous expression and functional characterization of desaturases associated with the biosynthesis of these unusual chemicals. By homology-based PCR screening we characterized five cDNAs from the female moth pheromone gland that were related to other moth desaturases, and investigated their role in the production of the (Z)-5-dodecenol and (Z5,E7)-dodecadienol, major pheromone constituents of the pine caterpillar moth, Dendrolimus punctatus. Functional expression of two desaturase cDNAs belonging to the Delta 11-subfamily, Dpu-Delta 11(1)-APSQ and Dpu-Delta 11(2)-LPAE, showed that they catalysed the formation of unsaturated fatty acyls (UFAs) that can be chain-shortened by beta-oxidation and subsequently reduced to the alcohol components. A first (Z)-11-desaturation step is performed by Dpu-Delta 11(2)-LPAE on stearic acid that leads to (Z)-11-octadecenoic acyl, which is subsequently chain shortened to the (Z)-5-dodecenoic acyl precursor. The Dpu-Delta 11(1)-APSQ desaturase had the unusual property of producing Delta 8 mono-UFA of various chain lengths, but not when transformed yeast were grown in presence of (Z)-9-hexadecenoic acyl, in which case the biosynthetic intermediate (Z9,E11)-hexadecadienoic UFA was produced. In addition to a typical Z9 activity, a third transcript, Dpu-Delta 9-KPSE produced E9 mono-UFAs of various chain lengths. When provided with the (Z)-7-tetradecenoic acyl, it formed the (Z7,E9)-tetradecadienoic UFA, another biosynthetic intermediate that can be chain-shortened to (Z5,E7)-dodecadienoic acyl. Both Dpu-Delta 11(1)-APSQ and Dpu-Delta 9-KPSE thus exhibited desaturase activities consistent with the biosynthesis of the dienoic precursor. The combined action of three desaturases in generating a dienoic sex-pheromone component emphasizes the

  8. Mathematical relationships between spore concentrations, delta-endotoxin levels, and entomotoxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis preparations produced in different fermentation media.

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    Vu, Khanh Dang; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y; Valéro, J R

    2012-11-01

    Mathematic relationships between spore concentrations, delta-endotoxin concentrations and entomotoxicity (Tx) of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD-1 (Btk HD-1) preparations produced in six different media were analysed. The relationship between delta-endotoxin and spore concentration and SpTx-spore (specific Tx per 1000 spore) and spore concentration produced in the different media (starch industry wastewater (SIW) with total solids (TS) concentration of 15g/L, SIW with TS of 30g/L, SIW supplemented with 0.2% (w/v) colloidal chitin, SIW supplemented with 1.25% (w/v) cornstarch and 0.2% (v/v) Tween 80, secondary sludge, and semi-synthetic medium) strictly followed the Power law. Tx and delta endotoxin concentration followed the exponential relation whereas a definite relation between Tx and spore concentration could not be established. Spore and delta-endotoxin produced at the early time (12h) during fermentation might be more toxic than those produced during latter period of fermentation irrespective of media used. Tx and delta-endotoxin concentration exhibited a semi-log linear relationship. Based on these findings, delta-endotoxin concentration can be determined rapidly to monitor the progress of the biopesticide production process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spray freeze drying to produce a stable Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol containing inulin-based solid dispersion powder suitable for inhalation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drooge, Dirk-Jan; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Dickhoff, Bastiaan H J; Elli, Marco N A; Visser, Marinella R; Zijlstra, Gerrit S; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether spray freeze drying produces an inhalable solid dispersion powder in which Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is stabilised. Solutions of THC and inulin in a mixture of tertiary butanol (TBA) and water were spray freeze dried. Drug loads varied

  10. Acute cerebellar ataxia and consecutive cerebellitis produced by glutamate receptor delta2 autoantibody.

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    Shiihara, Takashi; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Konno, Akihiro; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2007-05-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia is usually a self-limited benign disease, which may develop in children after certain viral infections or vaccinations. There are several reports of acute cerebellar ataxia associated with autoantibodies. Glutamate receptor delta2, a member of the glutamate receptor family, is predominantly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and plays a crucial role in cerebellar functions. To date anti-GluRdelta2 autoantibody was detected in a patient with chronic cerebellitis. Herein, an 18-month-old boy presented with cerebellar ataxia 9 days following a mild respiratory tract infection. Although cerebellar ataxia gradually improved, it worsened yet again following mumps and varicella virus infection. Cerebro-spinal fluid examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated pleocytosis and meningeal enhancement, respectively. Furthermore, glutamate receptor delta2 autoantibody was detected in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid. Thus, we believe that the glutamate receptor delta2 autoantibody may play a role in cerebellar ataxia and consecutive cerebellitis.

  11. Strategic infarcts of the thalamus in vascular dementia.

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    Szirmai, Imre; Vastagh, Ildikó; Szombathelyi, Eva; Kamondi, Anita

    2002-11-15

    Strategic infarcts or focal hemorrhages involving the paramedian nuclei of the thalamus may alter consciousness and produce complex neuropsychological symptoms such as impairment of memory, attention and motivation. Lesions disrupting the thalamo-prefrontal circuits lead to severe subcortical dementia. We analysed here the clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging data of 19 patients with cerebrovascular lesions in the thalamus. In six patients with bilateral paramedian infarcts, and in two with anterior thalamic infarcts, vascular dementia and severe personality changes developed. SPECT findings did not correlate with the neuropsychological symptoms. Transcortical sensory and motor aphasia was observed in four patients with thalamic hemorrhages and infarcts. In these patients SPECT detected hypoperfusion in adjacent cortical areas. Clinical symptoms and outcome of four patients are reported in detail. The clinico-morphological correlations of the thalamo-cortical circuits are reviewed and the possible causes of multiple cognitive and behavioural consequences of vascular thalamic lesions are discussed.

  12. Influence of chemically produced singlet delta oxygen molecules on thermal ignition of O2-H2 mixtures

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    Vagin, N. P.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.; Yuryshev, N. N.

    2016-02-01

    Thermal ignition of the H2-O2 mixture with O2(a 1Δ g ) addition is studied experimentally and theoretically. The singlet delta oxygen was produced in a chemical generator. In this way, the competing chemical processes involving plasma produced chemically active O atoms and ozone (O3) were excluded. A satisfactory agreement is achieved between experimentally observed and numerically predicted values of the ignition time at the initial gas temperature (900-950) K and gas pressure (9-10) Torr. The percentage of the reactive channel in the binary collisions O2(a 1Δg) H is evaluated on the level (10-20)% for the H2-O2 mixture.

  13. Identification of a novel delta9-fatty acid desaturase gene and its promoter from oil-producing fungus Rhizopus arrhizus.

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    Wei, Dongsheng; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Zhe; Zhang, Xinxin; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2009-01-01

    Reverse Transcriptional Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Rapid Amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE) and Thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL)-PCR were used successfully to clone the open reading frame (1,377 bp) of delta9-fatty acid desaturase gene (named as RAD9) and its promoter region from oil-producing fungi Rhizopus arrhizus. Functional identification of the protein was done by sub-cloning RAD9 into the expression vector pYES2.0 to generate a recombinant plasmid pYRAD9, which was then subsequently transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae delta9-fatty acid desaturase mutation strain L8-14C to be expressed under the control of GAL1 promoter. The transformant containing RAD9 named as L8-14C-pYRAD9 could grow on the synthetic minimal medium plate with out oleic acid supplement. Fatty acid analysis also showed that the transformant contained 16:1 and 18:1. This indicated that pYRAD9 could successfully complement the mutation of L8-14C. Computational analysis of the nucleotide sequence of RAD9 promoter showed several basic transcriptional elements including a CAAT box, a GC box, a CACCC box, two TATA boxes and also several putative target-binding sites for transcription factors, which have been reported to be involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Preliminary functional analysis of this promoter in S. cerevisiae was done using lacZ report gene.

  14. Characterization of progenitor domains in the developing mouse thalamus.

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    Vue, Tou Yia; Aaker, Joshua; Taniguchi, Aya; Kazemzadeh, Christina; Skidmore, Jennifer M; Martin, Donna M; Martin, James F; Treier, Mathias; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2007-11-01

    To understand the molecular basis of the specification of thalamic nuclei, we analyzed the expression patterns of various transcription factors and defined progenitor cell populations in the embryonic mouse thalamus. We show that the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig3 is expressed in the entire thalamic ventricular zone and the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI). Next, we define two distinct progenitor domains within the thalamus, which we name pTH-R and pTH-C, located caudal to the ZLI. pTH-R is immediately caudal to the ZLI and expresses Nkx2.2, Mash1, and Olig3. pTH-C is caudal to pTH-R and expresses Ngn1, Ngn2, and Olig3. Short-term lineage analysis of Olig3-, Mash1-, Ngn1-, and Ngn2-expressing progenitor cells as well as tracing the Pitx2 cell lineage suggests that pTH-C is the only major source of thalamic nuclei containing neurons that project to the cerebral cortex, whereas pTH-R and ZLI are likely to produce distinct postmitotic populations outside of the cortex-projecting part of the thalamus. To determine if pTH-C is composed of subdomains, we characterized expression of the homeodomain protein Dbx1 and the bHLH protein Olig2. We show that Dbx1 is expressed in caudodorsal-high to rostroventral-low gradient within pTH-C. Analysis of heterozygous Dbx1(nlslacZ) knockin mice demonstrated that Dbx1-expressing progenitors preferentially give rise to caudodorsal thalamic nuclei. Olig2 is expressed in an opposite gradient within pTH-C to that of Dbx1. These results establish the molecular heterogeneity within the progenitor cells of the thalamus, and suggest that such heterogeneity contributes to the specification of thalamic nuclei. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  15. Precipitation Chemistry and Occurrence of Acid Rain over the Oil-Producing Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

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    John Kanayo Chukwu Nduka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the nitrate, sulfate, total dissolved solid (TDS, electrical conductivity, total hardness (TH, and bicarbonates of rainwater samples collected from Warri and Port Harcourt between April–June, July–August, and September–October of 2005 and 2006 to depict onset of rainy season, mid-rainy season, and end of rainy season for the two major crude oil–producing cities of the Niger Delta region of Nigeria (although Port Harcourt is also noted for non-oil manufacturing industries. The same was done in Awka, a non-oil producing city in the hinterland of southeastern Nigeria. In each of the cities, rain samples were collected from three points in a triangular equilibrium using a clean plastic basin fastened to a table 2 m above ground level and 115 m away from tall buildings and trees. The parameters were determined after filtering, using their respective standard methods. Averages of 1.50, 1.81, 1.13 and 2.14, 1.50, 1.86 mg/l of nitrate for April–June, July–August, and September–October were recorded for Warri in 2005 and 2006, respectively. While 15.21, 3.23, 22.31 and 20.89, 9.96, and 14.27 mg/l were recorded in Port Harcourt. Sulfate levels for Warri and Port Harcourt for the same periods are follows: 1.38, 1.88, 1.06, 1.50, 1.43, 1.50 and 2.64, 1.15, 5.88, 4.73, 1.90, 1.55 mg/l, respectively. Nitrate levels were higher than sulfate. Other parameters include TDS (5.44, 4.79, 3.30 and 7.63, 3.69, 2.56 mg/l for Warri in 2005 and 2006; 12.57, 2.07, 25.214 and 28.87, 6.73, 7.80 mg/l for Port Harcourt for the same periods. Other parameters also varied in that order for the 2 years in same cities. Crude oil exploration and gas flaring in the Niger Delta, and multiplicity of cottage industries in Awka, impacted on the inorganic ion pollution of the rainwater. This may have public health implications in the region.

  16. Acupuncture for refractory epilepsy: role of thalamus.

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    Chen, Shuping; Wang, Shubin; Rong, Peijing; Liu, Junling; Zhang, Hongqi; Zhang, Jianliang

    2014-01-01

    Neurostimulation procedures like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and deep brain stimulation have been used to treat refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders. While holding promise, they are invasive interventions with serious complications and adverse effects. Moreover, their efficacies are modest with less seizure free. Acupuncture is a simple, safe, and effective traditional healing modality for a wide range of diseases including pain and epilepsy. Thalamus takes critical role in sensory transmission and is highly involved in epilepsy genesis particularly the absence epilepsy. Considering thalamus serves as a convergent structure for both acupuncture and VNS and the thalamic neuronal activities can be modulated by acupuncture, we propose that acupuncture could be a promising therapy or at least a screening tool to select suitable candidates for those invasive modalities in the management of refractory epilepsy.

  17. Acupuncture for Refractory Epilepsy: Role of Thalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurostimulation procedures like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS and deep brain stimulation have been used to treat refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders. While holding promise, they are invasive interventions with serious complications and adverse effects. Moreover, their efficacies are modest with less seizure free. Acupuncture is a simple, safe, and effective traditional healing modality for a wide range of diseases including pain and epilepsy. Thalamus takes critical role in sensory transmission and is highly involved in epilepsy genesis particularly the absence epilepsy. Considering thalamus serves as a convergent structure for both acupuncture and VNS and the thalamic neuronal activities can be modulated by acupuncture, we propose that acupuncture could be a promising therapy or at least a screening tool to select suitable candidates for those invasive modalities in the management of refractory epilepsy.

  18. Acupuncture for Refractory Epilepsy: Role of Thalamus

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    Chen, Shuping; Wang, Shubin; Rong, Peijing; Liu, Junling; Zhang, Hongqi; Zhang, Jianliang

    2014-01-01

    Neurostimulation procedures like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and deep brain stimulation have been used to treat refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders. While holding promise, they are invasive interventions with serious complications and adverse effects. Moreover, their efficacies are modest with less seizure free. Acupuncture is a simple, safe, and effective traditional healing modality for a wide range of diseases including pain and epilepsy. Thalamus takes critical role in ...

  19. What does the mediodorsal thalamus do?

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    Anna S Mitchell

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dense amnesia can result from damage to the medial diencephalon in humans and in animals. In humans this damage is diffuse and can include the mediodorsal nuclei of the thalamus. In animal models, lesion studies have confirmed the mediodorsal thalamus (MD has a role in memory and other cognitive tasks, although the extent of deficits is mixed. Anatomical tracing studies confirm at least three different subgroupings of the MD: medial, central and lateral, each differentially interconnected to the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, these subgroupings of the MD also receive differing inputs from other brain structures, including the basal ganglia thus the MD subgroupings form key nodes in interconnected frontal-striatal-thalamic neural circuits, integrating critical information within the prefrontal cortex. We will provide a review of data collected from non-human primates and rodents after selective brain injury to the whole of the MD as well as these subgroupings to highlight the extent of deficits in various cognitive tasks. This research highlights the neural basis of memory and cognitive deficits associated with the subgroupings of the MD and their interconnected neural networks. The evidence shows that the MD plays a critical role in many varied cognitive processes. In addition, the MD is actively processing information and integrating it across these neural circuits for successful cognition. Having established that the MD is critical for memory and cognition, further research is required to understand how the MD specifically influences these cognitive processing carried out by the brain.

  20. The GABRB1 gene is associated with thalamus volume and modulates the association between thalamus volume and intelligence.

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    Zhu, Bi; Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Lei, Xuemei; Li, Jin; Moyzis, Robert K; Dong, Qi; Lin, Chongde

    2014-11-15

    The GABRB1 gene encodes the beta 1 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA A receptor), which is responsible for mediating inhibitory neurotransmission in the thalamus. Potential relationships between the GABRB1 gene, thalamus volume, and intelligence have been suggested by previous clinical studies, but have not been directly examined among nonclinical samples. The current study collected structural MRI, genetic, and behavioral data from 316 healthy Chinese adults (including 187 females and 129 males), and examined associations between GABRB1 variants, thalamus volume, and intelligence (measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised). After controlling for intracranial volume, sex, and age, GABRB1 genetic polymorphism at the SNP rs7435958 had the strongest association with thalamus volume (p = 0.002 and 0.00008 for left and right thalamus volumes, respectively), with GG homozygotes having smaller bilateral thalamus volumes than the other genotypes. Furthermore, there were positive correlations between bilateral thalamus volumes and intelligence, especially for GABRB1 rs7435958 GG female homozygotes (r's = 0.31 and 0.29, p intelligence with left and right thalamus volumes, respectively). This study provides the first evidence for the involvement of the GABRB1 gene in the thalamus structure and their interactive effects on intelligence. Future studies of the thalamus-intelligence associations should consider genetic factors as potential moderators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thalamus lesions in chronic and acute seizure disorders

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    Tschampa, Henriette J.; Greschus, Susanne; Urbach, Horst [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Bonn (Germany); Sassen, Robert; Bien, Christian G. [University of Bonn, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Transient signal changes in the pulvinar have been described following status epilepticus. However, we observed persistent thalamus changes after seizures. The purpose of this study was to characterize thalamus changes in patients with seizure disorders and to correlate imaging findings with clinical features. We searched among 5,500 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams performed in patients with seizures and identified 43 patients. The MRI scans of these patients were reviewed and correlated with clinical data. We identified four patterns of thalamus lesions: (a) fluid attenuated inversion recovery-hyperintense pulvinar lesions (20 patients), as known from status epilepticus. Ten patients in this group had a status epilepticus. Among the remaining patients, three had frequent seizures and seven had sporadic seizures. Twelve patients had follow-up exams for a median of 11 months. The lesions had persisted in 11/12 cases in the last available exam and were reversible in one case only. In seven cases, cone-shaped thalamus atrophy resulted, (b) linear defects in the medial and anterior thalamus (five patients), accompanied by atrophy of the mamillary body and the fornix in patients with chronic epilepsy, (c) extensive bilateral thalamus lesions in two patients with a syndrome caused by mutation in the mitochondrial polymerase gamma, and (d) other thalamus lesions not associated with the seizure disorder (16 patients). The spectrum of thalamus lesions in patients with seizure disorders is wider than previously reported. Postictal pulvinar lesions can persist and may result in thalamic atrophy. Linear defects in the anterior thalamus are associated with limbic system atrophy. (orig.)

  2. Basal ganglia - thalamus and the crowning enigma

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    Marianela eGarcia-Munoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When Hubel (1982 referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as …a ‘crowning mystery’ to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come... he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80’s and 90’s there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1, the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory cortex before focusing on motor cortex.

  3. Gain control in the visual thalamus during perception and cognition.

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    Saalmann, Yuri B; Kastner, Sabine

    2009-08-01

    The thalamus has traditionally been thought to passively relay sensory information to the cortex. By showing that responses in visual thalamus are modulated by perceptual and cognitive tasks, recent fMRI and physiology studies have helped revise this view. The modulatory input to the visual thalamus derives from functionally distinct cortical and subcortical feedback pathways. These pathways enable the lateral geniculate nucleus and pulvinar to regulate the information transmitted to cortical areas according to cognitive requirements. Emerging evidence suggests that such regulation involves changing the degree of synchrony between neurons as well as changing the magnitude of thalamic activity. These findings support a role for the thalamus that extends as far as contributing to the control of visual attention and awareness.

  4. Differential developmental strategies by Sonic hedgehog in thalamus and hypothalamus.

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    Zhang, Yuanfeng; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The traditional concept of diencephalon (thalamus plus hypothalamus) and with it the entire traditional subdivision of the developing neural tube are being challenged by novel insights obtained by mapping the expression of key developmental genes. A model in which the hypothalamus is placed in the most rostral portion of the neural tube, followed caudally by a diencephalon formed by prethalamus, thalamus and pretectum has been proposed. The adult thalamus and hypothalamus are quite unlike each other in connectivity and functions. Here we review work on the role of the secreted morphogen protein Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the developing diencephalon and hypothalamic region to show how different these two regions are also from this point of view. Shh from the prechordal plate (PCP) induces and patterns the hypothalamus but there is no evidence that this role is fulfilled by a morphogen gradient. Later, the hypothalamic primordium itself expresses Shh and a large part of the hypothalamus belongs to the Shh lineage, including the ventral domains. Neural Shh is necessary to complete the specification (lateral hypothalamus), differentiation and growth of the hypothalamus. Although Gli2A is the major effector of Shh in this region, hypothalamic specification also depends on the suppression of Gli3R by Shh secreted by the PCP as well as the neuroepithelium. The thalamus is patterned by an Shh morphogen gradient originated in the ZLI following similar mechanisms to those in the spinal cord. The thalamus itself does not belong to the Shh lineage. Gli2A is necessary for appropriate growth and specification of the thalamic nuclei, to the exception of the medial and intralaminar groups (limbic-related), whose development depends on Gli3R. Beyond specification and patterning, the scarce data available about cell sorting and aggregation in these two regions shows key differences between them as well. In summary, not only expression patterns but also developmental mechanisms support

  5. Thalamus segmentation from MP2RAGE: a comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Næss-Schmidt, Erhard; Blicher, Jakob

    the Freesurfer pipeline, which is a high failure rate compared to studies running Freesurfer on conventional MPRAGE images [7]. All evaluated methods under-segments the thalamus, which may be desirable from a clinical point of view, if segmentation masks are used for characterizing the structure using e......Introduction: MPRAGE has become one of the most widely used MRI sequences to obtain T1-weighted anatomical images. However, at high static field strengths the increased inhomogeneity of B1 fields leads to high intensity variations across the image (bias field). Recently, it was suggested to use two...... methods may not work well with this new sequence. In this study we tested three different automatic methods for the important task of segmenting the thalamus from human brain MP2RAGE images. Methods: Twelve healthy control subjects (age range 19 – 38 years, two females) were scanned with a whole brain MP2...

  6. MRI of germinomas arising from the basal ganglia and thalamus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.I.; Yoon, P.H.; Ryu, Y.H.; Jeon, P.; Hwang, G.J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    We reviewed the MRI findings of germinomas originating from the basal ganglia, thalamus or deep white matter in 13 patients with 14 germinomas, excluding those in the suprasellar or pineal regions. Ten cases were confirmed as germinomas by stereotaxic biopsy, three by partial and one by total removal of the tumour. Analysis was focussed on the location and the signal characteristic of the tumour, haemorrhage, cysts within the tumour and any other associated findings. Thirteen of the tumours were in the basal ganglia and one in the thalamus. Haemorrhage was observed in seven patients, while twelve showed multiple cysts. Associated ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy was seen in three patients. The signal intensity of the parenchymal germinomas was heterogeneous on T1- and T2-weighted images due to haemorrhage, cysts and solid portions. We also report the MRI findings of germinomas in an early stage in two patients. (orig.) With 5 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs.

  7. Unusual acute encephalitis involving the thalamus: imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won; Han Moon Hee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho; Nam, Hyun Woo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Ho [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Woo Ho [Sanggyo Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    To describe the brain CT and MR imaging findings of unusual acute encephalitis involving the thalamus. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and CT and/or MR imaging findings of six patients with acute encephalitis involving the thalamus. CT (n=6) and MR imaging (n=6) were performed during the acute and/or convalescent stage of the illness. Brain CT showed brain swelling (n=2), low attenuation of both thalami (n=1) or normal findings (n=3). Initial MR imaging indicated that in all patients the thalamus was involved either bilaterally (n=5) or unilaterally (n=1). Lesions were also present in the midbrain (n=5), medial temporal lobe (n=4), pons (n=3), both hippocampi (n=3) the insular cortex (n=2), medulla (n=2), lateral temporal lobe cortex (n=1), both cingulate gyri (n=1), both basal ganglia (n=1), and the left hemispheric cortex (n=1). These CT or MR imaging findings of acute encephalitis of unknown etiology were similar to a combination of those of Japanese encephalitis and herpes simplex encephalitis. In order to document the specific causative agents which lead to the appearance of these imaging features, further investigation is required.

  8. Sensory percepts induced by microwire array and DBS microstimulation in human sensory thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Brandon D; Gasperson, Lynne B; Krucoff, Max O; Grill, Warren M; Turner, Dennis A

    2017-10-27

    Microstimulation in human sensory thalamus (ventrocaudal, VC) results in focal sensory percepts in the hand and arm which may provide an alternative target site (to somatosensory cortex) for the input of prosthetic sensory information. Sensory feedback to facilitate motor function may require simultaneous or timed responses across separate digits to recreate perceptions of slip as well as encoding of intensity variations in pressure or touch. To determine the feasibility of evoking sensory percepts on separate digits with variable intensity through either a microwire array or deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode, recreating "natural" and scalable percepts relating to the arm and hand. We compared microstimulation within ventrocaudal sensory thalamus through either a 16-channel microwire array (∼400 kΩ per channel) or a 4-channel DBS electrode (∼1.2 kΩ per contact) for percept location, size, intensity, and quality sensation, during thalamic DBS electrode placement in patients with essential tremor. Percepts in small hand or finger regions were evoked by microstimulation through individual microwires and in 5/6 patients sensation on different digits could be perceived from stimulation through separate microwires. Microstimulation through DBS electrode contacts evoked sensations over larger areas in 5/5 patients, and the apparent intensity of the perceived response could be modulated with stimulation amplitude. The perceived naturalness of the sensation depended both on the pattern of stimulation as well as intensity of the stimulation. Producing consistent evoked perceptions across separate digits within sensory thalamus is a feasible concept and a compact alternative to somatosensory cortex microstimulation for prosthetic sensory feedback. This approach will require a multi-element low impedance electrode with a sufficient stimulation range to evoke variable intensities of perception and a predictable spread of contacts to engage separate digits

  9. Delta Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette

    . The warming air temperature affects the soil temperature and permafrost thaws and destabilizes the material in the coastal zone. In Greenland, the warming temperature lowers the surface mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet and more material is transported to the coastal zone. The sea ice extent is thinning...... of a fjord and the second type is a wider fan-shaped open delta. Most deltas are directly coupled to the Greenland Ice Sheet or local icecaps and are highly influenced by the dynamics in the catchments. It is demonstrated how a modern changing climate directly affects delta dynamics, and that Greenlandic...

  10. Discrete Pattern of Burst Stimulation in the Ventrobasal Thalamus for Anti-Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus has been proposed to play a role in sensory modulation via switching between tonic and burst dual firing of individual neurons. Of the two firing modes, altered burst firing has been repeatedly implicated with pathological pain conditions, which suggests that maintaining a certain form of thalamic burst could be crucial for controlling pain. However, specific elements of burst firing that may contribute to pain control have not yet been actively investigated. Utilizing the deep brain stimulation (DBS) technique, we explored the effects of bursting properties in pain control by electrically stimulating the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus in forms of burst patterned to test different aspects of bursts during the formalin induced nociception in mice. Our results demonstrated that electrical stimulations mimicking specific burst firing properties are important in producing an anti-nociceptive effect and found that the ≤3 ms interval between burst pluses (intra-burst-interval: IntraBI) and ≥3 pulses per burst were required to reliably reduce formalin induced nociceptive responses in mice. Periodicity of IntraBI was also suggested to contribute to anti-nociception to a limited extent. PMID:23950787

  11. CD8+ gamma-delta TCR+ and CD4+ T cells produce IFN-γat 5–7 days after yellow fever vaccination in Indian rhesus macaques, before the induction of classical antigen-specific T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, Patrícia C. C.; Rudersdorf, Richard A.; Galler, Ricardo; Bonaldo, Myrna C.; de Santana, Marlon Gilsepp Veloso; Mudd, Philip A.; Martins, Maurício A.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Wilson, Nancy A.; Watkins, David I.

    2010-01-01

    The yellow fever 17D (YF-17D) vaccine is one of the most efficacious vaccines developed to date. Interestingly, vaccination with YF-17D induces IFN-γ production early after vaccination (d 5–7) before the development of classical antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses. Here we investigated the cellular source of this early IFN-γ production. At days 5 and 7 post vaccination activated CD8+ gamma-delta TCR T cells produced IFN-γ and TNF-α. Activated CD4+ T cells produced IFN-γ and TNF-α ...

  12. Working memory performance and thalamus microstructure in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, F; Caltagirone, C; Spalletta, G

    2010-12-01

    Research on the neural basis of working memory (WM) has generally focused on cortical regions, specifically frontal and parietal areas. Comparatively, evidence of a possible involvement of deep gray matter structures, that are parts of cortico-cortical circuits linking anterior and posterior cortical areas, is far less clear. The goal of the present study is to test the hypothesis that individual structural variations within deep gray matter structures may affect the cortical networks involved in WM. To this aim, a large sample (n=181) of healthy subjects underwent a high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scan protocol. Data of micro- (mean diffusivity, MD) and macro- (volume) structural variations of six bilateral deep gray matter structures (thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, hippocampus, amygdala and pallidum) and lateral ventriculi volume were analyzed in association with score in a WM (the so-called n-back task) and other neuropsychological tasks. Results showed that increased MD of bilateral thalami was the only structural parameter that significantly correlated with reduced WM performance. In particular, a voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed that the greater percentage of voxels showing significant anticorrelation between WM score and MD values were localized in those thalamic nuclei projecting to prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices. Results highlight the specific involvement of thalamus microstructure, not volume, in modulating WM performance, possibly by regulating the connections among cortical areas that are recruited during WM tasks. Copyright © 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Delta robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, J.L.; Van der Wijk, V.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a delta robot comprising a stationary base (2) and a movable platform (3) that is connected to the base with three chains of links (4,5,6), and comprising a balancing system incorporating at least one pantograph (7) for balancing the robot's center of mass, wherein the at

  14. Disconnection syndromes of basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebrocerebellar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Pandya, Deepak N

    2008-09-01

    Disconnection syndromes were originally conceptualized as a disruption of communication between different cerebral cortical areas. Two developments mandate a re-evaluation of this notion. First, we present a synopsis of our anatomical studies in monkey elucidating principles of organization of cerebral cortex. Efferent fibers emanate from every cortical area, and are directed with topographic precision via association fibers to ipsilateral cortical areas, commissural fibers to contralateral cerebral regions, striatal fibers to basal ganglia, and projection subcortical bundles to thalamus, brainstem and/or pontocerebellar system. We note that cortical areas can be defined by their patterns of subcortical and cortical connections. Second, we consider motor, cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders in patients with lesions restricted to basal ganglia, thalamus, or cerebellum, and recognize that these lesions mimic deficits resulting from cortical lesions, with qualitative differences between the manifestations of lesions in functionally related areas of cortical and subcortical nodes. We consider these findings on the basis of anatomical observations from tract tracing studies in monkey, viewing them as disconnection syndromes reflecting loss of the contribution of subcortical nodes to the distributed neural circuits. We introduce a new theoretical framework for the distributed neural circuits, based on general, and specific, principles of anatomical organization, and on the architecture of the nodes that comprise these systems. We propose that neural architecture determines function, i.e., each architectonically distinct cortical and subcortical area contributes a unique transform, or computation, to information processing; anatomically precise and segregated connections between nodes define behavior; and association fiber tracts that link cerebral cortical areas with each other enable the cross-modal integration required for evolved complex behaviors. This model

  15. Glucose hypermetabolism in the thalamus of patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Megumi; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Kiyosawa, Motohiro; Wakakura, Masato; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was investigate functional alteration in the brains of patients with hemifacial spasm using positron emission tomography (PET). We studied cerebral glucose metabolism using PET with (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose in 13 patients with right lateral hemifacial spasm and 13 with left lateral hemifacial spasm. All patients underwent 2 PET scans before treatment (active state) and after treatment (suppressive state) with the botulinum neurotoxin type A. At the time of the PET scans, the severity of the spasm was rated according to the Jankovic Disability Rating Scale. We also used magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate the grade of neurovascular compression in each patient using scores of 1 to 3 (1 = mild, 3 = severe). Fifty-two normal volunteers were examined as controls. Compared with controls, patients with right and left hemifacial spasm showed bilateral cerebral glucose hypermetabolism in the thalamus in both the active and suppressive states. However, thalamic glucose metabolism after the suppressive state was significantly reduced compared with that in the active state using region of interest analysis. There was a positive correlation between the severity of the spasm in the active state and the score of neurovascular compression (rs = 0.65) that was estimated using Spearman order correlation coefficient. We observed bilateral cerebral glucose hypermetabolism in the thalamus of patients with hemifacial spasm. The thalamic glucose hypermetabolism may be attributed to multiple sources, including afferent input from the skin and muscle spindle, antidromic conduction of the facial nerve, and secondary alteration in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Contributions of Volumetrics of the Hippocampus and Thalamus to Verbal Memory in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christopher C.; Griffith, H. Randall; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Martin, Roy C.; Knowlton, Robert K.; Richardson, Elizabeth J.; Hermann, Bruce P.; Seidenberg, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Recent theories have posited that the hippocampus and thalamus serve distinct, yet related, roles in episodic memory. Whereas the hippocampus has been implicated in long-term memory encoding and storage, the thalamus, as a whole, has been implicated in the selection of items for subsequent encoding and the use of retrieval strategies. However,…

  17. Delta Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette

    and diminishing and prolongs the open water period and thereby the period where waves can affect the coast. Only limited work has focused on coastal areas in Greenland and the current knowledge on these areas is sparse. Coastal morphology of Greenland is highly variable spanning from rocky coasts and archipelagos....... The warming air temperature affects the soil temperature and permafrost thaws and destabilizes the material in the coastal zone. In Greenland, the warming temperature lowers the surface mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet and more material is transported to the coastal zone. The sea ice extent is thinning...... deltas are prograding, contrary to the global trend showing eroding Arctic coasts. Moreover, it is revealed that the increasing proglacial freshwater runoff, caused by a lowering of the surface mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet is the main determining agent in delta progradation. The final part...

  18. Delta Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Herder, J.L.; van der Wijk, V.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a delta robot comprising a stationary base (2) and a movable platform (3) that is connected to the base with three chains of links (4,5,6), and comprising a balancing system incorporating at least one pantograph (7) for balancing the robot's center of mass, wherein the at least one pantograph has a first free extremity (10) at which it supports a countermass (13) which is arranged to balance the center of mass of the robot.

  19. Vasomotion and Neurovascular Coupling in the Visual Thalamus In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadulla, Casto; de Labra, Carmen; Grieve, Kenneth L.; Cudeiro, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous contraction and relaxation of arteries (and in some instances venules) has been termed vasomotion and has been observed in an extensive variety of tissues and species. However, its functions and underlying mechanisms are still under discussion. We demonstrate that in vivo spectrophotometry, measured simultaneously with extracellular recordings at the same locations in the visual thalamus of the cat, reveals vasomotion, measured as an oscillation (0.14hz) in the recorded oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) signal, which appears spontaneously in the microcirculation and can last for periods of hours. During some non-oscillatory periods, maintained sensory stimulation evokes vasomotion lasting ∼30s, resembling an adaptive vascular phenomenon. This oscillation in the oxyhaemoblobin signal is sensitive to pharmacological manipulation: it is inducible by chloralose anaesthesia and it can be temporarily blocked by systemic administration of adrenaline or acetylcholine (ACh). During these oscillatory periods, neurovascular coupling (i.e. the relationship between local neural activity and the rate of blood supply to that location) appears significantly altered. This raises important questions with regard to the interpretation of results from studies currently dependent upon a linear relationship between neural activity and blood flow, such as neuroimaging. PMID:22174886

  20. Multiplexed Spike Coding and Adaptation in the Thalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Mease

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency “burst” clusters of spikes are a generic output pattern of many neurons. While bursting is a ubiquitous computational feature of different nervous systems across animal species, the encoding of synaptic inputs by bursts is not well understood. We find that bursting neurons in the rodent thalamus employ “multiplexing” to differentially encode low- and high-frequency stimulus features associated with either T-type calcium “low-threshold” or fast sodium spiking events, respectively, and these events adapt differently. Thus, thalamic bursts encode disparate information in three channels: (1 burst size, (2 burst onset time, and (3 precise spike timing within bursts. Strikingly, this latter “intraburst” encoding channel shows millisecond-level feature selectivity and adapts across statistical contexts to maintain stable information encoded per spike. Consequently, calcium events both encode low-frequency stimuli and, in parallel, gate a transient window for high-frequency, adaptive stimulus encoding by sodium spike timing, allowing bursts to efficiently convey fine-scale temporal information.

  1. Vasomotion and neurovascular coupling in the visual thalamus in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casto Rivadulla

    Full Text Available Spontaneous contraction and relaxation of arteries (and in some instances venules has been termed vasomotion and has been observed in an extensive variety of tissues and species. However, its functions and underlying mechanisms are still under discussion. We demonstrate that in vivo spectrophotometry, measured simultaneously with extracellular recordings at the same locations in the visual thalamus of the cat, reveals vasomotion, measured as an oscillation (0.14 hz in the recorded oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb signal, which appears spontaneously in the microcirculation and can last for periods of hours. During some non-oscillatory periods, maintained sensory stimulation evokes vasomotion lasting ~30s, resembling an adaptive vascular phenomenon. This oscillation in the oxyhaemoblobin signal is sensitive to pharmacological manipulation: it is inducible by chloralose anaesthesia and it can be temporarily blocked by systemic administration of adrenaline or acetylcholine (ACh. During these oscillatory periods, neurovascular coupling (i.e. the relationship between local neural activity and the rate of blood supply to that location appears significantly altered. This raises important questions with regard to the interpretation of results from studies currently dependent upon a linear relationship between neural activity and blood flow, such as neuroimaging.

  2. Topography of inland deltas: Observations, modeling, and experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Seybold, H. J.; Molnar, P.; Akça, Mehmet Devrim; Doumi, M.; Tavares, M. Cavalcanti; Shinbrot, T.; Andrade, J. S.; Kinzelbach, W.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    The topography of inland deltas is influenced by the water-sediment balance in distributary channels and local evaporation and seepage rates. In this letter a reduced complexity model is applied to simulate inland delta formation, and results are compared with the Okavango Delta, Botswana and with a laboratory experiment. We show that water loss in inland deltas produces fundamentally different dynamics of water and sediment transport than coastal deltas, especially deposition associated with...

  3. Gating of attentional effort through the central thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, N D; Shah, S A; Hudson, A E; Nauvel, T; Kalik, S F; Purpura, K P

    2013-02-01

    The central thalamus plays an important role in the regulation of arousal and allocation of attentional resources in the performance of even simple tasks. To assess the contribution of central thalamic neurons to short-term adjustments of attentional effort, we analyzed 166 microelectrode recordings obtained from two rhesus monkeys performing a visuomotor simple reaction time task with a variable foreperiod. Multiunit responses showed maintained firing rate elevations during the variable delay period of the task in ∼24% of recording sites. Simultaneously recorded local field potentials demonstrated significant decreases in power at ∼10-20 Hz and increases in power at 30-100 Hz during the delay period when compared against precue baselines. Comparison of the spectral power of local field potentials during the delay period of correct and incorrect trials showed that, during incorrect trials, similar, but reduced, shifts of spectral power occurred within the same frequency bands. Sustained performance of even simple tasks requires regulation of arousal and attention that combine in the concept of "attentional effort". Our findings suggest that central thalamic neurons regulate task performance through brief changes in firing rates and spectral power changes during task-relevant short-term shifts of attentional effort. Increases in attentional effort may be reflected in changes within the central thalamic local populations, where correct task performance associates with more robust maintenance of firing rates during the delay period. Such ongoing fluctuations of central thalamic activity likely reflect a mix of influences, including variations in moment-to-moment levels of motivation, arousal, and availability of cognitive resources.

  4. Correlation transfer from basal ganglia to thalamus in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela, Reitsma; Brent, Doiron; Jonathan, Rubin

    2011-01-01

    Spike trains from neurons in the basal ganglia of parkinsonian primates show increased pairwise correlations, oscillatory activity, and burst rate compared to those from neurons recorded during normal brain activity. However, it is not known how these changes affect the behavior of downstream thalamic neurons. To understand how patterns of basal ganglia population activity may affect thalamic spike statistics, we study pairs of model thalamocortical (TC) relay neurons receiving correlated inhibitory input from the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi), a primary output nucleus of the basal ganglia. We observe that the strength of correlations of TC neuron spike trains increases with the GPi correlation level, and bursty firing patterns such as those seen in the parkinsonian GPi allow for stronger transfer of correlations than do firing patterns found under normal conditions. We also show that the T-current in the TC neurons does not significantly affect correlation transfer, despite its pronounced effects on spiking. Oscillatory firing patterns in GPi are shown to affect the timescale at which correlations are best transferred through the system. To explain this last result, we analytically compute the spike count correlation coefficient for oscillatory cases in a reduced point process model. Our analysis indicates that the dependence of the timescale of correlation transfer is robust to different levels of input spike and rate correlations and arises due to differences in instantaneous spike correlations, even when the long timescale rhythmic modulations of neurons are identical. Overall, these results show that parkinsonian firing patterns in GPi do affect the transfer of correlations to the thalamus. PMID:22355287

  5. Dopamine controls Parkinson's tremor by inhibiting the cerebellar thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, Michiel F; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Aarts, Esther; Timmer, Monique H M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan; Helmich, Rick C

    2017-03-01

    Parkinson's resting tremor is related to altered cerebral activity in the basal ganglia and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit. Although Parkinson's disease is characterized by dopamine depletion in the basal ganglia, the dopaminergic basis of resting tremor remains unclear: dopaminergic medication reduces tremor in some patients, but many patients have a dopamine-resistant tremor. Using pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging, we test how a dopaminergic intervention influences the cerebral circuit involved in Parkinson's tremor. From a sample of 40 patients with Parkinson's disease, we selected 15 patients with a clearly tremor-dominant phenotype. We compared tremor-related activity and effective connectivity (using combined electromyography-functional magnetic resonance imaging) on two occasions: ON and OFF dopaminergic medication. Building on a recently developed cerebral model of Parkinson's tremor, we tested the effect of dopamine on cerebral activity associated with the onset of tremor episodes (in the basal ganglia) and with tremor amplitude (in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit). Dopaminergic medication reduced clinical resting tremor scores (mean 28%, range -12 to 68%). Furthermore, dopaminergic medication reduced tremor onset-related activity in the globus pallidus and tremor amplitude-related activity in the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus. Network analyses using dynamic causal modelling showed that dopamine directly increased self-inhibition of the ventral intermediate nucleus, rather than indirectly influencing the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit through the basal ganglia. Crucially, the magnitude of thalamic self-inhibition predicted the clinical dopamine response of tremor. Dopamine reduces resting tremor by potentiating inhibitory mechanisms in a cerebellar nucleus of the thalamus (ventral intermediate nucleus). This suggests that altered dopaminergic projections to the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit have a role

  6. The thalamus and brainstem act as key hubs in alterations of human brain network connectivity induced by mild propofol sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gili, Tommaso; Saxena, Neeraj; Diukova, Ana; Murphy, Kevin; Hall, Judith E; Wise, Richard G

    2013-02-27

    Despite their routine use during surgical procedures, no consensus has yet been reached on the precise mechanisms by which hypnotic anesthetic agents produce their effects. Molecular, animal and human studies have suggested disruption of thalamocortical communication as a key component of anesthetic action at the brain systems level. Here, we used the anesthetic agent, propofol, to modulate consciousness and to evaluate differences in the interactions of remote neural networks during altered consciousness. We investigated the effects of propofol, at a dose that produced mild sedation without loss of consciousness, on spontaneous cerebral activity of 15 healthy volunteers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), exploiting oscillations (eigenvector centrality (EC) to characterize brain network properties. The EC mapping of fMRI data in healthy humans under propofol mild sedation demonstrated a decrease of centrality of the thalamus versus an increase of centrality within the pons of the brainstem, highlighting the important role of these two structures in regulating consciousness. Specifically, the decrease of thalamus centrality results from its disconnection from a widespread set of cortical and subcortical regions, while the increase of brainstem centrality may be a consequence of its increased influence, in the mildly sedated state, over a few highly central cortical regions key to the default mode network such as the posterior and anterior cingulate cortices.

  7. The tale of the three brothers - Shh, Wnt and Fgf during development of the thalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja IH Hagemann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The thalamic complex is an essential part of the brain that requires a combination of specialized activities to attain its final complexity. In the following review we will describe the induction process of the mid-diencephalic organizer (MDO where three different signaling pathways merge: Wnt, Shh and Fgf. Here, we dissect the function of each signaling pathway in the thalamus in chronological order of their appearance. First we describe the Wnt mediated induction of the MDO and compartition of the caudal forebrain, then the Shh mediated determination of proneural gene expression before discussing recent progress in characterizing Fgf function during thalamus development. Then, we focus on transcription factors, which are regulated by these pathways and which play a pivotal role in neurogenesis in the thalamus. The three signaling pathways act together in a strictly regulated chronology to orchestrate the development of the entire thalamus.

  8. Causal Evidence from Humans for the Role of Mediodorsal Nucleus of the Thalamus in Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peräkylä, Jari; Sun, Lihua; Lehtimäki, Kai; Peltola, Jukka; Öhman, Juha; Möttönen, Timo; Ogawa, Keith H; Hartikainen, Kaisa M

    2017-12-01

    The mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD), with its extensive connections to the lateral pFC, has been implicated in human working memory and executive functions. However, this understanding is based solely on indirect evidence from human lesion and imaging studies and animal studies. Direct, causal evidence from humans is missing. To obtain direct evidence for MD's role in humans, we studied patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) for refractory epilepsy. This treatment is thought to prevent the generalization of a seizure by disrupting the functioning of the patient's anterior nuclei of the thalamus (ANT) with high-frequency electric stimulation. This structure is located superior and anterior to MD, and when the DBS lead is implanted in ANT, tip contacts of the lead typically penetrate through ANT into the adjoining MD. To study the role of MD in human executive functions and working memory, we periodically disrupted and recovered MD's function with high-frequency electric stimulation using DBS contacts reaching MD while participants performed a cognitive task engaging several aspects of executive functions. We hypothesized that the efficacy of executive functions, specifically working memory, is impaired when the functioning of MD is perturbed by high-frequency stimulation. Eight participants treated with ANT-DBS for refractory epilepsy performed a computer-based test of executive functions while DBS was repeatedly switched ON and OFF at MD and at the control location (ANT). In comparison to stimulation of the control location, when MD was stimulated, participants committed 2.26 times more errors in general (total errors; OR = 2.26, 95% CI [1.69, 3.01]) and 2.86 times more working memory-related errors specifically (incorrect button presses; OR = 2.88, CI [1.95, 4.24]). Similarly, participants committed 1.81 more errors in general ( OR = 1.81, CI [1.45, 2.24]) and 2.08 times more working memory-related errors ( OR = 2.08, CI [1.57, 2.75]) in

  9. The regulatory role of interferon-γ producing gamma delta T cells via the suppression of T helper 17 cell activity in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, S; Goto, D; Iizuka, A; Kaneko, S; Yokosawa, M; Kondo, Y; Matsumoto, I; Sumida, T

    2016-09-01

    Interstitial pneumonia (IP) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease associated with poor prognosis and high mortality. However, the pathogenesis of IP remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of pulmonary γδT cells in IP. In wild-type (WT) mice exposed to bleomycin, pulmonary γδT cells were expanded and produced large amounts of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. Histological and biochemical analyses showed that bleomycin-induced IP was more severe in T cell receptor (TCR-δ-deficient (TCRδ(-/-) ) mice than WT mice. In TCRδ(-/-) mice, pulmonary IL-17A(+) CD4(+) Τ cells expanded at days 7 and 14 after bleomycin exposure. In TCRδ(-/-) mice infused with γδT cells from WT mice, the number of pulmonary IL-17A(+) CD4(+) T cells was lower than in TCRδ(-/-) mice. The examination of IL-17A(-/-) TCRδ(-/-) mice indicated that γδT cells suppressed pulmonary fibrosis through the suppression of IL-17A(+) CD4(+) T cells. The differentiation of T helper (Th)17 cells was determined in vitro, and CD4(+) cells isolated from TCRδ(-/-) mice showed normal differentiation of Th17 cells compared with WT mice. Th17 cell differentiation was suppressed in the presence of IFN-γ producing γδT cells in vitro. Pulmonary fibrosis was attenuated by IFN-γ-producing γδT cells through the suppression of pulmonary IL-17A(+) CD4(+) T cells. These results suggested that pulmonary γδT cells seem to play a regulatory role in the development of bleomycin-induced IP mouse model via the suppression of IL-17A production. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Human eosinophils express RAGE, produce RAGE ligands, exhibit PKC-delta phosphorylation and enhanced viability in response to the RAGE ligand, S100B

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Colleen S.; Bertics, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that human eosinophils produce ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), express RAGE and exhibit RAGE-mediated responses. In examining our microarray data, we identified the presence of RAGE and RAGE ligand (S100A4, S100A6, S100A8, S100A9, S100A11, S100P, HMGB1) transcripts. Expression of eosinophil RAGE mRNA was also compared with a known positive control and further assessed via bioinformatics and sequence analysis of RAGE cDNA. P...

  11. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  12. Fast and Slow Inhibition in the Visual Thalamus Is Influenced by Allocating GABAA Receptors with Different γ Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Ye

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell-type specific differences in the kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic conductance changes (IPSCs are believed to impact upon network dynamics throughout the brain. Much attention has focused on how GABAA receptor (GABAAR α and β subunit diversity will influence IPSC kinetics, but less is known about the influence of the γ subunit. We have examined whether GABAAR γ subunit heterogeneity influences IPSC properties in the thalamus. The γ2 subunit gene was deleted from GABAARs selectively in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN. The removal of the γ2 subunit from the dLGN reduced the overall spontaneous IPSC (sIPSC frequency across all relay cells and produced an absence of IPSCs in a subset of relay neurons. The remaining slower IPSCs were both insensitive to diazepam and zinc indicating the absence of the γ2 subunit. Because these slower IPSCs were potentiated by methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM, we propose these IPSCs involve γ1 subunit-containing GABAAR activation. Therefore, γ subunit heterogeneity appears to influence the kinetics of GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission in the visual thalamus in a cell-selective manner. We suggest that activation of γ1 subunit-containing GABAARs give rise to slower IPSCs in general, while faster IPSCs tend to be mediated by γ2 subunit-containing GABAARs.

  13. Nitric oxide synthase-containing projections to the ventrobasal thalamus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usunoff, K G; Kharazia, V N; Valtschanoff, J G; Schmidt, H H; Weinberg, R J

    1999-09-01

    Microiontophoretic studies of thalamic neurons suggests that nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in mediating somatosensory transmission. The thalamus contains few nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-immunoreactive neurons; thus, the major source of thalamic NO is presumably from NOS-positive axons of extrathalamic origin. The cells of origin of these putative NOS-containing pathways to the ventrobasal thalamus were investigated in rats by combining retrograde tracing with immunocytochemistry for NOS. The location and morphology of double-labeled neurons was compared with that of single-labeled neurons. The most significant sources of NOS-containing afferents to the thalamus were found to be the pedunculopontine (PPN) and laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nuclei. NOS-immunoreactive neurons in these cholinergic nuclei project bilaterally to the thalamus, most strongly ipsilaterally. The thalamus appears to be a major target of PPN, since even selective thalamic injections result in retrograde labeling of at least one third of its NOS-immunoreactive neurons. A significant number of NOS-negative neurons in both the PPN and LDT also project to the thalamus. Minor sources of NOS-containing thalamic afferents include the lateral hypothalamus, the dorsal, median and pontine raphe nuclei, the parabrachial nuclei, and the pontomedullary reticular formation. In all these structures, NOS-negative thalamopetal neurons greatly outnumber the NOS-positive ones. Ascending sensory pathways to the thalamus, including those from the sensory trigeminal nuclei, the dorsal column nuclei, and the spinal cord, as well as the auditory and vestibular centers, arise exclusively from NOS-negative neurons. The major NOS-positive projections are implicated in affective and alerting systems, supporting that NO may act to modulate attentiveness in thalamic relay nuclei.

  14. The Delta 2 launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousley, Gilbert W., Sr.

    1991-12-01

    The utilization of the Delta 2 as the vehicle for launching Aristoteles into its near Sun synchronous orbit is addressed. Delta is NASA's most reliable launch vehicle and is well suited for placing the present Aristoteles spacecraft into a 400 m circular orbit. A summary of some of the Delta 2 flight parameters is presented. Diagrams of a typical Delta 2 two stage separation are included along with statistics on delta reliability and launch plans.

  15. Bovine WC1- gamma delta T-cells incubated with IL-15 express the natural cytotoxicity receptor CD335 (NKp46) and produce IFN-gamma in response to exogenous IL-12 and IL-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gamma delta T-cells of ruminants are believed to participate in innate immunity and have been described with regulatory and cytotoxic functions. Here we describe a subset of CD3+ TcRr1+ Wc1- CD8+ CD2+ gamma delta T-cells expressing CD335 (NKp46), classically associated with CD3- NK cells, as a c...

  16. Evolving deltas: Conceptualising coevolution with engineered interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Amy; Nicholls, Robert; Lazar, Attila

    2017-04-01

    Mid to low latitude deltas have been populated for thousands of years due to their fertile soil and coastal location. This has led to an alteration in the land cover of deltas to primary agriculture and dense rural settlements and more recently, major cities and megacities have developed on or adjacent to many deltas. Deltas may be prosperous in terms of their outputs and services; however, they are also susceptible to many hazards due to their location and low-lying nature. Hazards include storm surges, fluvial flooding and erosion of both coastal and riverine areas, as well as subsidence, relative sea-level rise and pollution. This can have severe impacts on the delta, its population and its services. Therefore engineered interventions have been used for some time to protect the population and the valuable land from the consequences of hazards. Coevolution can be described as a feedback loop between nature and humans: each has an effect on how the other behaves and hence this inter-dependence interaction continues. Therefore the natural evolution of the delta interacts with engineered interventions, such as promoting accelerated subsidence over time, necessitating further adaptation. The deltaic landscape and associated livelihoods are thus the result of this co-evolution process between natural delta processes and engineered interventions. This presentation will identify and discuss various drivers and consequences of large scale engineered interventions, comparing and contrasting the management approaches taken in five populated deltas (Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna, Yangtze, Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt, Mekong and Nile). The type of engineered intervention and management approaches had a direct effect on the coevolution of deltas, with each of the deltas being at different stages in terms of extent of coevolution. A qualitative timeline of the typical steps of coevolution between the human system and the delta system of the studied deltas was produced. The major

  17. The Mechanics of River Avulsions on Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganti, Vamsi; Chadwick, Austin; Hassenruck-Gudipati, Hima; Lamb, Michael

    2017-04-01

    River deltas are highly dynamic, often fan-shaped depositional systems that form when rivers drain into a standing body of water. They host over a half billion people worldwide and are currently under threat of drowning and destruction by relative sea-level rise, subsidence, and anthropogenic interference. Many river deltas develop planform fan shapes through avulsions, whereby major river channel shifts occur via "channel jumping" about a persistent spatial node, thus determining their fundamental length scale. Emerging theories suggest that the size of deltas is set by backwater hydrodynamics; however, these ideas are difficult to test on natural deltas, which evolve on centennial to millennial timescales. Here, using physical experiments coupled with observations of the dynamics of modern deltaic evolution, we show that deltas grow through successive deposition of lobes that maintain a constant size that scales with backwater hydrodynamics. The preferential avulsion node in our experiments is a consequence of multiple river floods and Froude-subcritical flows that produce persistent nonuniform flows and a peak in net channel deposition within the backwater zone of the coastal river. Moreover, because the backwater hydrodynamics are controlled by the downstream boundary condition of constant sea level, the backwater-mediated avulsion sites translate seaward in step with shoreline progradation. In contrast, experimental deltas without multiple floods produce flows with uniform velocities and delta lobes that lack a characteristic size. Results have broad applications to sustainable management of deltas and for decoding their stratigraphic record on Earth and Mars.

  18. Delta Plaza kohvik = Delta Plaza cafe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Tallinnas Pärnu mnt 141 asuva kohviku Delta Plaza sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Tiiu Truus ja Marja Viltrop (Stuudio Truus OÜ). Tiiu Truusi tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Büroohoone Delta Plaza arhitektid Marika Lõoke ja Jüri Okas (AB J. Okas & M. Lõoke)

  19. delta-vision

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Delta Vision is intended to identify a strategy for managing the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta as a sustainable ecosystem that would continue to support environmental...

  20. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been accomplished only in a large amount of time. In this paper, there are presented the stages of a 3D model execution, also the physical achievement after of a Delta 3D printer after the model.

  1. Interaction between Thalamus and Hippocampus in Termination of Amygdala-Kindled Seizures in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus and hippocampus have been found both involved in the initiation, propagation, and termination of temporal lobe epilepsy. However, the interaction of these regions during seizures is not clear. The present study is to explore whether some regular patterns exist in their interaction during the termination of seizures. Multichannel in vivo recording techniques were used to record the neural activities from the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1 of hippocampus and mediodorsal thalamus (MDT in mice. The mice were kindled by electrically stimulating basolateral amygdala neurons, and Racine’s rank standard was employed to classify the stage of behavioral responses (stage 1~5. The coupling index and directionality index were used to investigate the synchronization and information flow direction between CA1 and MDT. Two main results were found in this study. (1 High levels of synchronization between the thalamus and hippocampus were observed before the termination of seizures at stage 4~5 but after the termination of seizures at stage 1~2. (2 In the end of seizures at stage 4~5, the information tended to flow from MDT to CA1. Those results indicate that the synchronization and information flow direction between the thalamus and the hippocampus may participate in the termination of seizures.

  2. Brief Report: Abnormal Association between the Thalamus and Brain Size in Asperger's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardan, Antonio Y.; Girgis, Ragy R.; Adams, Jason; Gilbert, Andrew R.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between thalamic volume and brain size in individuals with Asperger's disorder (ASP). Volumetric measurements of the thalamus were performed on MRI scans obtained from 12 individuals with ASP (age range: 10-35 years) and 12 healthy controls (age range: 9-33 years). A positive correlation…

  3. Disease-specific structural changes in thalamus and dentatorubrothalamic tract in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surova, Yulia; Hall, Sara; Widner, Haakan [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Markus [Lund University, Lund University Bioimaging Center, Lund (Sweden); Laett, Jimmy [Skaane University Hospital, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Lampinen, Bjoern [Lund University, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Lindberg, Olof [Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Nilsson, Christer [Skaane University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Lund (Sweden); Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Westen, Danielle van [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Hansson, Oskar [Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Memory Clinic, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to identify disease-specific changes of the thalamus, basal ganglia, pons, and midbrain in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple system atrophy with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-P) using diffusion tensor imaging and volumetric analysis. MRI diffusion and volumetric data were acquired in a derivation of 30 controls and 8 patients with PSP and a validation cohort comprised of controls (n = 21) and patients with PSP (n = 27), PD (n = 10), and MSA-P (n = 11). Analysis was performed using regions of interest (ROI), tract-based spatial statistic (TBSS), and tractography and results compared between diagnostic groups. In the derivation cohort, we observed increased mean diffusivity (MD) in the thalamus, superior cerebellar peduncle, and the midbrain in PSP compared to controls. Furthermore, volumetric analysis showed reduced thalamic volumes in PSP. In the validation cohort, the observations of increased MD were replicated by ROI-based analysis and in the thalamus by TBSS-based analysis. Such differences were not found for patients with PD in any of the cohorts. Tractography of the dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRTT) showed increased MD in PSP patients from both cohorts compared to controls and in the validation cohort in PSP compared to PD and MSA patients. Increased MD in the thalamus and along the DRTT correlated with disease stage and motor function in PSP. Patients with PSP, but not PD or MSA-P, exhibit signs of structural abnormalities in the thalamus and in the DRTT. These changes are associated with disease stage and impaired motor function. (orig.)

  4. delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope ratios in amphetamine synthesized from benzaldehyde and nitroethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael; Salouros, Helen; Cawley, Adam T; Robertson, James; Heagney, Aaron C; Arenas-Queralt, Andrea

    2010-06-15

    Previous work in these laboratories and by Butzenlechner et al. and Culp et al. has demonstrated that the delta(2)H isotope value of industrial benzaldehyde produced by the catalytic oxidation of toluene is profoundly positive, usually in the range +300 per thousand to +500 per thousand. Synthetic routes leading to amphetamine, methylamphetamine or their precursors and commencing with such benzaldehyde may be expected to exhibit unusually positive delta(2)H values. Results are presented for delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values of 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene synthesized from an industrial source of benzaldehyde, having a positive delta(2)H isotope value, by a Knoevenagel condensation with nitroethane. Results are also presented for delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values for amphetamine prepared from the resulting 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene. The values obtained were compared with delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values obtained for an amphetamine sample prepared using a synthetic route that did not involve benzaldehyde. Finally, results are presented for samples of benzaldehyde, 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene and amphetamine that had been seized at a clandestine amphetamine laboratory. Copyright (c) 2010 Commonwealth of Australia. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Altered network properties of the fronto-parietal network and the thalamus in impaired consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Sophia Crone

    2014-01-01

    In chronic disorders of consciousness, modularity at the global level was reduced suggesting a disturbance in the optimal balance between segregation and integration. Moreover, network properties were altered in several regions which are associated with conscious processing (particularly, in medial parietal, and frontal regions, as well as in the thalamus. Between minimally conscious and unconscious patients the local efficiency of medial parietal regions differed. Alterations in the thalamus were particularly evident in non-conscious patients. Most of the regions affected in patients with impaired consciousness belong to the so-called ‘rich club’ of highly interconnected central nodes. Disturbances in their topological characteristics have severe impact on information integration and are reflected in deficits in cognitive functioning probably leading to a total breakdown of consciousness.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals thalamus and posterior cingulate cortex abnormalities in internet gaming addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guangheng; DeVito, Elise; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaoxia

    2012-09-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is increasingly recognized as a widespread disorder with serious psychological and health consequences. Diminished white matter integrity has been demonstrated in a wide range of other addictive disorders which share clinical characteristics with IGA. Abnormal white matter integrity in addictive populations has been associated with addiction severity, treatment response and cognitive impairments. This study assessed white matter integrity in individuals with internet gaming addiction (IGA) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). IGA subjects (N = 16) showed higher fractional anisotropy (FA), indicating greater white matter integrity, in the thalamus and left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) relative to healthy controls (N = 15). Higher FA in the thalamus was associated with greater severity of internet addiction. Increased regional FA in individuals with internet gaming addiction may be a pre-existing vulnerability factor for IGA, or may arise secondary to IGA, perhaps as a direct result of excessive internet game playing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. How Vestibular Neurons Solve the Tilt/Translation Ambiguity: Comparison of Brainstem, Cerebellum, and Thalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Dora E. Angelaki; Yakusheva, Tatyana A.

    2009-01-01

    The peripheral vestibular system is faced by a sensory ambiguity, where primary otolith afferents respond identically to translational (inertial) accelerations and changes in head orientation relative to gravity. Under certain conditions, this sensory ambiguity can be resolved using extra-otolith cues, including semicircular canal signals. Here we review and summarize how neurons in the vestibular nuclei, rostral fastigial nuclei, cerebellar nodulus/uvula, and thalamus respond during combinat...

  8. Brain blood-flow changes during motion sickness. [thalamus vascular changes in dogs during swing tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. H.; Hsuen, J.

    1973-01-01

    The possibility of diminished blood flow in the brain is studied as one of the factors resulting from an increase in skeletal muscle blood volume concomitant with other characteristics of motion sickness. Thermistors are implanted in the thalamus of dogs and blood flow changes are recorded while they are subjected to sinusoidal movement on a two pole swing. Results of these initial steps in a proposed long term exploration of different areas of the brain are presented.

  9. Neo-Timm staining in the thalamus of chronically epileptic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamani C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus is an important modulator of seizures and is severely affected in cholinergic models of epilepsy. In the present study, chronically epileptic rats had their brains processed for neo-Timm and acetylcholinesterase two months after the induction of status epilepticus with pilocarpine. Both controls and pilocarpine-treated animals presented neo-Timm staining in the anterodorsal nucleus, laterodorsal nucleus, reticular nucleus, most intralaminar nuclei, nucleus reuniens, and rhomboid nucleus of the thalamus, as well as in the zona incerta. The intensity of neo-Timm staining was similar in control and pilocarpine-treated rats, except for the nucleus reuniens and the rhomboid nucleus, which had a lower intensity of staining in the epileptic group. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy, zinc seems to modulate glutamate release and to decrease seizure activity. In this context, a reduction of neo-Timm-stained terminals in the midline thalamus could ultimately result in an increased excitatory activity, not only within its related nuclei, but also in anatomical structures that receive their efferent connections. This might contribute to the pathological substrate observed in chronic pilocarpine-treated epileptic animals.

  10. Effects of neonatal excitotoxic lesions in ventral thalamus on social interaction in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Rainer; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Nullmeier, Sven; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schwegler, Herbert

    2017-03-30

    The role of the thalamus in schizophrenia has increasingly been studied in recent years. Deficits in the ventral thalamus have been described in only few postmortem and neuroimaging studies. We utilised our previously introduced neurodevelopmental animal model, the neonatal excitotoxic lesion of the ventral thalamus of Sprague-Dawley rats (Wolf et al., Pharmacopsychiatry 43:99-109, 22). At postnatal day (PD7), male pubs received bilateral thalamic infusions with ibotenic acid (IBA) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (control). In adulthood, social interaction of two animals not familiar to each other was studied by a computerised video tracking system. This study displays clear lesion effects on social interaction of adult male rats. The significant reduction of total contact time and the significant increase in distance between the animals in the IBA group compared to controls can be interpreted as social withdrawal modelling a negative symptom of schizophrenia. The significant increase of total distance travelled in the IBA group can be hypothesised as agitation modelling a positive symptom of schizophrenia. Using a triple concept of social interaction, the percentage of no social interaction (Non-SI%) was significantly larger, and inversely, the percentage of passive social interaction (SI-passive%) was significantly smaller in the IBA group when compared to controls. In conclusion, on the background of findings in schizophrenic patients, the effects of neonatal ventral thalamic IBA lesions in adult male rats support the hypothesis of face and construct validity as animal model of schizophrenia.

  11. Delta hedging strategies comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Giovanni, Domenico; Ortobelli, S.; Rachev, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we implement dynamic delta hedging strategies based on several option pricing models. We analyze different subordinated option pricing models and we examine delta hedging costs using ex-post daily prices of S&P 500. Furthermore, we compare the performance of each subordinated model...

  12. Desenvolvimento da ferrita delta na solda e ZTA resultante de soldagem plasma pulsada em um aço inoxidável supermartensítico Delta-ferrite development in weld and HAZ produced by pulsed plasma arc welding in a supermartensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio L. Henke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A ferrita delta é considerada uma fase indesejável na microestrutura dos aços inoxidáveis martensíticos haja vista a mesma poder influenciar no desempenho da resistência à fadiga, tenacidade e corrosão sob-tensão. Sendo assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar o efeito da soldagem plasma pulsada sobre a distribuição e quantidade de ferrita delta em um aço inoxidável supermartensítico. Para tal foram obtidos cordões por meio de fusão superficial sobre uma amostra de aço inoxidável supermartensítico de alta liga utilizando corrente pulsada e convencional. Em seguida foi efetuada a caracterização microestrutural, em especial da ferrita delta, via análises metalográficas por meio de microscopia óptica e eletrônica de varredura . Os experimentos revelaram que, para o mesmo aporte térmico, a pulsação de corrente promoveu a formação de ferrita delta na forma de bandas ao longo do cordão de solda e redução significativa desta fase na ZTA quando comparada à soldagem convencional.The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of pulsed plasma welding on the distribution and amount of delta ferrite which is considered an undesirable phase in a supermartensitic stainless steel. For such weld beads have been obtained by melting the surface of a sample of a high-alloy supermartensitic stainless steel using pulsed and conventional current. Microstructural characterization, especially of delta ferrite, was performed by metallographic analysis by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experiments showed that for the same heat input, pulsed current promoted the formation of delta ferrite in the form of bands along the weld bead and caused a significant reduction of this phase in HAZ as compared to conventional welding.

  13. A reduced-complexity model for river delta formation - Part 1: Modeling deltas with channel dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we develop a reduced-complexity model (RCM) for river delta formation (referred to as DeltaRCM in the following). It is a rule-based cellular morphodynamic model, in contrast to reductionist models based on detailed computational fluid dynamics. The basic framework of this model (DeltaRCM) consists of stochastic parcel-based cellular routing schemes for water and sediment and a set of phenomenological rules for sediment deposition and erosion. The outputs of the model include a depth-averaged flow field, water surface elevation and bed topography that evolve in time. Results show that DeltaRCM is able (1) to resolve a wide range of channel dynamics - including elongation, bifurcation, avulsion and migration - and (2) to produce a variety of deltas such as alluvial fan deltas and deltas with multiple orders of bifurcations. We also demonstrate a simple stratigraphy recording component which tracks the distribution of coarse and fine materials and the age of the deposits. Essential processes that must be included in reduced-complexity delta models include a depth-averaged flow field that guides sediment transport a nontrivial water surface profile that accounts for backwater effects at least in the main channels, both bedload and suspended sediment transport, and topographic steering of sediment transport.

  14. Delta robots – robots for high speed manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Poppeová, Viera; Uríček, Juraj; Bulej, Vladimír; Šindler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper is oriented to parallel kinematic robots definition, description of their specific application, comparison of robots made by different producers and determination of velocity and acceleration parameters, kinematic analysis – inverse and forward kinematic. It brings information about development of Delta robots at Academia, including the University of Žilina and Delta robots in the market. Two models of Delta robots called M-1iA and M-3iA have been developed by FANUC Robotics during...

  15. Early Exposure to General Anesthesia with Isoflurane Downregulates Inhibitory Synaptic Neurotransmission in the Rat Thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksovic, Pavle M; Lunardi, Nadia; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence supports the idea that common general anesthetics (GAs) such as isoflurane (Iso) and nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) are neurotoxic and may harm the developing mammalian brain, including the thalamus; however, to date very little is known about how developmental exposure to GAs may affect synaptic transmission in the thalamus which, in turn, controls the function of thalamocortical circuitry. To address this issue we used in vitro patch-clamp recordings of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) from intact neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRT) in brain slices from rat pups (postnatal age P10-P18) exposed at age of P7 to clinically relevant GA combinations of Iso and N2O. We found that rats exposed to a combination of 0.75 % Iso and 75 % N2O display lasting reduction in the amplitude and faster decays of eIPSCs. Exposure to sub-anesthetic concentrations of 75 % N2O alone or 0.75 % Iso alone at P7 did not affect the amplitude of eIPSCs; however, Iso alone, but not N2O, significantly accelerated decay of eIPSCs. Anesthesia with 1.5 % Iso alone decreased amplitudes, caused faster decay and decreased the paired-pulse ratio of eIPSCs. We conclude that anesthesia at P7 with Iso alone or in combination with N2O causes plasticity of eIPSCs in nRT neurons by both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We hypothesize that changes in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the thalamus induced by GAs may contribute to altered neuronal excitability and consequently abnormal thalamocortical oscillations later in life.

  16. Delta-robotin mekaniikkasuunnittelu

    OpenAIRE

    Välimäki, Pasi

    2015-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli suunnitella mekaniikka Delta-robotille, jonka on tarkoitus tulla opetuskäyttöön Seinäjoen ammattikorkeakoululle. Opinnäytetyöhön kuului selvittää, mitä Delta-robotin valmistaminen opetuskäyttöön vaatisi sekä laskea kinematiikka Delta-robotin raajojen ja ala-alustan liikkeille. Lisäksi opinnäytetyössä oli tarkoitus selvittää, mistä materiaalista Delta-robotti olisi kannattavinta valmistaa. Opinnäytetyöhön ei kuitenkaan kuulunut varsinaisen robotin valmista...

  17. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000216.htm Hepatitis D (Delta agent) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis D is a viral infection caused by the ...

  18. The Niger Delta : A Stakeholder Approach to Environmental Development

    OpenAIRE

    Linden, O.; Moffat, D.; Singh, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Niger Delta is one of the world's largest wetlands and includes by far the largest mangrove forest in Africa. Within this extremely valuable ecosystem, oil activities are widespread - Rivers State and Delta State produce 75 percent of Nigeria's petroleum, which represents over 50 percent of national government revenues. However, despite its vast oil reserves, the region remains poor. G...

  19. Planting Bottomland Hardwoods for Wildlife in the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile S. Gardiner; John A. Stanturf

    2000-01-01

    Tree season soon will be upon us. No, not cottontrees! The best time for planting dormant hardwood seedlings in the Delta is from December through February. All trees native to the Delta have some value as wildlife habitat. While some tree species produce mast, foliage, nectar, or fiber that are eaten by animals, others provide cover, vertical structure for nesting...

  20. The benefits of multibit chaotic sigma delta modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, J. D.; Sandler, M. B.

    2001-06-01

    Sigma delta modulation is a popular technique for high-resolution analog-to-digital conversion and digital-to-analog conversion. We investigate chaotic phenomena in multibit first-order sigma-delta modulators. Particular attention is placed on the occurrence of periodic orbits or limit cycles. These may result in idle tones audible to the listener when sigma-delta modulation is used for audio signal processing. One suggested method of eliminating idle tones is the operation of a sigma delta modulator in the chaotic regime. Unfortunately, chaotic modulation of a first order sigma delta modulator is a poor system for signal processing. We show that minor variations on a traditional first order sigma-delta modulator, together with a multibit implementation, may be used to produce an effective, stable chaotic modulator that accurately encodes the input and helps remove the presence of idle tones. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Nitrous oxide-induced slow and delta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Kara J; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Sampson, Aaron L; Ling, Kelly; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N

    2016-01-01

    Switching from maintenance of general anesthesia with an ether anesthetic to maintenance with high-dose (concentration >50% and total gas flow rate >4 liters per minute) nitrous oxide is a common practice used to facilitate emergence from general anesthesia. The transition from the ether anesthetic to nitrous oxide is associated with a switch in the putative mechanisms and sites of anesthetic action. We investigated whether there is an electroencephalogram (EEG) marker of this transition. We retrospectively studied the ether anesthetic to nitrous oxide transition in 19 patients with EEG monitoring receiving general anesthesia using the ether anesthetic sevoflurane combined with oxygen and air. Following the transition to nitrous oxide, the alpha (8-12 Hz) oscillations associated with sevoflurane dissipated within 3-12 min (median 6 min) and were replaced by highly coherent large-amplitude slow-delta (0.1-4 Hz) oscillations that persisted for 2-12 min (median 3 min). Administration of high-dose nitrous oxide is associated with transient, large amplitude slow-delta oscillations. We postulate that these slow-delta oscillations may result from nitrous oxide-induced blockade of major excitatory inputs (NMDA glutamate projections) from the brainstem (parabrachial nucleus and medial pontine reticular formation) to the thalamus and cortex. This EEG signature of high-dose nitrous oxide may offer new insights into brain states during general anesthesia. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sevoflurane Induces Coherent Slow-Delta Oscillations in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Guidera

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although general anesthetics are routinely administered to surgical patients to induce loss of consciousness, the mechanisms underlying anesthetic-induced unconsciousness are not fully understood. In rats, we characterized changes in the extradural EEG and intracranial local field potentials (LFPs within the prefrontal cortex (PFC, parietal cortex (PC, and central thalamus (CT in response to progressively higher doses of the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane. During induction with a low dose of sevoflurane, beta/low gamma (12–40 Hz power increased in the frontal EEG and PFC, PC and CT LFPs, and PFC–CT and PFC–PFC LFP beta/low gamma coherence increased. Loss of movement (LOM coincided with an abrupt decrease in beta/low gamma PFC–CT LFP coherence. Following LOM, cortically coherent slow-delta (0.1–4 Hz oscillations were observed in the frontal EEG and PFC, PC and CT LFPs. At higher doses of sevoflurane sufficient to induce loss of the righting reflex, coherent slow-delta oscillations were dominant in the frontal EEG and PFC, PC and CT LFPs. Dynamics similar to those observed during induction were observed as animals emerged from sevoflurane anesthesia. We conclude that the rat is a useful animal model for sevoflurane-induced EEG oscillations in humans, and that coherent slow-delta oscillations are a correlate of sevoflurane-induced behavioral arrest and loss of righting in rats.

  3. Error-related functional connectivity of the thalamus in cocaine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Error processing is a critical component of cognitive control, an executive function that has been widely implicated in substance misuse. In previous studies we showed that error related activations of the thalamus predicted relapse to drug use in cocaine addicted individuals (Luo et al., 2013. Here, we investigated whether the error-related functional connectivity of the thalamus is altered in cocaine dependent patients (PCD, n = 54 as compared to demographically matched healthy individuals (HC, n = 54. The results of a generalized psychophysiological interaction analysis showed negative thalamic connectivity with the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, in the area of perigenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, in HC but not PCD (p < 0.05, corrected, two-sample t test. This difference in functional connectivity was not observed for task-residual signals, suggesting that it is specific to task-related processes during cognitive control. Further, the thalamic-vmPFC connectivity is positively correlated with the amount of cocaine use in the prior month for female but not for male PCD. These findings add to recent literature and provide additional evidence for circuit-level biomarkers of cocaine dependence.

  4. Activation of thalamus in motor imagery results from gating by hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Katharina; Bacht, Katrin; Prochnow, Denise; Schramm, Stefanie; Seitz, Rüdiger J

    2013-02-01

    The ability to mentally imagine the performance of automatic movements has been well-established being employed in sports and physiotherapy as a tool for motor learning and rehabilitation. This is probably mediated by engagement of the same brain areas as during real motor performance. Here we investigated the effect of hypnotic trance on the cerebral activation pattern engaged in motor imagery in 16 healthy, right-handed subjects using fMRI. Motor imagery as compared with rest was related to activations in the left medial frontal areas (preSMA/SMA), prefrontal- and frontal areas, putamen and inferior parietal areas. When compared with performance of the same movements motor imagery resulted in activation of the left middle frontal cortex, precuneus, and posterior cingulate. Under hypnotic trance there was one extra-activation in the left thalamus which occurred specifically in the motor imagery condition. The regional beta indices were highly correlated among the areas of the cortical-subcortical motor network. Our data accord with the notion that hypnotic trance enhances the motor control circuit engaged in motor imagery by modulating the gating function of the thalamus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Thalamic dementia due to infarct of the left thalamus and genum of the right internal capsule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta-Etessam, J; Martínez-Salio, A; Berbel, A; Benito-León, J; García-Muñoz, A; Kesler, P; Mateo, S

    Thalamic dementia is the clinical consequence of a disorder of both thalami. It is generally secondary to bilateral paramedial thalamic infarcts due to disorders of small blood vessels or cardioembolism. We report a case of dementia of acute onset involving the left thalamus and the genum of the right internal capsule. A 33 year old man, HIV positive, category B2, admitted to hospital for tuberculous meningitis presented with the acute onset of somnolence, followed by marked bradypsychism, personality changes, marked disorder of executive explicit memory without associated praxic, gnosic or language disorders. Ocular motility remained normal. There was left central facial paralysis with inverse emotive voluntary dissociation. The other cranial nerves were normal. There was left hemiparesia with extensor plantar reflex. No other alterations. Cerebral MR imaging was compatible with paramedial infarcts of the left thalamus and genum of the right internal capsule. Thalamic dementia generally occurs in bilateral paramedian thalamic disorders. There are cases of disorders of executive memory secondary to infarcts of the genum of the internal capsule due to interruption of the thalamotemporal pathways and a contralateral paramedial thalamic lesion.

  6. The neurobiology of thalamic amnesia: Contributions of medial thalamus and prefrontal cortex to delayed conditional discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Robert G; Miller, Rikki L A; Wormwood, Benjamin A; Francoeur, Miranda J; Onos, Kristen D; Gibson, Brett M

    2015-07-01

    Although medial thalamus is well established as a site of pathology associated with global amnesia, there is uncertainty about which structures are critical and how they affect memory function. Evidence from human and animal research suggests that damage to the mammillothalamic tract and the anterior, mediodorsal (MD), midline (M), and intralaminar (IL) nuclei contribute to different signs of thalamic amnesia. Here we focus on MD and the adjacent M and IL nuclei, structures identified in animal studies as critical nodes in prefrontal cortex (PFC)-related pathways that are necessary for delayed conditional discrimination. Recordings of PFC neurons in rats performing a dynamic delayed non-matching-to position (DNMTP) task revealed discrete populations encoding information related to planning, execution, and outcome of DNMTP-related actions and delay-related activity signaling previous reinforcement. Parallel studies recording the activity of MD and IL neurons and examining the effects of unilateral thalamic inactivation on the responses of PFC neurons demonstrated a close coupling of central thalamic and PFC neurons responding to diverse aspects of DNMTP and provide evidence that thalamus interacts with PFC neurons to give rise to complex goal-directed behavior exemplified by the DNMTP task. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of the anterior, mediodorsal, and parafascicular thalamus in instrumental conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, Laura A; Hart, Genevra; Balleine, Bernard W

    2013-10-09

    The traditional animal model of instrumental behavior has focused almost exclusively on structures within the cortico-striatal network and ignored the contributions of various thalamic nuclei despite large and specific connections with each of these structures. One possible reason for this is that the thalamus has been conventionally viewed as a mediator of general processes, such as attention, arousal and movement, that are not easily separated from more cognitive aspects of instrumental behavior. Recent research has, however, begun to separate these roles. Here we review the role of three thalamic nuclei in instrumental conditioning: the anterior thalamic nuclei (ANT), the mediodorsal (MD), and parafascicular thalamic nuclei (PF). Early research suggested that ANT might regulate aspects of instrumental behavior but, on review, we suggest that the types of tasks used in these studies were more likely to recruit Pavlovian processes. Indeed lesions of ANT have been found to have no effect on performance in instrumental free-operant tasks. By contrast the mediodorsal thalamus (MD) has been found to play a specific and important role in the acquisition of goal-directed action. We propose this role is related to its connections with prelimbic cortex (PL) and present new data that directly implicates this circuit in the acquisition of goal-directed actions. Finally we review evidence suggesting the PF, although not critical for the acquisition or performance of instrumental actions, plays a specific role in regulating action flexibility.

  8. Postmortem diffusion MRI of the human brainstem and thalamus for deep brain stimulator electrode localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Evan; Hickey, Patrick; Hulette, Christine; Zhang, Jingxian; Parente, Beth; Lad, Shivanand P; Johnson, G Allan

    2015-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established surgical therapy for medically refractory tremor disorders including essential tremor (ET) and is currently under investigation for use in a variety of other neurologic and psychiatric disorders. There is growing evidence that the anti-tremor effects of DBS for ET are directly related to modulation of the dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRT), a white matter pathway that connects the cerebellum, red nucleus, and ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus. Emerging white matter targets for DBS, like the DRT, will require improved three-dimensional (3D) reference maps of deep brain anatomy and structural connectivity for accurate electrode targeting. High-resolution diffusion MRI of postmortem brain specimens can provide detailed volumetric images of important deep brain nuclei and 3D reconstructions of white matter pathways with probabilistic tractography techniques. We present a high spatial and angular resolution diffusion MRI template of the postmortem human brainstem and thalamus with 3D reconstructions of the nuclei and white matter tracts involved in ET circuitry. We demonstrate registration of these data to in vivo, clinical images from patients receiving DBS therapy, and correlate electrode proximity to tractography of the DRT with improvement of ET symptoms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The role of the anterior, mediodorsal, and parafascicular thalamus in instrumental conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Anne Bradfield

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The traditional animal model of instrumental behaviour has focused almost exclusively on structures within the cortico-striatal network and ignored the contributions of various thalamic nuclei despite large and specific connections with each of these structures. One possible reason for this is that the thalamus has been conventionally viewed as a mediator of general processes, such as attention, arousal and movement, that are not easily separated from more cognitive aspects of instrumental behaviour. Recent research has, however, begun to separate these roles. Here we review the role of three thalamic nuclei in instrumental conditioning: the anterior, the mediodorsal, and parafascicular thalamic nuclei. Early research suggested that anterior thalamic nuclei might regulate aspects of instrumental behaviour but, on review, we suggest that the types of tasks used in these studies were more likely to recruit Pavlovian processes. Indeed lesions of anterior thalamic nuclei have been found to have no effect on performance in instrumental free-operant tasks. By contrast the mediodorsal thalamus has been found to play a specific and important role in the acquisition of goal-directed action. We propose this role is related to its connections with prelimbic cortex and present new data that directly implicates this circuit in the acquisition of goal-directed actions. Finally we review evidence suggesting the parafascicular thalamic nucleus, although not critical for the acquisition or performance of instrumental actions, plays a specific role in regulating action flexibility.

  10. How vestibular neurons solve the tilt/translation ambiguity. Comparison of brainstem, cerebellum, and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, Dora E; Yakusheva, Tatyana A

    2009-05-01

    The peripheral vestibular system is faced by a sensory ambiguity, where primary otolith afferents respond identically to translational (inertial) accelerations and changes in head orientation relative to gravity. Under certain conditions, this sensory ambiguity can be resolved using extra-otolith cues, including semicircular canal signals. Here we review and summarize how neurons in the vestibular nuclei, rostral fastigial nuclei, cerebellar nodulus/uvula, and thalamus respond during combinations of tilt and translation. We focus primarily on cerebellar cortex responses, as nodulus/uvula Purkinje cells reliably encode translation rather than net gravito-inertial acceleration. In contrast, neurons in the vestibular and rostral fastigial nuclei, as well as the ventral lateral and ventral posterior nuclei of the thalamus represent a continuum, with some encoding translation and some net gravito-inertial acceleration. This review also outlines how Purkinje cells use semicircular canal signals to solve the ambiguity problem and how this solution fails at low frequencies. We conclude by attempting to bridge the gap between the proposed roles of nodulus/uvula in tilt/translation discrimination and velocity storage.

  11. Behavioral and cognitive changes after early postnatal lesions of the rat mediodorsal thalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouhaz, Zakaria; Ba-M’hamed, Saadia; Mitchell, Anna S.; Elidrissi, Abdeslem; Bennis, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Early insults to the thalamus result in functional and/or structural abnormalities in the cerebral cortex. However, differences in behavioral and cognitive changes after early insult are not well characterized. The present study assessed whether early postnatal damage to mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD), reciprocally interconnected with the prefrontal cortex, causes behavioral and cognitive alterations in young adult rats. Rat pups at postnatal day 4 received bilateral electrolytic lesion of MD, or a MD Sham lesion or were anesthetized controls; on recovery they were returned to their mothers until weaning. Seven weeks later, all rats were tested with the following behavioral and cognitive paradigms: T-maze test, open field test, actimetry, elevated plus maze test, social interactions test and passive avoidance test. Rats with bilateral MD damage presented with disrupted recognition memory, deficits in shifting response rules, significant hypoactivity, increased anxiety-like behavior, deficits in learning associations as well as decreased locomotor activity, and reduced social interactions compared to MD Sham lesion and anesthetized Control rats. The lesion also caused significant decreases in pyramidal cell density in three frontal cortex regions: medial infralimbic cortex, dorsolateral anterior cortex, and cingulate Cg1 cortex. The present findings suggest a functional role for MD in the postnatal maturation of affective behavior. Further some of the behavioral and cognitive alterations observed in these young adult rats after early MD lesion are reminiscent of those present in major psycho-affective disorders, such as schizophrenia in humans. PMID:26079768

  12. Neuronal correlates of ketamine and walking induced gamma oscillations in the medial prefrontal cortex and mediodorsal thalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina E Furth

    Full Text Available Alterations in the function of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and its major thalamic source of innervation, the mediodorsal (MD thalamus, have been hypothesized to contribute to the symptoms of schizophrenia. The NMDAR antagonist ketamine, used to model schizophrenia, elicits a brain state resembling early stage schizophrenia characterized by cognitive deficits and increases in cortical low gamma (40-70 Hz power. Here we sought to determine how ketamine differentially affects spiking and gamma local field potential (LFP activity in the rat mPFC and MD thalamus. Additionally, we investigated the ability of drugs targeting the dopamine D4 receptor (D4R to modify the effects of ketamine on gamma activity as a measure of potential cognitive therapeutic efficacy. Rats were trained to walk on a treadmill to reduce confounds related to hyperactivity after ketamine administration (10 mg/kg s.c. while recordings were obtained from electrodes chronically implanted in the mPFC and MD thalamus. Ketamine increased gamma LFP power in mPFC and MD thalamus in a similar frequency range, yet did not increase thalamocortical synchronization. Ketamine also increased firing rates and spike synchronization to gamma oscillations in the mPFC but decreased both measures in MD thalamus. Conversely, walking alone increased both firing rates and spike-gamma LFP correlations in both mPFC and MD thalamus. The D4R antagonist alone (L-745,870 had no effect on gamma LFP power during treadmill walking, although it reversed increases induced by the D4R agonist (A-412997 in both mPFC and MD thalamus. Neither drug altered ketamine-induced changes in gamma power or firing rates in the mPFC. However, in MD thalamus, the D4R agonist increased ketamine-induced gamma power and prevented ketamine's inhibitory effect on firing rates. Results provide new evidence that ketamine differentially modulates spiking and gamma power in MD thalamus and mPFC, supporting a potential role for both

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography--Pearl River Delta 2008: First Surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi was produced from remotely...

  14. {\\delta}M Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Talebian-Ashkezari, Alireza; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of the "non-perturbative" metric perturbations in a Bianchi background in the long-wavelength limit. By applying the gradient expansion to the equations of motion we exhibit a generalized "Separate Universe" approach to the cosmological perturbation theory. Having found this consistent separate universe picture, we introduce the "{\\delta}M formalism" for calculating the evolution of the tensor perturbations in anisotropic inflation models in almost similar way as the so-called {\\delta}N formula for the super-horizon dynamics of the curvature perturbations. Likewise its ancestor, {\\delta}N formalism, this new method can substantially reduce the amount of calculations related to the evolution of the tensor modes.

  15. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging of basal ganglia and thalamus in neurofibromatosis type 1: correlation with T2 hyperintensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbier, Charlotte; Barantin, Laurent [CHRU and Tours University, Department of Neuroradiology, Tours (France); Chabernaud, Camille [CHRU and Tours University et INSERM U930, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Tours (France); Bertrand, Philippe [CHRU and Tours University, Department of Radiology, Tours (France); Sembely, Catherine; Sirinelli, Dominique [CHRU and Tours University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Tours (France); Castelnau, Pierre [CHRU and Tours University et INSERM U930, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Tours (France); CHRU and Tours University et INSERM U930, Tours (France); Neurologie Pediatrique and INSERM U930, Hopital d' Enfants Gatien de Clocheville, Tours cedex 09 (France); Cottier, Jean-Philippe [CHRU and Tours University, Department of Neuroradiology, Tours (France); CHRU and Tours University et INSERM U930, Tours (France)

    2011-02-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is frequently associated with hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images called ''unidentified bright objects'' (UBO). To better characterize the functional significance of UBO, we investigate the basal ganglia and thalamus using spectroscopic imaging in children with NF1 and compare the results to anomalies observed on T2-weighted images. Magnetic resonance (MR) data of 25 children with NF1 were analyzed. On the basis of T2-weighted images analysis, two groups were identified: one with normal MR imaging (UBO- group; n = 10) and one with UBO (UBO+ group; n = 15). Within the UBO+ group, a subpopulation of patients (n = 5) only had lesions of the basal ganglia. We analyzed herein seven regions of interest (ROIs) for each side: caudate nucleus, capsulo-lenticular region, lateral and posterior thalamus, thalamus (lateral and posterior voxels combined), putamen, and striatum. For each ROI, a spectrum of the metabolites and their ratio was obtained. Patients with abnormalities on T2-weighted images had significantly lower NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, and NAA/mI ratios in the lateral right thalamus compared with patients with normal T2. These abnormal spectroscopic findings were not observed in capsulo-lenticular regions that had UBO but in the thalamus region that was devoid of UBO. Multivoxel spectroscopic imaging using short-time echo showed spectroscopic abnormalities in the right thalamus of NF1 patients harboring UBO, which were mainly located in the basal ganglia. This finding could reflect the anatomical and functional interactions of these regions. (orig.)

  16. The role of the thalamus in the human subcortical vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Julian; Baier, Bernhard; Dieterich, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Most of our knowledge concerning central vestibular pathways is derived from animal studies while evidence of the functional importance and localization of these pathways in humans is less well defined. The termination of these pathways at the thalamic level in humans is even less known. In this review we summarize the findings concerning the central subcortical vestibular pathways in humans and the role of these structures in the central vestibular system with regard to anatomical localization and function. Also, we review the role of the thalamus in the pathogenesis of higher order sensory deficits such as spatial neglect, pusher syndrome or thalamic astasia and the correlation of these phenomena with findings of a vestibular tone imbalance at the thalamic level. By highlighting thalamic structures involved in vestibular signal processing and relating the different nomenclatures we hope to provide a base for future studies on thalamic sensory signal processing.

  17. Functional Neurosurgery in the Human Thalamus by Transcranial Magnetic Resonance Guided Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Beat; Morel, Anne; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Martin, Ernst

    2009-04-01

    Potential applications of Transcranial Magnetic Resonance guided Focused Ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) include treatment of functional brain disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia and tremor, neurogenic pain and tinnitus, neuropsychiatric disorders and epilepsy. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility of non-invasive TcMRgFUS ablation of clinically well established targets in the human thalamus that are currently accessed stereotactically by interventional strategies based on the concept of the thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD). Thermal hotspots suitable for clinical intervention were created successfully in anatomical preparations of human ex-vivo heads under pseudo clinical conditions. The hotspots could be positioned at the target locations as needed and local energy deposition was sufficient to create tissue ablation. Numerical simulations based on these experimental data predict that the acoustic energy needed to create ablative lesions in-vivo will be within limits that can safely applied.

  18. Organization and morphology of thalamocortical neurons of mouse ventral lateral thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlamsa, Aileen P; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2010-01-01

    The ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (VL) serves as a central integrative center for motor control, receiving inputs from the cerebellum, striatum, and cortex and projecting to the primary motor cortex. We aimed to determine the somatotopy and morphological features of the thalamocortical neurons within mouse VL. Retrograde tracing studies revealed that whisker-related VL neurons were found relatively anterior and medial to those labeled following injection of retrograde tracer into hindpaw motor areas. Simultaneous injections of fluorescent microspheres in both cortical regions did not result in double-labeled neurons in VL. Quantitative analysis of dendritic and somatic morphologies did not reveal any differences between hindpaw and whisker thalamocortical neurons within VL. The morphology of the thalamocortical neurons within mouse VL is similar to those in other mammals and suggests that mouse can be used as a model system for studying thalamocortical transformations within the motor system as well as plasticity following sensory deprivation or enrichment.

  19. Extrastriatal binding of [¹²³I]FP-CIT in the thalamus and pons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Walter; Unterrainer, Marcus; Xiong, Guoming

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Apart from binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT), [(123)I]FP-CIT shows moderate affinity for the serotonin transporter (SERT), allowing imaging of both monoamine transporters in a single imaging session in different brain areas. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate...... extrastriatal binding (predominantly due to SERT) and its age and gender dependencies in a large cohort of healthy controls. METHODS: SPECT data from 103 healthy controls with well-defined criteria of normality acquired at 13 different imaging centres were analysed for extrastriatal binding using volumes...... of interest analysis for the thalamus and the pons. Data were examined for gender and age effects as well as for potential influence of striatal DAT radiotracer binding. RESULTS: Thalamic binding was significantly higher than pons binding. Partial correlations showed an influence of putaminal DAT binding...

  20. Birds' tails do act like delta wings but delta-wing theory does not always predict the forces they generate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Matthew R

    2003-07-07

    Delta-wing theory, which predicts the aerodynamics of aircraft like the Concorde, is the conventional explanation for the way in which a bird's tail operates in flight. Recently, doubt has been cast on the validity of applying a theory devised for supersonic aircraft to the small tails of slow-flying birds. By testing delta-wing models and birds' tails behind bodies with wings, I empirically show that the tails of birds produce lift in a very similar way to conventional delta-wing models. Both Perspex and birds' tail models produce lift similar to that predicted by delta-wing theory when narrowly spread and at low angles of attack. However, when widely spread and at high angles of attack, both tails and Perspex models produce much less lift than predicted, owing to vortex breakdown after which the assumptions of delta-wing theory are violated. These results indicate that birds' tails can be regarded as delta wings but that the theory predicting the forces produced by delta wings can only be applied within acceptable limits (i.e. tails spread less than 60 degrees and at angles of attack of less than 20 degrees).

  1. Behavioral and cognitive changes after early postnatal lesions of the rat mediodorsal thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouhaz, Zakaria; Ba-M'hamed, Saadia; Mitchell, Anna S; Elidrissi, Abdeslem; Bennis, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Early insults to the thalamus result in functional and/or structural abnormalities in the cerebral cortex. However, differences in behavioral and cognitive changes after early insult are not well characterized. The present study assessed whether early postnatal damage to mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD), reciprocally interconnected with the prefrontal cortex, causes behavioral and cognitive alterations in young adult rats. Rat pups at postnatal day 4 received bilateral electrolytic lesion of MD, or a MD Sham lesion or were anesthetized controls; on recovery they were returned to their mothers until weaning. Seven weeks later, all rats were tested with the following behavioral and cognitive paradigms: T-maze test, open field test, actimetry, elevated plus maze test, social interactions test and passive avoidance test. Rats with bilateral MD damage presented with disrupted recognition memory, deficits in shifting response rules, significant hypoactivity, increased anxiety-like behavior, deficits in learning associations as well as decreased locomotor activity, and reduced social interactions compared to MD Sham lesion and anesthetized Control rats. The lesion also caused significant decreases in pyramidal cell density in three frontal cortex regions: medial infralimbic cortex, dorsolateral anterior cortex, and cingulate Cg1 cortex. The present findings suggest a functional role for MD in the postnatal maturation of affective behavior. Further some of the behavioral and cognitive alterations observed in these young adult rats after early MD lesion are reminiscent of those present in major psycho-affective disorders, such as schizophrenia in humans. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Open-loop organization of thalamic reticular nucleus and dorsal thalamus: a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Adam M; Slater, Bernard J; Gribkova, Ekaterina D; Llano, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a shell of GABAergic neurons that surrounds the dorsal thalamus. Previous work has shown that TRN neurons send GABAergic projections to thalamocortical (TC) cells to form reciprocal, closed-loop circuits. This has led to the hypothesis that the TRN is responsible for oscillatory phenomena, such as sleep spindles and absence seizures. However, there is emerging evidence that open-loop circuits are also found between TRN and TC cells. The implications of open-loop configurations are not yet known, particularly when they include time-dependent nonlinearities in TC cells such as low-threshold bursting. We hypothesized that low-threshold bursting in an open-loop circuit could be a mechanism by which the TRN could paradoxically enhance TC activation, and that enhancement would depend on the relative timing of TRN vs. TC cell stimulation. To test this, we modeled small circuits containing TC neurons, TRN neurons, and layer 4 thalamorecipient cells in both open- and closed-loop configurations. We found that open-loop TRN stimulation, rather than universally depressing TC activation, increased cortical output across a broad parameter space, modified the filter properties of TC neurons, and altered the mutual information between input and output in a frequency-dependent and T-type calcium channel-dependent manner. Therefore, an open-loop model of TRN-TC interactions, rather than suppressing transmission through the thalamus, creates a tunable filter whose properties may be modified by outside influences onto the TRN. These simulations make experimentally testable predictions about the potential role for the TRN for flexible enhancement of cortical activation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Deep arteriovenous malformations in the Basal Ganglia, thalamus, and insula: microsurgical management, techniques, and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Matthew B; Young, William L; Lawton, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and insula are considered inoperable given their depth, eloquence, and limited surgical exposure. Although many neurosurgeons opt for radiosurgery or observation, others have challenged the belief that deep AVMs are inoperable. Further discussion of patient selection, technique, and multimodality management is needed. To describe and discuss the technical considerations of microsurgical resection for deep-seated AVMs. Patients with deep AVMs who underwent surgery during a 14-year period were reviewed through the use of a prospective AVM registry. Microsurgery was performed in 48 patients with AVMs in the basal ganglia (n=10), thalamus (n=13), or insula (n=25). The most common Spetzler-Martin grade was III- (68%). Surgical approaches included transsylvian (67%), transcallosal (19%), and transcortical (15%). Complete resection was achieved in 34 patients (71%), and patients with incomplete resection were treated with radiosurgery. Forty-five patients (94%) were improved or unchanged (mean follow-up, 1.6 years). This experience advances the notion that select deep AVMs may be operable lesions. Patients were highly selected for small size, hemorrhagic presentation, young age, and compactness-factors embodied in the Spetzler-Martin and Supplementary grading systems. Overall, 10 different approaches were used, exploiting direct, transcortical corridors created by hemorrhage or maximizing anatomic corridors through subarachnoid spaces and ventricles that minimize brain transgression. The same cautious attitude exercised in selecting patients for surgery was also exercised in deciding extent of resection, opting for incomplete resection and radiosurgery more than with other AVMs to prioritize neurological outcomes.

  4. The Niger Delta Crisis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2013-09-28

    Sep 28, 2013 ... Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, 2013. (ISSN 0850–7902). *. Department of History & International Studies, Delta State ..... and rocket propelled grenade launchers to carry out precise attack on installations in the region. The initial thinking that the military would rout.

  5. onshore, niger delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2016-12-02

    Dec 2, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. Three wells A1, A2 and A3 were identified on the 'T-X' field in onshore Niger Delta. A comprehensive petrophysical analysis on one of the wells (well A1) was carried out in order to come up with physical properties such as shale volume, porosity (Φ), permeability (K), fluid saturation, and net ...

  6. The Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2009-05-26

    May 26, 2009 ... For nearly three decades, conflicts surrounding environmental degradation, human security, and international development have dominated news about the ... Permanent night light sources as documented by United States Air Force Defense Meteorological Program shows flaring trouble in the Niger Delta ...

  7. The Niger Delta, Crisis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2007-09-10

    Sep 10, 2007 ... actions of the oil multinational corporations, with severe implications for Nige- ..... practice of supporting divisions of the Nigerian armed forces with opera- .... creeks) and fish, forest and human resources, the Niger Delta also supports ..... greatly undermined the global influence of Nigeria as Africa's most ...

  8. western niger delta, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    2015-07-21

    Jul 21, 2015 ... Ditch cutting samples from well 'Y' retrieved from the Niger Delta Basin were made available by. Chevron Nigeria Ltd for this study. The sampling .... temperatures as indicated with the increase in the quantities of Monoporites annulatus. Vermoere et al. (1999) in a study in SW Turkey reported that high.

  9. onshore, niger delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2016-12-02

    Dec 2, 2016 ... clays were transported to deep water areas characterized by low energy conditions and oxygen deficiency (Stacher, 1995). The formation underlies the entire delta, and is typically over pressured. The approximate range of the thickness is about 6,000m. (Paul, 2003).Deposition of the overlying Agbada.

  10. The Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2009-05-26

    May 26, 2009 ... slave mart in West Africa. In the first thirty years of the nineteenth century when the trade in palm oil had begun to displace the ... shows flaring trouble in the Niger Delta region. Data from 1995 are represented in blue, 2000 in green and 2006 in red. The gas flares associated with petroleum industry are ...

  11. Primary production in the Delta: Then and now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.; Robinson, April; Richey, Amy; Grenier, Letitia; Grossinger, Robin; Boyer, Katharyn E.; Burau, Jon; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; DeGeorge, John F.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Enright, Chris; Howe, Emily R.; Kneib, Ronald; Mueller-Solger, Anke; Naiman, Robert J.; Pinckney, James L.; Safran, Samuel M.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Simenstad, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the role of restoration in the recovery of the Delta ecosystem, we need to have clear targets and performance measures that directly assess ecosystem function. Primary production is a crucial ecosystem process, which directly limits the quality and quantity of food available for secondary consumers such as invertebrates and fish. The Delta has a low rate of primary production, but it is unclear whether this was always the case. Recent analyses from the Historical Ecology Team and Delta Landscapes Project provide quantitative comparisons of the areal extent of 14 habitat types in the modern Delta versus the historical Delta (pre-1850). Here we describe an approach for using these metrics of land use change to: (1) produce the first quantitative estimates of how Delta primary production and the relative contributions from five different producer groups have been altered by large-scale drainage and conversion to agriculture; (2) convert these production estimates into a common currency so the contributions of each producer group reflect their food quality and efficiency of transfer to consumers; and (3) use simple models to discover how tidal exchange between marshes and open water influences primary production and its consumption. Application of this approach could inform Delta management in two ways. First, it would provide a quantitative estimate of how large-scale conversion to agriculture has altered the Delta's capacity to produce food for native biota. Second, it would provide restoration practitioners with a new approach—based on ecosystem function—to evaluate the success of restoration projects and gauge the trajectory of ecological recovery in the Delta region.

  12. Reduced noradrenaline, but not dopamine and serotonin in motor thalamus of the MPTP primate: relation to severity of parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifl, Christian; Hornykiewicz, Oleh; Blesa, Javier; Adánez, Rebeca; Cavada, Carmen; Obeso, José A

    2013-06-01

    We recently found severe noradrenaline deficits throughout the thalamus of patients with Parkinson's disease [C. Pifl, S. J. Kish and O. Hornykiewicz Mov Disord. 27, 2012, 1618.]. As this noradrenaline loss was especially severe in nuclei of the motor thalamus normally transmitting basal ganglia motor output to the cortex, we hypothesized that this noradrenaline loss aggravates the motor disorder of Parkinson's disease. Here, we analysed noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin in motor (ventrolateral and ventroanterior) and non-motor (mediodorsal, centromedian, ventroposterior lateral and reticular) thalamic nuclei in MPTP-treated monkeys who were always asymptomatic; who recovered from mild parkinsonism; and monkeys with stable, either moderate or severe parkinsonism. We found that only the symptomatic parkinsonian animals had significant noradrenaline losses specifically in the motor thalamus, with the ventroanterior motor nucleus being affected only in the severe parkinsonian animals. In contrast, the striatal dopamine loss was identical in both the mild and severe symptom groups. MPTP-treatment had no significant effect on noradrenaline in non-motor thalamic nuclei or dopamine and serotonin in any thalamic subregion. We conclude that in the MPTP primate model, loss of noradrenaline in the motor thalamus may also contribute to the clinical expression of the parkinsonian motor disorder, corroborating experimentally our hypothesis on the role of thalamic noradrenaline deficit in Parkinson's disease. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Sporadic fatal insomnia with spongiform degeneration in the thalamus and widespread PrPSc deposits in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Yue-Shan; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    We report a case of human prion disease of 29 months duration in a 74-year-old Japanese man. The disease started with progressive sleeplessness and dementia. MRI showed gradually progressive cerebral atrophy. Neuronal loss, spongiform change and gliosis were evident in the thalamus and cerebral cortex, as well as in the striatum and amygdaloid nucleus. In the cerebellar cortex, mild-to-moderate depletion of Pukinje cells and spongiform change were observed. Mild neuronal loss in the inferior olivary nucleus was also seen. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread perivacuolar deposits of abnormal prion protein (PrPsc) in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, and brainstem, and minimal plaque-like deposits of PrPSc in the cerebellar cortex. In the cerebellar plaque-like deposits, the presence of amyloid fibrils was confirmed ultrastructurally. The entire pathology appeared to lie halfway between those of CJD and fatal insomnia, and further demonstrated the relationship between spongiform degeneration and PrPSc deposits, especially in the diseased thalamus. By immunoblotting, the thalamus was shown to contain the lowest amount of PrPSc among the brain regions examined. The PrPSc of type 2, in which the ratio of the three glycoforms was compatible with that of sporadic fatal insomnia (MM2-thalamic variant) reported previously, was also demonstrated. Analysis of the prion protein gene (PRNP) showed no mutation, and homozygosity for methionine at codon 129. In conclusion, we considered that this patient had been suffering from sporadic, pathologically atypical fatal insomnia.

  14. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  15. 2-Cl-MGV-1 Ameliorates Apoptosis in the Thalamus and Hippocampus and Cognitive Deficits After Cortical Infarct in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yicong; Veenman, Leo; Singh, Sukhdev; Ouyang, Fubing; Liang, Jiahui; Huang, Weixian; Marek, Ilan; Zeng, Jinsheng; Gavish, Moshe

    2017-11-16

    Focal cortical infarction causes neuronal apoptosis in the ipsilateral nonischemic thalamus and hippocampus, which is potentially associated with poststroke cognitive deficits. TSPO (translocator protein) is critical in regulating mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. We examined the effects of the novel TSPO ligand 2-(2-chlorophenyl)quinazolin-4-yl dimethylcarbamate (2-Cl-MGV-1) on poststroke cognitive deficits, neuronal mitochondrial apoptosis, and secondary damage in the ipsilateral thalamus and hippocampus after cortical infarction. One hundred fourteen hypertensive rats underwent successful distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (n=76) or sham procedures (n=38). 2-Cl-MGV-1 or dimethyl sulfoxide as vehicle was administrated 2 hours after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion and then for 6 or 13 days (n=19 per group). Spatial learning and memory were tested using the Morris water maze. Secondary degeneration and mitochondrial apoptosis in the thalamus and hippocampus were assessed using Nissl staining, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, JC-1 staining, and immunoblotting 7 and 14 days after surgery. Infarct volumes did not significantly differ between the vehicle and 2-Cl-MGV-1 groups. There were more neurons and fewer glia in the ipsilateral thalamus and hippocampus in the vehicle groups than in the sham-operated group 7 and 14 days post-distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. 2-Cl-MGV-1 significantly ameliorated spatial cognitive impairment and decreased neuronal death and glial activation when compared with vehicle treatment (P<0.05). The collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cytoplasmic release of apoptosis-inducing factors and cytochrome c was prevented within the thalamus. Caspase cleavage and the numbers of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling(+) or Nissl atrophic cells were reduced within the thalamus and hippocampus. This was accompanied by upregulation of B

  16. Disrupted Thalamus White Matter Anatomy and Posterior Default Mode Network Effective Connectivity in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alderson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD and its prodromal state amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI are characterized by widespread abnormalities in inter-areal white matter fiber pathways and parallel disruption of default mode network (DMN resting state functional and effective connectivity. In healthy subjects, DMN and task positive network interaction are modulated by the thalamus suggesting that abnormal task-based DMN deactivation in aMCI may be a consequence of impaired thalamo-cortical white matter circuitry. Thus, this article uses a multimodal approach to assess white matter integrity between thalamus and DMN components and associated effective connectivity in healthy controls (HCs relative to aMCI patients. Twenty-six HC and 20 older adults with aMCI underwent structural, functional and diffusion MRI scanning using the high angular resolution diffusion-weighted acquisition protocol. The DMN of each subject was identified using independent component analysis (ICA and resting state effective connectivity was calculated between thalamus and DMN nodes. White matter integrity changes between thalamus and DMN were investigated with constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD tractography. Significant structural deficits in thalamic white matter projection fibers to posterior DMN components posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and lateral inferior parietal lobe (IPL were identified together with significantly reduced effective connectivity from left thalamus to left IPL. Crucially, impaired thalamo-cortical white matter circuitry correlated with memory performance. Disrupted thalamo-cortical structure was accompanied by significant reductions in IPL and PCC cortico-cortical effective connectivity. No structural deficits were found between DMN nodes. Abnormal posterior DMN activity may be driven by changes in thalamic white matter connectivity; a view supported by the close anatomical and functional association of thalamic nuclei effected by AD pathology and

  17. {\\delta}M Formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Talebian-Ashkezari, Alireza; Ahmadi, Nahid; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of the "non-perturbative" metric perturbations in a Bianchi background in the long-wavelength limit. By applying the gradient expansion to the equations of motion we exhibit a generalized "Separate Universe" approach to the cosmological perturbation theory. Having found this consistent separate universe picture, we introduce the "{\\delta}M formalism" for calculating the evolution of the tensor perturbations in anisotropic inflation models in almost similar way as the so...

  18. State Dependency of Chemosensory Coding in the Gustatory Thalamus (VPMpc) of Alert Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixin; Fontanini, Alfredo

    2015-11-25

    The parvicellular portion of the ventroposteromedial nucleus (VPMpc) is the part of the thalamus that processes gustatory information. Anatomical evidence shows that the VPMpc receives ascending gustatory inputs from the parabrachial nucleus (PbN) in the brainstem and sends projections to the gustatory cortex (GC). Although taste processing in PbN and GC has been the subject of intense investigation in behaving rodents, much less is known on how VPMpc neurons encode gustatory information. Here we present results from single-unit recordings in the VPMpc of alert rats receiving multiple tastants. Thalamic neurons respond to taste with time-varying modulations of firing rates, consistent with those observed in GC and PbN. These responses encode taste quality as well as palatability. Comparing responses to tastants either passively delivered, or self-administered after a cue, unveiled the effects of general expectation on taste processing in VPMpc. General expectation led to an improvement of taste coding by modulating response dynamics, and single neuron ability to encode multiple tastants. Our results demonstrate that the time course of taste coding as well as single neurons' ability to encode for multiple qualities are not fixed but rather can be altered by the state of the animal. Together, the data presented here provide the first description that taste coding in VPMpc is dynamic and state-dependent. Over the past years, a great deal of attention has been devoted to understanding taste coding in the brainstem and cortex of alert rodents. Thanks to this research, we now know that taste coding is dynamic, distributed, and context-dependent. Alas, virtually nothing is known on how the gustatory thalamus (VPMpc) processes gustatory information in behaving rats. This manuscript investigates taste processing in the VPMpc of behaving rats. Our results show that thalamic neurons encode taste and palatability with time-varying patterns of activity and that thalamic coding

  19. Mean diffusivity of basal ganglia and thalamus specifically associated with motivational states among mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2017-03-01

    Previously, we proposed that the mean diffusivity (MD), a measure of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in areas of the dopaminergic system (MDDS), is associated with motivation. In this study, we tested if and how the motivational state is associated with MD in comparison with other mood states. We also tested the associations of these mood states with multiple cognitive functions. We examined these issues in 766 right-handed healthy young adults. We employed analyses of MD and a psychological measure of the profile of mood states (POMS) as well as multiple cognitive functions. We detected associations between the higher Vigor subscale of POMS and lower MD in the right globus pallidum, right putamen to right posterior insula, right caudate body, and right thalamus, and these associations were highly specific to the Vigor subscale. Similarly, the association of the motivational state with creativity measured by divergent thinking (CMDT) was rather specific and prominent compared with that of the other mood states and cognitive functions. In conclusion, when affective states are finely divided, only the motivational state is associated with MD in the areas related to the dopaminergic system, and psychological mechanisms that had been associated with dopaminergic system (CMDT). These results suggest that these mechanisms specifically contribute to the motivational state and not to the other states, such as depression and anxiety.

  20. Inhibitory synaptic transmission from the substantia nigra pars reticulata to the ventral medial thalamus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Daisuke; Uta, Daisuke; Ishihara, Hiromi; Imoto, Keiji

    2015-08-01

    The cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic loop circuit is involved in variety of motor, association and limbic functions. The basal ganglia receive neural information from various areas of the cerebral cortex and transfer them back to the frontal and motor cortex via the ventral medial (VM), and the anterior-ventral lateral thalamic complex. The projection from the basal ganglia to the thalamus is GABAergic, and, therefore, the output from the basal ganglia cannot directly evoke excitation in the thalamic nuclei. The mechanism underlying the information transfer via the inhibitory projection remains unclear. To address this issue, we recorded electrophysiological properties of nigro-thalamic synapses from the VM neuron. We developed a nigro-thalamic slice preparation, in which the projection from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) to VM nucleus is stored, to enable the selective activation of the projection from the SNr. We characterized synaptic properties and membrane properties of the VM neuron, and developed a VM neuron model to simulate the impacts of SNr inputs on VM neuron activity. Neural simulation suggested that the inhibitory projection from SNr can control neural activity in two ways: a disinhibition from the spontaneous nigral inhibition and a β-band synchronization evoked by combination of excitation and inhibition of SNr activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Barreloid Borders and Neuronal Activity Shape Panglial Gap Junction-Coupled Networks in the Mouse Thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Lena; Philippot, Camille; Griemsmann, Stephanie; Timmermann, Aline; Jabs, Ronald; Henneberger, Christian; Kettenmann, Helmut; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The ventral posterior nucleus of the thalamus plays an important role in somatosensory information processing. It contains elongated cellular domains called barreloids, which are the structural basis for the somatotopic organization of vibrissae representation. So far, the organization of glial networks in these barreloid structures and its modulation by neuronal activity has not been studied. We have developed a method to visualize thalamic barreloid fields in acute slices. Combining electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and electroporation in transgenic mice with cell type-specific fluorescence labeling, we provide the first structure-function analyses of barreloidal glial gap junction networks. We observed coupled networks, which comprised both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The spread of tracers or a fluorescent glucose derivative through these networks was dependent on neuronal activity and limited by the barreloid borders, which were formed by uncoupled or weakly coupled oligodendrocytes. Neuronal somata were distributed homogeneously across barreloid fields with their processes running in parallel to the barreloid borders. Many astrocytes and oligodendrocytes were not part of the panglial networks. Thus, oligodendrocytes are the cellular elements limiting the communicating panglial network to a single barreloid, which might be important to ensure proper metabolic support to active neurons located within a particular vibrissae signaling pathway. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Roles of prefrontal cortex and paraventricular thalamus in affective and mechanical components of visceral nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurik, Angela; Auffenberg, Eva; Klein, Sabine; Deussing, Jan M; Schmid, Roland M; Wotjak, Carsten T; Thoeringer, Christoph K

    2015-12-01

    Visceral pain represents a major clinical challenge in the management of many gastrointestinal disorders, eg, pancreatitis. However, cerebral neurobiological mechanisms underlying visceral nociception are poorly understood. As a representative model of visceral nociception, we applied cerulein hyperstimulation in C57BL6 mice to induce acute pancreatitis and performed a behavioral test battery and c-Fos staining of brains. We observed a specific pain phenotype and a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT), the periaqueductal gray, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Using neuronal tracing, we observed projections of the PVT to cortical layers of the mPFC with contacts to inhibitory GABAergic neurons. These inhibitory neurons showed more activation after cerulein treatment suggesting thalamocortical "feedforward inhibition" in visceral nociception. The activity of neurons in pancreatitis-related pain centers was pharmacogenetically modulated by designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs, selectively and cell type specifically expressed in target neurons using adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. Pharmacogenetic inhibition of PVT but not periaqueductal gray neurons attenuated visceral pain and induced an activation of the descending inhibitory pain pathway. Activation of glutamatergic principle neurons in the mPFC, but not inhibitory neurons, also reversed visceral nociception. These data reveal novel insights into central pain processing that underlies visceral nociception and may trigger the development of novel, potent centrally acting analgesic drugs.

  3. Birds' tails do act like delta wings but delta-wing theory does not always predict the forces they generate.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Matthew R

    2003-01-01

    Delta-wing theory, which predicts the aerodynamics of aircraft like the Concorde, is the conventional explanation for the way in which a bird's tail operates in flight. Recently, doubt has been cast on the validity of applying a theory devised for supersonic aircraft to the small tails of slow-flying birds. By testing delta-wing models and birds' tails behind bodies with wings, I empirically show that the tails of birds produce lift in a very similar way to conventional delta-wing models. Bot...

  4. Degeneration of paramedian nuclei in the thalamus induces Holmes tremor in a case of artery of Percheron infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tz-Shiang; Hsu, Chun-Sheng; Lee, Yu-Chun; Chang, Shin-Tsu

    2017-11-01

    Holmes' tremor is an uncommon neurologic disorder following brain insults, and its pathogenesis is undefined. The interruption of the dento-rubro-thalamic tract and secondary deterioration of the nigrostriatal pathway are both required to initiate Holmes' tremor. We used nuclear medicine imaging tools to analyze a patient with concurrent infarction in different zones of each side of the thalamus. Finding whether the paramedian nuclear groups of the thalamus were injured was a decisive element for developing Holmes' tremor. A 36-year-old woman was admitted to our department due to a bilateral paramedian thalamic infarction. Seven months after the stroke, a unilaterally involuntary trembling with irregularly wavering motions occurring in both her left hand and forearm. Based on the distinct features of the unilateral coarse tremor and the locations of the lesions on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the patient was diagnosed with bilateral paramedian thalamic infarction complicated with a unilateral Holmes' tremor. The patient refused our recommendation of pharmacological treatment with levodopa and other dopamine agonists based on personal reasons and was only willing to accept physical and occupational training programs at our outpatient clinic. We utilized serial anatomic and functional neuroimaging of the brain to survey the neurologic deficit. A brain magnetic resonance imaging showed unequal recovery on each side of the thalamus. The residual lesion appeared larger in the right-side thalamus and had gathered in the paramedian area. A brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) revealed that the post-stroke hypometabolic changes were not only in the right-side thalamus but also in the right basal ganglion, which was anatomically intact. Furthermore, the brain Technetium-99m-labeled tropanes as a dopamine transporter imaging agents scan ( Tc-TRODAT-1) displayed a secondary reduction of dopamine transporters in the right nigrostriatal

  5. Stimulation of accumbal GABAA receptors inhibits delta2-, but not delta1-, opioid receptor-mediated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Yuri; Kiguchi, Yuri; Watanabe, Yuriko; Waddington, John L; Saigusa, Tadashi

    2017-11-15

    The nucleus accumbens contains delta-opioid receptors that may reduce inhibitory neurotransmission. Reduction in GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of accumbal dopamine release due to delta-opioid receptor activation should be suppressed by stimulating accumbal GABAA receptors. As delta-opioid receptors are divided into delta2- and delta1-opioid receptors, we analysed the effects of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol on delta2- and delta1-opioid receptor-mediated accumbal dopamine efflux in freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis. Drugs were administered intracerebrally through the dialysis probe. Doses of compounds indicate total amount administered (mol) during 25-50min infusions. The delta2-opioid receptor agonist deltorphin II (25.0nmol)- and delta1-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE (5.0nmol)-induced increases in dopamine efflux were inhibited by the delta2-opioid receptor antagonist naltriben (1.5nmol) and the delta1-opioid receptor antagonist BNTX (150.0pmol), respectively. Muscimol (250.0pmol) inhibited deltorphin II (25.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (50.0pmol), which failed to affect deltorphin II (25.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux, counteracted the inhibitory effect of muscimol on deltorphin II-induced dopamine efflux. Neither muscimol (250.0pmol) nor bicuculline (50.0 and 500.0pmol) altered DPDPE (5.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux. The present results show that reduction in accumbal GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic activity is necessary to produce delta2-opioid receptor-induced increase in accumbal dopamine efflux. This study indicates that activation of delta2- but not delta1-opioid receptors on the cell bodies and/or terminals of accumbal GABAergic interneurons inhibits GABA release and, accordingly, decreases GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic terminals, resulting in enhanced accumbal dopamine efflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Complex Multiplexing of Reward-Cue- and Licking-Movement-Related Activity in Single Midline Thalamus Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhong; Lindemann, Christoph; Goddard, Matthew J; Hyland, Brian I

    2016-03-23

    Midline thalamus is implicated in linking visceral and exteroceptive sensory information with behavior. However, whether neuronal activity is modulated with temporal precision by cues and actions in real time is unknown. Using single-neuron recording and a Pavlovian visual-cue/liquid-reward association task in rats, we discovered phasic responses to sensory cues, appropriately timed to modify information processing in output targets, as well as tonic modulations within and between trials that were differentially reward modulated, which may have distinct arousal functions. Many of the cue-responsive neurons also responded to repetitive licks, consistent with sensorimotor integration. Further, some lick-related neurons were activated only by the first rewarded lick and only if that lick were also part of a conditioned response sequence initiated earlier, consistent with binding action decisions to their ensuing outcome. This rich repertoire of responses provides electrophysiological evidence for midline thalamus as a site of complex information integration for reward-mediated behavior. Disparate brain circuits are involved in sensation, movement, and reward information. These must interact in order for the relationships between cues, actions, and outcomes to be learned. We found that responses of single neurons in midline thalamus to sensory cues are increased when associated with reward. This output may amplify similar signals generated in parallel by the dopamine system. In addition, some neurons coded a three-factor decision in which the neuron fired only if there was a movement, if it was the first one after the reward becoming available, and if it was part of a sequence triggered in response to a preceding cue. These data highlight midline thalamus as an important node integrating multiple types of information for linking sensation, actions, and rewards. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363567-12$15.00/0.

  7. Connectivity-based parcellation of the thalamus explains specific cognitive and behavioural symptoms in patients with bilateral thalamic infarct.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Serra

    Full Text Available A novel approach based on diffusion tractography was used here to characterise the cortico-thalamic connectivity in two patients, both presenting with an isolated bilateral infarct in the thalamus, but exhibiting partially different cognitive and behavioural profiles. Both patients (G.P. and R.F. had a pervasive deficit in episodic memory, but only one of them (R.F. suffered also from a dysexecutive syndrome. Both patients had an MRI scan at 3T, including a T1-weighted volume. Their lesions were manually segmented. T1-volumes were normalised to standard space, and the same transformations were applied to the lesion masks. Nineteen healthy controls underwent a diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI scan. Their DTI data were normalised to standard space and averaged. An atlas of Brodmann areas was used to parcellate the prefrontal cortex. Probabilistic tractography was used to assess the probability of connection between each voxel of the thalamus and a set of prefrontal areas. The resulting map of corticothalamic connections was superimposed onto the patients' lesion masks, to assess whether the location of the thalamic lesions in R.F. (but not in G. P. implied connections with prefrontal areas involved in dysexecutive syndromes. In G.P., the lesion fell within areas of the thalamus poorly connected with prefrontal areas, showing only a modest probability of connection with the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Conversely, R.F.'s lesion fell within thalamic areas extensively connected with the ACC bilaterally, with the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and with the left supplementary motor area. Despite a similar, bilateral involvement of the thalamus, the use of connectivity-based segmentation clarified that R.F.'s lesions only were located within nuclei highly connected with the prefrontal cortical areas, thus explaining the patient's frontal syndrome. This study confirms that DTI tractography is a useful tool to examine in vivo the effect of focal

  8. Adolescents with current major depressive disorder show dissimilar patterns of age-related differences in ACC and thalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy C. Hagan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The depressed adolescent brain shows dissimilar age-related and symptom-sensitive patterns of GMV differences compared with controls. The thalamus and ACC may comprise neural markers for detecting these effects in youth. Further investigations therefore need to take both age and level of current symptoms into account when disaggregating antecedent neural vulnerabilities for MDD from the effects of MDD on the developing brain.

  9. Connectivity-based parcellation of the thalamus explains specific cognitive and behavioural symptoms in patients with bilateral thalamic infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Laura; Cercignani, Mara; Carlesimo, Giovanni A; Fadda, Lucia; Tini, Nadia; Giulietti, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bozzali, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach based on diffusion tractography was used here to characterise the cortico-thalamic connectivity in two patients, both presenting with an isolated bilateral infarct in the thalamus, but exhibiting partially different cognitive and behavioural profiles. Both patients (G.P. and R.F.) had a pervasive deficit in episodic memory, but only one of them (R.F.) suffered also from a dysexecutive syndrome. Both patients had an MRI scan at 3T, including a T1-weighted volume. Their lesions were manually segmented. T1-volumes were normalised to standard space, and the same transformations were applied to the lesion masks. Nineteen healthy controls underwent a diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) scan. Their DTI data were normalised to standard space and averaged. An atlas of Brodmann areas was used to parcellate the prefrontal cortex. Probabilistic tractography was used to assess the probability of connection between each voxel of the thalamus and a set of prefrontal areas. The resulting map of corticothalamic connections was superimposed onto the patients' lesion masks, to assess whether the location of the thalamic lesions in R.F. (but not in G. P.) implied connections with prefrontal areas involved in dysexecutive syndromes. In G.P., the lesion fell within areas of the thalamus poorly connected with prefrontal areas, showing only a modest probability of connection with the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Conversely, R.F.'s lesion fell within thalamic areas extensively connected with the ACC bilaterally, with the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and with the left supplementary motor area. Despite a similar, bilateral involvement of the thalamus, the use of connectivity-based segmentation clarified that R.F.'s lesions only were located within nuclei highly connected with the prefrontal cortical areas, thus explaining the patient's frontal syndrome. This study confirms that DTI tractography is a useful tool to examine in vivo the effect of focal lesions on

  10. Peat compaction in deltas : implications for Holocene delta evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselen, S.

    2010-01-01

    Many deltas contain substantial amounts of peat, which is the most compressible soil type. Therefore, peat compaction potentially leads to high amounts of subsidence in deltas. The main objective of this research was to quantify subsidence due to peat compaction in Holocene fluvial-deltaic settings

  11. Phenotypic expressions of CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, GT; Carrington, M; Beeler, JA; Dean, M; Aledort, LM; Blatt, PM; Cohen, AR; DiMichele, D; Eyster, ME; Kessler, CM; Konkle, B; Leissinger, C; Luban, N; O'Brien, SJ; Goedert, JJ; O'Brien, TR

    1999-01-01

    Objective: As blockade of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been proposed as therapy for HIV-1, we examined whether the CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygous genotype has phenotypic expressions other than those related to HIV-1. Design: Study subjects were white homosexual men or men with hemophilia

  12. Giant cavernous malformation in the ventrolateral midbrain with extension into the thalamus: a case report of a paramedian supracerebellar transtentorial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongzhou; Hara, Yosuke; Goto, Tetsuya; Chiba, Akihiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) of the midbrain and thalamus are relatively rare and particularly difficult to be resected given their location in eloquent tissues. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old boy who experienced repeated and progressive right hemiparesis. Image examinations showed a gradually enlarged CM originated in the left ventrolateral midbrain extending to the left thalamus with repeated hemorrhage. By performing a paramedian supracerebellar transtentorial approach, the CM was totally removed, and the patient recovered without any new neurological deficit. The authors' experience suggests that this approach is eminent in treating giant lesions involving the ventrolateral midbrain and thalamus.

  13. Effect of delta wing on the particle flow in a novel gas supersonic separator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Yang, Yan; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    The present work presents numerical simulations of the complex particle motion in a supersonic separator with a delta wing located in the supersonic flow. The effect of the delta wing on the strong swirling flow is analysed using the Discrete Particle Method. The results show that the delta wings...... re-compress the upstream flow and the gas Mach number decreases correspondingly. However, the Mach number does not vary significantly from the small, medium and large delta wing configurations. The small delta wing generates a swirl near its surface, but has minor influences on the flow above it....... On the contrary, the use of the large delta wing produces a strong swirling flow in the whole downstream region. For the large delta wing, the collection efficiency reaches 70% with 2 μm particles, indicating a good separation performance of the proposed supersonic separator....

  14. Proton spectroscopy of the thalamus in a homogeneous sample of patients with easy-to-control juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Claudia da Costa; Valente, Kette Dualibi Ramos; Fiore, Lia Arno; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia, E-mail: claudia.leite@hc.fm.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2017-09-15

    Objective: Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a subtype of genetically determined generalized epilepsy that does not present abnormalities on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The aim of this study was to identify metabolic alterations in the thalamus in a clinically homogeneous sample of patients with easy-to-control JME, using short-echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Materials and Methods: We performed single-voxel (2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm), short-echo time (TE = 35 ms) proton MRS of the thalamus in 21 patients with JME and in 14 healthy age-matched controls. We quantified N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total NAA, creatine (Cr), choline, and myo-inositol (MI), as well as the sum of glutamate and glutamine signals, all scaled to internal water content, and we calculated metabolite ratios using Cr as a reference. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: The MI level and the MI/Cr ratio were significantly lower in the thalami of patients diagnosed with JME than in those of the controls. Other metabolites and their ratios did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion: In our sample of 21 JME patients, we identified lower levels of MI in the thalamus. No significant abnormalities were observed in the concentrations or ratios of other metabolites. (author)

  15. Functional Anatomy of the Thalamus as a Model of Integrated Structural and Functional Connectivity of the Human Brain In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, Chiara; Bozzali, Marco; Spanò, Barbara; Koch, Giacomo; Cercignani, Mara

    2015-07-01

    While methods of measuring non-invasively both, functional and structural brain connectivity are available, the degree of overlap between them is still unknown. In this paper this issue is addressed by investigating the connectivity pattern of a brain structure with many, well characterized structural connections, namely the thalamus. Diffusion-weighted and resting state (RS) functional MRI (fMRI) data were collected in a group of 38 healthy participants. Probabilistic tractography was performed to parcellate the thalamus into regions structurally connected to different cortical areas. The resulting regions were used as seeds for seed-based analysis of RS fMRI data. The tractographic parcellation was thus cross-validated against functional connectivity data by evaluating the overlap between the functional and structural thalamo-cortical connections originating from the parcellated regions. Our data show only a partial overall correspondence between structural and functional connections, in the same group of healthy individuals, thus suggesting that the two approaches provide complementary and not overlapping information. Future studies are warranted to extend the results we obtained in the thalamus to other structures, and to confirm that the mechanisms behind functional connectivity are more complex than just expressing structural connectivity.

  16. Role of Neurotrophins on Postnatal Neurogenesis in the Thalamus: Prenatal Exposure to Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Sandra M.; Miller, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    A second wave of neuronal generation occurs in the ventrobasal nucleus of the rat thalamus (VB) during the first three postnatal weeks. The present study tested the hypotheses (1) that postnatal neurogenesis in the VB is neurotrophin-regulated and (2) that ethanol-induced changes in this proliferation are mediated by neurotrophins. The first studies examined the effects of neurotrophins on the numbers of cycling cells in ex vivo preparations of the VB from three-day-old rats. The proportion of cycling (Ki-67-positive) VB cells was higher in cultured thalamic slices treated with neurotrophins than in controls. Interestingly, this increase occurred with nerve growth factor (NGF) alone or with a combination of NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but not with BDNF alone. Based on these data, the VBs from young offspring of pregnant rats fed an ethanol-containing or an isocaloric non-alcoholic liquid diet were examined between postnatal day (P) 1 and P31. Studies used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblots to explore the effects of ethanol on the expression of neurotrophins, their receptors, and representative signaling proteins. Ethanol altered the expression of neurotrophins and receptors throughout the first postnatal month. Expression of NGF increased, but there was no change in the expression of BDNF. The high affinity receptors (TrkA and TrkB) were unchanged but ethanol decreased expression of the low affinity receptor, p75. One downstream signaling protein, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), decreased but Akt expression was unchanged. Thus, postnatal cell proliferation in the VB of young rat pups is neurotrophin-responsive and is affected by ethanol. PMID:21277941

  17. Lesions of the posterior paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus attenuate fear expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui eLi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT has generated interest because of its strong projections to areas of the brain associated with the regulation of emotional behaviors. The posterior aspect of the PVT (pPVT is notable for its projection to the central nucleus of the amygdala which is essential for the expression of a conditioned fear response. The present study was done to determine if the pPVT is involved in the expression of fear by examining the effect of post-conditioning lesions of the pPVT. Male rats were trained to bar press for food pellets on a variable ratio schedule. Fear conditioning was done using auditory tones (30 s that co-terminate with footschocks (0.65 mA, 1.0 s. Rats were anesthetized 24 hours later and small bilateral electrolytic lesions of the pPVT were made. Fear expression to the tone was assessed using suppression of bar-pressing and freezing after one week of recovery from the surgical procedure. Small bilateral lesions of the pPVT increased bar-pressing for food and decreased freezing during the presentation of the conditioned tone. Lesions of the pPVT had no effect on fear extinction, fear conditioning to a novel tone, or the motivation for food as assessed using a progressive ratio schedule. The results of the experiment support a role for the pPVT in fear expression. In contrast, the pPVT does not appear to be involved in fear learning or extinction nor does it appear to play a role in the motivation of rats to bar press for food.

  18. Reduced GABA content in the motor thalamus during effective deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eStefani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN, in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients, is a well established therapeutic option, but its mechanisms of action are only partially known. In our previous study, the clinical transitions from OFF- to ON-state were not correlated with significant changes of GABA content inside GPi or substantia nigra reticulata.Here, biochemical effects of STN-DBS have been assessed in putamen (PUT, internal pallidus (GPi, and inside the antero-ventral thalamus (VA, the key station receiving pallidothalamic fibres. In ten advanced PD patients undergoing surgery, microdialysis samples were collected before and during STN-DBS. cGMP, an index of glutamatergic transmission, was measured in GPi and PUT by radioimmunoassay, whereas GABA from VA was measured by HPLC.During clinically effective STN-DBS, we found a significant decrease in GABA extracellular concentrations in VA (- 30%. Simultaneously, cGMP extracellular concentrations were enhanced in PUT (+200% and GPi (+481%. These findings support a thalamic dis-inhibition, in turn re-establishing a more physiological corticostriatal transmission, as the source of motor improvement. They indirectly confirm the relevance of patterning (instead of mere changes of excitability and suggest that a rigid interpretation of the standard model, at least when it indicates the hyperactive indirect pathway as key feature of hypokinetic signs, is unlikely to be correct. Finally, given the demonstration of a key role of VA in inducing clinical relief, locally administration of drugs modulating GABA transmission in thalamic nuclei could become an innovative therapeutic strategy.

  19. Surgical Approaches for Symptomatic Cerebral Cavernous Malformations of the Thalamus and Brainstem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Robert M.; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Surgical resection of thalamic and brainstem cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) is associated with significant operative morbidity, but it may be outweighed, in some cases, by the neurological damage from recurrent hemorrhage in these eloquent areas. The goals of this retrospective cohort study are to describe the technical nuances of surgical approaches and determine the postoperative outcomes for CCMs of the thalamus and brainstem. Materials and Methods We reviewed an institutional database of patients harboring thalamic or brainstem CCMs, who underwent surgical resection from 2010 to 2014. The baseline and follow-up neuroimaging and clinical findings of each patient and the operative details of each case were evaluated. Results A total of eight patients, including two with thalamic and six with brainstem CCMs, were included in the study cohort. All patients had progressive neurological deterioration from recurrent CCM hemorrhage, and the median modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at presentation was 3. The median CCM maximum diameter and volume were 1.7 cm and 1.8 cm3, respectively. The thalamic CCMs were resected using the anterior transcallosal transchoroidal and supracerebellar infratentorial approaches each in one case (13%). The brainstem CCMs were resected using the retrosigmoid and suboccipital trans-cerebellomedullary fissure approaches each in three cases (38%). After a median follow-up of 11.5 months, all patients were neurologically stable or improved, with a median mRS of 2. The rate of functional independence (mRS 0-2) was 63%. Conclusion Microneurosurgical techniques and approaches can be safely and effectively employed for the management of thalamic and brainstem CCMs in appropriately selected patients. PMID:28503485

  20. Challenges, Approaches and Experiences from Asian Deltas and the Rhine-Meuse Delta : Regional Training Workshop on Delta Planning and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten, J.H.M.; Douven, W.; Long Phi, H.; Fida Abdullah Khan, M.

    2013-01-01

    River delta's, like the Mekong Delta (Vietnam), Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (Bangladesh), Ayeyarwady Delta (Myanmar), Nile (Egypt) and Ciliwung Delta (Indonesia) are developing rapidly and are characterised by large-scale urbanisation and industrialization processes. They are facing serious planning

  1. Mida pakub Delta? / Teele Kurm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurm, Teele

    2011-01-01

    Politsei- ja Piirivalveamet võtab kasutusele ühise Siseministeeriumi infotehnoloogia- ja arenduskeskuse ning Webmedia AS koostööna loodud dokumendihaldussüsteemi Delta. Kust sai Delta oma nime? Projekti "Dokumendihaldussüsteemi juurutamine Siseministeeriumi haldusalas" eesmärgid

  2. Challenges from the Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... leadership that we are going to consider the state of security in the Niger. Delta region. Vol. ... what Bolade and Adelemo. National Security and Sustainable Development in Nigeria: Challenges from the Niger Delta .... development theory adopts a holistic approach that is mindful of the future implications of ...

  3. The Niger Delta Prob em

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edlyne E Anugwom: Ethnicity, Federalism and Revenue Allocation in a Democratic Nigeria: The Niger Delta Problem. Ethnicity, Federalism and_Revenue. Allocation in a Democratic Ni eria. The Niger Delta Prob em. By Edlyne E. Anugwom. Department of Sociology/Anthropology,. University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Nigeria.

  4. Organization of the Zone of Transition between the Pretectum and the Thalamus, with Emphasis on the Pretectothalamic Lamina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Márquez-Legorreta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The zone of transition between the pretectum, derived from prosomere 1, and the thalamus, derived from prosomere 2, is structurally complex and its understanding has been hampered by cytoarchitectural and terminological confusion. Herein, using a battery of complementary morphological approaches, including cytoarchitecture, myeloarchitecture and the expression of molecular markers, we pinpoint the features or combination of features that best characterize each nucleus of the pretectothalamic transitional zone of the rat. Our results reveal useful morphological criteria to identify and delineate, with unprecedented precision, several [mostly auditory] nuclei of the posterior group of the thalamus, namely the pretectothalamic lamina (PTL; formerly known as the posterior limitans nucleus, the medial division of the medial geniculate body (MGBm, the suprageniculate nucleus (SG, and the ethmoid, posterior triangular and posterior nuclei of the thalamus. The PTL is a sparsely-celled and fiber rich flattened nucleus apposed to the lateral surface of the anterior pretectal nucleus that marks the border between the pretectum and the thalamus; this structure stains selectively with the Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA, and is essentially immunonegative for the calcium binding protein parvalbumin. The MGBm, located medial to the ventral division of the medial geniculate body, can be unequivocally identified by the large size of many of its neurons, its dark immunostaining for parvalbumin, and its rather selective staining for WFA. The SG, which extends for a considerable caudorostral distance and deviates progressively from the MGB, is characterized by its peculiar cytoarchitecture, the paucity of myelinated fibers, and the conspicuous absence of staining for calretinin; indeed, in many calretinin-stained sections, the SG stands out as a blank spot. Because most of these nuclei are small and show unique anatomical relationships, the information provided

  5. Upregulation of Intestinal Barrier Function in Mice with DSS-Induced Colitis by a Defined Bacterial Consortium Is Associated with Expansion of IL-17A Producing Gamma Delta T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial consortium transplantation (BCT is a promising alternative to fecal microbiota transplantation in treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Here, we showed that a defined bacterial consortium derived from healthy mice was able to enhance the intestinal barrier function of mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis. Interestingly, we found that the bacterial consortium significantly promoted the expansion of IL-17A-producing γδT (γδT17 cells in colonic lamina propria, which was closely associated with changing of intestinal microbial composition. The increased IL-17A secretion upon treatment with microbial products derived from the bacterial consortium was accompanied with upregulation of TLR2 expression by γδT cells, and it might be responsible for the upregulation of mucosal barrier function through IL-17R-ACT1-mediated recovery of the disrupted occludin subcellular location. Changing of some specific microbial groups such as Bifidobacterium and Bacillus spp. was closely correlated with the promotion of TLR2+ γδT cells. Our results support that BCT can restore the alliance between commensal microbiota and intestinal γδT cells, which contributes to the improvement of intestinal barrier function. This study provides new insight into the development of bacteria transplantation therapy for the treatment of IBD.

  6. Delta isobars in neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagliara Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of delta isobars in beta-stable matter is regulated by the behavior of the symmetry energy at densities larger than saturation density. We show that by taking into account recent constraints on the density derivative of the symmetry energy and the theoretical and experimental results on the excitations of delta isobars in nuclei, delta isobars are necessary ingredients for the equations of state used for studying neutron stars. We analyze the effect of the appearance of deltas on the structure of neutron stars: as in the case of hyperons, matter containing delta is too soft for allowing the existence of 2M⊙ neutron stars. Quark stars on the other hand, could reach very massive configurations and they could form from a process of conversion of hadronic stars in which an initial seed of strangeness appears through hyperons.

  7. Doubly truncated FosB isoform (Delta2DeltaFosB) induces osteosclerosis in transgenic mice and modulates expression and phosphorylation of Smads in osteoblasts independent of intrinsic AP-1 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabatakos, George; Rowe, Glenn C; Kveiborg, Marie

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Activator protein (AP)-1 family members play important roles in the development and maintenance of the adult skeleton. Transgenic mice that overexpress the naturally occurring DeltaFosB splice variant of FosB develop severe osteosclerosis. Translation of Deltafosb mRNA produces both...... DeltaFosB and a further truncated isoform (Delta2DeltaFosB) that lacks known transactivation domains but, like DeltaFosB, induces increased expression of osteoblast marker genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To test Delta2DeltaFosB's ability to induce bone formation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice...... that overexpress only Delta2DeltaFosB using the enolase 2 (ENO2) promoter-driven bitransgenic Tet-Off system. RESULTS: Despite Delta2DeltaFosB's failure to induce transcription of an AP-1 reporter gene, the transgenic mice exhibited both the bone and the fat phenotypes seen in the ENO2-DeltaFosB mice. Both Delta...

  8. Artificial delta growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    A deltaic sedimentary system has a point source; sediment is carried over the delta plain by distributary channels away from the point source and deposited at the delta front by distributary mouth bars. The established methods to describe such a sedimentary system are "bedding analysis", "facies analysis", and "basin analysis". We shall call the ambient conditions "input" and the rock record "output". There exist a number of methods to deduce input from output, e.g. "Sequence stratigraphy" (a.o. Vail et al. 1977, Catuneanu et al. 2009), "Shoreline trajectory" (a.o. Helland-Hansen & Martinsen 1996, Helland-Hansen & Hampson 2009) on the one hand and the complex use of established techniques on the other (a.o. Miall & Miall 2001, Miall & Miall 2002). None of these deductive methods seems to be sufficient. I claim that the common errors in all these attempts are the following: (1) a sedimentary system is four-dimensional (3+1) and a lesser dimensional analysis is insufficient; (2) a sedimentary system is complex and any empirical/deductive analysis is non-unique. The proper approach to the problem is therefore the theoretical/inductive analysis. To that end we performed six scenarios of a scaled version of a passive margin delta in a flume tank. The scenarios have identical stepwise tectonic subsidence and semi-cyclic sealevel, but different supply curves, i.e. supply is: constant, highly-frequent, proportional to sealevel, inversely proportional to sealevel, lagging to sealevel, ahead of sealevel. The preliminary results are indicative. Lobe-switching occurs frequently and hence locally sedimentation occurs shortly and hiatuses are substantial; therefore events in 2D (+1) cross-sections don't correlate temporally. The number of sedimentary cycles disequals the number of sealevel cycles. Lobe-switching and stepwise tectonic subsidence cause onlap/transgression. Erosional unconformities are local diachronous events, whereas maximum flooding surfaces are regional

  9. Adolescents with current major depressive disorder show dissimilar patterns of age-related differences in ACC and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Cindy C; Graham, Julia M E; Tait, Roger; Widmer, Barry; van Nieuwenhuizen, Adrienne O; Ooi, Cinly; Whitaker, Kirstie J; Simas, Tiago; Bullmore, Edward T; Lennox, Belinda R; Sahakian, Barbara J; Goodyer, Ian M; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    There is little understanding of the neural system abnormalities subserving adolescent major depressive disorder (MDD). In a cross-sectional study we compare currently unipolar depressed with healthy adolescents to determine if group differences in grey matter volume (GMV) were influenced by age and illness severity. Structural neuroimaging was performed on 109 adolescents with current MDD and 36 healthy controls, matched for age, gender, and handedness. GMV differences were examined within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and across the whole-brain. The effects of age and self-reported depressive symptoms were also examined in regions showing significant main or interaction effects. Whole-brain voxel based morphometry revealed no significant group differences. At the whole-brain level, both groups showed a main effect of age on GMV, although this effect was more pronounced in controls. Significant group-by-age interactions were noted: A significant regional group-by-age interaction was observed in the ACC. GMV in the ACC showed patterns of age-related differences that were dissimilar between adolescents with MDD and healthy controls. GMV in the thalamus showed an opposite pattern of age-related differences in adolescent patients compared to healthy controls. In patients, GMV in the thalamus, but not the ACC, was inversely related with self-reported depressive symptoms. The depressed adolescent brain shows dissimilar age-related and symptom-sensitive patterns of GMV differences compared with controls. The thalamus and ACC may comprise neural markers for detecting these effects in youth. Further investigations therefore need to take both age and level of current symptoms into account when disaggregating antecedent neural vulnerabilities for MDD from the effects of MDD on the developing brain.

  10. Consistent phosphenes generated by electrical microstimulation of the visual thalamus. An experimental approach for thalamic visual neuroprostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fivos ePanetsos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Most work on visual prostheses has centred on developing retinal or cortical devices. However, when retinal implants are not feasible, neuroprostheses could be implanted in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus (LGN, the intermediate relay station of visual information from the retina to the visual cortex (V1. The objective of the present study was to determine the types of artificial stimuli that when delivered to the visual thalamus can generate reliable responses of the cortical neurons similar to those obtained when the eye perceives a visual image. Visual stimuli {Si} were presented to one eye of an experimental animal and both, the thalamic {RThi} and cortical responses {RV1i} to such stimuli were recorded. Electrical patterns {RThi*} resembling {RThi} were then injected into the visual thalamus to obtain cortical responses {RV1i*} similar to {RV1i}. Visually- and electrically-generated V1 responses were compared.Results: During the course of this work we: (i characterised the response of V1 neurons to visual stimuli according to response magnitude, duration, spiking rate and the distribution of interspike intervals; (ii experimentally tested the dependence of V1 responses on stimulation parameters such as intensity, frequency, duration, etc. and determined the ranges of these parameters generating the desired cortical activity; (iii identified similarities between responses of V1 useful to compare the naturally and artificially generated neuronal activity of V1; and (iv by modifying the stimulation parameters, we generated artificial V1 responses similar to those elicited by visual stimuli.Generation of predictable and consistent phosphenes by means of artificial stimulation of the LGN is important for the feasibility of visual prostheses. Here we proved that electrical stimuli to the LGN can generate V1 neural responses that resemble those elicited by natural visual stimuli.

  11. Delta-ALA urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be used to help diagnose a condition called porphyria . Normal Results Normal value range for adults is ... of urinary delta-ALA may indicate: Lead poisoning Porphyria (several types) A decreased level may occur with ...

  12. B_s oscillation and prospects for delta m_s at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzemer, Stephanie; /MIT

    2005-07-01

    Till the start of the LHC, the Tevatron is the only running accelerator which produces enough B{sub s} mesons to perform {Delta}m{sub s} measurements. The status--as it was at the time of the conference--of two different {Delta}m{sub s} analysis performed both by the CDF and D0 collaboration will be presented.

  13. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  14. An Overview of Niger Delta Oil Producing Communities in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    with the Charter of the United Nations and the principles of international law, the sovereign right to exploit ... Nigeria, the towering flames resulting from gas burning now seem to the host communities as an inevitable ... of Environment proposed for the year 2003, the application of zero gas flares policy in Nigeria. The oil ...

  15. DC electrical stimulation of the pretectal thalamus and its effects on the feeding behavior of the toad (Bufo bufo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConville, James; Laming, Peter R

    2007-06-01

    The feeding motivation of the common European common toad (Bufo bufo) can be quantified by the feeding sequence of arousal-orientation-approach-fixate-snap. Previous work has found that the optic tectum is an important structure responsible for the mediation of feeding behaviors, and combined electrical and visual stimulation of the optic tectum was found to increase the animals feeding behaviors. However, the pretectal thalamus has an inhibitory influence upon the optic tectum and its lesion results in disinhibited feeding behaviors. This suggests that feeding behavior of anurans is also subject to influence from the pretectal thalamus. Previous studies involving the application of DC stimulation to brain tissue has generated slow potential shifts and these shifts have been implicated in the modulation of the neural mechanisms associated with behavior. The current study investigated the application of DC stimulation to the diencephalon surface dorsal to the lateral posterodorsal pretectal thalamic nucleus in Bufo bufo, in order to assess effects on feeding motivation. The application of DC stimulation increased the incidence of avoidance behaviors to a visual prey stimulus while reducing the prey catching behavior component of approach, suggesting that the DC current applied to the pretectum increased the inhibition upon the feeding elements of the optic tectum. This can be explained by the generation of slow potential shifts.

  16. CT and SPECT in two-cell-pattern germinoma arising from a unilateral thalamus and a basal ganglion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Kamisato, Nobuo; Kowada, Masayoshi; Ogayama, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kazuo.

    1988-06-01

    A case of primary intracranial germ-cell tumor involving a unilateral thalamus and a basal ganglion is presented. A 15-year-old boy was referred to the hospital for an evaluation of right hemiparesis and diabetes insipidus. A CT scan showed a slightly hyperdense mass lesion involving the left thalamic and basal ganglionic regions. The mass was homogeneously enhanced after the intravenous administration of a contrast medium. Serial cerebral angiograms revealed an avascular mass lesion, and neither tumor vessels nor tumor stains were visualized. Single-photon emission CT (SPECT) revealed that the mean cerebral blood flow in the entire affected hemisphere decreased by 12 - 15 %. The tumor was biopsied by a left subtemporal approach using an operating microscope; the histological diagnosis was that of ''two-cell-pattern'' germinoma. Postoperatively the patient underwent cranial irradiation (53.5 Gy) over a period of six weeks. Subsequent CT scans showed a complete disappearance of the enhancing lesion at the left basal ganglion. Primary germ-cell tumors arising from the unilateral thalamus and basal ganglion, as reported in the literature, are reviewed, with special reference to their CT appearances; the possible mechanism of an extensive decrease in the mean hemispheric cerebral blood flow, as delineated by SPECT in the present case, is also discussed.

  17. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation reduces pathological information transmission to the thalamus in a rat model of parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin James Anderson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leads to parkinsonian motor symptoms via changes in electrophysiological activity throughout the basal ganglia. High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS partially treats these symptoms, but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are associated with increased information transmission from basal ganglia output neurons to motor thalamus input neurons, and that therapeutic DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN treats these symptoms by reducing this extraneous information transmission. We tested these hypotheses in a unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rodent model of hemiparkinsonism. Information transfer between basal ganglia output neurons and motor thalamus input neurons increased in both the orthodromic and antidromic directions with hemiparkinsonian onset, and these changes were reversed by behaviorally therapeutic STN-DBS. Omnidirectional information increases in the parkinsonian state underscore the detrimental nature of that pathological information, and suggest a loss of information channel independence. Therapeutic STN-DBS reduced that pathological information, suggesting an effective increase in the number of independent information channels. We interpret these data with a model in which pathological information and fewer information channels diminishes the scope of possible motor activities, driving parkinsonian symptoms. In this model, STN-DBS restores information-channel independence by eliminating or masking the parkinsonism-associated information, and thus enlarges the scope of possible motor activities, alleviating parkinsonian symptoms.

  18. AFSC/REFM: Bomb-produced age validation study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish age validation with bomb-produced radiocarbon (14C) requires a known-age Delta14C reference chronology spanning the era of a marine increase in bomb-produced...

  19. The frontal lobe and thalamus have different sensitivities to hypoxia-hypotension after traumatic brain injury: a microdialysis study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanié, Antonia; Vigué, Bernard; Benhamou, Dan; Duranteau, Jacques; Geeraerts, Thomas

    2012-12-10

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI), lesions are anatomically heterogeneous, but the spatial heterogeneity of the post-traumatic brain's vulnerability to hypoxia-hypotension (HH) has been poorly studied. Our objective was to compare the effect of HH after TBI on brain energy metabolism into two regions: the frontal lobe and the thalamus. Twenty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: sham, TBI (brain trauma alone, impact acceleration, 450-g weight drop from 1.8 m), HH (blood depletion to mean arterial pressure 40 mm Hg, FiO(2) 10%, 15 min), and TBI-HH (TBI followed by HH, 45-min delay). Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was continuously measured. Brain microdialysis and brain tissue oxygen partial pressure (PtiO(2)) probes were both inserted stereotaxically into the right thalamus and frontal lobe. Except during the HH period, CPP was always above 60 mm Hg. During the hour following the HH period, significant increases in cerebral lactate-pyruvate ratio, glycerol, and glutamate were observed, and were always higher in the frontal lobe than in the thalamus (pfrontal lobe, increases in glutamate and glycerol were significantly higher than in the HH group (pfrontal lobe than in the thalamus. These findings demonstrate that in the early post-traumatic period, the metabolic cerebral response to HH is higher in the frontal lobe than in the thalamus, and is worsened by TBI, suggesting a higher vulnerability for the frontal lobes.

  20. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Huyet

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  1. EAARL Topography--Three Mile Creek and Mobile-Tensaw Delta, Alabama, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Mobile-Tensaw Delta region and Three Mile Creek in Alabama was produced from remotely sensed, geographically...

  2. Extrastriatal binding of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT in the thalamus and pons: gender and age dependencies assessed in a European multicentre database of healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Walter; Unterrainer, Marcus; Xiong, Guoming; Bartenstein, Peter [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diemling, Markus [Hermes Medical Solutions, Stockholm (Sweden); Varrone, Andrea [Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Dickson, John C. [UCLH NHS Foundation Trust and University College, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Tossici-Bolt, Livia [University Hospitals Southampton NHS Trust, Department of Medical Physics, Southampton (United Kingdom); Sera, Terez [University of Szeged, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Euromedic Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Asenbaum, Susanne [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Booij, Jan [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kapucu, Ozlem L. [Gazi University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Kluge, Andreas [ABX-CRO, Dresden (Germany); Ziebell, Morten [Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark); Darcourt, Jacques [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nuclear Medicine Department, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa, Clinical Neurology Unit, Department of Neuroscience (DINOGMI), Genoa (Italy); Pagani, Marco [CNR, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, Rome (Italy); Karolinska Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Hesse, Swen [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Medical Centre, Molecular Neuroimaging IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Borght, Thierry Vander [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Nuclear Medicine Division, CHU Dinant Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [University Hospital and K.U. Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Tatsch, Klaus [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karlsruhe (Germany); La Fougere, Christian [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Apart from binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT), [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT shows moderate affinity for the serotonin transporter (SERT), allowing imaging of both monoamine transporters in a single imaging session in different brain areas. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate extrastriatal binding (predominantly due to SERT) and its age and gender dependencies in a large cohort of healthy controls. SPECT data from 103 healthy controls with well-defined criteria of normality acquired at 13 different imaging centres were analysed for extrastriatal binding using volumes of interest analysis for the thalamus and the pons. Data were examined for gender and age effects as well as for potential influence of striatal DAT radiotracer binding. Thalamic binding was significantly higher than pons binding. Partial correlations showed an influence of putaminal DAT binding on measured binding in the thalamus but not on the pons. Data showed high interindividual variation in extrastriatal binding. Significant gender effects with 31 % higher binding in women than in men were observed in the thalamus, but not in the pons. An age dependency with a decline per decade (±standard error) of 8.2 ± 1.3 % for the thalamus and 6.8 ± 2.9 % for the pons was shown. The potential to evaluate extrastriatal predominant SERT binding in addition to the striatal DAT in a single imaging session was shown using a large database of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans in healthy controls. For both the thalamus and the pons, an age-related decline in radiotracer binding was observed. Gender effects were demonstrated for binding in the thalamus only. As a potential clinical application, the data could be used as a reference to estimate SERT occupancy in addition to nigrostriatal integrity when using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT for DAT imaging in patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. (orig.)

  3. Preparation of hydrogen from water by reduction with lithium aluminium hydride for the analysis of delta(2)H by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, S; Scantlebury, M; Król, E; Thomson, P J; Sparling, C; Speakman, J R

    2000-01-01

    An off-line technique is described for the preparation of H(2) from water prior to analysis of delta(2)H by dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry. H(2) is produced from sample water by reaction with LiAlH(4). This provides a rapid and inexpensive method for the analysis of delta(2)H in small (10 microL) samples of water. Precision was +/- 4.2 to 8.0 (1sigma(n), n = 8) delta(2)H(VSMOW) for samples between 428 and 1500 delta(2)H(VSMOW), +/- 14.5 delta(2)H(VSMOW) for water enriched to 3750 delta(2)H(VSMOW) and +/- 26.0 delta(2)H(VSMOW) for water enriched to 6100 delta(2)H(VSMOW). Accuracy was +/- 1.1 to 4.2 delta(2)H(VSMOW) for water standards from natural abundance to 1000 delta(2)H(VSMOW) (the highest enrichment at which water of accepted delta(2)H is currently available). This method for delta(2)H determination is most appropriate for use with small (enrichment such as those produced from doubly labelled water studies of small animals. The levels of measurement precision of delta(2)H would contribute 2.6-3.8% to the precision error in estimates of small animal energy expenditure made using the doubly labelled water technique when duplicate analyses are performed. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Initial isotopic geochemistry ({delta} 18 O, {delta} D) of fluids from wells of the Los Humeros, Pue., geothermal field; Geoquimica isotopica ({delta} 18 O, {delta} D) inicial de fluidos de pozos del campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Pue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan Reyes, Rosa Maria; Arellano Gomez, Victor Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Geotermia, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: rmb@iie.org.mx; Ramirez Montes, Miguel; Tovar Aguado, Rigoberto [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2010-01-15

    Isotopic data ({delta} 18 O, {delta} D) from fluids from production wells at the Los Humeros, Pue., geothermal field were analyzed to investigate the possible origin of these fluids and the dominant processes of the reservoir at its initial state. According to pre-exploitation data, it is suggested the Los Humeros reservoir fluids are made of a mixture of meteoric water of very light isotopic composition (paleo-fluids) and andesitic water. The relationship {delta} D vs {delta} 18 O from pre-exploitation data indicates the produced fluids are composed of a mixture of (at least) two fluids with distinct isotopic compositions. At the more enriched end of the mixing relationship are the isotopic compositions of the wells H-23 and H-18 (located in the southern area of the field), while the lighter fluids were found in well H-16 (originally) and then in well H-16 (repaired). It was found that the liquid phases of deep wells are more enriched in {delta} 18 O while the shallow wells present lower values, suggesting a convection process at the initial state. Based on this isotopic profile, it is considered that even the production depths of the wells H-1, H-12 and H-16 (repaired) are just about the same, but their respective isotopic compositions are quite different. The {delta} 18 O value for well H-16 (repaired) seems to be that of condensate steam, while the corresponding values for wells H-1 and H-12 fall within the value interval of the deep wells (H-23). This suggests wells H-1 and H-12 are collecting very deep fluids enriched in {delta} 18 O. These results could be useful in creating a conceptual model of the reservoir. [Spanish] Se analizaron datos isotopicos ({delta}18 O, {delta}D) de los fluidos de pozos productores del campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Pue., para investigar el posible origen de los fluidos asi como los procesos dominantes del yacimiento en su estado inicial. De acuerdo con datos previos a la explotacion, se plantea que los fluidos del yacimiento

  5. Thalamic reticular input to the rat visual thalamus: a single fiber study using biocytin as an anterograde tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinault, D; Bourassa, J; Deschênes, M

    1995-01-23

    This study describes the axonal projections of single thalamic reticular (TR) neurons within the visual thalamus in rats. Experiments were performed under urethane anesthesia and reticular cells were labeled by extracellular or juxtacellular microiontophoretic applications of biocytin. The axonal arborizations of 19 TR cells projecting to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (DLG) or to the lateral dorsal/lateral posterior complex (LD/LP) were reconstructed from serial horizontal sections. It was found that single TR cells projected within the limits of a single thalamic nucleus, either the DLG or the LD/LP complex, where their terminal fields formed rostrocaudally oriented rods (length: approximately 800 microns; diameter: approximately 100 microns) densely packed with grape-like boutons and varicosities. In addition, none of the labeled TR cells possessed recurrent axonal collaterals that ramified within the reticular complex itself. The functional implications of these morphological data for the synchronization of thalamic oscillations are discussed.

  6. Comparison of fMRI BOLD response patterns by electrical stimulation of the ventroposterior complex and medial thalamus of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Feng Yang

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the functional connectivity of the lateral and medial thalamocortical pain pathways by investigating the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD activation patterns in the forebrain elicited by direct electrical stimulation of the ventroposterior (VP and medial (MT thalamus. An MRI-compatible stimulation electrode was implanted in the VP or MT of α-chloralose-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation was applied to the VP or MT at various intensities (50 µA to 300 µA and frequencies (1 Hz to 12 Hz. BOLD responses were analyzed in the ipsilateral forelimb region of the primary somatosensory cortex (iS1FL after VP stimulation and in the ipsilateral cingulate cortex (iCC after MT stimulation. When stimulating the VP, the strongest activation occurred at 3 Hz. The stimulation intensity threshold was 50 µA and the response rapidly peaked at 100 µA. When stimulating the MT, The optimal frequency for stimulation was 9 Hz or 12 Hz, the stimulation intensity threshold was 100 µA and we observed a graded increase in the BOLD response following the application of higher intensity stimuli. We also evaluated c-Fos expression following the application of a 200-µA stimulus. Ventroposterior thalamic stimulation elicited c-Fos-positivity in few cells in the iS1FL and caudate putamen (iCPu. Medial thalamic stimulation, however, produced numerous c-Fos-positive cells in the iCC and iCPu. The differential BOLD responses and c-Fos expressions elicited by VP and MT stimulation indicate differences in stimulus-response properties of the medial and lateral thalamic pain pathways.

  7. Morphological, structural, and functional alterations of the prefrontal cortex and the basolateral amygdala after early lesion of the rat mediodorsal thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouhaz, Zakaria; Ba-M'hamed, Saadia; Bennis, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Early postnatal damage to the mediodorsal thalamus (MD) produces deficits in cognition and behavior believed to be associated with early prefrontal cortical maldevelopment. We assessed the role of MD afferents during development on the morphological and functional maturation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Sprague-Dawley rat pups (n = 56) received a bilateral electrolytic lesion of the MD or a MD Sham lesion on postnatal day 4. 7 weeks later, all rats were tested in anxiety-related and cognitive paradigms using the elevated plus maze and novel object recognition tests. Following behavioral testing (P70), rats were killed and the baseline expression of C-Fos protein and the number of GABAergic neurons were evaluated in the PFC and the BLA. The dendritic morphology and spine density in the PFC using Golgi-Cox staining was also evaluated. Adult rats with early postnatal bilateral MD damage exhibited disrupted recognition memory and increased anxiety-like behaviors. The lesion also caused a significant diminution of C-Fos immunolabeling and an increase of the number of GABAergic neurons in the PFC. In the BLA, the number of GABAergic neurons was significantly reduced, associated with an increase in C-Fos immunolabeling. Furthermore, in the PFC the lesion induced a significant reduction in dendritic branching and spine density. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the MD plays a role in the development of the PFC and, therefore, may be a good animal model to investigate cognitive symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation of Medial Dorsal and Ventral Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in OCD: A Retrospective Case Series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Maarouf

    Full Text Available The current notion that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits are involved in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD has instigated the search for the most suitable target for deep brain stimulation (DBS. However, despite extensive research, uncertainty about the ideal target remains with many structures being underexplored. The aim of this report is to address a new target for DBS, the medial dorsal (MD and the ventral anterior (VA nucleus of the thalamus, which has thus far received little attention in the treatment of OCD.In this retrospective trial, four patients (three female, one male aged 31-48 years, suffering from therapy-refractory OCD underwent high-frequency DBS of the MD and VA. In two patients (de novo group the thalamus was chosen as a primary target for DBS, whereas in two patients (rescue DBS group lead implantation was performed in a rescue DBS attempt following unsuccessful primary stimulation.Continuous thalamic stimulation yielded no significant improvement in OCD symptom severity. Over the course of thalamic DBS symptoms improved in only one patient who showed "partial response" on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive (Y-BOCS Scale. Beck Depression Inventory scores dropped by around 46% in the de novo group; anxiety symptoms improved by up to 34%. In the de novo DBS group no effect of DBS on anxiety and mood was observable.MD/VA-DBS yielded no adequate alleviation of therapy-refractory OCD, the overall strategy in targeting MD/VA as described in this paper can thus not be recommended in DBS for OCD. The magnocellular portion of MD (MDMC, however, might prove a promising target in the treatment of mood related and anxiety disorders.

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation of Medial Dorsal and Ventral Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in OCD: A Retrospective Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarouf, Mohammad; Neudorfer, Clemens; El Majdoub, Faycal; Lenartz, Doris; Kuhn, Jens; Sturm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The current notion that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits are involved in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has instigated the search for the most suitable target for deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, despite extensive research, uncertainty about the ideal target remains with many structures being underexplored. The aim of this report is to address a new target for DBS, the medial dorsal (MD) and the ventral anterior (VA) nucleus of the thalamus, which has thus far received little attention in the treatment of OCD. In this retrospective trial, four patients (three female, one male) aged 31-48 years, suffering from therapy-refractory OCD underwent high-frequency DBS of the MD and VA. In two patients (de novo group) the thalamus was chosen as a primary target for DBS, whereas in two patients (rescue DBS group) lead implantation was performed in a rescue DBS attempt following unsuccessful primary stimulation. Continuous thalamic stimulation yielded no significant improvement in OCD symptom severity. Over the course of thalamic DBS symptoms improved in only one patient who showed "partial response" on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive (Y-BOCS) Scale. Beck Depression Inventory scores dropped by around 46% in the de novo group; anxiety symptoms improved by up to 34%. In the de novo DBS group no effect of DBS on anxiety and mood was observable. MD/VA-DBS yielded no adequate alleviation of therapy-refractory OCD, the overall strategy in targeting MD/VA as described in this paper can thus not be recommended in DBS for OCD. The magnocellular portion of MD (MDMC), however, might prove a promising target in the treatment of mood related and anxiety disorders.

  10. 2016 Rose Ojowhoh Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OJOHWOH ROSE

    ) 2016. Rose Ojowhoh. Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro, Nigeria. Abstract. The study examined staff development and library services in academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta States. Descriptive survey research design was used for this study, ...

  11. Delta Vegetation and Land Use [ds292

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vegetation and land use are mapped for the approximately 725,000 acres constituting the Legal Delta portion of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Delta area....

  12. Luminescence dating of delta sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chamberlain, Elizabeth L.; Wallinga, Jakob; Reimann, Tony; Goodbred, Steven L.; Steckler, Michael S.; Shen, Zhixiong; Sincavage, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Deltas where luminescence dating is most essential due to organic-poor geologic records are also those where it is often most challenging due to unsuitable luminescence properties of quartz grains, associated with rapid production of young clastic sediment. One example is the

  13. Supersymmetry Transformations for Delta Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Fernández C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We make a detailed study of the first and second-order SUSY partners of a one-dimensional free Hamiltonian with a singular perturbation proportional to a Dirac delta function. It is shown that the second-order transformations increase the spectral manipulation possibilities offered by the standard first-order supersymmetric quantum mechanics.

  14. Absolute $F_{\\sigma\\delta}$ spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kovařík, Vojtěch; Kalenda, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    We prove that hereditarily Lindel\\"of space which is $F_{\\sigma\\delta}$ in some compactification is absolutely $F_{\\sigma\\delta}$. In particular, this implies that any separable Banach space is absolutely $F_{\\sigma\\delta}$ when equipped with the weak topology.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Refractory Bricks produced from locally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance evaluation of refractory bricks produced from some local clay deposits in Delta State, Nigeria was investigated. Four major sites in Delta State renowned for abundant clay deposits were selected, namely; Oghara, Ekpan, Ubeji and Jeddo. The clay samples were crushed, milled (pulverised) and sieved to ...

  16. The effect of crack cocaine addiction on the microstructure and morphology of the human striatum and thalamus using novel shape analysis and fast diffusion kurtosis imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Mallar, Chakravarty; Hansen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The striatum and thalamus are subcortical structures intimately involved in addiction, and the morphology and microstructure of these has been studied in murine models of cocaine addiction. However, human studies using non-invasive MRI has shown inconsistencies in morphology using volumetric anal...

  17. Electrical stimulation of the substantia nigra reticulata : Detection of neuronal extracellular GABA in the ventromedial thalamus and its regulatory mechanism using microdialysis in awake rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, B.H.C.

    A combination of electrical stimulation and microdialysis was used to study the nigrothalamic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system and its regulatory mechanisms in awake rats. Extracellular GABA levels in the ventromedial nucleus of the thalamus were detected in S-min fractions collected

  18. Single cell firing patterns in the anterior nucleus of the thalamus relate to therapy response in deep brain stimulation for refractory epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, F.; Zhao, Yan; Wagner, L.; Colon, A.; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, V.; Gommer, E.; Janssen, M.; Ackermans, L.; van Wezel, Richard Jack Anton; Temel, Y.; Heida, Tjitske; Rouhl, R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with medically refractory epilepsy treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (ANT) vary highly in their therapy response. Proper positioning of the DBS lead is crucial to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. For a correct

  19. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  20. Stable isotope deltas: tiny, yet robust signatures in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B

    2012-09-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including (14)C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. (13)C, (2)H, and (18)O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as-25 per mil can be written as-25 mUr (or-2.5 cUr or-0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg 'units' are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  1. Impaired functional connectivity of the thalamus in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Zengqiang; An, Ningyu; Yao, Hongxiang; Wang, Pan; Wang, Luning; Zhang, Xi; Jiang, Tianzi

    2013-09-01

    The current study evaluated whether the functional connectivity pattern of the thalamo-cortical network in patients with Alzheimer' s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) would show disease severityrelated alterations. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were obtained from 35 patients with AD, 27 patients with MCI and 27 subjects with normal cognition (NC). First, the altered functional connectivity pattern in AD patients was evaluated in comparison to NC subjects. Second, the MCI subjects were included to evaluate how different stages of disease affect the functional connectivity pattern of the thalamus. Finally, a correlation analysis was performed between the strength of the functional connectivity of the identified regions and various clinical variables to evaluate the relationship between the strength of functional connectivity and the cognitive abilities of MCI and AD patients. When compared to NC subjects, AD patients showed decreased functional connectivity between the left thalamus and brain regions including the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, right middle frontal gyrus and left inferior frontal gyrus. Decreased functional connectivity was also found between the right thalamus and right middle frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule/angular gyrus. In addition, increased functional connectivity was observed between the bilateral thalamus and brain regions including the middle frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, postcentral gyrus and precuneus. Functional connectivity between the bilateral thalamus and the identified brain regions of MCI subjects was intermediate in comparison to the functional connectivity of AD and NC subjects. A significant correlation between the fitted functional connectivity strength and the clinical variables was also detected. Our results revealed disease severity-related alterations of the thalamo-default mode network and

  2. Sinking deltas due to human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvitski, James P. M.; Kettner, Albert J.; Overeem, Irina; Hutton, Eric W. H.; Hannon, Mark T.; Brakenridge, G. Robert; Day, John; Vörösmarty, Charles; Saito, Yoshiki; Giosan, Liviu; Nicholls, Robert J.

    2009-10-01

    Many of the world's largest deltas are densely populated and heavily farmed. Yet many of their inhabitants are becoming increasingly vulnerable to flooding and conversions of their land to open ocean. The vulnerability is a result of sediment compaction from the removal of oil, gas and water from the delta's underlying sediments, the trapping of sediment in reservoirs upstream and floodplain engineering in combination with rising global sea level. Here we present an assessment of 33 deltas chosen to represent the world's deltas. We find that in the past decade, 85% of the deltas experienced severe flooding, resulting in the temporary submergence of 260,000 km2. We conservatively estimate that the delta surface area vulnerable to flooding could increase by 50% under the current projected values for sea-level rise in the twenty-first century. This figure could increase if the capture of sediment upstream persists and continues to prevent the growth and buffering of the deltas.

  3. about the Dirac Delta Function(?)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    one do in the case of a point charge q located at some point ro = (xo, Yo , zo)? A point charge is an idealiza- tion in which a finite amount of charge q is supposed to be packed into zero volume. The charge density must therefore be infinite at the point ro, and zero elsewhere. The delta function comes to our aid: we may write ...

  4. Single axon branching analysis in rat thalamocortical projection from the anteroventral thalamus to the granular retrosplenial cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saori eOdagiri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The granular retrosplenial cortex (GRS in the rat has a distinct microcoluimn-type structure. The apical tufts of dendritic bundles at layer I, which are formed by layer II neurons, co-localize with patches of thalamic terminations from anteroventral thalamic nucleus (AV. To further understand this microcolumn-type structure in the GRS, one of remaining questions is whether this structure extends into other layers, such as layers III/IV. Other than layer I, previous tracer injection study showed that AV thalamic nucleus also projects to layer III/IV in the GRS. In this study, we examined the morphology of branches in the GRS from the AV thalamus in single axon branch resolution in order to determine whether AV axon branches in layer III/IV are branches of axons with extensive branch in layer I, and, if so, whether the extent of these arborizations in layer III/IV vertically matches with that in layer I. For this purpose, we used a small volume injection of biotinylated dextran-amine into the AV thalamus and reconstructing labeled single axon branches in the GRS. We found that the AV axons consisted of heterogeneous branching types. Type 1 had extensive arborization occurring only in layer Ia. Type 2 had additional branches in III/IV. Types 1 and 2 had extensive ramifications in layer Ia, with lateral extensions within the previously reported extensions of tufts from single dendritic bundles (i.e., 30-200 µm; mean 78 µm. In type 2 branches, axon arborizations in layer III/IV were just below to layer Ia ramifications, but much wider (148-533 µm: mean, 341 µm than that in layer Ia axon branches and dendritic bundles, suggesting that layer-specific information transmission spacing existed even from the same single axons from the AV to the GRS. Thus, microcolumn-type structure in the upper layer of the GRS was not strictly continuous from layer I to layer IV. How each layer and its components interact each other in different spatial scale should

  5. Identification of developmentally regulated PCP-responsive non-coding RNA, prt6, in the rat thalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironao Takebayashi

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia and similar psychoses induced by NMDA-type glutamate receptor antagonists, such as phencyclidine (PCP and ketamine, usually develop after adolescence. Moreover, adult-type behavioral disturbance following NMDA receptor antagonist application in rodents is observed after a critical period at around 3 postnatal weeks. These observations suggest that the schizophrenic symptoms caused by and psychotomimetic effects of NMDA antagonists require the maturation of certain brain neuron circuits and molecular networks, which differentially respond to NMDA receptor antagonists across adolescence and the critical period. From this viewpoint, we have identified a novel developmentally regulated phencyclidine-responsive transcript from the rat thalamus, designated as prt6, as a candidate molecule involved in the above schizophrenia-related systems using a DNA microarray technique. The transcript is a non-coding RNA that includes sequences of at least two microRNAs, miR132 and miR212, and is expressed strongly in the brain and testis, with trace or non-detectable levels in the spleen, heart, liver, kidney, lung and skeletal muscle, as revealed by Northern blot analysis. The systemic administration of PCP (7.5 mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c. significantly elevated the expression of prt6 mRNA in the thalamus at postnatal days (PD 32 and 50, but not at PD 8, 13, 20, or 24 as compared to saline-treated controls. At PD 50, another NMDA receptor antagonist, dizocilpine (0.5 mg/kg, s.c., and a schizophrenomimetic dopamine agonist, methamphetamine (4.8 mg/kg, s.c., mimicked a significant increase in the levels of thalamic prt6 mRNAs, while a D2 dopmamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol, partly inhibited the increasing influence of PCP on thalamic prt6 expression without its own effects. These data indicate that prt6 may be involved in the pathophysiology of the onset of drug-induced schizophrenia-like symptoms and schizophrenia through the possible

  6. Unraveling the mineralogy of delta deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterloo, Mikki; Kierein-Young, Kathryn

    2017-04-01

    and preservation processes between the fan delta deposits. Our initial survey of the deltas indicates that almost all sites contain minor phyllosilicate detections, however only nine sites have significant abundances (i.e., spatially cohesive mapped deposits). Most of the phyllosilicate deposits consist of Fe/Mg clays such as nontronite and saponite, with a few sites showing detections of minor amounts of Al clays. Geologic observations indicate that most of the clays outcrop along the bottom edge of the deltas with a few sites showing a larger band of clays located just beyond the base of the delta. HiRISE images provide additional small-scale geologic context and indicate that most of the clay deposits are exposed as thin erosional layers. When clay deposits are located beyond the base of the delta they are typically more massive in outcrop. Our ongoing morphological, watershed, and catchment basin investigations will provide additional constraints on the style and extent of hydrologic activity. Coupling our detailed spectroscopic characterization with our ongoing work will provide key information on the geologic processes that produced the mineralogical diversity of martian deltas and will likely provide important clues regarding the past habitability of these environments.

  7. Deformation characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Y., E-mail: haiyanzhang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, S.H., E-mail: shzhang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Cheng, M. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Z.X. [Beijing Institute of Aeronautica1 Materials, Beijing 100095 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The hot working characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy during isothermal compression deformation at temperature of 950 deg. C and strain rate of 0.005 s{sup -1}, were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and quantitative X-ray diffraction technique. The results showed that the dissolution of plate-like {delta} phase and the precipitation of spherical {delta} phase particles coexisted during the deformation, and the content of {delta} phase decreased from 7.05 wt.% to 5.14 wt.%. As a result of deformation breakage and dissolution breakage, the plate-like {delta} phase was spheroidized and transferred to spherical {delta} phase particles. In the center with largest strain, the plate-like {delta} phase disappeared and spherical {delta} phase appeared in the interior of grains and grain boundaries.

  8. Migration in Deltas: An Integrated Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Robert J.; Hutton, Craig W.; Lazar, Attila; Adger, W. Neil; Allan, Andrew; Arto, Inaki; Vincent, Katharine; Rahman, Munsur; Salehin, Mashfiqus; Sugata, Hazra; Ghosh, Tuhin; Codjoe, Sam; Appeaning-Addo, Kwasi

    2017-04-01

    Deltas and low-lying coastal regions have long been perceived as vulnerable to global sea-level rise, with the potential for mass displacement of exposed populations. The assumption of mass displacement of populations in deltas requires a comprehensive reassessment in the light of present and future migration in deltas, including the potential role of adaptation to influence these decisions. At present, deltas are subject to multiple drivers of environmental change and often have high population densities as they are accessible and productive ecosystems. Climate change, catchment management, subsidence and land cover change drive environmental change across all deltas. Populations in deltas are also highly mobile, with significant urbanization trends and the growth of large cities and mega-cities within or adjacent to deltas across Asia and Africa. Such migration is driven primarily by economic opportunity, yet environmental change in general, and climate change in particular, are likely to play an increasing direct and indirect role in future migration trends. The policy challenges centre on the role of migration within regional adaptation strategies to climate change; the protection of vulnerable populations; and the future of urban settlements within deltas. This paper reviews current knowledge on migration and adaptation to environmental change to discern specific issues pertinent to delta regions. It develops a new integrated methodology to assess present and future migration in deltas using the Volta delta in Ghana, Mahanadi delta in India and Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta across India and Bangladesh. The integrated method focuses on: biophysical changes and spatial distribution of vulnerability; demographic changes and migration decision-making using multiple methods and data; macro-economic trends and scenarios in the deltas; and the policies and governance structures that constrain and enable adaptation. The analysis is facilitated by a range of

  9. Sporulation and delta-endotoxin synthesis by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, A

    2002-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is distinguished from the very closely related Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis by the presence of several plasmid-encoded delta-endotoxin genes. These delta-endotoxins, synthesized as protoxins, are produced in large quantities during sporulation and are packaged into intracellular inclusions. Ingestion of the inclusions by insect larvae leads to protoxin solubilization and conversion to toxins each specific for one of several orders of insects. The toxins form cation-selective channels in the membrane of cells lining the larval midgut with subsequent lethality. In most cases, delta-endotoxin synthesis and sporulation are closely coupled. The latter process in B. thuringiensis is probably virtually identical to that in Bacillus subtilis with the additional use of mother cell sporulation forms of RNA polymerase for the synthesis of the delta-endotoxins. There are other more subtle plasmid-encoded functions or plasmid interactions related to regulating protoxin synthesis. Consideration of both plasmid and chromosomal genes is thus critical for defining this organism.

  10. Heritability of brain structure and glutamate levels in the anterior cingulate and left thalamus assessed with MR: A twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Brian Villumsen; Legind, Christian Stefan; Mandl, Rene C W

    included without their siblings. A 3D-T1W structural image and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (PRESS) was obtained from each subject using a 3 Tesla Philips MRI system. Total brain (TB), Gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), peripheral GM (pGM), ventricular CSF (vCSF) volumes were calculated using......Heritability of brain structure and glutamate levels in the anterior cingulate and left thalamus assessed with MR: A twin study Brian V. Broberg1,2; Christian S. Legind1,2, Rene C. Mandl1,3, Maria H. Jensen1, Simon J. Anhøj1,2, Rikke Hilker1, Egill Rostrup1,2, Birte Y. Glenthøj1 Author affiliations...... the heritability of regional cerebral glutamate levels as well as structural brain volumes. Methods Population: 18 monozygotic, 13 dizygotic twin pairs con- or discordant for schizophrenia (ICD-10, F. 20-29), 16 monozygotic healthy control pairs and 10 dizygotic healthy control pairs. Nine additional twins were...

  11. PKC-Dependent Signaling Pathways within PAG and Thalamus Contribute to the Nitric Oxide-Induced Nociceptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Ghelardini, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in nociceptive processing in the central nervous system. The release of NO within the spinal cord has long been implicated in the mechanisms underlying exaggerated pain sensitivity, and administration of NO donors can induce hyperalgesia. To elucidate the supraspinal mechanism responsible for NO-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity, we investigated the modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) and downstream effectors following treatment with the NO donors nitroglycerin and sodium nitroprusside. Both compounds induced a prolonged cold allodynia and heat hyperalgesia, increased levels of c-Fos and IL-1β, and activated NF-κB within periaqueductal grey matter and thalamus. Simultaneously, an increased expression and phosphorylation of PKC γ and ε were detected. To clarify the cellular mechanism involved in the NO-induced hypernociception, we examined the expression of transcription factors that act as PKC downstream effectors. A dramatic hyperphosphorylation of CREB and STAT1 was observed. The i.c.v. administration of the PKC blocker calphostin C prevented the NO-induced hypernociception, the hyperphosphorylation of CREB and STAT1, and partially reduced NF-κB activation. Conversely, the increase of IL-1β was unmodified by calphostin C. These results suggest the relevance of cerebral PKC-mediated CREB and STAT1 activation in the NO donor-induced nociceptive behavior.

  12. Whisking-Related Changes in Neuronal Firing and Membrane Potential Dynamics in the Somatosensory Thalamus of Awake Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Urbain

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus transmits sensory information to the neocortex and receives neocortical, subcortical, and neuromodulatory inputs. Despite its obvious importance, surprisingly little is known about thalamic function in awake animals. Here, using intracellular and extracellular recordings in awake head-restrained mice, we investigate membrane potential dynamics and action potential firing in the two major thalamic nuclei related to whisker sensation, the ventral posterior medial nucleus (VPM and the posterior medial group (Pom, which receive distinct inputs from brainstem and neocortex. We find heterogeneous state-dependent dynamics in both nuclei, with an overall increase in action potential firing during active states. Whisking increased putative lemniscal and corticothalamic excitatory inputs onto VPM and Pom neurons, respectively. A subpopulation of VPM cells fired spikes phase-locked to the whisking cycle during free whisking, and these cells may therefore signal whisker position. Our results suggest differential processing of whisking comparing thalamic nuclei at both sub- and supra-threshold levels.

  13. Expression of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin genes during vegetative growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Mettus, A M; Macaluso, A

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin (crystal protein) genes are normally expressed only during sporulation. It is possible to produce crystal protein during vegetative growth by placing B. thuringiensis crystal protein genes downstream of a strong vegetative promoter. By removing a possible transcriptional terminator of the tetracycline resistance gene of pBC16 and inserting a multiple cloning site, delta-endotoxin genes can be cloned downstream from the tetracycline resistance gene promot...

  14. COMMD1 regulates the delta epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) through trafficking and ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Tina; Ke, Ying; Ly, Kevin [Department of Physiology, University of Otago, P.O. Box 913, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand); McDonald, Fiona J., E-mail: fiona.mcdonald@otago.ac.nz [Department of Physiology, University of Otago, P.O. Box 913, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} The COMM domain of COMMD1 mediates binding to {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 reduces the cell surface population of {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 increases the population of {delta}ENaC-ubiquitin. {yields} Both endogenous and transfected {delta}ENaC localize with COMMD1 and transferrin suggesting they are located in early/recycling endosomes. -- Abstract: The delta subunit of the epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. {delta}ENaC is distinct from the related {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}ENaC subunits, known for their role in sodium homeostasis and blood pressure control, as {delta}ENaC is expressed in brain neurons and activated by external protons. COMMD1 (copper metabolism Murr1 domain 1) was previously found to associate with and downregulate {delta}ENaC activity. Here, we show that COMMD1 interacts with {delta}ENaC through its COMM domain. Co-expression of {delta}ENaC with COMMD1 significantly reduced {delta}ENaC surface expression, and led to an increase in {delta}ENaC ubiquitination. Immunocytochemical and confocal microscopy studies show that COMMD1 promoted localization of {delta}ENaC to the early/recycling endosomal pool where the two proteins were localized together. These results suggest that COMMD1 downregulates {delta}ENaC activity by reducing {delta}ENaC surface expression through promoting internalization of surface {delta}ENaC to an intracellular recycling pool, possibly via enhanced ubiquitination.

  15. Analysis and Synthesis of Delta Operator Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hongjiu; Shi, Peng; Zhao, Ling

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to analysis and design on delta operator systems. When sampling is fast, a dynamical system will become difficult to control, which can be seen in wide real world applications. Delta operator approach is very effective to deal with fast sampling systems. Moreover, it is easy to observe and analyze the control effect with different sampling periods in delta operator systems. The framework of this book has been carefully constructed for delta operator systems to handle sliding mode control, time delays, filter design, finite frequency and networked control. These problems indeed are especially important and significant in automation and control systems design. Through the clear framework of the book, readers can easily go through the learning process on delta operator systems via a precise and comfortable learning sequence. Following this enjoyable trail, readers will come out knowing how to use delta operator approach to deal with control problems under fast sampling case. This book should...

  16. The Niger Delta Amnesty Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A. Okonofua

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The armed conflict between militias and government forces in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region has spanned for more than two decades, defying all solutions. A disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR program was established in August 2015 in effort to end the violence and has remained in place. It is a radically different approach from past approaches that displayed zero tolerance to all political challenges to oil production or the allocation of oil profits. The approach appeared to be immediately successful in that it forced a ceasefire, engaged militants in planned programs to rehabilitate and reintegrate them into civilian society, and opened up the oil wells (many of which had been shut due to the crisis with the effect of increasing government revenue, which depends 85% on oil exports. Yet, few studies have attempted to understand the dynamics within the country that are responsible for the design and implementation of this broad policy shift or to understand whether and how the current initiative is able to end the conflict and institute peace beyond the short term. This study, therefore, is important because it provides a critical perspective that anticipates and explains emerging issues with the Niger Delta Amnesty Program, which have implications for DDR adaptation and implementation all over the world. Ultimately, the research demonstrates how the DDR program both transforms the Niger Delta conflict and becomes embroiled in intense contestations not only about the mechanism for transforming the targeted population but also whether and how the program incorporates women who are being deprioritized by the program.

  17. $\\Delta(1232)$-Resonance in the Hydrogen Spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Hagelstein, Franziska

    2018-01-01

    The electromagnetic excitation of the $\\Delta(1232)$-resonance plays an appreciable role in the Lamb shift and hyperfine structure of muonic and electronic hydrogen. Its effect appears at the subleading order $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha^5)$, together with other proton-polarizability contributions from forward two-photon exchange. We use the large-$N_c$ relations for the nucleon-to-delta transition form factors to compute the effect of the $\\Delta(1232)$ in the hydrogen spectrum. We pay particular att...

  18. Delta FosB regulates wheel running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werme, Martin; Messer, Chad; Olson, Lars; Gilden, Lauren; Thorén, Peter; Nestler, Eric J; Brené, Stefan

    2002-09-15

    DeltaFosB is a transcription factor that accumulates in a region-specific manner in the brain after chronic perturbations. For example, repeated administration of drugs of abuse increases levels of DeltaFosB in the striatum. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of spontaneous wheel running, as a model for a natural rewarding behavior, on levels of DeltaFosB in striatal regions. Moreover, mice that inducibly overexpress DeltaFosB in specific subpopulations of striatal neurons were used to study the possible role of DeltaFosB on running behavior. Lewis rats given ad libitum access to running wheels for 30 d covered what would correspond to approximately 10 km/d and showed increased levels of DeltaFosB in the nucleus accumbens compared with rats exposed to locked running wheels. Mice that overexpress DeltaFosB selectively in striatal dynorphin-containing neurons increased their daily running compared with control littermates, whereas mice that overexpress DeltaFosB predominantly in striatal enkephalin-containing neurons ran considerably less than controls. Data from the present study demonstrate that like drugs of abuse, voluntary running increases levels of DeltaFosB in brain reward pathways. Furthermore, overexpression of DeltaFosB in a distinct striatal output neuronal population increases running behavior. Because previous work has shown that DeltaFosB overexpression within this same neuronal population increases the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse, results of the present study suggest that DeltaFosB may play a key role in controlling both natural and drug-induced reward.

  19. Climate Change and the Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Dettinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss3art5Anthropogenic climate change amounts to a rapidly approaching, “new” stressor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta system. In response to California’s extreme natural hydroclimatic variability, complex water-management systems have been developed, even as the Delta’s natural ecosystems have been largely devastated. Climate change is projected to challenge these management and ecological systems in different ways that are characterized by different levels of uncertainty. For example, there is high certainty that climate will warm by about 2°C more (than late-20th-century averages by mid-century and about 4°C by end of century, if greenhouse-gas emissions continue their current rates of acceleration. Future precipitation changes are much less certain, with as many climate models projecting wetter conditions as drier. However, the same projections agree that precipitation will be more intense when storms do arrive, even as more dry days will separate storms. Warmer temperatures will likely enhance evaporative demands and raise water temperatures. Consequently, climate change is projected to yield both more extreme flood risks and greater drought risks. Sea level rise (SLR during the 20th century was about 22 cm, and is projected to increase by at least 3-fold this century. SLR together with land subsidence threatens the Delta with greater vulnerabilities to inundation and salinity intrusion. Effects on the Delta ecosystem that are traceable to warming include SLR, reduced snowpack, earlier snowmelt and larger storm-driven streamflows, warmer and longer summers, warmer summer water temperatures, and water-quality changes. These changes and their uncertainties will challenge the operations of water projects and uses throughout the Delta’s watershed and delivery areas. Although the effects of of climate change on Delta ecosystems may be profound, the end results are difficult to predict

  20. Climate change and the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, Michael; Anderson, Jamie; Anderson, Michael L.; Brown, Larry R.; Cayan, Daniel; Maurer, Edwin P.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change amounts to a rapidly approaching, “new” stressor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta system. In response to California’s extreme natural hydroclimatic variability, complex water-management systems have been developed, even as the Delta’s natural ecosystems have been largely devastated. Climate change is projected to challenge these management and ecological systems in different ways that are characterized by different levels of uncertainty. For example, there is high certainty that climate will warm by about 2°C more (than late-20th-century averages) by mid-century and about 4°C by end of century, if greenhouse-gas emissions continue their current rates of acceleration. Future precipitation changes are much less certain, with as many climate models projecting wetter conditions as drier. However, the same projections agree that precipitation will be more intense when storms do arrive, even as more dry days will separate storms. Warmer temperatures will likely enhance evaporative demands and raise water temperatures. Consequently, climate change is projected to yield both more extreme flood risks and greater drought risks. Sea level rise (SLR) during the 20th century was about 22cm, and is projected to increase by at least 3-fold this century. SLR together with land subsidence threatens the Delta with greater vulnerabilities to inundation and salinity intrusion. Effects on the Delta ecosystem that are traceable to warming include SLR, reduced snowpack, earlier snowmelt and larger storm-driven streamflows, warmer and longer summers, warmer summer water temperatures, and water-quality changes. These changes and their uncertainties will challenge the operations of water projects and uses throughout the Delta’s watershed and delivery areas. Although the effects of climate change on Delta ecosystems may be profound, the end results are difficult to predict, except that native species will fare worse than invaders. Successful

  1. Effect of teriflunomide on cortex-basal ganglia-thalamus (CxBGTh circuit glutamatergic dysregulation in the Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Modica

    Full Text Available Pathology of gray matter is associated with development of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis. In particular, glutamatergic dysregulation in the cortex-basal ganglia-thalamus (CxBGTh circuit could be associated with decline in these behaviors.To investigate the effect of an immunomodulatory therapy (teriflunomide, Aubagio® on changes of the CxBGTh loop in the Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus, (TMEV mouse model of MS.Forty-eight (48 mice were infected with TMEV, treated with teriflunomide (24 or control vehicle (24 and followed for 39 weeks. Mice were examined with MRS and volumetric MRI scans (0, 8, 26, and 39 weeks in the cortex, basal ganglia and thalamus, using a 9.4T scanner, and with behavioral tests (0, 4, 8, 12, 17, 26, and 39 weeks. Within conditions, MRI measures were compared between two time points by paired samples t-test and across multiple time points by repeated measures ANOVA (rmANOVA, and between conditions by independent samples t-test and rmANOVA, respectively. Data were considered as significant at the p<0.01 level and as a trend at p<0.05 level.In the thalamus, the teriflunomide arm exhibited trends toward decreased glutamate levels at 8 and 26 weeks compared to the control arm (p = 0.039 and p = 0.026, while the control arm exhibited a trend toward increased glutamate between 0 to 8 weeks (p = 0.045. In the basal ganglia, the teriflunomide arm exhibited a trend toward decreased glutamate earlier than the control arm, from 0 to 8 weeks (p = 0.011, resulting in decreased glutamate compared to the control arm at 8 weeks (p = 0.016.Teriflunomide may reduce possible excitotoxicity in the thalamus and basal ganglia by lowering glutamate levels.

  2. Sesamin is a potent and specific inhibitor of delta 5 desaturase in polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, S; Akimoto, K; Shinmen, Y; Kawashima, H; Sugano, M; Yamada, H

    1991-07-01

    Incubation with sesame oil increases the mycelial dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid content of an arachidonic acid-producing fungus, Mortierella alpina, but decreases its arachidonic acid content [Shimizu, S., K. Akimoto, H. Kawashima, Y. Shinmen and H. Yamada (1989) J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 66, 237-241]. The factor causing these effects was isolated and identified to be (+)-sesamin. The results obtained in experiments with both a cell-free extract of the fungus and with rat liver microsomes demonstrated that (+)-sesamin specifically inhibits delta 5 desaturase at low concentrations, but does not inhibit delta 6, delta 9 and delta 12 desaturases. Kinetic analysis showed that (+)-sesamin is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki for rat liver delta 5 desaturase, 155 microM). (+)-Sesamolin, (+)-sesaminol and (+)-episesamin also inhibited only delta 5 desaturases of the fungus and liver. These results demonstrate that (+)-sesamin and related lignan compounds present in sesame seeds or its oil are specific inhibitors of delta 5 desaturase in polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in both microorganisms and animals.

  3. {delta}-FeOOH: a superparamagnetic material for controlled heat release under AC magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagas, Poliane; Candido da Silva, Adilson [ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Caetano Passamani, Edson [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Ardisson, Jose Domingos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (Brazil); Alves de Oliveira, Luiz Carlos [ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Domingos Fabris, Jose [Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (UFVJM) (Brazil); Paniago, Roberto M. [ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Monteiro, Douglas Santos; Pereira, Marcio Cesar, E-mail: mcpqui@gmail.com [Instituto de Ciencia, Engenharia e Tecnologia, UFVJM (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    Experimental evidences on its in vitro use reveal that {delta}-FeOOH is a material that release-controlled amount of heat if placed under an AC magnetic field. {delta}-FeOOH nanoparticles were prepared by precipitating Fe(OH){sub 2} in alkaline solution followed by fast oxidation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. XRD and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy data confirmed that {delta}-FeOOH is indeed the only iron-bearing compound in the produced sample. TEM images evidence that the averaged particle sizes for this {delta}-FeOOH sample is 23 nm. Magnetization measurements indicate that these {delta}-FeOOH particles behave superparamagnetically at 300 K; its saturation magnetization was found to be 13.2 emu g{sup -1}; the coercivity and the remnant magnetization were zero at 300 K. The specific absorption rate values at 225 kHz were 2.1, 6.2, and 34.2 W g{sup -1}, under 38, 64, and 112 mT, respectively. The release rate of heat can be directly controlled by changing the mass of {delta}-FeOOH nanoparticles. In view of these findings, the so-prepared {delta}-FeOOH is a real alternative to be further tested as a material for medical practices in therapies involving magnetic hyperthermia as in clinical oncology.

  4. $\\Delta I=4$ and $\\Delta I=8$ bifurcations in rotational bands of diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Lalazissis, G A; Drenska, S B; Minkov, N; Raychev, P P; Roussev, R P; Bonatsos, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the recently observed $\\Delta I=4$ bifurcation seen in superdeformed nuclear bands is also occurring in rotational bands of diatomic molecules. In addition, signs of a $\\Delta I=8$ bifurcation, of the same order of magnitude as the $\\Delta I=4$ one, are observed both in superdeformed nuclear bands and rotational bands of diatomic molecules.

  5. 2008 USGS/NPS/NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL): Pearl River Delta, LA and MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi was produced from remotely sensed,...

  6. 3D texture analysis reveals imperceptible MRI textural alterations in the thalamus and putamen in progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1, EPM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Suoranta

    Full Text Available Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1 (EPM1 is an autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young onset age, myoclonus and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. At the time of diagnosis, the visual assessment of the brain MRI is usually normal, with no major changes found later. Therefore, we utilized texture analysis (TA to characterize and classify the underlying properties of the affected brain tissue by means of 3D texture features. Sixteen genetically verified patients with EPM1 and 16 healthy controls were included in the study. TA was performed upon 3D volumes of interest that were placed bilaterally in the thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, caudate nucleus and putamen. Compared to the healthy controls, EPM1 patients had significant textural differences especially in the thalamus and right putamen. The most significantly differing texture features included parameters that measure the complexity and heterogeneity of the tissue, such as the co-occurrence matrix-based entropy and angular second moment, and also the run-length matrix-based parameters of gray-level non-uniformity, short run emphasis and long run emphasis. This study demonstrates the usability of 3D TA for extracting additional information from MR images. Textural alterations which suggest complex, coarse and heterogeneous appearance were found bilaterally in the thalamus, supporting the previous literature on thalamic pathology in EPM1. The observed putamenal involvement is a novel finding. Our results encourage further studies on the clinical applications, feasibility, reproducibility and reliability of 3D TA.

  7. Generation of a 3D atlas of the nuclear division of the thalamus based on histological sections of primate: Intra- and intersubject atlas-to-MRI warping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauguet, J.; Conde, F.; Hantraye, P.; Delzescaux, T. [CEA-CNRS, MIRCen, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Frouin, V. [CEA-DSV-IRCM-SCSR-LEFG, 2, place Gaston-Cremieux, 91057 Evry (France)

    2009-07-01

    We describe a framework to generate a 3D digital atlas of the thalamus based on a series of stained histological sections of a primate. The contours of the thalamus were first drawn on the stained histological slices. The series of histological sections were then aligned and mapped onto the in vivo MRI of the same animal acquired prior to the sacrifice following a methodology described in Dauguet et al. (2007) using the block face photographs as an intermediary modality. By applying the series of transformations previously estimated for the histological volume, the contours of the digital atlas were mapped onto the MRI data. The protocol was tested on two baboon brains for which the full series of slices were available, and a macaque brain for which a subset only of the histological slices were available demonstrating the ability of building digital atlases in the MRI geometry without mounting and staining all the brain slices. We then studied the accuracy of mapping the digital atlas of one baboon onto the MRI of the other baboon by comparing the overlapping with its original digital atlas. We finally used the digital atlas of one of the baboons to study the individual kinetic of the main thalamus nuclei on Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images providing a novel and accurate way of measuring very fine and local functional differences. (authors)

  8. Stimulation of the bilateral anterior nuclei of the thalamus in the treatment of refractory epilepsy: two cases of subcortical band heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana; Pimentel, José; Campos, Alexandre Rainha; Morgado, Carlos; Pinelo, Sara; Ferreira, António Gonçalves; Bentes, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Subcortical band heterotopia is a neuronal migration disorder that may cause refractory epilepsy. In these patients, resective surgery has yielded inadequate results. Deep brain stimulation of the anterior nuclei of the thalamus has been used for the treatment of refractory epilepsy with good results. We describe the first two patients with subcortical band heterotopia who were submitted to deep brain stimulation of the anterior nuclei of the thalamus, with evaluation of seizure outcome after 12 and 18 months of follow-up. At these times, both showed a >50% decrease in seizure frequency and an increase in seizure freedom. Both patients had a depressive syndrome after surgery that responded fully to anti-depressive medication in one patient and partly in the other. In both, deep brain stimulation of the anterior nuclei of the thalamus was associated with good seizure outcome. This procedure can therefore be considered in the treatment of patients with subcortical band heterotopia and refractory epilepsy. Depression may be a transient adverse event of the surgery or stimulation, however, its aetiology is probably multifactorial.

  9. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART signaling within the paraventricular thalamus modulates cocaine-seeking behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan H James

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART has been demonstrated to play a role in regulating the rewarding and reinforcing effects of various drugs of abuse. A recent study demonstrated that i.c.v. administration of CART negatively modulates reinstatement of alcohol seeking, however, the site(s of action remains unclear. We investigated the paraventricular thalamus (PVT as a potential site of relapse-relevant CART signaling, as this region is known to receive dense innervation from CART-containing hypothalamic cells and to project to a number of regions known to be involved in mediating reinstatement, including the nucleus accumbens (NAC, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and basolateral amygdala (BLA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male rats were trained to self-administer cocaine before being extinguished to a set criterion. One day following extinction, animals received intra-PVT infusions of saline, tetrodotoxin (TTX; 2.5 ng, CART (0.625 µg or 2.5 µg or no injection, followed by a cocaine prime (10 mg/kg, i.p.. Animals were then tested under extinction conditions for one hour. Treatment with either TTX or CART resulted in a significant attenuation of drug-seeking behaviour following cocaine-prime, with the 2.5 µg dose of CART having the greatest effect. This effect was specific to the PVT region, as misplaced injections of both TTX and CART resulted in responding that was identical to controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that CART signaling within the PVT acts to inhibit drug-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking behaviour, presumably by negatively modulating PVT efferents that are important for drug seeking, including the NAC, mPFC and BLA. In this way, we identify a possible target for future pharmacological interventions designed to suppress drug seeking.

  10. Meditation reduces pain-related neural activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, insula, secondary somatosensory cortex, and thalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eNakata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that meditation inhibits or relieves pain perception. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for this phenomenon, neuroimaging methods, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, and neurophysiological methods, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG, have been used. However, it has been difficult to interpret the results, because there is some paradoxical evidence. For example, some studies reported increased neural responses to pain stimulation during meditation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and insula, whereas others showed a decrease in these regions. There have been inconsistent findings to date. Moreover, in general, since the activities of the ACC and insula are correlated with pain perception, the increase in neural activities during meditation would be related to the enhancement of pain perception rather than its reduction. These contradictions might directly contribute to the ‘mystery of meditation’. In this review, we presented previous findings for brain regions during meditation and the anatomical changes that occurred in the brain with long-term meditation training. We then discussed the findings of previous studies that examined pain-related neural activity during meditation. We also described the brain mechanisms responsible for pain relief during meditation, and possible reasons for paradoxical evidence among previous studies. By thoroughly overviewing previous findings, we hypothesized that meditation reduces pain-related neural activity in the ACC, insula, secondary somatosensory cortex, and thalamus. We suggest that the characteristics of the modulation of this activity may depend on the kind of meditation and/or number of years of experience of meditation, which were associated with paradoxical findings among previous studies that investigated pain-related neural activities during meditation.

  11. Patient-Specific Electric Field Simulations and Acceleration Measurements for Objective Analysis of Intraoperative Stimulation Tests in the Thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemm, Simone; Pison, Daniela; Alonso, Fabiola; Shah, Ashesh; Coste, Jérôme; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) the fundamental mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Simulation of electric entities has previously been proposed for chronic DBS combined with subjective symptom evaluations, but not for intraoperative stimulation tests. The present paper introduces a method for an objective exploitation of intraoperative stimulation test data to identify the optimal implant position of the chronic DBS lead by relating the electric field (EF) simulations to the patient-specific anatomy and the clinical effects quantified by accelerometry. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, it was applied to five patients with essential tremor bilaterally implanted in the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM). The VIM and its neighborhood structures were preoperatively outlined in 3D on white matter attenuated inversion recovery MR images. Quantitative intraoperative clinical assessments were performed using accelerometry. EF simulations (n = 272) for intraoperative stimulation test data performed along two trajectories per side were set-up using the finite element method for 143 stimulation test positions. The resulting EF isosurface of 0.2 V/mm was superimposed to the outlined anatomical structures. The percentage of volume of each structure's overlap was calculated and related to the corresponding clinical improvement. The proposed concept has been successfully applied to the five patients. For higher clinical improvements, not only the VIM but as well other neighboring structures were covered by the EF isosurfaces. The percentage of the volumes of the VIM, of the nucleus intermediate lateral of the thalamus and the prelemniscal radiations within the prerubral field of Forel increased for clinical improvements higher than 50% compared to improvements lower than 50%. The presented new concept allows a detailed and objective analysis of a high amount of intraoperative data to identify the optimal stimulation target. First

  12. Meditation reduces pain-related neural activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, insula, secondary somatosensory cortex, and thalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Kiwako; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that meditation inhibits or relieves pain perception. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for this phenomenon, neuroimaging methods, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, and neurophysiological methods, such as magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography, have been used. However, it has been difficult to interpret the results, because there is some paradoxical evidence. For example, some studies reported increased neural responses to pain stimulation during meditation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insula, whereas others showed a decrease in these regions. There have been inconsistent findings to date. Moreover, in general, since the activities of the ACC and insula are correlated with pain perception, the increase in neural activities during meditation would be related to the enhancement of pain perception rather than its reduction. These contradictions might directly contribute to the ‘mystery of meditation.’ In this review, we presented previous findings for brain regions during meditation and the anatomical changes that occurred in the brain with long-term meditation training. We then discussed the findings of previous studies that examined pain-related neural activity during meditation. We also described the brain mechanisms responsible for pain relief during meditation, and possible reasons for paradoxical evidence among previous studies. By thoroughly overviewing previous findings, we hypothesized that meditation reduces pain-related neural activity in the ACC, insula, secondary somatosensory cortex, and thalamus. We suggest that the characteristics of the modulation of this activity may depend on the kind of meditation and/or number of years of experience of meditation, which were associated with paradoxical findings among previous studies that investigated pain-related neural activities during meditation. PMID:25566158

  13. Assessment of the magnetic entropy change in the metallic anti perovskite Mn{sub 3}GaC{sub 1-{delta}} ({delta}=0, 0.22)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Minghui [Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)]. E-mail: myu1@uno.edu; Lewis, L.H. [Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Moodenbaugh, A.R. [Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The character of the magnetic phase transitions in the metallic antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}GaC{sub 1-{delta}} ({delta}=0, 0.22) was analyzed to better evaluate the associated magnetic entropy changes under various field and temperature conditions. The stoichiometric Mn{sub 3}GaC compound exhibits an abrupt magnetostructural transition at T=159K that produces a large entropy change {delta}S{sub M} with a plateau-like temperature dependence. A unique spike in {delta}S{sub M} of Mn{sub 3}GaC at T=156.5K, associated with the abrupt magnetic transformation, is attributed to the interplay between the temperature- and field-induced transitions. The peak magnitude of this entropy change spike approaches 33J/kgK, over two times the averaged {delta}S{sub M}. It was observed that the field development of {delta}S{sub M} mimics the analogous magnetization behavior. An analytical phenomenological model based on the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization of this type of magnetic transition was developed to account for these results.

  14. The influence of delta formation mechanism on geotechnical property sequence of the late Pleistocene–Holocene sediments in the Mekong River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Minh Hoang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to characterize a variety of microstructure development-levels and geotechnical property sequences of the late Pleistocene–Holocene deposits in the Mekong River delta (MRD, and the paper furthermore discusses the influences of delta formation mechanisms on them. The survey associated the geotechnical engineering and the sedimentary geology of the late Pleistocene–Holocene deposits at five sites and also undifferentiated Pleistocene sediments. A cross-section which was rebuilt in the delta progradation-direction and between the Mekong and Bassac rivers represents the stratigraphy. Each sedimentary unit was formed under a different delta formation mechanism and revealed a typical geotechnical property sequence. The mechanical behaviors of the sediment succession in the tide-dominated delta with significant fluvial-activity and material source tend to be more cohesionless soils and strengths than those in the tide- and wave-dominated delta and even the coast. The particular tendency of the mechanical behavior of the deposit succession can be reasonably estimated from the delta formation mechanism. The characteristics of the clay minerals from the Mekong River produced the argillaceous soil which does not have extremely high plasticity. The microstructure development-levels are low to very high indicating how to choose hydraulic conductivity value, k, for estimating overconsolidation ratio, OCR, by the piezocone penetration tests (CPTU. The OCR of sediments in the delta types strangely change with depth but none less than 1. The post-depositional processes significantly influenced the microstructure development, particularly the dehydrating and oxidizing processes.

  15. Delta Blues Scholarship and Imperialist Nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, William P.

    When Delta blues are considered to be "folk music," the genre is inextricably tied to the neocolonial, sharecropping system of cotton production characteristic of the Mississippi Delta region between the Civil War and World War II. "Imperialist nostalgia," then, arises in accounts which pay primary and positive tribute to blues…

  16. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  17. Tidal controls on river delta morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Wang, Z. B.; Vermeulen, B.; Huismans, Y.; Kästner, K.

    2017-01-01

    River delta degradation has been caused by extraction of natural resources, sediment retention by reservoirs, and sea-level rise. Despite global concerns about these issues, human activity in the world's largest deltas intensifies. Harbour development, construction of flood defences, sand mining and

  18. Floating City IJmeer : Accelerator for Delta Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Graaf, R.; Fremouw, M.; Van Bueren, B.; Czapiewska, K.; Kuijper, M.

    2006-01-01

    Climate change, sea level rise, population growth and ongoing urbanization result in higher vulnerability of the Rhine delta because it will result in increased flooding frequency, increasing investments and increased use of water, energy and other resources. The Rhine Delta also faces strong

  19. DeltaFosB in brain reward circuits mediates resilience to stress and antidepressant responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialou, Vincent; Robison, Alfred J; Laplant, Quincey C; Covington, Herbert E; Dietz, David M; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Rush, Augustus J; Watts, Emily L; Wallace, Deanna L; Iñiguez, Sergio D; Ohnishi, Yoko H; Steiner, Michel A; Warren, Brandon L; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Bolaños, Carlos A; Neve, Rachael L; Ghose, Subroto; Berton, Olivier; Tamminga, Carol A; Nestler, Eric J

    2010-06-01

    In contrast with the many studies of stress effects on the brain, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms of resilience, the ability of some individuals to escape the deleterious effects of stress. We found that the transcription factor DeltaFosB mediates an essential mechanism of resilience in mice. Induction of DeltaFosB in the nucleus accumbens, an important brain reward-associated region, in response to chronic social defeat stress was both necessary and sufficient for resilience. DeltaFosB induction was also required for the standard antidepressant fluoxetine to reverse behavioral pathology induced by social defeat. DeltaFosB produced these effects through induction of the GluR2 AMPA glutamate receptor subunit, which decreased the responsiveness of nucleus accumbens neurons to glutamate, and through other synaptic proteins. Together, these findings establish a previously unknown molecular pathway underlying both resilience and antidepressant action.

  20. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Niger Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijers, T. J. A.

    2011-09-01

    During the Cenozoic, until the Middle Miocene, the Niger Delta grew through pulses of sedimentation over an oceanward-dipping continental basement into the Gulf of Guinea; thereafter progradation took place over a landward-dipping oceanic basement. A 12,000 m thick succession of overall regressive, offlapping sediments resulted that is composed of three diachronous siliciclastic units: the deep-marine pro-delta Akata Group, the shallow-marine delta-front Agbada Group and the continental, delta-top Benin Group. Regionally, sediment dispersal was controlled by marine transgressive/regressive cycles related to eustatic sea-level changes with varying duration. Differential subsidence locally influenced sediment accumulation. Collectively, these controls resulted in eleven chronostratigraphically confined delta-wide mega-sequences with considerable internal lithological variation. The various sea-level cycles were in or out of phase with each other and with local subsidence, and interfered with each other and thus influenced the depositional processes. At the high inflection points of the long-term eustatic sea-level curve, floodings took place that resulted in delta-wide shale markers. At the low inflection points, erosional channels were formed that are often associated, downdip, with turbidites in low-stand sediments (LSTs). The megasequences contain regional transgressive claystone units (TST) followed by a range of heterogeneous fine-to-coarse progradational or aggradational siliciclastic (para)sequence sets formed during sea-level high-stand (HST). An updated biostratigraphic scheme for the Niger Delta is presented. It also updates a sedimentation model that takes into consideration local and delta-wide effects of sea-level cyclicity and delta tectonics. Megasequences were formed over time intervals of ~5 Ma within individual accurate megastructures that laterally linked into depobelts. The megasequences form the time-stratigraphic frame of the delta and are the

  1. The {\\delta}N Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Sugiyama, Naonori S; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Precise understanding of non-linear evolution of cosmological perturbations during inflation is necessary for the correct interpretation of measurements of non-Gaussian correlations in the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale structure of the universe. The "{\\delta}N formalism" is a popular and powerful technique for computing non-linear evolution of cosmological perturbations on large scales. In particular, it enables us to compute the curvature perturbation, {\\zeta}, on large scales without actually solving perturbed field equations. However, people often wonder why this is the case. In order for this approach to be valid, the perturbed Hamiltonian constraint and matter-field equations on large scales must, with a suitable choice of coordinates, take on the same forms as the corresponding unperturbed equations. We find that this is possible when (1) the unperturbed metric is given by a homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker metric; and (2) on large scales and with a suita...

  2. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  3. Synaptic Contributions to Receptive Field Structure and Response Properties in the Rodent Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of the Thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Vandana; Çiftçioğlu, Ulaş M; Wang, Xin; Lala, Brittany M; Ding, Kimberly R; Smith, William A; Sommer, Friedrich T; Hirsch, Judith A

    2016-10-26

    . In mouse retina, the most numerous cell type has the smallest receptive fields but lacks push-pull. The most common receptive field in rodent thalamus, however, is center-surround with push-pull. Thus, receptive field structure supersedes size per se for form vision. Further, for many orientation-selective cells, the second-order component of the receptive field aligned with stimulus preference, whereas suppression was untuned. Thus, inhibition may improve spatial resolution and sharpen other forms of selectivity in rodent lateral geniculate nucleus. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3610949-15$15.00/0.

  4. Reading Ombrone river delta evolution through beach ridges morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammi, Irene; Piccardi, Marco; Pranzini, Enzo; Rossi, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    heights were analysed through LiDAR data and some of them were found higher than average. Conceptual models in literature allowed us to explain higher beach ridges as periods of stability or a very initial erosion stage interesting the beach. The high resolution DTM produced from LiDAR and UAV data permitted a better reconstruction of the last five centuries of delta evolution and to characterize the difference of beach ridges morphology of the up-drift and the down-drift sides of the delta. Within this framework the presence of interdune swales in the down-drift side has been explained.

  5. Tidal controls on river delta morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoitink, A. J. F.; Wang, Z. B.; Vermeulen, B.; Huismans, Y.; Kästner, K.

    2017-09-01

    River delta degradation has been caused by extraction of natural resources, sediment retention by reservoirs, and sea-level rise. Despite global concerns about these issues, human activity in the world’s largest deltas intensifies. Harbour development, construction of flood defences, sand mining and land reclamation emerge as key contemporary factors that exert an impact on delta morphology. Tides interacting with river discharge can play a crucial role in the morphodynamic development of deltas under pressure. Emerging insights into tidal controls on river delta morphology suggest that--despite the active morphodynamics in tidal channels and mouth bar regions--tidal motion acts to stabilize delta morphology at the landscape scale under the condition that sediment import during low flows largely balances sediment export during high flows. Distributary channels subject to tides show lower migration rates and are less easily flooded by the river because of opposing non-linear interactions between river discharge and the tide. These interactions lead to flow changes within channels, and a more uniform distribution of discharge across channels. Sediment depletion and rigorous human interventions in deltas, including storm surge defence works, disrupt the dynamic morphological equilibrium and can lead to erosion and severe scour at the channel bed, even decades after an intervention.

  6. Evolving deltas: Coevolution with engineered interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Welch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Deltaic environments are often densely populated with high socio-economic values, and thus are hotspots of climatic, environmental and anthropogenic change. Large scale engineered structures, such as dike systems, have played an important role in shaping both environmental and socio-economic conditions in deltas, with such interventions more likely where there is a high population and a wealthy economy. Engineered interventions interact with the morphological evolution of the delta, reducing or removing sedimentation and accelerating subsidence, increasing the consequences of flooding and necessitating further adaptation. They also encourage further development, reinforcing this feedback. Thus, in these cases, the deltaic landscape and associated livelihoods can be considered to be the result of a coevolution process between natural delta processes and human engineered interventions. This paper explores this hypothesis. It analyses the history of large scale engineering interventions and their implications in five representative, large, populated deltas across the globe (Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna, Yangtze, Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt, Mekong and Nile. The results demonstrate coevolution has occurred and indicate that the response type and the management approach of these engineered structures have significant implications for future delta development. To understand and manage unintended consequences and the development of lock-in trajectories in deltas, a systematic understanding of delta development, including these coevolution processes is essential.

  7. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-01-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae ‘Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, during 2005–2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava–ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava–ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  8. Questionnaire discrimination: (re)-introducing coefficient delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Matthew

    2007-05-18

    Questionnaires are used routinely in clinical research to measure health status and quality of life. Questionnaire measurements are traditionally formally assessed by indices of reliability (the degree of measurement error) and validity (the extent to which the questionnaire measures what it is supposed to measure). Neither of these indices assesses the degree to which the questionnaire is able to discriminate between individuals, an important aspect of measurement. This paper introduces and extends an existing index of a questionnaire's ability to distinguish between individuals, that is, the questionnaire's discrimination. Ferguson (1949) 1 derived an index of test discrimination, coefficient delta, for psychometric tests with dichotomous (correct/incorrect) items. In this paper a general form of the formula, deltaG, is derived for the more general class of questionnaires allowing for several response choices. The calculation and characteristics of deltaG are then demonstrated using questionnaire data (GHQ-12) from 2003-2004 British Household Panel Survey (N = 14761). Coefficients for reliability (alpha) and discrimination (deltaG) are computed for two commonly-used GHQ-12 coding methods: dichotomous coding and four-point Likert-type coding. Both scoring methods were reliable (alpha > 0.88). However, deltaG was substantially lower (0.73) for the dichotomous coding of the GHQ-12 than for the Likert-type method (deltaG = 0.96), indicating that the dichotomous coding, although reliable, failed to discriminate between individuals. Coefficient deltaG was shown to have decisive utility in distinguishing between the cross-sectional discrimination of two equally reliable scoring methods. Ferguson's delta has been neglected in discussions of questionnaire design and performance, perhaps because it has not been implemented in software and was restricted to questionnaires with dichotomous items, which are rare in health care research. It is suggested that the more general

  9. Distortion-free delta-sigma beamforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Carl-Inge Colombo; Holm, Sverre

    2008-08-01

    We have analyzed a compact, digital delay- and-sum beamformer using 1-bit delta-sigma A/D converters, where dynamic delays are applied directly to the delta-sigma modulated bitstream. It has previously been shown that the introduction of this time-variant operation into the time-invariant delta-sigma demodulator distorts the output signal, and several methods for minimizing this effect have been suggested. We have described the effect using standard system terminology. Based on this description, a new method for removing the distortion without any significant increase in system complexity is introduced. Its advantages, performance-wise, are supported by theoretical assessments and simulations.

  10. Effect of teriflunomide on cortex-basal ganglia-thalamus (CxBGTh) circuit glutamatergic dysregulation in the Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modica, Claire M; Schweser, Ferdinand; Sudyn, Michelle L; Bertolino, Nicola; Preda, Marilena; Polak, Paul; Siebert, Danielle M; Krawiecki, Jacqueline C; Sveinsson, Michele; Hagemeier, Jesper; Dwyer, Michael G; Pol, Suyog; Zivadinov, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Pathology of gray matter is associated with development of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis. In particular, glutamatergic dysregulation in the cortex-basal ganglia-thalamus (CxBGTh) circuit could be associated with decline in these behaviors. To investigate the effect of an immunomodulatory therapy (teriflunomide, Aubagio®) on changes of the CxBGTh loop in the Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus, (TMEV) mouse model of MS. Forty-eight (48) mice were infected with TMEV, treated with teriflunomide (24) or control vehicle (24) and followed for 39 weeks. Mice were examined with MRS and volumetric MRI scans (0, 8, 26, and 39 weeks) in the cortex, basal ganglia and thalamus, using a 9.4T scanner, and with behavioral tests (0, 4, 8, 12, 17, 26, and 39 weeks). Within conditions, MRI measures were compared between two time points by paired samples t-test and across multiple time points by repeated measures ANOVA (rmANOVA), and between conditions by independent samples t-test and rmANOVA, respectively. Data were considered as significant at the pteriflunomide arm exhibited trends toward decreased glutamate levels at 8 and 26 weeks compared to the control arm (p = 0.039 and p = 0.026), while the control arm exhibited a trend toward increased glutamate between 0 to 8 weeks (p = 0.045). In the basal ganglia, the teriflunomide arm exhibited a trend toward decreased glutamate earlier than the control arm, from 0 to 8 weeks (p = 0.011), resulting in decreased glutamate compared to the control arm at 8 weeks (p = 0.016). Teriflunomide may reduce possible excitotoxicity in the thalamus and basal ganglia by lowering glutamate levels.

  11. Developing Modern Niger Delta Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edewor Uyoyou Nelson O

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Edewor Nelson (b. 1970 is a sculptor whose works depict configurations that espouse contexts associated with inimical and exploitative tendencies of petroleum oil exploration and exploitation in the Niger Delta region. His expressions represent a new formalism that is iconic of the region’s reality in terms of environmental degradation and fundamental human rights abuses. This motivation became imperative in the seemingly failure of other artistic explorations on the subject to adequately reflect modern formal archetypes for which the region’s dilemma can be expressed. The challenge of analytic study of this effort for attaining interpretative insights into this studio practice is pertinent. To realize this, corresponding Ivri traditional art form associated with the past in the region has been studied alongside petroleum drilling–related forms. This provides the fulcrum on which this article approaches an analysis of contextual and conceptual applications attributable to the stylistic oeuvre of Edewor’s practice since 1997. It uses formalism and iconography interpretative tools for its critical discourse.

  12. Delta Electroproduction in 12-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLauchlan, Steven [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    The Δ-nucleus potential is a crucial element in the understanding of the nuclear system. Previous electroexcitation measurements in the delta region reported a Q2 dependence of the Δ mass indicating that this potential is dependent on the momentum of the Δ. Such a dependence is not observed for protons and neutrons in the nuclear medium. This thesis presents the experimental study of the electroexcitation of the Δ resonance in 12C, performed using the high energy electron beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and the near 4π acceptance detector CLAS that enables the detection of the full reaction final state. Inclusive, semi inclusive, and exclusive cross sections were measured with an incident electron beam energy of 1.162GeV over the Q2 range 0.175-0.475 (GeV/c)2. A Q2 dependence of the Δ mass was only observed in the exclusive measurements indicating that the Δ-nucleus potential is affected by the momentum of the Δ.

  13. Variability Matters: New Insights into Mechanics of River Avulsions on Deltas and Their Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganti, V.

    2015-12-01

    River deltas are highly dynamic, often fan-shaped depositional systems that form when rivers drain into a standing body of water. They host over a half billion people and are currently under threat of drowning and destruction by relative sea-level rise, subsidence, and anthropogenic interference. Deltas often develop planform fan shapes through avulsions, whereby major river channel shifts occur via "channel jumping" about a spatial node, thus determining their fundamental length scale. Emerging theories suggest that the size of delta lobes is set by backwater hydrodynamics; however, these ideas are difficult to test on natural deltas, which evolve on centennial to millennial timescales. In this presentation, I will show results from the first laboratory delta built through successive deposition of lobes that maintain a constant size that scales with backwater hydrodynamics. The characteristic size of deltas emerges because of a preferential avulsion node that remains fixed spatially relative to the prograding shoreline, and is a consequence of multiple river floods that produce persistent morphodynamic river-bed adjustment within the backwater zone. Moreover, river floods cause erosion in the lowermost reaches of the alluvial river near their coastline, which may leave erosional boundaries in the sedimentary record that may appear similar to those previously interpreted to be a result of relative sea-level fall. I will discuss the implications of these findings in the context of sustainability management of deltas, decoding their stratigraphic record, and identifying ancient standing bodies of water on other planets such as Mars. Finally, I will place this delta study in a broader context of recent work that highlights the importance of understanding and quantifying variability in sedimentology and geomorphology.

  14. Legal Delta Boundary, 2001, DWR [ds586

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The original topographic maps containing the drawn delta border were scanned from the Department of Water Resources. Images were registered to 1:24,000 USGS DRG's in...

  15. Astrobee Periodic Technical Review (PTR) Delta 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, Christopher; Smith, Marion F.; Smith, Ernest Everett; Bualat, Maria Gabriele; Barlow, Jonathan Spencer

    2017-01-01

    Astrobee is a free flying robot for the inside of the International Space Station (ISS). The Periodic Technical Review (PTR) delta 3 is the final design review of the system presented to stakeholders.

  16. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  17. California Black Rail - Central Delta [ds17

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Results of taped-call black rail surveys of in-stream habitat within certain waterways in the central Sacramento / San Joaquin Delta during 1992 and 1993. TIME...

  18. Yukon Delta NWR Land Status Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a map of Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge within the State of Alaska. It depicts the refuge and wilderness boundaries, hillshaded topography, and...

  19. Niger Delta Crisis and Security Implications for the Nation State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper seeks to examine the Niger Delta crisis and security implications for the Nigeria state. Its focus on the Niger Delta is because of the festering crisis in the region which is of critical importance to Nigeria. The Niger Delta is the nation's treasure base, the Niger Delta provides over 80 percent of government revenue, ...

  20. Stellar delta matter with delta-meson coupling constants constrained by QCD sum rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Antonio Ferreira da [Secretaria de Educacao, Cultura e Desportos do Estado de Roraima (SECD/RR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Oliveira, Jose Carlos Teixeira de [Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Rodrigues, Hilario [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, Sergio Barbosa [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chiapparini, Marcelo [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The considerable presence of delta-resonances (30% of baryonic population) in the dense phase of relativistic heavy ion collisions leads to a great interest in the study of the delta matter formation in the deep interior of compact stars. In the present work we determine the equation of state and the population of baryons and leptons and discuss the effects of the baryon-meson coupling constants to the formation of delta matter in the stellar medium. We use the non-linear Walecka model consisting of the octet of baryons of spin 1=2 (n, p, {Lambda}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -}, {Xi}{sup 0}) and baryonic resonances of spin 3=2, represented by the delta resonances ({Delta}{sup -}, ({Delta}{sup 0}, ({Delta}{sup +}, ({Delta}{sup ++}) and {Omega}{sup -}, in the baryonic sector. In the leptonic sector we consider the electrons and muons. The coupling constants between the hyperons {Lambda}, {Sigma}, and {Xi} and the mesons {omega} and {rho} are fixed by using SU(6) symmetry, while the hyperons-{sigma} coupling constants are constrained by the consistence of the hypernuclear potential in the nuclear matter with hypernuclear data. In addition, we use the finite density QCD sum rule to determine the possible values of delta-meson coupling constants. (author)

  1. The. delta. expansion and local gauge invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, C.M. (Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (US)); Cooper, F. (Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexic o 87545); Milton, K.A. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklaho ma 73019)

    1989-08-15

    A recently proposed approximation method, called the {delta} expansion, was introduced in the context of a self-interacting scalar field theory. This approximation method offers the hope of obtaining nonperturbative information about a quantum field theory using perturbative techniques. In this paper we extend formally the {delta}-expansion methods to field theories having local gauge symmetry. We then compute the anomaly in the Schwinger model.

  2. The Okavango delta: The value of tourism

    OpenAIRE

    G Mopelwa; J Blignaut

    2014-01-01

    In Botswana, tourism is the second most important economic activity after diamond mining and trading. The Okavango Delta in northern Botswana is the largest single tourist centre in the country. This study estimates the total economic value of tourism in the Okavango Delta and compares this value to that of other sectors in the economy of Botswana. The results are compared to results of similar studies for tourist destinations elsewhere in the world, and the policy implications of the finding...

  3. Delta-t protocol specification: working draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R.W.

    1981-12-04

    This document is one of a series describing protocols associated with the Livermore Interactive Network Communication System (LINCS) hierarchical architecture. At the heart of LINCS is its basic interprocess communication (LINCS-IPC) service. LINCS-IPC defines a reliable, flow controlled, full duplex, uninterpreted, labeled bit stream communication service. LINCS-IPC is level 4 in the LINCS architecture. Level 3 of LINCS is the Network layer defining an internetwork datagram type service. LINCS-IPC interfaces to User processes that utilize higher level syntactic and semantic conventions for process interaction. The transport service provided by the Delta-t protocol can be considered a sublayer of the LINCS-IPC layer. Delta-t augments the Network level service as required to support LINCS-IPC. This document specifies the services provided by the Delta-t protocol to support LINCS-IPC, the operation of Delta-t, and the services Delta-t requires of the Network level. This document was written to be self-contained but the reader will find it useful to have available for reference the LINCS-IPC and LINCS DeltaGram Network layer protocol specifications. Implementations are underway in Pascal for the PDP-11 running under RT11 and RX11, in BLISS for the VAX running under VMS, in MODEL for the CRAY-1 and CDC 7600 running under NLTSS and LTSS, and for the SEL 32/75 running under PORT.

  4. Investigations of (Delta)14C, (delta)13C, and (delta)15N in vertebrae of white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) from the eastern North Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, L A; Andrews, A H; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A; Coale, K H

    2006-06-08

    The white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) has a complex life history that is characterized by large scale movements and a highly variable diet. Estimates of age and growth for the white shark from the eastern North Pacific Ocean indicate they have a slow growth rate and a relatively high longevity. Age, growth, and longevity estimates useful for stock assessment and fishery models, however, require some form of validation. By counting vertebral growth band pairs, ages can be estimated, but because not all sharks deposit annual growth bands and many are not easily discernable, it is necessary to validate growth band periodicity with an independent method. Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) age validation uses the discrete {sup 14}C signal produced from thermonuclear testing in the 1950s and 1960s that is retained in skeletal structures as a time-specific marker. Growth band pairs in vertebrae, estimated as annual and spanning the 1930s to 1990s, were analyzed for {Delta}{sup 14}C and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N). The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of {sup 14}C age validation for a wide-ranging species with a complex life history and to use stable isotope measurements in vertebrae as a means of resolving complexity introduced into the {sup 14}C chronology by ontogenetic shifts in diet and habitat. Stable isotopes provided useful trophic position information; however, validation of age estimates was confounded by what may have been some combination of the dietary source of carbon to the vertebrae, large-scale movement patterns, and steep {sup 14}C gradients with depth in the eastern North Pacific Ocean.

  5. The Okavango: Whose Delta is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magole, Lapologang; Magole, Lefatshe Innocent

    The Okavango Delta is amongst the largest Ramsar sites ( http://www.ramsar.org/sitelist.pdf) in the world and an important wetland for community livelihoods, conservation and tourism in Botswana. Over the years, the utilization of the delta has shifted from communal use to state control, with an increased use for conservation and tourism. This increased use for conservation and tourism has manifested in the physical expansion of the conservation area - Moremi Game Reserve and the formation of Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) around the reserve, whose primary land use is wildlife utilization. The expansion of the conservation area has translated into several practical matters, including expansion of the area for non-hunting activities or photographic areas. The livelihoods of local communities of the Okavango delta who depended on fishing, hunter-gathering, livestock rearing, rain-fed agriculture and flood recession farming have been negatively affected by the expansion of conservation and tourism in the delta. The livelihoods alternatives in the form of Community Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) and tourism have not provided substitutes for the people as the communities are still reliant on the same old livelihood sources as in the past, albeit within smaller and restricted areas. This paper explores the ownership of the natural resources within the Okavango Delta. It asks and attempts to answer the following questions: Who owns and controls the use of the land? Who has access to other resources there in? Who makes the decisions on how the delta resources should be managed and used? Who benefits from the delta resources? We argue firstly that ownership of the delta as defined by legal parameters and demonstrated in natural resource management practice is vested on government. Secondly, government, after assuming ownership of the delta continues to sell its stake to the international community, at the expense of local ownership and access to resources. We

  6. Nigeria, oil and gas exploration and the Niger delta question : a study in corporate social responsibility / E.K Bribena

    OpenAIRE

    Bribena, E K

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses issues of the Niger Delta question which represents one of the most intractable sources of socio-political destabilization in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The study is on the intricate dynamics amongst the Nigerian state, the transnational oi l corporations, the oil producing communities and the insurgent militia conflict. It investigates and explicates the "paradox of plenty" and the "resource curse", the "absentee government" and "state capture"...

  7. Climate optimized planting windows for cotton in the lower Mississippi Delta region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unique, variable summer climate of the lower Mississippi Delta region poses a critical challenge to cotton producers in deciding when to plant for optimized production. Traditional 2- to 4-year agronomic field trials conducted in this area fail to capture the effects of long-term climate variabiliti...

  8. Rice-freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) farms in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Quang, Nguyen

    1993-01-01

    Aquaculture in riceland has been practiced in Mekong Delta, Vietnam for a long time and integrated rice-freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) farming has become more and more popular. The integrated farming systems developed and practiced by farmers in the area to produce more food and more cash crops are presented and discussed.

  9. An expanded Notch-Delta model exhibiting long-range patterning and incorporating MicroRNA regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry S Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Notch-Delta signaling is a fundamental cell-cell communication mechanism that governs the differentiation of many cell types. Most existing mathematical models of Notch-Delta signaling are based on a feedback loop between Notch and Delta leading to lateral inhibition of neighboring cells. These models result in a checkerboard spatial pattern whereby adjacent cells express opposing levels of Notch and Delta, leading to alternate cell fates. However, a growing body of biological evidence suggests that Notch-Delta signaling produces other patterns that are not checkerboard, and therefore a new model is needed. Here, we present an expanded Notch-Delta model that builds upon previous models, adding a local Notch activity gradient, which affects long-range patterning, and the activity of a regulatory microRNA. This model is motivated by our experiments in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis showing that the peripheral sensory neurons, whose specification is in part regulated by the coordinate activity of Notch-Delta signaling and the microRNA miR-124, exhibit a sparse spatial pattern whereby consecutive neurons may be spaced over a dozen cells apart. We perform rigorous stability and bifurcation analyses, and demonstrate that our model is able to accurately explain and reproduce the neuronal pattern in Ciona. Using Monte Carlo simulations of our model along with miR-124 transgene over-expression assays, we demonstrate that the activity of miR-124 can be incorporated into the Notch decay rate parameter of our model. Finally, we motivate the general applicability of our model to Notch-Delta signaling in other animals by providing evidence that microRNAs regulate Notch-Delta signaling in analogous cell types in other organisms, and by discussing evidence in other organisms of sparse spatial patterns in tissues where Notch-Delta signaling is active.

  10. Houtman Abrolhos Isotope (delta 18O, delta 13C) Data for 1795 to 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — DESCRIPTION: VARIABLES AND UNITS: Column #1: core depth in mm Column #2: delta C-13 vs V-PDB Column #3: delta O-18 vs V-PDB Column #4: assigned date in years A.D....

  11. Impact of sea-level rise in a Mediteranean delta : The Ebro delta cast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, A.; Stive, M.D.F.; Jiménez, J.A.; García, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    In anticipation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary study on the impact of climatic change on the Ebro Delta preliminary results are here presented of the response of the outer delta coast to present and future relative sea-level rise. Due to the absence of observations and predictions of regional

  12. The crystal structure of delta(3)-delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursula, A M; van Aalten, D M; Hiltunen, J K; Wierenga, R K

    2001-06-15

    The active-site geometry of the first crystal structure of a Delta(3)-Delta(2)-enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) isomerase (the peroxisomal enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae) shows that only one catalytic base, Glu158, is involved in shuttling the proton from the C2 carbon atom of the substrate, Delta(3)-enoyl-CoA, to the C4 atom of the product, Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA. Site-directed mutagenesis has been performed to confirm that this glutamate residue is essential for catalysis. This Delta(3)-Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase is a hexameric enzyme, consisting of six identical subunits. It belongs to the hydratase/isomerase superfamily of enzymes which catalyze a wide range of CoA-dependent reactions. The members of the hydratase/ isomerase superfamily have only a low level of sequence identity. Comparison of the crystal structure of the Delta(3)-Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase with the other structures of this superfamily shows only one region of large structural variability, which is in the second turn of the spiral fold and which is involved in defining the shape of the binding pocket. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Interdisciplinary and Distance Education in the Delta: The Delta Health Education Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorga, Phyllis

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Delta Health Education Partnership, an interdisciplinary distance education program intended to recruit, educate, and retain interdisciplinary groups of primary care health practitioners to increase access to health care in medically underserved and health professional shortage areas of the lower Mississippi Delta. It spans six…

  14. Does {delta}m = {delta}E{sub rest}/c{sup 2}?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redzic, Dragan V [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, PO Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2006-01-01

    We point out a logical possibility, based on special relativity, that the validity of Einstein's 1905 generalization, {delta}m = {delta}E{sub rest}/c{sup 2}, might depend on how the energy of a body is defined in special relativity. The analysis is another illustration of the importance of Ockham's razor in special relativity.

  15. Comparison of CIELAB DeltaE(*) and CIEDE2000 color-differences after polymerization and thermocycling of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2005-07-01

    Though instrumental technologies have been widely used for quantifying color of esthetic dental materials, the sizes for the perceptible or acceptable color-difference varied. Instead of the CIELAB DeltaE(*)(DeltaE(ab)(*)) formula, the CIEDE2000 (DeltaE(00)) formula that included weighting and parametric functions was introduced. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between color-difference values of DeltaE(ab)(*) and DeltaE(00) after polymerization and thermocycling of dental resin composites. Color-differences were calculated between unpolymerized and polymerized, and between polymerized and thermocycled resin composites. Color was measured relative to the standard illuminant D65 over a white background with SCE geometry. Regression analyses were performed between the color difference values of DeltaE(ab)(*) and DeltaE(00). There were significant correlations between DeltaE(ab)(*) values and DeltaE(00) values after polymerization and thermocycling (plightness, chroma and hue, the DeltaE(00) formula could be considered for the color evaluation of esthetic dental materials after confirming with human observer responses.

  16. Overproduction of delta-endotoxins by sporeless Bacillus thuringiensis mutants obtained by nitrous acid mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Zouari, Nabil; Messaddeq, Nadia; Schultz, Patrick; Jaoua, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Asporogenic and oligosporogenic Bacillus thuringiensis mutants having the ability to overproduce insecticidal crystal protein were generated by using nitrous acid (50 mg/ml), as chemical mutagenic agent. Insecticidal crystal proteins produced by asporogenic mutants remained encapsulated within the cells. Delta-endotoxin production by most of mutants was improved compared to the corresponding wild strains BNS3 and a mutant M26. The overproduction by asporogenic and oligosporogenic mutants was attributed to defect in genes involved in sporulation and to random mutations affecting cell metabolism at different pathways and delta-endotoxin synthesis. Sporeless bioinsecticides could be developed based on stable and environmentally safe Bacillus thuringiensis mutants.

  17. Interactions among mu- and delta-opioid receptors, especially putative delta1- and delta2-opioid receptors, promote dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirose, N.; Murakawa, K.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Nagase, H.; Cools, A.R.; Koshikawa, N.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of interactions among mu- and delta-opioid receptors, especially the putative delta(1)- and delta(2)-opioid receptors, in the nucleus accumbens on accumbal dopamine release was investigated in awake rats by in vivo brain microdialysis. In agreement with previous studies, perfusion of the

  18. Tracking Nile Delta vulnerability to Holocene change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, Nick; Flaux, Clément; Morhange, Christophe; Stanley, Jean-Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with insolation-driven changes in the 'monsoon pacemaker', attested throughout the mid-latitude tropics. Following the early to mid-Holocene growth of the Nile's deltaic plain, sediment losses and pronounced erosion are first recorded after ~4000 years ago, the corollaries of falling sediment supply and an intensification of anthropogenic impacts from the Pharaonic period onwards. Against the backcloth of the Saharan 'depeopling', reduced river flow underpinned by a weakening of monsoonal precipitation appears to have been particularly conducive to the expansion of human activities on the delta by exposing productive floodplain lands for occupation and irrigation agriculture. The reconstruction suggests that the Nile Delta has a particularly long history of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g. floods and storms) and sea-level rise, although the present sediment-starved system does not have a direct Holocene analogue. This study highlights the importance of the world's deltas as sensitive archives to investigate Holocene geosystem responses to climate change, risks and hazards, and societal interaction.

  19. Degradation Of Mangroves Ecosystem Of Indus Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Peracha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Indus Delta being the 6th largest delta of the world was earlier environmentally healthy and contributing its due share in the economic growth of the country. During the last six decades construction of reservoirs canals diversion of water for irrigation and considerable reduction in seasonal rains etc. substantially decreased the Indus water in the delta. The reduction of fresh water in the deltaic region threatened the livelihood of millions of fisher folk farmers marine inhabitants and as well as naturally rich mangroves ecosystem of the area. If the situation continues the country might lose its major share in revenue generation. Keeping in view the gravity of the circumstances preemptive measures are required to be taken forthwith. All stake-holders are to be apprised about the significance of the region and ask to play their respective role to save the delta. In this paper efforts have been made to develop a Mathematical Model that acquaints the government about the alarming situation particularly the degradation of the existence of Mangrove ecosystem in the Indus Delta.

  20. Open source integrated modeling environment Delta Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Jagers, B.; van Putten, H.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decade, integrated modelling has become a very popular topic in environmental modelling since it helps solving problems, which is difficult to model using a single model. However, managing complexity of integrated models and minimizing time required for their setup remains a challenging task. The integrated modelling environment Delta Shell simplifies this task. The software components of Delta Shell are easy to reuse separately from each other as well as a part of integrated environment that can run in a command-line or a graphical user interface mode. The most components of the Delta Shell are developed using C# programming language and include libraries used to define, save and visualize various scientific data structures as well as coupled model configurations. Here we present two examples showing how Delta Shell simplifies process of setting up integrated models from the end user and developer perspectives. The first example shows coupling of a rainfall-runoff, a river flow and a run-time control models. The second example shows how coastal morphological database integrates with the coastal morphological model (XBeach) and a custom nourishment designer. Delta Shell is also available as open-source software released under LGPL license and accessible via http://oss.deltares.nl.

  1. Tracking Nile Delta vulnerability to Holocene change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Marriner

    Full Text Available Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with insolation-driven changes in the 'monsoon pacemaker', attested throughout the mid-latitude tropics. Following the early to mid-Holocene growth of the Nile's deltaic plain, sediment losses and pronounced erosion are first recorded after ~4000 years ago, the corollaries of falling sediment supply and an intensification of anthropogenic impacts from the Pharaonic period onwards. Against the backcloth of the Saharan 'depeopling', reduced river flow underpinned by a weakening of monsoonal precipitation appears to have been particularly conducive to the expansion of human activities on the delta by exposing productive floodplain lands for occupation and irrigation agriculture. The reconstruction suggests that the Nile Delta has a particularly long history of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g. floods and storms and sea-level rise, although the present sediment-starved system does not have a direct Holocene analogue. This study highlights the importance of the world's deltas as sensitive archives to investigate Holocene geosystem responses to climate change, risks and hazards, and societal interaction.

  2. Challenges from the Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... have produced debilitating effects on the economy of the region. It need not be stated that this has ... include water pollution, solid and hazardous waste, deforestation, soil degradation and loss of ... oil spills impact negatively on the environment as it depletes the mangrove trees and pollute the streams and ...

  3. Hydrogen production by Escherichia coli {delta}hycA {delta}lacI using cheese whey as substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales-Colunga, Luis Manuel; Ordonez, Leandro G.; De Leon-Rodriguez, Antonio (Division de Biologia Molecular, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a secc. CP 78216, San Luis Potosi, SLP. Mexico); Razo-Flores, Elias; Alatriste-Mondragon, Felipe (Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a secc. CP 78216, San Luis Potosi, SLP. Mexico)

    2010-01-15

    This study reports a fermentative hydrogen production by Escherichia coli using cheese whey as substrate. To improve the biohydrogen production, an E. coli {delta}hycA {delta}lacI strain (WDHL) was constructed. The absence of hycA and lacI genes had a positive effect on the biohydrogen production. The strain produced 22% more biohydrogen in a shorter time than the wild-type (WT) strain. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to optimize pH, temperature and substrate concentration. The optimal initial conditions for biohydrogen production by WDHL strain were pH 7.5, 37 C and 20 g/L of cheese whey. The specific production rate was improved from 3.29 mL H{sub 2}/optical density at 600 nm (OD{sub 600nm}) unit-h produced by WDHL under non-optimal conditions to 5.88 mL H{sub 2}/OD{sub 600nm} unit-h under optimal conditions. Using optimal initial conditions, galactose can be metabolized by WDHL strain. The maximum yield obtained was 2.74 mol H{sub 2}/mol lactose consumed, which is comparable with the yield reached in other hydrogen production processes with Clostridium sp. or mixed cultures. (author)

  4. A behavioural comparison of acute and chronic Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol in C57BL/6JArc mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Leonora E; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C; Karl, Tim

    2010-08-01

    Cannabis contains over 70 unique compounds and its abuse is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia. The behavioural profiles of the psychotropic cannabis constituent Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and the non-psychotomimetic constituent cannabidiol (CBD) were investigated with a battery of behavioural tests relevant to anxiety and positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Male adult C57BL/6JArc mice were given 21 daily intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, Delta9-THC (0.3, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5, 10 or 50 mg/kg). Delta9-THC produced the classic cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated tetrad of hypolocomotion, analgesia, catalepsy and hypothermia while CBD had modest hyperthermic effects. While sedative at this dose, Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) produced locomotor-independent anxiogenic effects in the open-field and light-dark tests. Chronic CBD produced moderate anxiolytic-like effects in the open-field test at 50 mg/kg and in the light-dark test at a low dose (1 mg/kg). Acute and chronic Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) decreased the startle response while CBD had no effect. Prepulse inhibition was increased by acute treatment with Delta9-THC (0.3, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5 and 50 mg/kg) and by chronic CBD (1 mg/kg). Chronic CBD (50 mg/kg) attenuated dexamphetamine (5 mg/kg)-induced hyperlocomotion, suggesting an antipsychotic-like action for this cannabinoid. Chronic Delta9-THC decreased locomotor activity before and after dexamphetamine administration suggesting functional antagonism of the locomotor stimulant effect. These data provide the first evidence of anxiolytic- and antipsychotic-like effects of chronic but not acute CBD in C57BL/6JArc mice, extending findings from acute studies in other inbred mouse strains and rats.

  5. DELTA-DIESEL ENGINE LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATION Contract DE-FC05-97OR22606 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Nabil Balnaves, Mike

    2003-05-27

    DELTA Diesel Engine Light Truck Application End of Contract Report DE-FC05-97-OR22606 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report is the final technical report of the Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program under contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606. During the course of this contract, Detroit Diesel Corporation analyzed, designed, tooled, developed and applied the ''Proof of Concept'' (Generation 0) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine and designed the successor ''Production Technology Demonstration'' (Generation 1) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine. The objectives of DELTA Program contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606 were to: Demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies, specifically intended for the North American LDT and SUV markets; Demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages. With a clean sheet design, DDC produced the DELTA engine concept promising the following attributes: 30-50% improved fuel economy; Low cost; Good durability and reliability; Acceptable noise, vibration and harshness (NVH); State-of-the-art features; Even firing, 4 valves per cylinder; High pressure common rail fuel system; Electronically controlled; Turbocharged, intercooled, cooled EGR; Extremely low emissions via CLEAN Combustion{copyright} technology. To demonstrate the engine technology in the SUV market, DDC repowered a 1999 Dodge Durango with the DELTA Generation 0 engine. Fuel economy improvements were approximately 50% better than the gasoline engine replaced in the vehicle.

  6. El plan del delta - Holanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1963-09-01

    Full Text Available Holland is very poor in land resources. Hence its development has been directed towards intensive industrialization and maximum agricultural exploitation. The western part of the country is below sea level and is occupied by 65 percent of the population. Originally the coast consisted of a number of islands, estuaries and slight elevations. Man has transformed this coastline, first making a number of artificial lakes, or polders, and then converting these into fertile districts. These projects protect the soil by means of dykes, which require careful conservation, but even so violent floods are not infrequent. One of the difficult problems involved in this vast enterprise is the complex system of water supply, lines of communication and flow of the rivers into the sea along the estuary zone. This zone is on the south west, and to protect it a National Commission has been set up. After careful study, it was decided that the best defense against the violence of the sea would consist in closing off the inroads of the sea into the continental coastline. The set of hydraulic projects which constitutes this plan for the improvement of the sea defences will take 25 years to fulfil. The general project is highly ambitious and includes both maritime, road and structural works, in which there is a variety of stonework constructions. This paper describes, in brief outline, the main contents of the 11 headings into which the general construction project has been subdivided. In addition, this is supplemented with information on the projects which are already initiated and on the constructional procedure that is being adopted. Of these latter projects, the Nabla bridge is of particular interest. It is situated on the delta. It is made in prestressed concrete, and consists of 17 spans, of 60 length each. This enormous structure, in addition to its great length, and supporting a 22.8 ms wide roadway, is subjected to the tremendous forces 11» of the sea on one

  7. Delta capability for launch of communications satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, D. W.; Russell, W. A., Jr.; Kraft, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of capabilities and the current performance levels of the Delta launch vehicle are outlined. The first payload was the Echo I passive communications satellite, weighing 179 lb, and placed in GEO in 1960. Emphasis since then has been to use off-the-shelf hardware where feasible. The latest version in the 3924 first stage, 3920 second stage, and Pam D apogee kick motor third stage. The Delta is presently equipped to place 2800 lb in GEO, as was proven with the 2717 lb Anik-D1 satellite. The GEO payload placement performance matches the Shuttle's, and work is therefore under way to enhance the Delta performance to handle more massive payloads. Installation of the Castor-IV solid motor separation system, thereby saving mass by utilizing compressed nitrogen, rather than mechanical thrusters to remove the strap-on boosters, is indicated, together with use of a higher performance propellant and a wider nose fairing.

  8. Spin amplitudes for NN. -->. N. delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbar, R.R. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Div. de Physique Theorique; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA). Theoretical Div.); Lombard, R.J. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Div. de Physique Theorique); Kloet, W.M. (Rutgers - the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1982-06-21

    The scattering amplitude for NN..-->..N..delta.. is decomposed into sixteen independent spin-space operators Osub(i), where the corresponding coefficients Asub(i) only depend on scattering angle, incoming energy, and the ..delta..-mass. In addition to the commonly used vector spin-transition matrix, it is necessary to also employ a tensor spin-transition matrix. The Osub(i) can be chosen in two ways, either to facilitate discussion of underlying dynamical mechanisms or to simplify the antisymmetrization with respect to the initial nucleons. Relations between the Asub(i) (THETA) and the (LSJ) partial-wave amplitudes are given. We evaluate the Asub(i) using partial-wave amplitudes calculated elsewhere in a unitary three-body model with one-pion-exchange driving terms. Many amplitudes are of competing importance after antisymmetrization, and they are strongly dependent upon incident energy and ..delta.. invariant mass.

  9. The Okavango delta: The value of tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mopelwa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Botswana, tourism is the second most important economic activity after diamond mining and trading. The Okavango Delta in northern Botswana is the largest single tourist centre in the country. This study estimates the total economic value of tourism in the Okavango Delta and compares this value to that of other sectors in the economy of Botswana. The results are compared to results of similar studies for tourist destinations elsewhere in the world, and the policy implications of the findings are highlighted. The study uses secondary data to estimate the direct consumptive and non-consumptive use value, and a survey among tourists to determine the existence value of the Okavango Delta.

  10. Liquefaction potential of Nile delta, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed Fergany

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how sedimentary basins respond to seismic-wave energy generated by earthquake events is a significant concern for seismic-hazard estimation and risk analysis. The main goal of this study is assessing the vulnerability index, Kg, as an indicator for liquefaction potential sites in the Nile delta basin based on the microtremor measurements. Horizontal to Vertical spectral ratio analyses (HVSR of ambient noise data, which was conducted in 2006 at 120 sites covering the Nile delta from south to north were reprocessed using Geopsy software. HVSR factors of amplification, A, and fundamental frequency, F, were calculated and Kg was estimated for each measurement. The Kg value varies widely from south toward north delta and the potential liquefaction places were estimated. The higher vulnerability indices are associated with sites located in southern part of the Nile delta and close to the branches of Nile River. The HVSR factors were correlated with geologic setting of the Nile delta and show good correlations with the sediment thickness and subsurface stratigraphic boundaries. However, we note that sites located in areas that have greatest percentage of sand also yielded relatively high Kg values with respect to sites in areas where clay is abundant. We concluded that any earthquake with ground acceleration more than 50 gal at hard rock can cause a perceived deformation of sandy sediments and liquefaction can take place in the weak zones of Kg ≥ 20. The worst potential liquefaction zones (Kg > 30 are frequently joined to the Damietta and Rosetta Nile River branches and south Delta where relatively coarser sand exists. The HVSR technique is a very sensitive tool for lithological stratigraphy variations in two dimensions and varying liquefaction susceptibility.

  11. Liquefaction potential of Nile delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergany, Elsayed; Omar, Khaled

    2017-06-01

    Understanding how sedimentary basins respond to seismic-wave energy generated by earthquake events is a significant concern for seismic-hazard estimation and risk analysis. The main goal of this study is assessing the vulnerability index, Kg, as an indicator for liquefaction potential sites in the Nile delta basin based on the microtremor measurements. Horizontal to Vertical spectral ratio analyses (HVSR) of ambient noise data, which was conducted in 2006 at 120 sites covering the Nile delta from south to north were reprocessed using Geopsy software. HVSR factors of amplification, A, and fundamental frequency, F, were calculated and Kg was estimated for each measurement. The Kg value varies widely from south toward north delta and the potential liquefaction places were estimated. The higher vulnerability indices are associated with sites located in southern part of the Nile delta and close to the branches of Nile River. The HVSR factors were correlated with geologic setting of the Nile delta and show good correlations with the sediment thickness and subsurface stratigraphic boundaries. However, we note that sites located in areas that have greatest percentage of sand also yielded relatively high Kg values with respect to sites in areas where clay is abundant. We concluded that any earthquake with ground acceleration more than 50 gal at hard rock can cause a perceived deformation of sandy sediments and liquefaction can take place in the weak zones of Kg ≥ 20. The worst potential liquefaction zones (Kg > 30) are frequently joined to the Damietta and Rosetta Nile River branches and south Delta where relatively coarser sand exists. The HVSR technique is a very sensitive tool for lithological stratigraphy variations in two dimensions and varying liquefaction susceptibility.

  12. Delta Scuti and related stars - Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, M.; Stockenhuber, H.

    Present knowledge on Delta Scuti stars, short-period pulsators of spectral types A and F situated on or above the main sequence, is reviewed. The topics discussed include: pulsation periods, pulsational mode-typing through line profiles, cluster stars, and SX Phe-type variables. The position of Delta Scuti stars in the H-R diagram is shown along with the observed period-luminosity-color relation for the stars. Correlations of average pulsation period and M(v) with cluster age are given, showing that the observed correlations can be explained by the PLC relation and main sequence evolution of the clusters.

  13. Hepatitis Delta Infections in Toronto, Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    S. Victor Feinman; Barnet Berris; John L. Gerin; Robert H. Purcell

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of hepatitis delta virus infection, the relation of this infection to the clinical and histological status and to the geographic origin of 216 patients with hepatitis B virus infection in Toronto, Ontario. Evidence of delta infection was present in 13 of the 216 patients (6.0%). It was more common in patients with acute hepatitis (11.1%) and with chronic hepatitis (16.7%) than in asymptomatic carriers (3.6%). It was not present in the three patients with hep...

  14. Abraham Reef Stable Isotope Data (delta 13C, delta 18O, delta 14C) for 1635-1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site: Abraham Reef, 22ó 06'S, 153ó 00'E, Porites australiensus, Radiocarbon (delta 14C) and Stable Isotope (del 18O and del 13C) results from bi-annual samples from...

  15. Nature against nurture: calcification in the right thalamus in a young man with anorexia nervosa and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Rupert; Wegener, Ingo; Geiser, Franziska; Imbierowicz, Katrin; Liedtke, Reinhard

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the case of a young man with a large calcification in the right thalamus that was first diagnosed at 9 years of age. Case history reveals specific eating rituals and other obsessive-compulsive personality traits during the patient's childhood and adolescence, fulfilling diagnostic criteria of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. After a critical life event the patient develops anorexia nervosa. We suggest that our case and further literature provide evidence for an involvement of specific thalamic structures, such as the dorsomedial nucleus, in the development of anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, the treatment of the patient by a combined psychotherapeutic and pharmacotherapeutic approach is described. We focus on the beneficial effect of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine, which can induce weight gain by an increase of leptin levels.

  16. Increased hippocampal, thalamus and amygdala volume in long-term lithium-treated bipolar I disorder patients compared with unmedicated patients and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Jaramillo, Carlos; Vargas, Cristian; Díaz-Zuluaga, Ana M; Palacio, Juan David; Castrillón, Gabriel; Bearden, Carrie; Vieta, Eduard

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in bipolar I disorder (BD-I) suggest that lithium is associated with increased volumes of cortico-limbic structures. However, more rigorous control of confounding factors is needed to obtain further support for this hypothesis. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in brain volumes among long-term lithium-treated BD-I patients, unmedicated BD-I patients, and healthy controls. This was a cross-sectional study with 32 euthymic BD-I patients (16 on lithium monotherapy for a mean of 180 months, and 16 receiving no medication for at least the 2 months prior to the study) and 20 healthy controls. Patients were euthymic (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS] lithium for at least 6 months. Brain images were acquired on a 1.5 Tesla MRI (Phillips, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) and segmented to generate volumetric measures of cortical and subcortical brain areas, ventricles and global brain. Significant differences were found in the volumes of the left amygdala (P=.0003), right amygdala (P=.030), left hippocampus (P=.022), left thalamus (P=.022), and right thalamus (P=.019) in long-term lithium-treated BD-I patients, compared to unmedicated patients and controls, after multivariable adjustment. No differences were observed in global brain volume or in ventricular size among the three groups. Likewise, there was no correlation between serum lithium levels and the increase in size in the described brain areas. The structural differences found among the three groups, and specifically those between long-term lithium-treated and unmedicated BD-I patients, indicate increased limbic structure volumes in lithium-treated patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Spontaneous locomotor activity correlates with the degranulation of mast cells in the meninges rather than in the thalamus: Disruptive effect of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Alice A.; Thomas, Mark J.; McElhose, Alex; Kovács, Katalin J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are located in the central nervous system (CNS) of many mammals and stress induces their degranulation. We postulated that mast cells are associated with wakefulness and stimulatory tone in the CNS, as reflected by spontaneous motor activity. Because stress also precipitates drug-seeking behavior in cocaine addicts, we also postulated that cocaine manifests its effects through this relationship. We investigated the influence of single and repeated injections of cocaine on circulating corticosterone, motor activity and degranulation of mast cells in both the thalamus and meninges of mice. Mice were subjected to 5 consecutive days of cocaine or saline followed by a single injection of cocaine or saline 11 days later. Spontaneous locomotor activity was measure for one hour after the final injection before death. Neither a single injection nor prior treatment with cocaine increased motor activity compared to saline-injected controls, however, repeated administration of cocaine induced a significant sensitization to its behavioral effect when delivered 11 days later. In mice that received only saline, motor activity correlated positively with mast cell degranulation in the meninges but not in the thalamus. Cocaine, regardless of the treatment schedule, disrupted this correlation. The concentration of corticosterone did not differ amongst groups and did not correlate with either behavior or mast cell parameters in any group. The correlation between behavioral activity and the mast cell degranulation in the meninges suggests that these parameters are linked. The disruptive effect of cocaine on this relationship indicates a role downstream from mast cells in the regulation of motor activity. PMID:21561602

  18. Morphology of physiologically identified retinal X and Y axons in the cat's thalamus and midbrain as revealed by intraaxonal injection of biocytin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamaki, N; Uhlrich, D J; Sherman, S M

    1995-04-17

    Prior morphological studies of individual retinal X and Y axon arbors based on intraaxonal labeling with horseradish peroxidase have been limited by restricted diffusion or transport of the label. We used biocytin instead as the intraaxonal label, and this completely delineated each of our six X and 14 Y axons, including both thalamic and midbrain arbors. Arbors in the lateral geniculate nucleus appeared generally as has been well documented previously. Interestingly, all of the labeled axons projected a branch beyond thalamus to the midbrain. Each X axon formed a terminal arbor in the pretectum, but none continued to the superior colliculus. In contrast, 11 of 14 Y axons innervated both the pretectum and the superior colliculus, one innervated only the pretectum, and two innervated only the superior colliculus. Two of the Y axons were quite unusual in that their receptive fields were located well into the hemifield ipsilateral with respect to the hemisphere into which they were injected. These axons exhibited remarkable arbors in the lateral geniculate nucleus, diffusely innervating the C-laminae and medial interlaminar nucleus, but, unlike all other X and Y arbors, they did not innervate the A-laminae at all. In addition to these qualitative observations, we analyzed a number of quantitative features of these axons in terms of numbers and distributions of terminal boutons. We found that Y arbors contained more boutons than did X arbors in both thalamus and midbrain. Also, for axons with receptive fields in the contralateral hemifield (all X and all but two Y axons), 90-95% of their boutons terminated in the lateral geniculate nucleus; the other two Y axons had more of their arbors located in midbrain.

  19. Oil politics and violence in postcolonial Niger Delta drama | Otu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oil politics and violence in postcolonial Niger Delta drama. ... African state and an oppressive colonial or neo-colonial European power. ... and as such contemporary postcolonial Niger Delta drama can be described as drama of individualism ...

  20. Commissioning of the Delta Polarizing Undulator at LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2015-09-25

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) generates linearly polarized, intense, high-brightness x-ray pulses from planar fixed-gap undulators. While the fixed-gap design supports a very successful and tightly controlled alignment concept, it provides only limited taper capability (up to 1% through canted pole and horizontal position adjustability) and lacks polarization control. The latter is of great importance for soft x-ray experiments. A new 3.2-m-long compact undulator (based on the Cornell University Delta design) has been developed and installed in place of the last LCLS undulator segment (U33) in October 2014. This undulator provides full control of the polarization degree and K value. Used on its own, it produces fully polarized radiation in the selected state (linear, circular or elliptical) but at low intensity. To increase the output power by orders of magnitude, the electron beam is micro-bunched by several (~10) of the upstream LCLS undulator segments operated in the linear FEL regime. As unavoidable by-product, this microbunching process produces moderate amounts of horizontally linear polarized radiation which mixes with the radiation produced by the Delta undulator. This unwanted radiation component has been greatly reduced by the reverse taper configuration, as suggested by E. Schneidmiller and M. Yurkov. Full elimination of the linear polarized component was achieved through spatial separation combined with transverse collimation. The paper describes these and other methods tested during commissioning. It also presents results of polarization measurements showing high degrees of circular polarization in the soft x-ray wavelength range (500 eV - 1500 eV).

  1. Bioluminescent hydrocarbonclastic bacteria of the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of three petroleum hydrocarbons (Mobil SAE 40 Engine Oil, Diesel and Bonny light Crude Oil) by four bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio harveyi, V. fisheri, Photobacterium leiognathi and P. Phosphoreum isolated from the Bonny estuary in the Niger Delta, Nigeria was investigated. Microbial utilization was monitored ...

  2. Error Minimization of Polynomial Approximation of Delta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The difference between Universal time (UT) and Dynamical time (TD), known as Delta ( ) is tabulated for the first day of each year in the Astronomical Almanac. During the last four centuries it is found that there are large differences between its values for two consecutive years. Polynomial approximations have been ...

  3. The Delta Team: Empowering Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Marian White

    1994-01-01

    In response to adolescent girls' concerns about teen violence, rumors, grooming, careers, and equity, four women teachers and a woman administrator at a Maryland middle school developed the Delta Program. The program provides positive learning experiences, teaches social skills and conflict management techniques, empowers girls through mentoring…

  4. Water quality in the Okavango Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-12

    Mar 12, 2010 ... This review will discuss levels of water quality parameters, such as .... have a cascading negative impact on species at higher trophic levels, such as fish, ... into water through photosynthesis by plants and phytoplankton or via diffusion ...... Delta, Botswana, and its contribution to the structure and function.

  5. All about the Dirac Delta Function (?)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 8. All about the Dirac Delta Function (?). V Balakrishnan. General Article Volume 8 Issue 8 August 2003 pp 48-58. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/08/0048-0058. Keywords.

  6. Delta Semantics Defined By Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kyng, Morten; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    This report is identical to an earlier version of May 1978 except that Chapter 5 has been revised. A new paper: "A Petri Net Definition of a System Description Language", DAIMI, April 1979, 20 pages, extends the Petri net model to include a data state representing the program variables. Delta...

  7. A delta configured auxiliary resonant snubber inverter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; McKeever, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Technology Div.; Peng, F.Z. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A delta ({Delta}) configured auxiliary resonant snubber inverter is developed to overcome the voltage floating problem in a wye (Y) configured resonant snubber inverter. The proposed inverter is to connect auxiliary resonant branches between phase outputs to avoid a floating point voltage which may cause over-voltage failure of the auxiliary switches. Each auxiliary branch consists of a resonant inductor and a reverse blocking auxiliary switch. Instead of using an anti-paralleled diode to allow resonant current to flow in the reverse direction, as in the Y-configured version, the resonant branch in the {Delta}-configured version must block the negative voltage, typically done by a series diode. This paper shows single-phase and three-phase versions of {Delta}-configured resonant snubber inverters and describes in detail the operating principle of a single-phase version. The extended three-phase version is proposed with non-adjacent state space vector modulation. For hardware implementation, a single-phase 1-kW unit and a three-phase 100-kW unit were built to prove the concept. Experimental results show the superiority of the proposed topology.

  8. Delta governance: The DNA of a specific kind of urbanization

    OpenAIRE

    Boelens, L.

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization is the result of the way leading actors, volatile factors, and historic and dynamic institutional settings interact. However, major differences occur between what we might call Capital and Delta metropolitan areas. This paper compares the governance of two of these Metropolitan Delta Areas: the Euro Delta of the Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt and the Pearl River Delta of the Xi–Bei–Dong – partly historically but also with respect to recent developments within governments, businesses and civ...

  9. Tectonic Uplift and Fan Delta Incision along the Conway Coast, NZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtt, D. G.; Bassett, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Conway Coast features a unique confluence of fan deltas, terrace uplift, and transpressional faulting. Thrust faults have caused the uplift of the Hawkeswood Range which provides sediment sources for local Gilbert-type fan deltas uplifting to form terraces. Sediments are characterized by steeply dipping foreset beds, horizontal topset beds and tangential bottomset beds. These fan deltas tend to form on steep basin margins often associated with extensional faulting. However, the Conway coast is dominated by thrust faulting. The Rafa terrace, dated between 52.4±4.5 and 79.0±3.5 ka with Optically Stimulated Luminescence, is exposed in cliff faces on the beach. Local creek channels deposited the fan deltas and later incised older deposits to reveal a three-dimensional perspective of the fan delta. This perspective is vital to the recreation of the fan delta position and channel avulsion, leading to a better understanding of the role of uplift superimposed by sea level change in the formation of the terraces. Forty-three photographs were stitched together to form an extensive photomosaic. The types of sediments, significant structures and relationships between adjacent beds were noted and analyzed. Correlations between the sedimentary architecture and sea level change were made using a sea level curve of the South Pacific over the last 140 ka. The incision of mud by gravel producing large flame structures suggests that there was a drop in sea level and a subsequent progradation of the fan delta. Based on the sea level curve, this drop occurred between ~66-79 ka. Higher in the fan delta, a fining-upward sequence points to a rise in sea level. This correlates with a rise on the sea level curve between ~52-63 ka. Upsection there is another coarsening-upward sequence of 5-10 m thick beds suggesting a fall in sea level before the uplift and incision of the terrace and the subsequent formation of the Ngaroma terrace. Due to their lateral extent, the gravels seem to

  10. Sharing Remote and Local Information for Tracking Spring Breakup in the Mackenzie Delta and Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, D. L.; Whalen, D.; Fraser, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Mackenzie Delta is the second largest on the Arctic Ocean, covering 13 000 km2. The annual flood regime in the delta is dominated by the spring snowmelt freshet and associated ice breakup, as water from the south arrives in the ice-covered delta and spreads over bottomfast and adjacent floating sea ice at the delta front. The complex processes of water-ice interaction, flow partitioning, and overbank flooding to replenish waters in 43 000 delta lakes threaten community, transportation, subsistence, and energy infrastructure in the delta. The annual breakup season is a time of rejuvenation, excitement, and anxiety for delta residents and stakeholders. To track the progress of breakup and meet the need for knowledge dissemination to the local communities, a Mackenzie-Beaufort breakup newsletter has been produced by Natural Resources Canada on a quasi-daily basis during the May-June spring flood season for 10 years, and distributed to an e-mail list that grew to over 300 subscribers. This provides near real-time tracking of water levels and breakup using on-line gauges (Environment Canada), daily MODIS satellite imagery (NASA), Landsat imagery (USGS) and intermittent radar imagery (various sources). In earlier years, information was also supplied from field programs operating in the delta during breakup, but changing priorities and funding have reduced the number of outside researchers present during these critical weeks. Meanwhile the number of local contributors has grown, providing observations and photographs to share with the local, regional and global readership. In this way the newsletter evolved into a two-way communication tool and community portal. The newsletter is a chronicle of each breakup season and a key resource for territorial and municipal managers, subsistence organizations, and emergency response agencies, with routine requests for specific imagery in areas of concern. With the completion of 10 years under the present model, we are exploring

  11. Measurements of $\\Delta m_d$, $\\Delta m_s$, and $\\sin 2 \\beta$ with LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Wishahi, Julian

    2012-01-01

    We present measurements of the oscillation frequencies $\\Delta m_d$ and $\\Delta m_s$ of $B$ meson mixing as well as a measurement of the time-dependent CP-asymmetry in decays of $B^0\\to J/\\psi K_{\\text{S}}^0$ based on $1.0\\,\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011. These measurements give valuable input to tests of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix.

  12. Environmental challenges in Nigeria's Delta Region and Agriculture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discussed the environmental challenges in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria with emphasis on the impacts on agricultural production. It thus discussed the concepts of Niger-Delta, Environmental pollution, Niger-Delta crises and Agriculture. The paper posits that there are positive relationships between these ...

  13. Surface water quality in the Okavango Delta panhandle, Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Okavango Delta, a Ramsar and a World Heritage Site, is an important source of food and water in the Kalahari Desert of southern Africa. Although the eastern delta fan is a protected area, the rest, including the upstream panhandle, is unprotected. Water quality in the Okavango Delta panhandle from Popa Falls, ...

  14. Morphodynamics of a cyclic prograding delta: the Red River, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maren, D.S. van

    2004-01-01

    River deltas are inhabited by over 60% of the world population, and are, consequently, of paramount agricultural and economical importance. They constitute unique wetland envi ronments which gives river deltas ecological importance as well. Additionally, many deltas contain large accumulations of

  15. Deltas, Vulnerability, and Climate Change: Migration as an Adaptation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Deltas, Vulnerability, and Climate Change: Migration as an Adaptation. Deltas in Africa and South Asia have some of the highest population densities in the world. Many residents along the deltas live in poverty and depend on livelihoods that are sensitive to a changing climate. This research project will examine the issue.

  16. The Economic Dimensions of the Niger Delta Ethnic Conflicts (Pp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    employment and strategic benefits preferentially to their ethnic brethren. Discrimination against the Niger Delta ethnic groups in the award of contract jobs and employment became the order to the day. The Niger Delta .... roads and bridges across the Niger Delta will not reduce the unemployment problem, which is the ...

  17. Human T cell receptor gamma delta + T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.

    1991-01-01

    TCR gamma delta + T cells represent a minority of CD3+ T cells in many species including man. The molecular structure of the TCR gamma and delta loci in man is well understood. The gamma and delta loci contain V, D, J and C gene segments. These segments do not rearrange randomly but in a

  18. The oil rich Niger Delta region: a framework for improved performance of the Nigerian regulatory process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, N Chukemeka Hemanachi

    2003-06-01

    The adoption of this policy framework has the ability to reconcile industry, the environment and community interests, taking into account all factors that are relevant to managing developments that are both sustainable and contributory to the achievement of industrial and community stability. The management of resource development is crucial in sustaining the Niger Delta ecosystem and the human population resident in the Niger Delta region. If these separate bodies are constituted they would have the potential to reduce and discourage: i) the vulnerability of the regulatory body to influential and powerful multinational oil companies; ii) the proclivity for unaccountability to the people of the Niger Delta region, since the people of the Niger Delta would have access to the regulatory body's classified and unclassified information, and are part of the decision-making process; and iii) a reduction in conflict between the oil mining companies and the aggrieved youths of the oil rich Niger Delta region. This policy framework also has the added advantage of producing high quality decisions and more acceptable decisions than those for which the people of the Niger Delta region are excluded from the processes that concern their existence. The agency decision-making could now become a multilateral process and thus promote and enhance the accurate, impartial and rational application of legislative directives to given cases or classes of cases. Most importantly, the Minister of Petroleum Resources should be empowered by legislation to revoke any license or lease in respect of an area designated as marginal if left undeveloped for a period of 5 years and grant a lease or license for the area to a more responsible oil company.

  19. New Physics in {Delta}L = 2 neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delepine, David; Gonzalez Macias, Vannia [Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias de la Universidad de Guanajuato, C.P. 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Khalil, Shaaban [Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No, 11837, PO Box 43 (Egypt); Lopez Castro, Gabriel [Departamento de Fisica, Cinvestav, Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-04-01

    We propose a general framework to constrain {Delta}L = 2 processes by measuring observables associated with neutrino-antineutrino oscillations in {pi}{sup {+-}} decays. First, we use this formalism as a new strategy for detecting the CP-violating phases and the effective mass of muon Majorana neutrinos. Within the generic framework of quantum field theory, we compute the non-factorizable probability for producing a pair of same-charged muons in {pi}{sup {+-}} decays as a distinctive signature of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}*{sub {mu}}. Using the neutrino-antineutrino oscillation probability reported by MINOS collaboration, a new stringent bound on the effective muon-neutrino mass is derived. Secondly, we interpret the production of the pair of same-charged muons as a result of lepton number violating (LNV) interactions at the neutrino source, which allow us to constrain New Physics.

  20. Study of 4f hybridization in CeNiX with X=Sn{sub d}eltaGe{sub 1-d}elta, 0<=delta<=1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuente, C. de la, E-mail: cesar@unizar.e [Depto. Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Universidad de Zaragoza and ICMA-CSIC (Spain); Moral, A. del [Depto. Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Universidad de Zaragoza and ICMA-CSIC (Spain); Adroja, D.T. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Fraile, A. [Depto. Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Universidad de Zaragoza and ICMA-CSIC (Spain); Arnaudas, J.I. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    We report inelastic neutron scattering and core-level X-ray photoemission spectroscopy experiments for studying the Kondo problem in the CeNiX, X=Sn{sub d}eltaGe{sub 1-d}elta 0<=delta<=1 series. The neutron results confirm that they behave like a Kondo lattice for delta>=0.85, showing broad maxima at around 30 meV, typical of a crystal field magnetic scattering. So, the Ge doping could produce the suppression of the cerium magnetism observed for delta<=0.25. To open a more deep sight on this point, we have analyzed the 3d core-level XPS spectra by using the well-known Gunnarsson-Schoenhammer model. From this analysis, we have obtained the 'on-site' Coulomb bare repulsion for f states, U, and hybridization parameter, DELTA, related with the hopping from the f states to the conduction ones. These U values are very similar for all compounds, about 7 eV, but the hybridization parameter slightly changes from 0.2 to 0.16 eV on increasing the Sn concentration. In Sn-rich compounds, the 4f occupation is close to spin limit fluctuation, which allows us to obtain an estimation of the Kondo temperatures, approx1200 K, and the static 0 K susceptibility, approx1.1x10{sup -3} emu/mol. Finally, we have done 'ab-initio' calculations based on the LDA+U+SO which confirm the existence of a small electronic gap opening in the DOS of Ge-rich compounds for U values lower than 7 eV.

  1. Development of fluoroimmunoassay methods for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Heterogeneous, competitive, labelled-ligand solid-phase primary antibody fluoroimmunoassay methods for the detection of THC in blood and plasma were proposed, and the required assay components were produced and characterized. These components included polyclonal rabbit antisera and monoclonal antibodies reactive with tetrahydrocannabinols, solid-phase immunoglobin reagents, a fluoroligand, and protein conjugates of THC for immunization and immunoassay response amplification. The stereoselective rabbit anti-THC antiserum F-444-12 was found to have a high binding titer, a high affinity (K/sub D/ = 3.4 x 10/sup -/exclamation/sup 1/ M for 5'-iodo/sup -125/I-..delta../sup 2/-THC), and high specificity versus a large number of cannabinoid compounds. Immobilization of the immunoglobulin fraction of the antiserum on hydrophilic polyacrylamide microspheres resulted in only a four fold increase in K/sub D/, and a two fold increase in the concentration of binding sites required for the production of equivalent binding titers. Specificity for small ligands was not affected, but the binding of THC-protein conjugates was reduced in potency. Two monoclonal hybridoma cell lines were produced that secrete monoclonal antibodies which bind the radioligand. The fluoroligand was synthesized from 5'-carboxy-..delta../sup 2/-THC and FITC using a diamimoethane linkage structure. While the compound had the fluorescence properties of FTIC, it was bound to the antiserum F-144-12 with a cross-reactive potency 1.4x greater than the radioligand, and 10x greater than THC.

  2. On the 'delta-equations' for vortex sheet evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, James W.; Stansby, Peter K.

    1993-01-01

    We use a set of equations, sometimes referred to as the 'delta-equations', to approximate the two-dimensional inviscid motion of an initially circular vortex sheet released from rest in a cross-flow. We present numerical solutions of these equations for the case with delta-square = 0 (for which the equations are exact) and for delta-square greater than 0. For small values of the smoothing parameter delta, a spectral filter must be used to eliminate spurious instabilities due to round-off error. Two singularities appear simultaneously in the vortex sheet when delta-square = 0 at a critical time t(c). After t(c), the solutions do not converge as the computational mesh is refined. With delta-square greater than 0, converged solutions were found for all values of delta-square when t is less than t(c), and for all but the two smallest values of delta-square used when t is greater than t(c). Our results show that, when delta-square is greater than 0, the vortex sheet deforms into two doubly branched spirals some time after t(c). The limiting solution as delta approaching 0 clearly exists and equals the delta = 0 solution when t is less than t(c).

  3. Characterization of T cell receptor assembly and expression in a Ti gamma delta-positive cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, J; Caspar-Bauguil, S; Geisler, C

    1993-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TcR) heterodimers of both the Ti-alpha beta and Ti-gamma delta types are expressed at the surface of T cells noncovalently associated with the CD3 complex composed of the monomorphic chains gamma, delta, epsilon and zeta. The structural relationship and assembly...... of the various components of this multimeric protein complex is still not fully understood. In this report, the human leukemic T cell line Lyon which expresses a Ti-gamma delta/CD3 complex, was characterized and compared to another human leukemic T cell line Jurkat (Ti-alpha beta/CD3). Membrane TCR-/CD3......- variants of the T cell Lyon were induced and found to produce all of the Ti/CD3 components, with the exception of Ti-delta. Biochemical analysis indicated that: (1) Ti-gamma/CD3 gamma, delta, epsilon complexes were formed in the endoplasmic reticulum in the absence of Ti-delta; (2) the CD3-zeta chain did...

  4. Digital phased array beamforming using single-bit delta-sigma conversion with non-uniform oversampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, M; Karaman, M

    2001-07-01

    Digital beamforming based on oversampled delta-sigma (delta sigma) analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion can reduce the overall cost, size, and power consumption of phased array front-end processing. The signal resampling involved in dynamic delta sigma beamforming, however, disrupts synchronization between the modulators and demodulator, causing significant degradation in the signal-to-noise ratio. As a solution to this, we have explored a new digital beamforming approach based on non-uniform oversampling delta sigma A/D conversion. Using this approach, the echo signals received by the transducer array are sampled at time instants determined by the beamforming timing and then digitized by single-bit delta sigma A/D conversion prior to the coherent beam summation. The timing information involves a non-uniform sampling scheme employing different clocks at each array channel. The delta sigma coded beamsums obtained by adding the delayed 1-bit coded RF echo signals are then processed through a decimation filter to produce final beamforming outputs. The performance and validity of the proposed beamforming approach are assessed by means of emulations using experimental raw RF data.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Produced Water Quality from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Its negative impacts on the receiving water bodies have become a worrisome environmental issue. The effluent quality of a crude Oil processing and exporting installation located in the coastal area of the Niger Delta was studied for six months to ascertain the efficiency of the company's produced water treatment processes.

  6. Induction of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the hippocampus by chronic electroconvulsive seizures: role of [Delta]FosB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Zhang, Y; Kelz, M B; Steffen, C; Ang, E S; Zeng, L; Nestler, E J

    2000-12-15

    The transcription factor DeltaFosB is induced in the hippocampus and other brain regions by repeated electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an effective antidepressant treatment. The unusually high stability of this protein makes it an attractive candidate to mediate some of the long-lasting changes in the brain caused by ECS treatment. To understand how DeltaFosB might alter brain function, we examined the gene expression profiles in the hippocampus of inducible transgenic mice that express DeltaFosB in this brain region by the use of cDNA expression arrays that contain 588 genes. Of the 430 genes detected, 20 genes were consistently upregulated, and 14 genes were downregulated, by >50%. One of the upregulated genes is cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5). On the basis of its purported role in regulating neuronal structure, we studied directly whether cdk5 is a true target for DeltaFosB. Upregulation of cdk5 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus was confirmed by Western blotting in the DeltaFosB-expressing transgenic mice as well as in rats treated chronically with ECS. Chronic ECS treatment also increased, in the hippocampus, the phosphorylation state of tau, a microtubule-associated protein that is a known substrate for cdk5. A 1.6 kb fragment of the cdk5 promoter was cloned, and activity of the promoter was found to be increased after overexpression of DeltaFosB in cell culture. Moreover, mutation of the single consensus activator protein-1 site contained within the cdk5 promoter fragment completely abolished activation of the promoter by DeltaFosB. Together, these results suggest that cdk5 is one target by which DeltaFosB produces some of its physiological effects in the hippocampus and thereby mediates certain long-term consequences of chronic ECS treatment.

  7. Corticothalamic projections from the cortical barrel field to the somatosensory thalamus in rats: a single-fibre study using biocytin as an anterograde tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, J; Pinault, D; Deschênes, M

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the pattern of axonal projections of single corticothalamic neurons from the cortical barrel field representing the vibrissae in the rat. Microiontophoretic injections of biocytin were performed in cortical layers V and VI to label small pools of corticothalamic cells and their intrathalamic axonal projections. After a survival period of 48 h, the animals were perfused and the tissue was processed for biocytin histochemistry. On the basis of the intrathalamic distribution of axonal fields and of the types of terminations found in the thalamus, four types of corticothalamic projections were identified. (i) Cells of the upper part of layer VI projected exclusively to the ventral posteromedial (VPm) nucleus, where they arborized in long rostrocaudally oriented bands or 'rods'. (ii) All cells of the lower part of layer VI projected to the medial part of the thalamic posterior group (Pom) but the vast majority of them also collateralized in VPm where they participated in the formation of rods. (iii) A minority of corticothalamic cells in the lower portion of layer VI, possibly located under the interbarrel spaces (septae), arborized exclusively in Pom. (iv) The corticothalamic projection of layer V cells originated from collaterals of corticofugal cells whose main axons ran caudally towards the brainstem. These collaterals arborized exclusively in Pom or in the central lateral nucleus. All corticothalamic cells from layer VI displayed the same type of axonal network, made of long branches decorated by terminal buttons emitted en passant at the tip of fine stalks. Corticothalamic fibres arising from layer V pyramids, however, remained smooth as they ran across the lateral thalamus and they generated in Pom one or two clusters of large boutons. All corticothalamic axons derived from layer VI cells, but not those derived from layer V cells, gave off collaterals as they traversed the thalamic reticular complex. These observations are discussed in the

  8. Water quality in the Okavango Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-12

    Mar 12, 2010 ... 2009 (Fig. 4). Measurements had been taken at several points from Mohembo to Maun and Lake Ngami in the downstream end of the Delta. pH. The pH of an aquatic ... tion of the aquatic ecosystem (Smith et al., 1986). The pH of ... DO in the water was attributed to the decomposition of organic matter or ...

  9. (-)-delta-N-normethylskytanthine from Tecoma arequipensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G H; Fixman, E C; Stermitz, F R; Castedo, L

    1988-01-01

    Bark of Tecoma arequipensis yielded the major alkaloidal component (-)-delta-N-normethylskytanthine whose structure was proven by X-ray diffraction analysis of the N-thiourea derivative. The stereochemistry of 1 at all four centers was enantiomeric with that of skytanthine previously reported from Tecoma stans and Skytanthus acutus. Gc-ms of the crude base fraction indicated the presence of several related alkaloids as very minor constituents.

  10. Nucleon and delta masses in QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Rafecas López, María Magdalena; Vento Torres, Vicente

    1992-01-01

    Using the positivity of the path integral measure of $QCD$ and defining a structure for the quark propagator in a background field according to the fluxon scenario for confinement, we calculate and compare the correlators for nucleon and delta. From their shape we elucidate about the origin of their mass difference, which in our simplified scenario is due to the tensor structure in the propagator. This term arises due to a dynamical mechanism which is responsible simultaneously for confinemen...

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Nonslender Delta Wings

    OpenAIRE

    Gursul, I; Gordnier, R; Visbal, M

    2005-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamics of nonslender delta wings, covering topics of shear layer instabilities, structure of nonslender vortices, breakdown, maneuvering wings, and fluid/structure interactions, are reviewed in this paper. Vortical flows develop at very low angles of attack, and form close to the wing surface. This results in strong interactions with the upper-surface boundary layer and in a pronounced dependence of the flow structure on Reynolds number. Vortex breakdown is observed to be much ...

  12. Pole Positions of the Delta(1232) Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Kelabi, Mohamed E.

    2006-01-01

    The phase shift of pion nucleon elastic scattering D33, corresponding to isospin I=3/2 and angular momentum J=3/2, has been parameterized over the range 1100 < W < 1375 MeV, using the single channel p Pi+ data from CNS-DAC. By employing our four parameters formula, the pole positions of corresponding to the Delta(1232) resonance are then identified.

  13. Adaptive Delta Management: cultural aspects of dealing with uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Jos; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Hermans, Leon; Kwakkel, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Deltas are generally recognized as vulnerable to climate change and therefore a salient topic in adaptation science. Deltas are also highly dynamic systems viewed from physical (erosion, sedimentation, subsidence), social (demographic), economic (trade), infrastructures (transport, energy, metropolization) and cultural (multi-ethnic) perspectives. This multi-faceted dynamic character of delta areas warrants the emergence of a branch of applied adaptation science, Adaptive Delta Management, which explicitly focuses on climate adaptation of such highly dynamic and deeply uncertain systems. The application of Adaptive Delta Management in the Dutch Delta Program and its active international dissemination by Dutch professionals results in the rapid dissemination of Adaptive Delta Management to deltas worldwide. This global dissemination raises concerns among professionals in delta management on its applicability in deltas with cultural conditions and historical developments quite different from those found in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom where the practices now labelled as Adaptive Delta Management first emerged. This research develops an approach and gives a first analysis of the interaction between the characteristics of different approaches in Adaptive Delta Management and their alignment with the cultural conditions encountered in various delta's globally. In this analysis, first different management theories underlying approaches to Adaptive Delta Management as encountered in both scientific and professional publications are identified and characterized on three dimensions: The characteristics dimensions used are: orientation on today, orientation on the future, and decision making (Timmermans, 2015). The different underlying management theories encountered are policy analysis, strategic management, transition management, and adaptive management. These four management theories underlying different approaches in Adaptive Delta Management are connected to

  14. Understanding delta-sigma data converters

    CERN Document Server

    Pavan, Shanti; Temes, Gabor C

    2017-01-01

    This new edition introduces novel analysis and design techniques for delta-sigma (ΔΣ) converters in physical and conceptual terms, and includes new chapters that explore developments in the field over the last decade. This book explains the principles and operation of delta-sigma analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) in physical and conceptual terms in accordance with the most recent developments in the field. The interest of ΔΣ converter designers has shifted significantly over the past decade, due to many new applications for data converters at the far ends of the frequency spectrum. Continuous-time delta-sigma A/D converters with GHz clocks, of both lowpass and bandpass types, are required for wireless applications. At the other extreme, multiplexed ADCs with very narrow (sometimes 10 Hz wide) signal bandwidths, but very high accuracy are needed in the interfaces of biomedical and environmental sensors. To reflect the changing eeds of designers, the second edition includes significant new material on bo...

  15. Delta: Data Reduction for Integrated Application Workflows.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jean-Baptiste, Gregory [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Oldfield, Ron A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Integrated Application Workflows (IAWs) run multiple simulation workflow components con- currently on an HPC resource connecting these components using compute area resources and compensating for any performance or data processing rate mismatches. These IAWs require high frequency and high volume data transfers between compute nodes and staging area nodes during the lifetime of a large parallel computation. The available network band- width between the two areas may not be enough to efficiently support the data movement. As the processing power available to compute resources increases, the requirements for this data transfer will become more difficult to satisfy and perhaps will not be satisfiable at all since network capabilities are not expanding at a comparable rate. Furthermore, energy consumption in HPC environments is expected to grow by an order of magnitude as exas- cale systems become a reality. The energy cost of moving large amounts of data frequently will contribute to this issue. It is necessary to reduce the volume of data without reducing the quality of data when it is being processed and analyzed. Delta resolves the issue by addressing the lifetime data transfer operations. Delta removes subsequent identical copies of already transmitted data during transfers and restores those copies once the data has reached the destination. Delta is able to identify duplicated information and determine the most space efficient way to represent it. Initial tests show about 50% reduction in data movement while maintaining the same data quality and transmission frequency.

  16. Identification and characterization of a novel delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene from Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, He; Li, Jia-Na; Chai, You-Rong; Zhang, Xue-Kun

    2009-11-01

    Fatty acid composition of fungi is analysed through the gas chromatography technique. With specific activity a novel enzyme Delta6-fatty acid desaturase was screened and isolated from Rhizopus nigricans. In this study R. nigricans was identified as a fungal species that produced plentiful gamma-linolenic acid. A 1,475 bp full-length cDNA, designated as RnD6D here, with high homology to fungal Delta6-fatty acid desaturase genes was isolated from R. nigricans using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. Sequence analysis indicated that this cDNA sequence had an open reading frame of 1,380 bp encoding a deduced polypeptide of 459 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis characterized the putative RnD6D protein as a typical membrane-bound desaturase, including three conserved histidine-rich motifs, hydropathy profile and a cytochrome b5-like domain in the N-terminus. The corresponding genomic sequence of RnD6D was 1,689 bp with 4 introns, which was at least one intron more than other fungal Delta6-fatty acid desaturase genes. To elucidate the function of this novel putative desaturase, the coding sequence was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain INVScl. A novel peak corresponding to gamma-linolenic acid methyl ester standards was detected with the same retention time, which was absent in the cell transformed with empty vector. The result demonstrated that the coding produced Delta6-fatty acid desaturase activity of RnD6D which led to the accumulation of gamma-linolenic acid. The functionally active RnD6D gene cloned here defined a novel Delta6-fatty acid desaturase from R. nigricans.

  17. Organic matter sources and rehabilitation of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassby, A.D.; Cloern, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    1. The Sacramento San Joaquin River Delta, a complex mosaic of tidal freshwater habitats in California, is the focus of a major ecosystem rehabilitation effort because of significant long-term changes in critical ecosystem functions. One of these functions is the production, transport and transformation of organic matter that constitutes the primary food supply, which may be sub-optimal at trophic levels supporting fish recruitment. A long historical data set is used to define the most important organic matter sources, the factors underlying their variability, and the implications of ecosystem rehabilitation actions for these sources. 2. Tributary-borne loading is the largest organic carbon source on an average annual Delta-wide basis; phytoplankton production and agricultural drainage are secondary; wastewater treatment plant discharge, tidal marsh drainage and possibly aquatic macrophyte production are tertiary; and benthic microalgal production, urban run-off and other sources are negligible. 3. Allochthonous dissolved organic carbon must be converted to particulate form - with losses due to hydraulic flushing and to heterotroph growth inefficiency - before it becomes available to the metazoan food web. When these losses are accounted for, phytoplankton production plays a much larger role than is evident from a simple accounting of bulk organic carbon sources, especially in seasons critical for larval development and recruitment success. Phytoplankton-derived organic matter is also an important component of particulate loading to the Delta. 4. The Delta is a net producer of organic matter in critically dry years but, because of water diversion from the Delta, transport of organic matter from the Delta to important, downstream nursery areas in San Francisco Bay is always less than transport into the Delta from upstream sources. 5. Of proposed rehabilitation measures, increased use of floodplains probably offers the biggest increase in organic matter sources. 6

  18. Effects of intravenously administered recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV(deltaM51)) on multifocal and invasive gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, XueQing; Senger, Donna L; Alain, Tommy; Oprea, Andra; Parato, Kelley; Stojdl, Dave; Lichty, Brian; Power, Anthony; Johnston, Randal N; Hamilton, Mark; Parney, Ian; Bell, John C; Forsyth, Peter A

    2006-11-01

    An ideal virus for the treatment of cancer should have effective delivery into multiple sites within the tumor, evade immune responses, produce rapid viral replication, spread within the tumor, and infect multiple tumors. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been shown to be an effective oncolytic virus in a variety of tumor models, and mutations in the matrix (M) protein enhance VSV's effectiveness in animal models. We evaluated the susceptibility of 14 glioma cell lines to infection and killing by mutant strain VSV(deltaM51), which contains a single-amino acid deletion in the M protein. We also examined the activity and safety of this strain against the U87 and U118 experimental models of human malignant glioma in nude mice and analyzed the distribution of the virus in the brains of U87 tumor-bearing mice using fluorescence labeling. Finally, we examined the effect of VSV(deltaM51) on 15 primary human gliomas cultured from surgical specimens. All statistical tests were two-sided. All 14 glioma cell lines were susceptible to VSV(deltaM51) infection and killing. Intratumoral administration of VSV(deltaM51) produced marked regression of malignant gliomas in nude mice. When administered systemically, live VSV(deltaM51) virus, as compared with dead virus, statistically significantly prolonged survival of mice with unilateral U87 tumors (median survival: 113 versus 46 days, P = .0001) and bilateral U87 tumors (median survival: 73 versus 46 days, P = .0025). VSV(deltaM51) infected multifocal gliomas, invasive glioma cells that migrated beyond the main glioma, and all 15 primary human gliomas. There was no evidence of toxicity. Systemically delivered VSV(deltaM51) was an effective and safe oncolytic agent against laboratory models of multifocal and invasive malignant gliomas, the most challenging clinical manifestations of this disease.

  19. Workspace and Payload-Capacity of a New Reconfigurable Delta Parallel Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Maya; Eduardo Castillo; Alberto Lomelí; Emilio González-Galván; Antonio Cárdenas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the workspace and payload capacity of a new design of reconfigurable Delta-type parallel robot is analysed. The reconfiguration is achieved by adjusting the length of the kinematic chains of a given robot link simultaneously and symmetrically during the operation of the robot. This would produce a dynamic workspace in shape and volume. A numerical analysis of the variation of shape and volume of the workspace and payload capacity of the robot is presented. Based both on the resu...

  20. Biochemical and molecular characterization of delta-endotoxins in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-García, N M; Sánchez-Varela, A; Villegas-Mendoza, J M

    2009-11-01

    The delta-endotoxins (delta-ETX) of four native strains (RT7, RT19, RT25, and RT25), and one reference strain (4L1) of Bacillus thuringiensis were biochemically and molecularly characterized to determine their potential toxic activity against lepidopteran larvae. Crystals of delta-ETX were purified through a two-phase system to determine their morphology, molar mass, solubility, and resistance to proteinases. Toxic activity and cry gene content were also determined. Crystals from native strains exhibited polyhedral, irregular and cuboidal shapes, while those from 4L1 were bipyramidal. Seven proteins with estimated molar mass approximately 30-134 kDa were detected as the main components of the native delta-ETX. Only crystals from 4L1, RT24, and RT25 underwent complete solubilization at pH >12.0. Crystals from all strains produced trypsin-resistant peptides. None of the cry genes associated with toxicity in lepidopterans (cry1, cry2, cry9) was found in the native strains; however, 4L1 strain harbors cry1 and cry2 genes. Strains RT19 and RT25 caused significant mortality against Trichoplusia ni larvae with partial solubilization at pH 10, strain 4L1 caused 100 % mortality. Toxicity of native strains may come from a novel cry gene.

  1. Optimal Vibration Control for Half-Car Suspension on In-Vehicle Networks in Delta Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the optimal vibration control design problem for a half-car suspension working on in-vehicle networks in delta domain. First, the original suspension system with ECU-actuator delay and sensor-ECU delay is modeled. By using delta operators, the original system is transformed into an associated sampled-data system with time delays in delta domain. After model transformation, the sampled-data system equation is reduced to one without actuator delays and convenient to calculate the states with nonintegral time delay. Therefore, the sampled-data optimal vibration control law can be easily obtained deriving from a Riccati equation and a Stein equation of delta domain. The feedforward control term and the control memory terms designed in the control law ensure the compensation for the effects produced by disturbance and actuator delay, respectively. Moreover, an observer is constructed to implement the physical realizability of the feedforward term and solve the immeasurability problem of some state variables. A half-car suspension model with delays is applied to simulate the responses through the designed controller. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller and the simplicity of the designing approach.

  2. The effect of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and LSD on the acquisition of an active avoidance response in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waser, P G; Martin, A; Heer-Carcano, L

    1976-04-15

    The course of active avoidance learning of rats in a symmetrical Y-maze under the influence of 1, 3, and 9 mg/kg of delta 9-THC i.p., and 5, 20, and mug/kg of LSD was investigated. Delta-THC in a dosage of 1 mg/kg had no effect on avoidance learning. Three to a lesser extent 9 mg/kg produced more rapid learning with a significantly better performance. Learning under delta 9-THC proved to be state-dependent. The withdrawal of delta 9-THC caused a decrease in the avoidance rate, which was dependent on the dosage. Upon renewal of the THC doses, the animals reattained their earlier preformance. In the course of the experiment there was rapid tolerance development, especially of the sedative properties of THC. LSD retarded the rate of acquisition of the active avoidance response. Whereas the control animals displayed over 80% successful active avoidance from the 14th session onwards, this was achieved by the LSD groups only after the 20th session. However, in contrast to the control group the LSD animals were able to increase their avoidance rate to over 90%, and this was maintained to the end of the experiment (a total of 24 sessions with LSD). The sudden withdrawal of LSD produced a fall in avoidance rate, which was dependent on the pervious training dosage; as with delta 9-THC state-dependent learning can also be assumed for LSD.

  3. PET Mapping for Brain-Computer Interface Stimulation of the Ventroposterior Medial Nucleus of the Thalamus in Rats with Implanted Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqi; Xu, Kedi; Xu, Caiyun; Zhang, Jiacheng; Ji, Jianfeng; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology has great potential for improving the quality of life for neurologic patients. This study aimed to use PET mapping for BCI-based stimulation in a rat model with electrodes implanted in the ventroposterior medial (VPM) nucleus of the thalamus. PET imaging studies were conducted before and after stimulation of the right VPM. Stimulation induced significant orienting performance. (18)F-FDG uptake increased significantly in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, septohippocampal nucleus, olfactory bulb, left crus II of the ansiform lobule of the cerebellum, and bilaterally in the lateral septum, amygdala, piriform cortex, endopiriform nucleus, and insular cortex, but it decreased in the right secondary visual cortex, right simple lobule of the cerebellum, and bilaterally in the somatosensory cortex. This study demonstrated that PET mapping after VPM stimulation can identify specific brain regions associated with orienting performance. PET molecular imaging may be an important approach for BCI-based research and its clinical applications. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. The Xenopus Irx genes are essential for neural patterning and define the border between prethalamus and thalamus through mutual antagonism with the anterior repressors Fezf and Arx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Seguel, Elisa; Alarcón, Pilar; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2009-05-15

    The Iroquois (Irx) genes encode homeoproteins conserved during evolution. Vertebrate genomes contain six Irx genes organized in two clusters, IrxA (which harbors Irx1, Irx2 and Irx4) and IrxB (which harbors Irx3, Irx5 and Irx6). To determine the precise role of these genes during development and their putative redundancies, we conducted a comparative expression analysis and a comprehensive loss-of-function study of all the early expressed Irx genes (Irx1-5) using specific morpholinos in Xenopus. We found that the five Irx genes display largely overlapping expression patterns and contribute to neural patterning. All Irx genes are required for proper formation of posterior forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain and, to a lesser an extent, spinal cord. Nevertheless, Irx1 and Irx3 seem to have a predominant role during regionalization of the neural plate. In addition, we find that the common anterior limit of Irx gene expression, which will correspond to the future border between the prethalamus and thalamus, is defined by mutual repression between Fezf and Irx proteins. This mutual repression is likely direct. Finally, we show that Arx, another anteriorly expressed repressor, also contribute to delineate the anterior border of Irx expression.

  5. Clinically employed opioid analgesics produce antinociception via μ-δ opioid receptor heteromers in Rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekkirala, Ajay S; Banks, Matthew L; Lunzer, Mary M; Negus, Stevens S; Rice, Kenner C; Portoghese, Philip S

    2012-09-19

    Morphine and related drugs are widely employed as analgesics despite the side effects associated with their use. Although morphine is thought to mediate analgesia through mu opioid receptors, delta opioid receptors have been implicated in mediating some side effects such as tolerance and dependence. Here we present evidence in rhesus monkeys that morphine, fentanyl, and possibly methadone selectively activate mu-delta heteromers to produce antinociception that is potently antagonized by the delta opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (NTI). Studies with HEK293 cells expressing mu-delta heteromeric opioid receptors exhibit a similar antagonism profile of receptor activation in the presence of NTI. In mice, morphine was potently inhibited by naltrindole when administered intrathecally, but not intracerebroventricularly, suggesting the possible involvement of mu-delta heteromers in the spinal cord of rodents. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that, in primates, mu-delta heteromers are allosterically coupled and mediate the antinociceptive effects of three clinically employed opioid analgesics that have been traditionally viewed as mu-selective. Given the known involvement of delta receptors in morphine tolerance and dependence, our results implicate mu-delta heteromers in mediating both antinociception and these side effects in primates. These results open the door for further investigation in humans.

  6. Clinically Employed Opioid Analgesics Produce Antinociception via μ-δ Opioid Receptor Heteromers in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Morphine and related drugs are widely employed as analgesics despite the side effects associated with their use. Although morphine is thought to mediate analgesia through mu opioid receptors, delta opioid receptors have been implicated in mediating some side effects such as tolerance and dependence. Here we present evidence in rhesus monkeys that morphine, fentanyl, and possibly methadone selectively activate mu-delta heteromers to produce antinociception that is potently antagonized by the delta opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (NTI). Studies with HEK293 cells expressing mu-delta heteromeric opioid receptors exhibit a similar antagonism profile of receptor activation in the presence of NTI. In mice, morphine was potently inhibited by naltrindole when administered intrathecally, but not intracerebroventricularly, suggesting the possible involvement of mu-delta heteromers in the spinal cord of rodents. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that, in primates, mu-delta heteromers are allosterically coupled and mediate the antinociceptive effects of three clinically employed opioid analgesics that have been traditionally viewed as mu-selective. Given the known involvement of delta receptors in morphine tolerance and dependence, our results implicate mu-delta heteromers in mediating both antinociception and these side effects in primates. These results open the door for further investigation in humans. PMID:23019498

  7. How well do we know VPDB? Variability of delta13C and delta18O in CO2 generated from NBS19-calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A; Huang, Lin; Mukai, Hitoshi; Chivulescu, Alina; Richter, Jürgen M; Rothe, Michael

    2009-03-01

    In order to generate a local daughter scale from the material defining the international delta13C and delta18O stable isotope ratio scales (NBS19-calcite),1,2 the carbon and oxygen must be liberated to the gas phase, usually as CO2, using acid digestion of the calcite with H3PO4. It is during this conversion step that systematic errors can occur, giving rise to commonly observed discrepancies in isotopic measurements between different stable isotope laboratories. Scale consistency is of particular importance for air-CO2 isotope records where very small differences in isotopic composition have to be reliably compared between different laboratories and quantified over long time periods.3 The information is vital for estimating carbon budgets on regional and global scales and for understanding their variability under the conditions of climate change. Starting from this requirement a number of CO2 preparations from NBS19 were made at Environment Canada (EC) and analyzed in our laboratories together with Narcis II, a set of well-characterized CO2 samples in sealed tubes available from the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES).4,5 Narcis II is very homogeneous in delta13C and delta18O with the isotopic composition close to NBS19-CO2. Among our laboratories the results for delta13C agreed to within +/-0.004 per thousand. The same level of agreement in delta13C was obtained when CO2 was generated from NBS19-calcite using different experimental procedures and conditions in the other two laboratories. For delta18O, the corresponding data were +/-0.011 per thousand when using NBS19-CO2 produced at EC, but discrepancies were enhanced by almost one order of magnitude when NBS19-CO2 was prepared by the other laboratories using slightly different reaction conditions (range=0.13 per thousand).In a second series of experiments, larger amounts of CO2 prepared from NBS19 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie (MPI-BGC) were analyzed together with Narcis II and

  8. THE RURAL TOURISM IN DANUBE DELTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica SOARE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the rural areas has market size and forecast its development as an economic activity. The present paper aims at analyzing the rural areas has in Danube Delta. In an enviable BAs which have responsibility for their particular isolated, such as the Danube Delta and the Danube that used, fishing and rural areas has the main activities that provide jobs and income sources for local populations. Design/methodology/approach - A survey was administered to customers’ rural hostel accommodation in Danube Delta. Descriptive statistics method was mainly adopted to calculate the mean with standard deviation of entry assumes variable, and to examine the different levels of consumers' awareness. The index values of product familiarity, the ratio between entries assumes product's familiarity value and the average value. Findings - the research results show hash has rural consumers have different perception and accomplished through behaviour. The information channels of brand hash mainly from friends, relatives and neighbours, so word of mouth spreading is very important for a brand. Women show a higher sensitivity in health and are currently operating the propensity than referred to follow the recommendations for nutrition. Research limitations/implications - This item is intended to synthesize developments and challenges," on June 13th rural market growth has. The results of this paper should be considered tentatively until has also features replicated by larger has rural consumers. Originality/value - members of rural areas has consumer's behavior would improve marketing and the development of rural areas has products, in order to reduce consumer confusion.

  9. Sigma Delta Signal Processing on Via-Configurable Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Sigma Delta Signal Processing on Via-Configurable Arrays Jim Kemerling Triad Semiconductor, Inc. Winston-Salem, NC 27103 Abstract: Sigma -Delta...Mask Programmable Analog Array; Mixed-Signal ASIC; Sigma Delta Modulation; Structured Array; Switched Capacitor Circuits; Via-Configurable Array... phase of the input signal at the rate determined by the M output. Figure 9 shows the simulation results and Figure 10 shows the tiles used in the

  10. Stratigraphy and Evolution of Delta Channel Deposits, Jezero Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudge, T. A.; Mohrig, D.; Cardenas, B. T.; Hughes, C. M.; Fassett, C. I.

    2017-01-01

    The Jezero impact crater hosted an open-basin lake that was active during the valley network forming era on early Mars. This basin contains a well exposed delta deposit at the mouth of the western inlet valley. The fluvial stratigraphy of this deposit provides a record of the channels that built the delta over time. Here we describe observations of the stratigraphy of the channel deposits of the Jezero western delta to help reconstruct its evolution.

  11. Shoreface morphodynamics along the Danube Delta coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatui, Florin; Vespremeanu-Stroe, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    The shoreface has an important long-term contribution to the coastal sediment budget as it behaves as either a sink or source of sediment from/to the active zone (Hinton and Nicholls, 2007). Hence, it modulates the long-term shoreline movement. However, the shoreface behaviour remains poorly understood and such studies are scarce especially because of the lack of extensive long-term good-quality data. The objective of this study is to examine and explain the shoreface morphodynamics along the Danube Delta coast. The shoreface morphodynamics has been investigated over the medium- and large-scales (decades to centuries). This is a wave-dominated, low-lying coastline interrupted by river mouths and, sometimes, by engineering structures (jetties). This work uses historical and modern maps (since 1856) and bathymetrical measurements (2008 and 2014) extending along the whole Danube Delta coast (both Romanian and Ukrainian sectors) to water depths of approximately 20 m; sectorial seasonal and annual bathymetries of the upper shoreface (2003 - 2014); LIDAR data (2011), recent high resolution satellite images, ortophotos and GPS surveys for shoreline extraction, which were comparatively analysed (volume changes, profile to profile evolution) by means of GIS techniques in order to explain the morphological and volumetric evolution of the shoreface. The large scale coastal behaviour of Danube Delta coast (expressed in terms of shoreface sediment volume and spatial distribution pattern of cells) is linked to climatic forcings (storminess), Danube river sediment supply changes, longshore sediment transport distribution and impact of hard coastal engineering structures. Significant increase of shoreface volume in the last century is related to active deltaic lobes (Chilia) or developing barrier islands (Sacalin), while decreasing shoreface volumes are related to the presence of Sulina jetties which blocked the longshore sediment transport and induced severe erosion downdrift. In

  12. International Year of Deltas 2013: A proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Syvitski, James; Paola, Chris; Hoanh, Chu Thai; Tuong, Phuc; Vörösmarty, Charles; Kremer, Hartwig; Brondizio, Eduardo; Saito, Yoshiki; Twilley, Robert

    2011-10-01

    Marine and lacustrine deltas around the world are economic and environmental hot spots. They occupy approximately 1% of the Earth's land area but are home to more than 500 million people—a population density more than 10 times the world average [Ericson et al., 2006]—all within 5 meters of sea level [Overeem and Syvitski, 2009]. This high density is supported by high productivity, rich biodiversity, and transport along a network of waterways. Yet deltaic systems are some of the world's most delicate and vulnerable natural systems, residing at the boundary between land and water, and are subject to upstream human control, local resource exploration, and climatic impacts.

  13. Insulation coordination for delta connected transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keri, A.J.F.; Musa, Y.I.; Halladay, J.A. (American Electric Power Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1994-04-01

    It is common practice to install only phase to ground surge arresters for transformer insulation protection against electrical stresses. However, this may not adequately protect the delta connected transformer phase to phase winding insulation. High phase to phase overvoltages at the transformer terminals, due to capacitor switching, have been reported. This paper describes the excessive phase to phase overvoltages that can also occur due to wave propagation and surge transfer through transformers. This paper points out the need for surge arrester arrangements that protect both, phase to phase and phase to ground transformer insulations. Surge arrester arrangements, selection criteria, installation practices, and application considerations are discussed in this paper.

  14. Folding propensity of cyclohexylether-delta-peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Hans-Dieter; Ziemer, Burkhard; Koert, Ulrich

    2004-09-16

    [structure: see text] Linear (n = 2-18) and cyclic oligomers (n = 3-8) of a cyclohexylether-delta-amino acid (COA) were prepared in high yield and stereopurity. CD spectra of the linear oligomers were indicative of secondary structure formation. X-ray crystal structures of cyclic COA oligomers revealed hydrophobic packing and internal 5- and 10-membered-ring hydrogen bonds. Ether and amide oxygens reside preferably in an ap orientation. This conformational locking is apparently broken by a C-2 substituent in an asymmetric cyclotrimer, for which a zeolithe-like tubular structure was found.

  15. The Emergence of Kinked Flux Tubes as the Source of Delta-Spots on the Photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, Kalman; Linton, Mark; Norton, Aimee Ann

    2017-08-01

    It has been observationally well established that the magnetic configurations most favorable to producing energetic flaring events reside in so called delta-spots. These delta-spots are a subclass of sunspots, and are classified as sunspots which have umbrae (dark regions in the interior of sunspots) with opposite magnetic polarities that share a common penumbra. They are characterized by strong rotation and an extremely compact magnetic configuration, and are observed to follow an inverse-Hale law. It has been shown that over 90% of X-class flares that occurred during solar cycles 22 and 23 originated in delta-spots (Guo, Lin & Deng, 2014). Understanding the origin of delta-spots, therefore, is a crucial step towards the ultimate goal of space weather forecasting. In this work, we argue that delta-spots arise during the emergence of kinked flux tubes into the corona, and that their unique properties are due to the emergence of knots present in the kink mode of twisted flux tubes. We present numerical simulations that study the emergence of both kink-stable and unstable flux tubes into the solar corona, and demonstrate quantitatively that their photospheric signatures are dramatically different, with the latter flux tubes demonstrating strong coherent rotation and a very tight flux distribution on the photosphere. We show that the coronal magnetic field resulting from the emergence of a kinked flux tube contains significantly more free energy than the unkinked case, potentially leading to more energetic flares. We discuss the implications of our simulations for observations.

  16. On the status of IAEA delta-13C stable isotope reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assonov, Sergey; Groening, Manfred; Fajgelj, Ales

    2016-04-01

    For practical reasons all isotope measurements are performed on relative scales realized through the use of international, scale-defining primary standards. In fact these standards were materials (artefacts, similar to prototypes of meter and kg) selected based on their properties. The VPDB delta-13C scale is realised via two highest-level reference materials NBS19 and LSVEC, the first defining the scale and the second aimed to normalise lab-to-lab calibrations. These two reference materials (RMs) have been maintained and distributed by IAEA and NIST. The priority task is to maintain these primary RMs at the required uncertainty level, thus ensuring the long-term scale consistency. The second task is to introduce replacements when needed (currently for exhausted NBS19, work in progress). The next is to produce a family of lower level RMs (secondary, tertiary) addressing needs of various applications (with different delta values, in different physical-chemical forms) and their needs for the uncertainty; these RMs should be traceable to the highest level RMs. Presently three is a need for a range of RMs addressing existing and newly emerging analytical techniques (e.g. optical isotopic analysers) in form of calibrated CO2 gases with different delta-13C values. All that implies creating a family of delta-13C stable isotope reference materials. Presently IAEA works on replacement for NBS19 and planning new RMs. Besides, we found that LSVEC (introduced as second anchor for the VPDB scale in 2006) demonstrate a considerable scatter of its delta-13C value which implies a potential bias of the property value and increased value uncertainty which may conflict with uncertainty requirements for atmospheric monitoring. That is not compatible with the status of LSVEC, and therefore it should be replaced as soon as possible. The presentation will give an overview of the current status, the strategic plan of developments and the near future steps.

  17. A global analysis of human habitation on river deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Douglas; Caldwell, Rebecca; Baumgardner, Sarah; Paola, Chris; Roy, Samapriya; Nelson, Amelia; Nienhuis, Jaap

    2017-04-01

    River deltas are ideal sites for human habitation because of their fertile floodplains, easy access to the ocean, and abundant land. But anthropogenic and natural processes are causing deltas to sink, which increases the probability of coastal flooding and human exposure to risk. The full extent of the risk posed to humans is unclear because the number of people living on river deltas is unknown. Towards this end we mapped the locations and areas of all deltas in the world (n= 1813). Using Google Earth we identified all river mouths (≥ 50 m wide) on marine coastlines that are also connected to an upstream catchment. Rivers that split into two or more active or relict distributary channels, end in a depositional protrusion from the shoreline, or do both, are defined as deltas. The depositional protrusion and distributary channel network define the geomorphic area of each delta. We mark the position of the delta apex at the first bifurcation, or for a single channel delta at the intersection of the regional shoreline and the main channel. We mark three lateral extents, one on either side of the main channel at the maximum displacement of the depositional protrusion or the distributary network, and one on the most basinward position of the delta. We define delta area as the convex hull around these extent points and the delta apex. For each delta area polygon we extract elevation from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission dataset and population count in years 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015, and 2020 from Gridded Population of the World, version 4. In total, deltas cover 0.56% of the total area of the world yet contain 4.1% of the world's population. The population on deltas has grown from 237 million in 2000 to projected values of 322 million in 2020. Deltaic population is growing at 1.59% per year, which outpaces the world growth rate of 1.11%. Additionally, population density is increasing with time from 322 people per km2 in year 2000 to projected values of 422 people per

  18. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization of supersonic delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization procedure AeSOP(sub 3D) is described. This procedure incorporates some of the most promising concepts from the area of computational aerodynamic analysis and design, specifically, discrete sensitivity analysis, a fully implicit 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology, and 3D Bezier-Bernstein surface parameterizations. The new procedure is demonstrated in the preliminary design of supersonic delta wings. Starting from a symmetric clipped delta wing geometry, a Mach 1.62 asymmetric delta wing and two Mach 1. 5 cranked delta wings were designed subject to various aerodynamic and geometric constraints.

  19. Upper-division student difficulties with the Dirac delta function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany R. Wilcox

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dirac delta function is a standard mathematical tool that appears repeatedly in the undergraduate physics curriculum in multiple topical areas including electrostatics, and quantum mechanics. While Dirac delta functions are often introduced in order to simplify a problem mathematically, students still struggle to manipulate and interpret them. To characterize student difficulties with the delta function at the upper-division level, we examined students’ responses to traditional exam questions and a standardized conceptual assessment, and conducted think-aloud interviews. Our analysis was guided by an analytical framework that focuses on how students activate, construct, execute, and reflect on the Dirac delta function in the context of problem solving in physics. Here, we focus on student difficulties using the delta function to express charge distributions in the context of junior-level electrostatics. Common challenges included invoking the delta function spontaneously, translating a description of a charge distribution into a mathematical expression using delta functions, integrating 3D or non-Cartesian delta function expressions, and recognizing that the delta function can have units. We also briefly discuss implications of these difficulties for instruction.

  20. CMS: Aboveground Biomass for Mangrove Forest, Zambezi River Delta, Mozambique

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides several estimates of aboveground biomass from various regressions and allometries for mangrove forest in the Zambezi River Delta, Mozambique....

  1. Tidal modulated flow and sediment flux through Wax Lake Delta distributary channels: Implications for delta development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hanegan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a Delft3D model of the Wax Lake Delta was developed to simulate flow and sediment flux through delta distributary channels. The model was calibrated for tidal constituents as well as velocity and sediment concentration across channel transects. The calibrated model was then used to simulate full spring–neap tidal cycles under constant low flow upstream boundary conditions, with grain size variation in suspended load represented using two sediment fractions. Flow and sediment flux results through distributary channel cross-sections were examined for spatial and temporal variability with the goal of characterizing the role of tides in sediment reworking and delta development. The Wax Lake Delta has prograded through channel extension, river mouth bar deposition, and channel bifurcation. Here we show that tidal modulation of currents influences suspended sand transport, and spatial acceleration through distributary channels at low tides is sufficient to suspend sand in distal reaches during lower flows. The basinward-increasing transport capacity in distributary channels indicates that erosive channel extension could be an important process, even during non-flood events.

  2. Delta Plaza kohvik = The Delta Plaza Café / Margit Mutso

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mutso, Margit, 1966-

    2010-01-01

    Tallinnas Pärnu mnt. 141 asuva kohviku Delta Plaza sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Tiiu Truus ja Marja Viltrop (Stuudio Truus OÜ). Hoone arhitektid Jüri Okas ja Marika Lõoke (AB J. Okas & M. Lõoke). Žürii liikme Mait Summataveti arvamus kohvikust

  3. Delta Alliance Young Professionals Award: Innovative solutions for delta challenges worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krueger, I.; Miguel Ayala, L.; Driel, van W.F.

    2012-01-01

    Deltas are fragile, dynamic landforms at the boundary of land and ocean. They belong to the most valuable, but at the same time also to the most vulnerable areas in the world. With increasing pressure from population growth, industrialization and changing climate, it is more important than ever that

  4. Experimental delta formation in crater lakes and implications for interpretation of martian deltas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villiers, G. de; Kleinhans, M.G.; Postma, G.

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of delta deposits in crater lakes on Mars is indicative of upstream (e.g., flow discharge and sediment properties) and downstream (e.g., basin characteristics) parameters, from which the hydrological conditions at the time of formation can be inferred. To investigate the influences of

  5. The effects of electrical stimulation or an electrolytic lesion in the mediodorsal thalamus of the rat on survival, body weight, food intake and running activity in the activity-based anorexia model

    OpenAIRE

    Luyten, Laura; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Van Kuyck, Kris; Fieuws, Steffen; Das, John; Sciot, Raf; Nuttin, Bart

    2009-01-01

    The glucose metabolism in the mediodorsal thalamus (MD) is increased in rats in the activity-based anorexia (ABA) model. In patients, electrical stimulation in hyperactive brain regions reduced symptoms in e.g. major depressive disorder and cluster headache. In two blinded randomised controlled experiments, we therefore examined the effects of high-frequency electrical stimulation and an electrolytic lesion in the MD in a validated rat model for anorexia nervosa. The ABA model was successfull...

  6. Catalyzing action towards the sustainability of deltas: deltas as integrated socio-ecological systems and sentinels of regional and global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Tessler, Z. D.; Brondizio, E.; Overeem, I.; Renaud, F.; Sebesvari, Z.; Nicholls, R. J.; Anthony, E.

    2016-12-01

    Deltas are highly dynamic and productive environments: they are food baskets of the world, home to biodiverse and rich ecosystems, and they play a central role in food and water security. However, they are becoming increasingly vulnerable to risks arising from human activities, land subsidence, regional water management, global sea-level rise, and climate extremes. Our Belmont Forum DELTAS project (BF-DELTAS: Catalyzing actions towards delta sustainability) encompasses an international network of interdisciplinary research collaborators with focal areas in the Mekong, Ganges Brahmaputra, and the Amazon deltas. The project is organized around five main modules: (1) developing an analytical framework for assessing delta vulnerability and scenarios of change (Delta-SRES), (2) developing an open-acess, science-based integrative modeling framework for risk assessment and decision support (Delta-RADS), (3) developing tools to support quantitative mapping of the bio-physical and socio-economic environments of deltas and consolidate bio-physical and social data within shared data repositories (Delta-DAT), (4) developing Global Delta Vulnerability Indices (Delta-GDVI) that capture current and projected scenarios for major deltas around the world , and (5) collaborating with regional stakeholders to put the science, modeling, and data into action (Delta-ACT). In this talk, a research summary will be presented on three research domains around which significant collaborative work was developed: advancing biophysical classification of deltas, understanding deltas as coupled socio-ecological systems, and analyzing and informing social and environmental vulnerabilities in delta regions.

  7. The Potential of Tiger Prawn Fry from Delta Mahakam, East Kalimantan Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Suroso

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE Most of the life cycle of tiger prawns were estuarine (Delta Mahakam. In the juvenile stage life in estuarine and the adult stage in marine. The research objective is to assess the potential of the tiger prawn fry catches in the Mahakam Delta, as a source of tiger prawn fry in the Mahakam Delta area farms. Research using interviews and descriptive analysis through monitoring with fishermen. The results showed that the fry tiger prawn from the Delta Mahakam there on the beaches or the edge of the sea where the water is shallow and slightly brackish, as in the Delta Mahakam. Fry can be captured by using rumpon. Tiger prawns fry from Delta Mahakam durability is relatively higher than fry from the hatchery. However, the number and continuity of fry very limited because it depends on the season. Abundance of fry is determined by the number of larvae produced in the wild and their survival is greatly influenced by the availability of food. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Doi: 10.12777/ijse.6.1.43-46 [How to cite this article: Suroso, B., Hutabarat, J., and Afiati, N. (2013. The Potential of Tiger Prawn Fry from Delta Mahakam, East Kalimantan Indonesia, International Journal of Science and Engineering, 6(1,43-46. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.6.1.43-46

  8. Expression of the alpha(2)delta subunit interferes with prepulse facilitation in cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platano, D; Qin, N; Noceti, F; Birnbaumer, L; Stefani, E; Olcese, R

    2000-06-01

    We investigated the role of the accessory alpha(2)delta subunit on the voltage-dependent facilitation of cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channels (alpha(1C)). alpha(1C) Channels were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes with beta(3) and alpha(2)delta calcium channel subunits. In alpha(1C) + beta(3), the amplitude of the ionic current (measured during pulses to 10 mV) was in average approximately 1.9-fold larger after the application of a 200-ms prepulse to +80 mV. This phenomenon, commonly referred to as voltage-dependent facilitation, was not observed when alpha(2)delta was coexpressed with alpha(1C) + beta(3). In alpha(1C) + beta(3), the prepulse produced a left shift ( approximately 40 mV) of the activation curve. Instead, the activation curve for alpha(1C) + beta(3) + alpha(2)delta was minimally affected by the prepulse and had a voltage dependence very similar to the G-V curve of the alpha(1C) + beta(3) channel facilitated by the prepulse. Coexpression of alpha(2)delta with alpha(1C) + beta(3) seems to mimic the prepulse effect by shifting the activation curve toward more negative potentials, leaving little room for facilitation. The facilitation of alpha(1C) + beta(3) was associated with an increase of the charge movement. In the presence of alpha(2)delta, the charge remained unaffected after the prepulse. Coexpression of alpha(2)delta seems to set all the channels in a conformational state from where the open state can be easily reached, even without prepulse.

  9. Deprivation and Resistance: Environmental Crisis, Political Action, and Conflict Resolution in the Niger Delta since the 1980s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Aworawo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The interlocking relationship between environmental degradation, poverty,and violent conflict has been a prominent theme contained within the literature on sustainable development and conflict resolution since the midtwentieth century. While some analysts have argued that violence has not been limited to the poor and deprived, many have concluded from various studies that the devastation of the environment, poverty, and conflict are inextricably intertwined. This article examines this theme by analyzing the pattern of violence and nature of conflict resolution in the oil-producing enclave of the Niger Delta in the past three decades. A report of the United Nations Environment Programme on parts of the Niger Delta published in August 2011 reveals that the area is one of the most intensely polluted in the world. The report confirms the conclusion of several other earlier reports on the Niger Delta, which state that activities relating to the exploitation of oil and gas have led to intense environmental pollution and extreme poverty and that those conditions have spawned violence. The article is exploratory and analytical. It draws from diverse sources, including government records and reports of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations as well as oral information gathered by the author from fieldwork conducted across the Niger Delta between 2007 and 2012, to explore the nature of the Niger Delta crisis from the 1980s until the present. The article argues that environmental degradation is central to the Niger Delta crisis, as it has hampered rural economic activities and posed a threat to human security. The article concludes that the effective tackling of the environmental crisis in the Niger Delta would surely reduce poverty and violence in the area.

  10. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziliang Liu

    Full Text Available A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km. The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front

  11. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front" character.

  12. Expression of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNA in the human CNS: a {sup 33}P in situ hybridization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peckys, D.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B. [Department of Neurology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Neurozentrum, Breisacherstrasse 64, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    The existence of at least three opioid receptor types, referred to as {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta}, is well established. Complementary DNAs corresponding to the pharmacologically defined {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptors have been isolated in various species including man. The expression patterns of opioid receptor transcripts in human brain has not been established with a cellular resolution, in part because of the low apparent abundance of opioid receptor messenger RNAs in human brain. To visualize opioid receptor messenger RNAs we developed a sensitive in situ hybridization histochemistry method using {sup 33}P-labelled RNA probes. In the present study we report the regional and cellular expression of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNAs in selected areas of the human brain. Hybridization of the different opioid receptor probes resulted in distinct labelling patterns. For the {mu} and {kappa} opioid receptor probes, the most intense regional signals were observed in striatum, thalamus, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and certain brainstem areas as well as the spinal cord. The most intense signals for the {delta} opioid receptor probe were found in cerebral cortex. Expression of opioid receptor transcripts was restricted to subpopulations of neurons within most regions studied demonstrating differences in the cellular expression patterns of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNAs in numerous brain regions. The messenger RNA distribution patterns for each opioid receptor corresponded in general to the distribution of opioid receptor binding sites as visualized by receptor autoradiography. However, some mismatches, for instance between {mu} opioid receptor receptor binding and {mu} opioid receptor messenger RNA expression in the anterior striatum, were observed. A comparison of the distribution patterns of opioid receptor messenger RNAs in the human brain and that reported for the rat suggests a homologous

  13. Tactile representation in somatosensory thalamus (VPL) and cortex (S1) of awake primate and the plasticity induced by VPL neuroprosthetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiguo; Semework, Mulugeta

    2015-11-02

    To further understand how tactile information is carried in somatosensory cortex (S1) and the thalamus (VPL), and how neuronal plasticity after neuroprosthetic stimulation affects sensory encoding, we chronically implanted microelectrode arrays across hand areas in both S1 and VPL, where neuronal activities were simultaneously recorded during tactile stimulation on the finger pad of awake monkeys. Tactile information encoded in the firing rate of individual units (rate coding) or in the synchrony of unit pairs (synchrony coding) was quantitatively assessed within the information theoretic-framework. We found that tactile information encoded in VPL was higher than that encoded in S1 for both rate coding and synchrony coding; rate coding carried greater information than synchrony coding for the same recording area. With the aim for neuroprosthetic stimulation, plasticity of the circuit was tested after 30 min of VPL electrical stimulation, where stimuli were delivered either randomly or contingent on the spiking of an S1 unit. We showed that neural encoding in VPL was more stable than in S1, which depends not only on the thalamic input but also on recurrent feedback. The percent change of mutual-information after stimulation was increased with closed-loop stimulation, but decreased with random stimulation. The underlying mechanisms during closed-loop stimulation might be spike-timing-dependent plasticity, while frequency-dependent synaptic plasticity might play a role in random stimulation. Our results suggest that VPL could be a promising target region for somatosensory stimulation with closed-loop brain-machine-interface applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Role for the Ventral Posterior Medial/Posterior Lateral Thalamus and Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Affective/Motivation Pain Induced by Varicella Zoster Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip R. Kramer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV infects the face and can result in chronic, debilitating pain. The mechanism for this pain is unknown and current treatment is often not effective, thus investigations into the pain pathway become vital. Pain itself is multidimensional, consisting of sensory and affective experiences. One of the primary brain substrates for transmitting sensory signals in the face is the ventral posterior medial/posterior lateral thalamus (VPM/VPL. In addition, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC has been shown to be vital in the affective experience of pain, so investigating both of these areas in freely behaving animals was completed to address the role of the brain in VZV-induced pain. Our lab has developed a place escape avoidance paradigm (PEAP to measure VZV-induced affective pain in the orofacial region of the rat. Using this assay as a measure of the affective pain experience a significant response was observed after VZV injection into the whisker pad and after VZV infusion into the trigeminal ganglion. Local field potentials (LFPs are the summed electrical current from a group of neurons. LFP in both the VPM/VPL and ACC was attenuated in VZV injected rats after inhibition of neuronal activity. This inhibition of VPM/VPL neurons was accomplished using a designer receptor exclusively activated by a designer drug (DREADD. Immunostaining showed that cells within the VPM/VPL expressed thalamic glutamatergic vesicle transporter-2, NeuN and DREADD suggesting inhibition occurred primarily in excitable neurons. From these results we conclude: (1 that VZV associated pain does not involve a mechanism exclusive to the peripheral nerve terminals, and (2 can be controlled, in part, by excitatory neurons within the VPM/VPL that potentially modulate the affective experience by altering activity in the ACC.

  15. Spectral factorization using the delta operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Morten; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Ravn, Ole

    1994-01-01

    In recent years many papers have been published abouth the gamma-operator, mostly caused by the better numerical properties and the rapprochement between continuous and discrete time. A major problem within the LQG-design of a delta-based input-output relation has been how to spectral-factorize i......In recent years many papers have been published abouth the gamma-operator, mostly caused by the better numerical properties and the rapprochement between continuous and discrete time. A major problem within the LQG-design of a delta-based input-output relation has been how to spectral......-factorize in an efficient way. The discrete-time method of Kuccera will not be applied since numerical word-length characteristics will be poor for fast sampling rates. In this paper a new approach is considered. A new gamma-operator (Tustin operator) is introduced, in order to make an iterative and numerical stable...... solution to the spectral factorization problem. The key idea is to use the gamma-operator resembled by its behavior to the differential operator....

  16. Automated system for simultaneous analysis of delta(13)C, delta(18)O and CO(2) concentrations in small air samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Still, Chris; Berry, Joe

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present an automated system for simultaneous measurement of CO(2) concentration, delta(13)C and delta(18)O from small (CMDL analyzed air samples was 0.08 ppm for the CO(2) concentration, 0.01 per thousand for delta(13)C and 0.00 per thousand for delta(18)O. A specific list of the parts and operation of the system is detailed as well as some of the applications for micrometeorological and ecophysiological applications. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Quantifying the importance of orbital over spin correlations in delta-Pu within density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderlind, P; Wolfer, W

    2007-07-27

    Spin and orbital and electron correlations are known to be important when treating the high-temperature {delta} phase of plutonium within the framework of density-functional theory (DFT). One of the more successful attempts to model {delta}-Pu within this approach has included condensed-matter generalizations of Hund's three rules for atoms, i.e., spin polarization, orbital polarization, and spin-orbit coupling. Here they perform a quantitative analysis of these interactions relative rank for the bonding and electronic structure in {delta}-Pu within the DFT model. The result is somewhat surprising in that spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization are far more important than spin polarization for a realistic description of {delta}-Pu. They show that these orbital correlations on their own, without any formation of magnetic spin moments, can account for the low atomic density of the {delta} phase with a reasonable equation-of-state. In addition, this unambiguously non-magnetic (NM) treatment produces a one-electron spectra with resonances close to the Fermi level consistent with experimental valence band photoemission spectra.

  18. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baer, R.; Boehm, T.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one

  19. Standardization of the PCR technique for the detection of delta toxin in Staphylococcus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Marconi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS, components of the normal flora of neonates, have emerged as important opportunistic pathogens of nosocomial infections that occur in neonatal intensive care units. Some authors have reported the ability of some CNS strains, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, to produce a toxin similar to S. aureus delta toxin. This toxin is an exoprotein that has a detergent action on the membranes of various cell types resulting in rapid cell lysis. The objectives of the present study were to standardize the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR technique for the detection of the gene responsible for the production of delta toxin (hld gene in staphylococcal species isolated from catheters and blood cultures obtained from neonates, and to compare the results to those obtained with the phenotypic synergistic hemolysis method. Detection of delta toxin by the phenotypic and genotypic method yielded similar results for the S. aureus isolates. However, in S. epidermidis, a higher positivity was observed for PCR (97.4% compared to the synergistic hemolysis method (86.8%. Among CNS, S. epidermidis was the most frequent isolate and was a delta toxin producer. Staphylococcus simulans and S. warneri tested positive by the phenotypic method, but their positivity was not confirmed by PCR for the hld gene detection. These results indicate that different genes might be responsible for the production of this toxin in different CNS species, requiring highly specific primers for their detection. PCR was found to be a rapid and reliable method for the detection of the hld gene in S. aureus and S. epidermidis.

  20. Homosexuality amongst migrant oil workers in the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To determine the prevalence of homosexuality among migrant oil workers in Niger Delta. Methods: A prospective questionnaire – based study was conducted among migrant oil workers in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The design was to determine the prevalence of homosexuality in the workers in oil workers.

  1. Downstream hydraulic geometry of a tidally influenced river delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Brye, de B.; Deleersnijder, E.

    2012-01-01

    Channel geometry in tidally influenced river deltas can show a mixed scaling behavior between that of river and tidal channel networks, as the channel forming discharge is both of river and tidal origin. We present a method of analysis to quantify the tidal signature on delta morphology, by

  2. Occurrence of elevated nitrate in groundwaters of Krishna delta, India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrate concentrations were measured in the groundwater samples of Krishna delta, India. The results indicate a large variation of nitrate from 10 - 135 mg/l. In 79 groundwater samples, about 39% shows high nitrate contents (>50 mg/l), which is more than the permissible limits in drinking water. In north Krishna delta 49% ...

  3. Pattern of Complicated Unsafe Abortions in Niger Delta University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    developing world. This study aims to determine the pattern of complicated unsafe abortions in Niger delta. University Teaching Hospital (NDUTH) Okolobiri. Methods: The study is a four-year retrospective analysis of cases of complicated unsafe abortion managed at the. Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital Okolobiri,.

  4. Occurrence of elevated nitrate in groundwaters of Krishna delta, India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Krishna delta 49% and in south Krishna delta 26% water samples were found to exceed the permissible limits. This study indicates that ... plain aquifers are the main source of water for agriculture and domestic purposes. The deltaic ..... can result in runoff and leaching of residual nitrate in the soil and in turn pollute the ...

  5. Delta's paradise: a challenge for lan[d]scape architects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, te J.K.M.; Toorn, van den M.W.M.

    1996-01-01

    Paradise as a metaphor has always played an important role in art. This is definitely true for the art of garden design, but paradise is also a metaphor that can be used for the landscape. Some of the most interesting landscapes are found in deltas. Deltas are rich in natural and economic potential.

  6. Caribbean piracy and youth restiveness in Niger delta: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our aim in this paper is to make a comparative analysis of Caribbean piracy and youth restiveness in Niger Delta of Nigeria. It will not be out of place to carry out such an analysis having seen, heard or read of the ongoing chaos, insecurity in the. Niger Delta Zone in Nigeria. We have to look at the past to find out such similar

  7. Gamma/delta T lymphocytes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balikó, Z; Szereday, L; Szekeres-Bartho, J

    1997-04-01

    Data on the percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis are few and contradictory. The percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of tuberculin positive and tuberculin negative patients with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and healthy controls was compared. Thirty six patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 11 healthy controls were studied. Lymphocytes were separated, cytocentrifuged onto glass microscope slides, and reacted with anti-gamma/delta monoclonal antibody. The percentage of gamma/delta positive cells was determined by microscopic counting of 300 lymphocytes. No difference was found in the percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes between patients and controls. However, when the patients were divided into two groups according to reactivity or non-reactivity in the Mantoux skin reaction a higher percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes was found in the peripheral blood of patients with tuberculin anergy than in tuberculin positive patients or controls. Higher gamma/delta T cell counts are found in tuberculin negative patients with tuberculosis than in tuberculin positive patients or tuberculin positive controls. The high gamma/delta T cell counts in tuberculin anergic patients may reflect a shift in the immune response in a Th2 direction characterised by increased antibody production and decreased cell mediated responses.

  8. Information Needs of Cassava Farmers in Delta State of Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are currently three cassava projects implemented. Information Needs of Cassava Farmers in Delta ... study assessed the information needs of cassava farmers in Oshimili North Local Government Area of Delta. State. Specifically, the study ... An International Journal of Basic and Applied Research through the IITA in Nigeria.

  9. A Delta-Sigma beamformer with integrated apodization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new design of a discrete time Delta-Sigma (ΔΣ) oversampled ultrasound beamformer which integrates individual channel apodization by means of variable feedback voltage in the Delta-Sigma analog to digital (A/D) converters. The output bit-width of each oversampled A/D converte...

  10. West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network (WIoDER) aims to support research, training, and pilot interventions in up to four Western Indian Ocean river deltas under pressure from human activity. Research will examine in particular the links between population mobility, agriculture, climate change, ...

  11. Indanylacetic acids as PPAR-delta activator insulin sensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickens, Philip; Zhang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Amatruda, John; Bullock, William; Burns, Michael; Cantin, Louis-David; Chuang, Chih-Yuan; Claus, Thomas; Dai, Miao; Dela Cruz, Fernando; Dickson, David; Ehrgott, Frederick J; Fan, Dongping; Heald, Sarah; Hentemann, Martin; Iwuagwu, Christiana I; Johnson, Jeffrey S; Kumarasinghe, Ellalahewage; Ladner, David; Lavoie, Rico; Liang, Sidney; Livingston, James N; Lowe, Derek; Magnuson, Steve; Mannelly, Gretchen; Mugge, Ingo; Ogutu, Herbert; Pleasic-Williams, Susan; Schoenleber, Robert W; Shapiro, Jeff; Shelekhin, Tatiana; Sweet, Laurel; Town, Christopher; Tsutsumi, Manami

    2007-08-01

    A series of indane acetic acid derivatives were prepared which show a spectrum of activity as insulin sensitizers and PPAR-alpha and PPAR-delta ligands. In vivo data are presented for insulin sensitizers with selectivity for PPAR-delta over PPAR-alpha.

  12. The Niger Delta Avengers, Autonomous Ethnic Clans and Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These common consumption goods have eluded ordinary Nigerians with more devastating effect in the Niger Delta region owing to ineptitude of state actors and their accomplices in Multinational Oil Corporations. This paper therefore investigated the sudden emergence of Niger Delta Avengers militant group. It also raised ...

  13. Design of the workplace for a Delta Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo Alba, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    This project presents an introduction to parallel kinematic robots focused on Delta robot from the point of view of applications, kinematics, mechanics and investigation. The second part of the document shows the implantation of the fastest Delta robot (FANUC M-1iA 0.5A) at University of Zilina.

  14. Central Delta languages: An overview | Kari | Stellenbosch Papers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an overview of the phonology, morphology and syntax of Central Delta languages. It also provides information on the geo-linguistic, demographic and sociolinguistic situation of these languages. It notes that Central Delta languages have a 20-vowel system, which divides into two sets of 10 vowels ...

  15. An annotated list of Fishes from the Niger Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeseman, M.

    1963-01-01

    At the end of November 1960, the Leiden Museum received an interesting collection of animals, mostly fishes, from the Niger delta. All specimens were collected by Mr. H. J. G. Beets, at the time employed by Shell B.P. — Delta Investigations, during the period May to August 1960, and in the region

  16. The Localizing Value Of Focal Delta Slowing In Temporal Lobe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Clinical and structural correlates of lateralized interictal delta activity in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have been well documented in the literature. Nevertheless, its occurrence has not been considered a significant clinical feature. Objective To evaluate the significance of focal delta- range slowing ...

  17. Upper-Division Student Difficulties with the Dirac Delta Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The Dirac delta function is a standard mathematical tool that appears repeatedly in the undergraduate physics curriculum in multiple topical areas including electrostatics, and quantum mechanics. While Dirac delta functions are often introduced in order to simplify a problem mathematically, students still struggle to manipulate and interpret them.…

  18. NESG BOOK REVIEW: A Review of Niger Delta Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this thought-provoking review of the 2006 UNDP Niger Delta Human Development Report, the author examines the multidimensional nature of the problems of the Niger Delta and its effect on income, education, life expectancy of the host communities, and environmental sustainability, which has undermined the ...

  19. Terahertz radiation from delta-doped GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Hansen, Ole; Sørensen, Claus Birger

    1994-01-01

    Terahertz pulse emission from four different delta-doped molecular beam epitaxially grown GaAs samples is studied. We observe a decrease of the emitted THz pulse amplitude as the distance of the delta-doped layer from the surface is increased, and a change in polarity of the THz pulses as compared...

  20. Environmental Law and Underdevelopment in the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstracts. There is no ecological zone which has been so degraded and laid waste than the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The bounties of nature bestowed on this geographical area have gradually been turned into its instruments of poverty and squalor. The coastal area, mainly the Niger Delta from which much of. Nigeria's ...

  1. Environmental Philosophy and Suffering in the Niger Delta | Ikeke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is also the reality that much of the sufferings and abuses to which the Niger Delta peoples and its environment are subjected are manmade, avoidable and unjustified. The environmental problems that have pervaded the Niger Delta include oil spillage, gas flaring, corporate deforestation, poverty, loss of biodiversity, ...

  2. Towards a Comprehensive Framework for Adaptive Delta Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchand, M.; Ludwig, F.

    2014-01-01

    Deltas are dynamic landforms at the boundary of land and sea, involving intricate mazes of rivers and small waterways, wetlands, estuaries and coastal barrier islands. They are home to over half a billion people. Deltas are also home to rich ecosystems, such as mangroves and marshes. They are

  3. Carbide inclusions in delta-phase plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baros, T. (Thomas); Davis, C. C. (Charles C.); Hawkins, H. T. (Heather T.); Ruggiero, M. J. (Matthew J.); Valentine, S. J. (Scott J.); Storey, B. G. (Bradford G.); Roybal, L. (Lawrence)

    2004-01-01

    Inclusions in plutonium alloys are common and depend on the processing parameters and age of the material. Plutonium-bearing compounds frequently observed as inclusions include: hydrides, nitrides, oxides, and carbides. Optical metallography and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were used to characterize plutonium carbide (PuC) inclusions in delta-phase plutonium. The structural complexities of plutonium combined with its radioactivity, pyrophoric nature, and toxicity create a unique challenge to revealing and interpreting its microstructures. Samples of delta-phase Pu-239 were used in this study. Note that the delta phase is stabilized to room temperature by the addition of {approx}1 wt% gallium. After samples are cut, mounted in epoxy, ground, and polished, they are then electropolished at 40 V in an etchant of 10 vol.% nitric acid and 90 vol.% dimethylformamide and electroetched at 6 V in the same etchant. Optical micrographs were collected using an inverted metallograph equipped with a digital camera. Back-scattered electron images and elemental maps of the plutonium, carbon, and gallium content were collected using an EPMA equipped with wavelength dispersive spectrometers. After reviewing our data and consulting work done by Cramer and Bergin it was determined that the inclusions were acicular plutonium carbides and were formed during the casting process at the time the material was manufactured. It is believed that these inclusions would affect the high strain-rate properties. The response of plutonium alloys during implosion is critical to the performance and reliability of a nuclear weapon. We plan to further investigate these inclusions to gather information about orientation, composition, structure, and concentration. An x-ray diffractometer with a 10 {micro}m beam diameter will be used to gather information on the orientation and structure of individual inclusions. A field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a WDS will be used at low

  4. The {delta}N->NN transition in finite nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumillas, C. [Departament ECM, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail chumi@ecm.ub.es; Parreno, A. [Departament ECM, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain); Ramos, A. [Departament ECM, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-07-15

    We perform a direct finite nucleus calculation of the partial width of a bound {delta} isobar decaying through the non-mesonic decay mode, {delta}N->NN. This transition is modeled by the exchange of the long ranged {pi} meson and the shorter ranged {rho} meson. The contribution of this decay channel is found to be approximately 60% of the decay width of the {delta} particle in free space. Considering the additional pionic decay mode, we conclude that the total decay width of a bound {delta} resonance in nuclei is of the order of 100 MeV and, consequently, no narrow {delta} nuclear states exist, contrary to recent claims in the literature. Our results are in complete agreement with microscopic many-body calculations and phenomenological approaches performed in nuclear matter.

  5. Refactoring Delta-Oriented Product Lines to achieve Monotonicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferruccio Damiani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Delta-oriented programming (DOP is a flexible transformational approach to implement software product lines. In delta-oriented product lines, variants are generated by applying operations contained in delta modules to a (possibly empty base program. These operations can add, remove or modify named elements in a program (e.g., classes, methods and fields in a Java program. This paper presents algorithms for refactoring a delta-oriented product line into monotonic form, i.e., either to contain add and modify operations only (monotonic increasing or to contain remove and modify operations only (monotonic decreasing. Because of their simpler structure, monotonic delta-oriented product lines are easier to analyze. The algorithms are formalized by means of a core calculus for DOP of product lines of Java programs and their correctness and complexity are given.

  6. Cystic fibrosis Delta F508 heterozygotes, smoking, and reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Wittrup, H H

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal autosomal recessive disease affecting Caucasian populations. It remains a puzzle how this disease is maintained at such a remarkably high incidence, however, it could be due to a reproductive advantage in cystic fibrosis heterozygotes. We tested...... this hypothesis. An adult Danish general population sample of 9141 individuals was screened for cystic fibrosis DeltaF508 heterozygotes; 250 carriers of this mutation were identified (2.7%). In the total sample DeltaF508 heterozygotes did not have more children than noncarriers; however, smoking interacted.......001). In conclusion, overall these results do not support a reproductive advantage for cystic fibrosis DeltaF508 heterozygotes. However, the data cannot totally exclude the possibility that nonsmoking DeltaF508 heterozygotes experience a reproductive advantage while smoking DeltaF508 heterozygotes experience...

  7. Generalized delta functions and their use in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, R. A.; Franson, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    The Dirac delta function δ(x) is widely used in many areas of physics and mathematics. Here we consider the generalization of a Dirac delta function to allow the use of complex arguments. We show that the properties of a generalized delta function are very different from those of a Dirac delta function and that they behave more like a pole in the complex plane. We use the generalized delta function to derive the Glauber-Sudarshan P-function, P(α), for a Schrödinger cat state in a surprisingly simple form. Aside from their potential applications in classical electromagnetism and quantum optics, these results provide insight into the ability of the diagonal P-function to describe density operators with off-diagonal elements.

  8. Synthesis of gamma,delta-unsaturated and delta,epsilon-unsaturated alpha-amino acids from fragmentation of gamma- and delta-lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, James E; Joullié, Madeleine M

    2004-02-06

    A noncoded amino acid of cyclomarin A (1) was synthesized in a racemic fashion. The method employs a six-membered ring template to control the relative stereochemistry and introduction of the functional groups. Ultimately, Pd-catalyzed fragmentation of the lactone provided gamma,delta-unsaturated and delta,epsilon-unsaturated alpha-amino acids. A Pd-catalyzed ring opening of a gamma-lactone is also reported.

  9. Historical floods in the Dutch Rhine Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Glaser

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical records provide direct information about the climatic impact on society. Especially great natural disasters such as river floods have been for long attracting the attention of humankind. Time series for flood development on the Rhine branches Waal, Nederrijn/Lek and IJssel in the Dutch Rhine Delta are presented in this paper. In the case of the Waal it is even possible to compare historical flood frequencies based on documentary data with the recent development reconstructed from standardized instrumental measurements. In brief, we will also discuss various parameters concerning the structure of the flood series and the "human dimension" of natural disaster, i.e. the vulnerability of society when facing natural disasters.

  10. Delta method, an empirical drag buildup technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, R. C.; Morrison, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    An empirical drag correlation technique was developed from analysis of 19 subsonic and supersonic military aircraft and 15 advanced or supercritical airfoil configurations which can be applied in conceptual and advanced aircraft design activities. The Delta Method may be used for estimating the clean wing drag polar for cruise and maneuver conditions up to buffet onset, and to approximately Mach 2.0. This technique incorporates a unique capability of predicting the off-design performance of advanced or supercritical airfoil sections. The buffet onset limit may also be estimated. The method is applicable to wind tunnel models as well as to full scale configurations. This technique has been converted into a computer code for use on the IBM 360 and CDC 7600 computer facilities at NASA AMES. Results obtained using this method to predict known aircraft characteristics are good and agreement can be obtained within a degree of accuracy judged to be sufficient for the initial processes of preliminary design.

  11. Head orientation prediction: delta quaternions versus quaternions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himberg, Henry; Motai, Yuichi

    2009-12-01

    Display lag in simulation environments with helmet-mounted displays causes a loss of immersion that degrades the value of virtual/augmented reality training simulators. Simulators use predictive tracking to compensate for display lag, preparing display updates based on the anticipated head motion. This paper proposes a new method for predicting head orientation using a delta quaternion (DQ)-based extended Kalman filter (EKF) and compares the performance to a quaternion EKF. The proposed framework operates on the change in quaternion between consecutive data frames (the DQ), which avoids the heavy computational burden of the quaternion motion equation. Head velocity is estimated from the DQ by an EKF and then used to predict future head orientation. We have tested the new framework with captured head motion data and compared it with the computationally expensive quaternion filter. Experimental results indicate that the proposed DQ method provides the accuracy of the quaternion method without the heavy computational burden.

  12. Second overtone pulsators among {delta} scuti stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bono, G. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Caputo, F. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, via Moiariello 16, 80131 Napoli (Italy); Cassisi, S. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, via M. Maggini, 64100 Teramo (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita de LAquila, via Vetoio, 67100 LAquila (Italy); Castellani, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Piazza Torricelli 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy)]|[Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, via M. Maggini, 64100 Teramo (Italy); Marconi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Piazza Torricelli 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Stellingwerf, R.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, X-1 Division, MS F645, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the modal stability of stellar models at masses and luminosity levels corresponding to post-main-sequence luminous {delta} Scuti pulsators. The envelope models have been computed at fixed mass value (M/M{sub sun}=2.0), luminosity level [log(L/L{sub sun})=1.7], and chemical composition (Y=0.28, Z=0.02). According to a nonlinear approach to radial oscillations, the present investigation for the first time predicts the occurrence of stable second overtone pulsators. More generally, we found that when moving inside the instability strip from lower to higher effective temperatures, the models show a stable limit cycle in three different pulsation modes: fundamental and first and second overtones. The shapes of both light and velocity curves are presented and discussed, providing a useful tool for the identification of second overtone pulsators among the known groups of radially pulsating stars. Comparison with observations shows that our nonlinear, nonlocal, and time-dependent convective models provide light curves in agreement with observed values, suggesting that second overtone pulsators have already been observed, though misclassified as fundamental pulsators. In a limited region of the instability strip we also found some models presenting mixed-mode features, i.e., radial pulsators that show a stable limit cycle in more than one pulsational mode. The period ratios of mixed-mode pulsators obtained by perturbing the first and the second overtone radial eigenfunctions are in agreement with observed values. This result is a crucial point for understanding the pulsation properties of {delta} Scuti stars, since it provides sound evidence that these variables during their evolution off the main sequence are pure or mixed-mode radial pulsators. Finally, the physical structure and the dynamical properties of second overtone pulsators are discussed in detail. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  13. Frequency of the HIV-protective CC chemokine receptor 5-Delta32/Delta32 genotype is increased in hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitas, Rainer P; Ahlenstiel, Golo; Iwan, Agathe; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Brackmann, Hans H; Kupfer, Bernd; Matz, Bertfried; Offergeld, Ruth; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich

    2002-06-01

    A homozygous 32-base pair deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) protects against human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV). However, the role of this mutation in other infections, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, has not been defined. We determined the frequency of the CCR5-Delta32 mutation by polymerase chain reaction in anti-HCV(+) (n = 153), anti-HIV(+) (n = 102), and anti-HCV(+)/HIV(+) (n = 130) white patients as well as in 102 healthy blood donors. Then, HIV and HCV loads, aminotransferases, and CD4 and CD8 cell counts were compared between the resulting subsets of CCR5-Delta32/wild-type heterozygotes, CCR5-Delta32, and wild-type homozygotes, respectively. Twelve of 153 (7.8%) anti-HCV-seropositive patients and 1 of 102 (1.0%) healthy blood donors were CCR5-Delta32 homozygous, whereas CCR5-Delta32 homozygosity was absent in anti-HIV(+) and anti-HCV(+)/HIV(+) patients (P Hardy-Weinberg equation (P < 0.0001) and had significantly higher HCV loads than wild-type patients (P = 0.045). The increased prevalence of CCR5-Delta32 homozygosity associated with increased viral loads in patients with chronic hepatitis C suggests that the CCR5-Delta32 mutation may be an adverse host factor in hepatitis C.

  14. Small-scale stratigraphy in a large ramp delta: recent and Holocene sedimentation in de the Volga delta, Caspian Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, I.; Kroonenberg, S.B.; Veldkamp, A.; Groenesteijn, K.; Rusakov, G.V.; Svitoch, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Volga delta differs from all other major deltas in the world by its extremely gentle onshore and offshore gradient (similar to 5 cm/km) and by being affected by the rapid sea-level changes of the Caspian Sea, at rates up to a hundred times the global sea-level rise. This paper reports (1) the

  15. Sustainable Growth in Urbanised Delta Areas : The Opportunities of a Geographical Approach to the Pearl River Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rens, G.; Nillisen, A.L.; Schamhart, C.; Lugt, N.

    2006-01-01

    The attractions of delta areas have boomed economies and founded major cities, but the threats of the adjacent water have persisted and natural resources have declined. The objective to facilitate sustainable urban growth in delta areas can only be met by a simultaneous approach of all the

  16. Vortex Breakdown over Slender Delta Wings (Eclatement tourbillonnaire sur les ailes delta effil es)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    tourbillonnaire sur aile delta en coulement incompressible. Caracterisation du champ externe,” ONERA Rapport Tech. Nº 5/1147 AN, 1992. [81] Miller, L.S. and...encoder incorporated in the actuator. 5.2.4.3 CONING RIG The coning rig is a unique orbital platform apparatus. Fig. 9 shows its installation in IAR...translating spiral structure is modelled in the cross-flow plane by a point vortex orbiting about the nominal vortex centreline. This approach has been

  17. Interdisciplinary and distance education in the Delta: the Delta Health Education Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorga, Phyllis

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the activities and outcomes of the Delta Health Education Partnership (DHEP), an interdisciplinary and distance education program developed to promote 'anytime, anywhere' education. The goal of the project is to recruit, educate, and retain interdisciplinary groups of primary care health practitioners to increase access to health care in medically underserved and health professional shortage areas of the lower Mississippi Delta. The targeted health providers are certified nurse midwives, physician assistants, and family nurse practitioners. The DHEP program spans six universities across four primarily rural states. Primary health care students in the lower Mississippi Delta region are taught using asynchronous technology strategies including Internet-based coursework. Opportunities to expand educational options for distance learners and geographically bound students are explained. In addition, methods of building community partnerships in an effort to recruit and retain primary care providers are also explained. The advantages and limitations of the asynchronous Internet-based courses are explored as part of the program evaluation.

  18. Brain plasticity and microglia: is transsynaptic glial activation in the thalamus after limb denervation linked to cortical plasticity and central sensitisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banati, Richard B

    2002-01-01

    Microglia are a subset of tissue-macrophages that are ubiquitously distributed throughout the entire CNS. In health, they remain largely dormant until activated by a pathological stimulus. The availability of more sensitive detection techniques has allowed the early measurement of the cell responses of microglia in areas with few signs of active pathology. Subtle neuronal injury can induce microglial activation in retrograde and anterograde projection areas remote from the primary lesion focus. There is also evidence that in cases of long-standing abnormal neuronal activity, such as in patients after limb amputation with chronic pain and phantom sensations, glial activation may occur transsynaptically in the thalamus. Such neuronally driven glial responses may be related to the emergence central sensitisation in chronic pain states or plasticity phenomena in the cerebral cortex. It is suggested, that such persistent low-level microglial activation is not adequately described by the traditional concept of phagocyte-mediated tissue damage that largely evolved from studies of acute brain lesion models or acute human brain pathology. Due to the presence of signal molecules that can act on neurons and microglia alike, the communication between neurons and microglia is likely to be bi-directional. Persistent subtle microglial activity may modulate basal synaptic transmission and thus neuronal functioning either directly or through the interaction with astrocytes. The activation of microglia leads to the emergence of microstructural as well as functional compartments in which neurokines, interleukins and other signalling molecules introduce a qualitatively different, more open mode of cell-cell communication that is normally absent from the healthy adult brain. This 'neo-compartmentalisation', however, occurs along predictable neuronal pathways within which these glial changes are themselves under the modulatory influence of neurons or other glial cells and are subject to

  19. Defining the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (ANT) as a deep brain stimulation target in refractory epilepsy: Delineation using 3 T MRI and intraoperative microelectrode recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möttönen, T; Katisko, J; Haapasalo, J; Tähtinen, T; Kiekara, T; Kähärä, V; Peltola, J; Öhman, J; Lehtimäki, K

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a minimally invasive and reversible method to treat an increasing number of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy. Targeting poorly defined deep structures is based in large degree on stereotactic atlas information, which may be a major source of inconsistent treatment effects. In the present study, we aimed to study whether a recently approved target for epilepsy (anterior nucleus of thalamus, ANT) is visualized in clinically established 3 T MRI and whether ANT is delineated using intraoperative microelectrode recording (MER). We have especially focused on individual variation in the location of ANT in stereotactic space. We also aimed to demonstrate the role of individual variation in interpretation of MER data by projecting samples onto AC-PC (anterior and posterior commissure) and ANT-normalized coordinate systems. Detailed analysis of ANT delineations in 3 T MRI short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images from eight patients undergoing DBS for refractory epilepsy was performed. Coronal and sagittal cross-sectional models of ANT were plotted in the AC-PC coordinate system to study individual variation. A total of 186 MER samples collected from 10 DBS trajectories and 5 patients were analyzed, and the location of each sample was calculated and corrected accordingly to the location of the final DBS electrode and projected to the AC-PC or coordinate system normalized to ANT. Most of the key structures in the anatomic atlas around ANT (mammillothalamic tract and external medullary lamina) were identified in STIR images allowing visual delineation of ANT. We observed a high degree of anatomical variation in the location of ANT, and the cross-sectional areas overlapped by study patients decreased in a linear fashion with an increasing number of patients. MER information from 10 individual trajectories correlated with STIR signal characteristics by demonstrating a spike-negative zone, presumably white matter layer

  20. Mechanism of inhibition of herpes simplex virus replication by delta 7-prostaglandin A1 and delta 12-prostaglandin J2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Fukushima, M; Tsurumi, T; Maeno, K; Nishiyama, Y

    1987-08-14

    We studied the effect of prostaglandins (PGs) A1, delta 7-A1, A2, D2, E1, E2, F2 alpha, J2 and delta 12-J2 on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Of nine PGs we tested, delta 7-PGA1 was found to have the most potent inhibitory effect; 50% inhibitory dose (ID50) was 0.35 microgram/ml in the plaque reduction assays and HSV-2 induced protein synthesis was strongly suppressed at 0.5 microgram/ml whereas at this dose, the protein synthesis of uninfected cells was not inhibited. Dot blot hybridization analysis revealed that delta 7-PGA1 and delta 12-PGJ2 inhibited the primary transcription of HSV-2. Thus we suggest that those PGs are primarily active at the level of mRNA synthesis.

  1. Shock Sensitivity of LX-04 Containing Delta Phase HMX at Elevated Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Hsu, P C; Maienschein, J L

    2003-07-11

    LX-04 is a widely used HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, which contains 85 weight % HMX and 15 weight % Viton binder. The sensitivity of LX-04 to a single stimulus such as heat, impact, and shock has been previously studied. However, hazard scenarios can involve multiple stimuli, such as heating to temperatures close to thermal explosion conditions followed by fragment impact, producing a shock in the hot explosive. The sensitivity of HMX at elevated temperatures is further complicated by the beta to delta solid-state phase transition, which occurs at approximately 165 C. This paper presents the results of shock initiation experiments conducted with LX-04 preheated to 190 C, as well as density measurements and small scale safety test results of the {delta} phase HMX at room temperature. This work shows that LX-04 at 190 C is more shock sensitive than LX-04 at 150 C or 170 C due to the volume increase during the {beta} to {delta} solid phase transition, which creates more hot spots, and the faster growth of reaction during shock compression.

  2. Influence of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on photically evoked after-discharge potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkanis, S A; Chiu, P; Borys, H K; Karler, R

    1977-04-29

    Two cannabinoids, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and several reference drugs were compared relative to their effects in a recently developed anticonvulsant test system, the after-discharge potentials of the visually evoked response; the potentials were recorded electrophysiologically from electrodes permanently mounted over the visual cortices of conscious rats. In anticonvulsant doses, trimethadione and ethosuximide produced an extensive depression of after-discharge activity, whereas diphenylhydantoin and cannabidiol exerted no such effect. In contrast, anticonvulsant doses of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and subconvulsant doses of pentylenetetrazol markedly increased after-discharge activity, which may represent a manifestation of their central nervous system excitatory properties. The data from the present study support our previously published ovservations from several other anticonvulsant tests that indicate the anticonvulsant characteristics of cannabidiol resemble those of diphenylhydantoin rather than those of trimethadione and that the central excitatory properties of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol distinguish it from cannabidiol. The results consistently suggest that the cannabinoids will be effective against grand mal but not absence seizures.

  3. Disparate effects of p24alpha and p24delta on secretory protein transport and processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen R P M Strating

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p24 family is thought to be somehow involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER-to-Golgi protein transport. A subset of the p24 proteins (p24alpha(3, -beta(1, -gamma(3 and -delta(2 is upregulated when Xenopus laevis intermediate pituitary melanotrope cells are physiologically activated to produce vast amounts of their major secretory cargo, the prohormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we find that transgene expression of p24alpha(3 or p24delta(2 specifically in the Xenopus melanotrope cells in both cases causes an effective displacement of the endogenous p24 proteins, resulting in severely distorted p24 systems and disparate melanotrope cell phenotypes. Transgene expression of p24alpha(3 greatly reduces POMC transport and leads to accumulation of the prohormone in large, ER-localized electron-dense structures, whereas p24delta(2-transgenesis does not influence the overall ultrastructure of the cells nor POMC transport and cleavage, but affects the Golgi-based processes of POMC glycomaturation and sulfation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Transgenic expression of two distinct p24 family members has disparate effects on secretory pathway functioning, illustrating the specificity and non-redundancy of our transgenic approach. We conclude that members of the p24 family furnish subcompartments of the secretory pathway with specific sets of machinery cargo to provide the proper microenvironments for efficient and correct secretory protein transport and processing.

  4. Subsidence detection in Grizzly Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Torres, F. A.; Brooks, B. A.; Glennie, C. L.; Hauser, D.; Ericksen, T.; Hudnut, K. W.; LeWinter, A.; Pollitz, F. F.; Finnegan, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a vital resource for the state of California, providing fresh water to approximately one million cultivated hectares and more than two thirds of the state population. This freshwater resource is protected by several inner islands in the delta and a system of levees that extends 1,700 kilometer and prevents salt water influx from the nearby bay. In the past, subsidence has been detected at these levees, which presents a potential hazard for the inner islands that are several meters under sea level. We use airborne and terrestrial LIDAR data from Grizzly island collected in 2007 and 2015 to deduce the rate of subsidence of portions of the island in order to quantified this ongoing event. By georeferencing, correcting for secular plate motion, and differencing these two data sets we have produced a preliminary map indicating a subsidence rate between 3 to 7.5 cm/yr within several unvegetated sections of the island, including roads adjacent to the levees. Our results show that differential LIDAR should be used as one of the tools to continue monitoring the subsidence of the Delta inner islands.

  5. Is there a self-organization principle of river deltas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Longjas, Anthony; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2017-04-01

    River deltas are known to possess a complex topological and flux-partitioning structure which has recently been quantified using spectral graph theory [Tejedor et al., 2015a,b]. By analysis of real and simulated deltas it has also been shown that there is promise in formalizing relationships between this topo-dynamic delta structure and the underlying delta forming processes [e.g., Tejedor et al., 2016]. The question we pose here is whether there exists a first order organizational principle behind the self-organization of river deltas and whether this principle can be unraveled from the co-evolving topo-dynamic structure encoded in the delta planform. To answer this question, we introduce a new metric, the nonlocal Entropy Rate (nER) that captures the information content of a delta network in terms of the degree of uncertainty in delivering fluxes from any point of the network to the shoreline. We hypothesize that if the "guiding principle" of undisturbed deltas is to efficiently and robustly build land by increasing the diversity of their flux pathways over the delta plane, then they would exhibit maximum nonlocal Entropy Rate at states at which geometry and flux dynamics are at equilibrium. At the same time, their nER would be non-optimal at transient states, such as before and after major avulsions during which topology and dynamics adjust to each other to reach a new equilibrium state. We will present our results for field and simulated deltas, which confirm this hypothesis and open up new ways of thinking about self-organization, complexity and robustness in river deltas. One particular connection of interest might have important implications since entropy rate and resilience are related by the fluctuation theorem [Demetrius and Manke, 2005], and therefore our results suggest that deltas might in fact self-organize to maximize their resilience to structural and dynamic perturbations. References: Tejedor, A., A. Longjas, I. Zaliapin, and E. Foufoula

  6. River delta self-organization via entropy rate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, A.; Longjas, A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2016-12-01

    Previous work [Tejedor et al., 2015a,b; 2016] has shown that network topologic characteristics for a wide range of field and simulated delta channel networks vary significantly reflecting to some extend the different underlying physical processes. While more work remains to be done in this direction to advance quantitative delta classification, a problem of parallel interest is that of unraveling whether deltas evolve and attain topologies and flow partitions that are consistent with an underlying principle of optimization, as for example has been examined for tributary river networks. Here we study concepts of Entropy as applied to directed acyclic graphs such as river deltas, and specifically the concept of Entropy rate that measures the rate at which a stochastic process generates information. For deltas, Entropy rate can be interpreted as the amount of information we need to acquire at each time step to probabilistically track the position of the particles on the network. We propose a new Entropy metric, the non-local Entropy Rate (nER), which we argue is more pertinent to deltas as it captures the averaged information content of a delta network in terms of the degree of uncertainty in delivering fluxes from any point of the network to the shoreline. We interpret nER as measuring delta's capacity to optimally grow by spreading water and sediment over its delta top in a non-preferential way. We present results for field and simulated deltas, showing that conditional on a network topology, channel widths self-adjust such that the delivery of fluxes from the delta top to the shoreline has a maximal value of non-local Entropy Rate. Drawing on the connection between Entropy and resilience via the fluctuation theorem [Demetrius and Manke, 2005], we also suggest that deltas might in fact self-organize to maximize their resilience to perturbations. Tejedor, A., A. Longjas, I. Zaliapin, and E. Foufoula-Georgiou (2015), Water Resour. Res., 51, 3998-4018 Tejedor, A., A

  7. Verification of Software Product Lines with Delta-Oriented Slicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Daniel; Klebanov, Vladimir; Schaefer, Ina

    Software product line (SPL) engineering is a well-known approach to develop industry-size adaptable software systems. SPL are often used in domains where high-quality software is desirable; the overwhelming product diversity, however, remains a challenge for assuring correctness. In this paper, we present delta-oriented slicing, an approach to reduce the deductive verification effort across an SPL where individual products are Java programs and their relations are described by deltas. On the specification side, we extend the delta language to deal with formal specifications. On the verification side, we combine proof slicing and similarity-guided proof reuse to ease the verification process.

  8. Catalytic asymmetric formation of delta-lactones from unsaturated acyl halides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiseni, Paolo S; Peters, René

    2010-02-22

    Previously unexplored enantiopure zwitterionic ammonium dienolates have been utilized in this work as reactive intermediates that act as diene components in hetero-Diels-Alder reactions (HDAs) with aldehydes to produce optically active delta-lactones, subunits of numerous bioactive products. The dienolates were generated in situ from E/Z mixtures of alpha,beta-unsaturated acid chlorides by use of a nucleophilic quinidine derivative and Sn(OTf)(2) as co-catalyst. The latter component was not directly involved in the cycloaddition step with aldehydes and simply facilitated the formation of the reactive dienolate species. The scope of the cycloaddition was considerably improved by use of a complex formed from Er(OTf)(3) and a simple commercially available norephedrine-derived ligand that tolerated a broad range of aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes for a cooperative bifunctional Lewis-acid-/Lewis-base-catalyzed reaction, providing alpha,beta-unsaturated delta-lactones with excellent enantioselectivities. Mechanistic studies confirmed the formation of the dienolate intermediates for both catalytic systems. The active Er(III) complex is most likely a monomeric species. Interestingly, all lanthanides can catalyze the title reaction, but the efficiency in terms of yield and enantioselectivity depends directly on the radius of the Ln(III) ion. Similarly, use of the pseudolanthanides Sc(III) and Y(III) also resulted in product formation, whereas the larger La(III) and other transition metal salts, as well as main group metal salts, proved to be inefficient. In addition, various synthetic transformations of 6-CCl(3)- or 4-silyl-substituted alpha,beta-unsaturated delta-lactones, giving access to a number of valuable delta-lactone building blocks, were investigated.

  9. Interaction between Mu and Delta Opioid Receptor Agonists in an Assay of Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Allodynia in Rhesus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stevens Negus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta opioid agonists enhance antinociceptive effects of mu-opioid agonists in many preclinical assays of acute nociception, but delta/mu interactions in preclinical models of inflammation-associated pain have not been examined. This study examined interactions between the delta agonist SNC80 [(+-4-[(αR-α-((2S,5R-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide] and the mu agonist analgesics methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine in an assay of capsaicin-induced thermal allodynia in rhesus monkeys. Thermal allodynia was produced by topical application of capsaicin to the tail. Antiallodynic effects of methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine were evaluated alone or in combination with fixed proportions of SNC80 identical to proportions previously shown to enhance acute thermal antinociceptive effects of these mu agonists in rhesus monkeys (0.9 : 1 SNC80/methadone; 0.29 : 1 SNC80/morphine; 3.6 : 1 SNC80/nalbuphine. Methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine each produced dose-dependent antiallodynia. SNC80 produced partial antiallodynia up to the highest dose tested (5.6 mg/kg. SNC80 produced a modest, enantioselective, and naltrindole-reversible enhancement of methadone-induced antiallodynia. However, SNC80 did not enhance morphine antiallodynia and only weakly enhanced nalbuphine antiallodynia. Overall, SNC80 produced modest or no enhancement of the antiallodynic effects of the three mu agonists evaluated. These results suggest that delta agonist-induced enhancement of mu agonist antiallodynia may be weaker and less reliable than previously demonstrated enhancement of mu agonist acute thermal nociception.

  10. Hepatitis delta virus infection: open issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niro, Grazia Anna; Gioffreda, Domenica; Fontana, Rosanna

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) consists of a circular single-stranded RNA genome which assembles two viral proteins and acquires a lipid envelope in which the hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) are embedded. HDV does not encode its own polymerase, but exploits a cellular enzyme for its replication. A better understanding of the mechanisms of HDV replication mechanism would provide new insights for antiviral strategies. Based on genomic variability, eight major genotypes of HDV have been identified, which differ as much as 40% in the nucleotide sequence. The cloning of HDV-RNA has provided genetic probes for the measurement of HDV-RNA in serum and liver; the sensitivity of HDV-RNA detection improved significantly when the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was introduced. As no commercial test is standardized for viral load detection, home-made assays have been developed in the different referral centers, which may not be comparable. Quantification of HDV in serum by real-time PCR has been recently proposed in the management of chronically infected patients. No specific inhibitors of HDV are available at present and, in spite of the crucial relationship between HDV and HBV, drugs that block HBV have only a theoretical but no sound effect on HDV replication. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonlinear slender wing aerodynamics. [delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    On present day high performance aircraft, a large portion of the lift is generated by leading edge vortices generated by flow separation off the highly swept leading edges of the lifting surfaces employed. It has been shown in an earlier paper how the vortex effects can be superimposed on a modified slender wing theory to give the unsteady longitudinal characteristics of sharp-edged delta wings up to very high angles of attack. The present paper extends the previous analysis to include the effects of leading edge roundness and trailing edge sweep on the aerodynamic characteristics. The paper also derives analytic means for prediction of the yaw stability of slender wings and the first order effects of Mach number. Universal scaling laws are defined for rapid preliminary design estimates of the slender wing lift and rolling moment. The results indicate that simple analytic tools can be developed to predict the aeroelastic characteristics of the space shuttle ascent configuration with its complicated flow field and aeroelastic cross-couplings.

  12. Workspace and Payload-Capacity of a New Reconfigurable Delta Parallel Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Maya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the workspace and payload capacity of a new design of reconfigurable Delta-type parallel robot is analysed. The reconfiguration is achieved by adjusting the length of the kinematic chains of a given robot link simultaneously and symmetrically during the operation of the robot. This would produce a dynamic workspace in shape and volume. A numerical analysis of the variation of shape and volume of the workspace and payload capacity of the robot is presented. Based both on the results of this analysis and on practical requirements, a proposal for the design of a reconfiguring mechanism is presented.

  13. Bathymetry of the Hong and Luoc River Junction, Red River Delta, Vietnam, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Toan, Duong Duc; Thanh, Mung Dinh; Shimizu, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Water Resources University in Hanoi, Vietnam, conducted a bathymetric survey of the junction of the Hong and Luoc Rivers. The survey was done to characterize the channel morphology of this delta distributary network and provide input for hydrodynamic and sediment transport models. The survey was carried out in December 2010 using a boat-mounted multibeam echo sounder integrated with a global positioning system. A bathymetric map of the Hong and Luoc River junction was produced which was referenced to the datum of the Trieu Duong tide gage on the Luoc River.

  14. Delta Morphodynamics Matters! Ecosystem Services, Poverty and Morphodynamic Change in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Mega-Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Adger, N.; Allan, A.; Darby, S. E.; Hutton, C.; Matthews, Z.; Rahman, M.; Whitehead, P. G.; Wolf, J.

    2013-12-01

    The world's deltas are probably the most vulnerable type of coastal environment, and they face multiple stresses in the coming decades. These stresses include, amongst others, local drivers due to land subsidence, population growth and urbanisation within the deltas, regional drivers due to changes in catchment management (e.g. upstream land use and dam construction), as well as global climate change impacts such as sea-level rise. At the same time, the ecosystem services of river deltas support high population densities, with around 14% of the global population inhabiting deltas. A large proportion of these people experience extremes of poverty and they are therefore severely exposed to vulnerability from environmental and ecological stress and degradation. In areas close to or below the poverty boundary, both subsistence and cash elements of the economy tend to rely disproportionately heavily on ecosystem services which underpin livelihoods. Therefore, to sustainably manage delta environments they must be viewed as complex social-environmental systems where change is only partially driven by physical drivers such as sea level rise and climate change, and human-induced development activities are also critical. Here we outline a new conceptual framework for the development of methods to understand and characterise the key drivers of change in ecosystem services that affect the environment and economic status of populous deltas, focusing specifically on the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) mega-delta. The GBM delta is characterised by densely populated coastal lowlands with significant poverty, with livelihoods supported to a large extent by natural ecosystems such as the Sunderbahns (the largest mangrove forest in the world). However, the GBM delta is under severe development pressure due to many growing cities. At present the importance of ecosystems services to poverty and livelihoods is poorly understood. This is due to due to the complexity of interactions

  15. Diet design for a multicenter controlled feeding trial: the DELTA program. Delta Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B H; Stewart, P; Wang, C H; Champagne, C; Windhauser, M; Ershow, A; Karmally, W; Phillips, K; Stewart, K; Van Heel, N; Farhat-Wood, A; Kris-Etherton, P M

    1998-07-01

    To describe the process and results of diet standardization, diet validation, and monitoring of diet composition, which were key components of protocol 1 of Dietary Effects on Lipoproteins and Thrombogenic Activity (DELTA-1), the initial protocol in a program of multicenter human feeding studies designed to evaluate the effects of amount and type of fat on lipoproteins and hemostasis parameters in various demographic groups. DELTA-1 was based on a randomized, blinded, crossover experimental design. Three diets were fed for 8 weeks to 103 healthy men and women aged 22 to 67 years at 4 field centers. Diet A, an average American diet, was designed to provide 37% of energy from fat, 16% of energy from saturated fatty acids (SFAs); diet B (step 1 diet) was designed to provide 30% of energy from fat, 9% of energy from SFA; and diet C (low SFA diet) was designed to provide 26% of energy from fat, 5% of energy from SFA. Key features of diet standardization included central procurement of fat-containing foods, inclusion of standard ingredients, precision weighing of foods--especially sources of fat and cholesterol--and use of standardized written procedures. For menu validation, a set of 12 menus for each diet was prepared in duplicate and chemically assayed. For monitoring of diet composition during the study, an 8-day diet cycle (6 weekday and 2 weekend menus) was sampled by every field center twice during each of 3 feeding periods. Means (+/- standard error) were calculated and compared with target nutrient specifications. DELTA-1 was able to provide a standardized diet that met nutrient specifications across 4 field centers over 24 weeks of participant feeding spanning a total of 8 months. Prestudy chemical validation of menus and continuous sampling and assay of diets throughout the study are essential to standardize experimental diets and to ensure that nutrient target goals are met and maintained throughout a controlled multicenter feeding study.

  16. What are Pregnant Women in a Rural Niger Delta Community's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    exploratory qualitative study was carried out to identify pregnant women in a rural Niger Delta community's perceptions of conventional .... formal medical practice should be considered12. .... writing process, literature was used to support the.

  17. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  18. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  19. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  20. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  1. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  2. among in-school adolescents in delta state. nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS among in-school adolescents in Delta state ofNigeria ... had good knowledge of HIV/AIDS. The electronic media were their main sources of information. ... observed differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Knowledge of ...

  3. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, February 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in February 2016. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  4. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, August 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in August 2011. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  5. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, September 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in September 2013. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  6. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, May 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in May 2012. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  7. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, August 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in August 2012. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  8. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, January 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in January 2015. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  9. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, May 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in May 2011. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  10. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, September 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in September 2010. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  11. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, July 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in July 2016. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  12. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, March 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in March 2013. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  13. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, April 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in April 2014. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  14. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, July 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in July 2015. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  15. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, September 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in September 2014. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  16. Linear delta expansion technique for the solution of anharmonic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The linear delta expansion technique has been developed for solving the differential equation of motion for symmetric and asymmetric anharmonic oscillators. We have also demonstrated the sophistication and simplicity of this new perturbation technique.

  17. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  18. Rarotonga Radiocarbon (delta 14C) for 1950 to 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rarotonga coral radiocarbon (14C) timeseries. Coral radiocarbon (Delta-14C) on untreated, low-speed drilled samples. Precision is +/- 4 per mil as documented by an...

  19. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  20. Establishment report: Reforestation of the Pen Branch corridor and delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E.A.; Dulohery, N.J.; Bunton, C.S.; Trettin, C.C.; McKee, W.H. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service in the reforestation of the Pen Branch floodplain and delta. The report focuses upon the reforestation activities and monitoring to characterize the sites.

  1. Delta progradation in Greenland driven by increasing glacial mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette; Iversen, Lars Lonsmann; Bjork, Anders Anker

    2017-01-01

    Climate changes are pronounced in Arctic regions and increase the vulnerability of the Arctic coastal zone(1). For example, increases in melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and reductions in sea ice and permafrost distribution are likely to alter coastal morphodynamics. The deltas of Greenland...... imagery. We find that delta progradation was driven by high freshwater runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet coinciding with periods of open water. Progradation was controlled by the local initial environmental conditions (that is, accumulated air temperatures above 0 degrees C per year, freshwater runoff...... are largely unaffected by human activity, but increased freshwater runoff and sediment fluxes may increase the size of the deltas, whereas increased wave activity in ice-free periods could reduce their size, with the net impact being unclear until now. Here we show that southwestern Greenland deltas were...

  2. The Niger Delta Avengers, Autonomous Ethnic Clans and Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    modern health facilities, quality education, efficient communication network and .... include migrants and bonded labourers, refugees and internally displaced ..... Niger Delta Region, such genuine organizations include the movement for the ...

  3. LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California from the California Department of Water Resources. Bare earth grids from LiDAR.This data is in ESRI Grid format with 2...

  4. Migratory Bird Avian Influenza Sampling; Yukon Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Data set containing avian influenza sampling information for spring and summer waterbirds on the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta, 2015. Data contains sample ID, species common...

  5. Black Women Leaders: The Case of Delta Sigma Theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canady, Hortense

    1985-01-01

    Describes the leadership role taken by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., in educational and economic development, international affairs, and physical and mental health since the organization's founding at Howard University in 1913. (GC)

  6. Pteridophytes of the Okavango Delta, Botswana (Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega Hernández, Efrén

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Okavango Delta in Botswana constitutes one of the larger inland deltas in the world. Fifteen species of fern were found in this ecological system integrated into 10 genera and 9 families. Included in this report are descriptions of each family, genus and species. Also given are artificial keys to the genera, as well as keys for genera and species within the family when necessary. A documented distribution and ecological notes for each species also appears.Se estudian los pterid6fitos del delta del Okavango, uno de los deltas interiores ma's grandes del mundo. Se citan 15 especies, incluidas en 10 generos y 9 familias. Se aportan descripciones, claves de identification, datos sobre la distribucitin y ecologia. y mapas de distribuci6n detallada de cada una de las especies.

  7. Quick Scan Monitroing Delta Programme Wadden Sea Area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stapel, J.; Dankers, N.M.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Welke informatie is bekend over: veiligheid, natuur en sociaaleconomische ontwikkeling in het Delta Programma Waddengebied. Naar aanleiding van deze Quickscan worden de volgende vijf monitoringstaken voorgesteld die grotendeels parallel kunnen worden uitgevoerd. Een aantal taken kunnen gefaseerd

  8. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  9. DEltas, vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Hutton C.W.

    Stakeholder Dialogue, London, June 19th, 2014. DEltas, vulnerability and Climate. Change: Migration and Adaptation. (DECCMA). Stakeholder Dialogue. Radisson Blu Edwardian Grafton Hotel, London, UK. June 19th, 2014 ...

  10. Lead analysis of waterfowl from Yukon Delta NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1995, WAES received funds from the Yukon Delta Ecosystem Team to analyze livers of waterfowl, other than spectacled eiders, for lead concentrations. Nineteen...

  11. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2002 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  12. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2000 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  13. Tale of Two Deltas: Permafrost Dynamics on the Colville and Yukon-Kuskokwim Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, T.; Shur, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Arctic deltas are the predominant coastline in the Arctic and are greatly modified by permafrost aggradation and degradation. In comparing the Colville Delta (CD) along the Beaufort Sea (MAAT -11 °C) with the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) along the Bering Sea (MAAT -1 °C), permafrost characteristics respond to differences in climate, flooding, salinization, and vegetation-soil development. Both deltas have an inner zone dominated by fluvial processes and nonsaline ecosystems, and an outer zone affected by both tidal and fluvial processes and has salt-affected ecosystems. In the CD, closed taliks develop under the deeper channels and surface permafrost starts to form on channel bars where water is <2 m deep. During early floodplain development with active sedimentation, syngenetic permafrost is climate driven, ice-poor, and dominated by pore and lenticular cryostructures. On inactive floodplains, where flooding is infrequent and fine-grained sedimentation is greatly diminished, climate-driven, ecosystem-modified permafrost aggrades upward in response to thickening organics and thinning active layer. Here a 2-m-thick intermediate layer develops that is ice-rich and dominated by reticulate and ataxitic cryostructures. On the oldest abandoned floodplains, permafrost becomes sufficiently ice rich from segregated and wedge ice that thermokarst lakes develop. Large storm surges up to 3 m amsl, such as those in 1963 and 1970, have caused extensive salt killed and ice-wedge degradation. Thus, thermokarst is abundant even at low temperatures. In the YKD, permafrost develops only during late floodplain stages in response to sphagnum accumulation and creates extensive permafrost plateaus that rise 1 m above the floodplain. This ecosystem-driven permafrost is epigenetic, ice-poor, and dominated by pore and lenticular cryostructures. Permafrost develops around existing water bodies, but thermokarst lakes are uncommon. Large storm surges up to 3.5 m amsl, such those in 1974 and

  14. Rimonabant-induced Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol withdrawal in rhesus monkeys: discriminative stimulus effects and other withdrawal signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jennifer L; McMahon, Lance R

    2010-07-01

    Marijuana-dependent individuals report using marijuana to alleviate withdrawal, suggesting that pharmacotherapy of marijuana withdrawal could promote abstinence. To identify potential pharmacotherapies for marijuana withdrawal, this study first characterized rimonabant-induced Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) withdrawal in rhesus monkeys by using drug discrimination and directly observable signs. Second, drugs were examined for their capacity to modify cannabinoid withdrawal. Monkeys receiving chronic Delta(9)-THC (1 mg/kg/12 h s.c.) discriminated the cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg i.v.) under a fixed ratio schedule of stimulus-shock termination. The discriminative stimulus effects of rimonabant were dose-dependent (ED(50) = 0.25 mg/kg) and accompanied by head shaking. In the absence of chronic Delta(9)-THC treatment (i.e., in nondependent monkeys), a larger dose (3.2 mg/kg) of rimonabant produced head shaking and tachycardia. Temporary discontinuation of Delta(9)-THC treatment resulted in increased responding on the rimonabant lever, head shaking, and activity during the dark cycle. The rimonabant discriminative stimulus was attenuated fully by Delta(9)-THC (at doses larger than mg/kg/12 h) and the cannabinoid agonist CP 55940 [5-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-2-[5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexyl]phenol], and partially by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 [(R)-(+)-[2, 3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate] and the alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist clonidine. In contrast, a benzodiazepine (diazepam) and monoamine agonist (cocaine) did not attenuate the rimonabant discriminative stimulus. Head shaking was attenuated by all test compounds. These results show that the discriminative stimulus effects of rimonabant in Delta(9)-THC-treated monkeys are a more pharmacologically selective measure of cannabinoid withdrawal than rimonabant-induced head shaking. These results suggest

  15. Natural levee evolution in the Rhine-Meuse delta, the Netherlands, during the first millennium CE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, H.J.; Stouthamer, E.; Cohen, K.M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents reconstructions on natural levee development in the Rhine-Meuse delta, the Netherlands, during the first millennium CE, covering the full delta plain. It is the first study that performs this on a delta scale, which allows seeing the delta-wide trends on levee-forming controls

  16. Gamma/delta T lymphocytes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Baliko, Z.; Szereday, L.; Szekeres-Bartho, J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on the percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis are few and contradictory. The percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of tuberculin positive and tuberculin negative patients with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and healthy controls was compared. METHODS: Thirty six patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 11 healthy controls were studied. Lymphocytes we...

  17. Delta progradation in Greenland driven by increasing glacial mass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Mette; Lønsmann Iversen, Lars; Anker Bjørk, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Westergaard-Nielsen, Andreas; Overeem, Irina; Barnhart, Katy R.; Abbas Khan, Shfaqat; Box, Jason E.; Abermann, Jakob; Langley, Kirsty; Kroon, Aart

    2017-10-01

    Climate changes are pronounced in Arctic regions and increase the vulnerability of the Arctic coastal zone. For example, increases in melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and reductions in sea ice and permafrost distribution are likely to alter coastal morphodynamics. The deltas of Greenland are largely unaffected by human activity, but increased freshwater runoff and sediment fluxes may increase the size of the deltas, whereas increased wave activity in ice-free periods could reduce their size, with the net impact being unclear until now. Here we show that southwestern Greenland deltas were largely stable from the 1940s to 1980s, but prograded (that is, sediment deposition extended the delta into the sea) in a warming Arctic from the 1980s to 2010s. Our results are based on the areal changes of 121 deltas since the 1940s, assessed using newly discovered aerial photographs and remotely sensed imagery. We find that delta progradation was driven by high freshwater runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet coinciding with periods of open water. Progradation was controlled by the local initial environmental conditions (that is, accumulated air temperatures above 0 °C per year, freshwater runoff and sea ice in the 1980s) rather than by local changes in these conditions from the 1980s to 2010s at each delta. This is in contrast to a dominantly eroding trend of Arctic sedimentary coasts along the coastal plains of Alaska, Siberia and western Canada, and to the spatially variable patterns of erosion and accretion along the large deltas of the main rivers in the Arctic. Our results improve the understanding of Arctic coastal evolution in a changing climate, and reveal the impacts on coastal areas of increasing ice mass loss and the associated freshwater runoff and lengthening of open-water periods.

  18. Longitudinal spin asymmetries and $\\Delta G$ at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Le Goff, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    The spin structure $g_{1}$ of the deuteron has been measured by COMPASS with unprecedented accuracy at low $x$, providing much more reliable values for the first moment $\\Gamma_{1}$ and for the quark spin contribution $\\Delta\\Sigma$. Difference-charge semi-inclusive asymmetries have been measured and seem to favor a flavor asymmetric polarized sea. The gluon polarization has been measured in the open-charm and high-$p_{t}$ channels. Large values of $\\Delta G$ are now unlikely.

  19. Automatisierte VHDL-Code-Generierung eines Delta-Sigma Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Spilka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Im vorliegenden Beitrag wird eine automatische Generierung des VHDL-Codes eines Delta-Sigma Modulators präsentiert. Die Koeffizientenmultiplikation wird hierbei durch Bit-Serielle-Addition durchgeführt. Mit Hilfe zweier neuer Matlab Funktionen wird der Systementwurf durch die bekannte Delta-Sigma Toolbox von R. Schreier erweitert und direkt synthesefähiger VHDL Code erzeugt.

  20. The Great Diversion: Danube Delta under Human Control (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giosan, L.

    2009-12-01

    Many deltas around the world are suffering from sediment deficits that render them unstable to current and predicted rates of sea level rise. One solution proposed to alleviate the complete or partial drowning of such deltas is the use of river diversions to increase the quantity of sediment supplied to the delta plain to support marsh accretion. We examine the results of a half century old program of diversion in the Danube delta that led to the creation of an extensive diversion channel network akin in scope and size to a natural deltaic network. Danube’s importance as a shipping route increased after the Crimean War in the 1850s; the European Danube Commission was charged with maintaining the Sulina distributary as a shipping channel until 1940s. In the same period, several canals were dug to aid fishing in lakes and bring freshwater to brackish lagoons. After World War II, Communist authorities dramatically increased the number of canals for fishing, fish-farming and reed harvesting. New data on sedimentation rates and estimates of sediment fluxes suggest that the intensive canalization in the second half of the 20th Century led to increased sediment deposition that compensated the decreasing sediment discharge linked to damming within the internal fluvial part of the delta; however, the external marine delta has become increasingly sediment starved during the same interval. We emphasize the similarities and contrasts between the “human-controlled” and natural deltaic channel networks of the Danube delta and discuss the sustainability of the delta as a sediment budget problem within a sea level rise context.

  1. Inundations in the delta of the Northern Dvina River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magritsky Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides information about the types, factors and features of ice dam and storm surge inundations in the Northern Dvina River delta, new methods and results of their research, changing the situation with inundations for a long time-period. This article contains data on current structure and regime of the Northern Dvina delta, changes of hydrological factors in XX-XXI centuries.

  2. Clostridium perfringens delta toxin is sequence related to beta toxin, NetB, and Staphylococcus pore-forming toxins, but shows functional differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Manich

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens produces numerous toxins, which are responsible for severe diseases in man and animals. Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysins released by a number of C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. Delta toxin was characterized to be cytotoxic for cells expressing the ganglioside G(M2 in their membrane. Here we report the genetic characterization of Delta toxin and its pore forming activity in lipid bilayers. Delta toxin consists of 318 amino acids, its 28 N-terminal amino acids corresponding to a signal peptide. The secreted Delta toxin (290 amino acids; 32619 Da is a basic protein (pI 9.1 which shows a significant homology with C. perfringens Beta toxin (43% identity, with C. perfringens NetB (40% identity and, to a lesser extent, with Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin and leukotoxins. Recombinant Delta toxin showed a preference for binding to G(M2, in contrast to Beta toxin, which did not bind to gangliosides. It is hemolytic for sheep red blood cells and cytotoxic for HeLa cells. In artificial diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine membranes, Delta and Beta toxin formed channels. Conductance of the channels formed by Delta toxin, with a value of about 100 pS to more than 1 nS in 1 M KCl and a membrane potential of 20 mV, was higher than those formed by Beta toxin and their distribution was broader. The results of zero-current membrane potential measurements and single channel experiments suggest that Delta toxin forms slightly anion-selective channels, whereas the Beta toxin channels showed a preference for cations under the same conditions. C. perfringens Delta toxin shows a significant sequence homolgy with C. perfringens Beta and NetB toxins, as well as with S. aureus alpha hemolysin and leukotoxins, but exhibits different channel properties in lipid bilayers. In contrast to Beta toxin, Delta toxin recognizes G(M2 as receptor and forms anion-selective channels.

  3. Sigma-delta cellular neural network for 2D modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aomori, Hisashi; Otake, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2008-01-01

    Although sigma-delta modulation is widely used for analog-to-digital (A/D) converters, sigma-delta concepts are only for 1D signals. Signal processing in the digital domain is extremely useful for 2D signals such as used in image processing, medical imaging, ultrasound imaging, and so on. The intricate task that provides true 2D sigma-delta modulation is feasible in the spatial domain sigma-delta modulation using the discrete-time cellular neural network (DT-CNN) with a C-template. In the proposed architecture, the A-template is used for a digital-to-analog converter (DAC), the C-template works as an integrator, and the nonlinear output function is used for the bilevel output. In addition, due to the cellular neural network (CNN) characteristics, each pixel of an image corresponds to a cell of a CNN, and each cell is connected spatially by the A-template. Therefore, the proposed system can be thought of as a very large-scale and super-parallel sigma-delta modulator. Moreover, the spatio-temporal dynamics is designed to obtain an optimal reconstruction signal. The experimental results show the excellent reconstruction performance and capabilities of the CNN as a sigma-delta modulator.

  4. An integrated assessment framework for land subsidence in delta cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. M. Bucx

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In many delta cities land subsidence exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten by excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without change, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other delta (and coastal cities will sink below sea level. Increased flooding and also other widespread impacts of land subsidence result already in damage of billions of dollars per year. In order to gain insight in the complex, multi-sectoral aspects of subsidence, to raise awareness and to support decision making on appropriate adaptation strategies and measures, an Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF for subsidence is introduced, illustrated by several (delta case studies. Based on that a list of 10 generic key issues and possible solutions is presented in order to further develop and support a (generic approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas. For exchange of experiences and knowledge development.on subsidence in deltas the Delta Alliance, a knowledge network of deltas worldwide, can be supportive.

  5. Angoff's delta method revisited: improving DIF detection under small samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magis, David; Facon, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Most methods for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) are suitable when the sample sizes are sufficiently large to validate the null statistical distributions. There is no guarantee, however, that they will still perform adequately when there are few respondents in the focal group or in both the reference and the focal group. Angoff's delta plot is a potentially useful alternative for small-sample DIF investigation, but it suffers from an improper DIF flagging criterion. The purpose of this paper is to improve this classification rule under mild statistical assumptions. This improvement yields a modified delta plot with an adjusted DIF flagging criterion for small samples. A simulation study was conducted to compare the modified delta plot with both the classical delta plot approach and the Mantel-Haenszel method. It is concluded that the modified delta plot is consistently less conservative and more powerful than the usual delta plot, and is also less conservative and more powerful than the Mantel-Haenszel method as long as at least one group of respondents is small. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  6. Non-commutative valuation rings of $K(X;\\sigma,\\delta)$ over a division ring $K$

    OpenAIRE

    XIE, Guangming; MARUBAYASHI, Hidetoshi; KOBAYASHI, Shigeru; KOMATSU, Hiroaki

    2004-01-01

    Let $K$ be a division ring with a $\\sigma$ -derivation $\\delta$ , where $\\sigma$ is an endomorphism of $K$ and $K(X;\\sigma,\\delta)$ be the quotient division ring of the Ore extension $K[X;\\sigma,\\delta]$ over $K$ in an indeterminate $X$ . First, we describe non-commutative valuation rings of $K(X;\\sigma,\\delta)$ which contain $K[X;\\sigma,\\delta]$ . Suppose that $(\\sigma,\\delta)$ is compatible with $V$ , where $V$ is a total valuation ring of $K$ , then $R^{(1)}=V[X;\\sigma,\\delta]_{J(V)[X;\\sig...

  7. Multiple linear regression and artificial neural networks for delta-endotoxin and protease yields modelling of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennouri, Karim; Ben Ayed, Rayda; Triki, Mohamed Ali; Ottaviani, Ennio; Mazzarello, Maura; Hertelli, Fathi; Zouari, Nabil

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a model that supplies accurate predictions of the yields of delta-endotoxins and proteases produced by B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD-1. Using available medium ingredients as variables, a mathematical method, based on Plackett-Burman design (PB), was employed to analyze and compare data generated by the Bootstrap method and processed by multiple linear regressions (MLR) and artificial neural networks (ANN) including multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) models. The predictive ability of these models was evaluated by comparison of output data through the determination of coefficient (R 2 ) and mean square error (MSE) values. The results demonstrate that the prediction of the yields of delta-endotoxin and protease was more accurate by ANN technique (87 and 89% for delta-endotoxin and protease determination coefficients, respectively) when compared with MLR method (73.1 and 77.2% for delta-endotoxin and protease determination coefficients, respectively), suggesting that the proposed ANNs, especially MLP, is a suitable new approach for determining yields of bacterial products that allow us to make more appropriate predictions in a shorter time and with less engineering effort.

  8. Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)—positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis—produces commercially...

  9. A Conceptual Framework for Analyzing Deltas as Coupled Social-Ecological Systems: An example from the Amazon Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondizio, E.; Vogt, N. D.; Hetrick, S.; da Costa, S. M. F.; Anthony, E.

    2015-12-01

    At the nexus of watersheds, land, coastal areas, oceans, and human settlements, river delta regions pose specific challenges to environmental governance and sustainability. Using the Amazon Delta (AD) as our focus we reflect on the challenges created by the high degree of functional interdependencies shaping social-ecological dynamics of delta regions. The article introduces the initial design of an integrated conceptual framework to analyze delta regions as coupled social-ecological systems (SES). The first component of the framework is used to provide integrated definitions of delta regions according to a problem and/or collective action dilemma. Five different systematic components are suggested: social-economic systems, governance systems, ecosystems-resource systems, topographic-hydrological systems, and oceanic-climate systems. The second component of the framework presents a strategy for nested social ecological analysis to examine collective action situations in delta regions from local to regional and basin levels. The article provides illustrative applications of the framework to the Amazon Delta. First, it is used to define the AD region as a coupled, multi-level SES. We further proposed a definition of what we call the core SES of the AD. We then utilize the framework to diagnose an example collective action problem related to the impacts of urban growth and pollution on small-scale fishing resources. We argue that the functional interdependencies characteristic of delta regions require new approaches to understand, diagnose, and evaluate the current and future impact of social and environmental changes and potential solutions to the sustainability dilemmas characteristic of these regions.

  10. Cloning, expression, and purification of the functional Delta(3)-Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ding; Wong, Chi-Kin; Yu, Wen-hua; Li, Pingfeng

    2002-10-01

    Delta(3)-Delta(2)-Enoyl-CoA isomerase (EC 5.3.3.8) is a key enzyme for the beta-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. The cDNA of the full-length rat liver Delta(3)-Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase was previously cloned as pAG847. PCR methodologies were used to subclone the gene encoding the functional Delta(3)-Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase from pAG847 with primers that were designed to add six continuous histidine codon to the 5(') primer. The PCR product was inserted into a pLM1 expression vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The soluble expressed protein was purified with a nickel HiTrap chelating metal affinity column to apparent homogeneity based on Coomassie blue-stained SDS-PAGE and the molecular weight of the protein subunit was 30 kDa. The purified protein had a dimeric structure composed of identical subunits, and the molecular weight of the enzyme determined by gel chromatography was 60 kDa. Kinetic studies have been carried out and K(M) of 81 microM and V(max) of 292 micromol/min/mg were determined. The specific activity of the protein is 201 U/mg, which is significantly higher than that reported before for the same protein isolated from a natural source. The one-step purification of the highly active Delta(3)-Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase will greatly facilitate the further investigation of this enzyme through site-directed mutagenesis and enzyme catalyzed reactions with substrate analogues.

  11. Mean proloculus size, delta super(13) C and delta super(18) O variations in recent benthic foraminifera from the west coast of India and their climatic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Sarkar, A.

    The interrelationship between mean proloculus size (MPS), delta super(18) O and delta super(13) C vatiations in benthic foraminiferal species Rotalidium annectens and their relation with temperature (T) and salinity (S) have been studied in samples...

  12. Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta regulates period length of the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Etchegaray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta plays a more prominent role in the regulation of circadian cycle length than its homologue casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1epsilon in peripheral tissues such as liver and embryonic fibroblasts. Mice lacking CK1delta die shortly after birth, so it has not been possible to assess the impact of loss of CK1delta on behavioral rhythms controlled by the master circadian oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, mPER2::LUCIFERASE bioluminescence rhythms were monitored from SCN explants collected from neonatal mice. The data demonstrate that SCN explants from neonatal CK1delta-deficient mice oscillate, but with a longer circadian period than littermate controls. The cycle length of rhythms recorded from neonatal SCN explants of CK1epsilon-deficient mice did not differ from control explants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that CK1delta plays a more prominent role than CK1epsilon in the maintenance of 24-hour rhythms in the master circadian oscillator.

  13. Influence of ion-irradiation on hardness change in type 304 stainless steel weldment containing delta({delta}) ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan; Hong, Jun-Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Nuclear Materials Development Team, Taejon (Korea); Shin, Yong-Kwan [Hyundai Power Tech., Transmission Production Team, Chungnam (Korea); Kim, Young-Jig [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Dept. of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kyonggi-do (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Differences of high energy-ion induced microstructure of bcc {delta}-ferrite and fcc austenite matrix, and the effects of {delta}-ferrite on the Vickers micro-hardness (Hv) after irradiation were investigated for Type 304 stainless steel weldments containing two different {delta}-ferrite contents: ferrite number (FN) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. Specimens were irradiated to 1.5 dpa with 8 MeV Fe{sup +4} ions using a Tandem Vande-Graff accelerator (flux: 4.3 x 10{sup 10} ion/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s, fluence: 0.83 x 10{sup 15} ion/cm{sup 2}) at below 60 degC. Calculations TRIM 95 showed that a peak damage appeared at 1.5 {mu}m in depth with 0.7 {mu}m full width at half maximum (FWHM). These results on irradiation-induced defects (IIDs) distribution were confirmed by TEM. Clear differences for the size and number density of IIDs as black dots (size: 5-10 nm) and loops observed in both the austenitic matrix and {delta}-ferrite, where the size of IIDs was far larger in the fcc matrix than the bcc {delta}-ferrite. Hv test results showed that the irradiation hardening of {delta}-ferrite was about 1.5 times larger than the austenitic matrix. From microstructural observation the increase of the higher Vickers micro-hardness was explained. (author)

  14. Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta) regulates period length of the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchegaray, Jean-Pierre; Yu, Elizabeth A; Indic, Premananda; Dallmann, Robert; Weaver, David R

    2010-04-22

    Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta) plays a more prominent role in the regulation of circadian cycle length than its homologue casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1epsilon) in peripheral tissues such as liver and embryonic fibroblasts. Mice lacking CK1delta die shortly after birth, so it has not been possible to assess the impact of loss of CK1delta on behavioral rhythms controlled by the master circadian oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the present study, mPER2::LUCIFERASE bioluminescence rhythms were monitored from SCN explants collected from neonatal mice. The data demonstrate that SCN explants from neonatal CK1delta-deficient mice oscillate, but with a longer circadian period than littermate controls. The cycle length of rhythms recorded from neonatal SCN explants of CK1epsilon-deficient mice did not differ from control explants. The results indicate that CK1delta plays a more prominent role than CK1epsilon in the maintenance of 24-hour rhythms in the master circadian oscillator.

  15. Perspectives on Bay–Delta Science and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Healey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available doi: https://doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss4art6The State of Bay–Delta Science 2008 highlighted seven emerging perspectives on science and management of the Delta. These perspectives had important effects on policy and legislation concerning management of the Delta ecosystem and water exports. From the collection of papers that make up the State of Bay–Delta Science 2016, we derive another seven perspectives that augment those published in 2008. The new perspectives address nutrient and contaminant concentrations in Delta waters, the failure of the Delta food web to support native species, the role of multiple stressors in driving species toward extinction, and the emerging importance of extreme events in driving change in the ecosystem and the water supply. The scientific advances that underpin these new perspectives were made possible by new measurement and analytic tools. We briefly discuss some of these, including miniaturized acoustic fish tags, sensors for monitoring of water quality, analytic techniques for disaggregating complex contaminant mixtures, remote sensing to assess levee vulnerability, and multidimensional hydrodynamic modeling. Despite these new tools and scientific insights, species conservation objectives for the Delta are not being met. We believe that this lack of progress stems in part from the fact that science and policy do not incorporate sufficiently long-term perspectives. Looking forward half a century was central to the Delta Visioning process, but science and policy have not embraced this conceptual breadth. We are also concerned that protection and enhancement of the unique cultural, recreational, natural resource, and agricultural values of the Delta as an evolving place, as required by the Delta Reform Act, has received no critical study and analysis. Adopting wider and longer science and policy perspectives immediately encourages recognition of the need for evaluation, analysis, and public discourse on

  16. Preparation of 2-(/sup 125/I) iodohistamine-labelled. delta. /sup 8/-tetrahydrocannabinol-11-oic acid for use in cannabinoid radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B.; Mason, P.A.; Moffat, A.C. (Home Office Central Research Establishment, Aldermaston (UK)); King, L.J. (Surrey Univ., Guildford (UK))

    1982-08-01

    A simple method is described for the preparation of 2-(/sup 125/I)iodohistamine-labelled ..delta../sup 8/-tetrahydrocannabinol-11-oic acid with high specific activity for use in radioimmunoassay. This compound is produced in high yield and shows excellent radiochemical stability when stored at 4/sup 0/C.

  17. An evaluation of fish health-management practices and occupational health hazards associated with Pangasius catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) aquaculture in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phu, Tran Minh; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Dung, Tu Thanh; Hai, Dao Minh; Son, Vo Nam; Rico Artero, Andreu; Clausen, Jesper Hedegaard; Madsen, Henry; Murray, Francis; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the current status on the use of probiotics, disinfectants and antimicrobials in hatcheries, nurseries and grow-out farms producing Pangasius catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 83

  18. Isolation of eicosapentaenoic acid-producing fungi from soil based on polymerase chain reaction amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing-Rong; Zhou, Peng-Peng; Zhu, Yuan-Min; Ren, Liang; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed for rapid screening and isolation of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-producing soil fungi through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Genes coding for delta6 fatty acid desaturase and delta5 fatty acid desaturase were used as molecular markers for screening these EPA-producing fungi from soil. Three out of 65 soil fungi gave positive results through PCR amplification. Two out of these three strains were found to produce EPA when they had grown in 80 ml potato/dextrose liquid medium at (25 +/- 1) degrees C for 144 h. The EPA yields were 215.81 mg 1(-1) and 263.80 mg 1(-1), respectively. The other positive strain was detected to produce arachidonic acid (AA). This study indicates that molecular detection of genes encoding delta6 and delta5 desaturases is an efficient method for primary screening of EPA- or its related polyunsaturated fatty acids (PuFAs)-producing fungi, which can improve the screening efficiency prominently.

  19. Stratigraphy and paleohydrology of delta channel deposits, Jezero crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudge, Timothy A.; Mohrig, David; Cardenas, Benjamin T.; Hughes, Cory M.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2018-02-01

    The Jezero crater open-basin lake contains two well-exposed fluvial sedimentary deposits formed early in martian history. Here, we examine the geometry and architecture of the Jezero western delta fluvial stratigraphy using high-resolution orbital images and digital elevation models (DEMs). The goal of this analysis is to reconstruct the evolution of the delta and associated shoreline position. The delta outcrop contains three distinct classes of fluvial stratigraphy that we interpret, from oldest to youngest, as: (1) point bar strata deposited by repeated flood events in meandering channels; (2) inverted channel-filling deposits formed by avulsive distributary channels; and (3) a valley that incises the deposit. We use DEMs to quantify the geometry of the channel deposits and estimate flow depths of ∼7 m for the meandering channels and ∼2 m for the avulsive distributary channels. Using these estimates, we employ a novel approach for assessing paleohydrology of the formative channels in relative terms. This analysis indicates that the shift from meandering to avulsive distributary channels was associated with an approximately four-fold decrease in the water to sediment discharge ratio. We use observations of the fluvial stratigraphy and channel paleohydrology to propose a model for the evolution of the Jezero western delta. The delta stratigraphy records lake level rise and shoreline transgression associated with approximately continuous filling of the basin, followed by outlet breaching, and eventual erosion of the delta. Our results imply a martian surface environment during the period of delta formation that supplied sufficient surface runoff to fill the Jezero basin without major drops in lake level, but also with discrete flooding events at non-orbital (e.g., annual to decadal) timescales.

  20. Anadromous salmonids in the Delta: New science 2006–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Russell W.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Brandes, Patricia L.; Burau, Jon R.; Israel, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    As juvenile salmon enter the Sacramento–SanJoaquin River Delta (“the Delta”) they disperse among its complex channel network where they are subject to channel-specific processes that affect their rate of migration, vulnerability to predation, feeding success, growth rates, and ultimately, survival. In the decades before 2006, tools available to quantify growth, dispersal, and survival of juvenile salmon in this complex channel network were limited.Fortunately, thanks to technological advances such as acoustic telemetry and chemical and structural otolith analysis, much has been learned over the past decade about the role of the Delta in the life cycle of juvenile salmon. Here, we review new science between 2006and 2016 that sheds light on how different life stages and runs of juvenile salmon grow, move, and survive in the complex channel network of the Delta. One of the most important advances during the past decade has been the widespread adoption of acoustic telemetry techniques. Use of telemetry has shed light on how survival varies among alternative migration routes and the proportion of fish that use each migration route. Chemical and structural analysis of otoliths has provided insights about when juveniles left their natal river and provided evidence of extended rearing in the brackish or saltwater regions of the Delta. New advancements in genetics now allow individuals captured by trawls to be assigned to specific runs. Detailed information about movement and survival in the Delta has spurred development of agent-based models of juvenile salmon that are coupled to hydrodynamic models. Although much has been learned, knowledge gaps remain about how very small juvenile salmon (fry and parr) use the Delta. Understanding how all life stages of juvenile salmon grow, rear, and survive in the Delta is critical for devising management strategies that support a diversity of life history strategies.

  1. Challenges and Approaches in Delta Planning and Management - Sharing experiences from SE Asian Deltas and the Rhine-Meuse Delta -Report on Regional Training Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long Phi, H.; Fida Abdullah Khan, M.; Wosten, J.H.M.; Douven, W.

    2014-01-01

    The training workshop consisted of a balanced mix of lectures on specific delta topics, work on group assignments, group and plenary discussions, and group presentations. Due to high professional level of the participants the discussions often reached the level of a policy dialogue among equals

  2. ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL STATE OF WATERCOURSES OF DELTA OF THE VOLGA RIVER BY THE STRUCTURE OF BOTTOM COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Zaitcev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The assessment of the ecological status of watercourses of Delta of the Volga River on the structure of benthic communities. The main objective of our researches was the assess the ecological status of watercourses of Delta of the Volga River on the basis of the analyzes of the structural-functional characteristics of benthic communities.Location. Delta of the Volga River was the area of researches.Methods. Processing samples of zoobenthos of the studied watercourses of Delta of the Volga River was produced according to standard techniques. (Zhadan V.I.,1960, Vinberg G.G., 1984, Abakumov V.A., 1992. Altogether were selected and processed 516 samples of zoobenthos. Species identification was done using the "Atlas of invertebrates of the Caspian Sea" (Birshtein A.Ya., 1968and “The determinant to freshwater invertebrates…” (Kutikova L.A., 1977. Next, based on the obtained data, we determined the abundance and biomass of species per m2 surface area of the bottom. To the assessment of the ecological status of watercourses of Delta of the Volga River by the structure of microzoobenthos we used the following indicators: number of species, abundance (N, specimens/m2, biomass (B, g/m2, percentage of principal taxonomic groups, oligogenic index of Parele (D1 (Parele E. A., 1974, biotic index of Wudiwiss in the modification of Nasibulina (B (Nasibulina B. M., 1995, the index of species diversity of Shannon-Uiver (H, bit/copy (Shitikov V. K., 2003.Results. The obtained results of the assessment of the ecological status of watercourses in the Delta of the Volga River by the structure of benthic communities show that the same species having in different water bodies their different representation and structural-functional characteristics were the kernel of bottom fauna. According to the values of the modified biotic index of Wudiwiss and oligochaetae index of Parele calculated for the whole period of studies, the water quality in the

  3. Critical Assessment of the Delta Smelt Population in the San Francisco Estuary, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Bennett

    2005-09-01

    growth, survival, and reproductive success on an annual basis despite an array of limiting factors that can occur at specific times and locations. Variability in spawning success and larval survival is induced by climate and other environmental and anthropogenic factors that operate between winter and mid-summer. However, spawning microhabitats with egg deposition have not been discovered. Spawning success appears to be timed to lunar periods within a water temperature range of about 15 to 20°C. Longer spawning seasons in cooler years can produce more cohorts and on average higher numbers of adult delta smelt. Cohorts spaced in time have different probabilities of encountering various sources of mortality, including entrainment in freshwater export operations, pulses of toxic pesticides, food shortages and predation by exotic species. Density dependence may provide an upper limit on the numbers of juvenile delta smelt surviving to the adult stage. This may occur during late summer in years when juvenile abundance is high relative to habitat carrying capacity. Factors defining the carrying capacity for juvenile delta smelt are unknown, but may include a shrinking volume of physically suitable habitat combined with a high density of competing planktivorous fishes during late summer and fall. Understanding the relative importance of anthropogenic effects on the population can be improved through better estimates of abundance and measurements of potentially limiting processes. There is little information on losses of larval delta smelt (less than 20 mm fork length, FL to the export facilities. Use of a population model suggests that water export operations can impact the abundance of post-larval (about 20 mm FL delta smelt, but these effects may not reflect on adult abundance due to other processes operating in the intervening period. Effects from changes to the estuarine food web by exotic species and toxic chemicals occur but measuring their influence on population

  4. Multi-isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 7}Li-{delta}{sup 11}B-{delta}D-{delta}{sup 18}O) of rainwaters in France: Origin and spatio-temporal characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millot, Romain, E-mail: r.millot@brgm.fr [BRGM, Metrology Monitoring Analysis Department, Orleans (France); Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle [BRGM, Water Department, Orleans (France); Guerrot, Catherine; Negrel, Philippe [BRGM, Metrology Monitoring Analysis Department, Orleans (France)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} A contour map of France for {delta}{sup 18}O was drawn after compiling data that included more than 400 values from all of France. {yields} The seasonal effect (i.e. the month or rainfall amount) is not the main controlling factor for the Li and B isotopic variations. {yields} Most Li and B in rainwaters does not have a marine origin. {yields} Finally, this work also adds to the potential for use of Li and B isotopes as environmental tracers. - Abstract: In the present work, the first results are reported for both Li and B isotope ratios in rainwater samples collected over a long time period (i.e. monthly rainfall events over 1 a) at a national scale (from coastal and inland locations). In addition, the stable isotopes of the water molecule ({delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O) are also reported here for the same locations so that the Li and B isotope data can be discussed in the same context. The range of Li and B isotopic variations in these rainwaters were measured to enable the determination of the origin of these elements in rainwaters and the characterization of both the seasonal and spatio-temporal effects for {delta}{sup 7}Li and {delta}{sup 11}B signatures in rainwaters. Lithium and B concentrations are low in rainwater samples, ranging from 0.004 to 0.292 {mu}mol/L and from 0.029 to 6.184 {mu}mol/L, respectively. {delta}{sup 7}Li and {delta}{sup 11}B values in rainwaters also show a great range of variation between +3.2 per mille and +95.6 per mille and between -3.3 per mille and +40.6 per mille over a period of 1 a, respectively, clearly different from the signature of seawater. Seasonal effects (i.e. rainfall amount and month) are not the main factors controlling element concentrations and isotopic variations. {delta}{sup 7}Li and {delta}{sup 11}B values in rainwaters are clearly different from one site to another, indicating the variable contribution of sea salts in the rainwater depending on the sampling site (coastal vs

  5. Hydrology and morphology of two river mouth regions (temperate Vistula Delta and subtropical Red River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Pruszak

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparative analysis of two different river mouths from two different geographical zones (subtropical and temperate climatic regions. One is the multi-branch and multi-spit mouth of the Red River on the Gulf of Tonkin (Vietnam, the other is the smaller delta of the river Vistula on a bay of the Baltic Sea (Poland. The analysis focuses on the similarities and differences in the hydrodynamics between these estuaries and the adjacent coastal zones, the features of sediment transport, and the long-term morphodynamics of the river outlets. Salinity and water level are also discussed, the latter also in the context of the anticipated global effect of accelerated sea level rise. The analysis shows that the climatic and environmental conditions associated with geographical zones give rise to fundamental differences in the generation and dynamic evolution of the river mouths.

  6. Monitoring rice farming activities in the Mekong Delta region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. F.; Chen, C. R.; Chiang, S. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Khin, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Half of the world's population depends on rice for survival. Rice agriculture thus plays an important role in the developing world's economy. Vietnam is one of the largest rice producers and suppliers on earth and more than 80% of the exported rice was produced from the Mekong Delta region, which is situated in the southwestern Vietnam and encompasses approximately 40,000 km2. Changes in climate conditions could likely trigger the increase of insect populations and rice diseases, causing the potential loss of rice yields. Monitoring rice-farming activities through crop phenology detection can provide policymakers with timely strategies to mitigate possible impacts on the potential yield as well as rice grain exports to ensure food security for the region. The main objective of this study is to develop a logistic-based algorithm to investigate rice sowing and harvesting activities from the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Landsat fusion data. We processed the data for two main cropping seasons (i.e., winter-spring and summer-autumn seasons) through a three-step procedure: (1) MODIS-Landsat data fusion, (2) construction of the time-series enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI2) data, (3) rice crop phenology detection. The EVI2 data derived from the fusion results between MODIS and Landsat data were compared with that of Landsat data indicated close correlation between the two datasets (R2 = 0.93). The time-series EVI2 data were processed using the double logistic method to detect the progress of sowing and harvesting activities in the region. The comparisons between the estimated sowing and harvesting dates and the field survey data revealed the root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 8.4 and 5.5 days for the winter-spring crop and 9.4 and 12.8 days for the summer-autumn crop, respectively. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the double logistic-based algorithm for rice crop monitoring from temporal MODIS-Landsat fusion data

  7. Functional characterization of Delta3,Delta2-enoyl-CoA isomerases from rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyan; Yu, Wenfeng; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Gould, Stephen J; Sprecher, Howard; Schulz, Horst

    2002-03-15

    The degradation of unsaturated fatty acids by beta-oxidation involves Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerases (enoyl-CoA isomerases) that catalyze 3-cis --> 2-trans and 3-trans --> 2-trans isomerizations of enoyl-CoAs and the 2,5 --> 3,5 isomerization of dienoyl-CoAs. An analysis of rat liver enoyl-CoA isomerases revealed the presence of a monofunctional enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in addition to mitochondrial enoyl-CoA isomerase (MECI) in mitochondria, whereas peroxisomes contain ECI and multifunctional enzyme 1 (MFE1). Thus ECI, which previously had been described as peroxisomal enoyl-CoA isomerase, was found to be present in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. This enzyme seems to be identical with mitochondrial long-chain enoyl-CoA isomerase (Kilponen, J.M., Palosaari, P.M., and Hiltunen, J.K. 1990. Biochem. J. 269, 223-226). All three hepatic enoyl-CoA isomerases have broad chain length specificities but are distinguishable by their preferences for one of the three isomerization reactions. MECI is most active in catalyzing the 3-cis --> 2-trans isomerization; ECI has a preference for the 3-trans --> 2-trans isomerization, and MFE1 is the optimal isomerase for the 2,5 --> 3,5 isomerization. A functional characterization based on substrate specificities and total enoyl-CoA isomerase activities in rat liver leads to the conclusion that the 3-cis --> 2-trans and 2,5 --> 3,5 isomerizations in mitochondria are catalyzed overwhelmingly by MECI, whereas ECI contributes significantly to the 3-trans --> 2-trans isomerization. In peroxisomes, ECI is predicted to be the dominant enzyme for the 3-cis --> 2-trans and 3-trans --> 2-trans isomerizations of long-chain intermediates, whereas MFE1 is the key enzyme in the 2,5 --> 3,5 isomerization.

  8. Delta opioid receptors in brain function and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu Sin Chung, Paul; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2013-10-01

    Evidence that the delta opioid receptor (DOR) is an attractive target for the treatment of brain disorders has strengthened in recent years. This receptor is broadly expressed in the brain, binds endogenous opioid peptides, and shows as functional profile highly distinct from those of mu and kappa opioid receptors. Our knowledge of DOR function has enormously progressed from in vivo studies using pharmacological tools and genetic approaches. The important role of this receptor in reducing chronic pain has been extensively overviewed; therefore this review focuses on facets of delta receptor activity relevant to psychiatric and other neurological disorders. Beneficial effects of DOR agonists are now well established in the context of emotional responses and mood disorders. DOR activation also regulates drug reward, inhibitory controls and learning processes, but whether delta compounds may represent useful drugs in the treatment of drug abuse remains open. Epileptogenic and locomotor-stimulating effects of delta agonists appear drug-dependent, and the possibility of biased agonism at DOR for these effects is worthwhile further investigations to increase benefit/risk ratio of delta therapies. Neuroprotective effects of DOR activity represent a forthcoming research area. Future developments in DOR research will benefit from in-depth investigations of DOR function at cellular and circuit levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Competition between Delta and the Abruptex domain of Notch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Nicholas E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular domains of the Notch family of signalling receptors contain many EGF repeat domains, as do their major ligands. Some EGF repeats are modified by O-fucosylation, and most have no identified role in ligand binding. Results Using a binding assay with purified proteins in vitro, it was determined that, in addition to binding to Delta, the ligand binding region of Notch bound to EGF repeats 22–27 of Notch, but not to other EGF repeat regions of Notch. EGF repeats 22–27 of Drosophila Notch overlap the genetically-defined 'Abruptex' region, and competed with Delta for binding to proteins containing the ligand-binding domain. Delta differed from the Abruptex domain in showing markedly enhanced binding at acid pH. Both Delta and the Abruptex region are heavily modified by protein O-fucosylation, but the split mutation of Drosophila Notch, which affects O-fucosylation of EGF repeat 14, did not affect binding of Notch to either Delta or the Abruptex region. Conclusion The Abruptex region may serve as a barrier to Notch activation by competing for the ligand-binding domain of Notch.

  10. The case for selection at CCR5-Delta32.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardis C Sabeti

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-Delta32 allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-Delta32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%-14% in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the bubonic plague or smallpox during the Middle Ages. This hypothesis was based on several lines of evidence, including the absence of the allele outside of Europe and long-range linkage disequilibrium at the locus. We reevaluated this evidence with the benefit of much denser genetic maps and extensive control data. We find that the pattern of genetic variation at CCR5-Delta32 does not stand out as exceptional relative to other loci across the genome. Moreover using newer genetic maps, we estimated that the CCR5-Delta32 allele is likely to have arisen more than 5,000 y ago. While such results can not rule out the possibility that some selection may have occurred at C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5, they imply that the pattern of genetic variation seen at CCR5-Delta32 is consistent with neutral evolution. More broadly, the results have general implications for the design of future studies to detect the signs of positive selection in the human genome.

  11. The case for selection at CCR5-Delta32.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-Delta32 allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-Delta32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%-14% in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the bubonic plague or smallpox during the Middle Ages. This hypothesis was based on several lines of evidence, including the absence of the allele outside of Europe and long-range linkage disequilibrium at the locus. We reevaluated this evidence with the benefit of much denser genetic maps and extensive control data. We find that the pattern of genetic variation at CCR5-Delta32 does not stand out as exceptional relative to other loci across the genome. Moreover using newer genetic maps, we estimated that the CCR5-Delta32 allele is likely to have arisen more than 5,000 y ago. While such results can not rule out the possibility that some selection may have occurred at C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5, they imply that the pattern of genetic variation seen atCCR5-Delta32 is consistent with neutral evolution. More broadly, the results have general implications for the design of future studies to detect the signs of positive selection in the human genome.

  12. Effects of age on delta and REM sleep parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, C L; Kupfer, D J

    1989-02-01

    Sleep EEGs were evaluated in 24 men without medical and psychiatric disease segregated into 3 age groups: 21-30, 31-40, and 51-70 years of age. Sleep was evaluated by 3 different methods: traditional sleep stage scoring, computer-assisted delta and rapid eye movement (REM) quantification, and power spectral analysis. Analysis of manually scored sleep variables revealed that age-related changes in sleep were most pronounced in the oldest age group (51-70). Older subjects spent more time awake, had low sleep efficiency and sleep maintenance, displayed a decreased REM latency, and spent less time in delta sleep. Computer quantification further confirmed that the largest drop in delta activity occurred between the 21-30 and the 31-40 year olds. The largest decrease in delta activity occurred to the greatest extent during the first 100 min of sleep (NREM period 1), and was characterized by a shift in the spectral distribution of power towards higher delta frequencies. Total nighttime REM was increased in the 31-40-year-old group as compared to older and younger subjects. This unexpected non-linear trend may reflect a progressive tendency toward 'lightening' of sleep with increasing age. These studies further suggest that the effects of aging should be incorporated into models aiming at explaining the physiology of sleep.

  13. ThemeDelta: Dynamic Segmentations over Temporal Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Samah; Javed, Waqas; Ghani, Sohaib; Elmqvist, Niklas; Ewing, Tom; Hampton, Keith N; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2015-05-01

    We present ThemeDelta, a visual analytics system for extracting and visualizing temporal trends, clustering, and reorganization in time-indexed textual datasets. ThemeDelta is supported by a dynamic temporal segmentation algorithm that integrates with topic modeling algorithms to identify change points where significant shifts in topics occur. This algorithm detects not only the clustering and associations of keywords in a time period, but also their convergence into topics (groups of keywords) that may later diverge into new groups. The visual representation of ThemeDelta uses sinuous, variable-width lines to show this evolution on a timeline, utilizing color for categories, and line width for keyword strength. We demonstrate how interaction with ThemeDelta helps capture the rise and fall of topics by analyzing archives of historical newspapers, of U.S. presidential campaign speeches, and of social messages collected through iNeighbors, a web-based social website. ThemeDelta is evaluated using a qualitative expert user study involving three researchers from rhetoric and history using the historical newspapers corpus.

  14. AdDelta24 and the p53-expressing variant AdDelta24-p53 achieve potent anti-tumor activity in glioma when combined with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idema, Sander; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Noske, David P; Heukelom, Stan; Moeniralm, Sharif; Gerritsen, Winald R; Vandertop, W Peter; Dirven, Clemens M F

    2007-12-01

    The conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAd) AdDelta24-p53 replicates selectively in Rb mutant cells, and encodes the p53 suppressor protein. It has shown improved oncolytic potency compared to the parental control AdDelta24. As exogenous p53 has been shown to enhance radiosensitivity, the combination of AdDelta24-p53 and AdDelta24 with radiotherapy was assessed in vitro and in vivo against the therapy resistant gliomas. In glioma cells, multicellular spheroids and animal xenografts the efficacy of combination therapy was assessed. P53 phosphorylation, induction of apoptosis and viral replication were determined following single or combination therapies. In vitro, AdDelta24-p53 was more effective against glioma cells than the control AdDelta24. Addition of irradiation equally increased the efficacy of both AdDelta24-p53 and AdDelta24 resulting in improved oncolysis compared to single agent treatment. Radiotherapy did not significantly change the replication kinetics of AdDelta24-p53 or AdDelta24. No detectable increase in p53 phosphorylation was observed but combination of radiotherapy and AdDelta24-p53 caused an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. In vivo, combination therapy with either AdDelta24 or AdDelta24-p53 significantly increased the number of mice demonstrating tumor regression (100%) as well as long-term survival (50%). No differences between viruses were noted. Exogenous p53 expression does not appear to increase the synergistic interaction of CRAds combined with radiotherapy. These results however do indicate that radiotherapy provides the time frame in which AdDelta24 and AdDelta24-p53 can eradicate established tumors that would otherwise escape treatment, and establishes the need to combine these modalities to form an effective anti-cancer treatment.

  15. Oxygen Nonstoichiometry and Defect Chemistry Modeling of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2-delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2010-01-01

    (DeltaHPrexc=aHdelta) and a completely random distribution of defects (referred to as “delta-linear”), or a “generalized delta-linear” solution model, where the excess Gibbs energy change in the reduction reaction of the dopant linearly varies with delta (DeltaGPrexc=aGdelta). A comparison of the partial...

  16. Delta-Domain Predictive Control and Identification for Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Morten Bach

    1997-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with different aspects of modelling, control and identification of linear systems. Traditionally, discrete-time sampled-data systems are represented using shift-operator parametrizations. Such parametrizations are not suitable at fast sampling rates. An alternative...... parametrization using the so-called delta-operator is examined. It is shown how to maintain a close correspondence to continuous-time when sampling a system described in continuous-time by stochastic differential equations. Using delta-operator parametrizations makes it possible to unify discrete......-time and continuous-time theory. In addition these parametrizations possess certain numerical advantages compared to shift-operator representations. A new prediction method is developed. It is based on ideas from continuous-time but derived from discrete-time delta-operator models. It is shown to include the optimal...

  17. Sliding mode control the delta-sigma modulation approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sira-Ramírez, Hebertt

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents a novel method of sliding mode control for switch-regulated nonlinear systems. The Delta Sigma modulation approach allows one to implement a continuous control scheme using one or multiple, independent switches, thus effectively merging the available linear and nonlinear controller design techniques with sliding mode control.   Sliding Mode Control: The Delta-Sigma Modulation Approach, combines rigorous mathematical derivation of the unique features of Sliding Mode Control and Delta-Sigma modulation with numerous illustrative examples from diverse areas of engineering. In addition, engineering case studies demonstrate the applicability of the technique and the ease with which one can implement the exposed results. This book will appeal to researchers in control engineering and can be used as graduate-level textbook for a first course on sliding mode control.

  18. Three-Level Delta Modulation for Laplacian Source Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENIC, B.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel solution for coding of time varying signals with Laplacian distribution, which is based on delta modulation and three-level quantization. It upgrades the conventional scheme by introducing the quantizer with variable length code. Forward adaptive scheme is used, where the adaptation to the signal variance is performed on frame-by-frame basis. We employ configurations with simple fixed first-order predictor and switched first-order predictor utilizing correlation. Furthermore, we propose different methods for optimizing predictor coefficients. The configurations are tested on speech signal and compared to an adaptive two-level and four-level delta modulation, showing that proposed three-level delta modulation offers performance comparable to a four-level baseline with significant savings in bit rate.

  19. Consumers and Producers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maira (Elisa)

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractIn the last few decades, advances in information and communication technology have dramatically changed the way consumers and producers interact in the marketplace. The Internet and social media have torn down the information barrier between producers and consumers, leading to

  20. Bathymetry, topography, and sediment grain-size data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, July 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Warrick, Jonathan; Miller, Ian M.; Weiner, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    velocity profiles measured with a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor during the survey. A total of 176 km of nearshore bathymetric survey lines and 176 km of topographic survey lines were collected during the 3 days of survey operations. Environmental conditions were favorable resulting in excellent coverage of the beach and nearshore region. Bed sediment was sampled using a small ponar, or 'grab', sampler on July 28, 2015 from the R/V Frontier at a total of 70 locations in water depths between about 1 and 17 m around the delta. An additional 17 sediment samples were collected between July 22 and August 23, 2015 by SCUBA divers. Forty-eight sediment samples were collected at low tide at intertidal locations on the delta. Figure 1 (top) shows the locations of bathymetric- and topographic-survey lines, sediment samples, CTD samples, and GNSS base stations. A continuous DEM surface of the primary survey area was produced from all available bathymetry and topography data using linear interpolation and a grid-spacing of 5 m. Figure 1 (bottom) shows the bathymetry and topography data for areas adjacent to the river mouth color-coded by elevation. An additional DEM with 1-m resolution grid-spacing was produced using linear interpolation for this smaller region.