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Sample records for tgf-b binding protein

  1. Abnormal Expressions of Age, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 Receptor in Colonic Wall Contributed to STZ-Induced Diabetic Colon Remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    glycation end product (AGE) and AGE receptor (RAGE) were up-regulated in the diabetic colon wall (2). However, it lacks data in relation to the association between AGE, RAGE, transforming growth factor- b1 (TGF-b1) and TGFb1 receptor expressions with colon morphological and biomechanical remodeling...... glucose level was measured. The parameters of morphometric and biomechanical properties of colonic segments were obtained from diabetic (DM) and normal (Con) rats. The expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor were detected in different layers of the colon by immunohistochemistry. In order...... to determine the expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor in association with other parameters, and to see interrelation among AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor expressions, the multiple linear regression analysis was done. Results: The expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF-b1 and TGF- b1 receptor...

  2. Interaction entropy for protein-protein binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaoxi; Yan, Yu N.; Yang, Maoyou; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the heart of signal transduction and are central to the function of protein machine in biology. The highly specific protein-protein binding is quantitatively characterized by the binding free energy whose accurate calculation from the first principle is a grand challenge in computational biology. In this paper, we show how the interaction entropy approach, which was recently proposed for protein-ligand binding free energy calculation, can be applied to computing the entropic contribution to the protein-protein binding free energy. Explicit theoretical derivation of the interaction entropy approach for protein-protein interaction system is given in detail from the basic definition. Extensive computational studies for a dozen realistic protein-protein interaction systems are carried out using the present approach and comparisons of the results for these protein-protein systems with those from the standard normal mode method are presented. Analysis of the present method for application in protein-protein binding as well as the limitation of the method in numerical computation is discussed. Our study and analysis of the results provided useful information for extracting correct entropic contribution in protein-protein binding from molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  4. A de-novo synthesis of transforming growth factor (TGF-b) by human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we cultured a human endometrial cell-line (ECC-1) and evaluated their capacity to synthesize TGF-b in the absence of normal stimulation. We found that these cells can produce determinable levels of the cytokine constitutively. The secretion of the cytokine into the luminal side of the endometrium further ...

  5. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...... diffract X-rays to at least 2.0 A resolution. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to 2.7 A resolution. The crystals of TN, obtained by the vapour-diffusion reverse salting-in method at 280 K, are rhombohedral, space group R3, with the hexagonal axes a = b = 89.1, c = 75.8 A, and diffract...

  6. Oxygen-binding haem proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael T; Reeder, Brandon J

    2008-01-01

    Myoglobin and haemoglobin, the respiratory pigments of mammals and some molluscs, annelids and arthropods, belong to an ancient superfamily of haem-associated globin proteins. Members of this family share common structural and spectral features. They also share some general functional characteristics, such as the ability to bind ligands, e.g. O2, CO and NO, at the iron atom and to undergo redox changes. These properties are used in vivo to perform a wide range of biochemical and physiological roles. While it is acknowledged that the major role of haemoglobin is to bind oxygen reversibly and deliver it to the tissues, this is not its only function, while the often-stated role of myoglobin as an oxygen storage protein is possibly a misconception. Furthermore, haemoglobin and myoglobin express enzymic activities that are important to their function, e.g. NO dioxygenase activity or peroxidatic activity that may be partly responsible for pathophysiology following haemorrhage. Evidence for these functions is described, and the discussion extended to include proteins that have recently been discovered and that are expressed at low levels within the cell. These proteins are hexaco-ordinate, unlike haemoglobin and myoglobin, and are widely distributed throughout the animal kingdom (e.g. neuroglobins and cytoglobins). They may have specialist roles in oxygen delivery to particular sites within the cell but may also perform roles associated with O2 sensing and signalling and in responses to stress, e.g. protection from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Haemoglobins are also widespread in plants and bacteria and may serve similar protective functions.

  7. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J; Poulsen, F M

    1999-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein a...

  8. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-08-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequence specificity will provide valuable tools for biochemical research as well as potential therapeutic applications. In this review, we discuss the suitability of various RNA-binding domains for engineering RNA-binding specificity, based on the structural basis for their recognition. We also compare various protein engineering and design methods applied to RNA-binding proteins, and discuss future applications of these proteins. © 2013 FEBS.

  9. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    and semen. The function and significance of FBPs are unresolved, however, it has been suggested that they may facilitate folate uptake, e.g. during suckling. The present study shows that megalin, a large, multiligand endocytic receptor and member of the low-density lipoprotein-receptor family, is able...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...

  10. Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein peptides specifically bind to reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Marisol; Vera, Ricardo; Eduardo Rodriguez, Luis; Curtidor, Hernando; Urquiza, Mauricio; Suarez, Jorge; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Lopez, Ramsés; Trujillo, Mary; Torres, Elizabeth; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (Pv-DBP) is essential during merozoite invasion of reticulocytes. Reticulocyte binding region identification is important for understanding Pv-DBP reticulocyte recognition. Fifty 20 mer non-overlapping peptides, spanning Pv-DBP sequences, were tested in erythrocyte and reticulocyte binding assays. Ten HARBPs, mainly located in region II (Kd 50-130 nM), were High Activity Reticulocyte Binding Peptides (HARBPs); one bound to erythrocytes. Reticulocyte trypsin-, chymotrypsin- or neuraminidase- treatment affects HARBP binding differently, suggesting that these peptides have different reticulocyte-binding-sites. Some peptides bound to a Coomasie non-stainable 40 Kda band. Some HARBPs were able to block recombinant PvRII binding (Pv-DBP region II) to Duffy positive reticulocytes.

  11. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

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    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  12. binding protein gene from Dasypyrum Villosum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... common wheat. Blue copper-binding protein (BCB) can bind a single copper atom (Ryden and Hunt, 1993). The copper binding sites consist of two ..... Moerschbacher BM, Noll U, Gorrichon L, Reisener HJ (1990). Specific inhibition of lignification breaks hypersensitive resistance of wheat to stem rust.

  13. Fractal aspects of calcium binding protein structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isvoran, Adriana [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)], E-mail: aisvoran@cbg.uvt.ro; Pitulice, Laura [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania); Craescu, Constantin T. [INSERM U759/Institute Curie-Recherche, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 112, 91405 Orsay (France); Chiriac, Adrian [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)

    2008-03-15

    The structures of EF-hand calcium binding proteins may be classified into two distinct groups: extended and compact structures. In this paper we studied 20 different structures of calcium binding proteins using the fractal analysis. Nine structures show extended shapes, one is semi-compact and the other 10 have compact shapes. Our study reveals different fractal characteristics for protein backbones belonging to different structural classes and these observations may be correlated to the physicochemical forces governing the protein folding.

  14. The complexity of minocycline serum protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Tran, Brian T; Tam, Vincent H

    2017-06-01

    Serum protein binding is critical for understanding the pharmacology of antimicrobial agents. Tigecycline and eravacycline were previously reported to have atypical non-linear protein binding; the percentage of free fraction decreased with increasing total concentration. In this study, we extended the investigation to other tetracyclines and examined the factors that might impact protein binding. Different minocycline concentrations (0.5-50 mg/L) and perfusion media (saline, 0.1 M HEPES buffer and 0.1 and 1 M PBS) were examined by in vitro microdialysis. After equilibration, two dialysate samples were taken from each experiment and the respective antimicrobial agent concentrations were analysed by validated LC-MS/MS methods. For comparison, the serum protein bindings of doxycycline and levofloxacin were also determined. The free fraction of minocycline decreased with increasing total concentration, and the results depended on the perfusion media used. The trends of minocycline protein binding in mouse and human sera were similar. In addition, serum protein binding of doxycycline showed the same concentration-dependent trend as minocycline, while the results of levofloxacin were concentration independent. The serum protein bindings of minocycline and doxycycline are negatively correlated with their total concentrations. It is possible that all tetracyclines share the same pharmacological property. Moreover, the specific perfusion media used could also impact the results of microdialysis. Additional studies are warranted to understand the mechanism(s) and clinical implications of serum protein binding of tetracyclines.

  15. Temporal and spatial expression of TGF-b 2 in tooth crown development in mouse first lower molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JY Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Transforming Growth Factor b2 (TGF-b2 is involved in the regulation of many important cellular processes during tooth development. In this study we systematically characterized the expression pattern of TGF-b2 in vivo and further analyzed its possible roles during different developmental stages of mouse first lower molar using immunofluorescence histochemical method with confocal microscopy. TGF-b2 signaling was detected in different developing stages in both dental epithelium and surrounding dental mesenchyme. For the first time, we found that the basement membrane and epithelial cells in the basal layer showed no immunostaining from embryonic day 11 to 13; the primary enamel knot and secondary enamel knot exhibited pronounced immunostaining with different expression patterns at embryonic day 14 and 16. In addition, the mature ameloblast lost immunoreactivity, but the secretory ameloblast still exhibited positive immunoreaction at day 2 of postnatal development. Collectively, the temporospatial distribution patterns of TGF- b2, especially in the basement membrane, epithelial cells in the basal layer, enamel knot, mature odontoblast and ameloblast, suggested a close association between TGF-b2 signaling and tooth crown development, and indicated that TGF-b2 might participate in tooth initiation, epithelial morphogenesis, formation of dentine matrix, and ameloblast differentiation.

  16. Adenovirus DNA binding protein: helix destabilising properties.

    OpenAIRE

    Monaghan, A; Webster, A; Hay, R T

    1994-01-01

    Adenovirus DNA binding protein is a multifunctional protein essential for viral DNA replication. To investigate the role of the DNA binding protein in this process its interaction with partial DNA duplexes was examined. Duplex regions of DNA, created when a short DNA strand is annealed to its complementary sequence present in the single stranded form of M13 phage DNA, were efficiently unwound by DNA binding protein in a reaction that required neither ATP nor MgCl2. The unwinding activity of D...

  17. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  18. Functions of Intracellular Retinoid Binding-Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Joseph L

    Multiple binding and transport proteins facilitate many aspects of retinoid biology through effects on retinoid transport, cellular uptake, metabolism, and nuclear delivery. These include the serum retinol binding protein sRBP (aka Rbp4), the plasma membrane sRBP receptor Stra6, and the intracellular retinoid binding-proteins such as cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBP) and cellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP). sRBP transports the highly lipophilic retinol through an aqueous medium. The major intracellular retinol-binding protein, CRBP1, likely enhances efficient retinoid use by providing a sink to facilitate retinol uptake from sRBP through the plasma membrane or via Stra6, delivering retinol or retinal to select enzymes that generate retinyl esters or retinoic acid, and protecting retinol/retinal from excess catabolism or opportunistic metabolism. Intracellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP1 and 2, and FABP5) seem to have more diverse functions distinctive to each, such as directing retinoic acid to catabolism, delivering retinoic acid to specific nuclear receptors, and generating non-canonical actions. Gene ablation of intracellular retinoid binding-proteins does not cause embryonic lethality or gross morphological defects. Metabolic and functional defects manifested in knockouts of CRBP1, CRBP2 and CRBP3, however, illustrate their essentiality to health, and in the case of CRBP2, to survival during limited dietary vitamin A. Future studies should continue to address the specific molecular interactions that occur between retinoid binding-proteins and their targets and their precise physiologic contributions to retinoid homeostasis and function.

  19. SVOP is a nucleotide binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2 and SV2-related protein (SVOP are transporter-like proteins that localize to neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. Both proteins share structural similarity with the major facilitator (MF family of small molecule transporters. We recently reported that SV2 binds nucleotides, a feature that has also been reported for another MF family member, the human glucose transporter 1 (Glut1. In the case of Glut1, nucleotide binding affects transport activity. In this study, we determined if SVOP also binds nucleotides and assessed its nucleotide binding properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed in vitro photoaffinity labeling experiments with the photoreactive ATP analogue, 8-azido-ATP[gamma] biotin and purified recombinant SVOP-FLAG fusion protein. We found that SVOP is a nucleotide-binding protein, although both its substrate specificity and binding site differ from that of SV2. Within the nucleotides tested, ATP, GTP and NAD show same level of inhibition on SVOP-FLAG labeling. Dose dependent studies indicated that SVOP demonstrates the highest affinity for NAD, in contrast to SV2, which binds both NAD and ATP with equal affinity. Mapping of the binding site revealed a single region spanning transmembrane domains 9-12, which contrasts to the two binding sites in the large cytoplasmic domains in SV2A. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SVOP is the third MF family member to be found to bind nucleotides. Given that the binding sites are unique in SVOP, SV2 and Glut1, this feature appears to have arisen separately.

  20. CAP binding proteins associated with the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, E; Blaas, D; Kuechler, E

    1983-01-01

    Cap binding proteins of HeLa cells were identified by photo-affinity labelling using the cap analogue gamma-[32P]-[4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido]-7-methylguanosine-5'- triphosphate. Photoreaction with whole cell homogenates resulted in specific labelling of five major polypeptides. The small molecular weight polypeptide appeared to be identical to the 24 000 to 26 000 dalton cap binding protein previously identified in initiation factors. A cap binding protein of 37 000 dalton was found in initiation factors as well as in preparations of crude nuclei. It was released from nuclei by washing with buffer of moderate salt concentration. Three high molecular weight cap binding proteins (approximately 120 000, approximately 89 000, approximately 80 000 dalton) were found in the nuclear fraction and were only partly released upon nuclease digestion and high salt extraction. Images PMID:6889136

  1. Binding pocket optimization by computational protein design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Malisi

    Full Text Available Engineering specific interactions between proteins and small molecules is extremely useful for biological studies, as these interactions are essential for molecular recognition. Furthermore, many biotechnological applications are made possible by such an engineering approach, ranging from biosensors to the design of custom enzyme catalysts. Here, we present a novel method for the computational design of protein-small ligand binding named PocketOptimizer. The program can be used to modify protein binding pocket residues to improve or establish binding of a small molecule. It is a modular pipeline based on a number of customizable molecular modeling tools to predict mutations that alter the affinity of a target protein to its ligand. At its heart it uses a receptor-ligand scoring function to estimate the binding free energy between protein and ligand. We compiled a benchmark set that we used to systematically assess the performance of our method. It consists of proteins for which mutational variants with different binding affinities for their ligands and experimentally determined structures exist. Within this test set PocketOptimizer correctly predicts the mutant with the higher affinity in about 69% of the cases. A detailed analysis of the results reveals that the strengths of PocketOptimizer lie in the correct introduction of stabilizing hydrogen bonds to the ligand, as well as in the improved geometric complemetarity between ligand and binding pocket. Apart from the novel method for binding pocket design we also introduce a much needed benchmark data set for the comparison of affinities of mutant binding pockets, and that we use to asses programs for in silico design of ligand binding.

  2. Telomere-binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, U

    1995-02-01

    The nucleoprotein structure of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres was investigated. A protein specifically binding to telomeric sequences was characterized by gel mobility shift assays with synthetic oligonucleotides consisting of four 7 bp telomeric repeats of Arabidopsis (TTTAGGG) and crude nuclear protein extracts of Arabidopsis leaves. These DNA-protein binding studies revealed that the binding affinity of this telomere-binding protein to the G-rich single-strand as well as to the double-stranded telomeric DNA is much higher than to the C-rich single-strand. The molecular mass of the protein was identified by SDS-PAGE to be 67 kDa. The isoelectric points were determined to be 5.0, 4.85 and 4.7, respectively, indicating that either one protein with different modifications or three slightly different proteins have been isolated. An RNA component, possibly serving as a template for reverse transcription of a plant telomerase, does not mediate the DNA-protein contact because the DNA-protein interactions were not RNAse-sensitive.

  3. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Two main families of lipid binding proteins have been identified in parasitic Platyhelminthes: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment. PMID:22988444

  4. Lipid Binding Proteins from Parasitic Platyhelmithes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela eAlvite

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two main families of lipid binding proteins have been identified in parasitic Platyhelminthes: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs. Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesise their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms.HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates.Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organisation, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localisation, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  5. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

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    Itai Chipinda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight chemical (LMW allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed.

  6. Binding interactions of niclosamide with serum proteins

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    Esra Maltas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A study of the binding of niclosamide (NC to serum proteins such as human serum albumin, hemoglobin, and globulin was carried out using fluorescence and UV-visible spectroscopy. Interactions between NC and these proteins were estimated by Stern–Volmer and van't Hoff equations. The binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters, ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG at different temperatures were also determined by using these equations. Data showed that NC may exhibit a static quenching mechanism with all proteins. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Data showed that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds are the main forces for human serum albumin and hemoglobin. Globulin, however, bound to NC via hydrophobic interaction. The spectral changes of synchronous fluorescence suggested that both the microenvironment of NC and the conformation of the proteins changed in relation to their concentrations during NC's binding.

  7. Computational search for aflatoxin binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Aflatoxin is one of the mycotoxins that contaminate various food products. Among various aflatoxin types (B1, B2, G1, G2 and M1), aflatoxin B1 is the most important and the most toxic one. In this study, through computational screening, we found that several proteins may bind specifically with different type of aflatoxins. Combination of theoretical methods including target fishing, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, MM/PBSA calculation were utilized to search for new aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. A recently developed method for calculating entropic contribution to binding free energy called interaction entropy (IE) was employed to compute the binding free energy between the protein and aflatoxin B1. Through comprehensive comparison, three proteins, namely, trihydroxynaphthalene reductase, GSK-3b, and Pim-1 were eventually selected as potent aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. GSK-3b and Pim-1 are drug targets of cancers or neurological diseases. GSK-3b is the strongest binder for aflatoxin B1.

  8. Improved mapping of protein binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortvelyesi, Tamas; Silberstein, Michael; Dennis, Sheldon; Vajda, Sandor

    2003-02-01

    Computational mapping methods place molecular probes - small molecules or functional groups - on a protein surface in order to identify the most favorable binding positions by calculating an interaction potential. Mapping is an important step in a number of flexible docking and drug design algorithms. We have developed improved algorithms for mapping protein surfaces using small organic molecules as molecular probes. The calculations reproduce the binding of eight organic solvents to lysozyme as observed by NMR, as well as the binding of four solvents to thermolysin, in good agreement with x-ray data. Application to protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B shows that the information provided by the mapping can be very useful for drug design. We also studied why the organic solvents bind in the active site of proteins, in spite of the availability of alternative pockets that can very tightly accommodate some of the probes. A possible explanation is that the binding in the relatively large active site retains a number of rotational states, and hence leads to smaller entropy loss than the binding elsewhere else. Indeed, the mapping reveals that the clusters of the ligand molecules in the protein's active site contain different rotational-translational conformers, which represent different local minima of the free energy surface. In order to study the transitions between different conformers, reaction path and molecular dynamics calculations were performed. Results show that most of the rotational states are separated by low free energy barriers at the experimental temperature, and hence the entropy of binding in the active site is expected to be high.

  9. Binding characteristics of galectin-3 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcker, Sophia; Elling, Lothar

    2017-05-01

    Galectin-3 modulates cell adhesion and signaling events by specific binding and cross-linking galactoside containing carbohydrate ligands. Proteolytic cleavage by metalloproteinases yields in vivo N-terminally truncated galectin-3 still bearing the carbohydrate recognition domain. Truncated galectin-3 has been demonstrated to act in vivo as a negative inhibitor of galectin-3 due to higher affinity for carbohydrate ligands. We here present our studies on a series of 12 human galectin-3 protein constructs. Truncated galectin-3 (∆1-62 and ∆1-116) and fusions with SNAP-tag and/or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) display altered binding efficiencies (ratio of maximum binding signal and apparent affinity constant Kd) to asialofetuin (ASF) in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays. Galectin-3(Δ1-62) and full-length (native) galectin-3 have highest affinity to ASF in ELISA and SPR experiments, respectively, whereas galectin-3(Δ1-116) shows only weak binding. We demonstrate here for the first time that SNAP-tag and YFP fusions of galectin-3 and truncated galectin-3 proteins improve binding efficiencies to ASF. SNAP-tagged galectin-3, galectin-3(Δ1-62) and galectin-3(Δ1-116) are found with significant (3- to 6-fold) higher binding efficiencies in SPR when compared with native galectin-3. Fusion of truncated galectin-3 with YFP renders binding properties similar to native galectin-3, whereas in combination with SNAP-tag improved binding characteristics are obtained. Our results emphasize the importance of the N-terminal domain of human galectin-3 for ligand binding. Most importantly, in combination with fusion proteins suitable for the design of diagnostic and therapeutic tools binding properties can be beneficially tuned. The resulting novel protein tools may be advantageous for potential galectin-3 directed applications in tumor diagnostics and therapy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  10. AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1: The Outsider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Michael; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is one of the first characterized proteins that bind auxin and has been implied as a receptor for a number of auxin responses. Early studies characterized its auxin binding properties and focused on rapid electrophysiological and cell expansion responses, while subsequent work indicated a role in cell cycle and cell division control. Very recently, ABP1 has been ascribed a role in modulating endocytic events at the plasma membrane and RHO OF PLANTS-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements during asymmetric cell expansion. The exact molecular function of ABP1 is still unresolved, but its main activity apparently lies in influencing events at the plasma membrane. This review aims to connect the novel findings with the more classical literature on ABP1 and to point out the many open questions that still separate us from a comprehensive model of ABP1 action, almost 40 years after the first reports of its existence. PMID:21719690

  11. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  12. Protein-Protein Interactions: Structurally Conserved Residues Distinguish between Binding Sites and Exposed Protein Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buyong Ma; Tal Elkayam; Haim Wolfson; Ruth Nussinov

    2003-01-01

    Polar residue hot spots have been observed at protein-protein binding sites. Here we show that hot spots occur predominantly at the interfaces of macromolecular complexes, distinguishing binding sites from the remainder of the surface...

  13. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  14. End binding proteins are obligatory dimers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Sen

    Full Text Available End binding (EB proteins are responsible for the recruitment of an array of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs to growing microtubules ends. EBs encompass an N-terminal calponin homology domain that confers microtubule tip tracking activity to the protein. The C-terminal domain of EBs contains a coiled coil that mediates the parallel dimerization of EB monomers. This part of the protein is also responsible for partner binding. While dimerization is not essential for microtubule tip tracking by EBs it is a prerequisite for +TIP partner binding. The concentration of EBs in cells has been estimated to be in the range of hundreds of nanomoles. In contrast, in in vitro single molecule experiments EB concentrations of subnanomoles are employed. From a mechanistic point of view it is important to assess the oligomerization state of EBs at physiologically and experimentally relevant protein concentrations, in particular if the goal of a study is to model the behavior of EB-dependent dynamic +TIP networks. Here we have determined the stability of the EB1 and EB3 dimers using multi-angle light scattering and fluorescence analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that these EBs form stable dimers and do not dissociate even at very low nanomolar concentrations. The dimers remained stable at both room temperature as well as at the physiologically relevant temperature of 37°C. Together, our results reveal that EBs are obligatory dimers, a conclusion that has implications for the mechanistic understanding of these key proteins involved in the orchestration of dynamic protein networks at growing microtubule ends.

  15. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  16. Alcohol binding to the odorant binding protein LUSH: multiple factors affecting binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, Lauren; Jones, David N M; Lin, Hai

    2010-07-27

    Density function theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of alcohols to the odorant binding protein LUSH from Drosophila melanogaster. LUSH is one of the few proteins known to bind to ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations and where high-resolution structural information is available for the protein bound to alcohol at these concentrations. The structures of the LUSH-alcohol complexes identify a set of specific hydrogen-bonding interactions as critical for optimal binding of ethanol. A set of truncated models based on the structure of the LUSH-butanol complex were constructed for the wild-type and mutant (T57S, S52A, and T57A) proteins in complexes with a series of n-alcohols and for the apoprotein bound to water and for the ligand-free protein. Using both gas-phase calculations and continuum solvation model calculations, we found that the widely used DFT model, B3LYP, failed to reproduce the experimentally observed trend of increasing binding affinity with the increasing length of the alkyl chain in the alcohol. In contrast, the recently developed M05-2X DFT model successfully reproduced this subtle trend. Analysis of the results indicated that multiple factors contribute to the differences in alcohol binding affinity: the H-bonding with Thr57 and Ser52 (4-5 kcal/mol per H-bond), the desolvation contribution (4-6 kcal/mol for alcohols and 8-10 kcal/mol for water), and the other noncovalent interaction (1.2 kcal/mol per CH(2) group of the alcohol alkyl chain). These results reveal the outstanding potential for using the M05-2X model in calculations of protein-substrate complexes where noncovalent interactions are important.

  17. molecular interactions of the TATA-binding protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Binding characteristics of yeast TATA-binding protein (yTBP) over five oligomers having different TATA variants and lacking a UASGAL, ..... Effect of GAL4-VP16 on binding characteristics of yTBP to DNA. Equilibrium dissociation ..... binding protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae oligomerizes in solution at micromolar ...

  18. Maximizing binding capacity for protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sanchayita; Zhang, Jennifer; Conley, Lynn; Caple, Ryan; Williams, Kevin P; Cecchini, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Advances in cell culture expression levels in the last two decades have resulted in monoclonal antibody titers of ≥10 g/L to be purified downstream. A high capacity capture step is crucial to prevent purification from being the bottleneck in the manufacturing process. Despite its high cost and other disadvantages, Protein A chromatography still remains the optimal choice for antibody capture due to the excellent selectivity provided by this step. A dual flow loading strategy was used in conjunction with a new generation high capacity Protein A resin to maximize binding capacity without significantly increasing processing time. Optimum conditions were established using a simple empirical Design of Experiment (DOE) based model and verified with a wide panel of antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities of >65 g/L could be achieved under these new conditions, significantly higher by more than one and half times the values that have been typically achieved with Protein A in the past. Furthermore, comparable process performance and product quality was demonstrated for the Protein A step at the increased loading. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. A Crayfish Insulin-like-binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a “pulldown” methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23–38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development. PMID:23775079

  20. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Brázda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc., the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGGn, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2 and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development.

  1. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-08-11

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of "matching water affinities." This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K(+) < Na(+) < Li(+) of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules.

  2. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous...

  3. Competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolley, J.L. Jr.; Ringstad, J.L.; Sigel, C.W. (Wellcome Research Laboratories, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-09-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim (PTX, 1) that makes use of a commercially available radioassay kit for methotrexate has been developed. After it is selectively extracted from plasma, PTX competes with ({sup 125}I)methotrexate for binding to dihydrofolate reductase isolated from Lactobacillus casei. Free drug is separated from bound drug by adsorption to dextran-coated charcoal. Piritrexim is measurable over a range of 0.01 to 10.0 micrograms/mL in plasma with a coefficient of variation less than 15%. The limit of sensitivity of the assay is approximately 2 ng/mL. An excellent correlation between this assay and a previously published HPLC method was found.

  4. Cobalamin and its binding protein in rat milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaberg, Lasse; Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1989-01-01

    Cobalamin and its binding protein, haptocorrin, are present in rat milk throughout the lactation period. The concentration of cobalamin is approximately 0.3-times the concentration of the unsaturated binding protein. The concentration of the unsaturated cobalamin-binding protein varies between 18...... nmol l-1 and 16 nmol l-1. The binding protein has a Stokes radius of 2.49 nm when saturated with cobalamin and 2.61 nm when unsaturated. It binds cobalamin over a broad range of pH and is able to bind cobinamide also. With immunohistochemistry, we find haptocorrin immunoreactivity in the mammary glands...

  5. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  6. Comparative footprinting of DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2006-07-15

    Comparative modelling is a computational method used to tackle a variety of problems in molecular biology and biotechnology. Traditionally it has been applied to model the structure of proteins on their own or bound to small ligands, although more recently it has also been used to model protein-protein interfaces. This work is the first to systematically analyze whether comparative models of protein-DNA complexes could be built and be useful for predicting DNA binding sites. First, we describe the structural and evolutionary conservation of protein-DNA interfaces, and the limits they impose on modelling accuracy. Second, we find that side-chains from contacting residues can be reasonably modeled and therefore used to identify contacting nucleotides. Third, the DNASITE protocol is implemented and different parameters are benchmarked on a set of 85 regulators from Escherichia coli. Results show that comparative footprinting can make useful predictions based solely on structural data, depending primarily on the interface identity with respect to the template used. DNASITE code available on request from the authors.

  7. Identification of actin binding protein, ABP-280, as a binding partner of human Lnk adaptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Li, Y; Schembri-King, J; Jakes, S; Hayashi, J

    2000-08-01

    Human Lnk (hLnk) is an adaptor protein with multiple functional domains that regulates T cell activation signaling. In order to identify cellular Lnk binding partners, a yeast two-hybrid screening of human spleen cDNA library was carried out using human hLnk as bait. A polypeptide sequence identical to the C-terminal segment of the actin binding protein (ABP-280) was identified as a hLnk binding protein. The expressed hLnk and the FLAG tagged C-terminal 673 amino acid residues of ABP-280 or the endogenous ABP-280 in COS-7 cells could be co-immunoprecipitated using antibodies either to hLnk, FLAG or ABP-280, respectively. Furthermore, immunofluorescence confocal microscope showed that hLnk and ABP-280 co-localized at the plasma membrane and at juxtanuclear region of COS-7 cells. In Jurkat cells, the endogenous hLnk also associates with the endogenous ABP-280 indicating that the association of these two proteins is physiological. The interacting domains of both proteins were mapped using yeast two-hybrid assays. Our results indicate that hLnk binds to the residues 2006-2454 (repeats 19-23C) of ABP-280. The domain in hLnk that associates with ABP-280 was mapped to an interdomain region of 56 amino acids between pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domains. These results suggest that hLnk may exert its regulatory role through its association with ABP-280.

  8. Vitamin D Binding Protein and Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishir Bhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D binding protein (DBP is the major carrier protein of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH D in the circulation, where it may serve roles in maintaining stable levels during times of decreased 25(OH availability and in regulating delivery of 25(OH D to target tissues. Several genetic polymorphisms of DBP have been described that lead to phenotypic changes in the protein that may affect affinity, activity, and concentration. These polymorphisms have been linked with alterations in bone density in several populations. One of the mechanisms by which DBP may alter bone health involves regulating vitamin D bioavailability. DBP-bound vitamin is thought to be relatively unavailable to target tissues, and thus alterations in DBP levels or affinity could lead to changes in vitamin D bioactivity. As a result, functional vitamin D status may differ greatly between individuals with similar total 25(OH D levels. Additionally, DBP may have independent roles on macrophage and osteoclast activation. This review will summarize recent findings about DBP with respect to measures of bone density and health.

  9. Glycan masking of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein for probing protein binding function and vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Sampath

    Full Text Available Glycan masking is an emerging vaccine design strategy to focus antibody responses to specific epitopes, but it has mostly been evaluated on the already heavily glycosylated HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Here this approach was used to investigate the binding interaction of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP and the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and to evaluate if glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens would focus the antibody response on key interaction surfaces. Four variants of PVDBPII were generated and probed for function and immunogenicity. Whereas two PvDBPII glycosylation variants with increased glycan surface coverage distant from predicted interaction sites had equivalent binding activity to wild-type protein, one of them elicited slightly better DARC-binding-inhibitory activity than wild-type immunogen. Conversely, the addition of an N-glycosylation site adjacent to a predicted PvDBP interaction site both abolished its interaction with DARC and resulted in weaker inhibitory antibody responses. PvDBP is composed of three subdomains and is thought to function as a dimer; a meta-analysis of published PvDBP mutants and the new DBPII glycosylation variants indicates that critical DARC binding residues are concentrated at the dimer interface and along a relatively flat surface spanning portions of two subdomains. Our findings suggest that DARC-binding-inhibitory antibody epitope(s lie close to the predicted DARC interaction site, and that addition of N-glycan sites distant from this site may augment inhibitory antibodies. Thus, glycan resurfacing is an attractive and feasible tool to investigate protein structure-function, and glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens might contribute to P. vivax vaccine development.

  10. Ice-Binding Proteins in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bredow

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sub-zero temperatures put plants at risk of damage associated with the formation of ice crystals in the apoplast. Some freeze-tolerant plants mitigate this risk by expressing ice-binding proteins (IBPs, that adsorb to ice crystals and modify their growth. IBPs are found across several biological kingdoms, with their ice-binding activity and function uniquely suited to the lifestyle they have evolved to protect, be it in fishes, insects or plants. While IBPs from freeze-avoidant species significantly depress the freezing point, plant IBPs typically have a reduced ability to lower the freezing temperature. Nevertheless, they have a superior ability to inhibit the recrystallization of formed ice. This latter activity prevents ice crystals from growing larger at temperatures close to melting. Attempts to engineer frost-hardy plants by the controlled transfer of IBPs from freeze-avoiding fish and insects have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, the expression of recombinant IBP sequences from freeze-tolerant plants significantly reduced electrolyte leakage and enhanced freezing survival in freeze-sensitive plants. These promising results have spurred additional investigations into plant IBP localization and post-translational modifications, as well as a re-evaluation of IBPs as part of the anti-stress and anti-pathogen axis of freeze-tolerant plants. Here we present an overview of plant freezing stress and adaptation mechanisms and discuss the potential utility of IBPs for the generation of freeze-tolerant crops.

  11. Apolipoprotein B is a calcium binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashti, N.; Lee, D.M.; Mok, T.

    1986-05-29

    Human hepatocarcinoma Hep G2 cells were grown in culture medium containing (/sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/). The secreted lipoproteins of d < 1.063 g/ml and d 1.063-1.21 g/ml were isolated from the culture media and analyzed by 3.3% and 7% SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Radioactivity profiles of (/sup 45/Ca) from the gels showed that the peak of radioactivity corresponded to the apolipoprotein B band. The molar ratio of the incorporated (/sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/) and apolipoprotein B was close to unity. No radioactivity was found associated with any other secreted apolipoproteins. To confirm these findings, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins were precipitated with anti-apolipoprotein B and high density lipoproteins were precipitated with anti-apolipoprotein A-I. Only the former precipitate was radioactive. These results suggest that apolipoprotein B is a calcium binding protein.

  12. STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF PLANT CHITINASES AND CHITIN-BINDING PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEINTEMA, JJ

    1994-01-01

    Structural features of plant chitinases and chitin-binding proteins are discussed. Many of these proteins consist of multiple domains,of which the chitin-binding hevein domain is a predominant one. X-ray and NMR structures of representatives of the major classes of these proteins are available now,

  13. Rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordhoff, E; Krogsdam, A M; Jorgensen, H F

    1999-01-01

    We report a protocol for the rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins. Immobilized DNA probes harboring a specific sequence motif are incubated with cell or nuclear extract. Proteins are analyzed directly off the solid support by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass...... was validated by the identification of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins, and its use provided evidence that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase exhibits DNA sequence-specific binding to DNA....

  14. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Figueroa-Angulo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  15. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-11-26

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  16. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  17. Consideration on some hormone binding proteins patterns during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M A; Miller, N J; Hamdi, I M; el-Adawi, S A; al-Zaid, M; al-Awqati, M A

    1991-02-01

    Serum concentrations of sex hormone binding globulin, transcortin, thyroxine binding globulin, transthyretin together with retinol binding protein, ceruloplasmin, transferrin and albumin were measured sequentially in pregnant women in order to derive more definite suppositions relating to the prime function of hormone binding proteins. Thus, the fact that except for transthyretin all other specific hormone binding proteins exhibited appreciable but significantly variable increases would suggest: a) the apparent existence of more complex mechanisms regulating protein metabolism during pregnancy than hitherto postulated (i.e. the general notion of an integrated estrogen influence); b) a major and distinctive role for each of the hormone binding proteins is plausible since alterations in hormonal requirements by the fetus as pregnancy progresses can not be provided by the almost constant transplacental transfer rate of the "free" hormone moiety.

  18. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Un eHuh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific binding. Host plants intensively use RNA binding proteins for defense against viral infections in nature. In this mini review, we will summarize the function of some host RNA binding proteins which act in a sequence-specific binding manner to the infecting virus RNA. It is important to understand how plants effectively suppresses RNA virus infections via RNA binding proteins, and this defense system can be potentially developed as a synthetic virus defense strategy for use in crop engineering.

  19. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  20. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  1. The Cobalamin-binding Protein in Zebrafish is an Intermediate Between the Three Cobalamin-binding Proteins in Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Eva Holm; Fedosov, Sergey; Nexø, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    knowledge concerning the phylogenetic evolution of kindred proteins. We identified a cobalamin binding capacity in zebrafish protein extracts (8.2 pmol/fish) and ambient water (13.5 pmol/fish) associated with a single protein. The protein showed resistance toward degradation by trypsin and chymotrypsin......In humans, three soluble extracellular cobalamin-binding proteins; transcobalamin (TC), intrinsic factor (IF), and haptocorrin (HC), are involved in the uptake and transport of cobalamin. In this study, we investigate a cobalamin-binding protein from zebrafish (Danio rerio) and summarize current...... with human IF. The absorbance spectrum of the purified protein in complex with hydroxo-cobalamin resembled those of human HC and IF, but not TC. We searched available databases to further explore the phylogenies of the three cobalamin-binding proteins in higher vertebrates. Apparently, TC-like proteins...

  2. Interleukin-18 and interleukin-18 Binding Protein

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    Charles eDinarello

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-18 (IL 18 is a member of the IL 1 family of cytokines. Increasing reports have expanded the role of IL 18 in mediating inflammation in animal models of disease using IL 18 deficient mice, neutralization of IL 18 or deficiency in the IL 18 receptor alpha chain. Similar to IL 1β, IL 18 is synthesized as an inactive precursor requiering processing by caspase 1 into an active cytokine but unlike IL 1β, the IL 18 precursor is constitutively present in nearly all cells in healthy humans and animals. The activity of IL 18 is balanced by the presence of a high-affinity naturally occuring IL 18 binding protein (IL 18BP. In humans, disease increased disease severity can be associated with an imbalance of IL 18 to IL 18BP such that the levels of free IL 18 are elevated in the circulation. A role for IL 18 has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, myocardial function, emphysema, metabolic syndromes, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, hemophagocytic syndromes, macrophage activation syndrome, sepsis and acute kidney injury, although in some diseases, IL 18 is protective. IL 18 plays a major role in the production of interferon-g from natural killer cells. The IL 18BP has been used safely in humans and clinical trials of IL 18BP as well as neutralizing anti-IL 18 antibodies are in clinical trials. This review updates the biology of IL 18 as well as its role in human disease

  3. IGF Binding Protein-5 Induces Cell Senescence

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    Fumihiro Sanada

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is the complex process of deterioration that drives the aging of an organism, resulting in the progressive loss of organ function and eventually phenotypic aging. Senescent cells undergo irreversible growth arrest, usually by inducing telomere shortening. Alternatively, senescence may also occur prematurely in response to various stress stimuli, such as oxidative stress, DNA damage, or activated oncogenes. Recently, it has been shown that IGF binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5 with the induction of the tumor suppressor p53 is upregulated during cellular senescence. This mechanism mediates interleukin-6/gp130-induced premature senescence in human fibroblasts, irradiation-induced premature senescence in human endothelial cells (ECs, and replicative senescence in human ECs independent of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and IGF-II. Additionally, a link between IGFBP-5, hyper-coagulation, and inflammation, which occur with age, has been implicated. Thus, IGFBP-5 seems to play decisive roles in controlling cell senescence and cell inflammation. In this review, we describe the accumulating evidence for this role of IGFBP-5 including our new finding.

  4. Informing the Human Plasma Protein Binding of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The free fraction of a xenobiotic in plasma (Fub) is an important determinant of chemical adsorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and toxicity, yet experimental plasma protein binding data is scarce for environmentally relevant chemicals. The presented work explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to predict Fub for environmentally relevant chemicals via machine learning techniques. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were constructed with k nearest neighbors (kNN), support vector machines (SVM), and random forest (RF) machine learning algorithms from a training set of 1045 pharmaceuticals. The models were then evaluated with independent test sets of pharmaceuticals (200 compounds) and environmentally relevant ToxCast chemicals (406 total, in two groups of 238 and 168 compounds). The selection of a minimal feature set of 10-15 2D molecular descriptors allowed for both informative feature interpretation and practical applicability domain assessment via a bounded box of descriptor ranges and principal component analysis. The diverse pharmaceutical and environmental chemical sets exhibit similarities in terms of chemical space (99-82% overlap), as well as comparable bias and variance in constructed learning curves. All the models exhibit significant predictability with mean absolute errors (MAE) in the range of 0.10-0.18 Fub. The models performed best for highly bound chemicals (MAE 0.07-0.12), neutrals (MAE 0

  5. SONAR Discovers RNA-Binding Proteins from Analysis of Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Jin, Wenhao; Huelga, Stephanie C; Banks, Charles A S; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Schwinn, Marie K; Daniels, Danette L; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-10-20

    RNA metabolism is controlled by an expanding, yet incomplete, catalog of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), many of which lack characterized RNA binding domains. Approaches to expand the RBP repertoire to discover non-canonical RBPs are currently needed. Here, HaloTag fusion pull down of 12 nuclear and cytoplasmic RBPs followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrates that proteins interacting with multiple RBPs in an RNA-dependent manner are enriched for RBPs. This motivated SONAR, a computational approach that predicts RNA binding activity by analyzing large-scale affinity precipitation-MS protein-protein interactomes. Without relying on sequence or structure information, SONAR identifies 1,923 human, 489 fly, and 745 yeast RBPs, including over 100 human candidate RBPs that contain zinc finger domains. Enhanced CLIP confirms RNA binding activity and identifies transcriptome-wide RNA binding sites for SONAR-predicted RBPs, revealing unexpected RNA binding activity for disease-relevant proteins and DNA binding proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Helical propensity in an intrinsically disordered protein accelerates ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Dogan, Jakob; Jemth, Per

    2014-01-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins fold upon binding to other macromolecules. The secondary structure present in the well-ordered complex is often formed transiently in the unbound state. The consequence of such transient structure for the binding process is, however, not clear. The activatio...... the notion of preformed secondary structure as an important determinant for molecular recognition in intrinsically disordered proteins....

  7. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

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    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  8. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; González, D.; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-p...

  9. Accurate prediction of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

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    Evangelia Petsalaki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many important protein-protein interactions are mediated by the binding of a short peptide stretch in one protein to a large globular segment in another. Recent efforts have provided hundreds of examples of new peptides binding to proteins for which a three-dimensional structure is available (either known experimentally or readily modeled but where no structure of the protein-peptide complex is known. To address this gap, we present an approach that can accurately predict peptide binding sites on protein surfaces. For peptides known to bind a particular protein, the method predicts binding sites with great accuracy, and the specificity of the approach means that it can also be used to predict whether or not a putative or predicted peptide partner will bind. We used known protein-peptide complexes to derive preferences, in the form of spatial position specific scoring matrices, which describe the binding-site environment in globular proteins for each type of amino acid in bound peptides. We then scan the surface of a putative binding protein for sites for each of the amino acids present in a peptide partner and search for combinations of high-scoring amino acid sites that satisfy constraints deduced from the peptide sequence. The method performed well in a benchmark and largely agreed with experimental data mapping binding sites for several recently discovered interactions mediated by peptides, including RG-rich proteins with SMN domains, Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 with TRADD domains, DBC1 with Sir2, and the Ago hook with Argonaute PIWI domain. The method, and associated statistics, is an excellent tool for predicting and studying binding sites for newly discovered peptides mediating critical events in biology.

  10. Calcium-binding proteins from human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogstad, G.O.; Krutnes, M.B.; Solum, N.O.

    1983-06-01

    Calcium-binding platelet proteins were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis of solubilized platelets against antibodies to whole platelets followed by incubation of the immunoplates with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ and autoradiography. When the immunoplates had been pretreated with EDTA at pH 9.0 in order to remove divalent cations, three immunoprecipitates were markedly labelled with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. These corresponded to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex, glycoprotein Ia and a presently unidentified antigen termed G18. These antigens were membrane-bound and surface-oriented. When an excess of EDTA was introduced in the incubation media the results revealed that the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex and antigen G18, but not glycoprotein Ia, contained sites with a stronger affinity for calcium than has EDTA at pH 7.4. Immunoprecipitates of the separate glycoproteins IIb and IIIa both bound calcium in the same manner as the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. As another approach, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ prior to crossed immunoelectrophoresis of the solubilized platelets. A single immunoprecipitate was weakly labelled. This did not correspond to any of the immunoprecipitates which were visible after staining with Coomassie blue. The labelling of this antigen was markedly increased when the platelet-rich plasma had been preincubated with EDTA and in this case a weak labelling of the glycoprotein IIB-IIIa precipitate also became apparent. No increased incorporation of calcium occured in any of these immunoprecipitates when the platelets were aggregated with ADP in the presence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/.

  11. Characterization of the comparative drug binding to intra- (liver fatty acid binding protein) and extra- (human serum albumin) cellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Andrew; Hallifax, David; Nussio, Matthew R; Shapter, Joseph G; Mackenzie, Peter I; Brian Houston, J; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-01-01

    1. This study compared the extent, affinity, and kinetics of drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) and liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) using ultrafiltration and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). 2. Binding of basic and neutral drugs to both HSA and LFABP was typically negligible. Binding of acidic drugs ranged from minor (fu > 0.8) to extensive (fu transport mechanisms for drugs bound moderately or extensively to HSA and LFABP.

  12. Roles of Copper-Binding Proteins in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockhuys, Stéphanie; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2017-04-20

    Copper ions are needed in several steps of cancer progression. However, the underlying mechanisms, and involved copper-binding proteins, are mainly elusive. Since most copper ions in the body (in and outside cells) are protein-bound, it is important to investigate what copper-binding proteins participate and, for these, how they are loaded with copper by copper transport proteins. Mechanistic information for how some copper-binding proteins, such as extracellular lysyl oxidase (LOX), play roles in cancer have been elucidated but there is still much to learn from a biophysical molecular viewpoint. Here we provide a summary of copper-binding proteins and discuss ones reported to have roles in cancer. We specifically focus on how copper-binding proteins such as mediator of cell motility 1 (MEMO1), LOX, LOX-like proteins, and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) modulate breast cancer from molecular and clinical aspects. Because of the importance of copper for invasion/migration processes, which are key components of cancer metastasis, further insights into the actions of copper-binding proteins may provide new targets to combat cancer.

  13. Post-Translational Modifications and RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovci, Michael T; Bengtson, Mario H; Massirer, Katlin B

    RNA-binding proteins affect cellular metabolic programs through development and in response to cellular stimuli. Though much work has been done to elucidate the roles of a handful of RNA-binding proteins and their effect on RNA metabolism, the progress of studies to understand the effects of post-translational modifications of this class of proteins is far from complete. This chapter summarizes the work that has been done to identify the consequence of post-translational modifications to some RNA-binding proteins. The effects of these modifications have been shown to increase the panoply of functions that a given RNA-binding protein can assume. We will survey the experimental methods that are used to identify the presence of several protein modifications and methods that attempt to discern the consequence of these modifications.

  14. TGF-b superfamily cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 is a physiological appetite and body weight regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Wang-Wei Tsai

    Full Text Available The TGF-b superfamily cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 circulates in all humans and when overproduced in cancer leads to anorexia/cachexia, by direct action on brain feeding centres. In these studies we have examined the role of physiologically relevant levels of MIC-1/GDF15 in the regulation of appetite, body weight and basal metabolic rate. MIC-1/GDF15 gene knockout mice (MIC-1(-/- weighed more and had increased adiposity, which was associated with increased spontaneous food intake. Female MIC-1(-/- mice exhibited some additional alterations in reduced basal energy expenditure and physical activity, possibly owing to the associated decrease in total lean mass. Further, infusion of human recombinant MIC-1/GDF15 sufficient to raise serum levels in MIC-1(-/- mice to within the normal human range reduced body weight and food intake. Taken together, our findings suggest that MIC-1/GDF15 is involved in the physiological regulation of appetite and energy storage.

  15. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca 2+ -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Further biochemical characterization of Mycobacterium leprae laminin-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.M. Marques

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the alpha2 chain of laminin-2 present on the surface of Schwann cells is involved in the process of attachment of Mycobacterium leprae to these cells. Searching for M. leprae laminin-binding molecules, in a previous study we isolated and characterized the cationic proteins histone-like protein (Hlp and ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 as potential adhesins involved in M. leprae-Schwann cell interaction. Hlp was shown to bind alpha2-laminins and to greatly enhance the attachment of mycobacteria to ST88-14 Schwann cells. In the present study, we investigated the laminin-binding capacity of the ribosomal proteins S4 and S5. The genes coding for these proteins were PCR amplified and their recombinant products were shown to bind alpha2-laminins in overlay assays. However, when tested in ELISA-based assays and in adhesion assays with ST88-14 cells, in contrast to Hlp, S4 and S5 failed to bind laminin and act as adhesins. The laminin-binding property and adhesin capacity of two basic host-derived proteins were also tested, and only histones, but not cytochrome c, were able to increase bacterial attachment to ST88-14 cells. Our data suggest that the alanine/lysine-rich sequences shared by Hlp and eukaryotic H1 histones might be involved in the binding of these cationic proteins to laminin.

  17. Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X; Beardslee, T; Zeece, M; Sarath, G; Markwell, J

    2001-11-01

    Soy lecithin is widely used as an emulsifier in processed foods, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Soy lecithin is composed principally of phospholipids; however, it has also been shown to contain IgE-binding proteins, albeit at a low level. A few clinical cases involving allergic reactions to soy lecithin have been reported. The purpose of this investigation is to better characterize the IgE-binding proteins typically found in lecithin. Soy lecithin proteins were isolated following solvent extraction of lipid components and then separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The separated lecithin proteins were immunoblotted with sera from soy-sensitive individuals to determine the pattern of IgE-binding proteins. The identity of IgE-reactive bands was determined from their N-terminal sequence. The level of protein in six lecithin samples obtained from commercial suppliers ranged from 100 to 1,400 ppm. Lecithin samples showed similar protein patterns when examined by SDS-PAGE. Immunoblotting with sera from soy-sensitive individuals showed IgE binding to bands corresponding to 7, 12, 20, 39 and 57 kD. N-terminal analysis of these IgE-binding bands resulted in sequences for 3 components. The 12-kD band was identified as a methionine-rich protein (MRP) and a member of the 2S albumin class of soy proteins. The 20-kD band was found to be soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The 39-kD band was matched to a soy protein with unknown function. Soy lecithin contains a number of IgE-binding proteins; thus, it might represent a source of hidden allergens. These allergens are a more significant concern for soy-allergic individuals consuming lecithin products as a health supplement. In addition, the MRP and the 39-kD protein identified in this study represent newly identified IgE-binding proteins. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  19. Library of binding protein scaffolds (LibBP): a computational platform for selection of binding protein scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seungpyo; Kim, Dongsup

    2016-06-01

    Developments in biotechnology have enabled the in vitro evolution of binding proteins. The emerging limitations of antibodies in binding protein engineering have led to suggestions for other proteins as alternative binding protein scaffolds. Most of these proteins were selected based on human intuition rather than systematic analysis of the available data. To improve this strategy, we developed a computational framework for finding desirable binding protein scaffolds by utilizing protein structure and sequence information. For each protein, its structure and the sequences of evolutionarily-related proteins were analyzed, and spatially contiguous regions composed of highly variable residues were identified. A large number of proteins have these regions, but leucine rich repeats (LRRs), histidine kinase domains and immunoglobulin domains are predominant among them. The candidates suggested as new binding protein scaffolds include histidine kinase, LRR, titin and pentapeptide repeat protein. The database and web-service are accessible via http://bcbl.kaist.ac.kr/LibBP CONTACT: kds@kaist.ac.krSupplementary data: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

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    Antje Anji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins.

  1. A linear model for transcription factor binding affinity prediction in protein binding microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Annala

    Full Text Available Protein binding microarrays (PBM are a high throughput technology used to characterize protein-DNA binding. The arrays measure a protein's affinity toward thousands of double-stranded DNA sequences at once, producing a comprehensive binding specificity catalog. We present a linear model for predicting the binding affinity of a protein toward DNA sequences based on PBM data. Our model represents the measured intensity of an individual probe as a sum of the binding affinity contributions of the probe's subsequences. These subsequences characterize a DNA binding motif and can be used to predict the intensity of protein binding against arbitrary DNA sequences. Our method was the best performer in the Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods 5 (DREAM5 transcription factor/DNA motif recognition challenge. For the DREAM5 bonus challenge, we also developed an approach for the identification of transcription factors based on their PBM binding profiles. Our approach for TF identification achieved the best performance in the bonus challenge.

  2. A method to assay penicillin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Michael J; Dougherty, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Key enzymes that assemble the bacterial cell wall are also the target of the Beta-lactam class of antibiotics. The covalent binding of labeled penicillin to these proteins has been used in numerous studies in drug discovery, antibiotic mechanisms of action and resistance, and cell wall physiology. Methods to label and measure penicillin binding proteins in two prototypical organisms, a Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus), are described. The methods discussed include identifying penicillin-binding proteins in both intact cells (in vivo measurements) and isolated cell membranes.

  3. New binding mode to TNF-alpha revealed by ubiquitin-based artificial binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hoffmann

    Full Text Available A variety of approaches have been employed to generate binding proteins from non-antibody scaffolds. Utilizing a beta-sheet of the human ubiquitin for paratope creation we obtained binding proteins against tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha. The bioactive form of this validated pharmacological target protein is a non-covalently linked homo-trimer. This structural feature leads to the observation of a certain heterogeneity concerning the binding mode of TNF-alpha binding molecules, for instance in terms of monomer/trimer specificity. We analyzed a ubiquitin-based TNF-alpha binder, selected by ribosome display, with a particular focus on its mode of interaction. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, specific binding to TNF-alpha with nanomolar affinity was observed. In isothermal titration calorimetry we obtained comparable results regarding the affinity and detected an exothermic reaction with one ubiquitin-derived binding molecule binding one TNF-alpha trimer. Using NMR spectroscopy and other analytical methods the 1:3 stoichiometry could be confirmed. Detailed binding analysis showed that the interaction is affected by the detergent Tween-20. Previously, this phenomenon was reported only for one other type of alternative scaffold-derived binding proteins--designed ankyrin repeat proteins--without further investigation. As demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy, the presence of the detergent increases the association rate significantly. Since the special architecture of TNF-alpha is known to be modulated by detergents, the access to the recognized epitope is indicated to be restricted by conformational transitions within the target protein. Our results suggest that the ubiquitin-derived binding protein targets a new epitope on TNF-alpha, which differs from the epitopes recognized by TNF-alpha neutralizing antibodies.

  4. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared to patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. PMID:22086767

  5. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Thioredoxin binding protein (TBP)-2/Txnip and α-arrestin proteins in cancer and diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masutani, Hiroshi; Yoshihara, Eiji; Masaki, So; Chen, Zhe; Yodoi, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Thioredoxin binding protein −2/ thioredoxin interacting protein is an α-arrestin protein that has attracted much attention as a multifunctional regulator. Thioredoxin binding protein −2 expression is downregulated in tumor cells and the level of thioredoxin binding protein is correlated with clinical stage of cancer. Mice with mutations or knockout of the thioredoxin binding protein −2 gene are much more susceptible to carcinogenesis than wild-type mice, indicating a role for thioredoxin binding protein −2 in cancer suppression. Studies have also revealed roles for thioredoxin binding protein −2 in metabolic control. Enhancement of thioredoxin binding protein −2 expression causes impairment of insulin sensitivity and glucose-induced insulin secretion, and β-cell apoptosis. These changes are important characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Thioredoxin binding protein −2 regulates transcription of metabolic regulating genes. Thioredoxin binding protein −2-like inducible membrane protein/ arrestin domain containing 3 regulates endocytosis of receptors such as the β2-adrenergic receptor. The α-arrestin family possesses PPXY motifs and may function as an adaptor/scaffold for NEDD family ubiquitin ligases. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of α-arrestin proteins would provide a new pharmacological basis for developing approaches against cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:22247597

  7. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...

  8. The Art of Compiling Protein Binding Site Ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietz, Stefan; Fährrolfes, Rainer; Rarey, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Structure-based drug design starts with the collection, preparation, and initial analysis of protein structures. With more than 115,000 structures publically available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), fully automated processes reliably performing these important preprocessing steps are needed. Several tools are available for these tasks, however, most of them do not address the special needs of scientists interested in protein-ligand interactions. In this paper, we summarize our research activities towards an automated processing pipeline from raw PDB data towards ready-to-use protein binding site ensembles. Starting from a single protein structure, the pipeline covers the following phases: Extracting structurally related binding sites from the PDB, aligning disconnected binding site sequences, resolving tautomeric forms and protonation, orienting hydrogens and flippable side-chains, structurally aligning the multitude of binding sites, and performing a reasonable reduction of ensemble structures. The pipeline, named SIENA, creates protein-structural ensembles for the analysis of protein flexibility, molecular design efforts like docking or de novo design within seconds. For the first time, we are able to process the whole PDB in order to create a large collection of protein binding site ensembles. SIENA is available as part of the ZBH ProteinsPlus webserver under http://proteinsplus.zbh.uni-hamburg.de. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Pleiotropic virulence factor - Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a broad spectrum of infectious diseases, including pharyngitis, skin infections and invasive necrotizing fasciitis. The initial phase of infection involves colonization, followed by intimate contact with the host cells, thus promoting bacterial uptake by them. S. pyogenes recognizes fibronectin (Fn) through its own Fn-binding proteins to obtain access to epithelial and endothelial cells in host tissue. Fn-binding proteins bind to Fn to form a bridge to α5 β1 -integrins, which leads to rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin in host cells and uptake of invading S. pyogenes. Recently, several structural analyses of the invasion mechanism showed molecular interactions by which Fn converts from a compact plasma protein to a fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix. After colonization, S. pyogenes must evade the host innate immune system to spread into blood vessels and deeper organs. Some Fn-binding proteins contribute to evasion of host innate immunity, such as the complement system and phagocytosis. In addition, Fn-binding proteins have received focus as non-M protein vaccine candidates, because of their localization and conservation among different M serotypes.Here, we review the roles of Fn-binding proteins in the pathogenesis and speculate regarding possible vaccine antigen candidates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. De-novo protein function prediction using DNA binding and RNA binding proteins as a test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Sapir; Leiderman, Olga; Charar, Rotem; Efroni, Gilat; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Ofran, Yanay

    2016-11-21

    Of the currently identified protein sequences, 99.6% have never been observed in the laboratory as proteins and their molecular function has not been established experimentally. Predicting the function of such proteins relies mostly on annotated homologs. However, this has resulted in some erroneous annotations, and many proteins have no annotated homologs. Here we propose a de-novo function prediction approach based on identifying biophysical features that underlie function. Using our approach, we discover DNA and RNA binding proteins that cannot be identified based on homology and validate these predictions experimentally. For example, FGF14, which belongs to a family of secreted growth factors was predicted to bind DNA. We verify this experimentally and also show that FGF14 is localized to the nucleus. Mutating the predicted binding site on FGF14 abrogated DNA binding. These results demonstrate the feasibility of automated de-novo function prediction based on identifying function-related biophysical features.

  11. The interaction of membrane DNA-binding protein with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielyan, A. G.; Arakhelyan, H. H.; Zakharyan, R. A.

    1994-07-01

    A 31-kDa protein specifically binding to double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) was isolated from plasmatic membranes of rat liver cells by means of affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Some of the properties of this protein were determined. Judging by the UV and circular dichroism spectroscopic data, the protein forms a complex with DNA, stabilizing its native structure, mainly in the regions rich in AT pairs. The 31-kDa protein-pAO3 plasmid DNA binding constant was determined by nitrocellulose filter analysis of protein labelled DNA complexes. The results obtained correspond to cooperative binding with DNA molecules of extended interacting ligands, having AT specificity. A possible role of the 31-kDa protein in DNA transmembrane transition processes is discussed.

  12. The interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of the folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Schou, Christian; Babol, Linnea N.

    2011-01-01

    The folate binding protein (FBP) regulates homeostasis and intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of decisive importance in cell division and growth. We analyzed whether interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of FBP plays a significant role in the physiology...

  13. RNA-binding specificity of Y-box protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinjiang; Akcakanat, Argun; Stivers, David N; Zhang, Jiexin; Kim, Doyil; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2009-01-01

    Y-box protein 1 (YB-1) is a multifunctional DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates transcription and translation. The specificity of YB-1's RNA binding and its consequences are unknown. Because expression and subcellular localization of YB-1 have been reported to be important in breast cancer, we determined the specificity and functional impact of YB-1 mRNA-binding in MCF7 breast cancer cells. We used YB-1 antibodies to immunoprecipitate YB-1 and microarray profiling to compare YB-1-bound and total poly(A) RNA. We demonstrated that YB-1 mRNA-binding was preferential. Transcript sequences significantly associated with this binding had high GC content. Selected YB-1 mRNA-binding targets were confirmed by QRT-PCR. However, downregulation of YB-1 levels by siRNA did not affect their RNA or protein expression. Thus, YB-1 has RNA-binding specificity; however, YB-1 binding does not necessarily regulate the stability or translation of its mRNA targets. Further study is needed to determine the functional consequences of selective YB-1 mRNA binding.

  14. Proteomic analysis of heparin-binding proteins from human seminal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heparin-binding proteins (HBPs) are essential constituents of human seminal fluid, which bind to sperm lipids containing the phosphorylcholine group and mediate the fertilization process. We utilized a proteomic set-up consisting of affinity chromatography, isoelectric focusing (IEF) coupled with matrix-assisted laser ...

  15. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  16. Identification of Putative Vero Cell Protein(s) that Bind Specifically to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa plasma membrane proteins were identified as viral envelope targets. Competitive binding assay showed these proteins competing with dengue virus binding. MTT assay indicate that viability of vero cells increases in cultures pretreated with 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa proteins ...

  17. How to use not-always-reliable binding site information in protein-protein docking prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Huang, Yanzhao; Xiao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In many protein-protein docking algorithms, binding site information is used to help predicting the protein complex structures. Using correct and accurate binding site information can increase protein-protein docking success rate significantly. On the other hand, using wrong binding sites information should lead to a failed prediction, or, at least decrease the success rate. Recently, various successful theoretical methods have been proposed to predict the binding sites of proteins. However, the predicted binding site information is not always reliable, sometimes wrong binding site information could be given. Hence there is a high risk to use the predicted binding site information in current docking algorithms. In this paper, a softly restricting method (SRM) is developed to solve this problem. By utilizing predicted binding site information in a proper way, the SRM algorithm is sensitive to the correct binding site information but insensitive to wrong information, which decreases the risk of using predicted binding site information. This SRM is tested on benchmark 3.0 using purely predicted binding site information. The result shows that when the predicted information is correct, SRM increases the success rate significantly; however, even if the predicted information is completely wrong, SRM only decreases success rate slightly, which indicates that the SRM is suitable for utilizing predicted binding site information.

  18. Anchored clathrate waters bind antifreeze proteins to ice

    OpenAIRE

    Garnham, Christopher P; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, t...

  19. Proteomic Profiling of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Responses to Mechanical Strain and TGF-B1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurpinski, Kyle; Chu, Julia; Wang, Daojing; Li, Song

    2009-10-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a potential source of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for constructing tissue-engineered vascular grafts. However, the details of how specific combinations of vascular microenvironmental factors regulate MSCs are not well understood. Previous studies have suggested that both mechanical stimulation with uniaxial cyclic strain and chemical stimulation with transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) can induce smooth muscle markers in MSCs. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of uniaxial cyclic strain and TGF-{beta}1 stimulation on MSCs. By using a proteomic analysis, we found differential regulation of several proteins and genes, such as the up-regulation of TGF-{beta}1-induced protein ig-h3 (BGH3) protein levels by TGF-{beta}1 and up-regulation of calponin 3 protein level by cyclic strain. At the gene expression level, BGH3 was induced by TGF-{beta}1, but calponin 3 was not significantly regulated by mechanical strain or TGF-{beta}1, which was in contrast to the synergistic up-regulation of calponin 1 gene expression by cyclic strain and TGF-{beta}1. Further experiments with cycloheximide treatment suggested that the up-regulation of calponin 3 by cyclic strain was at post-transcriptional level. The results in this study suggest that both mechanical stimulation and TGF-{beta}1 signaling play unique and important roles in the regulation of MSCs at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and that a precise combination of microenvironmental cues may promote MSC differentiation.

  20. Water-binding of protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.P.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    As overweight and obesity become more prevalent in society, the demand for food products that can help maintain body weight increases. One way to make such products is by decreasing the protein and fat content through increasing the water content. This thesis describes the potential of protein

  1. Drosophila DNA-Binding Proteins in Polycomb Repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Erokhin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of individual gene expression patterns in different cell types is required during differentiation and development of multicellular organisms. Polycomb group (PcG proteins are key epigenetic regulators responsible for gene repression, and dysregulation of their activities leads to developmental abnormalities and diseases. PcG proteins were first identified in Drosophila, which still remains the most convenient system for studying PcG-dependent repression. In the Drosophila genome, these proteins bind to DNA regions called Polycomb response elements (PREs. A major role in the recruitment of PcG proteins to PREs is played by DNA-binding factors, several of which have been characterized in detail. However, current knowledge is insufficient for comprehensively describing the mechanism of this process. In this review, we summarize and discuss the available data on the role of DNA-binding proteins in PcG recruitment to chromatin.

  2. Engineering a periplasmic binding protein for amino acid sensors with improved binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wooseok; Kim, Sanggil; Lee, Hyun Soo

    2017-10-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are members of a widely distributed protein superfamily found in bacteria and archaea, and are involved in the cellular uptake of solutes. In this report, a leucine-binding PBP was engineered to detect l-Leu based on a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) change upon ligand binding. A fluorescent unnatural amino acid, l-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine (CouA), was genetically incorporated into the protein as a FRET donor, and a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) was fused with its N-terminus as a FRET acceptor. When CouA was incorporated into position 178, the sensor protein showed a 2.5-fold increase in the FRET ratio. Protein engineering significantly improved its substrate specificity, showing minimal changes in the FRET ratio with the other 19 natural amino acids and d-Leu. Further modification increased the sensitivity of the sensor protein (14-fold) towards l-Leu, and it recognized l-Met as well with moderate binding affinity. Selected mutant sensors were used to measure concentrations of l-Leu in a biological sample (fetal bovine serum) and to determine the optical purity of Leu and Met. This FRET-based sensor design strategy allowed us to easily manipulate the natural receptor to improve its binding affinity and specificity and to recognize other natural molecules, which are not recognized by the wild-type receptor. The design strategy can be applied to other natural receptors, enabling engineering receptors that sense biochemically interesting molecules.

  3. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, S; Lokhande, N; González, D; Cassill, A; Renthal, R

    2013-02-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins, using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila odorant-binding protein that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in Escherichia coli was assessed by measuring N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) binding and Förster resonance energy transfer between LUSH tryptophan 123 (W123) and NPN. Binding of cVA was measured from quenching of W123 fluorescence as a function of cVA concentration. The equilibrium constant for transfer of cVA between β-cyclodextrin and LUSH was determined from a linked equilibria model. This constant, multiplied by the β-cyclodextrin-cVA dissociation constant, gives the LUSH-cVA dissociation constant: ∼100 nM. It was also found that other ligands quench W123 fluorescence. The LUSH-ligand dissociation constants were determined to be ∼200 nM for the silk moth pheromone bombykol and ∼90 nM for methyl oleate. The results indicate that the ligand-binding cavity of LUSH can accommodate a variety ligands with strong binding interactions. Implications of this for the Laughlin, Ha, Jones and Smith model of pheromone reception are discussed. © 2012 Royal Entomological Society.

  4. Metal-binding proteins as metal pollution indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, H.F.

    1986-03-01

    The fact that metal-binding proteins are a consequence of elevated metal concentration in organisms is well known. What has been overlooked is that the presence of these proteins provides a unique opportunity to reformulate the criteria of metal pollution. The detoxification effect of metal-binding proteins in animals from polluted areas has been cited, but there have been only very few studies relating metal-binding proteins to pollution. This lack is due partly to the design of most experiments, which were aimed at isolation of metal-binding proteins and hence were of too short duration to allow for correlation to adverse physiological effects on the organism. In this study metal-binding proteins were isolated and characterized from five different marine animals (rock lobster, Jasus lalandii; hermit crab, Diogenes brevirostris; sandshrimp, Palaemon pacificus; black mussel, Choromytilus meridionalis; and limpet, Patella granularis). These animals were kept under identical metal-enriched conditions, hence eliminating differences in method and seasons. The study animals belonged to different phyla; varied in size, mass, age, behavior, food requirements and life stages; and accumulated metals at different rates. It is possible to link unseasonal moulting in crustacea, a known physiological effect due to a metal-enriched environment, to the production of the metal-binding protein without evidence of obvious metal body burden. Thus a new concept of pollution is defined: the presence of metal-binding proteins confirms toxic metal pollution. This concept was then tested under field conditions in the whelk Bullia digitalis and in metal-enriched grass.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum normocyte binding protein (PfNBP-1) peptides bind specifically to human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, John Jairo; Vera, Ricardo; García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Urquiza, Mauricio; Rivera, Zuly; Guzmán, Fanny; Torres, Elizabeth; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2003-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum normocyte binding protein-1 (PfNBP-1), a Plasmodium vivax RBP-1 orthologue is expressed in the apical merozoite area. PfNBP-1 binds directly to human erythrocyte membrane in a sialic acid-dependent but trypsin-resistant way. Erythrocyte binding assays were done with synthetic peptides covering the sequence reported as PfNBP-1. Two specific erythrocyte high activity binding peptides were found: 101VFINDLDTYQYEYFYEWNQ(120), peptide 26332, and 181NTKETYLKELNKKKMLQNKK(200), peptide 26336. These two peptides' binding was saturable and presenting nanomolar affinity constants. The critical binding residues (those residues underlined and highlighted in bold) were determined by competition assays with glycine-scan analogue peptides. These peptides were able to block merozoite in vitro invasion of erythrocytes.

  6. Zeatin-binding proteins in barley leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, G.A.; Kulaeva, O.N.; Taryan, V.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Highly labelled tritium-zeatin was used in the work to clarify for the first time a protein factor that is present in cytokinin-sensitive vegetative organs of plants (barley leaves) and which possesses the properties of a cytokinin receptor. Aliquots of tritium-zeatin were mixed with a solution of protein and incubated for several hours in buffer. Following incubation, protein was precipitated by ammonium sulfate at 90% of saturation, and radioactivity of the precipitate was checked in a dioxane scintillator with an efficiency of about 35%. It is shown that the characteristics of interaction of the clarified specific protein sites with cytokinins in regard to a number of criteria correspond to the characteristics expected of receptors of these phytohormones.

  7. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  8. Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Brandon Laurence

    Robust and simple strategies to directly functionalize graphene- and diamond-based nanostructures with proteins are of considerable interest for biologically driven manufacturing, biosensing and bioimaging. In this work, we identify a new set of carbon binding peptides that vary in overall hydrophobicity and charge, and engineer two of these sequences (Car9 and Car15) within the framework of various proteins to exploit their binding ability. In addition, we conducted a detailed analysis of the mechanisms that underpin the interaction of the fusion proteins with carbon and silicon surfaces. Through these insights, we were able to develop proteins suitable for dispersing graphene flakes and carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions, while retaining protein activity. Additionally, our investigation into the mechanisms of adhesion for our carbon binding peptides inspired a cheap, disposable protein purification system that is more than 10x cheaper than commonly used His-tag protein purification. Our results emphasize the importance of understanding both bulk and molecular recognition events when exploiting the adhesive properties of solid-binding peptides and proteins in technological applications.

  9. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key ... [Roy S, Dutta S, Khanna K, Singla S and Sundar D 2012 Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. J. Biosci. .... well as protection from HIV infection (Reynolds, et al. 2003).

  10. Myosin Binding Protein C Interaction with Actin: CHARACTERIZATION AND MAPPING OF THE BINDING SITE*

    OpenAIRE

    Rybakova, Inna N.; Greaser, Marion L.; Moss, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Myosin binding protein C (MyBPC) is a multidomain protein associated with the thick filaments of striated muscle. Although both structural and regulatory roles have been proposed for MyBPC, its interactions with other sarcomeric proteins remain obscure. The current study was designed to examine the actin-binding properties of MyBPC and to define MyBPC domain regions involved in actin interaction. Here, we have expressed full-length mouse cardiac MyBPC (cMyBPC) in a baculovirus system and show...

  11. Replacing antibodies: engineering new binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Scott; Dooley, Kevin; Shur, Oren

    2013-01-01

    Nature's reliance on proteins to carry out nearly all biological processes has led to the evolution of biomolecules that exhibit a seemingly endless range of functions. Much research has been devoted toward advancing this process in the laboratory in order to create new proteins with improved or unique capabilities. The protein-engineering field has rapidly evolved from pioneering studies in engineering protein stability and activity to an application-driven powerhouse on the forefront of emerging technologies in biomedical engineering and biotechnology. A classic protein-engineering technique in the medical field has focused on manipulating antibodies and antibody fragments for various applications. New classes of alternative scaffolds have recently challenged this paradigm, and these structures have been successfully engineered for applications including targeted cancer therapy, regulated drug delivery, in vivo imaging, and a host of others. This review aims to capture recent advances in the engineering of nonimmunoglobulin scaffolds as well as some of the applications for these molecular recognition elements in the biomedical field.

  12. Sequence analysis of cytoplasmic mRNA-binding proteins of Xenopus oocytes identifies a family of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M T; Schiller, D L; Franke, W W

    1992-01-01

    Storage of maternal mRNAs as nontranslated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes is an adaptive strategy in various vertebrate and invertebrate oocytes, for rapid translational recruitment during embryonic development. Previously, we showed that Xenopus laevis oocytes have a soluble cytoplasmic pool of mRNA-binding proteins and particles competent for messenger RNP assembly in vitro. Here we report the isolation of cDNAs for the most abundant messenger RNPs, the 54- and 56-kDa polypeptide (p54/p56) components of the approximately 6S mRNA-binding particle, from an ovarian expression library. The nucleotide sequence of p56 cDNA is almost identical to that recently reported for the putative Xenopus transcription factor FRG Y2. p54 and p56 are highly homologous and are smaller than expected by SDS/PAGE (36 kDa and 37 kDa) due to anomalous electrophoretic mobility. They lack the "RNP consensus motif" but contain four arginine-rich "basic/aromatic islands" that are similar to the RNA-binding domain of bacteriophage mRNA antiterminator proteins and of tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus. The basic/aromatic regions and a second conspicuous 100-amino acid "domain C" of p54 and p56 are conserved in the following DNA-binding proteins: human proteins dpbA, dpbB, and YB-1, rat protein EFIA, and Xenopus protein FRG Y1, all reported to bind to DNA; domain C is homologous to the major Escherichia coli cold-stress-response protein reportedly involved in translational control. Antibodies raised against a peptide of domain C have identified similar proteins in Xenopus somatic cells and in some mammalian cells and tissues. We conclude that p54 and p56 define a family of RNA-binding proteins, at least some of which may be involved in translational regulation.

  13. Building an automated classification of DNA-binding protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Julia V; Bourne, Philip E; Shindyalov, Ilya N

    2002-01-01

    Intensive growth in 3D structure data on DNA-protein complexes as reflected in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) demands new approaches to the annotation and characterization of these data and will lead to a new understanding of critical biological processes involving these data. These data and those from other protein structure classifications will become increasingly important for the modeling of complete proteomes. We propose a fully automated classification of DNA-binding protein domains based on existing 3D-structures from the PDB. The classification, by domain, relies on the Protein Domain Parser (PDP) and the Combinatorial Extension (CE) algorithm for structural alignment. The approach involves the analysis of 3D-interaction patterns in DNA-protein interfaces, assignment of structural domains interacting with DNA, clustering of domains based on structural similarity and DNA-interacting patterns. Comparison with existing resources on describing structural and functional classifications of DNA-binding proteins was used to validate and improve the approach proposed here. In the course of our study we defined a set of criteria and heuristics allowing us to automatically build a biologically meaningful classification and define classes of functionally related protein domains. It was shown that taking into consideration interactions between protein domains and DNA considerably improves the classification accuracy. Our approach provides a high-throughput and up-to-date annotation of DNA-binding protein families which can be found at http://spdc.sdsc.edu.

  14. Ubiquitin-binding proteins: similar, but different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Hofmann, Kay; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    described. UBA (ubiquitin-associated) domain-containing proteins is the largest family and includes members involved in different cell processes. The smaller groups of UIM (ubiquitin-interacting motif), GAT [GGA (Golgi-associated gamma-adaptin homologous) and Tom1 (target of Myb 1)], CUE (coupling......Covalent modification of proteins with ubiquitin is a common regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Typically, ubiquitinated proteins are targeted for degradation by the 26 S proteasome. However, more recently the ubiquitin signal has also been connected with many other cell processes, including...... endocytosis, vesicle fusion, DNA repair and transcriptional silencing. Hence ubiquitination may be comparable with phosphorylation in its importance as an intracellular switch, controlling various signal-transduction pathways. Similar to the regulation of the extent of phosphorylation by kinases...

  15. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, V Joachim; Daminelli, Simone; Schroeder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology) - a drug's ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand flexibility to have a minor

  16. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  17. Differential binding of heavy chain variable domain 3 antigen binding fragments to protein A chromatography resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Julia; Lewis, Nathaniel; Maggiora, Kathy; Gillespie, Alison J; Connell-Crowley, Lisa

    2015-08-28

    This work examines the binding of 15 different VH3 IgGs and their corresponding F(ab')2 fragments to two different protein A chromatography resins: MabSelect(®), which utilizes a recombinant protein A ligand, and MabSelect SuRe(®) (SuRe), which utilizes a tetrameric Z domain ligand. The results show that VH3 F(ab')2 fragments can exhibit a variety of binding behaviours for the two resins. Contrary to previously published data, a subset of these molecules show strong interaction with the Z domain of SuRe(®). Furthermore, the results show that sequence variability of residue 57 in the VH3 heavy chain CDR2 domain correlates with binding behaviour on MabSelect(®) and SuRe(®). Site-directed mutagenesis of this residue confers gain or loss of VH3 F(ab')2 binding to these resins in 3 mAbs, demonstrating that it plays a key role in both recombinant protein A and Z domain interaction. A fourth mAb with a longer CDR2 loop was not affected by mutation of residue 57, indicating that CDR2 domain length may alter the binding interface and lead to the involvement of other residues in protein A binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Method for estimating protein binding capacity of polymeric systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite biomaterials made from synthetic and protein-based polymers are extensively researched in tissue engineering. To successfully fabricate a protein-polymer composite, it is critical to understand how strongly the protein binds to the synthetic polymer, which occurs through protein adsorption. Currently, there is no cost-effective and simple method for characterizing this interfacial binding. To characterize this interfacial binding, we introduce a simple three-step method that involves: 1 synthetic polymer surface characterisation, 2 a quick, inexpensive and robust novel immuno-based assay that uses protein extraction compounds to characterize protein binding strength followed by 3 an in vitro 2D model of cell culture to confirm the results of the immuno-based assay. Fibrinogen, precursor of fibrin, was adsorbed (test protein on three different polymeric surfaces: silicone, poly(acrylic acid-coated silicone and poly(allylamine-coated silicone. Polystyrene surface was used as a reference. Characterisation of the different surfaces revealed different chemistry and roughness. The novel immuno-based assay showed significantly stronger binding of fibrinogen to both poly(acrylic acid and poly(allylamine coated silicone. Finally, cell studies showed that the strength of the interaction between the protein and the polymer had an effect on cell growth. This novel immuno-based assay is a valuable tool in developing composite biomaterials of synthetic and protein-based polymers with the potential to be applied in other fields of research where protein adsorption onto surfaces plays an important role.

  19. Computational design of binding proteins to EGFR domain II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Sup Choi

    Full Text Available We developed a process to produce novel interactions between two previously unrelated proteins. This process selects protein scaffolds and designs protein interfaces that bind to a surface patch of interest on a target protein. Scaffolds with shapes complementary to the target surface patch were screened using an exhaustive computational search of the human proteome and optimized by directed evolution using phage display. This method was applied to successfully design scaffolds that bind to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR domain II, the interface of EGFR dimerization, with high reactivity toward the target surface patch of EGFR domain II. One potential application of these tailor-made protein interactions is the development of therapeutic agents against specific protein targets.

  20. TATA-binding protein and the retinoblastoma gene product bind to overlapping epitopes on c-Myc and adenovirus E1A protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Timmers, H.T.M.; Rustgi, A.K.; Billaud, Marc; Veer, L.J. Van 't; Bernards, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a protein binding assay, we show that the amino-teminal 204 amino acids of the c-Myc protein interact di y with a key component of the basal p tdon factor TFID, the TATA box-binding protein (TBP). Essentialy the same region of the c-Myc protein alo binds the product of the retinoblatoma

  1. Natural history of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushegian Arcady R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S-adenosylmethionine is a source of diverse chemical groups used in biosynthesis and modification of virtually every class of biomolecules. The most notable reaction requiring S-adenosylmethionine, transfer of methyl group, is performed by a large class of enzymes, S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases, which have been the focus of considerable structure-function studies. Evolutionary trajectories of these enzymes, and especially of other classes of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins, nevertheless, remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by computational comparison of sequences and structures of various S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins. Results Two widespread folds, Rossmann fold and TIM barrel, have been repeatedly used in evolution for diverse types of S-adenosylmethionine conversion. There were also cases of recruitment of other relatively common folds for S-adenosylmethionine binding. Several classes of proteins have unique unrelated folds, specialized for just one type of chemistry and unified by the theme of internal domain duplications. In several cases, functional divergence is evident, when evolutionarily related enzymes have changed the mode of binding and the type of chemical transformation of S-adenosylmethionine. There are also instances of functional convergence, when biochemically similar processes are performed by drastically different classes of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins. Comparison of remote sequence similarities and analysis of phyletic patterns suggests that the last universal common ancestor of cellular life had between 10 and 20 S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins from at least 5 fold classes, providing for S-adenosylmethionine formation, polyamine biosynthesis, and methylation of several substrates, including nucleic acids and peptide chain release factor. Conclusion We have observed several novel relationships between families that were not known to be

  2. SCM, the M Protein of Streptococcus canis Binds Immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Simone; Eichhorn, Inga; Kohler, Thomas P; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus canis (SCM) is a virulence factor and serves as a surface-associated receptor with a particular affinity for mini-plasminogen, a cleavage product of the broad-spectrum serine protease plasmin. Here, we report that SCM has an additional high-affinity immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding activity. The ability of a particular S. canis isolate to bind to IgG significantly correlates with a scm-positive phenotype, suggesting a dominant role of SCM as an IgG receptor. Subsequent heterologous expression of SCM in non-IgG binding S. gordonii and Western Blot analysis with purified recombinant SCM proteins confirmed its IgG receptor function. As expected for a zoonotic agent, the SCM-IgG interaction is species-unspecific, with a particular affinity of SCM for IgGs derived from human, cats, dogs, horses, mice, and rabbits, but not from cows and goats. Similar to other streptococcal IgG-binding proteins, the interaction between SCM and IgG occurs via the conserved Fc domain and is, therefore, non-opsonic. Interestingly, the interaction between SCM and IgG-Fc on the bacterial surface specifically prevents opsonization by C1q, which might constitute another anti-phagocytic mechanism of SCM. Extensive binding analyses with a variety of different truncated SCM fragments defined a region of 52 amino acids located in the central part of the mature SCM protein which is important for IgG binding. This binding region is highly conserved among SCM proteins derived from different S. canis isolates but differs significantly from IgG-Fc receptors of S. pyogenes and S. dysgalactiae sub. equisimilis, respectively. In summary, we present an additional role of SCM in the pathogen-host interaction of S. canis. The detailed analysis of the SCM-IgG interaction should contribute to a better understanding of the complex roles of M proteins in streptococcal pathogenesis.

  3. RNA-Binding Proteins in Female Reproductive Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaj, Kasra; Miller, Jessica E; Fenn, Christian R; Ahn, SooHyun; Luna, Rayana L; Symons, Lindsey; Monsanto, Stephany P; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-06-01

    RNA-binding proteins are key regulatory molecules involved primarily in post-transcriptional gene regulation of RNAs. Post-transcriptional gene regulation is critical for adequate cellular growth and survival. Recent reports have shown key interactions between these RNA-binding proteins and other regulatory elements, such as miRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, either enhancing or diminishing their response to RNA stabilization. Many RNA-binding proteins have been reported to play a functional role in mediation of cytokines involved in inflammation and immune dysfunction, and some have been classified as global post-transcriptional regulators of inflammation. The ubiquitous expression of RNA-binding proteins in a wide variety of cell types and their unique mechanisms of degradative action provide evidence that they are involved in reproductive tract pathologies. Aberrant inflammation and immune dysfunction are major contributors to the pathogenesis and disease pathophysiology of many reproductive pathologies, including ovarian and endometrial cancers in the female reproductive tract. Herein, we discuss various RNA-binding proteins and their unique contributions to female reproductive pathologies with a focus on those mediated by aberrant inflammation and immune dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  5. Retinoblastoma-binding Protein 1 Has an Interdigitated Double Tudor Domain with DNA Binding Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-01-01

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10–100 μm; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1. PMID:24379399

  6. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  7. Binding dynamics of single-stranded DNA binding proteins to fluctuating bubbles in breathing DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambjoernsson, Tobias; Metzler, Ralf [NORDITA-Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Oe (Denmark)

    2005-05-25

    We investigate the dynamics of a single local denaturation zone in a DNA molecule, a so-called DNA bubble, in the presence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). In particular, we develop a dynamical description of the process in terms of a two-dimensional master equation for the time evolution of the probability distribution of having a bubble of size m with n bound SSBs, for the case when m and n are the slowest variables in the system. We derive explicit expressions for the equilibrium statistical weights for a given m and n, which depend on the statistical weight u associated with breaking a base-pair interaction, the loop closure exponent c, the cooperativity parameter {sigma}{sub 0}, the SSB size {lambda}, and binding strength {kappa}. These statistical weights determine, through the detailed balance condition, the transfer coefficient in the master equation. For the case of slow and fast binding dynamics the problem can be reduced to one-dimensional master equations. In the latter case, we perform explicitly the adiabatic elimination of the fast variable n. Furthermore, we find that for the case that the loop closure is neglected and the binding dynamics is vanishing (but with arbitrary {sigma}{sub 0}) the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the master equation can be obtained analytically, using an orthogonal polynomial approach. We solve the general case numerically (i.e., including SSB binding and the loop closure) as a function of statistical weight u, binding protein size {lambda}, and binding strength {kappa}, and compare to the fast and slow binding limits. In particular, we find that the presence of SSBs in general increases the relaxation time, compared to the case when no binding proteins are present. By tuning the parameters, we can drive the system from regular bubble fluctuation in the absence of SSBs to full denaturation, reflecting experimental and in vivo situations.

  8. Chromate Binding and Removal by the Molybdate-Binding Protein ModA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpus, Jason; Bosscher, Michael; Ajiboye, Ifedayo; Zhang, Liang; He, Chuan

    2017-04-04

    Effective and cheap methods and techniques for the safe removal of hexavalent chromate from the environment are in increasingly high demand. High concentrations of hexavalent chromate have been shown to have numerous harmful effects on human biology. We show that the E. coli molybdate-binding protein ModA is a genetically encoded tool capable of removing chromate from aqueous solutions. Although previously reported to not bind chromate, we show that ModA binds chromate tightly and is capable of removing chromate to levels well below current US federal standards. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. STRUCTURAL INSIGHT INTO THE FORMIN BINDING PROPERTY OF HUMAN FORMIN BINDING PROTEIN 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Das

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Formin mediated dynamic regulation of actin cytoskeleton is involved in numerous cellular processes, organism growth and development and different diseases. The cellular formin-actin network is further fine tuned by different formin binding proteins (FNBPs. Four such FNBPs which were initially discovered as formin poly proline rich FH1 domain binding; were found to contain tandem WW domains as their formin interacting module. Despite the fact that WW domains are the smallest known protein module that is involved in multi-protein interactions, the interaction of formins and WW domain containing FNBPs were rarely explored and their interactions under physiological contexts became doubtful. However different studies continuously provided indications of greater cellular impacts of these interactions. We have used computational techniques (homology modeling and molecular docking to investigate the ligand binding, especially formin binding properties of human FNBP4 WW domains. We have found that the triple β sheet structure of the 1st WW domain of FNBP4 can bind to the proline rich FH1 region of formin mDia1. However the FNBP4 second WW domain was found to be unable to bind to mDia1 FH1 region. Detailed investigation showed the importance of sequence variations of FNBP4 WW domains in specifying their interactions with formins

  10. Interactome-Wide Prediction of Protein-Protein Binding Sites Reveals Effects of Protein Sequence Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentim, F.L.; Neven, F.; Boyen, P.; Dijk, van A.D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The specificity of protein-protein interactions is encoded in those parts of the sequence that compose the binding interface. Therefore, understanding how changes in protein sequence influence interaction specificity, and possibly the phenotype, requires knowing the location of binding sites in

  11. Solvation structure of ice-binding antifreeze proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wettlaufer, John

    2009-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can be found in organisms which survive at subzero temperatures. They were first discovered in polar fishes since the 1950's [1] and have been isolated meanwhile also from insects, plants, and bacteria. While AFPs shift the freezing point of water below the bulk melting point and hence can prevent recrystallization; the effect is non-colligative and there is a pronounced hysteresis between freezing and melting. For many AFPs it is generally accepted that they function through an irreversible binding to the ice-water interface which leads to a piecewise convex growth front with a lower nonequilibrium freezing point due to the Kelvin effect. Recent molecular dynamics simulations of the AFP from Choristoneura fumiferana reveal that the solvation structures of water at ice-binding and non-ice-binding faces of the protein are crucial for understanding how the AFP binds to the ice surface and how it is protected from being overgrown [2]. We use density functional theory of classical fluids in order to assess the microscopic solvent structure in the vicinity of protein faces with different surface properties. With our method, binding energies of different protein faces to the water-ice-interface can be computed efficiently in a simplified model. [1] Y. Yeh and R.E. Feeney, Chem. Rev. 96, 601 (1996). [2] D.R. Nutt and J.C. Smith, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 13066 (2008).

  12. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  13. TAK1-binding protein 1 is a pseudophosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Sarah H.; Kular, Gursant; Peggie, Mark; Shepherd, Sharon; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W.; Cohen, Philip; Van Aalten, Daan M. F.

    2006-01-01

    TAB1 [TAK1 (transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1)-binding protein 1] is one of the regulatory subunits of TAK1, a protein kinase that lies at the head of three pro-inflammatory kinase cascades. In the current study we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of TAB1. Surprisingly, TAB1 possesses a fold closely related to that of the PPM (Mg2+- or Mn2+-dependent protein phosphatase) family as demonstrated by the close structural similarity with protein phosphatase 2Cα. However, we were unable to detect any phosphatase activity for TAB1 using a phosphopeptide or p-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrate. Although the overall protein phosphatase 2Cα fold is conserved in TAB1, detailed structural analyses and mutagenesis studies show that several key residues required for dual metal-binding and catalysis are not present in TAB1, although binding of a single metal is supported by soaking experiments with manganese and isothermal titration calorimetry. Thus, it appears that TAB1 is a ‘pseudophosphatase’, possibly binding to and regulating accessibility of phosphorylated residues on substrates downstream of TAK1 or on the TAK1 complex itself. PMID:16879102

  14. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-07-11

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses.

  15. RBPPred: predicting RNA-binding proteins from sequence using SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Shiyong

    2017-03-15

    Detection of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) is essential since the RNA-binding proteins play critical roles in post-transcriptional regulation and have diverse roles in various biological processes. Moreover, identifying RBPs by computational prediction is much more efficient than experimental methods and may have guiding significance on the experiment design. In this study, we present the RBPPred (an RNA-binding protein predictor), a new method based on the support vector machine, to predict whether a protein binds RNAs, based on a comprehensive feature representation. By integrating the physicochemical properties with the evolutionary information of protein sequences, the new approach RBPPred performed much better than state-of-the-art methods. The results show that RBPPred correctly predicted 83% of 2780 RBPs and 96% out of 7093 non-RBPs with MCC of 0.808 using the 10-fold cross validation. Furthermore, we achieved a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 97% and MCC of 0.788 on the testing set of human proteome. In addition we tested the capability of RBPPred to identify new RBPs, which further confirmed the practicability and predictability of the method. RBPPred program can be accessed at: http://rnabinding.com/RBPPred.html . liushiyong@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Lamins and lamin-binding proteins in functional chromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotzmann, J; Foisner, R

    1999-01-01

    Lamins are the major components of the nuclear lamina, a two-dimensional filamentous network at the periphery of the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, directly underlying the inner nuclear membrane. Several integral proteins of the inner nuclear membrane bind to lamins and may link the nuclear membrane to the core lamina network. The lamins and the lamin-binding proteins lamina-associated polypeptide (LAP)2beta and lamin B receptor (LBR) have been described to bind to DNA or to interact with chromatin via histones, BAF-1, and HP1 chromodomain proteins, respectively, and may provide anchorage sites for chromatin fibers at the nuclear periphery. In addition, lamin A structures on intranuclear filaments, or lamin B in replication foci have been described in the nuclear interior, but their specific roles remain unclear. An isoform of the LAP2 protein family, LAP2alpha, has been found to colocalize with A-type lamins in the nucleoplasm and might be involved in intranuclear structure organization. In the course of cell-cycle-dependent dynamics of the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, lamins as well as lamin-binding proteins seem to possess important functions during various steps of post-mitotic nuclear reassembly, including cross-linking of chromatides, nuclear membrane targeting, nuclear lamina assembly, and the formation of a replication-competent nucleus.

  17. Selectivity determinants of GPCR-G-protein binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flock, Tilman; Hauser, Alexander S; Lund, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The selective coupling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to specific G proteins is critical to trigger the appropriate physiological response. However, the determinants of selective binding have remained elusive. Here we reveal the existence of a selectivity barcode (that is, patterns of amino...... of the G-protein barcode through distinct residues, like multiple keys (receptors) opening the same lock (G protein) using non-identical cuts. Considering the evolutionary history of GPCRs allows the identification of these selectivity-determining residues. These findings lay the foundation...

  18. Tritium NMR spectroscopy of ligand binding to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, K.; Williams, P.G.; Pelton, J.G.; Morimoto, H.; Wemmer, D.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-06-04

    Tritium-labeled {alpha}- and {beta}-maltodextrins have been used to study their complexes with maltose-binding protein (MBP), a 40-kDa bacterial protein. Five substrates, from maltose to maltohexaose, were labeled at their reducing ends and their binding studied. Tritium NMR specctroscopy of the labeled sugars showed large upfield chamical shift changes upon binding and strong anomeric specficity. At 10{degrees}C, MBP bound {alpha}-maltose with 2.7 {plus minus} 0.5-fold higher affinity than {beta}-maltose, and, for longer maltodextrins, the ratio of affinities was even larger. The maximum chemical shift change was 2.2 ppm, suggesting that the reducing end of bound {alpha}-maltodextrin makes close contact with an aromatic residue in the MBP-binding site. Experiments with maltotriose (and longer maltodextrins) also revealed the presence of two bound {beta}-maltotriose resonances in rapid exchange. The authors interpret these two resonances as arising from two distinct sugar-protein complexes. In one complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by its reducing end, and, in the other complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by the middle glucose residue(s). This interpretation also suggests how MBP is able to bind both linear and circular maltodextrins.

  19. Structure of Osh3 reveals a conserved mode of phosphoinositide binding in oxysterol-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Yang, Hongyuan; Eom, Soo Hyun; Im, Young Jun

    2013-07-02

    The oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related proteins (ORPs) are conserved from yeast to humans, and implicated in the regulation of lipid homeostasis and in signaling pathways. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has seven ORPs (Osh1-Osh7) that share one unknown essential function. Here, we report the 1.5-2.3 Å structures of the PH domain and ORD (OSBP-related domain) of yeast Osh3 in apo-form or in complex with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI[4]P). Osh3 recognizes PI(4)P by the highly conserved residues in the tunnel of ORD whereas it lacks sterol binding due to the narrow hydrophobic tunnel. Yeast complementation tests suggest that PI(4)P binding to PH and ORD is essential for function. This study suggests that the unifying feature in all ORP homologs is the binding of PI(4)P to ORD and sterol binding is additional to certain homologs. Structural modeling of full-length Osh3 is consistent with the concept that Osh3 is a lipid transfer protein or regulator in membrane contact sites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasmonic nanosensors for simultaneous quantification of multiple protein-protein binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahijado-Guzmán, Rubén; Prasad, Janak; Rosman, Christina; Henkel, Andreas; Tome, Lydia; Schneider, Dirk; Rivas, Germán; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2014-10-08

    Most of current techniques used for the quantification of protein-protein interactions require the analysis of one pair of binding partners at a time. Herein we present a label-free, simple, fast, and cost-effective route to characterize binding affinities between multiple macromolecular partners simultaneously, using optical dark-field spectroscopy and individual protein-functionalized gold nanorods as sensing elements. Our NanoSPR method could easily become a simple and standard tool in biological, biochemical, and medical laboratories.

  1. Fluorescence properties of porcine odorant binding protein Trp 16 residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albani, Jihad Rene, E-mail: Jihad-Rene.Albani@univ-lille1.f [Laboratoire de Biophysique Moleculaire, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15

    Summary: The present work deals with fluorescence studies of adult porcine odorant binding protein at pH=7.5. At this pH, the protein is a dimer, each monomer contains one tryptophan residue. Our results show that tryptophan residue displays significant motions and emits with three fluorescence lifetimes. Decay associated spectra showed that the three lifetime's components emanate from sub-structures surrounded by the same microenvironment.

  2. Cooperative interactions between odorant-binding proteins of Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Huili; He, Xiaoli; Schymura, Danuta; Ban, Liping; Field, Linda; Dani, Francesca Romana; Michelucci, Elena; Caputo, Beniamino; della Torre, Alessandra; Iatrou, Kostas; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Krieger, Jürgen; Pelosi, Paolo

    2011-05-01

    To understand olfactory discrimination in Anopheles gambiae, we made six purified recombinant OBPs and investigated their ligand-binding properties. All OBPs were expressed in bacteria with additional production of OBP47 in the yeast Kluveromyces lactis. Ligand-binding experiments, performed with a diverse set of organic compounds, revealed marked differences between the OBPs. Using the fluorescent probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine, we also measured the binding curves for binary mixtures of OBPs and obtained, in some cases, unexpected behaviour, which could only be explained by the OBPs forming heterodimers with binding characteristics different from those of the component proteins. This shows that OBPs in mosquitoes can form complexes with novel ligand specificities, thus amplifying the repertoire of OBPs and the number of semiochemicals that can be discriminated. Confirmation of the likely role of heterodimers was demonstrated by in situ hybridisation, suggesting that OBP1 and OBP4 are co-expressed in some antennal sensilla of A. gambiae.

  3. RNA Bind-n-Seq: quantitative assessment of the sequence and structural binding specificity of RNA binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nicole; Robertson, Alex; Jangi, Mohini; McGeary, Sean; Sharp, Phillip A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Specific protein-RNA interactions guide post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here we describe RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS), a method that comprehensively characterizes sequence and structural specificity of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), and its application to the developmental alternative splicing factors RBFOX2, CELF1/CUGBP1 and MBNL1. For each factor, we recovered both canonical motifs and additional near-optimal binding motifs. RNA secondary structure inhibits binding of RBFOX2 and CELF1, while MBNL1 favors unpaired Us but tolerates C/G pairing in motifs containing UGC and/or GCU. Dissociation constants calculated from RBNS data using a novel algorithm correlated highly with values measured by surface plasmon resonance. Motifs identified by RBNS were conserved, were bound and active in vivo, and distinguished the subset of motifs enriched by CLIP-Seq that had regulatory activity. Together, our data demonstrate that RBNS complements crosslinking-based methods and show that in vivo binding and activity of these splicing factors is driven largely by intrinsic RNA affinity. PMID:24837674

  4. Flexibility of PCNA-protein interface accommodates differential binding partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedley, Anthony M; Lill, Markus A; Davisson, V Jo

    2014-01-01

    The expanding roles of PCNA in functional assembly of DNA replication and repair complexes motivated investigation of the structural and dynamic properties guiding specificity of PCNA-protein interactions. A series of biochemical and computational analyses were combined to evaluate the PIP Box recognition features impacting complex formation. The results indicate subtle differences in topological and molecular descriptors distinguishing both affinity and stoichiometry of binding among PCNA-peptide complexes through cooperative effects. These features were validated using peptide mimics of p85α and Akt, two previously unreported PCNA binding partners. This study characterizes for the first time a reverse PIP Box interaction with PCNA. Small molecule ligand binding at the PIP Box interaction site confirmed the adaptive nature of the protein in dictating overall shape and implicates allosterism in transmitting biological effects.

  5. Flexibility of PCNA-protein interface accommodates differential binding partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M Pedley

    Full Text Available The expanding roles of PCNA in functional assembly of DNA replication and repair complexes motivated investigation of the structural and dynamic properties guiding specificity of PCNA-protein interactions. A series of biochemical and computational analyses were combined to evaluate the PIP Box recognition features impacting complex formation. The results indicate subtle differences in topological and molecular descriptors distinguishing both affinity and stoichiometry of binding among PCNA-peptide complexes through cooperative effects. These features were validated using peptide mimics of p85α and Akt, two previously unreported PCNA binding partners. This study characterizes for the first time a reverse PIP Box interaction with PCNA. Small molecule ligand binding at the PIP Box interaction site confirmed the adaptive nature of the protein in dictating overall shape and implicates allosterism in transmitting biological effects.

  6. T3: Targeted Proteomics of DNA-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagore, Linda I.; Jarrett, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    A technique that allows the inclusion of a specific DNA to enrich and direct proteomic identification of transcription factors (TF) while providing a route for high throughput screening on a single platform would be valuable in investigations of gene expression and regulation. Polyvinylpyrrolidone binds DNA avidly while binding negligible amounts of protein. This observation is used in a proof-of-concept method to enrich for TF by combining nuclear extract with a specific DNA sequence and immobilizing the DNA-protein complex on a PVP-coated MALDI plate. Any unbound proteins are washed away and further processed for analysis in a MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometer. Enrichment on a PVP-coated plate gives the unique advantage of purification, enzymatic digestion and analysis on a single platform. The method is termed T3 as it combines Targeted purification on a Target plate with Targeted proteomics. Validation was achieved in model experiments with a chimeric fusion protein, green fluorescent protein-CAAT enhancer binding protein (GFP-C/EBP) with an oligonucleotide containing the CAAT sequence. Both domains were identified with an expectation value of less than 10−15 and over 15% sequence coverage. The same oligonucleotide mixed with HEK293 cell nuclear extract allowed the unambiguous identification of native human C/EBP alpha with 24.3% sequence coverage. PMID:25644705

  7. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    The transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, ...

  8. Genome-wide regulation of TATA-binding protein activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werven, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription, the synthesis of RNA from a DNA template, is a well-controlled process. TATA binding protein (TBP) recruitment to promoters is essential for transcription by all three RNA polymerases, and often is the rate-limiting step of transcription initiation. TBP is incorporated into different

  9. Controlling transcription fidelity via TATA-binding protein dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription underlies all cellular processes and responses to internal and external cues. Deregulation of transcription has implications for the fitness of the cell or organism. During my PhD I have investigated the importance of proper TATA-binding protein (TBP) regulation as a mechanism to

  10. QSAR models for the prediction of plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafourian, Taravat; Amin, Zeshan

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of plasma protein binding (ppb) is of paramount importance in the pharmacokinetics characterization of drugs, as it causes significant changes in volume of distribution, clearance and drug half life. This study utilized Quantitative Structure - Activity Relationships (QSAR) for the prediction of plasma protein binding. Protein binding values for 794 compounds were collated from literature. The data was partitioned into a training set of 662 compounds and an external validation set of 132 compounds. Physicochemical and molecular descriptors were calculated for each compound using ACD labs/logD, MOE (Chemical Computing Group) and Symyx QSAR software packages. Several data mining tools were employed for the construction of models. These included stepwise regression analysis, Classification and Regression Trees (CART), Boosted trees and Random Forest. Several predictive models were identified; however, one model in particular produced significantly superior prediction accuracy for the external validation set as measured using mean absolute error and correlation coefficient. The selected model was a boosted regression tree model which had the mean absolute error for training set of 13.25 and for validation set of 14.96. Plasma protein binding can be modeled using simple regression trees or multiple linear regressions with reasonable model accuracies. These interpretable models were able to identify the governing molecular factors for a high ppb that included hydrophobicity, van der Waals surface area parameters, and aromaticity. On the other hand, the more complicated ensemble method of boosted regression trees produced the most accurate ppb estimations for the external validation set.

  11. Capacitance-modulated transistor detects odorant binding protein chiral interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Mohammad Yusuf; Tuccori, Elena; Magliulo, Maria; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Palazzo, Gerardo; Persaud, Krishna; Torsi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral events in olfaction involve odorant binding proteins (OBPs) whose role in the recognition of different volatile chemicals is yet unclear. Here we report on the sensitive and quantitative measurement of the weak interactions associated with neutral enantiomers differentially binding to OBPs immobilized through a self-assembled monolayer to the gate of an organic bio-electronic transistor. The transduction is remarkably sensitive as the transistor output current is governed by the small capacitance of the protein layer undergoing minute changes as the ligand-protein complex is formed. Accurate determination of the free-energy balances and of the capacitance changes associated with the binding process allows derivation of the free-energy components as well as of the occurrence of conformational events associated with OBP ligand binding. Capacitance-modulated transistors open a new pathway for the study of ultra-weak molecular interactions in surface-bound protein-ligand complexes through an approach that combines bio-chemical and electronic thermodynamic parameters.

  12. Immunoglobulin classes, metal binding proteins, and trace metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , IgA and IgM), metal binding proteins (Transferrin, Caeruloplasmin, Alpha-2- Macroglobulin and Haptoglobin) and nutritionally essential trace metals/heavy metals (Zn, Fe, Se, Cu, Mg, Cd and Pb) in Nigerian cassava processors using single ...

  13. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1

  14. Sampling and energy evaluation challenges in ligand binding protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jiayi; Doyle, Lindsey; Jr Greisen, Per; Schena, Alberto; Park, Hahnbeom; Johnsson, Kai; Stoddard, Barry L; Baker, David

    2017-12-01

    The steroid hormone 17α-hydroxylprogesterone (17-OHP) is a biomarker for congenital adrenal hyperplasia and hence there is considerable interest in development of sensors for this compound. We used computational protein design to generate protein models with binding sites for 17-OHP containing an extended, nonpolar, shape-complementary binding pocket for the four-ring core of the compound, and hydrogen bonding residues at the base of the pocket to interact with carbonyl and hydroxyl groups at the more polar end of the ligand. Eight of 16 designed proteins experimentally tested bind 17-OHP with micromolar affinity. A co-crystal structure of one of the designs revealed that 17-OHP is rotated 180° around a pseudo-two-fold axis in the compound and displays multiple binding modes within the pocket, while still interacting with all of the designed residues in the engineered site. Subsequent rounds of mutagenesis and binding selection improved the ligand affinity to nanomolar range, while appearing to constrain the ligand to a single bound conformation that maintains the same "flipped" orientation relative to the original design. We trace the discrepancy in the design calculations to two sources: first, a failure to model subtle backbone changes which alter the distribution of sidechain rotameric states and second, an underestimation of the energetic cost of desolvating the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of the ligand. The difference between design model and crystal structure thus arises from both sampling limitations and energy function inaccuracies that are exacerbated by the near two-fold symmetry of the molecule. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  15. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y

    1990-01-01

    the highly conserved 60 amino acid homeodomain. This peptide antiserum recognized a protein species of molecular weight 63,000 in immunoblots of nuclear extracts obtained from several tumor cell lines. The predominant molecular weight 63,000 nuclear protein recognized by the peptide antiserum...... the same patients exhibited little immunoreactivity. Both the peptide antiserum and the polyclonal antiserum against the native protein immunoblotted a molecular weight 63,000 protein in nuclear extracts of tumor tissue, but not significantly in extracts of normal tissue. At the molecular level......Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from...

  16. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein in neutrophilic leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, P L; Heremans, J F; Schonne, E

    1969-09-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein previously shown to occur in many external secretions, is identified as one of the major proteins present in human and guinea pig neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The identification of this protein in leukocyte extracts was based upon a comparison of its electrophoretic, antigenic, and iron-combining properties with the corresponding properties of the same protein isolated from human and guinea pig milk. Immunochemical quantitations showed that lactoferrin occurs in human neutrophilic leukocytes at the concentration of 3 microg per 10(6) cells. Tissue cultures from guinea pig bone marrow and spleen actively synthesized the protein, as shown both by net production of lactoferrin and incorporation of labeled amino acids into the protein. Immunohistochemical data indicate that lactoferrin first appears in myeloid cells at the stage of the promyelocyte.

  17. Lead(II) Binding in Natural and Artificial Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangelosi, Virginia; Ruckthong, Leela; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2017-04-10

    This article describes recent attempts to understand the biological chemistry of lead using a synthetic biology approach. Lead binds to a variety of different biomolecules ranging from enzymes to regulatory and signaling proteins to bone matrix. We have focused on the interactions of this element in thiolate-rich sites that are found in metalloregulatory proteins such as Pbr, Znt, and CadC and in enzymes such as δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD). In these proteins, Pb(II) is often found as a homoleptic and hemidirectic Pb(II)(SR)3- complex. Using first principles of biophysics, we have developed relatively short peptides that can associate into three-stranded coiled coils (3SCCs), in which a cysteine group is incorporated into the hydrophobic core to generate a (cysteine)3 binding site. We describe how lead may be sequestered into these sites, the characteristic spectral features may be observed for such systems and we provide crystallographic insight on metal binding. The Pb(II)(SR)3- that is revealed within these α-helical assemblies forms a trigonal pyramidal structure (having an endo orientation) with distinct conformations than are also found in natural proteins (having an exo conformation). This structural insight, combined with 207Pb NMR spectroscopy, suggests that while Pb(II) prefers hemidirected Pb(II)(SR)3- scaffolds regardless of the protein fold, the way this is achieved within α-helical systems is different than in β-sheet or loop regions of proteins. These interactions between metal coordination preference and protein structural preference undoubtedly are exploited in natural systems to allow for protein conformation changes that define function. Thus, using a design approach that separates the numerous factors that lead to stable natural proteins allows us to extract fundamental concepts on how metals behave in biological systems.

  18. Treponema pallidum receptor binding proteins interact with fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, K.M.; Baseman, J.B.; Alderete, J.F.

    1983-06-01

    Analysis of plasma proteins avidly bound to T. pallidum surfaces revealed the ability of T. pallidum to acquire numerous host macromolecules. No acquisition was evident by the avirulent spirochete, T. phagedenis biotype Reiter. Western blotting technology using hyperimmune antifibronectin serum as a probe revealed the ability of virulent treponemes to avidly bind fibronectin from a complex medium such as plasma. The specificity of the tiplike adherence of motile T. pallidum to fibronectin-coated glass surfaces and to fibronectin on HEp-2 cells was reinforced by the observation that pretreatment of coverslips or cell monolayers with monospecific antiserum against fibronectin substantially reduced T. pallidum attachment. The stoichiometric binding of T. pallidum to fibronectin-coated coverslips and the inability of unlabeled or /sup 35/S-radiolabeled treponemes to interact with glass surfaces treated with other plasma proteins further established the specific nature of the interaction between virulent T. pallidum and fibronectin. The avid association between three outer envelope proteins of T. pallidum and fibronectin was also demonstrated. These treponemal surface proteins have been previously identified as putative receptor-binding proteins responsible for T. pallidum parasitism of host cells. The data suggest that surface fibronectin mediates tip-oriented attachment of T. pallidum to host cells via a receptor-ligand mechanism of recognition.

  19. TAK1-binding protein 1 is a pseudophosphatase

    OpenAIRE

    Conner, Sarah H; Kular, Gursant; Peggie, Mark; Shepherd, Sharon; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W; Cohen, Philip; van Aalten, Daan M.F.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract TAB1 (TAK1-binding protein 1) is one of the regulatory subunits of TGF{beta}-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), a protein kinase that lies at the head of three pro-inflammatory kinase cascades. Here we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of TAB1. Surprisingly, TAB1 possesses a fold closely related to that of the PPM phosphatase family as demonstrated by the close structural similarity with protein phosphatase 2C{alpha}. However, we were unable to detect any phosp...

  20. Engineering periplasmic ligand binding proteins as glucose nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance J. Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes affects over 100 million people worldwide. Better methods for monitoring blood glucose levels are needed for improving disease management. Several labs have previously made glucose nanosensors by modifying members of the periplasmic ligand binding protein superfamily. This minireview summarizes recent developments in constructing new versions of these proteins that are responsive within the physiological range of blood glucose levels, employ new reporter groups, and/or are more robust. These experiments are important steps in the development of novel proteins that have the characteristics needed for an implantable glucose nanosensor for diabetes management: specificity for glucose, rapid response, sensitivity within the physiological range of glucose concentrations, reproducibility, and robustness.

  1. New fluorescent probes for ligand-binding assays of odorant-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiacomo, Rosa; Iovinella, Immacolata; Napolitano, Elio

    2014-03-28

    Fluorescence-linked binding assays allow determination of dissociation constants at equilibrium and have recently become increasingly popular, thanks to their ease of operation. Currently used probes, such as 1-aminoanthracene and N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine, are excited and emit in the ultraviolet region, but alternative ligands operating in the visible spectrum would be highly desirable for applications in biosensing devices. Based on the two above structures, we have designed and synthesised six new fluorescent probes to be used in ligand-binding assays. The compounds are derivatives of naphatalene, anthracene and fluoranthene and present two aromatic moieties linked by an amine nitrogen. We have measured the emission spectra of the new probes and their binding to three odorant-binding proteins. The probes bind the tested proteins with different affinities, generally with dissociation constants about one order of magnitude lower than the parent compounds. The extended aromatic systems present in the new compounds produced a shift of both excitation and emission peaks at higher wavelength, close or within the visible spectrum, thus facilitating measurements in biosensors for odorants and small organic molecules using optical devices. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Thermal unfolding of a Ca- and Lanthanide-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Goettfert, M. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Knoeppel, J.

    2017-06-01

    The MIIA (metal ion-induced autocleavage)-domain of the protein Vic001052 from the pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus, comprises 173 amino acids and exhibits Ca-dependent autoproteolytic activity. It shows homology to nodulation proteins which are secreted by Rhizobiacea into plant host cells where they exert Ca-dependent functions. We have studied the structural and energetic aspects of metal protein interactions of the MIIA domain which appear attractive for engineering metal-binding synthetic peptides. Using a non-cleavable MIIA domain construct, we detected very similar structural changes upon binding to Ca{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+}. The thermal denaturation of the Ca-bound state was studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The metal-bound folded state unfolds reversibly into an unstructured metal-free state similar to the metal-free state at room temperature.

  3. Factors Affecting the Binding of a Recombinant Heavy Metal-Binding Domain (CXXC motif) Protein to Heavy Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Kamala Boonyodying; Thanakorn Watcharasupat; Waranan Yotpanya; Thawatchai Kitti; Wanna Kawang; Duangkamol Kunthalert; Sutthirat Sitthisak

    2012-01-01

    A number of heavy metal-binding proteins have been used to study bioremediation. CXXC motif, a metal binding domain containing Cys-X-X-Cys motif, has been identified in various organisms. These proteins are capable of binding various types of heavy metals. In this study, heavy metal binding domain (CXXC motif) recombinant protein encoded from mcsA gene of S. aureus were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The factors involved in the metal-binding activity were determined in order to...

  4. Protein-folding location can regulate manganese-binding versus copper- or zinc-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottey, Steve; Waldron, Kevin J; Firbank, Susan J; Reale, Brian; Bessant, Conrad; Sato, Katsuko; Cheek, Timothy R; Gray, Joe; Banfield, Mark J; Dennison, Christopher; Robinson, Nigel J

    2008-10-23

    Metals are needed by at least one-quarter of all proteins. Although metallochaperones insert the correct metal into some proteins, they have not been found for the vast majority, and the view is that most metalloproteins acquire their metals directly from cellular pools. However, some metals form more stable complexes with proteins than do others. For instance, as described in the Irving-Williams series, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) typically form more stable complexes than Mn(2+). Thus it is unclear what cellular mechanisms manage metal acquisition by most nascent proteins. To investigate this question, we identified the most abundant Cu(2+)-protein, CucA (Cu(2+)-cupin A), and the most abundant Mn(2+)-protein, MncA (Mn(2+)-cupin A), in the periplasm of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Each of these newly identified proteins binds its respective metal via identical ligands within a cupin fold. Consistent with the Irving-Williams series, MncA only binds Mn(2+) after folding in solutions containing at least a 10(4) times molar excess of Mn(2+) over Cu(2+) or Zn(2+). However once MncA has bound Mn(2+), the metal does not exchange with Cu(2+). MncA and CucA have signal peptides for different export pathways into the periplasm, Tat and Sec respectively. Export by the Tat pathway allows MncA to fold in the cytoplasm, which contains only tightly bound copper or Zn(2+) (refs 10-12) but micromolar Mn(2+) (ref. 13). In contrast, CucA folds in the periplasm to acquire Cu(2+). These results reveal a mechanism whereby the compartment in which a protein folds overrides its binding preference to control its metal content. They explain why the cytoplasm must contain only tightly bound and buffered copper and Zn(2+).

  5. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  6. Circulating insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4) is not regulated by parathyroid hormone and vitamin D in vivo: evidence from children with rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereket, Abdullah; Cesur, Yaşar; Özkan, Behzat; Adal, Erdal; Turan, Serap; Onan, Sertaç Hanedan; Döneray, Hakan; Akçay, Teoman; Haklar, Goncagül

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4), inhibits IGF actions under a variety of experimental conditions. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1.25-hydroxy(OH)vitamin D, IGF-I, IGF-II and transforming growth factor (TGF)-b are the major regulators of IGFBP-4 production in vitro. However, little is known about the in vivo regulation of circulating IGFBP-4 in humans. We measured serum concentrations of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), PTH, vitamin D, IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-4 in infants (n=22) with nutritional rickets before and after treatment of rickets with vitamin D (300 000 U single dose po). The mean±SD age of the patients was 1.3±1.6 years (range 0.2-3). Serum Ca and P increased, whereas ALP and PTH decreased after treatment (Ca from 6.6±1.4 to 9.5±1.6 mg/dL, P from 3.9±1.4 to 5.4±0.8 mg/dL, ALP from 2590±2630 to 1072±776 IU/mL and PTH from 407±248 to 27.4±20.8 ng/dL, respectively). Vitamin D levels were low (7.8±2.5 ng/mL) and increased after treatment (18.1±4.0 ng/mL, prickets since IGFBP-4 levels did not change after normalization of PTH with vitamin D treatment.

  7. Milk proteins interact with goat Binder of SPerm (BSP) proteins and decrease their binding to sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Erika Bezerra; van Tilburg, Mauricio; Plante, Geneviève; de Oliveira, Rodrigo V; Moura, Arlindo A; Manjunath, Puttaswamy

    2016-11-01

    Seminal plasma Binder of SPerm (BSP) proteins bind to sperm at ejaculation and promote capacitation. When in excess, however, BSP proteins damage the sperm membrane. It has been suggested that milk components of semen extenders associate with BSP proteins, potentially protecting sperm. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate if milk proteins interact with BSP proteins and reduce BSP binding to goat sperm. Using gel filtration chromatography, milk was incubated with goat seminal plasma proteins and loaded onto columns with and without calcium. Milk was also fractionated into parts containing mostly whey proteins or mostly caseins, incubated with seminal plasma proteins and subjected to gel filtration. Eluted fractions were evaluated by immunoblot using anti-goat BSP antibodies, confirming milk protein-BSP protein interactions. As determined by ELISA, milk proteins coated on polystyrene wells bound to increasing of goat BSP proteins. Far-western dot blots confirmed that BSP proteins bound to caseins and β-lactoglobulin in a concentration-dependent manner. Then, cauda epididymal sperm from five goats was incubated with seminal plasma; seminal plasma followed by milk; and milk followed by seminal plasma. Sperm membrane proteins were extracted and evaluated by immunoblotting. The pattern of BSP binding to sperm membrane proteins was reduced by 59.3 % when epididymal sperm were incubated with seminal plasma and then with skimmed milk (p sperm were treated with milk followed by seminal plasma, coating of sperm with BSP proteins was not significantly reduced (57.6 %; p > 0.05). In conclusion, goat BSP proteins have an affinity for caseins and whey proteins. Milk reduces BSP binding to goat sperm, depending whether or not sperm had been previously exposed to seminal plasma. Such events may explain the protective effect of milk during goat sperm preservation.

  8. Physicochemical characteristics of structurally determined metabolite-protein and drug-protein binding events with respect to binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To better understand and ultimately predict both the metabolic activities as well as the signaling functions of metabolites, a detailed understanding of the physical interactions of metabolites with proteins is highly desirable. Focusing in particular on protein binding specificity vs. promiscuity, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the physicochemical properties of compound-protein binding events as reported in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We compared the molecular and structural characteristics obtained for metabolites to those of the well-studied interactions of drug compounds with proteins. Promiscuously binding metabolites and drugs are characterized by low molecular weight and high structural flexibility. Unlike reported for drug compounds, low rather than high hydrophobicity appears associated, albeit weakly, with promiscuous binding for the metabolite set investigated in this study. Across several physicochemical properties, drug compounds exhibit characteristic binding propensities that are distinguishable from those associated with metabolites. Prediction of target diversity and compound promiscuity using physicochemical properties was possible at modest accuracy levels only, but was consistently better for drugs than for metabolites. Compound properties capturing structural flexibility and hydrogen-bond formation descriptors proved most informative in PLS-based prediction models. With regard to diversity of enzymatic activities of the respective metabolite target enzymes, the metabolites benzylsuccinate, hypoxanthine, trimethylamine N-oxide, oleoylglycerol, and resorcinol showed very narrow process involvement, while glycine, imidazole, tryptophan, succinate, and glutathione were identified to possess broad enzymatic reaction scopes. Promiscuous metabolites were found to mainly serve as general energy currency compounds, but were identified to also be involved in signaling processes and to appear in diverse organismal systems (digestive and nervous

  9. Physicochemical characteristics of structurally determined metabolite-protein and drug-protein binding events with respect to binding specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To better understand and ultimately predict both the metabolic activities as well as the signaling functions of metabolites, a detailed understanding of the physical interactions of metabolites with proteins is highly desirable. Focusing in particular on protein binding specificity vs. promiscuity, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the physicochemical properties of compound-protein binding events as reported in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We compared the molecular and structural characteristics obtained for metabolites to those of the well-studied interactions of drug compounds with proteins. Promiscuously binding metabolites and drugs are characterized by low molecular weight and high structural flexibility. Unlike reported for drug compounds, low rather than high hydrophobicity appears associated, albeit weakly, with promiscuous binding for the metabolite set investigated in this study. Across several physicochemical properties, drug compounds exhibit characteristic binding propensities that are distinguishable from those associated with metabolites. Prediction of target diversity and compound promiscuity using physicochemical properties was possible at modest accuracy levels only, but was consistently better for drugs than for metabolites. Compound properties capturing structural flexibility and hydrogen-bond formation descriptors proved most informative in PLS-based prediction models. With regard to diversity of enzymatic activities of the respective metabolite target enzymes, the metabolites benzylsuccinate, hypoxanthine, trimethylamine N-oxide, oleoylglycerol, and resorcinol showed very narrow process involvement, while glycine, imidazole, tryptophan, succinate, and glutathione were identified to possess broad enzymatic reaction scopes. Promiscuous metabolites were found to mainly serve as general energy currency compounds, but were identified to also be involved in signaling processes and to appear in diverse organismal systems (digestive and nervous

  10. ASC Pyrin Domain Self-associates and Binds NLRP3 Protein Using Equivalent Binding Interfaces *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroz, Javier; Barrera-Vilarmau, Susana; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; de Alba, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Death domain superfamily members typically act as adaptors mediating in the assembly of supramolecular complexes with critical apoptosis and inflammation functions. These modular proteins consist of death domains, death effector domains, caspase recruitment domains, and pyrin domains (PYD). Despite the high structural similarity among them, only homotypic interactions participate in complex formation, suggesting that subtle factors differentiate each interaction type. It is thus critical to identify these factors as an essential step toward the understanding of the molecular basis of apoptosis and inflammation. The proteins apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) and NLRP3 play key roles in the regulation of apoptosis and inflammation through self-association and protein-protein interactions mediated by their PYDs. To better understand the molecular basis of their function, we have characterized ASC and NLRP3 PYD self-association and their intermolecular interaction by solution NMR spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation. We found that ASC self-associates and binds NLRP3 PYD through equivalent protein regions, with higher binding affinity for the latter. These regions are located at opposite sides of the protein allowing multimeric complex formation previously shown in ASC PYD fibril assemblies. We show that NLRP3 PYD coexists in solution as a monomer and highly populated large-order oligomerized species. Despite this, we determined its monomeric three-dimensional solution structure by NMR and characterized its binding to ASC PYD. Using our novel structural data, we propose molecular models of ASC·ASC and ASC·NLRP3 PYD early supramolecular complexes, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome and apoptosis signaling. PMID:27432880

  11. Yersinia enterocolitica serum resistance proteins YadA and ail bind the complement regulator C4b-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa Kirjavainen

    Full Text Available Many pathogens are equipped with factors providing resistance against the bactericidal action of complement. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Gram-negative enteric pathogen with invasive properties, efficiently resists the deleterious action of human complement. The major Y. enterocolitica serum resistance determinants include outer membrane proteins YadA and Ail. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS O-antigen (O-ag and outer core (OC do not contribute directly to complement resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible mechanism whereby Y. enterocolitica could inhibit the antibody-mediated classical pathway of complement activation. We show that Y. enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:8, and O:9 bind C4b-binding protein (C4bp, an inhibitor of both the classical and lectin pathways of complement. To identify the C4bp receptors on Y. enterocolitica serotype O:3 surface, a set of mutants expressing YadA, Ail, O-ag, and OC in different combinations was tested for the ability to bind C4bp. The studies showed that both YadA and Ail acted as C4bp receptors. Ail-mediated C4bp binding, however, was blocked by the O-ag and OC, and could be observed only with mutants lacking these LPS structures. C4bp bound to Y. enterocolitica was functionally active and participated in the factor I-mediated degradation of C4b. These findings show that Y. enterocolitica uses two proteins, YadA and Ail, to bind C4bp. Binding of C4bp could help Y. enterocolitica to evade complement-mediated clearance in the human host.

  12. Regulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-ARegulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaidamauskas, Ervinas

    During his PhD studies, Ervinas Gaidamauskas researched the proteins pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and its homologue PAPP-A2 in vitro. As suggested by its name, PAPP-A plays an important role in pregnancy and fetal development. Additionally, recent studies indicate a newly...... recognised role for PAPP-A in ageing and in the development of age-related disease. PAPP-A is a secreted metalloproteinase that cleaves insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs). Ervinas Gaidamauskas studied the mechanism of IGF-modulated proteolysis of IGFBPs by PAPP-A and the structural...... determinants for cleavage. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), he also analysed the intermodular structural organisation of the C-terminal domain of PAPP-A involved in substrate binding. Detailed knowledge of interactions between PAPP-A and its substrates is required to understand the modulatory role...

  13. Sampling and energy evaluation challenges in ligand binding protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jiayi; Doyle, Lindsey; Jr. Greisen, Per; Schena, Alberto; Park, Hahnbeom; Johnsson, Kai; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The steroid hormone 17α‐hydroxylprogesterone (17‐OHP) is a biomarker for congenital adrenal hyperplasia and hence there is considerable interest in development of sensors for this compound. We used computational protein design to generate protein models with binding sites for 17‐OHP containing an extended, nonpolar, shape‐complementary binding pocket for the four‐ring core of the compound, and hydrogen bonding residues at the base of the pocket to interact with carbonyl and hydroxyl groups at the more polar end of the ligand. Eight of 16 designed proteins experimentally tested bind 17‐OHP with micromolar affinity. A co‐crystal structure of one of the designs revealed that 17‐OHP is rotated 180° around a pseudo‐two‐fold axis in the compound and displays multiple binding modes within the pocket, while still interacting with all of the designed residues in the engineered site. Subsequent rounds of mutagenesis and binding selection improved the ligand affinity to nanomolar range, while appearing to constrain the ligand to a single bound conformation that maintains the same “flipped” orientation relative to the original design. We trace the discrepancy in the design calculations to two sources: first, a failure to model subtle backbone changes which alter the distribution of sidechain rotameric states and second, an underestimation of the energetic cost of desolvating the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of the ligand. The difference between design model and crystal structure thus arises from both sampling limitations and energy function inaccuracies that are exacerbated by the near two‐fold symmetry of the molecule. PMID:28980354

  14. Competition between Ski and CREB-binding protein for binding to Smad proteins in transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijun; Lam, Suvana S; Srinath, Hema; Schiffer, Celia A; Royer, William E; Lin, Kai

    2007-04-13

    The family of Smad proteins mediates transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling in cell growth and differentiation. Smads repress or activate TGF-beta signaling by interacting with corepressors (e.g. Ski) or coactivators (e.g. CREB-binding protein (CBP)), respectively. Specifically, Ski has been shown to interfere with the interaction between Smad3 and CBP. However, it is unclear whether Ski competes with CBP for binding to Smads and whether they can interact with Smad3 at the same binding surface on Smad3. We investigated the interactions among purified constructs of Smad, Ski, and CBP in vitro by size-exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutational studies. Here, we show that Ski-(16-192) interacted directly with a homotrimer of receptor-regulated Smad protein (R-Smad), e.g. Smad2 or Smad3, to form a hexamer; Ski-(16-192) interacted with an R-Smad.Smad4 heterotrimer to form a pentamer. CBP-(1941-1992) was also found to interact directly with an R-Smad homotrimer to form a hexamer and with an R-Smad.Smad4 heterotrimer to form a pentamer. Moreover, these domains of Ski and CBP competed with each other for binding to Smad3. Our mutational studies revealed that domains of Ski and CBP interacted with Smad3 at a portion of the binding surface of the Smad anchor for receptor activation. Our results suggest that Ski negatively regulates TGF-beta signaling by replacing CBP in R-Smad complexes. Our working model suggests that Smad protein activity is delicately balanced by Ski and CBP in the TGF-beta pathway.

  15. Structural and binding studies of SAP-1 protein with heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikash K; Mandal, Rahul S; Puniya, Bhanwar L; Kumar, Rahul; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-03-01

    SAP-1 is a low molecular weight cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) which belongs to type-2 cystatins family. SAP-1 protein purified from human seminal plasma (HuSP) has been shown to inhibit cysteine and serine proteases and exhibit interesting biological properties, including high temperature and pH stability. Heparin is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan (with varied chain length) which interacts with a number of proteins and regulates multiple steps in different biological processes. As an anticoagulant, heparin enhances inhibition of thrombin by the serpin antithrombin III. Therefore, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to improve our understanding of the binding interaction between heparin and SAP-1 (protease inhibitor). SPR data suggest that SAP-1 binds to heparin with a significant affinity (KD = 158 nm). SPR solution competition studies using heparin oligosaccharides showed that the binding of SAP-1 to heparin is dependent on chain length. Large oligosaccharides show strong binding affinity for SAP-1. Further to get insight into the structural aspect of interactions between SAP-1 and heparin, we used modelled structure of the SAP-1 and docked with heparin and heparin-derived polysaccharides. The results suggest that a positively charged residue lysine plays important role in these interactions. Such information should improve our understanding of how heparin, present in the reproductive tract, regulates cystatins activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. [Liquid chromatography frontal analysis of the protein binding of glimepiride].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Da-wei; Wang, Huai-feng; Li, Fa-mei

    2005-01-01

    To study the protein binding of glimepiride. An HPLC-FA method is performed by using Pinkerton GFF II-S5-80 internal-surface reversed-phase silica support (150 mm x 4.6 mm ID, 5 microm) at pH 7.4 in a 67 mmol x L(-1) isotonic sodium phosphate buffer at 37 degree C. Other conditions included flow rate of 0.2 mL x min(-1), UV detection at wavelength 230 nm and injection volume 900 microL. Nonlinear regression parameter estimation was used for the association constant measurement of glimepiride to both primary and secondary sites, which were 5.1 (micromol x L(-1)-1 and 1 for K1 and n1, and 0.017 (micromol x L(-1))-1 and 7 for K2 and n2, respectively. The method is shown to be suitable for investigation of protein binding of glimepiride.

  17. Fragile X mental retardation protein: A paradigm for translational control by RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eileen; Joseph, Simpson

    2015-07-01

    Translational control is a common mechanism used to regulate gene expression and occur in bacteria to mammals. Typically in translational control, an RNA-binding protein binds to a unique sequence in the mRNA to regulate protein synthesis by the ribosomes. Alternatively, a protein may bind to or modify a translation factor to globally regulate protein synthesis by the cell. Here, we review translational control by the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the absence of which causes the neurological disease, fragile X syndrome (FXS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Unusual binding of ursodeoxycholic acid to ileal bile acid binding protein: role in activation of FXRα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Changming; Filipp, Fabian V; Smith, Jeffrey W

    2012-04-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, ursodiol) is used to prevent damage to the liver in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The drug also prevents the progression of colorectal cancer and the recurrence of high-grade colonic dysplasia. However, the molecular mechanism by which UDCA elicits its beneficial effects is not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) has a role in mediating the effects of UDCA. We find that UDCA binds to a single site on IBABP and increases the affinity for major human bile acids at a second binding site. As UDCA occupies one of the bile acid binding sites on IBABP, it reduces the cooperative binding that is often observed for the major human bile acids. Furthermore, IBABP is necessary for the full activation of farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα) by bile acids, including UDCA. These observations suggest that IBABP may have a role in mediating some of the intestinal effects of UDCA.

  19. QSAR Models for the Prediction of Plasma Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshan Amin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prediction of plasma protein binding (ppb is of paramount importance in the pharmacokinetics characterization of drugs, as it causes significant changes in volume of distribution, clearance and drug half life. This study utilized Quantitative Structure – Activity Relationships (QSAR for the prediction of plasma protein binding. Methods: Protein binding values for 794 compounds were collated from literature. The data was partitioned into a training set of 662 compounds and an external validation set of 132 compounds. Physicochemical and molecular descriptors were calculated for each compound using ACD labs/logD, MOE (Chemical Computing Group and Symyx QSAR software packages. Several data mining tools were employed for the construction of models. These included stepwise regression analysis, Classification and Regression Trees (CART, Boosted trees and Random Forest. Results: Several predictive models were identified; however, one model in particular produced significantly superior prediction accuracy for the external validation set as measured using mean absolute error and correlation coefficient. The selected model was a boosted regression tree model which had the mean absolute error for training set of 13.25 and for validation set of 14.96. Conclusion: Plasma protein binding can be modeled using simple regression trees or multiple linear regressions with reasonable model accuracies. These interpretable models were able to identify the governing molecular factors for a high ppb that included hydrophobicity, van der Waals surface area parameters, and aromaticity. On the other hand, the more complicated ensemble method of boosted regression trees produced the most accurate ppb estimations for the external validation set.

  20. Effect of paracetamol on the plasma protein binding of quinine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was done to investigate if the co-administration of quinine and paracetamol could have an effect on the protein binding of quinine. Exactly 5ml of plasma contained in a dialysis sack was placed into 20ml of varying concentrations (2 -10µg/ml) of test sample at 37oC. 2ml of the dialysate was basified with ...

  1. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  2. Spatial Analysis and Quantification of the Thermodynamic Driving Forces in Protein-Ligand Binding: Binding Site Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provides an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both non-polar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the “hydrophobic effect”. Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. Notable is the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  3. Folate and folate-binding protein content in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigertz, K; Svensson, U K; Jägerstad, M

    1997-05-01

    Recent findings suggest a protective role for folates in the reduction of neural tube defects and possibly also coronary heart disease and cancer. Consequently, an increase in the daily intake of folates is warranted, which emphasizes the need for quantitative as well as qualitative measurements of dietary folates. Milk plays an important part in the food chain in many Western countries today. Several studies suggest that folate-binding proteins might have an impact on folate absorption and therefore their concentrations are also important. The mean concentration of the predominant form of folate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-CH3THF), was determined using HPLC in thirteen selected dairy products; skim milk powder, two pasteurized milks, UHT milk, two fermented milks, three whey products and four different cheeses. All results were corrected for recovery by spiking the samples with 5-CH3THF. Effects of storage of dairy products on 5-CH3THF concentrations were also investigated; generally small and insignificant fluctuations were found, except for hard cheese, in which 5-CH3THF decreased significantly. There was a significant seasonal variation in the folate concentration of pasteurized milk which peaked in the summer months. The concentrations of folate-binding protein in skim milk powder and pasteurized milk analysed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were similar. UHT milk and fermented milk, both of which are processed at temperatures > 90 degrees C, contained significantly lower concentrations of folate-binding protein.

  4. Phyletic distribution of fatty acid-binding protein genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Zheng

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are a family of fatty acid-binding small proteins essential for lipid trafficking, energy storage and gene regulation. Although they have 20 to 70% amino acid sequence identity, these proteins share a conserved tertiary structure comprised of ten beta sheets and two alpha helixes. Availability of the complete genomes of 34 invertebrates, together with transcriptomes and ESTs, allowed us to systematically investigate the gene structure and alternative splicing of FABP genes over a wide range of phyla. Only in genomes of two cnidarian species could FABP genes not be identified. The genomic loci for FABP genes were diverse and their genomic structure varied. In particular, the intronless FABP genes, in most of which the key residues involved in fatty acid binding varied, were common in five phyla. Interestingly, several species including one trematode, one nematode and four arthropods generated FABP mRNA variants via alternative splicing. These results demonstrate that both gene duplication and post-transcriptional modifications are used to generate diverse FABPs in species studied.

  5. Characterization of microtubule-binding and dimerization activity of Giardia lamblia end-binding 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Nagami, Sara; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2014-01-01

    End-binding 1 (EB1) proteins are evolutionarily conserved components of microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein that regulate MT dynamics. Giardia lamblia, with two nuclei and cytoskeletal structures, requires accurate MT distribution for division. In this study, we show that a single EB1 homolog gene of G. lamblia regulates MT dynamics in mitosis. The haemagglutinin-tagged G. lamblia EB1 (GlEB1) localizes to the nuclear envelopes and median bodies, and is transiently present in mitotic spindles of dividing cells. Knockdown of GlEB1 expression using the morpholinos-based anti-EB1 oligonucleotides, resulted in a significant defect in mitosis of Giardia trophozoites. The MT-binding assays using recombinant GlEB1 (rGlEB1) proteins demonstrated that rGlEB1102-238, but not rGlEB11-184, maintains an MT-binding ability comparable with that of the full length protein, rGlEB11-238. Size exclusion chromatography showed that rGlEB1 is present as a dimer formed by its C-terminal domain and a disulfide bond. In vitro-mutagenesis of GlEB1 indicated that an intermolecular disulfide bond is made between cysteine #13 of the two monomers. Complementation assay using the BIM1 knockout mutant yeast, the yeast homolog of mammalian EB1, indicated that expression of the C13S mutant GlEB1 protein cannot rescue the mitotic defect of the BIM1 mutant yeast. These results suggest that dimerization of GlEB1 via the 13th cysteine residues plays a role during mitosis in Giardia.

  6. Characterization of Microtubule-Binding and Dimerization Activity of Giardia lamblia End-Binding 1 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Nagami, Sara; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2014-01-01

    End-binding 1 (EB1) proteins are evolutionarily conserved components of microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein that regulate MT dynamics. Giardia lamblia, with two nuclei and cytoskeletal structures, requires accurate MT distribution for division. In this study, we show that a single EB1 homolog gene of G. lamblia regulates MT dynamics in mitosis. The haemagglutinin-tagged G. lamblia EB1 (GlEB1) localizes to the nuclear envelopes and median bodies, and is transiently present in mitotic spindles of dividing cells. Knockdown of GlEB1 expression using the morpholinos-based anti-EB1 oligonucleotides, resulted in a significant defect in mitosis of Giardia trophozoites. The MT-binding assays using recombinant GlEB1 (rGlEB1) proteins demonstrated that rGlEB1102–238, but not rGlEB11–184, maintains an MT-binding ability comparable with that of the full length protein, rGlEB11–238. Size exclusion chromatography showed that rGlEB1 is present as a dimer formed by its C-terminal domain and a disulfide bond. In vitro-mutagenesis of GlEB1 indicated that an intermolecular disulfide bond is made between cysteine #13 of the two monomers. Complementation assay using the BIM1 knockout mutant yeast, the yeast homolog of mammalian EB1, indicated that expression of the C13S mutant GlEB1 protein cannot rescue the mitotic defect of the BIM1 mutant yeast. These results suggest that dimerization of GlEB1 via the 13th cysteine residues plays a role during mitosis in Giardia. PMID:24828878

  7. Alcohol epitheliectomy with mechanical debridement in a case of granular corneal dystrophy with r555w homozygous mutation of TGF B1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg Prashant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An eight-year-old girl, an offspring of a consanguineous marriage presented with multiple anterior stromal geographic corneal opacities in both eyes. She was diagnosed to have superficial variant of granular dystrophy based on the family history, clinical features and mutation of TGF B1 gene. She was treated by alcohol-assisted removal of epithelium followed by mechanical debridement of abnormal deposits. Postoperatively, the cornea in both eyes was clear with no trace of opacity and the patient had an unaided visual acuity of 20/20 partial.

  8. Mannan-binding protein forms complexes with alpha-2-macroglobulin. A protein model for the interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, P; Holm Nielsen, E; Skriver, E

    1995-01-01

    We report that alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) can form complexes with a high molecular weight porcine mannan-binding protein (pMBP-28). The alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes was isolated by PEG-precipitation and affinity chromatography on mannan-Sepharose, protein A-Sepharose and anti-IgM Sepharose...

  9. Haptoglobin-related protein is a high-affinity hemoglobin-binding plasma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Petersen, Steen Vang; Jacobsen, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) is a primate-specific plasma protein associated with apolipoprotein L-I (apoL-I)-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles shown to be a part of the innate immune defense. Despite the assumption hitherto that Hpr does not bind to hemoglobin, the present...

  10. A Venom Gland Extracellular Chitin-Binding-Like Protein from Pupal Endoparasitoid Wasps, Pteromalus Puparum, Selectively Binds Chitin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitin-binding proteins (CBPs) existed in various species and involved in different biology processes. In the present study, we cloned a full length cDNA of chitin-binding protein-like (PpCBP-like) from Pteromalus puparum, a pupal endoparasitoid of Pieris rapae. PpCBP-like encoded a 96 putative amin...

  11. Fatty acid- and retinoid-binding proteins have distinct binding pockets for the two types of cargo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordanova, Rositsa; Groves, Matthew R.; Kostova, Elena; Woltersdorf, Christian; Liebau, Eva; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes cause serious diseases in humans, animals, and plants. They have limited lipid metabolism and are reliant on lipid-binding proteins to acquire these metabolites from their hosts. Several structurally novel families of lipid-binding proteins in nematodes have been described,

  12. Human pentraxin 3 binds to the complement regulator c4b-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Braunschweig

    Full Text Available The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a soluble recognition molecule with multiple functions including innate immune defense against certain microbes and the clearance of apoptotic cells. PTX3 interacts with recognition molecules of the classical and lectin complement pathways and thus initiates complement activation. In addition, binding of PTX3 to the alternative complement pathway regulator factor H was shown. Here, we show that PTX3 binds to the classical and lectin pathway regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP. A PTX3-binding site was identified within short consensus repeats 1-3 of the C4BP α-chain. PTX3 did not interfere with the cofactor activity of C4BP in the fluid phase and C4BP maintained its complement regulatory activity when bound to PTX3 on surfaces. While C4BP and factor H did not compete for PTX3 binding, the interaction of C4BP with PTX3 was inhibited by C1q and by L-ficolin. PTX3 bound to human fibroblast- and endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrices and recruited functionally active C4BP to these surfaces. Whereas PTX3 enhanced the activation of the classical/lectin pathway and caused enhanced C3 deposition on extracellular matrix, deposition of terminal pathway components and the generation of the inflammatory mediator C5a were not increased. Furthermore, PTX3 enhanced the binding of C4BP to late apoptotic cells, which resulted in an increased rate of inactivation of cell surface bound C4b and a reduction in the deposition of C5b-9. Thus, in addition to complement activators, PTX3 interacts with complement inhibitors including C4BP. This balanced interaction on extracellular matrix and on apoptotic cells may prevent excessive local complement activation that would otherwise lead to inflammation and host tissue damage.

  13. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  14. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  15. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Lun Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  16. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  17. Collagen-binding proteins of Streptococcus mutans and related streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés-Reyes, A; Miller, J H; Lemos, J A; Abranches, J

    2017-04-01

    The ability of Streptococcus mutans to interact with collagen through the expression of collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) bestows this oral pathogen with an alternative to the sucrose-dependent mechanism of colonization classically attributed to caries development. Based on the abundance and distribution of collagen throughout the human body, stringent adherence to this molecule grants S. mutans with the opportunity to establish infection at different host sites. Surface proteins, such as SpaP, WapA, Cnm and Cbm, have been shown to bind collagen in vitro, and it has been suggested that these molecules play a role in colonization of oral and extra-oral tissues. However, robust collagen binding is not achieved by all strains of S. mutans, particularly those that lack Cnm or Cbm. These observations merit careful dissection of the contribution from these different CBPs towards tissue colonization and virulence. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of mechanisms used by S. mutans and related streptococci to colonize collagenous tissues, and the possible contribution of CBPs to infections in different sites of the host. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The telomere binding protein TRF2 induces chromatin compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Asmaa M; Fu, Qiang; Hayward, William; Victoria, Samuel; Pedroso, Ilene M; Lindsay, Stuart M; Fletcher, Terace M

    2011-04-19

    Mammalian telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that require the telomere binding protein, TRF2, for maintaining chromosome stability. In addition to its ability to modulate DNA repair activities, TRF2 also has direct effects on DNA structure and topology. Given that mammalian telomeric chromatin includes nucleosomes, we investigated the effect of this protein on chromatin structure. TRF2 bound to reconstituted telomeric nucleosomal fibers through both its basic N-terminus and its C-terminal DNA binding domain. Analytical agarose gel electrophoresis (AAGE) studies showed that TRF2 promoted the folding of nucleosomal arrays into more compact structures by neutralizing negative surface charge. A construct containing the N-terminal and TRFH domains together altered the charge and radius of nucleosomal arrays similarly to full-length TRF2 suggesting that TRF2-driven changes in global chromatin structure were largely due to these regions. However, the most compact chromatin structures were induced by the isolated basic N-terminal region, as judged by both AAGE and atomic force microscopy. Although the N-terminal region condensed nucleosomal array fibers, the TRFH domain, known to alter DNA topology, was required for stimulation of a strand invasion-like reaction with nucleosomal arrays. Optimal strand invasion also required the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Furthermore, the reaction was not stimulated on linear histone-free DNA. Our data suggest that nucleosomal chromatin has the ability to facilitate this activity of TRF2 which is thought to be involved in stabilizing looped telomere structures.

  19. The clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Choromańska

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Excessive levels of free fatty acids are toxic to cells. The human body has evolved a defense mechanism in the form of small cytoplasmic proteins called fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs that bind long-chain fatty acids (LCFA, and then refer them to appropriate intracellular disposal sites (oxidation in mitochondria and peroxisomes or storage in the endoplasmic reticulum. So far, nine types of these proteins have been described, and their name refers to the place in which they were first identified or where they can be found in the greatest concentration. The most important FABPs were isolated from the liver (L-FABP, heart (H-FABP, intestine (I-FABP, brain (B-FABP, epidermis (E-FABP and adipocytes (A-FABP. Determination of H-FABP is used in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction, and L-FABP in kidney lesions of different etiologies. It is postulated that FABPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Elevated levels of A-FABP have been found in the pericardial fat tissue and were associated with cardiac dysfunction in obese people. A rise in A-FABP has been observed in patients with type II diabetes. I-FABP is known as a marker of cell damage in the small intestine. Increased concentration of B-FABP has been associated with human brain tumors such as glioblastoma and astrocytoma, as well as with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other disorders of cognitive function. The aim of this work was to present current data on the clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins.

  20. Shrimp arginine kinase being a binding protein of WSSV envelope protein VP31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cuiyan; Gao, Qiang; Liang, Yan; Li, Chen; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Viral entry into the host is the earliest stage of infection in the viral life cycle in which attachment proteins play a key role. VP31 (WSV340/WSSV396), an envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide domain known as a cellular attachment site. At present, the process of VP31 interacting with shrimp host cells has not been explored. Therefore, the VP31 gene was cloned into pET30a (+), expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 and purified with immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Four gill cellular proteins of shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were pulled down by an affinity column coupled with recombinant VP31 (rVP31), and the amino acid sequences were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Hemocyanin, beta-actin, arginine kinase (AK), and an unknown protein were suggested as the putative VP31 receptor proteins. SDS-PAGE showed that AK is the predominant binding protein of VP31. An i n vitro binding activity experiment indicated that recombinant AK's (rAK) binding activity with rVP31 is comparable to that with the same amount of WSSV. These results suggested that AK, as a member of the phosphagen kinase family, plays a role in WSSV infection. This is the first evidence showing that AK is a binding protein of VP31. Further studies on this topic will elucidate WSSV infection mechanism in the future.

  1. DMPD: LPS-binding proteins and receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9665271 LPS-binding proteins and receptors. Fenton MJ, Golenbock DT. J Leukoc Biol.... 1998 Jul;64(1):25-32. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS-binding proteins and receptors. PubmedID 9665271 Title LPS-binding prot...eins and receptors. Authors Fenton MJ, Golenbock DT. Publication J Leukoc Biol. 199

  2. Binding proteins enhance specific uptake rate by increasing the substrate-transporter encounter rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosdriesz, E.; Magnúsdóttir, S.; Bruggeman, F.J.; Teusink, B.; Molenaar, D.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms rely on binding-protein assisted, active transport systems to scavenge for scarce nutrients. Several advantages of using binding proteins in such uptake systems have been proposed. However, a systematic, rigorous and quantitative analysis of the function of binding proteins is

  3. A unique bivalent binding and inhibition mechanism by the yatapoxvirus interleukin 18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Krumm

    Full Text Available Interleukin 18 (IL18 is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation as well as host defense against microbes. Mammals encode a soluble inhibitor of IL18 termed IL18 binding protein (IL18BP that modulates IL18 activity through a negative feedback mechanism. Many poxviruses encode homologous IL18BPs, which contribute to virulence. Previous structural and functional studies on IL18 and IL18BPs revealed an essential binding hot spot involving a lysine on IL18 and two aromatic residues on IL18BPs. The aromatic residues are conserved among the very diverse mammalian and poxviruses IL18BPs with the notable exception of yatapoxvirus IL18BPs, which lack a critical phenylalanine residue. To understand the mechanism by which yatapoxvirus IL18BPs neutralize IL18, we solved the crystal structure of the Yaba-Like Disease Virus (YLDV IL18BP and IL18 complex at 1.75 Å resolution. YLDV-IL18BP forms a disulfide bonded homo-dimer engaging IL18 in a 2∶2 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 1∶1 complex of ectromelia virus (ECTV IL18BP and IL18. Disruption of the dimer interface resulted in a functional monomer, however with a 3-fold decrease in binding affinity. The overall architecture of the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 complex is similar to that observed in the ECTV-IL18BP:IL18 complex, despite lacking the critical lysine-phenylalanine interaction. Through structural and mutagenesis studies, contact residues that are unique to the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 binding interface were identified, including Q67, P116 of YLDV-IL18BP and Y1, S105 and D110 of IL18. Overall, our studies show that YLDV-IL18BP is unique among the diverse family of mammalian and poxvirus IL-18BPs in that it uses a bivalent binding mode and a unique set of interacting residues for binding IL18. However, despite this extensive divergence, YLDV-IL18BP binds to the same surface of IL18 used by other IL18BPs, suggesting that all IL18BPs use a conserved inhibitory mechanism by blocking a putative receptor-binding

  4. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-12-10

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term "movable type". Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the free

  5. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Michael E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1 multiple sequence alignments, 2 mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3 phylogenetic trees, 4 inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5 amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural

  6. Factors Affecting the Binding of a Recombinant Heavy Metal-Binding Domain (CXXC motif Protein to Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Boonyodying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of heavy metal-binding proteins have been used to study bioremediation. CXXC motif, a metal binding domain containing Cys-X-X-Cys motif, has been identified in various organisms. These proteins are capable of binding various types of heavy metals. In this study, heavy metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein encoded from mcsA gene of S. aureus were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The factors involved in the metal-binding activity were determined in order to analyze the potential of recombinant protein for bioremediation. A recombinant protein can be bound to Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The thermal stability of a recombinant protein was tested, and the results showed that the metal binding activity to Cu2+ and Zn2+ still exist after treating the protein at 85ºC for 30 min. The temperature and pH that affected the metal binding activity was tested and the results showed that recombinant protein was still bound to Cu2+ at 65ºC, whereas a pH of 3-7 did not affect the metal binding E. coli harboring a pRset with a heavy metal-binding domain CXXC motif increased the resistance of heavy metals against CuCl2 and CdCl2. This study shows that metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein can be effectively bound to various types of heavy metals and may be used as a potential tool for studying bioremediation.

  7. Control of nuclear organization by F-actin binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfisterer, Karin; Jayo, Asier; Parsons, Maddy

    2017-03-04

    The regulation of nuclear shape and deformability is a key factor in controlling diverse events from embryonic development to cancer cell metastasis, but the mechanisms governing this process are still unclear. Our recent study demonstrated an unexpected role for the F-actin bundling protein fascin in controlling nuclear plasticity through a direct interaction with Nesprin-2. Nesprin-2 is a component of the LINC complex that is known to couple the F-actin cytoskeleton to the nuclear envelope. We demonstrated that fascin, which is predominantly associated with peripheral F-actin rich filopodia, binds directly to Nesprin-2 at the nuclear envelope in a range of cell types. Depleting fascin or specifically blocking the fascin-Nesprin-2 complex leads to defects in nuclear polarization, movement and cell invasion. These studies reveal a novel role for an F-actin bundling protein in control of nuclear plasticity and underline the importance of defining nuclear-associated roles for F-actin binding proteins in future.

  8. Rbfox2 controls autoregulation in RNA-binding protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangi, Mohini; Boutz, Paul L; Paul, Prakriti; Sharp, Phillip A

    2014-03-15

    The tight regulation of splicing networks is critical for organismal development. To maintain robust splicing patterns, many splicing factors autoregulate their expression through alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD). However, as negative autoregulation results in a self-limiting window of splicing factor expression, it is unknown how variations in steady-state protein levels can arise in different physiological contexts. Here, we demonstrate that Rbfox2 cross-regulates AS-NMD events within RNA-binding proteins to alter their expression. Using individual nucleotide-resolution cross-linking immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (iCLIP) and mRNA sequencing, we identified >200 AS-NMD splicing events that are bound by Rbfox2 in mouse embryonic stem cells. These "silent" events are characterized by minimal apparent splicing changes but appreciable changes in gene expression upon Rbfox2 knockdown due to degradation of the NMD-inducing isoform. Nearly 70 of these AS-NMD events fall within genes encoding RNA-binding proteins, many of which are autoregulated. As with the coding splicing events that we found to be regulated by Rbfox2, silent splicing events are evolutionarily conserved and frequently contain the Rbfox2 consensus UGCAUG. Our findings uncover an unexpectedly broad and multilayer regulatory network controlled by Rbfox2 and offer an explanation for how autoregulatory splicing networks are tuned.

  9. Coupled binding-bending-folding: The complex conformational dynamics of protein-DNA binding studied by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-05-01

    Protein-DNA binding often involves dramatic conformational changes such as protein folding and DNA bending. While thermodynamic aspects of this behavior are understood, and its biological function is often known, the mechanism by which the conformational changes occur is generally unclear. By providing detailed structural and energetic data, molecular dynamics simulations have been helpful in elucidating and rationalizing protein-DNA binding. This review will summarize recent atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the conformational dynamics of DNA and protein-DNA binding. A brief overview of recent developments in DNA force fields is given as well. Simulations have been crucial in rationalizing the intrinsic flexibility of DNA, and have been instrumental in identifying the sequence of binding events, the triggers for the conformational motion, and the mechanism of binding for a number of important DNA-binding proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations are an important tool for understanding the complex binding behavior of DNA-binding proteins. With recent advances in force fields and rapid increases in simulation time scales, simulations will become even more important for future studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Conjugation Dependent Interaction of Folic Acid with Folate Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzel, Rachel L; Frey, Carolina; Chen, Junjie; Garn, Rachel; van Dongen, Mallory; Dougherty, Casey A; Kandaluru, Ananda Kumar; Low, Philip S; Marsh, E Neil G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2017-09-20

    Serum proteins play a critical role in the transport, uptake, and efficacy of targeted drug therapies, and here we investigate the interactions between folic acid-polymer conjugates and serum folate binding protein (FBP), the soluble form of the cellular membrane-bound folate receptor. We demonstrate that both choice of polymer and method of ligand conjugation affect the interactions between folic acid-polymer conjugates and serum FBP, resulting in changes in the folic acid-induced protein aggregation process. We have previously demonstrated that individual FBP molecules self-aggregate into nanoparticles at physiological concentrations. When poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-folic acid conjugates bound to FBP, the distribution of nanoparticles was preserved. However, the dendritic conjugates produced larger nanoparticles than those formed in the presence of physiologically normal human levels of folic acid, and the conjugation method affected particle size distribution. In contrast, poly(ethylene glycol)-folic acid conjugates demonstrated substantially reduced binding to FBP, did not cause folic acid-induced aggregation, and fully disrupted FBP self-aggregation. On the basis of these results, we discuss the potential implications for biodistribution, trafficking, and therapeutic efficacy of targeted nanoscale therapeutics, especially considering the widespread clinical use of poly(ethylene glycol) conjugates. We highlight the importance of considering specific serum protein interactions in the rational design of similar nanocarrier systems. Our results suggest that prebinding therapeutic nanocarriers to serum FBP may allow folate-specific metabolic pathways to be exploited for delivery while also affording benefits of utilizing an endogenous protein as a vector.

  11. Structural and binding properties of two paralogous fatty acid binding proteins of Taenia solium metacestode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fatty acid (FA binding proteins (FABPs of helminths are implicated in acquisition and utilization of host-derived hydrophobic substances, as well as in signaling and cellular interactions. We previously demonstrated that secretory hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs of Taenia solium metacestode (TsM, a causative agent of neurocysticercosis (NC, shuttle FAs in the surrounding host tissues and inwardly transport the FAs across the parasite syncytial membrane. However, the protein molecules responsible for the intracellular trafficking and assimilation of FAs have remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated two novel TsMFABP genes (TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2, which encoded 133- and 136-amino acid polypeptides with predicted molecular masses of 14.3 and 14.8 kDa, respectively. They shared 45% sequence identity with each other and 15-95% with other related-members. Homology modeling demonstrated a characteristic β-barrel composed of 10 anti-parallel β-strands and two α-helices. TsMFABP2 harbored two additional loops between β-strands two and three, and β-strands six and seven, respectively. TsMFABP1 was secreted into cyst fluid and surrounding environments, whereas TsMFABP2 was intracellularly confined. Partially purified native proteins migrated to 15 kDa with different isoelectric points of 9.2 (TsMFABP1 and 8.4 (TsMFABP2. Both native and recombinant proteins bound to 11-([5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl]aminoundecannoic acid, dansyl-DL-α-amino-caprylic acid, cis-parinaric acid and retinol, which were competitively inhibited by oleic acid. TsMFABP1 exhibited high affinity toward FA analogs. TsMFABPs showed weak binding activity to retinol, but TsMFABP2 showed relatively high affinity. Isolation of two distinct genes from an individual genome strongly suggested their paralogous nature. Abundant expression of TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2 in the canal region of worm matched well with the histological distributions

  12. Serum lipopolysaccharide-binding protein as a marker of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Marta; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Puig, Josep; Moreno, María; Guerra, Ester; Ortega, Francisco; Xifra, Gemma; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    Recently, serum lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) has been closely associated with coronary artery disease. Here, we aimed to investigate the possible relationship between serum LBP and markers of atherosclerosis. Serum LBP and carotid intima media thickness (C-IMT) were measured in 332 subjects (101 men and 231 women) who were recruited from an ongoing multicenter project. Serum LBP was significantly associated with obesity [BMI, fat mass and waist circumference (r > 0.38, p atherosclerosis marker, reveals serum LBP as a putative factor related to atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and proteasome protein complexes with multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeger, Michael; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Wilkinson, Caroline R M

    2003-01-01

    Fission yeast Rhp23 and Pus1 represent two families of multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins that associate with the proteasome. We show that both proteins bind to different regions of the proteasome subunit Mts4. The binding site for Pus1 was mapped to a cluster of repetitive sequences also foun...

  14. Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins by Voting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Peng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to identify which proteins can interact with RNA for the purpose of protein annotation, since interactions between RNA and proteins influence the structure of the ribosome and play important roles in gene expression. This paper tries to identify proteins that can interact with RNA using voting systems. Firstly through Weka, 34 learning algorithms are chosen for investigation. Then simple majority voting system (SMVS is used for the prediction of RNA-binding proteins, achieving average ACC (overall prediction accuracy value of 79.72% and MCC (Matthew’s correlation coefficient value of 59.77% for the independent testing dataset. Then mRMR (minimum redundancy maximum relevance strategy is used, which is transferred into algorithm selection. In addition, the MCC value of each classifier is assigned to be the weight of the classifier’s vote. As a result, best average MCC values are attained when 22 algorithms are selected and integrated through weighted votes, which are 64.70% for the independent testing dataset, and ACC value is 82.04% at this moment.

  15. Light-activated DNA binding in a designed allosteric protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, Devin; Moffat, Keith; Sosnick, Tobin R. (UC)

    2008-09-03

    An understanding of how allostery, the conformational coupling of distant functional sites, arises in highly evolvable systems is of considerable interest in areas ranging from cell biology to protein design and signaling networks. We reasoned that the rigidity and defined geometry of an {alpha}-helical domain linker would make it effective as a conduit for allosteric signals. To test this idea, we rationally designed 12 fusions between the naturally photoactive LOV2 domain from Avena sativa phototropin 1 and the Escherichia coli trp repressor. When illuminated, one of the fusions selectively binds operator DNA and protects it from nuclease digestion. The ready success of our rational design strategy suggests that the helical 'allosteric lever arm' is a general scheme for coupling the function of two proteins.

  16. The Role of Microtubule End Binding (EB) Proteins in Ciliogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Jacob Morville

    centrosomal MT array and abnormally long centriole-associated rootlet filaments. Cells lacking EB1 also had stumpy cilia and a disorganized centrosomal MT array, but rootlet filaments appeared normal. Further, live imaging revealed increased release frequency of MTs from the centrosome upon EB1 or EB3......EB1 is a small microtubule (MT)-binding protein that associates preferentially with MT plus ends. EB1 plays a role in regulating MT dynamics, localizing other MT-associated proteins to the plus end, and in regulating interactions of MTs with the cell cortex, mitotic kinetochores and different......, are required for assembly of primary cilia in cultured human cells. The EB3 - siRNA ciliary phenotype could be rescued by GFP-EB1 expression, and GFP-EB3 over expression resulted in elongated cilia. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that EB3-depleted cells possess stumpy cilia, a disorganized...

  17. Mapping protein binding sites on the biomolecular corona of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Philip M.; Åberg, Christoffer; Polo, Ester; O'Connell, Ann; Cookman, Jennifer; Fallon, Jonathan; Krpetić, Željka; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles in a biological milieu are known to form a sufficiently long-lived and well-organized ‘corona’ of biomolecules to confer a biological identity to the particle. Because this nanoparticle-biomolecule complex interacts with cells and biological barriers, potentially engaging with different biological pathways, it is important to clarify the presentation of functional biomolecular motifs at its interface. Here, we demonstrate that by using antibody-labelled gold nanoparticles, differential centrifugal sedimentation and various imaging techniques it is possible to identify the spatial location of proteins, their functional motifs and their binding sites. We show that for transferrin-coated polystyrene nanoparticles only a minority of adsorbed proteins exhibit functional motifs and the spatial organization appears random, which is consistent, overall, with a stochastic and irreversible adsorption process. Our methods are applicable to a wide array of nanoparticles and can offer a microscopic molecular description of the biological identity of nanoparticles.

  18. Comparison of entropic contributions to binding in a "hydrophilic" versus "hydrophobic" ligand-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syme, Neil R; Dennis, Caitriona; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Paesen, Guido C; Homans, Steve W

    2010-06-30

    In the present study we characterize the thermodynamics of binding of histamine to recombinant histamine-binding protein (rRaHBP2), a member of the lipocalin family isolated from the brown-ear tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding pocket of this protein contains a number of charged residues, consistent with histamine binding, and is thus a typical example of a "hydrophilic" binder. In contrast, a second member of the lipocalin family, the recombinant major urinary protein (rMUP), binds small hydrophobic ligands, with a similar overall entropy of binding in comparison with rRaHBP2. Having extensively studied ligand binding thermodynamics for rMUP previously, the data we obtained in the present study for HBP enables a comparison of the driving forces for binding between these classically distinct binding processes in terms of entropic contributions from ligand, protein, and solvent. In the case of rRaHBP2, we find favorable entropic contributions to binding from desolvation of the ligand; however, the overall entropy of binding is unfavorable due to a dominant unfavorable contribution arising from the loss of ligand degrees of freedom, together with the sequestration of solvent water molecules into the binding pocket in the complex. This contrasts with binding in rMUP where desolvation of the protein binding pocket makes a minor contribution to the overall entropy of binding given that the pocket is substantially desolvated prior to binding.

  19. Immobilized sialyloligo-macroligand and its protein binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-05-14

    We report a chemoenzymatic synthesis of chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers with different linkages and their oriented immobilization for glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor applications. Specifically, O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were synthesized by enzymatic α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation of a lactose-containing glycopolymer that was synthesized by cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization. (1)H NMR showed almost quantitative α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation. The O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were printed onto amine-functionalized glass slides via isourea bond formation for glycoarray formation. Specific protein binding activity of the arrays was confirmed with α2,3- and α2,6-sialyl specific binding lectins together with inhibition assays. Further, immobilizing O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers onto amine-modified SPR chip via isourea bond formation afforded SPR-based glyco-biosensor, which showed specific binding activity for lectins and influenza viral hemagglutinins (HA). These sialyloligo-macroligand derived glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor are closely to mimic 3D nature presentation of sialyloligosaccharides and will provide important high-throughput tools for virus diagnosis and potential antiviral drug candidates screening applications.

  20. Protein-protein binding before and after photo-modification of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Bioeffects of directed-optical-energy encompass a wide range of applications. One aspect of photochemical interactions involves irradiating a photosensitizer with visible light in order to induce protein unfolding and consequent changes in function. In the past, irradiation of several dye-protein combinations has revealed effects on protein structure. Beta lactoglobulin, human serum albumin (HSA) and tubulin have all been photo-modified with meso-tetrakis(4- sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) bound, but only in the case of tubulin has binding caused a verified loss of biological function (loss of ability to form microtubules) as a result of this light-induced structural change. The current work questions if the photo-induced structural changes that occur to HSA, are sufficient to disable its biological function of binding to osteonectin. The albumin-binding protein, osteonectin, is about half the molecular weight of HSA, so the two proteins and their bound product can be separated and quantified by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography. TSPP was first bound to HSA and irradiated, photo-modifying the structure of HSA. Then native HSA or photo-modified HSA (both with TSPP bound) were compared, to assess loss in HSA's innate binding ability as a result of light-induced structure modification.

  1. Efficient purification of recombinant proteins fused to maltose-binding protein by mixed-mode chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanne, Charlotte; Pezzini, Jérôme; Joucla, Gilles; Hocquellet, Agnès; Barbot, Caroline; Garbay, Bertrand; Santarelli, Xavier

    2009-05-15

    Two mixed-mode resins were evaluated as an alternative to conventional affinity resins for the purification of recombinant proteins fused to maltose-binding protein (MPB). We purified recombinant MBP, MBP-LacZ and MBP-Leap2 from crude Escherichia coli extracts. Mixed-mode resins allowed the efficient purification of MBP-fused proteins. Indeed, the quantity of purified proteins was significantly higher with mixed-mode resins, and their purity was equivalent to that obtained with affinity resins. By using purified MBP, MBP-LacZ and MBP-Leap2, the dynamic binding capacity of mixed-mode resins was 5-fold higher than that of affinity resins. Moreover, the recovery for the three proteins studied was in the 50-60% range for affinity resins, and in the 80-85% range for mixed-mode resins. Mixed-mode resins thus represent a powerful alternative to the classical amylose or dextrin resins for the purification of recombinant proteins fused to maltose-binding protein.

  2. DNA synthesis determines the binding mode of the human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, José A; Cerrón, Fernando; Jarillo, Javier; Beltran-Heredia, Elena; Ciesielski, Grzegorz L; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo; Kaguni, Laurie S; Cao, Francisco J; Ibarra, Borja

    2017-07-07

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) play a key role in genome maintenance, binding and organizing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates. Multimeric SSBs, such as the human mitochondrial SSB (HmtSSB), present multiple sites to interact with ssDNA, which has been shown in vitro to enable them to bind a variable number of single-stranded nucleotides depending on the salt and protein concentration. It has long been suggested that different binding modes might be used selectively for different functions. To study this possibility, we used optical tweezers to determine and compare the structure and energetics of long, individual HmtSSB-DNA complexes assembled on preformed ssDNA and on ssDNA generated gradually during 'in situ' DNA synthesis. We show that HmtSSB binds to preformed ssDNA in two major modes, depending on salt and protein concentration. However, when protein binding was coupled to strand-displacement DNA synthesis, only one of the two binding modes was observed under all experimental conditions. Our results reveal a key role for the gradual generation of ssDNA in modulating the binding mode of a multimeric SSB protein and consequently, in generating the appropriate nucleoprotein structure for DNA synthetic reactions required for genome maintenance. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  4. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  5. Activated macrophage survival is coordinated by TAK1 binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    September R Mihaly

    Full Text Available Macrophages play diverse roles in tissue homeostasis and immunity, and canonically activated macrophages are critically associated with acute inflammatory responses. It is known that activated macrophages undergo cell death after transient activation in some settings, and the viability of macrophages impacts on inflammatory status. Here we report that TGFβ- activated kinase (TAK1 activators, TAK1-binding protein 1 (TAB1 and TAK1-binding protein 2 (TAB2, are critical molecules in the regulation of activated macrophage survival. While deletion of Tak1 induced cell death in bone marrow derived macrophages even without activation, Tab1 or Tab2 deletion alone did not profoundly affect survival of naïve macrophages. However, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated macrophages, even single deletion of Tab1 or Tab2 resulted in macrophage death with both necrotic and apoptotic features. We show that TAB1 and TAB2 were redundantly involved in LPS-induced TAK1 activation in macrophages. These results demonstrate that TAK1 activity is the key to activated macrophage survival. Finally, in an in vivo setting, Tab1 deficiency impaired increase of peritoneal macrophages upon LPS challenge, suggesting that TAK1 complex regulation of macrophages may participate in in vivo macrophage homeostasis. Our results demonstrate that TAB1 and TAB2 are required for activated macrophages, making TAB1 and TAB2 effective targets to control inflammation by modulating macrophage survival.

  6. Melanocortin receptor binding determinants in the agouti protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, L L; Veal, J M; Mountjoy, K G; Wilkison, W O

    1998-01-27

    The agouti protein plays an important role in the development of diabetes and obesity in rodents and has been shown to be a potent antagonist of melanocortin receptors. For this reason alanine-scanning mutagenesis was performed on the agouti protein carboxyl terminus to locate residues important for melanocortin receptor binding inhibition. When agouti residues Arg116 and Phe118 are changed to alanine, very large decreases in agouti affinity for melanocortin receptor 1, 3, and 4 result. Mutation of Phe117 to alanine causes a similar increase in agouti KI app at melanocortin receptor 4. Substitution of agouti residue Asp108 with alanine results in large increases in KI app for all three melanocortin receptors examined. All of these residues are conserved in the agouti-related transcript, ART, whose expression is up-regulated in animal models of obesity. The three-dimensional structure of the agouti carboxyl terminus was modeled, and residues which decrease receptor binding by a factor of > or = 15 when mutated to alanine localize to one side of the structure. These agouti variants with altered receptor selectivity may be useful in determining the role of melanocortin receptors in diabetes and obesity.

  7. Simulation of Reversible Protein–Protein Binding and Calculation of Binding Free Energies Using Perturbed Distance Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Virtually all biological processes depend on the interaction between proteins at some point. The correct prediction of biomolecular binding free-energies has many interesting applications in both basic and applied pharmaceutical research. While recent advances in the field of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have proven the feasibility of the calculation of protein–protein binding free energies, the large conformational freedom of proteins and complex free energy landscapes of binding processes make such calculations a difficult task. Moreover, convergence and reversibility of resulting free-energy values remain poorly described. In this work, an easy-to-use, yet robust approach for the calculation of standard-state protein–protein binding free energies using perturbed distance restraints is described. In the binding process the conformations of the proteins were restrained, as suggested earlier. Two approaches to avoid end-state problems upon release of the conformational restraints were compared. The method was evaluated by practical application to a small model complex of ubiquitin and the very flexible ubiquitin-binding domain of human DNA polymerase ι (UBM2). All computed free energy differences were closely monitored for convergence, and the calculated binding free energies had a mean unsigned deviation of only 1.4 or 2.5 kJ·mol–1 from experimental values. Statistical error estimates were in the order of thermal noise. We conclude that the presented method has promising potential for broad applicability to quantitatively describe protein–protein and various other kinds of complex formation. PMID:28898077

  8. The telomere binding protein TRF2 induces chromatin compaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa M Baker

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that require the telomere binding protein, TRF2, for maintaining chromosome stability. In addition to its ability to modulate DNA repair activities, TRF2 also has direct effects on DNA structure and topology. Given that mammalian telomeric chromatin includes nucleosomes, we investigated the effect of this protein on chromatin structure. TRF2 bound to reconstituted telomeric nucleosomal fibers through both its basic N-terminus and its C-terminal DNA binding domain. Analytical agarose gel electrophoresis (AAGE studies showed that TRF2 promoted the folding of nucleosomal arrays into more compact structures by neutralizing negative surface charge. A construct containing the N-terminal and TRFH domains together altered the charge and radius of nucleosomal arrays similarly to full-length TRF2 suggesting that TRF2-driven changes in global chromatin structure were largely due to these regions. However, the most compact chromatin structures were induced by the isolated basic N-terminal region, as judged by both AAGE and atomic force microscopy. Although the N-terminal region condensed nucleosomal array fibers, the TRFH domain, known to alter DNA topology, was required for stimulation of a strand invasion-like reaction with nucleosomal arrays. Optimal strand invasion also required the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Furthermore, the reaction was not stimulated on linear histone-free DNA. Our data suggest that nucleosomal chromatin has the ability to facilitate this activity of TRF2 which is thought to be involved in stabilizing looped telomere structures.

  9. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  10. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The function of DNA binding protein nucleophosmin in AAV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkunanathan, Stifani; Thorpe, Robin; Zhao, Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) contain minimal viral proteins necessary for their replication. During virus assembly, AAV acquire, inherently and submissively, various cellular proteins. Our previous studies identified the association of AAV vectors with the DNA binding protein nucleophosmin (NPM1). Nucleophosmin has been reported to enhance AAV infection by mobilizing AAV capsids into and out of the nucleolus, indicating the importance of NPM1 in the AAV life cycle; however the role of NPM1 in AAV production remains unknown. In this study, we systematically investigated NPM1 function on AAV production using NPM1 knockdown cells and revealing for the first time the presence of G-quadruplex DNA sequences (GQRS) in the AAV genome, the synergistic NPM1-GQRS function in AAV production and the significant enhancement of NPM1 gene knockdown on AAV vector production. Understanding the role of cellular proteins in the AAV life cycle will greatly facilitate high titre production of AAV vectors for clinical use. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct protein-protein interactions and substrate channelling between cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and CYP26B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cara H; Peng, Chi-Chi; Lutz, Justin D.; Yeung, Catherine K.; Zelter, Alex; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABPs) bind all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) tightly. This study aimed to determine whether atRA is channeled directly to cytochrome P450 (CYP) CYP26B1 by CRABPs, and whether CRABPs interact directly with CYP26B1. atRA bound to CRABPs (holo-CRABP) was efficiently metabolized by CYP26B1. Isotope dilution experiments showed that delivery of atRA to CYP26B1 in solution was similar with or without CRABP. Holo-CRABPs had higher affinity for CYP26B1 than free atRA, but both apo-CRABPs inhibited the formation of 4-OH-RA by CYP26B1. Similar protein-protein interactions between soluble binding proteins and CYPs may be important for other lipophilic CYP substrates. PMID:27416800

  13. Novel approach for selecting the best predictor for identifying the binding sites in DNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, R; Ahmad, Shandar; Gromiha, M Michael

    2013-09-01

    Protein-DNA complexes play vital roles in many cellular processes by the interactions of amino acids with DNA. Several computational methods have been developed for predicting the interacting residues in DNA-binding proteins using sequence and/or structural information. These methods showed different levels of accuracies, which may depend on the choice of data sets used in training, the feature sets selected for developing a predictive model, the ability of the models to capture information useful for prediction or a combination of these factors. In many cases, different methods are likely to produce similar results, whereas in others, the predictors may return contradictory predictions. In this situation, a priori estimates of prediction performance applicable to the system being investigated would be helpful for biologists to choose the best method for designing their experiments. In this work, we have constructed unbiased, stringent and diverse data sets for DNA-binding proteins based on various biologically relevant considerations: (i) seven structural classes, (ii) 86 folds, (iii) 106 superfamilies, (iv) 194 families, (v) 15 binding motifs, (vi) single/double-stranded DNA, (vii) DNA conformation (A, B, Z, etc.), (viii) three functions and (ix) disordered regions. These data sets were culled as non-redundant with sequence identities of 25 and 40% and used to evaluate the performance of 11 different methods in which online services or standalone programs are available. We observed that the best performing methods for each of the data sets showed significant biases toward the data sets selected for their benchmark. Our analysis revealed important data set features, which could be used to estimate these context-specific biases and hence suggest the best method to be used for a given problem. We have developed a web server, which considers these features on demand and displays the best method that the investigator should use. The web server is freely available at

  14. Binding site prediction for protein-protein interactions and novel motif discovery using re-occurring polypeptide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos-Binks, Adam; Patulea, Catalin; Pitre, Sylvain; Schoenrock, Andrew; Gui, Yuan; Green, James R; Golshani, Ashkan; Dehne, Frank

    2011-06-02

    While there are many methods for predicting protein-protein interaction, very few can determine the specific site of interaction on each protein. Characterization of the specific sequence regions mediating interaction (binding sites) is crucial for an understanding of cellular pathways. Experimental methods often report false binding sites due to experimental limitations, while computational methods tend to require data which is not available at the proteome-scale. Here we present PIPE-Sites, a novel method of protein specific binding site prediction based on pairs of re-occurring polypeptide sequences, which have been previously shown to accurately predict protein-protein interactions. PIPE-Sites operates at high specificity and requires only the sequences of query proteins and a database of known binary interactions with no binding site data, making it applicable to binding site prediction at the proteome-scale. PIPE-Sites was evaluated using a dataset of 265 yeast and 423 human interacting proteins pairs with experimentally-determined binding sites. We found that PIPE-Sites predictions were closer to the confirmed binding site than those of two existing binding site prediction methods based on domain-domain interactions, when applied to the same dataset. Finally, we applied PIPE-Sites to two datasets of 2347 yeast and 14,438 human novel interacting protein pairs predicted to interact with high confidence. An analysis of the predicted interaction sites revealed a number of protein subsequences which are highly re-occurring in binding sites and which may represent novel binding motifs. PIPE-Sites is an accurate method for predicting protein binding sites and is applicable to the proteome-scale. Thus, PIPE-Sites could be useful for exhaustive analysis of protein binding patterns in whole proteomes as well as discovery of novel binding motifs. PIPE-Sites is available online at http://pipe-sites.cgmlab.org/.

  15. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  16. Differential dissociation micromethod for the investigation of binding of metandrostenolone (Nerobol) to plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojadzsieva, M.; Kocsar, L. (Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszseguegyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)); Kremmer, T. (Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1985-01-01

    A micromethod was developed to determine the binding of anabolic steroids to plasma proteins. The new procedure combines precipitation with ammonium sulphate and differential dissociation. The binding parameters (association constant, specific binding capacity) are calculated on the basis of dissociation curves of sup(3)H-metandrostenolone from the precipitated sexual binding globuline.

  17. Growth hormone-binding proteins in high-speed cytosols of multiple tissues of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S; Roupas, P; Stevenson, J

    1986-04-11

    Soluble, specific binding protein(s) for growth hormone (GH) have been identified and partially characterized in high-speed cytosolic preparations from a number of rabbit tissues. The binding of 125I-labelled human GH to proteins in liver, heart, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and kidney cytosols was dependent on time and cytosolic protein concentration. By Scatchard analysis, the binding affinities (KA: (2-7) X 10(9) M-1) were somewhat higher than those generally reported for membrane GH receptors. The binding proteins had a greater specificity for somatotrophic hormones than lactogenic hormones, although the kidney appeared to have, in addition, a lactogen-binding protein. By gel filtration, the Mr of the cytosolic GH-binding protein was approximately 100 000 in all tissues. None of the binding proteins was detectable by the poly(ethylene glycol) precipitation method used widely for soluble hormone receptors. The cytosolic GH-binding proteins also cross-reacted with a monoclonal antibody to the rabbit liver membrane GH receptor. These results indicate the ubiquitous presence of apparently naturally soluble GH-binding proteins in the cytosolic fractions of several tissues in the rabbit. Of great interest is their presence in muscle, where GH receptors or binding proteins have not previously been detected, despite muscle being recognized as a classical GH target tissue.

  18. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (DDIT3) induces osteoblastic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renata C; Delany, Anne M; Canalis, Ernesto

    2004-04-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP/DDIT3), a member of the C/EBP family of transcription factors, plays a role in cell survival and differentiation. CHOP/DDIT3 binds to C/EBPs to form heterodimers that do not bind to consensus Cebp sequences, acting as a dominant-negative inhibitor. CHOP/DDIT3 blocks adipogenesis, and we postulated it could induce osteoblastogenesis. We investigated the effects of constitutive CHOP/DDIT3 overexpression in murine ST-2 stromal cells transduced with retroviral vectors. ST-2 cells differentiated toward osteoblasts, and CHOP/DDIT3 accelerated and enhanced the appearance of mineralized nodules, and the expression of osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase mRNAs, particularly in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein-2. CHOP/DDIT3 overexpression opposed adipogenesis, and did not cause substantial changes in cell number. CHOP/DDIT3 overexpression did not modify C/EBPalpha or -beta mRNA levels but decreased C/EBPdelta after 24 d of culture. Electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays demonstrated that overexpression of CHOP/DDIT3 decreased the binding of C/EBPs to their consensus sequence by interacting with C/EBPalpha and -beta, confirming its dominant-negative role. In addition, CHOP/DDIT3 enhanced bone morphogenetic protein-2/Smad signaling. In conclusion, CHOP/DDIT3 enhances osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells, in part by interacting with C/EBPalpha and -beta and also by enhancing Smad signaling.

  19. Interacting protein partners of Arabidopsis RNA binding protein AtRBP45b

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are important players in post-transcriptional gene regulation and shown to play an important role in normal development and in response to environmental perturbations. Arabidopsis RBP, AtRBP45b with triple RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) have are closely related to the yeas...

  20. Acyl-CoA binding protein is an essential protein in mammalian cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jens; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2002-01-01

    In the present work, small interference RNA was used to knock-down acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) in HeLa, HepG2 and Chang cells. Transfection with ACBP-specific siRNA stopped growth, detached cells from the growth surface and blocked thymidine and acetate incorporation. The results show that de...

  1. Down modulation of HIV-1 gene expression using a procaryotic RNA-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Jeang, K. T.

    1990-01-01

    The coat protein of the single stranded RNA bacteriophages acts as a translational repressor by binding with high affinity to a target RNA that encompasses the ribosomal binding site of the replicase gene. We have expressed this procaryotic RNA-binding protein in mammalian cells. Using the coat

  2. A single rainbow trout cobalamin-binding protein stands in for three human binders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Eva; Fedosov, Sergey; Sorensen, Boe S

    2012-01-01

    -binding proteins of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and to compare their properties with those of the three human cobalamin-binding proteins. High cobalamin-binding capacity was found in trout stomach (210 pmol/g), roe (400 pmol/g), roe fluid (390 nmol/liter), and plasma (2500 nmol/liter). In all cases...... affinity for the cobalamin analog cobinamide. Like haptocorrin and transcobalamin, the trout cobalamin-binding protein was present in plasma and recognized ligands with altered nucleotide moiety. Like intrinsic factors, the trout cobalamin-binding protein was present in the stomach and resisted degradation...

  3. Value of heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: heart-type fatty acid-binding protein, acute coronary syndrome, biomarker. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v14i3.36 ... weight (14.5 kDa) protein, which contains 132 amino acid residues (3). Fatty acid-binding proteins ..... injury by assessment of the plasma ratio of my- oglobin over fatty acid binding protein.

  4. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans--A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis.This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein. This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity. The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7 ± 1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100 °C and melting temperature (T(m is 100.2 °C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis.NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids.

  5. Accuracy of protein-protein binding sites in high-throughput template-based modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras J Kundrotas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of protein structures, particularly their binding sites, is essential for the success of modeling protein complexes. Computationally inexpensive methodology is required for genome-wide modeling of such structures. For systematic evaluation of potential accuracy in high-throughput modeling of binding sites, a statistical analysis of target-template sequence alignments was performed for a representative set of protein complexes. For most of the complexes, alignments containing all residues of the interface were found. The full interface alignments were obtained even in the case of poor alignments where a relatively small part of the target sequence (as low as 40% aligned to the template sequence, with a low overall alignment identity (<30%. Although such poor overall alignments might be considered inadequate for modeling of whole proteins, the alignment of the interfaces was strong enough for docking. In the set of homology models built on these alignments, one third of those ranked 1 by a simple sequence identity criteria had RMSD<5 A, the accuracy suitable for low-resolution template free docking. Such models corresponded to multi-domain target proteins, whereas for single-domain proteins the best models had 5 Aprotein-protein complexes.

  6. The surface protein Shr of Streptococcus pyogenes binds heme and transfers it to the streptococcal heme-binding protein Shp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Benfang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heme acquisition machinery in Streptococcus pyogenes is believed to consist of the surface proteins, Shr and Shp, and heme-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter HtsABC. Shp has been shown to rapidly transfer its heme to the lipoprotein component, HtsA, of HtsABC. The function of Shr and the heme source of Shp have not been established. Results The objective of this study was to determine whether Shr binds heme and is a heme source of Shp. To achieve the objective, recombinant Shr protein was prepared. The purified Shr displays a spectrum typical of hemoproteins, indicating that Shr binds heme and acquires heme from Escherichia coli hemoproteins in vivo. Spectral analysis of Shr and Shp isolated from a mixture of Shr and heme-free Shp (apoShp indicates that Shr and apoShp lost and gained heme, respectively; whereas Shr did not efficiently lose its heme in incubation with apoHtsA under the identical conditions. These results suggest that Shr directly transfers its heme to Shp. In addition, the rates of heme transfer from human hemoglobin to apoShp are close to those of simple ferric heme dissociation from hemoglobin, suggesting that methemoglobin does not directly transfer its heme to apoShp. Conclusion We have demonstrated that recombinant Shr can acquire heme from E. coli hemoproteins in vivo and appears to directly transfer its heme to Shp and that Shp appears not to directly acquire heme from human methemoglobin. These results suggest the possibility that Shr is a source of heme for Shp and that the Shr-to-Shp heme transfer is a step of the heme acquisition process in S. pyogenes. Further characterization of the Shr/Shp/HtsA system would advance our understanding of the mechanism of heme acquisition in S. pyogenes.

  7. Application of immunoglobulin-binding proteins a, g, l in the affinity chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Sviatenko, О.; Gorbatiuk, O.; Vasylchenko, О.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins A, G and L are native or recombinant proteins of microbial origin that bind to mammalian immunoglobulins. Preferably recombinant variants of proteins A, G, L are used in biotechnology for affinity sorbents production. Сomparative characteristics of proteins A, G, L and affinity sorbents on the basis of them, advantages and disadvantages of these proteins application as ligands in the affinity chromatography are done. Analysis of proteins A, G, L properties is presented. Binding speci...

  8. Nonequilibrium synthesis and assembly of hybrid inorganic-protein nanostructures using an engineered DNA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Haixia; Choe, Woo-Seok; Thai, Corrine K; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Traxler, Beth A; Baneyx, François; Schwartz, Daniel T

    2005-11-09

    We show that a protein with no intrinsic inorganic synthesis activity can be endowed with the ability to control the formation of inorganic nanostructures under thermodynamically unfavorable (nonequilibrium) conditions, reproducing a key feature of biological hard-tissue growth and assembly. The nonequilibrium synthesis of Cu(2)O nanoparticles is accomplished using an engineered derivative of the DNA-binding protein TraI in a room-temperature precursor electrolyte. The functional TraI derivative (TraIi1753::CN225) is engineered to possess a cysteine-constrained 12-residue Cu(2)O binding sequence, designated CN225, that is inserted into a permissive site in TraI. When TraIi1753::CN225 is included in the precursor electrolyte, stable Cu(2)O nanoparticles form, even though the concentrations of [Cu(+)] and [OH(-)] are at 5% of the solubility product (K(sp,Cu2O)). Negative control experiments verify that Cu(2)O formation is controlled by inclusion of the CN225 binding sequence. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction reveal a core-shell structure for the nonequilibrium nanoparticles: a 2 nm Cu(2)O core is surrounded by an adsorbed protein shell. Quantitative protein adsorption studies show that the unexpected stability of Cu(2)O is imparted by the nanomolar surface binding affinity of TraIi1753::CN225 for Cu(2)O (K(d) = 1.2 x 10(-)(8) M), which provides favorable interfacial energetics (-45 kJ/mol) for the core-shell configuration. The protein shell retains the DNA-binding traits of TraI, as evidenced by the spontaneous organization of nanoparticles onto circular double-stranded DNA.

  9. A bioinformatic survey of RNA-binding proteins in Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B P Niranjan; Shrestha, Sony; Hart, Kevin J; Liang, Xiaoying; Kemirembe, Karen; Cui, Liwang; Lindner, Scott E

    2015-11-02

    The malaria parasites in the genus Plasmodium have a very complicated life cycle involving an invertebrate vector and a vertebrate host. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are critical factors involved in every aspect of the development of these parasites. However, very few RBPs have been functionally characterized to date in the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Using different bioinformatic methods and tools we searched P. falciparum genome to list and annotate RBPs. A representative 3D models for each of the RBD domain identified in P. falciparum was created using I-TESSAR and SWISS-MODEL. Microarray and RNAseq data analysis pertaining PfRBPs was performed using MeV software. Finally, Cytoscape was used to create protein-protein interaction network for CITH-Dozi and Caf1-CCR4-Not complexes. We report the identification of 189 putative RBP genes belonging to 13 different families in Plasmodium, which comprise 3.5% of all annotated genes. Almost 90% (169/189) of these genes belong to six prominent RBP classes, namely RNA recognition motifs, DEAD/H-box RNA helicases, K homology, Zinc finger, Puf and Alba gene families. Interestingly, almost all of the identified RNA-binding helicases and KH genes have cognate homologs in model species, suggesting their evolutionary conservation. Exploration of the existing P. falciparum blood-stage transcriptomes revealed that most RBPs have peak mRNA expression levels early during the intraerythrocytic development cycle, which taper off in later stages. Nearly 27% of RBPs have elevated expression in gametocytes, while 47 and 24% have elevated mRNA expression in ookinete and asexual stages. Comparative interactome analyses using human and Plasmodium protein-protein interaction datasets suggest extensive conservation of the PfCITH/PfDOZI and PfCaf1-CCR4-NOT complexes. The Plasmodium parasites possess a large number of putative RBPs belonging to most of RBP families identified so far, suggesting the presence of extensive post

  10. IRBP-like proteins in the eyes of six cephalopod species--immunochemical relationship to vertebrate interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) and cephalopod retinal-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, S L; Lee, P G; Ozaki, K; Hara, R; Hara, T; Bridges, C D

    1988-01-01

    SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting were used to examine soluble proteins from the eyes of six species of cephalopods i.e. Lolliguncula brevis, Sepia officinalis, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides, Rossia pacifica and Loligo opalescens. All species had a protein ("IRBP") with molecular weight virtually identical with vertebrate interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) averaging 132,400 +/- 700 (n = 6). "IRBP" reacted on nitrocellulose blot transfers with rabbit antibovine IRBP and rabbit antifrog IRBP antibodies. Unlike vertebrate IRBP, cephalopod "IRBP" (from L. brevis) did not bind exogenous retinol or concanavalin A. The N-terminal amino acid appeared to be blocked in samples electroeluted from SDS gels. The antifrog IRBP antibodies also reacted with a series of proteins with molecular weights between 46,000 and 47,000, identified as retinal-binding protein (RALBP) with anti-RALBP antibodies. Anti-IRBP also reacted with pure RALBP prepared from Todarodes pacificus. Occasionally, anti-RALBP antibodies were seen to react weakly with "IRBP" in some cephalopods. We conclude that RALBP, cephalopod "IRBP" and vertebrate IRBP share a common but distant ancestry, and that a protein resembling IRBP appeared before the vertebrates diverged from the invertebrates. Both RALBP and IRBP appear to have analogous functions in shuttling retinoids between rhodopsin and the corresponding isomerizing system, retinochrome in the cephalopods and retinol isomerase in the vertebrates. The function of cephalopod "IRBP" is unknown.

  11. Facile manipulation of protein localization in fission yeast through binding of GFP-binding protein to GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Hui; Wang, Gao-Yuan; Hao, Hao-Chao; Chao, Chun-Jiang; Wang, Yamei; Jin, Quan-Wen

    2017-03-01

    GFP-binding protein (or GBP) has been recently developed in various systems and organisms as an efficient tool to purify GFP-fusion proteins. Due to the high affinity between GBP and GFP or GFP variants, this GBP-based approach is also ideally suited to alter the localization of functional proteins in live cells. In order to facilitate the wide use of the GBP-targeting approach in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we developed a set of pFA6a-, pJK148- and pUC119-based vectors containing GBP- or GBP-mCherry-coding sequences and variants of inducible nmt1 or constitutive adh1 promoters that result in different levels of expression. The GBP or GBP-mCherry fragments can serve as cassettes for N- or C-terminal genomic tagging of genes of interest. We illustrated the application of these vectors in the construction of yeast strains with Dma1 or Cdc7 tagged with GBP-mCherry and efficient targeting of Dma1- or Cdc7-GBP-mCherry to the spindle pole body by Sid4-GFP. This series of vectors should help to facilitate the application of the GBP-targeting approach in manipulating protein localization and the analysis of gene function in fission yeast, at the level of single genes, as well as at a systematic scale. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. A Venom Gland Extracellular Chitin-Binding-Like Protein from Pupal Endoparasitoid Wasps, Pteromalus Puparum, Selectively Binds Chitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitin-binding proteins (CBPs are present in many species and they act in a variety of biological processes. We analyzed a Pteromalus puparum venom apparatus proteome and transcriptome and identified a partial gene encoding a possible CBP. Here, we report cloning a full-length cDNA of a sequence encoding a chitin-binding-like protein (PpCBP from P. puparum, a pupal endoparasitoid of Pieris rapae. The cDNA encoded a 96-amino-acid protein, including a secretory signal peptide and a chitin-binding peritrophin-A domain. Phylogenetic analysis of chitin binding domains (CBDs of cuticle proteins and peritrophic matrix proteins in selected insects revealed that the CBD of PpCBP clustered with the CBD of Nasonia vitripennis. The PpCBP is specifically expressed in the venom apparatus of P. puparum, mostly in the venom gland. PpCBP expression was highest at day one after adult eclosion and much lower for the following five days. We produced a recombinant PpCBP and binding assays showed the recombinant protein selectively binds chitin but not cellulose in vitro. We infer that PpCBP serves a structural role in the venom reservoir, or may be injected into the host to help wound healing of the host exoskeleton.

  13. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: physiology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S I; Stevenson, J L; Roupas, P

    1994-07-01

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular form(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR.

  14. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: Physiology and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herington, A.C.; Ymer, S.I.; Stevenson, J.L.; Roupas, P. [Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular forms(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and a membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR. 43 refs.

  15. Covalent binding of acetaldehyde to proteins: participation of lysine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, D J; Newman, M R; Donohue, T M; Sorrell, M F

    1987-12-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that lysine is the major amino acid participating in the binding of acetaldehyde to proteins. The formation of both stable and unstable acetaldehyde-albumin adducts was shown to occur via the reaction of acetaldehyde with lysine residues. This conclusion was based on the following experimental evidence: (a) the ratio of stable to unstable adducts of bovine serum albumin was similar to that observed for polylysine; (b) acetylation of albumin markedly reduced acetaldehyde binding; (c) the radio-activity profiles (obtained by high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis) of [14C]acetaldehyde modified amino acids hydrolyzed from total and stable adducts of albumin were nearly identical to those of polylysine or alpha-t-boc-lysine. Analysis of stable adducts of albumin indicated two major modified lysine residues; one residue was much more acidic and the other more basic than unmodified lysine. Unstable adducts were shown to be Schiff bases since NaBH4 treatment resulted in the formation of N-ethyllysine residues. The reducing agents, NaCNBH3 and ascorbic acid, both increased stable adduct formation via increased binding to lysine residues; however, a different elution profile of modified lysine residues was observed for these reducing agents. NaCNBH3 increased the formation of N-ethyllysine residues exclusively, whereas ascorbate increased the formation of the acidic adduct of lysine and also caused the formation of an additional modified lysine residue which was present only in the ascorbate-treated polypeptides. In addition to their detection by radioactivity measurements, the acetaldehyde-lysine adducts could also be detected by the fluorescence of their ophthalaldehyde derivatives.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RNA BINDING DOMAIN OF HUMAN STEM LOOP BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruthi Kashyap

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A gene encoding the RNA binding domain (RBD of human stem loop binding protein (SLBP was cloned in pET 28a vector and over-expressed in E. coli codon plus cells. The over-expressed SLBP-RBD carried no tag and aggregated as inclusion bodies in the cell lysate. Inclusion bodies were semi-purified to >85% purity by establishing a method involving detergent washing and subsequently denatured in 8 M urea. Refolding of the denatured RBD was carried out by step dialysis in decreasing concentrations of urea and L-arginine. Refolded SLBP-RBD was analyzed using size exclusion chromatography that revealed its monomeric nature and folded state. Uniformly 15N and 15N,13C labeled SLBP-RBD was prepared at concentrations for solution NMR studies. Approximately, 60% of the sequence specific backbone resonance assignments have been achieved through standard triple resonance NMR experiments. Analyses of secondary chemical shifts reveal presence of a small helical secondary structural elements and large intrinsically disordered regions.

  17. Ku80 facilitates chromatin binding of the telomere binding protein, TRF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Lauren S; Lerner, Chad A; Torres, Paulina F; Sell, Christian

    2010-09-15

    The Ku70/80 heterodimer is central to non-homologous end joining repair of DNA double-strand breaks and the Ku80 gene appears to be essential for human but not rodent cell survival. The Ku70/80 heterodimer is located at telomeres but its precise function in telomere maintenance is not known. In order to examine the role of Ku80 beyond DNA repair in more detail, we have taken a knockdown approach using a human fibroblast strain. Following targeted Ku80 knockdown, telomere defects are observed and the steady state levels of the TRF2 protein are reduced. Inhibitor studies indicate that this loss of TRF2 is mediated by the proteasome and degradation of TRF2 following Ku depletion appears to involve a decrease in chromatin binding of TRF2, suggesting that the Ku heterodimer enhances TRF2 chromatin association and that non-chromatin bound TRF2 is targeted to the proteasome.

  18. Convolutional neural network architectures for predicting DNA–protein binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Haoyang; Edwards, Matthew D.; Liu, Ge; Gifford, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Convolutional neural networks (CNN) have outperformed conventional methods in modeling the sequence specificity of DNA–protein binding. Yet inappropriate CNN architectures can yield poorer performance than simpler models. Thus an in-depth understanding of how to match CNN architecture to a given task is needed to fully harness the power of CNNs for computational biology applications. Results: We present a systematic exploration of CNN architectures for predicting DNA sequence binding using a large compendium of transcription factor datasets. We identify the best-performing architectures by varying CNN width, depth and pooling designs. We find that adding convolutional kernels to a network is important for motif-based tasks. We show the benefits of CNNs in learning rich higher-order sequence features, such as secondary motifs and local sequence context, by comparing network performance on multiple modeling tasks ranging in difficulty. We also demonstrate how careful construction of sequence benchmark datasets, using approaches that control potentially confounding effects like positional or motif strength bias, is critical in making fair comparisons between competing methods. We explore how to establish the sufficiency of training data for these learning tasks, and we have created a flexible cloud-based framework that permits the rapid exploration of alternative neural network architectures for problems in computational biology. Availability and Implementation: All the models analyzed are available at http://cnn.csail.mit.edu. Contact: gifford@mit.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307608

  19. Convolutional neural network architectures for predicting DNA-protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Haoyang; Edwards, Matthew D; Liu, Ge; Gifford, David K

    2016-06-15

    Convolutional neural networks (CNN) have outperformed conventional methods in modeling the sequence specificity of DNA-protein binding. Yet inappropriate CNN architectures can yield poorer performance than simpler models. Thus an in-depth understanding of how to match CNN architecture to a given task is needed to fully harness the power of CNNs for computational biology applications. We present a systematic exploration of CNN architectures for predicting DNA sequence binding using a large compendium of transcription factor datasets. We identify the best-performing architectures by varying CNN width, depth and pooling designs. We find that adding convolutional kernels to a network is important for motif-based tasks. We show the benefits of CNNs in learning rich higher-order sequence features, such as secondary motifs and local sequence context, by comparing network performance on multiple modeling tasks ranging in difficulty. We also demonstrate how careful construction of sequence benchmark datasets, using approaches that control potentially confounding effects like positional or motif strength bias, is critical in making fair comparisons between competing methods. We explore how to establish the sufficiency of training data for these learning tasks, and we have created a flexible cloud-based framework that permits the rapid exploration of alternative neural network architectures for problems in computational biology. All the models analyzed are available at http://cnn.csail.mit.edu gifford@mit.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  1. RNA-Binding Proteins: Splicing Factors and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alger M. Fredericks

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by interactions of the Core Spliceosome and an array of accessory RNA binding proteins with cis-sequence elements. Splicing is a major regulatory component in higher eukaryotes. Disruptions in splicing are a major contributor to human disease. One in three hereditary disease alleles are believed to cause aberrant splicing. Hereditary disease alleles can alter splicing by disrupting a splicing element, creating a toxic RNA, or affecting splicing factors. One of the challenges of medical genetics is identifying causal variants from the thousands of possibilities discovered in a clinical sequencing experiment. Here we review the basic biochemistry of splicing, the mechanisms of splicing mutations, the methods for identifying splicing mutants, and the potential of therapeutic interventions.

  2. Novel RNA-binding properties of the MTG chromatin regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchi Nicoletta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myeloid translocation gene (MTG proteins are non-DNA-binding transcriptional regulators capable of interacting with chromatin modifying proteins. As a consequence of leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, two of the MTG proteins, MTG8 and MTG16, are fused to the DNA-binding domain of AML1, a transcriptional activator crucial for hematopoiesis. The AML1-MTG fusion proteins, as the wild type MTGs, display four conserved homology regions (NHR1-4 related to the Drosophila nervy protein. Structural protein analyses led us to test the hypothesis that specific MTG domains may mediate RNA binding. Results By using an RNA-binding assay based on synthetic RNA homopolymers and a panel of MTG deletion mutants, here we show that all the MTG proteins can bind RNA. The RNA-binding properties can be traced to two regions: the Zinc finger domains in the NHR4, which mediate Zinc-dependent RNA binding, and a novel short basic region (SBR upstream of the NHR2, which mediates Zinc-independent RNA binding. The two AML1-MTG fusion proteins, retaining both the Zinc fingers domains and the SBR, also display RNA-binding properties. Conclusion Evidence has been accumulating that RNA plays a role in transcriptional control. Both wild type MTGs and chimeric AML1-MTG proteins display in vitro RNA-binding properties, thus opening new perspectives on the possible involvement of an RNA component in MTG-mediated chromatin regulation.

  3. Essential dynamics of the cellular retinol-binding protein - Evidence for ligand-induced conformational changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalten, D.M.F.; Findlay, J.B.C.; Amadei, A; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) is an intracellular retinol carrier protein belonging to a family of hydrophobic ligand-binding proteins, It transports retinol to specific locations in the cell where, for instance, it is esterified for storage, Recently solved crystallographic structures

  4. A Sequence-Based Dynamic Ensemble Learning System for Protein Ligand-Binding Site Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Hu, ShanShan; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Xin; Li, Jinyan; Xia, Junfeng; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures. This paper proposes a dynamic ensemble approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues by using sequence information only. To avoid problems resulting from highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we constructed several balanced data sets and we trained a random forest classifier for each of them. We dynamically selected a subset of classifiers according to the similarity between the target protein and the proteins in the training data set. The combination of the predictions of the classifier subset to each query protein target yielded the final predictions. The ensemble of these classifiers formed a sequence-based predictor to identify protein-ligand binding sites. Experimental results on two Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction datasets and the ccPDB dataset demonstrated that of our proposed method compared favorably with the state-of-the-art. http://www2.ahu.edu.cn/pchen/web/LigandDSES.htm.

  5. [Determination of plasma protein binding rate of arctiin and arctigenin with ultrafiltration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue-Ying; Wang, Wei; Tan, Ri-Qiu; Dou, De-Qiang

    2013-02-01

    To determine the plasma protein binding rate of arctiin and arctigenin. The ultrafiltration combined with HPLC was employed to determine the plasma protein binding rate of arctiin and arctigenin as well as rat plasma and healthy human plasma proteins. The plasma protein binding rate of arctiin with rat plasma at the concentrations of 64. 29, 32.14, 16.07 mg x L(-1) were (71.2 +/- 2.0)%, (73.4 +/- 0.61)%, (78.2 +/- 1.9)%, respectively; while the plasma protein binding rate of arctiin with healthy human plasma at the above concentrations were (64.8 +/- 3.1)%, (64.5 +/- 2.5)%, (77.5 +/- 1.7)%, respectively. The plasma protein binding rate of arctigenin with rat plasma at the concentrations of 77.42, 38.71, 19.36 mg x L(-1) were (96.7 +/- 0.41)%, (96.8 +/- 1.6)%, (97.3 +/- 0.46)%, respectively; while the plasma protein binding rate of arctigenin with normal human plasma at the above concentrations were (94.7 +/- 3.1)%, (96.8 +/- 1.6)%, (97.9 +/- 1.3)%, respectively. The binding rate of arctiin with rat plasma protein was moderate, which is slightly higher than the binding rate of arctiin with healthy human plasma protein. The plasma protein binding rates of arctigenin with both rat plasma and healthy human plasma are very high.

  6. A Genetic Approach to Identifying Signal Transduction Mechanisms Initiated by Receptors for TGF-B-Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    they can function as transcriptional activators. In Drosophila , Mad can directly bind the enhancer of vestigial and mediate its activation by dpp...J. (1975). Pattern formation in the imaginal wing disc of Drosophila melanogaster : fate map, regeneration, and duplication. J. Exp. Zool. 193, 49...In The Development of Drosophila melanogaster , M. Bate and M. Martinez Arias, ed. (Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory press

  7. A tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins from PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jing

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the research on protein functional sites, researchers often need to identify binding-site residues on a protein. A commonly used strategy is to find a complex structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB that consists of the protein of interest and its interacting partner(s and calculate binding-site residues based on the complex structure. However, since a protein may participate in multiple interactions, the binding-site residues calculated based on one complex structure usually do not reveal all binding sites on a protein. Thus, this requires researchers to find all PDB complexes that contain the protein of interest and combine the binding-site information gleaned from them. This process is very time-consuming. Especially, combing binding-site information obtained from different PDB structures requires tedious work to align protein sequences. The process becomes overwhelmingly difficult when researchers have a large set of proteins to analyze, which is usually the case in practice. Results In this study, we have developed a tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins, TCBRP http://yanbioinformatics.cs.usu.edu:8080/ppbindingsubmit. For an input protein, TCBRP can quickly find all binding-site residues on the protein by automatically combining the information obtained from all PDB structures that consist of the protein of interest. Additionally, TCBRP presents the binding-site residues in different categories according to the interaction type. TCBRP also allows researchers to set the definition of binding-site residues. Conclusion The developed tool is very useful for the research on protein binding site analysis and prediction.

  8. A tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins from PDB structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Yan, Changhui

    2009-08-03

    In the research on protein functional sites, researchers often need to identify binding-site residues on a protein. A commonly used strategy is to find a complex structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that consists of the protein of interest and its interacting partner(s) and calculate binding-site residues based on the complex structure. However, since a protein may participate in multiple interactions, the binding-site residues calculated based on one complex structure usually do not reveal all binding sites on a protein. Thus, this requires researchers to find all PDB complexes that contain the protein of interest and combine the binding-site information gleaned from them. This process is very time-consuming. Especially, combing binding-site information obtained from different PDB structures requires tedious work to align protein sequences. The process becomes overwhelmingly difficult when researchers have a large set of proteins to analyze, which is usually the case in practice. In this study, we have developed a tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins, TCBRP http://yanbioinformatics.cs.usu.edu:8080/ppbindingsubmit. For an input protein, TCBRP can quickly find all binding-site residues on the protein by automatically combining the information obtained from all PDB structures that consist of the protein of interest. Additionally, TCBRP presents the binding-site residues in different categories according to the interaction type. TCBRP also allows researchers to set the definition of binding-site residues. The developed tool is very useful for the research on protein binding site analysis and prediction.

  9. Proteomic analysis of egg white heparin-binding proteins: towards the identification of natural antibacterial molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Guyot, Nicolas; Labas, Valérie; Harichaux, Grégoire; Chessé, Magali; Poirier, Jean-Claude; Nys, Yves; Rehault-Godbert, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The chicken egg resists most environmental microbes suggesting that it potentially contains efficient antimicrobial molecules. Considering that some heparin-binding proteins in mammals are antibacterial, we investigated the presence and the antimicrobial activity of heparin-binding proteins from chicken egg white. Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins recovered after heparin-affinity chromatography, revealed 20 proteins, including known antimicrobial proteins (avidin, lysozyme, TENP, ova...

  10. Versatile protein microarray based on carbohydrate-binding modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Keren; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Benhar, Itai; Azriel-Rosenfeld, Ronit; Lamed, Raphael; Barak, Yoav; Bayer, Edward A; Morag, Ely

    2005-05-01

    Non-DNA microarrays, such as protein, peptide and small molecule microarrays, can potentially revolutionize the high-throughput screening tools currently used in basic and pharmaceutical research. However, fundamental obstacles remain that limit their rapid and widespread implementation as an alternative bioanalytical approach. These include the prerequisite for numerous proteins in active and purified form, ineffectual immobilization strategies and inadequate means for quality control of the considerable numbers of multiple reagents. This study describes a simple yet efficient strategy for the production of non-DNA microarrays, based on the tenacious affinity of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) for its three-dimensional substrate, i.e., cellulose. Various microarray formats are described, e.g., conventional and single-chain antibody microarrays and peptide microarrays for serodiagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus patients. CBM-based microarray technology overcomes many of the previous obstacles that have hindered fabrication of non-DNA microarrays and provides a technically simple but effective alternative to conventional microarray technology.

  11. Microarray-based study of carbohydrate-protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenxin; Gao, Jingqing

    2010-01-01

    To develop a novel high-throughput tool for monitoring carbohydrate-protein interactions, carbohydrate or glycoprotein microarrays have been prepared for binding with lectins. The interaction events are marked by attachment of fluorescent dyes and gold nanoparticles. The attachment of the fluorescent dyes and gold nanoparticles is achieved by standard avidin-biotin chemistry. The detection principle is fluorescence or resonance light scattering (RLS). The electroless deposition of silver onto the gold particles has been employed for RLS signal enhancement. Well-defined recognition systems, three monosaccharides (Man-alpha, Glc-beta, and Gal-beta) or three glycoproteins (Asf, RNase A, and RNase B) with two lectins (ConA and RCA120), are chosen here to establish the microarray-based assay, respectively. Highly selective recognition of carbohydrate-protein down to 25.6 pg/mL for RCA120 in solution and 8 microM for Gal-beta and 32 ng/mL for Asf on the microarray spots is demonstrated.

  12. QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Studies of Metal Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Vidossich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM simulations have strongly contributed to providing insights into the understanding of several structural and mechanistic aspects of biological molecules. They played a particularly important role in metal binding proteins, where the electronic effects of transition metals have to be explicitly taken into account for the correct representation of the underlying biochemical process. In this review, after a brief description of the basic concepts of the QM/MM method, we provide an overview of its capabilities using selected examples taken from our work. Specifically, we will focus on heme peroxidases, metallo-β-lactamases, α-synuclein and ligase ribozymes to show how this approach is capable of describing the catalytic and/or structural role played by transition (Fe, Zn or Cu and main group (Mg metals. Applications will reveal how metal ions influence the formation and reduction of high redox intermediates in catalytic cycles and enhance drug metabolism, amyloidogenic aggregate formation and nucleic acid synthesis. In turn, it will become manifest that the protein frame directs and modulates the properties and reactivity of the metal ions.

  13. RNA binding proteins in the regulation of heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blech-Hermoni, Yotam; Ladd, Andrea N

    2013-11-01

    In vivo, RNA molecules are constantly accompanied by RNA binding proteins (RBPs), which are intimately involved in every step of RNA biology, including transcription, editing, splicing, transport and localization, stability, and translation. RBPs therefore have opportunities to shape gene expression at multiple levels. This capacity is particularly important during development, when dynamic chemical and physical changes give rise to complex organs and tissues. This review discusses RBPs in the context of heart development. Since the targets and functions of most RBPs--in the heart and at large--are not fully understood, this review focuses on the expression and roles of RBPs that have been implicated in specific stages of heart development or developmental pathology. RBPs are involved in nearly every stage of cardiogenesis, including the formation, morphogenesis, and maturation of the heart. A fuller understanding of the roles and substrates of these proteins could ultimately provide attractive targets for the design of therapies for congenital heart defects, cardiovascular disease, or cardiac tissue repair. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Is vitamin D binding protein a novel predictor of labour?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Liong

    Full Text Available Vitamin D binding protein (VDBP has previously been identified in the amniotic fluid and cervicovaginal fluid (CVF of pregnant women. The biological functions of VDBP include acting as a carrier protein for vitamin D metabolites, the clearance of actin that is released during tissue injury and the augmentation of the pro-inflammatory response. This longitudinal observational study was conducted on 221 healthy pregnant women who spontaneously laboured and delivered either at term or preterm. Serial CVF samples were collected and VDBP was measured by ELISA. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the utility of VDBP as a predictor of labour. VDBP in the CVF did not change between 20 and 35 weeks' gestation. VDBP measured in-labour was significantly increased 4.2 to 7.4-fold compared to 4-7, 8-14 and 15-28 days before labour (P<0.05. VDBP concentration was 4.3-fold significantly higher at 0-3 days compared to 15-28 days pre-labour (P<0.05. The efficacy of VDBP to predict spontaneous labour onset within 3 days provided a positive and negative predictive value of 82.8% and 95.3% respectively (area under receiver operator characteristic curve  = 0.974. This longitudinal study of pregnant women suggests that VDBP in the CVF may be a useful predictor of labour.

  15. The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lauridsen, Anna Lis

    2004-01-01

    function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). DESIGN: Study 1...

  16. Penicillin binding proteins as danger signals: meningococcal penicillin binding protein 2 activates dendritic cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Hill

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen responsible for life-threatening inflammatory diseases. Meningococcal penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs and particularly PBP2 are involved in bacterial resistance to β-lactams. Here we describe a novel function for PBP2 that activates human and mouse dendritic cells (DC in a time and dose-dependent manner. PBP2 induces MHC II (LOGEC50 = 4.7 µg/ml ± 0.1, CD80 (LOGEC50 = 4.88 µg/ml ± 0.15 and CD86 (LOGEC50 = 5.36 µg/ml ± 0.1. This effect was abolished when DCs were co-treated with anti-PBP2 antibodies. PBP2-treated DCs displayed enhanced immunogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, proteins co-purified with PBP2 showed no effect on DC maturation. We show through different in vivo and in vitro approaches that this effect is not due to endotoxin contamination. At the mechanistic level, PBP2 induces nuclear localization of p65 NF-kB of 70.7 ± 5.1% cells versus 12 ± 2.6% in untreated DCs and needs TLR4 expression to mature DCs. Immunoprecipitation and blocking experiments showed thatPBP2 binds TLR4. In conclusion, we describe a novel function of meningococcal PBP2 as a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP at the host-pathogen interface that could be recognized by the immune system as a danger signal, promoting the development of immune responses.

  17. Penicillin binding proteins as danger signals: meningococcal penicillin binding protein 2 activates dendritic cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Marcelo; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Segovia, Mercedes; Zarantonelli, Maria Leticia; Tilly, Gaëlle; Blancou, Philippe; Bériou, Gaëlle; Josien, Régis; Anegon, Ignacio; Hong, Eva; Ruckly, Corinne; Antignac, Aude; El Ghachi, Meriem; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Cuturi, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen responsible for life-threatening inflammatory diseases. Meningococcal penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and particularly PBP2 are involved in bacterial resistance to β-lactams. Here we describe a novel function for PBP2 that activates human and mouse dendritic cells (DC) in a time and dose-dependent manner. PBP2 induces MHC II (LOGEC50 = 4.7 µg/ml ± 0.1), CD80 (LOGEC50 = 4.88 µg/ml ± 0.15) and CD86 (LOGEC50 = 5.36 µg/ml ± 0.1). This effect was abolished when DCs were co-treated with anti-PBP2 antibodies. PBP2-treated DCs displayed enhanced immunogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, proteins co-purified with PBP2 showed no effect on DC maturation. We show through different in vivo and in vitro approaches that this effect is not due to endotoxin contamination. At the mechanistic level, PBP2 induces nuclear localization of p65 NF-kB of 70.7 ± 5.1% cells versus 12 ± 2.6% in untreated DCs and needs TLR4 expression to mature DCs. Immunoprecipitation and blocking experiments showed thatPBP2 binds TLR4. In conclusion, we describe a novel function of meningococcal PBP2 as a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) at the host-pathogen interface that could be recognized by the immune system as a danger signal, promoting the development of immune responses.

  18. Identification of pheromone components and their binding affinity to the odorant binding protein CcapOBP83a-2 of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siciliano, P.; He, X. L.; Woodcock, C.; Pickett, J. A.; Field, L. M.; Birkett, M. A.; Kalinová, Blanka; Gomulski, L. M.; Scolari, F.; Gasperi, G.; Malacrida, A. R.; Zhou, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 48, May (2014), s. 51-62 ISSN 0965-1748 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : medfly * Ceratitis capitata * olfaction * odorant binding protein * pheromone binding protein * pheromone * binding studies * protein expression * electroantennography * GC-EAG * fluorescence displacement Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.450, year: 2014

  19. The Structure, Stability and Pheromone Binding of the Male Mouse Protein Sex Pheromone Darcin: e108415

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marie M Phelan; Lynn McLean; Stuart D Armstrong; Jane L Hurst; Robert J Beynon; Lu-Yun Lian

    2014-01-01

      Mouse urine contains highly polymorphic major urinary proteins that have multiple functions in scent communication through their abilities to bind, transport and release hydrophobic volatile pheromones...

  20. The structure, stability and pheromone binding of the male mouse protein sex pheromone darcin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phelan, Marie M; McLean, Lynn; Armstrong, Stuart D; Hurst, Jane L; Beynon, Robert J; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Mouse urine contains highly polymorphic major urinary proteins that have multiple functions in scent communication through their abilities to bind, transport and release hydrophobic volatile pheromones...

  1. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate...... defence against HIV. A chimeric protein containing the N-terminal and collagen domains of SP-D linked to the neck and carbohydrate-recognition domains of MBL (called SP-D/MBL(neck+CRD)) had greater ability to bind to gp120 and inhibit virus replication than either SP-D or MBL. The enhanced binding of SP...

  2. Complement proteins bind to nanoparticle protein corona and undergo dynamic exchange in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Guankui; Griffin, James I.; Brenneman, Barbara; Banda, Nirmal K.; Holers, V. Michael; Backos, Donald S.; Wu, Linping; Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Simberg, Dmitri

    2017-05-01

    When nanoparticles are intravenously injected into the body, complement proteins deposit on the surface of nanoparticles in a process called opsonization. These proteins prime the particle for removal by immune cells and may contribute toward infusion-related adverse effects such as allergic responses. The ways complement proteins assemble on nanoparticles have remained unclear. Here, we show that dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide core-shell nanoworms incubated in human serum and plasma are rapidly opsonized with the third complement component (C3) via the alternative pathway. Serum and plasma proteins bound to the nanoworms are mostly intercalated into the nanoworm shell. We show that C3 covalently binds to these absorbed proteins rather than the dextran shell and the protein-bound C3 undergoes dynamic exchange in vitro. Surface-bound proteins accelerate the assembly of the complement components of the alternative pathway on the nanoworm surface. When nanoworms pre-coated with human plasma were injected into mice, C3 and other adsorbed proteins undergo rapid loss. Our results provide important insight into dynamics of protein adsorption and complement opsonization of nanomedicines.

  3. Ligand-binding properties of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain of Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, W; Banas, J A

    2000-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan.

  4. Adsorption of DNA binding proteins to functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces with and without DNA wrapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    We examined the adsorption of DNA binding proteins on functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When SWNTs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), moderate adsorption of protein molecules was observed. In contrast, nanotubes functionalized with CONH 2 groups (CONH 2 -SWNT) exhibited very strong interactions between the CONH 2 -SWNT and DNA binding proteins. Instead, when these SWNT surfaces were wrapped with DNA molecules (thymine 30-mers), protein binding was a little decreased. Our results revealed that DNA wrapped PEG-SWNT was one of the most promising candidates to realize DNA nanodevices involving protein reactions on DNA-SWNT surfaces. In addition, the DNA binding protein RecA was more adhesive than single-stranded DNA binding proteins to the functionalized SWNT surfaces.

  5. Analyzing the Folding and Binding Steps of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein by Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Daniela; Troilo, Francesca; Toto, Angelo; Brunori, Maurizio; Longhi, Sonia; Gianni, Stefano

    2017-07-25

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are functionally active despite lacking a well-defined three-dimensional structure. Such proteins often undergo a disorder-to-order transition, or induced folding, when binding to their specific physiological partner. Because of cooperativity, the folding and binding steps typically appear as a single event, and therefore, induced folding is extremely difficult to characterize experimentally. In this perspective, the interaction between the disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein NTAIL and the folded X domain of the viral phosphoprotein (XD) is particularly interesting because the inherent complexity of the observed kinetics allows characterization of the binding and folding steps individually. Here we present a detailed structural description of the folding and binding events occurring in the recognition between NTAIL and XD. This result was achieved by measuring the effect of single-amino acid substitutions in NTAIL on the reaction mechanism. Analysis of the experimental data allowed us (i) to identify the key residues involved in the initial recognition between the two molecules and (ii) to depict the general features of the folding pathway of NTAIL. Furthermore, an analysis of the changes in stability obtained for the whole set of variants highlights how the sequence of this IDP has not been selected during evolution to fold efficiently. This feature might be a consequence of the weakly funneled nature of the energy landscape of IDPs in their unbound state and represents a plausible explanation of their highly dynamic nature even in the bound state, typically defined as "fuzziness".

  6. Multicopper manganese oxidase accessory proteins bind Cu and heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Cristina N; Tao, Lizhi; Chacón, Kelly N; Spiro, Thomas G; Blackburn, Ninian J; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M

    2015-12-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) catalyze the oxidation of a diverse group of metal ions and organic substrates by successive single-electron transfers to O2 via four bound Cu ions. MnxG, which catalyzes MnO2 mineralization by oxidizing both Mn(II) and Mn(III), is unique among multicopper oxidases in that it carries out two energetically distinct electron transfers and is tightly bound to accessory proteins. There are two of these, MnxE and MnxF, both approximately 12kDa. Although their sequences are similar to those found in the genomes of several Mn-oxidizing Bacillus species, they are dissimilar to those of proteins with known function. Here, MnxE and MnxF are co-expressed independent of MnxG and are found to oligomerize into a higher order stoichiometry, likely a hexamer. They bind copper and heme, which have been characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry. Cu is found in two distinct type 2 (T2) copper centers, one of which appears to be novel; heme is bound as a low-spin species, implying coordination by two axial ligands. MnxE and MnxF do not oxidize Mn in the absence of MnxG and are the first accessory proteins to be required by an MCO. This may indicate that Cu and heme play roles in electron transfer and/or Cu trafficking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling nucleic acid structure in the presence of single-stranded binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forties, Robert; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    There are many important proteins which bind single-stranded nucleic acids, such as the nucleocapsid protein in HIV, the RecA DNA repair protein in bacteria, and all proteins involved in mRNA splicing and translation. We extend the Vienna Package for quantitatively modeling the secondary structure of nucleic acids to include proteins which bind to unpaired portions of the nucleic acid. All parameters needed to model nucleic acid secondary structures in the absence of proteins have been previously measured. This leaves the footprint and sequence dependent binding affinity of the protein as adjustable parameters of our model. Using this model we are able to predict the probability of the protein binding at any position in the nucleic acid sequence, the impact of the protein on nucleic acid base pairing, the end-to-end distance distribution for the nucleic acid, and FRET distributions for fluorophores attached to the nucleic acid.

  8. Two different proteins that compete for binding to thrombin have opposite kinetic and thermodynamic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerga-Ortiz, Abel; Bergqvist, Simon; Mandell, Jeffrey G; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2004-01-01

    Thrombin binds thrombomodulin (TM) at anion binding exosite 1, an allosteric site far from the thrombin active site. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been isolated that competes with TM for binding to thrombin. Complete binding kinetic and thermodynamic profiles for these two protein-protein interactions have been generated. Binding kinetics were measured by Biacore. Although both interactions have similar K(D)s, TM binding is rapid and reversible while binding of the mAb is slow and nearly irreversible. The enthalpic contribution to the DeltaG(bind) was measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and van't Hoff analysis. The contribution to the DeltaG(bind) from electrostatic steering was assessed from the dependence of the k(a) on ionic strength. Release of solvent H(2)O molecules from the interface was assessed by monitoring the decrease in amide solvent accessibility at the interface upon protein-protein binding. The mAb binding is enthalpy driven and has a slow k(d). TM binding appears to be entropy driven and has a fast k(a). The favorable entropy of the thrombin-TM interaction seems to be derived from electrostatic steering and a contribution from solvent release. The two interactions have remarkably different thermodynamic driving forces for competing reactions. The possibility that optimization of binding kinetics for a particular function may be reflected in different thermodynamic driving forces is discussed.

  9. GenProBiS: web server for mapping of sequence variants to protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Skrlj, Blaz; Erzen, Nika; Kunej, Tanja; Janezic, Dusanka

    2017-05-11

    Discovery of potentially deleterious sequence variants is important and has wide implications for research and generation of new hypotheses in human and veterinary medicine, and drug discovery. The GenProBiS web server maps sequence variants to protein structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and further to protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, protein-compound, and protein-metal ion binding sites. The concept of a protein-compound binding site is understood in the broadest sense, which includes glycosylation and other post-translational modification sites. Binding sites were defined by local structural comparisons of whole protein structures using the Protein Binding Sites (ProBiS) algorithm and transposition of ligands from the similar binding sites found to the query protein using the ProBiS-ligands approach with new improvements introduced in GenProBiS. Binding site surfaces were generated as three-dimensional grids encompassing the space occupied by predicted ligands. The server allows intuitive visual exploration of comprehensively mapped variants, such as human somatic mis-sense mutations related to cancer and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms from 21 species, within the predicted binding sites regions for about 80 000 PDB protein structures using fast WebGL graphics. The GenProBiS web server is open and free to all users at http://genprobis.insilab.org. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Fc-Binding Ligands of Immunoglobulin G: An Overview of High Affinity Proteins and Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weonu Choe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing application of antibodies has inspired the development of several novel methods to isolate and target antibodies using smart biomaterials that mimic the binding of Fc-receptors to antibodies. The Fc-binding domain of antibodies is the primary binding site for e.g., effector proteins and secondary antibodies, whereas antigens bind to the Fab region. Protein A, G, and L, surface proteins expressed by pathogenic bacteria, are well known to bind immunoglobulin and have been widely exploited in antibody purification strategies. Several difficulties are encountered when bacterial proteins are used in antibody research and application. One of the major obstacles hampering the use of bacterial proteins is sample contamination with trace amounts of these proteins, which can invoke an immune response in the host. Many research groups actively develop synthetic ligands that are able to selectively and strongly bind to antibodies. Among the reported ligands, peptides that bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies are attractive tools in antibody research. Besides their use as high affinity ligands in antibody purification chromatography, Fc-binding peptides are applied e.g., to localize antibodies on nanomaterials and to increase the half-life of proteins in serum. In this review, recent developments of Fc-binding peptides are presented and their binding characteristics and diverse applications are discussed.

  11. Analysis and classification of DNA-binding sites in single-stranded and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins using protein information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Juan; Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Lida; Zhou, Xionghui

    2014-08-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins (DSBs) play different roles in biological processes when they bind to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). However, the underlying binding mechanisms of SSBs and DSBs have not yet been fully understood. Here, the authors firstly constructed two groups of ssDNA and dsDNA specific binding sites from two non-redundant sets of SSBs and DSBs. They further analysed the relationship between the two classes of binding sites and a newly proposed set of features (residue charge distribution, secondary structure and spatial shape). To assess and utilise the predictive power of these features, they trained a classification model using support vector machine to make predictions about the ssDNA and the dsDNA binding sites. The author's analysis and prediction results indicated that the two classes of binding sites can be distinguishable by the three types of features, and the final classifier using all the features achieved satisfactory performance. In conclusion, the proposed features will deepen their understanding of the specificity of proteins which bind to ssDNA or dsDNA.

  12. APF/CBP, the small, amphipathic, anionic protein(s) in bile and gallstones, consists of lipid-binding and calcium-binding forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafont, H.; Domingo, N.; Groen, A.; Kaler, E. W.; Lee, S. P.; Koehler, R.; Ostrow, J. D.; Veis, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two very similar small anionic, amphipathic proteins, a phospholipid-binding apoprotein (anionic polypeptide fraction [APF]) and a calcium-binding polypeptide (CBP), are found abundantly in bile and all types of gallstones. The often disparate properties among various preparations of APF/CBP could

  13. Identification of c-di-AMP-Binding Proteins Using Magnetic Beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Jan; Gundlach, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Treffon, Katrin; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    To identify cytosolic proteins that bind to cyclic di-AMP, a biotinylated analog of the nucleotide is used for protein pull-down experiments. In this approach, biotinylated c-di-AMP is coupled to Streptactin-covered beads. After protein separation using standard SDS-PAGE, the protein(s) of interest are identified by mass spectrometric analyses.

  14. Specifying RNA-Binding Regions in Proteins by Peptide Cross-Linking and Affinity Purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullari, Meeli; Lyon, David; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) allow cells to carry out pre-RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, and aberrations in RBP functions have been linked to many diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer. Human cells encode thousands of RNA-binding proteins...... with unique RNA-binding properties. These properties are regulated through modularity of a large variety of RNA-binding domains, rendering RNA-protein interactions difficult to study. Recently, the introduction of proteomics methods has provided novel insights into RNA-binding proteins at a systems level....... However, determining the exact protein sequence regions that interact with RNA remains challenging and laborious, especially considering that many RBPs lack canonical RNA-binding domains. Here we describe a streamlined proteomic workflow called peptide cross-linking and affinity purification (p...

  15. Interspecies In Vitro Evaluation of Stereoselective Protein Binding for 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Raihana Wan Aasim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abuse of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA is becoming more common worldwide. To date, there is no information available on stereoselectivity of MDMA protein binding in humans, rats, and mice. Since stereoselectivity plays an important role in MDMA’s pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, in this study we investigated its stereoselectivity in protein binding. The stereoselective protein binding of rac-MDMA was investigated using two different concentrations (20 and 200 ng/mL in human plasma and mouse and rat sera using an ultrafiltration technique. No significant stereoselectivity in protein binding was observed in both human plasma and rat serum; however, a significant stereoselective binding (p<0.05 was observed in mouse serum. Since the protein binding of MDMA in mouse serum is considerably lower than in humans and rats, caution should be exercised when using mice for in vitro studies involving MDMA.

  16. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. RiceRBP: a database of experimentally identified RNA-binding proteins in Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert T; Doroshenk, Kelly A; Crofts, Andrew J; Lewis, Nicholas; Okita, Thomas W; Wyrick, John J

    2011-02-01

    RNA-binding proteins play critical roles at multiple steps during gene expression, including mRNA transport and translation. mRNA transport is particularly important in rice (Oryza sativa L.) in order to ensure the proper localization of the prolamine and glutelin seed storage proteins. However, relatively little information is available about RNA-binding proteins that have been isolated or characterized in plants. The RiceRBP database is a novel resource for the analysis of RNA-binding proteins in rice. RiceRBP contains 257 experimentally identified RNA-binding proteins, which are derived from at least 221 distinct rice genes. Many of the identified proteins catalogued in RiceRBP had not previously been annotated or predicted to bind RNA. RiceRBP provides tools to facilitate the analysis of the identified RNA-binding proteins, including information about predicted protein domains, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns of the identified genes. Importantly, RiceRBP also contains tools to search and analyze predicted RNA-binding protein orthologs in other plant species. We anticipate that the data and analysis tools provided by RiceRBP should facilitate the study of plant RNA-binding proteins. RiceRBP is available at http://www.bioinformatics2.wsu.edu/RiceRBP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing protein-ligand docking for the binding of organometallic compounds to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Carrasco, Elisabeth; Lledós, Agusti; Maréchal, Jean-Didier

    2014-01-30

    Organometallic compounds are increasingly used as molecular scaffolds in drug development projects; their structural and electronic properties offering novel opportunities in protein-ligand complementarities. Interestingly, while protein-ligand dockings have long become a spearhead in computer assisted drug design, no benchmarking nor optimization have been done for their use with organometallic compounds. Pursuing our efforts to model metal mediated recognition processes, we herein present a systematic study of the capabilities of the program GOLD to predict the interactions of protein with organometallic compounds. The study focuses on inert systems for which no alteration of the first coordination sphere of the metal occurs upon binding. Several scaffolds are used as test systems with different docking schemes and scoring functions. We conclude that ChemScore is the most robust scoring function with ASP and ChemPLP providing with good results too and GoldScore slightly underperforming. This study shows that current state-of-the-art protein-ligand docking techniques are reliable for the docking of inert organometallic compounds binding to protein. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Influence of binding pH and protein solubility on the dynamic binding capacity in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Pascal; Baumgartner, Kai; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-05-29

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is one of the most frequently used purification methods in biopharmaceutical industry. A major drawback of HIC, however, is the rather low dynamic binding capacity (DBC) obtained when compared to e.g. ion exchange chromatography (IEX). The typical purification procedure for HIC includes binding at neutral pH, independently of the proteins nature and isoelectric point. Most approaches to process intensification are based on resin and salt screenings. In this paper a combination of protein solubility data and varying binding pH leads to a clear enhancement of dynamic binding capacity. This is shown for three proteins of acidic, neutral, and alkaline isoelectric points. High-throughput solubility screenings as well as miniaturized and parallelized breakthrough curves on Media Scout RoboColumns (Atoll, Germany) were conducted at pH 3-10 on a fully automated robotic workstation. The screening results show a correlation between the DBC and the operational pH, the protein's isoelectric point and the overall solubility. Also, an inverse relationship of DBC in HIC and the binding kinetics was observed. By changing the operational pH, the DBC could be increased up to 30% compared to the standard purification procedure performed at neutral pH. As structural changes of the protein are reported during HIC processes, the applied samples and the elution fractions were proven not to be irreversibly unfolded. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ligand-Binding Properties of the Carboxyl-Terminal Repeat Domain of Streptococcus mutans Glucan-Binding Protein A

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Wolfgang; Banas, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypot...

  1. Nuclear spectrin-like proteins are structural actin-binding proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Munive, Clara; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2011-03-01

    Although actin is a relevant component of the plant nucleus, only three nuclear ABPs (actin-binding proteins) have been identified in plants to date: cofilin, profilin and nuclear myosin I. Although plants lack orthologues of the main structural nuclear ABPs in animals, such as lamins, lamin-associated proteins and nesprins, their genome does contain sequences with spectrin repeats and N-terminal calponin homology domains for actin binding that might be distant relatives of spectrin. We investigated here whether spectrin-like proteins could act as structural nuclear ABPs in plants. We have investigated the presence of spectrins in Allium cepa meristematic nuclei by Western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy, using antibodies against α- and β-spectrin chains that cross-react in plant nuclei. Their role as nuclear ABPs was analysed by co-immunoprecipitation and IF (immunofluorescence) co-localization and their association with the nuclear matrix was investigated by sequential extraction of nuclei with non-ionic detergent, and in low- and high-salt buffers after nuclease digestion. Our results demonstrate the existence of several spectrin-like proteins in the nucleus of onion cells that have different intranuclear distributions in asynchronous meristematic populations and associate with the nuclear matrix. These nuclear proteins co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize with actin. These results reveal that the plant nucleus contains spectrin-like proteins that are structural nuclear components and function as ABPs. Their intranuclear distribution suggests that plant nuclear spectrin-like proteins could be involved in multiple nuclear functions.

  2. RNAcontext: a new method for learning the sequence and structure binding preferences of RNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Kazan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Metazoan genomes encode hundreds of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. These proteins regulate post-transcriptional gene expression and have critical roles in numerous cellular processes including mRNA splicing, export, stability and translation. Despite their ubiquity and importance, the binding preferences for most RBPs are not well characterized. In vitro and in vivo studies, using affinity selection-based approaches, have successfully identified RNA sequence associated with specific RBPs; however, it is difficult to infer RBP sequence and structural preferences without specifically designed motif finding methods. In this study, we introduce a new motif-finding method, RNAcontext, designed to elucidate RBP-specific sequence and structural preferences with greater accuracy than existing approaches. We evaluated RNAcontext on recently published in vitro and in vivo RNA affinity selected data and demonstrate that RNAcontext identifies known binding preferences for several control proteins including HuR, PTB, and Vts1p and predicts new RNA structure preferences for SF2/ASF, RBM4, FUSIP1 and SLM2. The predicted preferences for SF2/ASF are consistent with its recently reported in vivo binding sites. RNAcontext is an accurate and efficient motif finding method ideally suited for using large-scale RNA-binding affinity datasets to determine the relative binding preferences of RBPs for a wide range of RNA sequences and structures.

  3. Dominant Alcohol-Protein Interaction via Hydration-Enabled Enthalpy-Driven Binding Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Water plays an important role in weak associations of small drug molecules with proteins. Intense focus has been on binding-induced structural changes in the water network surrounding protein binding sites, especially their contributions to binding thermodynamics. However, water is also tightly coupled to protein conformations and dynamics, and so far little is known about the influence of water-protein interactions on ligand binding. Alcohols are a type of low-affinity drugs, and it remains unclear how water affects alcohol-protein interactions. Here, we present alcohol adsorption isotherms under controlled protein hydration using in-situ NMR detection. As functions of hydration level, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding were determined from the temperature dependence of isotherms. Two types of alcohol binding were found. The dominant type is low-affinity nonspecific binding, which is strongly dependent on temperature and the level of hydration. At low hydration levels, this nonspecific binding only occurs above a threshold of alcohol vapor pressure. An increased hydration level reduces this threshold, with it finally disappearing at a hydration level of h~0.2 (g water/g protein), gradually shifting alcohol binding from an entropy-driven to an enthalpy-driven process. Water at charged and polar groups on the protein surface was found to be particularly important in enabling this binding. Although further increase in hydration has smaller effects on the changes of binding enthalpy and entropy, it results in significant negative change in Gibbs free energy due to unmatched enthalpy-entropy compensation. These results show the crucial role of water-protein interplay in alcohol binding. PMID:25856773

  4. Schistosoma bovis: plasminogen binding in adults and the identification of plasminogen-binding proteins from the worm tegument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramajo-Hernández, Alicia; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Ramajo-Martín, Vicente; Oleaga, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Schistosoma bovis is a ruminant haematic parasite that lives for years in the mesenteric vessels of the host. The aim of this work was to investigate the ability of adult S. bovis worms to interact with plasminogen, a central component in the host fibrinolytic system. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that plasminogen bound to the tegument surface of the male-but not female-S. bovis worms and that this binding was strongly dependent on lysine residues. It was also observed that a protein extract of the worm tegument (TG) had the capacity to generate plasmin and to enhance the plasmin generation by the tissue-type plasminogen activator. Proteomic analysis of the TG extract identified 10 plasminogen-binding proteins, among which the major ones were enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and actin. This study represents the first report about the binding of plasminogen to Schistosoma sp. proteins.

  5. Photoaffinity labeling of the messenger RNA cap-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads, R.; Patzelt, E.; Blaas, D.; Kuechler, E.

    1986-05-01

    A photoaffinity derivative of a cap analogue, ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-(4-(benzoylphenyl)methylamido)-7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate, was reacted with the 28-kDa messenger RNA cap-binding protein (CBP), purified by affinity chromatography from rabbit erythrocyte lysate. The predominant labeling was of the 28-kDa species. No labeling occurred without photoillumination or in the presence of 250 ..mu..M m/sup 7/GTP. In addition CBP, two polypeptides of 19 and 17kDa, present in the affinity-purified preparation, were specifically labeled. Another sample tested was the eIF-3 region of a sucrose gradient fractionation, in 100 mM KCl, of rabbit reticulocyte high salt ribosomal wash. The only polypeptide labeled was the 28-kDa CBP. Labeling was more intense than with an equivalent amount of affinity-purified CBP, suggesting the presence of stabilizing or stimulatory factors in the eIF-3 preparation.

  6. Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein protects retinoids from photodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Federico; Betts-Obregon, Brandi; Yust, Brian; Mimun, Joshua; Sung, Dongjin; Sardar, Dhiraj; Tsin, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Retinol degrades rapidly in light into a variety of photoproducts. It is remarkable that visual cycle retinoids can evade photodegradation as they are exchanged between the photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium and Müller glia. Within the interphotoreceptor matrix, all-trans retinol, 11-cis retinol and retinal are bound by interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP). Apart from its role in retinoid trafficking and targeting, could IRBP have a photoprotective function? HPLC was used to evaluate the ability of IRBP to protect all-trans and 11-cis retinols from photodegradation when exposed to incandescent light (0 to 8842 μW cm(-2)); time periods of 0-60 min, and bIRBP: retinol molar ratios of 1:1 to 1:5. bIRBP afforded a significant prevention of both all-trans and 11-cis retinol to rapid photodegradation. The effect was significant over the entire light intensity range tested, and extended to the bIRBP: retinol ratio 1:5. In view of the continual exposure of the retina to light, and the high oxidative stress in the outer retina, our results suggest IRBP may have an important protective role in the visual cycle by reducing photodegradation of all-trans and 11-cis retinols. This role of IRBP is particularly relevant in the high flux conditions of the cone visual cycle. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Evidence for a vasopressin receptor-GTP binding protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Uhing, R.J.; Exton, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Plasma membranes from the livers of rats were able to hydrolyze the ..gamma..-phosphate from guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP). The rate of GTP hydrolysis could be decreased to 10% of its initial rate by the addition of adenosine-5'-triphosphate with a concomitant decrease in the K/sub m/ for GTP from approx. 10/sup -3/ M to 10/sup -6/ M. The low K/sub m/ GTPase activity was inhibited by the addition of nonhydrolyzable analogs of GTP. In addition, the GTPase activity was stimulated from 10 to 30% over basal by the addition of vasopressin. A dose dependency curve showed that the maximum stimulation was obtained with 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin. Identical results were obtained from plasma membranes that had been solubilized with 1% digitonin. When membranes that had been solubilized in the presence of (Phenylalanyl-3,4,5-/sup 3/H(N))vasopressin were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the majority of bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin migrated with an approximate molecular weight of 300,000. Moreover, there was a GTPase activity that migrated with the bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin. This peak of bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin was decreased by 90% when the sucrose gradient centrifugation was run in the presence of 10/sup -5/ M guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). These results support the conclusion that liver plasma membranes contain a GTP-binding protein that can complex with the vasopressin receptor.

  8. RNA-Binding Proteins Impacting on Internal Initiation of Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Diaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs are pivotal regulators of all the steps of gene expression. RBPs govern gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level by virtue of their capacity to assemble ribonucleoprotein complexes on certain RNA structural elements, both in normal cells and in response to various environmental stresses. A rapid cellular response to stress conditions is triggered at the step of translation initiation. Two basic mechanisms govern translation initiation in eukaryotic mRNAs, the cap-dependent initiation mechanism that operates in most mRNAs, and the internal ribosome entry site (IRES-dependent mechanism activated under conditions that compromise the general translation pathway. IRES elements are cis-acting RNA sequences that recruit the translation machinery using a cap-independent mechanism often assisted by a subset of translation initiation factors and various RBPs. IRES-dependent initiation appears to use different strategies to recruit the translation machinery depending on the RNA organization of the region and the network of RBPs interacting with the element. In this review we discuss recent advances in understanding the implications of RBPs on IRES-dependent translation initiation.

  9. RNA-binding proteins impacting on internal initiation of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salas, Encarnación; Lozano, Gloria; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Galan, Alfonso; Diaz, Rosa

    2013-11-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal regulators of all the steps of gene expression. RBPs govern gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level by virtue of their capacity to assemble ribonucleoprotein complexes on certain RNA structural elements, both in normal cells and in response to various environmental stresses. A rapid cellular response to stress conditions is triggered at the step of translation initiation. Two basic mechanisms govern translation initiation in eukaryotic mRNAs, the cap-dependent initiation mechanism that operates in most mRNAs, and the internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent mechanism activated under conditions that compromise the general translation pathway. IRES elements are cis-acting RNA sequences that recruit the translation machinery using a cap-independent mechanism often assisted by a subset of translation initiation factors and various RBPs. IRES-dependent initiation appears to use different strategies to recruit the translation machinery depending on the RNA organization of the region and the network of RBPs interacting with the element. In this review we discuss recent advances in understanding the implications of RBPs on IRES-dependent translation initiation.

  10. Symbiont-induced odorant binding proteins mediate insect host hematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Joshua B; Vigneron, Aurélien; Broderick, Nichole A; Wu, Yineng; Sun, Jennifer S; Carlson, John R; Aksoy, Serap; Weiss, Brian L

    2017-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria assist in maintaining homeostasis of the animal immune system. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie symbiont-mediated host immunity are largely unknown. Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) house maternally transmitted symbionts that regulate the development and function of their host’s immune system. Herein we demonstrate that the obligate mutualist, Wigglesworthia, up-regulates expression of odorant binding protein six in the gut of intrauterine tsetse larvae. This process is necessary and sufficient to induce systemic expression of the hematopoietic RUNX transcription factor lozenge and the subsequent production of crystal cells, which actuate the melanotic immune response in adult tsetse. Larval Drosophila’s indigenous microbiota, which is acquired from the environment, regulates an orthologous hematopoietic pathway in their host. These findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that underlie enteric symbiont-stimulated systemic immune system development, and indicate that these processes are evolutionarily conserved despite the divergent nature of host-symbiont interactions in these model systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19535.001 PMID:28079523

  11. Retinol binding protein 4, obesity, and insulin resistance in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldi Noor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Obesity is a global problem. Even in poor and developing countries, obesity has reached alarming levels. In childhood, obesity may lead to insulin resistance. Retinol binding protein (RBP4, secreted primarily by liver and adipose tissues, was recently proposed as a link between obesity and insulin resistance. The role of RBP4 in pediatric obesity and its relationship with insulin resistance have not been well elucidated. Objective To compare RBP4 levels in obese and lean adolescents and to assess for a relationship between RBP4 levels and insulin resistance. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in three senior high schools in Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia. Subjects were adolescents aged 14-18 years, who were obese or normal weight (n=56. We measured subjects’ body mass index (BMI and serum RBP4 concentrations. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index. Results Similar RBP4 levels were found in the obese and normoweight groups (P>0.05. Higher RBP4 levels were found in the insulin resistant compared to the non-insulin resistant group, but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion There is no significant difference in mean RBP4 levels in obese adolescents compared to normoweight adolescents. Nor are mean RBP4 levels significantly different between obese adolescents with and without insulin resistance.

  12. Binding Properties of General Odorant Binding Proteins from the Oriental Fruit Moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwei Li

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta is a host-switching pest species. The adults highly depend on olfactory cues in locating optimal host plants and oviposition sites. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs are thought to be responsible for recognizing and transporting hydrophobic odorants across the aqueous sensillum lymph to stimulate the odorant receptors (ORs within the antennal sensilla and activate the olfactory signal transduction pathway. Exploring the physiological function of these OBPs could facilitate understanding insect chemical communications.Two antennae-specific general OBPs (GOBPs of G. molesta were expressed and purified in vitro. The binding affinities of G. molesta GOBP1 and 2 (GmolGOBP1 and 2 for sex pheromone components and host plant volatiles were measured by fluorescence ligand-binding assays. The distribution of GmolGOBP1 and 2 in the antennal sensillum were defined by whole mount fluorescence immunohistochemistry (WM-FIHC experiments. The binding sites of GmolGOBP2 were predicted using homology modeling, molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis. Both GmolGOBP1 and 2 are housing in sensilla basiconica and with no differences in male and female antennae. Recombinant GmolGOBP1 (rGmolGOBP1 exhibited broad binding properties towards host plant volatiles and sex pheromone components; rGmolGOBP2 could not effectively bind host plant volatiles but showed specific binding affinity with a minor sex pheromone component dodecanol. We chose GmolGOBP2 and dodecanol for further homology modeling, molecular docking, and site-directed mutagenesis. Binding affinities of mutants demonstrated that Thr9 was the key binding site and confirmed dodecanol bonding to protein involves a hydrogen bond. Combined with the pH effect on binding affinities of rGmolGOBP2, ligand binding and release of GmolGOBP2 were related to a pH-dependent conformational transition.Two rGmolGOBPs exhibit different binding characteristics for tested ligands. r

  13. Binding Properties of General Odorant Binding Proteins from the Oriental Fruit Moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangwei; Chen, Xiulin; Li, Boliao; Zhang, Guohui; Li, Yiping; Wu, Junxiang

    2016-01-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta is a host-switching pest species. The adults highly depend on olfactory cues in locating optimal host plants and oviposition sites. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are thought to be responsible for recognizing and transporting hydrophobic odorants across the aqueous sensillum lymph to stimulate the odorant receptors (ORs) within the antennal sensilla and activate the olfactory signal transduction pathway. Exploring the physiological function of these OBPs could facilitate understanding insect chemical communications. Two antennae-specific general OBPs (GOBPs) of G. molesta were expressed and purified in vitro. The binding affinities of G. molesta GOBP1 and 2 (GmolGOBP1 and 2) for sex pheromone components and host plant volatiles were measured by fluorescence ligand-binding assays. The distribution of GmolGOBP1 and 2 in the antennal sensillum were defined by whole mount fluorescence immunohistochemistry (WM-FIHC) experiments. The binding sites of GmolGOBP2 were predicted using homology modeling, molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis. Both GmolGOBP1 and 2 are housing in sensilla basiconica and with no differences in male and female antennae. Recombinant GmolGOBP1 (rGmolGOBP1) exhibited broad binding properties towards host plant volatiles and sex pheromone components; rGmolGOBP2 could not effectively bind host plant volatiles but showed specific binding affinity with a minor sex pheromone component dodecanol. We chose GmolGOBP2 and dodecanol for further homology modeling, molecular docking, and site-directed mutagenesis. Binding affinities of mutants demonstrated that Thr9 was the key binding site and confirmed dodecanol bonding to protein involves a hydrogen bond. Combined with the pH effect on binding affinities of rGmolGOBP2, ligand binding and release of GmolGOBP2 were related to a pH-dependent conformational transition. Two rGmolGOBPs exhibit different binding characteristics for tested ligands. rGmolGOBP1 has

  14. Binding Properties of General Odorant Binding Proteins from the Oriental Fruit Moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangwei; Chen, Xiulin; Li, Boliao; Zhang, Guohui; Li, Yiping; Wu, Junxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta is a host-switching pest species. The adults highly depend on olfactory cues in locating optimal host plants and oviposition sites. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are thought to be responsible for recognizing and transporting hydrophobic odorants across the aqueous sensillum lymph to stimulate the odorant receptors (ORs) within the antennal sensilla and activate the olfactory signal transduction pathway. Exploring the physiological function of these OBPs could facilitate understanding insect chemical communications. Methodology/Principal Finding Two antennae-specific general OBPs (GOBPs) of G. molesta were expressed and purified in vitro. The binding affinities of G. molesta GOBP1 and 2 (GmolGOBP1 and 2) for sex pheromone components and host plant volatiles were measured by fluorescence ligand-binding assays. The distribution of GmolGOBP1 and 2 in the antennal sensillum were defined by whole mount fluorescence immunohistochemistry (WM-FIHC) experiments. The binding sites of GmolGOBP2 were predicted using homology modeling, molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis. Both GmolGOBP1 and 2 are housing in sensilla basiconica and with no differences in male and female antennae. Recombinant GmolGOBP1 (rGmolGOBP1) exhibited broad binding properties towards host plant volatiles and sex pheromone components; rGmolGOBP2 could not effectively bind host plant volatiles but showed specific binding affinity with a minor sex pheromone component dodecanol. We chose GmolGOBP2 and dodecanol for further homology modeling, molecular docking, and site-directed mutagenesis. Binding affinities of mutants demonstrated that Thr9 was the key binding site and confirmed dodecanol bonding to protein involves a hydrogen bond. Combined with the pH effect on binding affinities of rGmolGOBP2, ligand binding and release of GmolGOBP2 were related to a pH-dependent conformational transition. Conclusion Two rGmolGOBPs exhibit different

  15. A novel mechanism of ligand binding and release in the odorant binding protein 20 from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Murphy, Emma J; Edlin, Hannah T; Jones, David N M

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes that transmit malaria are attracted to humans by the odor molecules that emanate from skin and sweat. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are the first component of the olfactory apparatus to interact with odorant molecules, and so present potential targets for preventing transmission of malaria by disrupting the normal olfactory responses of the insect. AgamOBP20 is one of a limited subset of OBPs that it is preferentially expressed in female mosquitoes and its expression is regulated by blood feeding and by the day/night light cycles that correlate with blood-feeding behavior. Analysis of AgamOBP20 in solution reveals that the apo-protein exhibits significant conformational heterogeneity but the binding of odorant molecules results in a significant conformational change, which is accompanied by a reduction in the conformational flexibility present in the protein. Crystal structures of the free and bound states reveal a novel pathway for entrance and exit of odorant molecules into the central-binding pocket, and that the conformational changes associated with ligand binding are a result of rigid body domain motions in α-helices 1, 4, and 5, which act as lids to the binding pocket. These structures provide new insights into the specific residues involved in the conformational adaptation to different odorants and have important implications in the selection and development of reagents targeted at disrupting normal OBP function. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  16. Modification of the loops in the ligand-binding site turns avidin into a steroid-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulomaa Markku S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered proteins, with non-immunoglobulin scaffolds, have become an important alternative to antibodies in many biotechnical and therapeutic applications. When compared to antibodies, tailored proteins may provide advantageous properties such as a smaller size or a more stable structure. Results Avidin is a widely used protein in biomedicine and biotechnology. To tailor the binding properties of avidin, we have designed a sequence-randomized avidin library with mutagenesis focused at the loop area of the binding site. Selection from the generated library led to the isolation of a steroid-binding avidin mutant (sbAvd-1 showing micromolar affinity towards testosterone (Kd ~ 9 μM. Furthermore, a gene library based on the sbAvd-1 gene was created by randomizing the loop area between β-strands 3 and 4. Phage display selection from this library led to the isolation of a steroid-binding protein with significantly decreased biotin binding affinity compared to sbAvd-1. Importantly, differential scanning calorimetry and analytical gel-filtration revealed that the high stability and the tetrameric structure were preserved in these engineered avidins. Conclusions The high stability and structural properties of avidin make it an attractive molecule for the engineering of novel receptors. This methodology may allow the use of avidin as a universal scaffold in the development of novel receptors for small molecules.

  17. Predicting target DNA sequences of DNA-binding proteins based on unbound structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yu Chen

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins such as transcription factors use DNA-binding domains (DBDs to bind to specific sequences in the genome to initiate many important biological functions. Accurate prediction of such target sequences, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs, is an important step to understand many biological processes. Recent studies have shown that knowledge-based potential functions can be applied on protein-DNA co-crystallized structures to generate PWMs that are considerably consistent with experimental data. However, this success has not been extended to DNA-binding proteins lacking co-crystallized structures. This study aims at investigating the possibility of predicting the DNA sequences bound by DNA-binding proteins from the proteins' unbound structures (structures of the unbound state. Given an unbound query protein and a template complex, the proposed method first employs structure alignment to generate synthetic protein-DNA complexes for the query protein. Once a complex is available, an atomic-level knowledge-based potential function is employed to predict PWMs characterizing the sequences to which the query protein can bind. The evaluation of the proposed method is based on seven DNA-binding proteins, which have structures of both DNA-bound and unbound forms for prediction as well as annotated PWMs for validation. Since this work is the first attempt to predict target sequences of DNA-binding proteins from their unbound structures, three types of structural variations that presumably influence the prediction accuracy were examined and discussed. Based on the analyses conducted in this study, the conformational change of proteins upon binding DNA was shown to be the key factor. This study sheds light on the challenge of predicting the target DNA sequences of a protein lacking co-crystallized structures, which encourages more efforts on the structure alignment-based approaches in addition to docking- and homology

  18. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Biogenic Amine-binding Proteins in Soft Ticks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M.C.; Andersen, John F. (NIH)

    2008-08-19

    Two highly abundant lipocalins, monomine and monotonin, have been isolated from the salivary gland of the soft tick Argas monolakensis and shown to bind histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), respectively. The crystal structures of monomine and a paralog of monotonin were determined in the presence of ligands to compare the determinants of ligand binding. Both the structures and binding measurements indicate that the proteins have a single binding site rather than the two sites previously described for the female-specific histamine-binding protein (FS-HBP), the histamine-binding lipocalin of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding sites of monomine and monotonin are similar to the lower, low affinity site of FS-HBP. The interaction of the protein with the aliphatic amine group of the ligand is very similar for the all of the proteins, whereas specificity is determined by interactions with the aromatic portion of the ligand. Interestingly, protein interaction with the imidazole ring of histamine differs significantly between the low affinity binding site of FS-HBP and monomine, suggesting that histamine binding has evolved independently in the two lineages. From the conserved features of these proteins, a tick lipocalin biogenic amine-binding motif could be derived that was used to predict biogenic amine-binding function in other tick lipocalins. Heterologous expression of genes from salivary gland libraries led to the discovery of biogenic amine-binding proteins in soft (Ornithodoros) and hard (Ixodes) tick genera. The data generated were used to reconstruct the most probable evolutionary pathway for the evolution of biogenic amine-binding in tick lipocalins.

  19. Effects of protein binding on the biodistribution of PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles post oral administration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Semete, B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available of surface coating with various concentrations of polymeric surfactants (PEG and Pluronics F127) on the in vitro protein binding as well as the tissue biodistribution, post oral administration, of PLGA nanoparticles. The in vitro protein binding varied...

  20. Vitamin D, vitamin D binding protein, lung function and structure in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Isaac; Hanson, Corrine; Sayles, Harlan

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) have been associated with COPD and FEV1. There are limited data regarding emphysema and vitamin D and DBP.......Vitamin D and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) have been associated with COPD and FEV1. There are limited data regarding emphysema and vitamin D and DBP....

  1. Viral proteins that bind double-stranded RNA: countermeasures against host antiviral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Robert M

    2014-06-01

    Several animal viruses encode proteins that bind double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to counteract host dsRNA-dependent antiviral responses. This article discusses the structure and function of the dsRNA-binding proteins of influenza A virus and Ebola viruses (EBOVs).

  2. Steady-State Fluorescence Anisotropy to Investigate Flavonoids Binding to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christine M.; Strollo, Christen M.

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy is employed to study the binding of protein of a model protein, human serum albumin, to a commonly used flavonoid, quercetin. The experiment describes the thermodynamics, as well as the biochemical interactions of such binding effectively.

  3. A small cellulose binding domain protein (CBD1) is highly variable in the nonbinding amino terminus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small cellulose binding domain protein CBD1 is tightly bound to the cellulosic cell wall of the plant pathogenic stramenophile Phytophthora infestans. Transgene expression of the protein in plants has also demonstrated binding to plant cell walls. A study was undertaken using 47 isolates of P. ...

  4. Identification of procollagen promoter DNA-binding proteins: effects of dexamethasone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, C.; Cutroneo, K.R.

    1987-05-01

    Glucocorticoids selectively decrease procollagen synthesis by decreasing procollagen mRNA transcription. Dexamethasone coordinately decreased total cellular type I and type III procollagen mRNAs in mouse embryonic skin fibroblasts. Since sequence specific DNA-binding proteins are known to modulate eukaryotic gene expression the authors identified in mouse fibroblasts nuclear proteins which bind to types I and III procollagen promoter DNAs. Nuclear proteins were electrophoresed, blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with /sup 32/P-end-labeled type I and type III procollagen promoter DNAs in the presence of equimolar amounts of /sup 32/P-end-labeled vector DNA. Differences in total DNA binding were noted by the densitometric scans of the nuclear proteins. Dexamethasone treatment enhanced total DNA binding. Increasing the NaCl concentration decreased the number of promoter DNA-binding proteins without altering the relative specificity for the promoter DNAs. Promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was also inhibited by increasing concentrations of E. coli DNA. The number of DNA-binding proteins was greater for type III procollagen promoter DNA. The effect of dexamethasone treatment on promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was determined.

  5. Mannan-binding protein forms complexes with alpha-2-macroglobulin. A protein model for the interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, P; Holm Nielsen, E; Skriver, E

    1995-01-01

    We report that alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) can form complexes with a high molecular weight porcine mannan-binding protein (pMBP-28). The alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes was isolated by PEG-precipitation and affinity chromatography on mannan-Sepharose, protein A-Sepharose and anti-IgM Sepharose......-PAGE, which reacted with antibodies against alpha 2M and pMBP-28, respectively, in Western blotting. Furthermore, alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes were demonstrated by electron microscopy. Fractionation of pMBP-containing D-mannose eluate from mannan-Sepharose on Superose 6 showed two protein peaks which reacted...

  6. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  7. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Bagaria; D Kumaran; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    The APT-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and nontransport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport, and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP), and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consits of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations hafve been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the ingral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, they report 1.9 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound

  8. D-fructose-binding proteins in bull seminal plasma: Isolation and characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liberda, J.; Kraus, Marek; Ryšlavá, H.; Vlasáková, M.; Jonáková, Věra; Tichá, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2001), s. 113-119 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/99/0357; GA ČR GV524/96/K162 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : bull seminal plasma * non-heparin-binding and heparin-binding proteins * D-fructose-binding proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  9. Drug-plasma protein binding assay by electrokinetic chromatography-frontal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Yasushi; Miwa, Toshinobu; Asakawa, Naoki

    2002-03-01

    We developed a rapid, microscale and reliable analytical method for binding of drugs to plasma proteins using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with ionic cyclodextrins (CD) combined with frontal analysis. These CDs were used as pseudostationary phases of electrokinetic chromatography (EKC). The CD-modified EKC (CDEKC) approach allowed us to separate anionic drugs from plasma proteins, whereas CZE could not separate these drugs from plasma proteins because they had a similar mobility like plasma proteins. CDs uniquely interact with these drugs but not with plasma proteins. Therefore, CDEKC could be coupled with frontal analysis to measure the binding of anionic drugs to plasma proteins. The binding values obtained by CDEKC were highly consistent with those determined by the ultrafiltration method. Our CDEKC approach should expand the applicability of CE to protein binding analysis.

  10. Mannose-Binding Lectin Binds to Amyloid Protein and Modulates Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykol Larvie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a soluble factor of the innate immune system, is a pattern recognition molecule with a number of known ligands, including viruses, bacteria, and molecules from abnormal self tissues. In addition to its role in immunity, MBL also functions in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. We present evidence here that MBL binds to amyloid β peptides. MBL binding to other known carbohydrate ligands is calcium-dependent and has been attributed to the carbohydrate-recognition domain, a common feature of other C-type lectins. In contrast, we find that the features of MBL binding to Aβ are more similar to the reported binding characteristics of the cysteine-rich domain of the unrelated mannose receptor and therefore may involve the MBL cysteine-rich domain. Differences in MBL ligand binding may contribute to modulation of inflammatory response and may correlate with the function of MBL in processes such as coagulation and tissue homeostasis.

  11. The human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein displays distinct kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA binding and exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yufeng; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2017-08-04

    The human mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein (mtSSB) is a homotetrameric protein, involved in mtDNA replication and maintenance. Although mtSSB is structurally similar to SSB from Escherichia coli (EcoSSB), it lacks the C-terminal disordered domain, and little is known about the biophysics of mtSSB-ssDNA interactions. Here, we characterized the kinetics and thermodynamics of mtSSB binding to ssDNA by equilibrium titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements. We show that the mtSSB tetramer can bind to ssDNA in two distinct binding modes: (SSB) 30 and (SSB) 60 , defined by DNA binding site sizes of 30 and 60 nucleotides, respectively. We found that the binding mode is modulated by magnesium ion and NaCl concentration, but unlike EcoSSB, the mtSSB does not show negative intersubunit cooperativity. Global fitting of both the equilibrium and kinetic data afforded estimates for the rate and equilibrium constants governing the formation of (SSB) 60 and (SSB) 30 complexes and for the transitions between the two binding modes. We found that the mtSSB tetramer binds to ssDNA with a rate constant near the diffusion limit (2 × 10 9 m -1 s -1 ) and that longer DNA (≥60 nucleotides) rapidly wraps around all four monomers, as revealed by FRET assays. We also show that the mtSSB tetramer can directly transfer from one ssDNA molecule to another via an intermediate with two DNA molecules bound to the mtSSB. In conclusion, our results indicate that human mtSSB shares many physicochemical properties with EcoSSB and that the differences may be explained by the lack of an acidic, disordered C-terminal tail in human mtSSB protein. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Modulation of protein A binding allows single-step purification of mouse bispecific antibodies that retain FcRn binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Anthony A.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Zheng, Songmao; Brosnan, Kerry; Emmell, Eva; Luo, Jeffrey; Chiu, Mark L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The increased number of bispecific antibodies (BsAb) under therapeutic development has resulted in a need for mouse surrogate BsAbs. Here, we describe a one-step method for generating highly pure mouse BsAbs suitable for in vitro and in vivo studies. We identify two mutations in the mouse IgG2a and IgG2b Fc region: one that eliminates protein A binding and one that enhances protein A binding by 8-fold. We show that BsAbs harboring these mutations can be purified from the residual parental monoclonal antibodies in one step using protein A affinity chromatography. The structural basis for the effects of these mutations was analyzed by X-ray crystallography. While the mutation that disrupted protein A binding also inhibited FcRn interaction, a bispecific mutant in which one subunit retained the ability to bind protein A could still interact with FcRn. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the serum half-lives of the mutants showed that the mutant BsAb had a serum half-life comparable to a wild-type Ab. The results describe a rapid method for generating panels of mouse BsAbs that could be used in mouse studies. PMID:28898162

  13. An Improved Method for Identifying Specific DNA-Protein-Binding Sites In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangyan; Lu, Huizhi; Wang, Yunguang; Yang, Su; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Kaiying; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2017-03-01

    Binding of proteins to specific DNA sequences is essential for a variety of cellular processes such as DNA replication, transcription and responses to external stimuli. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is widely used for determining intracellular DNA fragments bound by a specific protein. However, the subsequent specific or accurate DNA-protein-binding sequence is usually determined by DNA footprinting. Here, we report an alternative method for identifying specific sites of DNA-protein-binding (designated SSDP) in vitro. This technique is mainly dependent on antibody-antigen immunity, simple and convenient, while radioactive isotope labeling and optimization of partial degradation by deoxyribonuclease (DNase) are avoided. As an example, the specific binding sequence of a target promoter by DdrO (a DNA damage response protein from Deinococcus radiodurans) in vitro was determined by the developed method. The central sequence of the binding site could be easily located using this technique.

  14. Fast Calculation of Protein-Protein Binding Free Energies using Umbrella Sampling with a Coarse-Grained Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jagdish Suresh; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2017-12-29

    Determination of protein-protein binding affinity values is key to understanding various underlying biological phenomena, such as how mutations change protein-protein binding. Most existing non-rigorous (fast) and rigorous (slow) methods that rely on all-atom representation of the proteins force the user to choose between speed and accuracy. In an attempt to achieve balance between speed and accuracy, we have combined rigorous umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulation with a coarse-grained protein model. We predicted the effect of mutations on binding affinity by selecting three protein-protein systems and comparing results to empirical relative binding affinity values, and to non-rigorous modeling approaches. We obtained significant improvement both in our ability to discern stabilizing from destabilizing mutations and in the correlation between predicted and experimental values compared to non-rigorous approaches. Overall our results suggest that using a rigorous affinity calculation method with coarse-grained protein models could offer fast and reliable predictions of protein-protein binding free energies.

  15. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Klein

    Full Text Available We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites.

  16. Structure-based function prediction of uncharacterized protein using binding sites comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Hodošček, Milan; Ogrizek, Mitja; Trykowska Konc, Joanna; Janežič, Dušanka

    2013-01-01

    A challenge in structural genomics is prediction of the function of uncharacterized proteins. When proteins cannot be related to other proteins of known activity, identification of function based on sequence or structural homology is impossible and in such cases it would be useful to assess structurally conserved binding sites in connection with the protein's function. In this paper, we propose the function of a protein of unknown activity, the Tm1631 protein from Thermotoga maritima, by comparing its predicted binding site to a library containing thousands of candidate structures. The comparison revealed numerous similarities with nucleotide binding sites including specifically, a DNA-binding site of endonuclease IV. We constructed a model of this Tm1631 protein with a DNA-ligand from the newly found similar binding site using ProBiS, and validated this model by molecular dynamics. The interactions predicted by the Tm1631-DNA model corresponded to those known to be important in endonuclease IV-DNA complex model and the corresponding binding free energies, calculated from these models were in close agreement. We thus propose that Tm1631 is a DNA binding enzyme with endonuclease activity that recognizes DNA lesions in which at least two consecutive nucleotides are unpaired. Our approach is general, and can be applied to any protein of unknown function. It might also be useful to guide experimental determination of function of uncharacterized proteins.

  17. Predicting binding affinities of protein ligands from three-dimensional models: application to peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Lauemoller, S L; Holm, A

    1999-01-01

    A simple and fast free energy scoring function (Fresno) has been developed to predict the binding free energy of peptides to class I major histocompatibility (MHC) proteins. It differs from existing scoring functions mainly by the explicit treatment of ligand desolvation and of unfavorable protein...

  18. Fine mapping of the amyloid β-protein binding site on myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, Annmarie E; Aucoin, Darryl; Hoos, Michael D; Smith, Steven O; Van Nostrand, William E

    2013-04-16

    The assembly and deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in brain is a key pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. Factors have been identified that can either promote or inhibit Aβ assembly in brain. We previously reported that myelin basic protein (MBP) is a potent inhibitor of Aβ fibrillar assembly [Hoos, M. D., et al. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9952-9961; Hoos, M. D., et al. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 4720-4727]. Moreover, the region on MBP responsible for this activity was localized to the 64 N-terminal amino acids (MBP1-64) [Liao, M. C., et al. (2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285, 35590-35598]. In the study presented here, we sought to further define the site on MBP1-64 involved in this activity. Deletion mapping studies showed that the C-terminal region (residues 54-64) is required for the ability of MBP1-64 to bind Aβ and inhibit fibril assembly. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed that amino acids K54, R55, G56, and K59 within MBP1-64 are important for both Aβ binding and inhibition of fibril assembly as assessed by solid phase binding, thioflavin T binding and fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy studies. Strong spectral shifts are observed by solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of specific N-terminal residues (E3, R5, D7, E11, and Q15) of Aβ42 upon the interaction with MBP1-64. Although the C-terminal region of MBP1-64 is required for interactions with Aβ, a synthetic MBP50-64 peptide was itself devoid of activity. These studies identify key residues in MBP and Aβ involved in their interactions and provide structural insight into how MBP regulates Aβ fibrillar assembly.

  19. Lactoferrin binding protein B - a bi-functional bacterial receptor protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas K H Ostan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed outer membrane-bound lipoprotein that comprises part of the lactoferrin (Lf receptor complex in Neisseria meningitidis and other Gram-negative pathogens. Recent studies have demonstrated that LbpB plays a role in protecting the bacteria from cationic antimicrobial peptides due to large regions rich in anionic residues in the C-terminal lobe. Relative to its homolog, transferrin-binding protein B (TbpB, there currently is little evidence for its role in iron acquisition and relatively little structural and biophysical information on its interaction with Lf. In this study, a combination of crosslinking and deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry, information-driven computational docking, bio-layer interferometry, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to probe LbpB:hLf complexes. The formation of a 1:1 complex of iron-loaded Lf and LbpB involves an interaction between the Lf C-lobe and LbpB N-lobe, comparable to TbpB, consistent with a potential role in iron acquisition. The Lf N-lobe is also capable of binding to negatively charged regions of the LbpB C-lobe and possibly other sites such that a variety of higher order complexes are formed. Our results are consistent with LbpB serving dual roles focused primarily on iron acquisition when exposed to limited levels of iron-loaded Lf on the mucosal surface and effectively binding apo Lf when exposed to high levels at sites of inflammation.

  20. Effect of plasma protein and tissue binding on the time course of drug concentration in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, P J; Levy, G; Gibaldi, M

    1979-04-01

    We have studied by digital computer simulation the effect of concentration-dependent plasma protein and tissue binding on the time course of drug concentrations (both unbound and total) in plasma following rapid injection of a drug whose elimination rate is proportional to either free or total drug concentration in plasma, assuming instantaneous equilibration of the drug between vascular and nonvascular spaces. The following observations were made when elimination rate was assumed to be a function of free drug concentration: (a) when plasma protein binding is nonlinear and there is either no tissue binding or linear tissue binding, log concentration-time plots of free drug are always concave whereas such plots for total (sum of free and bound) drug can be convex, almost linear, or concave (apparently biexponential) depending on the plasma protein binding parameters relative to the initial concentration; (b) linear tissue binding in association with nonlinear plasma protein binding can reduce the concavity or enhance the convexity of log total concentration-time plots. When drug elimination rate was assumed to be a function of total concentration in plasma, nonlinear plasma protein binding in association with linear or no tissue binding yielded convex log total concentration-time plots which could sometimes be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In general, drug concentration-dependent changes in the apparent volume of distribution resulting from nonlinear plasma protein and (where applicable) tissue binding have a pronounced effect on the slope of log total plasma concentration-time plots. It appears that under clinically realistic conditions an otherwise marked curvature of such plots, due to nonlinear plasma protein binding, may in fact be dampened or overcome by linear tissue binding.

  1. Misexpression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta causes osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, Stefano; Stadmeyer, Lisa; Smerdel-Ramoya, Anna; Durant, Deena; Canalis, Ernesto

    2009-05-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) are expressed by osteoblasts and adipocytes during differentiation. C/EBP beta is critical for adipogenesis; however, its role in osteoblastogenesis is unclear, and its function in the postnatal skeleton is not known. To study C/EBP beta in osteoblasts in vivo, we created transgenic mice expressing full length C/EBP beta under the control of a 3.8 kb fragment of the human osteocalcin promoter. Two transgenic lines were established in a friend leukemia virus strain B genetic background, and compared with wild type littermate controls. Both C/EBP beta transgenic lines exhibited osteopenia, with a 30% decrease in bone volume, due to a decrease in trabecular number. The number of osteoblasts and osteoclasts per bone perimeter was not changed. Bone marrow stromal cells from C/EBP beta transgenics showed reduced mineralization, and reduced alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels. Calvarial osteoblasts from C/EBP beta transgenics displayed reduced alkaline phosphatase activity. To determine the consequences of the Cebpb deletion in vivo, the phenotype of Cebpb null mice was compared with that of wild type controls of identical genetic composition. Cebpb null mice exhibited reduced weight, body fat, and bone mineral density, and decreased bone volume, due to a decrease in trabecular number. The number of osteoblasts and osteoclasts per bone perimeter was not changed. C/EBP beta downregulation by RNA interference in calvarial osteoblasts had no effect on osteoblast differentiation/function. The phenotype of the Cebpb inactivation may be secondary to systemic indirect effects, and to direct effects of C/EBP beta in osteoblasts. In conclusion, C/EBP beta plays a role in mesenchymal cell differentiation and its misexpression in vivo causes osteopenia.

  2. Plakophilin-associated RNA-binding proteins in prostate cancer and their implications in tumor progression and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Cheng; Stroebel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander; Hofmann, Ilse

    Both plakophilins (PKP) 1 and 3 play a role in the progression of prostate cancer. The RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) GAP-SH3-binding protein (G3BP), fragile-X-related protein 1 (FXR1), poly(A)-binding protein, cytoplasmic 1 (PABPC1), and up-frameshift factor 1 (UPF1) are associated with PKP3. All

  3. Redefining the Protein-Protein Interface: Coarse Graining and Combinatorics for an Improved Understanding of Amino Acid Contributions to the Protein-Protein Binding Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Josh K; Jiang, Shaoyi; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2017-10-24

    The ability to intervene in biological pathways has for decades been limited by the lack of a quantitative description of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Herein we generate and compare millions of simple PPI models for insight into the mechanisms of specific recognition and binding. We use a coarse-grained approach whereby amino acids are counted in the interface, and these counts are used as binding affinity predictors. We perform lasso regression, a modern regression technique aimed at interpretability, with every possible amino acid combination (over 10(6) unique feature sets) to select only those amino acid predictors that provide more information than noise. This approach circumvents arbitrary binning and assumptions about the binding environment that obscure other binding affinity models. Aggregated analysis of these models trained at various interfacial cutoff distances informs the roles of specific amino acids in different binding contexts. We find that a simple amino acid count model outperforms detailed intermolecular contact and binned residue type models. We identify the prevalence of serine, glycine, and tryptophan in the interface as particularly important for predicting binding affinity across a range of distance cutoffs. Although current sample size limitations prevent a robust consensus model for binding affinity prediction, our approach underscores the relevance of a residue-based description of the protein-protein interface to increase our understanding of specific interactions.

  4. Interaction of Alzheimer's A beta peptide with an engineered binding protein--thermodynamics and kinetics of coupled folding-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Härd, Torleif

    2008-04-25

    The oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide, a cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein predominantly 40 or 42 amino acids in length, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The identification of A beta-binding agents, e.g., antibodies or peptides, constitutes a promising therapeutic approach. However, the amount of structural and biophysical data on the underlying A beta interactions is currently very limited. We have earlier determined the structure of A beta (1-40) in complex with the affibody protein Z(A beta 3), a selected binding protein based on a three-helix bundle scaffold (Z domain). Z(A beta 3) is a dimer of affibody subunits linked via a disulfide bridge involving a selected cysteine mutation at position 28. Z(A beta 3) binds to the central and C-terminal part of A beta (residues 17-36), which adopts a beta-hairpin conformation in the complex. Here we present a detailed biophysical analysis of the Z(A beta 3):A beta (1-40) interaction, employing NMR, circular dichroism spectroscopy, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid and tyrosine fluorescence, size-exclusion chromatography, thermal denaturation profiles and isothermal titration calorimetry. We conclude that (i) free Z(A beta 3) is characterized by conformational exchange and the loss of helix 1 of the three-helix bundle scaffold; (ii) a high-energy barrier is associated with the conversion of an initial Z(A beta 3):A beta (1-40) recognition complex into the native complex structure, entailing slow binding kinetics; (iii) both A beta and Z(A beta 3) fold upon binding, which, e.g., becomes manifest in the binding thermodynamics that feature a large negative change in heat capacity; (iv) the C28-disulfide does not merely afford dimerization, but its impact on the binding interfaces of the affibody subunits and A beta is a prerequisite for tight binding. The extensive folding coupled to binding observed here likely constitutes an obligate

  5. Cooperative binding of copper(I) to the metal binding domains in Menkes disease protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P Y; Bonander, N; Møller, L B

    1999-01-01

    . The regulation does not occur as an 'all-or-none' cooperativity, suggesting that the copper(I) binding domains have a basal low affinity for binding and release of copper(I) at low concentrations but are able to respond to higher copper levels by increasing the affinity, thereby contributing to prevent...

  6. Immuno-histochemical localization of cholesterol binding proteins in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... Positive control tissue sections were stained with Sudan Black-B for microscopic visualization of cholesterol .... 6 cm) by holes made. .... Sudan black-B specially stained the cholesterol droplets in form of black granules, which gave positive binding of cholesterol at appropriate binding sites (Figure 8).

  7. A novel signal transduction protein: Combination of solute binding and tandem PAS-like sensor domains in one polypeptide chain: Periplasmic Ligand Binding Protein Dret_0059

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Wilton, R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Cuff, M. E. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Endres, M. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Babnigg, G. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Edirisinghe, J. N. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Henry, C. S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Joachimiak, A. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Schiffer, M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Pokkuluri, P. R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439

    2017-03-06

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of a novel periplasmic ligand-binding protein, Dret_0059, from Desulfohalobium retbaense DSM 5692, an organism isolated from the Salt Lake Retba in Senegal. The structure of the protein consists of a unique combination of a periplasmic solute binding protein (SBP) domain at the N-terminal and a tandem PAS-like sensor domain at the C-terminal region. SBP domains are found ubiquitously and their best known function is in solute transport across membranes. PAS-like sensor domains are commonly found in signal transduction proteins. These domains are widely observed as parts of many protein architectures and complexes but have not been observed previously within the same polypeptide chain. In the structure of Dret_0059, a ketoleucine moiety is bound to the SBP, whereas a cytosine molecule is bound in the distal PAS-like domain of the tandem PAS-like domain. Differential scanning flourimetry support the binding of ligands observed in the crystal structure. There is significant interaction between the SBP and tandem PAS-like domains, and it is possible that the binding of one ligand could have an effect on the binding of the other. We uncovered three other proteins with this structural architecture in the non-redundant sequence data base, and predict that they too bind the same substrates. The genomic context of this protein did not offer any clues for its function. We did not find any biological process in which the two observed ligands are coupled. The protein Dret_0059 could be involved in either signal transduction or solute transport.

  8. Identification of some lectin IB4 binding proteins in rat dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullmer, Joseph M; Riedl, Maureen S; Higgins, LeeAnn; Elde, Robert

    2004-08-06

    Lectins are proteins that bind to glycoproteins and glycolipids. The isolectin Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 (IB4) recognizes terminal alpha-galactose and binds to a subset of small and medium-sized neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Using one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have identified several proteins that bind IB4 in sciatic nerve, dorsal horn, and DRG. Treatment with the enzyme alpha-galactosidase reduces IB4 binding, strongly suggesting the binding is specific for the IB4 epitope. Mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic digests of alpha-galactosidase sensitive bands identified three proteins that bind IB4: the laminin beta 2 chain and the light and medium subunits of neurofilaments.

  9. Multivalent binding of nonnative substrate proteins by the chaperonin GroEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, G W; Furtak, K; Rowland, M B; Ranson, N A; Saibil, H R; Kirchhausen, T; Horwich, A L

    2000-03-03

    The chaperonin GroEL binds nonnative substrate protein in the central cavity of an open ring through exposed hydrophobic residues at the inside aspect of the apical domains and then mediates productive folding upon binding ATP and the cochaperonin GroES. Whether nonnative proteins bind to more than one of the seven apical domains of a GroEL ring is unknown. We have addressed this using rings with various combinations of wild-type and binding-defective mutant apical domains, enabled by their production as single polypeptides. A wild-type extent of binary complex formation with two stringent substrate proteins, malate dehydrogenase or Rubisco, required a minimum of three consecutive binding-proficient apical domains. Rhodanese, a less-stringent substrate, required only two wild-type domains and was insensitive to their arrangement. As a physical correlate, multivalent binding of Rubisco was directly observed in an oxidative cross-linking experiment.

  10. Identification of cisplatin-binding proteins using agarose conjugates of platinum compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatoshi Karasawa

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP, and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment.

  11. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  12. Genome-Wide Motif Statistics are Shaped by DNA Binding Proteins over Evolutionary Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Qian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition of a genome with respect to all possible short DNA motifs impacts the ability of DNA binding proteins to locate and bind their target sites. Since nonfunctional DNA binding can be detrimental to cellular functions and ultimately to organismal fitness, organisms could benefit from reducing the number of nonfunctional DNA binding sites genome wide. Using in vitro measurements of binding affinities for a large collection of DNA binding proteins, in multiple species, we detect a significant global avoidance of weak binding sites in genomes. We demonstrate that the underlying evolutionary process leaves a distinct genomic hallmark in that similar words have correlated frequencies, a signal that we detect in all species across domains of life. We consider the possibility that natural selection against weak binding sites contributes to this process, and using an evolutionary model we show that the strength of selection needed to maintain global word compositions is on the order of point mutation rates. Likewise, we show that evolutionary mechanisms based on interference of protein-DNA binding with replication and mutational repair processes could yield similar results and operate with similar rates. On the basis of these modeling and bioinformatic results, we conclude that genome-wide word compositions have been molded by DNA binding proteins acting through tiny evolutionary steps over time scales spanning millions of generations.

  13. Evidence for two interacting ligand binding sites in human multidrug resistance protein 2 (ATP binding cassette C2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelcer, Noam; Huisman, Maarten T.; Reid, Glen; Wielinga, Peter; Breedveld, Pauline; Kuil, Annemieke; Knipscheer, Puck; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Schinkel, Alfred H.; Borst, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) belongs to the ATP binding cassette family of transporters. Its substrates include organic anions and anticancer drugs. We have used transport assays with vesicles derived from Sf9 insect cells overproducing MRP2 to study the interactions of drugs, organic

  14. Pilot study on binding of bovine salivary proteins to grit silicates and plant phytoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Marcus; M Kaiser, Thomas; Südekum, Karl-Heinz

    2013-06-01

    Mostly fed with grass in fresh or conserved form, cattle and other livestock have to cope with silicate defence bodies from plants (phytoliths) and environmental silicates (grit), which abrade tooth enamel and could additionally interact with various salivary proteins. To detect potential candidates for silicate-binding proteins, bovine whole saliva was incubated with grass-derived phytoliths and silicates. Interactions of salivary proteins with pulverized bovine dental enamel and dentine were additionally analysed. After intense washing, the powder fractions were loaded onto 1D-polyacrylamide gels, most prominent adhesive protein bands were cut out and proteins were identified by mass spectrometry within three independent replicates. All materials were mainly bound by bovine odorant-binding protein, bovine salivary protein 30×10(3) and carbonic anhydrase VI. The phytolith/silicate fraction showed additional stronger interaction with haemoglobin β and lactoperoxidase. Conceivably, the binding of these proteins to the surfaces may contribute to biological processes occurring on them.

  15. Identification of arsenic-binding proteins in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyan; Yang, Fan; Shim, Joong-Youn; Kirk, Kenneth L; Anderson, D Eric; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2007-09-18

    As a cancer chemotherapeutic drug, arsenic acts on numerous intracellular signal transduction pathways in cancer cells. However, its mechanism of actions is still not fully understood. Previous studies suggest that arsenic reacts with closely spaced cysteine (Cys) residues of proteins with high Cys content and accessible sulfhydryl (SH) groups. In this study, human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was examined as a cellular model to explore arsenic-binding proteins and the mechanism of binding. An arsenic-biotin conjugate was synthesized by coupling the pentafluorophenol ester of biotin with p-aminophenylarsenoxide. Arsenic-binding proteins were eluted with streptavidin resin from arsenic-biotin treated MCF-7 cells, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Arsenic-binding properties of two of these proteins, beta-tubulin and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), were studied further in vitro and the biological consequences of this binding was evaluated. Binding assay with Western blotting confirmed binding of beta-tubulin and PKM2 by arsenic in a concentration-dependent manner. Arsenic binding inhibited tubulin polymerization, but surprisingly had no effect on PKM2 activity. Molecular modeling showed that binding of Cys(12) alone or vicinal Cys residues (Cys(12) and Cys(213)) of beta-tubulin by arsenic blocked the active site for access of GTP, which is necessary for tubulin polymerization. On the contrary, all Cys residues of PKM2 were far away from the active site of the enzyme. In summary, this study confirmed beta-tubulin and PKM2 as arsenic-binding proteins in MCF-7 cells. Functional consequence of such binding may depend on whether arsenic binding causes conformational changes or blocks active sites of target proteins.

  16. Nomenclature for the human Arf family of GTP-binding proteins: ARF, ARL, and SAR proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Richard A.; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Elias, Marek; Lovering, Ruth C.; Munro, Sean; Schurmann, Annette

    2006-01-01

    The Ras superfamily is comprised of at least four large families of regulatory guanosine triphosphate–binding proteins, including the Arfs. The Arf family includes three different groups of proteins: the Arfs, Arf-like (Arls), and SARs. Several Arf family members have been very highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution and have orthologues in evolutionally diverse species. The different means by which Arf family members have been identified have resulted in an inconsistent and confusing array of names. This confusion is further compounded by differences in nomenclature between different species. We propose a more consistent nomenclature for the human members of the Arf family that may also serve as a guide for nomenclature in other species. PMID:16505163

  17. An accurate binding interaction model in de novo computational protein design of interactions: if you build it, they will bind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Nir; Ambroggio, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    Computational protein design efforts aim to create novel proteins and functions in an automated manner and, in the process, these efforts shed light on the factors shaping natural proteins. The focus of these efforts has progressed from the interior of proteins to their surface and the design of functions, such as binding or catalysis. Here we examine progress in the development of robust methods for the computational design of non-natural interactions between proteins and molecular targets such as other proteins or small molecules. This problem is referred to as the de novo computational design of interactions. Recent successful efforts in de novo enzyme design and the de novo design of protein-protein interactions open a path towards solving this problem. We examine the common themes in these efforts, and review recent studies aimed at understanding the nature of successes and failures in the de novo computational design of interactions. While several approaches culminated in success, the use of a well-defined structural model for a specific binding interaction in particular has emerged as a key strategy for a successful design, and is therefore reviewed with special consideration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Abraham

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP. AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies.

  19. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  20. Binding of acyl CoA by fatty acid binding protein and the effect on fatty acid activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrier, R.E.; Manson, C.R.; Brecher, P.

    1987-05-01

    The ability of purified rat liver and heart fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) to bind oleoyl CoA and modulate acyl CoA synthesis by microsomal membranes was investigated. Using binding assays employing either Lipidex 1000 or multilamellar liposomes to sequester unbound ligand, rat liver but not rat heart FABP was shown to bind radiolabeled acyl CoA. Binding studies suggest that liver FABP has a single binding site for acyl CoA which is separate from the two binding sites for fatty acids. Experiments were then performed to determine how binding may influence acyl CoA metabolism by liver microsomes or heart sarcoplasmic reticulum. Using liposomes as fatty acid donors, liver FABP stimulated acyl CoA production whereas heart FABP did not stimulate production over control values. /sup 14/C-Fatty acid-FABP complexes were prepared, incubated with membranes and acyl CoA synthetase activity was determined. Up to 70% of the fatty acid could be converted to acyl CoA in the presence of liver FABP but in the presence of heart FABP, only 45% of the fatty acid was converted. The amount of product formed was not changed by additional membrane, enzyme cofactor, or incubation time. Liver but not heart FABP bound the acyl CoA formed and removed it from the membranes. These studies suggest that liver FABP can increase the amount of acyl CoA by binding this ligand thereby removing it from the membrane and possibly aiding transport within the cell.

  1. Identification of Arsenic Direct-Binding Proteins in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of arsenic direct-binding proteins is essential for determining the mechanism by which arsenic trioxide achieves its chemotherapeutic effects. At least two cysteines close together in the amino acid sequence are crucial to the binding of arsenic and essential to the identification of arsenic-binding proteins. In the present study, arsenic binding proteins were pulled down with streptavidin and identified using a liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS. More than 40 arsenic-binding proteins were separated, and redox-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1, heat shock 70 kDa protein 9 (HSPA9 and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, were further studied using binding assays in vitro. Notably, PKM2 has a high affinity for arsenic. In contrast to PKM2, GSTP1and HSPA9 did not combine with arsenic directly in vitro. These observations suggest that arsenic-mediated acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL suppressive effects involve PKM2. In summary, we identified several arsenic binding proteins in APL cells and investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of arsenic trioxide for APL. Further investigation into specific signal pathways by which PKM2 mediates APL developments may lead to a better understanding of arsenic effects on APL.

  2. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun [Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, Korea University Graduate School of Medicine, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chaeseung [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungho [Department of Life Science, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Dae Ryong [Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-020 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Junseo, E-mail: ohjs@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, Korea University Graduate School of Medicine, Ansan, Gyeonggi do 425-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I-III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin{sup domain} {sup III} (R-III) and albumin{sup domain} {sup I}-RBP-albumin{sup III} (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises

  3. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel M; Thuesen, Cathrine K; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless......, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic...... potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area...

  4. Two outer membrane proteins are bovine lactoferrin-binding proteins in Mannheimia haemolytica A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego-Barrón, Luisa; Luna-Castro, Sarahí; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; de la Garza, Mireya

    2016-09-06

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a Gram negative bacterium that is part of the bovine respiratory disease, which causes important economic losses in the livestock industry. In the present work, the interaction between M. haemolytica A1 and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) was studied. This iron-chelating glycoprotein is part of the mammalian innate-immune system and is present in milk and mucosal secretions; Lf is also contained in neutrophils secondary granules, which release this glycoprotein at infection sites. It was evidenced that M. haemolytica was not able to use iron-charged BLf (BholoLf) as a sole iron source; nevertheless, iron-lacked BLf (BapoLf) showed a bactericidal effect against M. haemolytica with MIC of 4.88 ± 1.88 and 7.31 ± 1.62 μM for M. haemolytica strain F (field isolate) and M. haemolytica strain R (reference strain), respectively. Through overlay assays and 2-D electrophoresis, two OMP of 32.9 and 34.2 kDa with estimated IP of 8.18 and 9.35, respectively, were observed to bind both BapoLf and BholoLf; these OMP were identified by Maldi-Tof as OmpA (heat-modifiable OMP) and a membrane protein (porin). These M. haemolytica BLf binding proteins could be interacting in vivo with both forms of BLf depending on the iron state of the bovine.

  5. Can copper binding to the prion protein generate a misfolded form of the protein?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushie, M Jake; Rauk, Arvi; Jirik, Frank R; Vogel, Hans J

    2009-02-01

    The native prion protein (PrP) has a two domain structure, with a globular folded alpha-helical C-terminal domain and a flexible extended N-terminal region. The latter can selectively bind Cu(2+) via four His residues in the octarepeat (OR) region, as well as two sites (His96 and His111) outside this region. In the disease state, the folded C-terminal domain of PrP undergoes a conformational change, forming amorphous aggregates high in beta-sheet content. Cu(2+) bound to the ORs can be redox active and has been shown to induce cleavage within the OR region, a process requiring conserved Trp residues. Using computational modeling, we have observed that electron transfer from Trp residues to copper can be favorable. These models also reveal that an indole-based radical cation or Cu(+) can initiate reactions leading to protein backbone cleavage. We have also demonstrated, by molecular dynamics simulations, that Cu(2+) binding to the His96 and His111 residues in the remaining PrP N-terminal fragment can induce localized beta-sheet structure, allowing us to suggest a potential mechanism for the initiation of beta-sheet misfolding in the C-terminal domain by Cu(2+).

  6. Biochemical characterization of DNA-binding proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Christine D; Martin, Patrick K

    2008-03-01

    Several representatives of the Crenarchaeal branch of the Archaea contain highly abundant, small, positively charged proteins exemplified by the Sso7d protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus. These proteins bind to DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner. Using publicly available genomic sequence information, we identified a second class of small Crenarchaeal DNA-binding proteins represented by the Pyrobaculum aerophilum open reading frame 3192-encoded (Pae3192) protein and its paralogs. We investigated the biochemical properties of the Pae3192 protein and an orthologous protein (Ape1322b) from Aeropyrum pernix in side-by-side experiments with the Sso7d protein. We demonstrate that the recombinant Ape1322b, Pae3192 and Sso7d proteins bind to DNA and that the DNA-protein complexes formed are slightly different for each protein. We show that like Sso7d, Pae3192 constrains negative supercoils in DNA. In addition, we show that all three proteins raise the melting temperature of duplex DNA upon binding. Finally, we present the equilibrium affinity constants and kinetic association constants of each protein for single-stranded and double-stranded DNA.

  7. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Maurer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK, but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  8. Global analysis of small molecule binding to related protein targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix A Kruger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the integration of pharmacological data and homology information for a large scale analysis of small molecule binding to related targets. Differences in small molecule binding have been assessed for curated pairs of human to rat orthologs and also for recently diverged human paralogs. Our analysis shows that in general, small molecule binding is conserved for pairs of human to rat orthologs. Using statistical tests, we identified a small number of cases where small molecule binding is different between human and rat, some of which had previously been reported in the literature. Knowledge of species specific pharmacology can be advantageous for drug discovery, where rats are frequently used as a model system. For human paralogs, we demonstrate a global correlation between sequence identity and the binding of small molecules with equivalent affinity. Our findings provide an initial general model relating small molecule binding and sequence divergence, containing the foundations for a general model to anticipate and predict within-target-family selectivity.

  9. Manganese binding to the 23 kDa extrinsic protein of Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarava, Natallia; Un, Sun; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2007-06-01

    The recombinant form of the extrinsic 23 kDa protein (psbP) of Photosystem II (PSII) was studied with respect to its capability to bind Mn. The stoichiometry was determined to be one manganese bound per protein. A very high binding constant, K(A)=10(-17) M(-1), was determined by dialysis of the Mn containing protein against increasing EDTA concentration. High Field EPR spectroscopy was used to distinguish between specific symmetrically ligated Mn(II) from those non-specifically Mn(II) attached to the protein surface. Upon Mn binding PsbP exhibited fluorescence emission with maxima at 415 and 435 nm when tryptophan residues were excited. The yield of this blue fluorescence was variable from sample to sample. It was likely that different conformational states of the protein were responsible for this variability. The importance of Mn binding to PsbP in the context of photoactivation of PSII is discussed.

  10. Probing the binding between norbixin and dairy proteins by spectroscopy methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhong, Qixin

    2013-08-15

    Annatto (norbixin) has been used to color cheeses for centuries, but there is very little knowledge about interactions between the pigment and dairy proteins. In this study, binding of norbixin with whey protein isolate (WPI), sodium caseinate (NaCN), and 6 individual dairy proteins was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Norbixin was observed to effectively quench the fluorescence of WPI and NaCN by forming complexes. The binding affinity between NaCN and norbixin was higher than that of WPI-norbixin. For individual proteins, bovine serum albumin had higher binding affinity with norbixin than β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin, while κ-casein bound with norbixin better than α- and β-caseins. Binding changed the conformation of WPI and NaCN, but the extent and trend varied for individual proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  12. Deciphering Cryptic Binding Sites on Proteins by Mixed-Solvent Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S Roy; Hu, Hai Peng; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Sherman, Woody; Favia, Angelo D

    2017-06-26

    In recent years, molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in explicit mixed solvents have been applied to various problems in protein biophysics and drug discovery, including protein folding, protein surface characterization, fragment screening, allostery, and druggability assessment. In this study, we perform a systematic study on how mixtures of organic solvent probes in water can reveal cryptic ligand binding pockets that are not evident in crystal structures of apo proteins. We examine a diverse set of eight PDB proteins that show pocket opening induced by ligand binding and investigate whether solvent MD simulations on the apo structures can induce the binding site observed in the holo structures. The cosolvent simulations were found to induce conformational changes on the protein surface, which were characterized and compared with the holo structures. Analyses of the biological systems, choice of probes and concentrations, druggability of the resulting induced pockets, and application to drug discovery are discussed here.

  13. Binding, tuning and mechanical function of the 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid chromophore in photoactive yellow protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, M.A. van der; Arents, J.C.; Kort, R.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial photoreceptor protein photoactive yellow protein (PYP) covalently binds the chromophore 4-hydroxy coumaric acid, tuning (spectral) characteristics of this cofactor. Here, we study this binding and tuning using a combination of pointmutations and chromophore analogs. In all photosensor

  14. Multifunctionality and mechanism of ligand binding in a mosquito antiinflammatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Eric; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.; (NIH)

    2009-04-07

    The mosquito D7 salivary proteins are encoded by a multigene family related to the arthropod odorant-binding protein (OBP) superfamily. Forms having either one or two OBP domains are found in mosquito saliva. Four single-domain and one two-domain D7 proteins from Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (AeD7), respectively, were shown to bind biogenic amines with high affinity and with a stoichiometry of one ligand per protein molecule. Sequence comparisons indicated that only the C-terminal domain of AeD7 is homologous to the single-domain proteins from A. gambiae, suggesting that the N-terminal domain may bind a different class of ligands. Here, we describe the 3D structure of AeD7 and examine the ligand-binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminal domains. Isothermal titration calorimetry and ligand complex crystal structures show that the N-terminal domain binds cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) with high affinities (50-60 nM) whereas the C-terminal domain binds biogenic amines. The lipid chain of the cysLT binds in a hydrophobic pocket of the N-terminal domain, whereas binding of norepinephrine leads to an ordering of the C-terminal portion of the C-terminal domain into an alpha-helix that, along with rotations of Arg-176 and Glu-268 side chains, acts to bury the bound ligand.

  15. Aptamer-Conjugated Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Reducing Diabetes Risk via Retinol Binding Protein 4 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Raheleh; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud; Pasalar, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Inhibition of the binding of retinol to its carrier, retinol binding protein 4, is a new strategy for treating type 2 diabetes; for this purpose, we have provided an aptamer-functionalized multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticle. First, calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized and conjugated to the aptamer. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles releases the process of aptamer from nanoparticles and their inhibition function of binding retinol to retinol binding protein 4. After synthesizing and characterizing the multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticles and observing the noncytotoxicity of conjugate, the optimum time (48 hours) and the pH (7.4) for releasing the aptamer from the nanoparticles was determined. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value for inhibition of retinol binding to retinol binding protein 4 was 210 femtomolar (fmol). The results revealed that the aptamer could prevent connection between retinol and retinol binding protein 4 at a very low IC 50 value (210 fmol) compared to other reported inhibitors. It seems that this aptamer could be used as an efficient candidate not only for decreasing the insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but also for inhibiting the other retinol binding protein 4-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex difference in cellular retinol- and retinoic acid-binding proteins in human colon adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, P R; Duttagupta, C; Romney, S L

    1980-12-01

    Human colon adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous, normal colon from the same patient were assayed for the presence and amounts of cellular binding proteins for retinol (CRBP) and retinoic acid (CRABP) by sucrose gradient analysis. In male patients, the mean concentrations of both CRBP and CRABP in the colon cancers were statistically significantly higher than in the adjacent normal colon. By contrast, in female colon cancers, the mean levels for both binding proteins were reduced approximately 2-fold, compared to the concentrations in the adjacent normal colon. These findings reveal an unexpected sex difference in the binding proteins for retinol and retinoic acid in human colon malignancies.

  17. Identification of a Human Lactoferrin-Binding Protein in Gardnerella vaginalis

    OpenAIRE

    Jarosik, Gregory P.; Land, Carol Beth

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Gardnerella vaginalis can utilize iron-loaded human lactoferrin as a sole source of iron. In this study, G. vaginalis cells were shown to bind digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled human lactoferrin in a dot blot assay. Using the DIG-labeled human lactoferrin, a 120-kDa human lactoferrin-binding protein was detected by Western blot analysis of G. vaginalis proteins. The lactoferrin-binding activity of this protein was found to be heat stable. Competition studies indicated...

  18. Triggering of the Newcastle Disease Virus Fusion Protein by a Chimeric Attachment Protein That Binds to Nipah Virus Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Anne M.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Zhu, Qiyun; Mahon, Paul J.; Rota, Paul A.; Lee, Benhur; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The fusion (F) proteins of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are both triggered by binding to receptors, mediated in both viruses by a second protein, the attachment protein. However, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) attachment protein of NDV recognizes sialic acid receptors, whereas the NiV G attachment protein recognizes ephrinB2/B3 as receptors. Chimeric proteins composed of domains from the two attachment proteins have been evaluated for fusion-promoting activity with each F protein. Chimeras having NiV G-derived globular domains and NDV HN-derived stalks, transmembranes, and cytoplasmic tails are efficiently expressed, bind ephrinB2, and trigger NDV F to promote fusion in Vero cells. Thus, the NDV F protein can be triggered by binding to the NiV receptor, indicating that an aspect of the triggering cascade induced by the binding of HN to sialic acid is conserved in the binding of NiV G to ephrinB2. However, the fusion cascade for triggering NiV F by the G protein and that of triggering NDV F by the chimeras can be distinguished by differential exposure of a receptor-induced conformational epitope. The enhanced exposure of this epitope marks the triggering of NiV F by NiV G but not the triggering of NDV F by the chimeras. Thus, the triggering cascade for NiV G-F fusion may be more complex than that of NDV HN and F. This is consistent with the finding that reciprocal chimeras having NDV HN-derived heads and NiV G-derived stalks, transmembranes, and tails do not trigger either F protein for fusion, despite efficient cell surface expression and receptor binding. PMID:21460213

  19. Triggering of the newcastle disease virus fusion protein by a chimeric attachment protein that binds to Nipah virus receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Anne M; Aguilar, Hector C; Zhu, Qiyun; Mahon, Paul J; Rota, Paul A; Lee, Benhur; Iorio, Ronald M

    2011-05-20

    The fusion (F) proteins of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are both triggered by binding to receptors, mediated in both viruses by a second protein, the attachment protein. However, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) attachment protein of NDV recognizes sialic acid receptors, whereas the NiV G attachment protein recognizes ephrinB2/B3 as receptors. Chimeric proteins composed of domains from the two attachment proteins have been evaluated for fusion-promoting activity with each F protein. Chimeras having NiV G-derived globular domains and NDV HN-derived stalks, transmembranes, and cytoplasmic tails are efficiently expressed, bind ephrinB2, and trigger NDV F to promote fusion in Vero cells. Thus, the NDV F protein can be triggered by binding to the NiV receptor, indicating that an aspect of the triggering cascade induced by the binding of HN to sialic acid is conserved in the binding of NiV G to ephrinB2. However, the fusion cascade for triggering NiV F by the G protein and that of triggering NDV F by the chimeras can be distinguished by differential exposure of a receptor-induced conformational epitope. The enhanced exposure of this epitope marks the triggering of NiV F by NiV G but not the triggering of NDV F by the chimeras. Thus, the triggering cascade for NiV G-F fusion may be more complex than that of NDV HN and F. This is consistent with the finding that reciprocal chimeras having NDV HN-derived heads and NiV G-derived stalks, transmembranes, and tails do not trigger either F protein for fusion, despite efficient cell surface expression and receptor binding. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. An Overview of the Prediction of Protein DNA-Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  1. Identification of Aminopeptidase-N2 as a Cry2Ab binding protein in Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofre, Janette; Gaytán, Meztlli O; Peña-Cardeña, Arlen; García-Gomez, Blanca I; Pacheco, Sabino; Gómez, Isabel; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2017-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab toxin has been used in combination with Cry1Ac for resistance management on the Bt-cotton that is widely planted worldwide. However, little is known regarding Cry2Ab mode of action. Particularly, there is a gap of knowledge on the identification of insect midgut proteins that bind Cry2Ab and mediate toxicity. In the case of Cry1Ab toxin, a transmembrane cadherin protein and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored proteins like aminopeptidase-N1 (APN1) or alkaline-phosphatase (ALP) from Manduca sexta, have been shown to be important for oligomer formation and insertion into the membrane. Binding competition experiments showed that Cry2Ab toxin does not share binding sites with Cry1Ab toxin in M. sexta brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Also, that Cry2Ab shows reduced binding to the Cry1Ab binding molecules cadherin, APN1 or ALP. Finally, ligand blot experiments and protein sequence by LC-MS/MS identified APN2 isoform as a Cry2Ab binding protein. Cloning and expression of APN2 confirmed that APN2 is a Cry2Ab binding protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-13

    Jan 13, 2017 ... Arabidopsis thaliana; Argonoute 4; DNA methylation; histone deacetylase; methyl CpG binding domain protein; nuclear ..... involved in the process of RNA-directed DNA methylation. Sequence analysis of NTF2 protein revealed several impor- tant features. The protein is made of 460 amino acids with a.

  3. Structural determinants required to target penicillin-binding protein 3 to the septum of Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piette, A.; Aarsman, M.E.G.; Fraipont, C.; den Blaauwen, T.; Pastoret, S.; Nguyen-Disteche, M.

    2004-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, cell division is mediated by the concerted action of about 12 proteins that assemble at the division site to presumably form a complex called the divisome. Among these essential division proteins, the multimodular class B penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), which is

  4. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  5. Genome-wide computational identification of WG/GW Argonaute-binding proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlowski, Wojciech M; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Carrère, Julie; Pontier, Dominique; Lagrange, Thierry; Cooke, Richard

    2010-07-01

    Domains in Arabidopsis proteins NRPE1 and SPT5-like, composed almost exclusively of repeated motifs in which only WG or GW sequences and an overall amino-acid preference are conserved, have been experimentally shown to bind multiple molecules of Argonaute (AGO) protein(s). Domain swapping between the WG/GW domains of NRPE1 and the human protein GW182 showed a conserved function. As classical sequence alignment methods are poorly-adapted to detect such weakly-conserved motifs, we have developed a tool to carry out a systematic analysis to identify genes potentially encoding AGO-binding GW/WG proteins. Here, we describe exhaustive analysis of the Arabidopsis genome for all regions potentially encoding proteins bearing WG/GW motifs and consider the possible role of some of them in AGO-dependent mechanisms. We identified 20 different candidate WG/GW genes, encoding proteins in which the predicted domains range from 92aa to 654aa. These mostly correspond to a limited number of families: RNA-binding proteins, transcription factors, glycine-rich proteins, translation initiation factors and known silencing-associated proteins such as SDE3. Recent studies have argued that the interaction between WG/GW-rich domains and AGO proteins is evolutionarily conserved. Here, we demonstrate by an in silico domain-swapping simulation between plant and mammalian WG/GW proteins that the biased amino-acid composition of the AGO-binding sites is conserved.

  6. Identification of DNA-binding proteins using support vector machines and evolutionary profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gromiha Michael M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of DNA-binding proteins is one of the major challenges in the field of genome annotation, as these proteins play a crucial role in gene-regulation. In this paper, we developed various SVM modules for predicting DNA-binding domains and proteins. All models were trained and tested on multiple datasets of non-redundant proteins. Results SVM models have been developed on DNAaset, which consists of 1153 DNA-binding and equal number of non DNA-binding proteins, and achieved the maximum accuracy of 72.42% and 71.59% using amino acid and dipeptide compositions, respectively. The performance of SVM model improved from 72.42% to 74.22%, when evolutionary information in form of PSSM profiles was used as input instead of amino acid composition. In addition, SVM models have been developed on DNAset, which consists of 146 DNA-binding and 250 non-binding chains/domains, and achieved the maximum accuracy of 79.80% and 86.62% using amino acid composition and PSSM profiles. The SVM models developed in this study perform better than existing methods on a blind dataset. Conclusion A highly accurate method has been developed for predicting DNA-binding proteins using SVM and PSSM profiles. This is the first study in which evolutionary information in form of PSSM profiles has been used successfully for predicting DNA-binding proteins. A web-server DNAbinder has been developed for identifying DNA-binding proteins and domains from query amino acid sequences http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/dnabinder/.

  7. A High-Throughput Solid-Phase Microplate Protein-Binding Assay to Investigate Interactions between Myofilament Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Biesiadecki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the structure-function relationship of muscle-regulatory-protein isoforms, mutations, and posttranslational modifications, it is necessary to probe functional effects at the level of the protein-protein interaction. Traditional methodologies assessing such protein-protein interactions are laborious and require significant amounts of purified protein, while many current methodologies require costly and specialized equipment or modification of the proteins, which may affect their interaction. To address these issues, we developed a novel method of microplate-based solid-phase protein-binding assay over the recent years. This method assesses specific protein-protein interactions at physiological conditions, utilizes relatively small amounts of protein, is free of protein modification, and does not require specialized instrumentation. Here we present detailed methodology for the solid-phase protein-binding assay with examples that we have successfully applied to quantify interactions of myofilament-regulatory proteins. We further provide considerations for optimization of the assay conditions and its broader application in studies of other protein-protein interactions.

  8. How does fluorescent labeling affect the binding kinetics of proteins with intact cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Linliang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shaopeng; Zhang, Fenni; Zhang, Shengtao; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent labeling is a mainstream technology for detecting molecular binding. Despite the importance, few studies have been devoted to quantitatively examine the effect of labeling on the molecular binding processes. Here we present a quantitative study on the binding kinetics of fluorescent-labeled and un-labeled molecules (lectin proteins) with glycoproteins on the membrane of cells using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technique. The study shows that fluorescent labeling has a significant influence on the binding behaviors of proteins, especially the association processes, and the influence depends sensitively on the charge of fluorescent labels. It further shows that the labels also affect the local distribution of probe proteins, due to the inhomogeneous surface charge distribution of the cell membrane. Our work indicates that fluorescent labeling in general affects the binding behaviors, but proper design of the label will help to minimize its effect. PMID:25486538

  9. Effect of sodium molybdate on the thyroxine-binding affinity of transport cytosol proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodová, V; Kraml, J; Schreiber, V

    1985-01-01

    The presence of sodium molybdate during tissue homogenization is known to increase the number of cytosol binding sites for glucocorticoids, progesterone, androgens and oestrogens. We wondered whether a phenomenon similar to this stabilization of steroid receptors would also occur in thyroxine-binding cytosol protein. We found that the presence of sodium molybdate (10 mmol/l) in rat adenohypophyseal cytosol increased its thyroxine-binding capacity by up to 96%. In the case of binding protein cytosol minus molybdate, Ka = 5.5 X 10(9) l.mol-1, whereas for cytosol plus molybdate Ka(1) = 6.0 X 10(9) l.mol-1 and Ka(2) = 3.0 X 10(10) l.mol-1. Cytosol prepared without molybdate did not contain a binding protein class with a higher Ka. The effect is stereo-specific and the LT4 bond is not displaced by DT4.

  10. Methylated DNA-binding protein is present in various mammalian cell types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supakar, P.C.; Weist, D.; Zhang, D.; Inamdar, N.; Zhang, Xianyang; Khan, R.; Ehrlich, M. (Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, LA (USA)); Ehrlich, K.C. (Department of Agriculture, New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1988-08-25

    A DNA-binding protein from human placenta, methylated DNA-binding protein (MDBP), binds to certain DNA sequences only when they contain 5-methylcytosine (m{sup 5}C) residues at specific positions. The authors found a very similar DNA-binding activity in nuclear extracts of rat tissues, calf thymus, human embryonal carcinoma cells, HeLa cells, and mouse LTK cells. Like human placental MDBP, the analogous DNA-binding proteins from the above mammalian cell lines formed a number of different low-electrophoretic-mobility complexes with a 14-bp MDBP-specific oligonucleotide duplex. All of these complexes exhibited the same DNA methylation specificity and DNA sequence specificity. Although MDBP activity was found in various mammalian cell types, it was not detected in extracts of cultured mosquito cells and so may be associated only with cells with vertebrate-type DNA methylation.

  11. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  12. A machine learning approach for the identification of odorant binding proteins from sequence-derived properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganthan PN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Odorant binding proteins (OBPs are believed to shuttle odorants from the environment to the underlying odorant receptors, for which they could potentially serve as odorant presenters. Although several sequence based search methods have been exploited for protein family prediction, less effort has been devoted to the prediction of OBPs from sequence data and this area is more challenging due to poor sequence identity between these proteins. Results In this paper, we propose a new algorithm that uses Regularized Least Squares Classifier (RLSC in conjunction with multiple physicochemical properties of amino acids to predict odorant-binding proteins. The algorithm was applied to the dataset derived from Pfam and GenDiS database and we obtained overall prediction accuracy of 97.7% (94.5% and 98.4% for positive and negative classes respectively. Conclusion Our study suggests that RLSC is potentially useful for predicting the odorant binding proteins from sequence-derived properties irrespective of sequence similarity. Our method predicts 92.8% of 56 odorant binding proteins non-homologous to any protein in the swissprot database and 97.1% of the 414 independent dataset proteins, suggesting the usefulness of RLSC method for facilitating the prediction of odorant binding proteins from sequence information.

  13. High-affinity single-domain binding proteins with a binary-code interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Akiko; Gilbreth, Ryan N; Esaki, Kaori; Tereshko, Valentina; Koide, Shohei

    2007-04-17

    High degrees of sequence and conformation complexity found in natural protein interaction interfaces are generally considered essential for achieving tight and specific interactions. However, it has been demonstrated that specific antibodies can be built by using an interface with a binary code consisting of only Tyr and Ser. This surprising result might be attributed to yet undefined properties of the antibody scaffold that uniquely enhance its capacity for target binding. In this work we tested the generality of the binary-code interface by engineering binding proteins based on a single-domain scaffold. We show that Tyr/Ser binary-code interfaces consisting of only 15-20 positions within a fibronectin type III domain (FN3; 95 residues) are capable of producing specific binding proteins (termed "monobodies") with a low-nanomolar K(d). A 2.35-A x-ray crystal structure of a monobody in complex with its target, maltose-binding protein, and mutation analysis revealed dominant contributions of Tyr residues to binding as well as striking molecular mimicry of a maltose-binding protein substrate, beta-cyclodextrin, by the Tyr/Ser binary interface. This work suggests that an interaction interface with low chemical diversity but with significant conformational diversity is generally sufficient for tight and specific molecular recognition, providing fundamental insights into factors governing protein-protein interactions.

  14. Oligosaccharide binding proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveal a preference for host glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J Bruce; Raybould, Helen E; Mills, David A

    2011-03-15

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process.

  15. Oligosaccharide binding proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveal a preference for host glycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garrido

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO. Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs, part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process.

  16. Isothermal chemical denaturation to determine binding affinity of small molecules to G-protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Patrick; Weihofen, Wilhelm; Siu, Fai; Xie, Amy; Katakia, Hetal; Wright, S Kirk; Hunt, Ian; Brown, Richard K; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-03-15

    The determination of accurate binding affinities is critical in drug discovery and development. Several techniques are available for characterizing the binding of small molecules to soluble proteins. The situation is different for integral membrane proteins. Isothermal chemical denaturation has been shown to be a valuable biophysical method to determine, in a direct and label-free fashion, the binding of ligands to soluble proteins. In this study, the application of isothermal chemical denaturation was applied to an integral membrane protein, the A2a G-protein coupled receptor. Binding affinities for a set of 19 small molecule agonists/antagonists of the A2a receptor were determined and found to be in agreement with data from surface plasmon resonance and radioligand binding assays previously reported in the literature. Therefore, isothermal chemical denaturation expands the available toolkit of biophysical techniques to characterize and study ligand binding to integral membrane proteins, specifically G-protein coupled receptors in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The complex interplay between ligand binding and conformational structure of the folate binding protein (folate receptor)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Hansen, Steen I.

    2015-01-01

    , and the binding induces a conformational change with formation of hydrophilic and stable holo-FBP. Holo-FBP exhibits a ligand-mediated concentration-dependent self-association into multimers of great thermal and chemical stability due to strong intermolecular forces. Both ligand and FBP are thus protected against...... biological/physicochemical decomposition. In biological fluids with low FBP concentrations, e.g., saliva, semen and plasma, hydrophobic apo-monomers and hydrophilic holo-monomers associate into stable asymmetrical complexes with aberrant binding kinetics unless detergents, e.g., cholesterol or phospholipids...

  18. Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding in chromatin

    CERN Document Server

    Teif, Vladimir B

    2010-01-01

    Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding are well established as a method to describe complex ligand binding equilibriums measured in vitro with purified DNA and protein components. Recently, a new field of applications has opened up for this approach since it has become possible to experimentally quantify genome-wide protein occupancies in relation to the DNA sequence. In particular, the organization of the eukaryotic genome by histone proteins into a nucleoprotein complex termed chromatin has been recognized as a key parameter that controls the access of transcription factors to the DNA sequence. New approaches have to be developed to derive statistical mechanical lattice descriptions of chromatin-associated protein-DNA interactions. Here, we present the theoretical framework for lattice models of histone-DNA interactions in chromatin and investigate the (competitive) DNA binding of other chromosomal proteins and transcription factors. The results have a number of applications for quant...

  19. Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies possess proteins which bind to eucaryotic cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenman, W M; Meuser, R U

    1986-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis proteins were electrophoresed and then transferred to nitrocellulose paper to detect chlamydial proteins which bind to eucaryotic cell membranes. Resolved polypeptides of C. trachomatis serovars J and L2 were reacted with iodinated HeLa cell membranes and autoradiographed. Infectious elementary bodies of both serovars possess 31,000- and 18,000-dalton proteins which bind to HeLa cells. In contrast, noninfectious reticulate bodies do not possess eucaryotic cell-binding proteins. Both proteins are antigenic when reacted with hyperimmune rabbit antisera in immunoblots and antisera raised against the 31,000- and 18,000-dalton proteins are inhibitory to chlamydia-host cell association. In addition, these antisera exhibit neutralizing activity. Our data suggest that these putative chlamydial adhesins play a key role in the early steps of chlamydia-host cell interaction and that antibody directed against them may be protective. Images PMID:3511037

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies possess proteins which bind to eucaryotic cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenman, W.M.; Meuser, R.U.

    1986-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis proteins were electrophoresed and then transferred to nitrocellulose paper to detect chlamydial proteins which bind to eucaryotic cell membranes. Resolved polypeptides of C. trachomatis serovars J and L/sub 2/ were reacted with iodinated HeLa cell membranes and autoradiographed. Infectious elementary bodies of both serovars possess 31,000- and 18,000-dalton proteins which bind to HeLa cells. In contrast, noninfectious reticulate bodies do not possess eucaryotic cell-binding proteins. Both proteins are antigenic when reacted with hyperimmune rabbit antisera in immunoblots and antisera raised against the 31,000- and 18,000-dalton proteins are inhibitory to chlamydia-host cell association. In addition, these antisera exhibit neutralizing activity. These data suggest that these putative chlamydial adhesions play a key role in the early steps of chlamydia-host cell interaction and that antibody directed against them may be protective.

  1. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  2. Cadmium-binding proteins from blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) environmentally exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedow, M.A.; Kneip, T.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1982-06-01

    Two heat-stable (90/sup 0/C) cadmium-binding proteins were isolated from the hepatopancreas of Hudson River blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration chromatography. These proteins have molecular weights of 10,600 and 9,400, and ultraviolet absorbance ratios at 250/280 nm of 12.4 and 5.4, respectively. Repeated freezing and thawing and prolonged (3-6 weeks) storage resulted in protein degradation or loss of Cd-binding activity. These proteins were induced by laboratory injection of CdCl/sub 2/ in blue crabs from pristine (Chesapeake Bay) areas; however, injection of CdCl/sub 2/ into Hudson River animals yielded anomalous chromatography profiles. Cadmium-binding proteins were also identified in blue crab thoracic muscle and gill. The possibility is discussed that these proteins are a type of metallothionein and could contribute to the human toxicity of this cadmium-contaminated edible crustacean.

  3. Dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding amino acid residues in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuraj, Karthe; Saravanan, Konda Mani

    2017-04-01

    A protein can interact with DNA or RNA molecules to perform various cellular processes. Identifying or analyzing DNA/RNA binding site amino acid residues is important to understand molecular recognition process. It is quite possible to accurately model DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues in experimental protein-DNA/RNA complex by using the electron density map whereas, locating/modeling the binding site amino acid residues in the predicted three dimensional structures of DNA/RNA binding proteins is still a difficult task. Considering the above facts, in the present work, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding site amino acid residues by using a classical Ramachandran map. We have computed backbone dihedral angles of non-DNA/RNA binding residues and used as control dataset to make a comparative study. The dihedral angle preference of DNA and RNA binding site residues of twenty amino acid type is presented. Our analysis clearly revealed that the dihedral angles (φ, ψ) of DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues prefer to occupy (-89° to -60°, -59° to -30°) bins. The results presented in this paper will help to model/locate DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues with better accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA-binding polarity of human replication protein A positions nucleases in nucleotide excision repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.L. de Laat (Wouter); E. Appeldoorn (Esther); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe human single-stranded DNA-binding replication A protein (RPA) is involved in various DNA-processing events. By comparing the affinity of hRPA for artificial DNA hairpin structures with 3'- or 5'-protruding single-stranded arms, we found that hRPA binds ssDNA with a

  5. A Comparison Study for DNA Motif Modeling on Protein Binding Microarray

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-06-11

    Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs) are relatively short (5-15 bp) and degenerate. Identifying them is a computationally challenging task. In particular, Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner; for instance, a typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all possible DNA k-mers (k=810). Since proteins can often bind to DNA with different binding intensities, one of the major challenges is to build motif models which can fully capture the quantitative binding affinity data. To learn DNA motif models from the non-convex objective function landscape, several optimization methods are compared and applied to the PBM motif model building problem. In particular, representative methods from different optimization paradigms have been chosen for modeling performance comparison on hundreds of PBM datasets. The results suggest that the multimodal optimization methods are very effective for capturing the binding preference information from PBM data. In particular, we observe a general performance improvement using di-nucleotide modeling over mono-nucleotide modeling. In addition, the models learned by the best-performing method are applied to two independent applications: PBM probe rotation testing and ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction, demonstrating its biological applicability.

  6. Isolation and characterization of porcine mannan-binding proteins of different size and ultrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, P; Nielsen, EH; Andersen, Ove

    1996-01-01

    to mouse and rat MBP-C (41-45% identity). Both pMBPs exhibited Ca2+-dependent binding to D-mannose immobilized on agarose but no significant binding to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine- or fucose-agarose. The results further suggested the presence of a third pMBP which copurified with pMBP-27 but this protein...

  7. Plasmodium falciparum EBA-140 kDa protein peptides that bind to human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Vera, R; Puentes, A; Lopez, R; Garcia, J; Curtidor, H; Valbuena, J; Suarez, J; Rosas, J; Rivera, Z; Urquiza, M; Patarroyo, M E

    2003-10-01

    The erythrocyte-binding antigen 140 (EBA140) sequence was chemically synthesized in 61 20-mer sequential peptides covering the entire 3D7 protein strain, each of which was tested in erythrocyte-binding assays. Peptides 26135, 26144, 26147, 26160, 26170 and 26177 presented high erythrocyte-binding activity, with affinity constants ranging from 350 to 750 nM. Critical erythrocyte-binding residues were determined by competition-binding assays with glycine analogous peptides. Cross-linking assays with SDS-PAGE from high erythrocyte membrane protein binding peptides showed that all these peptides bound specifically to 25, 52 and 75 kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. The nature of these receptor sites was studied in peptide-binding assays using enzyme-treated erythrocytes, showing that these protein receptors are susceptible to structural changes provoked by enzyme treatment (neuraminidase, trypsin or chymotrypsin). Inhibition invasion assays in 'in vitro' cultures showed that all specific high binding sequences were able to inhibit invasion by 11-69% at 200 microM concentration.

  8. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2?) and tungstate (WO4 2?). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across

  9. NMR characterizations of the ice binding surface of an antifreeze protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hong

    Full Text Available Antifreeze protein (AFP has a unique function of reducing solution freezing temperature to protect organisms from ice damage. However, its functional mechanism is not well understood. An intriguing question concerning AFP function is how the high selectivity for ice ligand is achieved in the presence of free water of much higher concentration which likely imposes a large kinetic barrier for protein-ice recognition. In this study, we explore this question by investigating the property of the ice binding surface of an antifreeze protein using NMR spectroscopy. An investigation of the temperature gradient of amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil was performed for CfAFP-501, a hyperactive insect AFP. A good correlation between the two parameters was observed for one of the two Thr rows on the ice binding surface. A significant temperature-dependent protein-solvent interaction is found to be the most probable origin for this correlation, which is consistent with a scenario of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface. In accordance with this finding, rotational correlation time analyses combined with relaxation dispersion measurements reveals a weak dimer formation through ice binding surface at room temperature and a population shift of dimer to monomer at low temperature, suggesting hydrophobic effect involved in dimer formation and hence hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface of the protein. Our finding of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface provides a test for existing simulation studies. The occurrence of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface is likely unnecessary for enhancing protein-ice binding affinity which is achieved by a tight H-bonding network. Subsequently, we speculate that the hydrophobic hydration occurring on the ice binding surface plays a role in facilitating protein-ice recognition by lowering the kinetic barrier as suggested by

  10. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow: An Intricate Subfamily of Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maegen A. Ackermann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C consists of a family of thick filament associated proteins. Three isoforms of MyBP-C exist in striated muscles: cardiac, slow skeletal, and fast skeletal. To date, most studies have focused on the cardiac form, due to its direct involvement in the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we focus on the slow skeletal form, discuss past and current literature, and present evidence to support that: (i MyBP-C slow comprises a subfamily of four proteins, resulting from complex alternative shuffling of the single MyBP-C slow gene, (ii the four MyBP-C slow isoforms are expressed in variable amounts in different skeletal muscles, (iii at least one MyBP-C slow isoform is preferentially found at the periphery of M-bands and (iv the MyBP-C slow subfamily may play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of sarcomeric M- and A-bands and regulate the contractile properties of the actomyosin filaments.

  11. NKAP is a novel RS-related protein that interacts with RNA and RNA binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgute, Bhagyashri D.; Peche, Vivek S.; Steckelberg, Anna-Lena; Glöckner, Gernot; Gaßen, Berthold; Gehring, Niels H.; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2014-01-01

    NKAP is a highly conserved protein with roles in transcriptional repression, T-cell development, maturation and acquisition of functional competency and maintenance and survival of adult hematopoietic stem cells. Here we report the novel role of NKAP in splicing. With NKAP-specific antibodies we found that NKAP localizes to nuclear speckles. NKAP has an RS motif at the N-terminus followed by a highly basic domain and a DUF 926 domain at the C-terminal region. Deletion analysis showed that the basic domain is important for speckle localization. In pull-down experiments, we identified RNA-binding proteins, RNA helicases and splicing factors as interaction partners of NKAP, among them FUS/TLS. The FUS/TLS–NKAP interaction takes place through the RS domain of NKAP and the RGG1 and RGG3 domains of FUS/TLS. We analyzed the ability of NKAP to interact with RNA using in vitro splicing assays and found that NKAP bound both spliced messenger RNA (mRNA) and unspliced pre-mRNA. Genome-wide analysis using crosslinking and immunoprecipitation-seq revealed NKAP association with U1, U4 and U5 small nuclear RNA, and we also demonstrated that knockdown of NKAP led to an increase in pre-mRNA percentage. Our results reveal NKAP as nuclear speckle protein with roles in RNA splicing and processing. PMID:24353314

  12. DNA and protein footprinting analysis of the modulation of DNA binding by the N-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sayan; Cheng, Huiyong; Mollah, A K M M; Jamison, Elizabeth; Morris, Stephanie; Chance, Mark R; Khrapunov, Sergei; Brenowitz, Michael

    2007-09-04

    Recombinant full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein (TBP) and its isolated C-terminal conserved core domain (TBPc) were prepared with measured high specific DNA-binding activities. Direct, quantitative comparison of TATA box binding by TBP and TBPc reveals greater affinity by TBPc for either of two high-affinity sequences at several different experimental conditions. TBPc associates more rapidly than TBP to TATA box bearing DNA and dissociates more slowly. The structural origins of the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of the N-terminal domain on DNA binding by TBP were explored in comparative studies of TBPc and TBP by "protein footprinting" with hydroxyl radical (*OH) side chain oxidation. Some residues within TBPc and the C-terminal domain of TBP are comparably protected by DNA, consistent with solvent accessibility changes calculated from core domain crystal structures. In contrast, the reactivity of some residues located on the top surface and the DNA-binding saddle of the C-terminal domain differs between TBP and TBPc in both the presence and absence of bound DNA; these results are not predicted from the crystal structures. A strikingly different pattern of side chain oxidation is observed for TBP when a nonionic detergent is present. Taken together, these results are consistent with the N-terminal domain actively modulating TATA box binding by TBP and nonionic detergent modulating the interdomain interaction.

  13. DNA and Protein Footprinting Analysis of the Modulation of DNA Binding by the N-Terminal Domain of the Saccharomyces cervisiae TATA Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta,S.; Cheng, H.; Mollah, A.; Jamison, E.; Morris, S.; Chance, M.; Khrapunov, S.; Brenowitz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein (TBP) and its isolated C-terminal conserved core domain (TBPc) were prepared with measured high specific DNA-binding activities. Direct, quantitative comparison of TATA box binding by TBP and TBPc reveals greater affinity by TBPc for either of two high-affinity sequences at several different experimental conditions. TBPc associates more rapidly than TBP to TATA box bearing DNA and dissociates more slowly. The structural origins of the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of the N-terminal domain on DNA binding by TBP were explored in comparative studies of TBPc and TBP by 'protein footprinting' with hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) side chain oxidation. Some residues within TBPc and the C-terminal domain of TBP are comparably protected by DNA, consistent with solvent accessibility changes calculated from core domain crystal structures. In contrast, the reactivity of some residues located on the top surface and the DNA-binding saddle of the C-terminal domain differs between TBP and TBPc in both the presence and absence of bound DNA; these results are not predicted from the crystal structures. A strikingly different pattern of side chain oxidation is observed for TBP when a nonionic detergent is present. Taken together, these results are consistent with the N-terminal domain actively modulating TATA box binding by TBP and nonionic detergent modulating the interdomain interaction.

  14. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-long synthetic peptides covering the whole Rv2536 protein sequence. Peptide 11207 (161DVFSAVRADDSPTGEMQVAQY180) presented high specific binding to both types of cells; the binding was saturable and presented nanomolar affinity constants. Cross-linking assays revealed that this peptide specifically binds to 50 kDa U937 cell membrane and 45 kDa A549 cell membrane proteins. PMID:16131654

  16. Protein microarray analysis reveals BAFF-binding autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Jordan V; Haddon, David J; Kemmer, Dodge; Delepine, Guillaume; Mandelbaum, Gil; Jarrell, Justin A; Gupta, Rohit; Balboni, Imelda; Chakravarty, Eliza F; Sokolove, Jeremy; Shum, Anthony K; Anderson, Mark S; Cheng, Mickie H; Robinson, William H; Browne, Sarah K; Holland, Steven M; Baechler, Emily C; Utz, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    .... We designed a nitrocellulose-surface microarray containing human cytokines, chemokines, and other circulating proteins and demonstrated that the array permitted specific detection of serum factor-binding probes...

  17. Micro-ELISA for the quantitation of human urinary and serum retinol-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Deckert, M; Dawnay, A

    1989-01-01

    A highly sensitive enzyme linked immunoadsorbent assay for determining retinol-binding protein in urine and serum is described. Commercially available reagents are used. The standard curve ranges from 1.2-24 micrograms/l, recovery of retinol-binding protein added to urine was 99-102% (n = 10......) and dilution of urine was linear. The within-assay coefficient of variation ranged from 1.2-3.1% and the day-to-day coefficient of variation from 9.2-10.5% depending on concentration. The correlation with urinary retinol-binding protein determined by radioimmunoassay was good (n = 90, r = 0.95). In vitro...... experiments show that retinol-binding protein is stable in urine with pH 5.2....

  18. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins...... at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-09-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-long synthetic peptides covering the whole Rv2536 protein sequence. Peptide 11207 (161DVFSAVRADDSPTGEMQVAQY180) presented high specific binding to both types of cells; the binding was saturable and presented nanomolar affinity constants. Cross-linking assays revealed that this peptide specifically binds to 50 kDa U937 cell membrane and 45 kDa A549 cell membrane proteins.

  20. Automation of plasma protein binding assay using rapid equilibrium dialysis device and Tecan workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhengqi; Zetterberg, Craig; Gao, Hong

    2017-06-05

    Binding of drug molecules to plasma proteins is an important parameter in assessing drug ADME properties. Plasma protein binding (PPB) assays are routinely performed during drug discovery and development. A fully automated PPB assay was developed using rapid equilibrium dialysis (RED) device and Tecan workstation coupled to an automated incubator. The PPB assay was carried out in unsealed RED plates which allowed the assay to be fully automated. The plasma pH was maintained at 7.4 during the 6-h dialysis under 2% CO2 condition. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The percent bound results of 10 commercial drugs in plasma protein binding were very similar between the automated and manual assays, and were comparable to literature values. The automated assay increases laboratory productivity and is applicable to high-throughput screening of drug protein binding in drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional Analysis of an S-Layer-Associated Fibronectin-Binding Protein in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hymes, Jeffrey P; Johnson, Brant R; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    ... dairy products and probiotic supplements. One putative S-layer-associated protein (SLAP), LBA0191, was predicted to mediate adhesion to fibronectin based on the in silico detection of a fibronectin-binding domain...

  2. Some features of the kinetics and equilibrium of drug binding to plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2008-12-01

    The reaction of drug-protein binding is considered based on the common calculations of chemical equilibrium (using the mass action and mass balance laws) and formal chemical kinetics. The calculative and theoretical aspects presented in the review are pertinent to routine drug development. Numerous real-life examples are provided throughout the article to illustrate the practical utility of the presented concepts. This may be very helpful in the interpretation of protein binding and pharmacokinetic data. Considerable resources may be saved by the proper setting of protein binding experiments, using relatively simple calculations and estimations instead of doing experimental measurements, and also avoiding 'improvements' that are destined to failure. The presented material may be also useful for the simulations of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, which attempt the complete account of drug-protein binding. A complete description of the considered topics is given in the last paragraph of the Introduction.

  3. Effects of thermal denaturation on binding between bixin and whey protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhong, Qixin

    2012-08-01

    Heating is commonly used in the manufacture of dairy products, but impacts of thermal denaturation on binding between whey protein and molecules such as pigments are poorly understood. The objective of this work was to study the impacts of thermal denaturation on binding between bixin, a pigment relevant to colored cheeses, and whey proteins using several complementary techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy data showed that heat treatment caused tryptophan in β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin to be exposed to a more polar environment, but the opposite was observed for bovine serum albumin. The fluorescence quenching study indicated that the quenching of whey protein fluorescence by bixin was static quenching, and the affinity of binding with bixin was enhanced after thermal denaturation, caused by a higher extent of unordered structures, as revealed by results from circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectra. β-Lactoglobulin was responsible for overall impacts of thermal denaturation on binding between bixin and whey protein isolate.

  4. Electrostatics, structure prediction, and the energy landscapes for protein folding and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Yeh; Zheng, Weihua; Balamurugan, D; Schafer, Nicholas P; Kim, Bobby L; Cheung, Margaret S; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    While being long in range and therefore weakly specific, electrostatic interactions are able to modulate the stability and folding landscapes of some proteins. The relevance of electrostatic forces for steering the docking of proteins to each other is widely acknowledged, however, the role of electrostatics in establishing specifically funneled landscapes and their relevance for protein structure prediction are still not clear. By introducing Debye-Hückel potentials that mimic long-range electrostatic forces into the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure, and Energy Model (AWSEM), a transferable protein model capable of predicting tertiary structures, we assess the effects of electrostatics on the landscapes of thirteen monomeric proteins and four dimers. For the monomers, we find that adding electrostatic interactions does not improve structure prediction. Simulations of ribosomal protein S6 show, however, that folding stability depends monotonically on electrostatic strength. The trend in predicted melting temperatures of the S6 variants agrees with experimental observations. Electrostatic effects can play a range of roles in binding. The binding of the protein complex KIX-pKID is largely assisted by electrostatic interactions, which provide direct charge-charge stabilization of the native state and contribute to the funneling of the binding landscape. In contrast, for several other proteins, including the DNA-binding protein FIS, electrostatics causes frustration in the DNA-binding region, which favors its binding with DNA but not with its protein partner. This study highlights the importance of long-range electrostatics in functional responses to problems where proteins interact with their charged partners, such as DNA, RNA, as well as membranes. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  5. A Universal Stress Protein (USP) in Mycobacteria Binds cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arka; Adolph, Ramona S.; Gopalakrishnapai, Jayashree; Kleinboelting, Silke; Emmerich, Christiane; Steegborn, Clemens; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria are endowed with rich and diverse machinery for the synthesis, utilization, and degradation of cAMP. The actions of cyclic nucleotides are generally mediated by binding of cAMP to conserved and well characterized cyclic nucleotide binding domains or structurally distinct cGMP-specific and -regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase, and E. coli transcription factor FhlA (GAF) domain-containing proteins. Proteins with cyclic nucleotide binding and GAF domains can be identified in the genome of mycobacterial species, and some of them have been characterized. Here, we show that a significant fraction of intracellular cAMP is bound to protein in mycobacterial species, and by using affinity chromatography techniques, we identify specific universal stress proteins (USP) as abundantly expressed cAMP-binding proteins in slow growing as well as fast growing mycobacteria. We have characterized the biochemical and thermodynamic parameters for binding of cAMP, and we show that these USPs bind cAMP with a higher affinity than ATP, an established ligand for other USPs. We determined the structure of the USP MSMEG_3811 bound to cAMP, and we confirmed through structure-guided mutagenesis, the residues important for cAMP binding. This family of USPs is conserved in all mycobacteria, and we suggest that they serve as “sinks” for cAMP, making this second messenger available for downstream effectors as and when ATP levels are altered in the cell. PMID:25802331

  6. Generalizing and learning protein-DNA binding sequence representations by an evolutionary algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka Chun

    2011-02-05

    Protein-DNA bindings are essential activities. Understanding them forms the basis for further deciphering of biological and genetic systems. In particular, the protein-DNA bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) play a central role in gene transcription. Comprehensive TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs have been found in a recent study. However, they are in one-to-one mappings which cannot fully reflect the many-to-many mappings within the bindings. An evolutionary algorithm is proposed to learn generalized representations (many-to-many mappings) from the TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs (one-to-one mappings). The generalized pairs are shown to be more meaningful than the original TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs. Some representative examples have been analyzed in this study. In particular, it shows that the TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs are not presumably in one-to-one mappings. They can also exhibit many-to-many mappings. The proposed method can help us extract such many-to-many information from the one-to-one TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs found in the previous study, providing further knowledge in understanding the bindings between TFs and TFBSs. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Common binding by redundant group B Sox proteins is evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Sarah H; Russell, Steven

    2015-04-13

    Group B Sox proteins are a highly conserved group of transcription factors that act extensively to coordinate nervous system development in higher metazoans while showing both co-expression and functional redundancy across a broad group of taxa. In Drosophila melanogaster, the two group B Sox proteins Dichaete and SoxNeuro show widespread common binding across the genome. While some instances of functional compensation have been observed in Drosophila, the function of common binding and the extent of its evolutionary conservation is not known. We used DamID-seq to examine the genome-wide binding patterns of Dichaete and SoxNeuro in four species of Drosophila. Through a quantitative comparison of Dichaete binding, we evaluated the rate of binding site turnover across the genome as well as at specific functional sites. We also examined the presence of Sox motifs within binding intervals and the correlation between sequence conservation and binding conservation. To determine whether common binding between Dichaete and SoxNeuro is conserved, we performed a detailed analysis of the binding patterns of both factors in two species. We find that, while the regulatory networks driven by Dichaete and SoxNeuro are largely conserved across the drosophilids studied, binding site turnover is widespread and correlated with phylogenetic distance. Nonetheless, binding is preferentially conserved at known cis-regulatory modules and core, independently verified binding sites. We observed the strongest binding conservation at sites that are commonly bound by Dichaete and SoxNeuro, suggesting that these sites are functionally important. Our analysis provides insights into the evolution of group B Sox function, highlighting the specific conservation of shared binding sites and suggesting alternative sources of neofunctionalisation between paralogous family members.

  8. Binding of recombinant apolipoprotein(a) to extracellular matrix proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoek, Y. Y.; Sangrar, W.; Côté, G. P.; Kastelein, J. J.; Koschinsky, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a), which consists of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] covalently linked to a low-density lipoprotein-like moiety, is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. We show that a recombinant form of apo(a) [r-apo(a)] binds strongly to fibronectin and

  9. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbreth, Ryan N.; Koide, Shohei

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  10. The Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) Secreted Protein, MopE*, Binds Both Reduced and Oxidized Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Ve; Karina Mathisen; Ronny Helland; Karlsen, Odd A.; Anne Fjellbirkeland; Røhr, Åsmund K.; K Kristoffer Andersson; Rolf-Birger Pedersen; Lillehaug, Johan R; Harald B Jensen

    2012-01-01

    Under copper limiting growth conditions the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) secrets essentially only one protein, MopE*, to the medium. MopE* is a copper-binding protein whose structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure of MopE* revealed a unique high affinity copper binding site consisting of two histidine imidazoles and one kynurenine, the latter an oxidation product of Trp130. In this study, we demonstrate that the copper ion coordinated b...

  11. Coagulation protein FVIII binding to phospholipid membranes investigated by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Engelke, Hanna C.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) allows one to measure protein-membrane binding, self-assembly and other molecular reactions and parameters quantitatively in buffer as well as in complex media. Subject of this thesis was to investigate protein-membrane interactions within blood coagulation in buffer as well as in their biological environment with FCS. Binding of Factor VIII (FVIII) to phosphatidylserine (PS)-expressing platelets is a key process in the intravascular pathwa...

  12. Delineation of Methyl-DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome (PC110091)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    association regions or sites for each protein. The genes that overlap these common sites were identified and the genes among these with increased or decreased...regions, a major difference from “typical” DNA-binding proteins such as CREB or C/EBP which bind relatively small and discrete recognition sites ...from three matched sets of malignant prostate cancer and normal/benign prostate tissue were sequenced using the Ion Torrent (Life Technologies

  13. Preparation and characterization of magnetic polymer nanospheres with high protein binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianqiao; Guan, Yueping; Liu, Huizhou; Ma, Zhiya; Yang, Yu; Wu, Xiaobing

    2005-05-01

    A novel magnetic support with high protein binding capacity was prepared by mini-emulsion polymerization. The magnetic poly(methacrylate-divinylbenzene) nanospheres prepared are 390 nm in diameter with narrow size distribution and star-like external morphology which leads to a large increase in specific surface area. Experimental results indicate that the maximum protein binding capacity is 316 mg bovine hemoglobin (BHb)/g support.

  14. Preparation and characterization of magnetic polymer nanospheres with high protein binding capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xianqiao [Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100080 (China); Guan Yueping [Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100080 (China); Liu Huizhou [Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100080 (China)]. E-mail: hzliu@home.ipe.ac.cn; Ma Zhiya [Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100080 (China); Yang Yu [AGTC Gene Technology Company Ltd., Beijing 100176 (China); Wu Xiaobing [AGTC Gene Technology Company Ltd., Beijing 100176 (China)

    2005-05-15

    A novel magnetic support with high protein binding capacity was prepared by mini-emulsion polymerization. The magnetic poly(methacrylate-divinylbenzene) nanospheres prepared are 390 nm in diameter with narrow size distribution and star-like external morphology which leads to a large increase in specific surface area. Experimental results indicate that the maximum protein binding capacity is 316 mg bovine hemoglobin (BHb)/g support.

  15. Identification of arsenic-binding proteins in human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xinyan; YANG, FAN; Shim, Joong-Youn; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Anderson, D. Eric; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2007-01-01

    As a cancer chemotherapeutic drug, arsenic acts on numerous intracellular signal transduction pathways in cancer cells. However, its mechanism of actions is still not fully understood. Previous studies suggest that arsenic reacts with closely spaced cysteine (Cys) residues of proteins with high Cys content and accessible sulfhydryl (SH) groups. In this study, human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was examined as a cellular model to explore arsenic-binding proteins and the mechanism of binding. ...

  16. Novel purification scheme and functions for a C3-binding protein from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Q; Finkel, D; Hostetter, M K

    2000-05-09

    To isolate microbial proteins capable of binding the third component of complement (C3), we coupled the free sulfhydryl group of methylamine-inactivated C3 to a thiolSepharose matrix. This simple technique facilitated the purification of the first C3-binding protein isolated from a bacterium (Streptococcus pneumoniae). Both metastable (native) and thioester-disrupted C3 were recognized by this protein; binding of C3 was noncovalent, independent of thioester conformation, and preferential for the C3 alpha-chain. Sequencing of amino-terminal and internal peptides from the C3-binding protein disclosed a proline-rich region spanning approximately 20 amino acids and a signal peptide that had not been previously reported. The gene was isolated from a library of genomic DNA from laboratory strain CP1200 by screening with a 1200 bp PCR product amplified from degenerate oligonucleotides encoding the amino terminal sequence and the internal proline-rich sequence. The open reading frame spanned 1692 bp; all peptide sequences were identified in the translated gene product, which also contained at least three choline-binding repeats at the carboxy-terminus. The gene was conserved, and the translated protein was functionally active in pneumococcal clinical isolates of serotypes 1, 3, 4, 14, and 19F. Serum from a patient recovering from acute pneumococcal infection contained IgG antibodies specific for this protein by immunoblot. Wide conservation among clinical isolates, saturable binding of C3, and the ability to stimulate the human immune response have not previously been reported for this choline-binding protein. A similar biochemical approach should enable the identification of other C3-binding proteins in microorganisms able to elude complement-mediated host defense.

  17. Role of Third Serum Vitamin B12 Binding Protein in Vitamin B12 Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Chanarin, I.; England, J. M.; Rowe, K. L.; Stacey, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A third vitamin B12 binding protein present in normal serum has been shown to participate in transport of labelled vitamin B12 absorbed from the gut. All three vitamin B12 binding proteins in serum were labelled at the same time after oral administration of vitamin B12, implying that “free” vitamin B12 reached the portal blood from the gut mucosa.

  18. Using RNase sequence specificity to refine the identification of RNA-protein binding regions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinguo; Li Lang; Shen Changyu; Wang Guohua; Wang Xin; Mooney Sean D; Edenberg Howard J; Sanford Jeremy R; Liu Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Massively parallel pyrosequencing is a high-throughput technology that can sequence hundreds of thousands of DNA/RNA fragments in a single experiment. Combining it with immunoprecipitation-based biochemical assays, such as cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), provides a genome-wide method to detect the sites at which proteins bind DNA or RNA. In a CLIP-pyrosequencing experiment, the resolutions of the detected protein binding regions are partially determined by the length of the...

  19. A Proteomic Approach to Identification of Plutonium Binding Proteins in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Baikuntha P.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle E.; He, Chuan; Jensen, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Plutonium can enter the body through different routes and remains there for decades; however its specific biochemical interactions are poorly defined. We, for the first time, have studied plutonium-binding proteins using a metalloproteomic approach with rat PC12 cells. A combination of immobilized metal ion chromatography, 2D gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry were employed to analyze potential plutonium-binding proteins. Our results show that several proteins from PC12 cells show affinity towards Pu4+-NTA (plutonium bound to nitrilotriacetic acid). Proteins from seven different spots in the 2D gel were identified. In contrast to the previously known plutonium-binding proteins transferrin and ferritin, which bind ferric ions, most identified proteins in our experiment are known to bind calcium, magnesium, or divalent transition metal ions. The identified plutonium interacting proteins also have functional roles in downregulation of apoptosis and other pro-proliferative processes. MetaCore analysis based on this group of proteins produced a pathway with a statistically significant association with development of neoplastic diseases. PMID:22146473

  20. Self-Assembly of Protein Monolayers Engineered for Improved Monoclonal Immunoglobulin G Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy H. Lakey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial outer membrane proteins, along with a filling lipid molecule can be modified to form stable self-assembled monolayers on gold. The transmembrane domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A has been engineered to create a scaffold protein to which functional motifs can be fused. In earlier work we described the assembly and structure of an antibody-binding array where the Z domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A was fused to the scaffold protein. Whilst the binding of rabbit polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG to the array is very strong, mouse monoclonal IgG dissociates from the array easily. This is a problem since many immunodiagnostic tests rely upon the use of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Here we describe a strategy to develop an antibody-binding array that will bind mouse monoclonal IgG with lowered dissociation from the array. A novel protein consisting of the scaffold protein fused to two pairs of Z domains separated by a long flexible linker was manufactured. Using surface plasmon resonance the self-assembly of the new protein on gold and the improved binding of mouse monoclonal IgG were demonstrated.

  1. Structure-based de novo prediction of zinc-binding sites in proteins of unknown function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Xu, Meng; Liang, Zhi; Ding, Bo; Niu, Liwen; Liu, Haiyan; Teng, Maikun

    2011-05-01

    Zinc-binding proteins are the most abundant metallo-proteins in Protein Data Bank (PDB). Accurate prediction of zinc-binding sites in proteins of unknown function may provide important clues for the inference of protein function. As zinc binding is often associated with characteristic 3D arrangements of zinc ligand residues, its prediction may benefit from using not only the sequence information but also the structure information of proteins. In this work, we present a structure-based method, TEMSP (3D TEmplate-based Metal Site Prediction), to predict zinc-binding sites. TEMSP significantly improves over previously reported best methods in predicting as many as possible true ligand residues for zinc with minimum overpredictions: if only those results in which all zinc ligand residues have been correctly predicted are defined as true positives, our method improves sensitivity from less than 30% to above 60%, and selectivity from around 25% to 80%. These results are for predictions based on apo state structures. In addition, the method can predict the zinc-bound local structures reliably, generating predictions useful for function inference. We applied TEMSP to 1888 protein structures of the 'Unknown Function' class in the PDB database. A number of zinc-binding sites have been discovered de novo, i.e. based solely on the protein structures. Using the predicted local structures of these sites, possible functional roles were analyzed. TEMSP is freely available from http://netalign.ustc.edu.cn/temsp/.

  2. A new supervised over-sampling algorithm with application to protein-nucleotide binding residue prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hu

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleotide interactions are ubiquitous in a wide variety of biological processes. Accurately identifying interaction residues solely from protein sequences is useful for both protein function annotation and drug design, especially in the post-genomic era, as large volumes of protein data have not been functionally annotated. Protein-nucleotide binding residue prediction is a typical imbalanced learning problem, where binding residues are extremely fewer in number than non-binding residues. Alleviating the severity of class imbalance has been demonstrated to be a promising means of improving the prediction performance of a machine-learning-based predictor for class imbalance problems. However, little attention has been paid to the negative impact of class imbalance on protein-nucleotide binding residue prediction. In this study, we propose a new supervised over-sampling algorithm that synthesizes additional minority class samples to address class imbalance. The experimental results from protein-nucleotide interaction datasets demonstrate that the proposed supervised over-sampling algorithm can relieve the severity of class imbalance and help to improve prediction performance. Based on the proposed over-sampling algorithm, a predictor, called TargetSOS, is implemented for protein-nucleotide binding residue prediction. Cross-validation tests and independent validation tests demonstrate the effectiveness of TargetSOS. The web-server and datasets used in this study are freely available at http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetSOS/.

  3. Binding of host iron-binding proteins and expression of iron-regulated membrane proteins by different serotypes of Pasteurella multocida causing haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veken, J W; Shah, N H; Klaasen, P; Oudega, B; de Graaf, F K

    1996-07-01

    Pasteurella multocida strains of serotype B: 2,5, B: 3,4 and E: 2,5 are associated with haemorrhagic septicaemia in domestic and feral ruminants. These strains were investigated for their ability to bind transferrin, lactoferrin and haemoglobin and for their ability to use these host iron-binding proteins as a source of iron. All strains bound haemoglobin, none of the strains bound lactoferrin, whereas transferrin binding was restricted to serotype B: 2,5 strains. Growth experiments indicated that transferrin (serotype B: 2,5) and haemoglobin could restore bacterial growth under iron-depleted conditions. Two distinct serotype-independent profiles of iron-regulated membrane proteins were expressed in vitro as well as in vivo.

  4. Binding site of ribosomal proteins on prokaryotic 5S ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1982-01-01

    The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S., & Garr......The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S...

  5. Binding site of ribosomal proteins on prokaryotic 5S ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1982-01-01

    The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S......., & Garrett, R. A. (1981) Biochemistry 20, 7301--7307], reveal an extensive interaction site for protein L18 and a more localized one for L25. Generally comparable results, with a few important differences, were obtained in a study of the binding sites of the two E. coli proteins on Bacillus...

  6. Unusual binding of ursodeoxycholic acid to ileal bile acid binding protein: role in activation of FXRα[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Changming; Filipp, Fabian V.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, ursodiol) is used to prevent damage to the liver in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The drug also prevents the progression of colorectal cancer and the recurrence of high-grade colonic dysplasia. However, the molecular mechanism by which UDCA elicits its beneficial effects is not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) has a role in mediating the effects of UDCA. We find that UDCA binds to a single site on IBABP and increases the affinity for major human bile acids at a second binding site. As UDCA occupies one of the bile acid binding sites on IBABP, it reduces the cooperative binding that is often observed for the major human bile acids. Furthermore, IBABP is necessary for the full activation of farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα) by bile acids, including UDCA. These observations suggest that IBABP may have a role in mediating some of the intestinal effects of UDCA. PMID:22223860

  7. Are scoring functions in protein-protein docking ready to predict interactomes? Clues from a novel binding affinity benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastritis, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315886668; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238

    2010-01-01

    The design of an ideal scoring function for protein-protein docking that would also predict the binding affinity of a complex is one of the challenges in structural proteomics. Such a scoring function would open the route to in silico, large-scale annotation and prediction of complete interactomes.

  8. Modeling the interplay of single-stranded binding proteins and nucleic acid secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forties, Robert A; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    There are many important proteins which bind single-stranded nucleic acids, such as the nucleocapsid protein in HIV and the RecA DNA repair protein in bacteria. The presence of such proteins can strongly alter the secondary structure of the nucleic acid molecules. Therefore, accurate modeling of the interaction between single-stranded nucleic acids and such proteins is essential to fully understand many biological processes. We develop a model for predicting nucleic acid secondary structure in the presence of single-stranded binding proteins, and implement it as an extension of the Vienna RNA Package. All parameters needed to model nucleic acid secondary structures in the absence of proteins have been previously determined. This leaves the footprint and sequence-dependent binding affinity of the protein as adjustable parameters of our model. Using this model we are able to predict the probability of the protein binding at any position in the nucleic acid sequence, the impact of the protein on nucleic acid base pairing, the end-to-end distance distribution for the nucleic acid and FRET distributions for fluorophores attached to the nucleic acid. Source code for our modified version of the Vienna RNA package is freely available at http://bioserv.mps.ohio-state.edu/Vienna+P, implemented in C and running on Linux.

  9. New fluorescent reagents specific for Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Lemelson, Daniela [Department of Life Sciences and the NIBN, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Israelson, Adrian [Department of Physiology, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda, E-mail: vardasb@bgu.ac.il [Department of Life Sciences and the NIBN, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New reagents specifically inhibit the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru allow for mechanism-independent probing of Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in reagents fluorescence allow characterization of protein Ca{sup 2+}-binding properties. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} carries information pivotal to cell life and death via its interactions with specific binding sites in a protein. We previously developed a novel photoreactive reagent, azido ruthenium (AzRu), which strongly inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities. Here, we synthesized new fluorescent ruthenium-based reagents containing FITC or EITC, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru. These reagents were purified, characterized and found to specifically interact with and markedly inhibit Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities but not the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-independent reactions. In contrast to many reagents that serve as probes for Ca{sup 2+}, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru are the first fluorescent divalent cation analogs to be synthesized and characterized that specifically bind to Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and inhibit their activity. Such reagents will assist in characterizing Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins, thereby facilitating better understanding of the function of Ca{sup 2+} as a key bio-regulator.

  10. RNA Binding Protein-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Rebecca; Vogel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children, is a disease whose mechanisms are now beginning to be uncovered by high-throughput studies of somatic mutations, mRNA expression patterns, and epigenetic profiles of patient tumors. One emerging theme from studies that sequenced the tumor genomes of large cohorts of medulloblastoma patients is frequent mutation of RNA binding proteins. Proteins which bind multiple RNA targets can act as master regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level to co-ordinate cellular processes and alter the phenotype of the cell. Identification of the target genes of RNA binding proteins may highlight essential pathways of medulloblastomagenesis that cannot be detected by study of transcriptomics alone. Furthermore, a subset of RNA binding proteins are attractive drug targets. For example, compounds that are under development as anti-viral targets due to their ability to inhibit RNA helicases could also be tested in novel approaches to medulloblastoma therapy by targeting key RNA binding proteins. In this review, we discuss a number of RNA binding proteins, including Musashi1 (MSI1), DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box helicase 3 X-linked (DDX3X), DDX31, and cell division cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1), which play potentially critical roles in the growth and/or maintenance of medulloblastoma. PMID:24608801

  11. Discrepancy between the measurement of thyroxine-binding prealbumin plasma level and binding capacity in protein-calorie malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenbleek, Y; De Nayer, P; De Visscher, M

    1975-04-01

    The measurement of thyroxine-bindung prealbumin (TBPA) in protein-calorie malnutrition by two different techniques leads to the recognition of an unexpected discrepancy. Whereas TBPA plasma levels as measured by immunodiffusion are markedly decreased to 29.3% of the normal, those recorded by maximal binding capacity (TBPAcap) are characterized by a wide dispersion. In the control group, the ratio between TBPAcap and TBPA plasma level is 9.1. In the malnourished group on admission, the same ratio is 30.0. The possibility of a qualitative effect in the tetrameric TBPA structure, with the binding of additional thyroxine (T4) molecules on the secondary binding sites, has been investigated. This hypothesis has been discarded by Scatchard plot studies. The normal 1:1 molar ratio between TBPA and T4 is unaffected in protein-deficient patients. Discrepant results obtained for TBPAcap and TBPA levels appear to be the consequence of low plasma protein levels, leading to an artifact in the electrophoretic method.

  12. PASTA in Penicillin Binding Proteins and Serine/Threonine Kinases: A Recipe of Structural, Dynamic and Binding Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvanese, Luisa; Falcigno, Lucia; Squeglia, Flavia; D'Auria, Gabriella; Berisio, Rita

    2017-11-24

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) and Serine Threonine kinases (STPKs) are two classes of bacterial enzymes whose involvement in a series of vital processes in bacterial growth and division is well assessed. Many PBPs and STPKs show linked an ancillary domain named PASTA, whose functional role is not completely deciphered so far. It has been proposed that PASTAs are sensor modules that by binding opportune ligands (i.e. muropeptides) activate the cognate proteins to their functions. However, based on recent data, the sensor annotation sounds true for PASTA from STPKs, and false for PASTA from PBPs. Different PASTA domains, belonging or not to different protein classes, sharing or not appreciable sequence identities, always show identical folds. This survey of the structural, binding and dynamic properties of PASTA domains pursues the reasons why identical topologies may turn in different roles. Amino acid compositions, total charges and distribution of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic patches on the surface, significantly vary among PASTAs from STPKs and PBPs and appear to correlate with different functions. A possible criterion to discriminate between PASTA modules of STPKs or PBPs solely based on their sequences is proposed. Possibly reflecting different species as well as functional roles and evolutionary profile, our routine represents a fast even though approximate method to distinguish between PASTA belonging to different classes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I binding to a cell membrane associated IGF binding protein-3 acid-labile subunit complex in human anterior pituitary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilczak, N; Kuhl, N; Chesik, D; Geerts, A; Luiten, P; De Keyser, J

    The binding characteristics of [(125) I]insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I were studied in human brain and pituitary gland. Competition binding studies with DES(1-3)IGF-I and R-3 -IGF-I, which display high affinity for the IGF-I receptor and low affinity for IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), were

  14. Maltose-binding protein effectively stabilizes the partially closed conformation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter MalFGK2

    KAUST Repository

    Weng, Jingwei

    2017-02-23

    Maltose transporter MalFGK2 is a type-I importer in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Upon the binding of its periplasmic binding protein, MalE, the ATPase activity of MalFGK2 can be greatly enhanced. Crystal structures of the MalFGK2-MalE-maltose complex in a so-called

  15. DBBP: database of binding pairs in protein-nucleic acid interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Byungkyu; Kim, Hyungchan; Han, Kyungsook

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction of proteins with other molecules plays an important role in many biological activities. As many structures of protein-DNA complexes and protein-RNA complexes have been determined in the past years, several databases have been constructed to provide structure data of the complexes. However, the information on the binding sites between proteins and nucleic acids is not readily available from the structure data since the data consists mostly of the three-dimensional coordi...

  16. Data for chitin binding activity of Moringa seed resistant protein (MSRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anudeep Sandanamudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitin binding activity of moringa seed resistant protein (MSRP isolated from defatted moringa seed flour was investigated in the present study “Characterization of soluble dietary fiber from Moringa oleifera seeds and its immunomodulatory effects” (S. Anudeep, V.K. Prasanna, S.M. Adya, C. Radha, 2016 [1]. The assay reaction mixture contained 0.4 mg/ml of MSRP and different amounts (20–100 mg of chitin. MSRP exhibited binding activity over wide range of chitin concentration. Maximum binding activity was observed at 80 mg of chitin. The property of MSRP to bind chitin can be exploited for its purification.

  17. Data for chitin binding activity of Moringa seed resistant protein (MSRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandanamudi, Anudeep; Bharadwaj, Kishan R; Cheruppanpullil, Radha

    2016-12-01

    Chitin binding activity of moringa seed resistant protein (MSRP) isolated from defatted moringa seed flour was investigated in the present study "Characterization of soluble dietary fiber from Moringa oleifera seeds and its immunomodulatory effects" (S. Anudeep, V.K. Prasanna, S.M. Adya, C. Radha, 2016) [1]. The assay reaction mixture contained 0.4 mg/ml of MSRP and different amounts (20-100 mg) of chitin. MSRP exhibited binding activity over wide range of chitin concentration. Maximum binding activity was observed at 80 mg of chitin. The property of MSRP to bind chitin can be exploited for its purification.

  18. THE MASS OF CELLULAR RETINOIC ACID BINDING PROTEIN I ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The accuracy of mass spectrometry used to determine large molecular mass as proteins is often influenced by the isotopic compositions within a protein. Isotopic depletion is a powerful tool to resolve this problem. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, we investigated the 13C depleted cellular ...

  19. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  20. Analysis of high-affinity binding of protein kinase R to double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Bushra; Mukerji, Ishita; Cole, James L

    2012-11-06

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity response to viral infection. PKR is activated upon binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Our previous analysis of binding of PKR to dsRNAs ranging from 20 to 40 bp supports a dimerization model for activation in which 30 bp represents the minimal length required to bind two PKR monomers and activate PKR via autophosphorylation. These studies were complicated by the formation of protein-RNA aggregates, particularly at low salt concentrations using longer dsRNAs. Here, we have taken advantage of the enhanced sensitivity afforded using fluorescence-detected analytical ultracentrifugation to reduce the RNA concentrations from micromolar to nanomolar. Under these conditions, we are able to characterize high-affinity binding of PKR to longer dsRNAs in 75 mM NaCl. The PKR binding stoichiometries are increased at lower salt concentrations but remain lower than those previously obtained for the dsRNA binding domain. The dependence of the limiting PKR binding stoichiometries on dsRNA length does not conform to standard models for nonspecific binding and suggests that binding to longer sequences occurs via a different binding mode with a larger site size. Although dimerization plays a key role in the PKR activation mechanism, the ability of shorter dsRNAs to bind two PKR monomers is not sufficient to induce autophosphorylation. We propose that activation of PKR by longer RNAs is correlated with an alternative binding mode in which both of the dsRNA binding motifs contact the RNA, inducing PKR to dimerize via a direct interaction of the kinase domains.

  1. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target.

  2. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, O N; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    molecular weight urokinase receptor-associated protein. The tryptic peptide mixture derived from a cross-linked complex of pro-urokinase and the latter protein was analyzed by nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. This analysis identified the novel protein as the human homologue of a murine...... membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  3. Glucose Binding Protein as a Novel Optical Glucose Nanobiosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed DWEIK

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of an in vivo optical sensor requires the utilization of Near Infra Red (NIR fluorophores due to their ability to operate within the biological tissue window. Alexa Fluor 750 (AF750 and Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680 were examined as potential NIR fluorophores for an in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET glucose biosensor. AF680 and AF750 found to be a FRET pair and percent energy transfer was calculated. Next, the tested dye pair was utilized in a competitive binding assay in order to detect glucose. Concanavalin A (Con A and dextran have binding affinity, but in the presence of glucose, glucose displaces dextran due to its higher affinity to Con A than dextran. Finally, the percent signal transfer through porcine skin was examined. The results showed with approximately 4.0 mm porcine skin thickness, 1.98 % of the fluorescence was transmitted and captured by the detector.

  4. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein-protein interaction module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S; Doria, M

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein-protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine-proline-phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct...... screening of expression libraries with EH domains yielded a number of putative EH interactors, all of which possessed NPF motifs that were shown to be responsible for the interaction. Among these interactors were the human homolog of NUMB, a developmentally reguated gene of Drosophila, and RAB, the cellular...... cofactor of the HIV REV protein. We demonstrated coimmunoprecipitation of Eps15 with NUMB and RAB. Finally, in vitro binding of NPF-containing peptides to cellular proteins and EST database screening established the existence of a family of EH-containing proteins in mammals. Based on the characteristics...

  5. [Design of artificial DNA binding proteins toward control and elucidation of cellular functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanishi, Miki

    2012-01-01

    An artificial transcription factor that can regulate the expression of specific genes at a desired time is very useful for research in chemical biology, cell biology, and future gene therapy. A C2H2 zinc finger motif, one of zinc-containing proteins, is known as the most ubiquitous DNA binding motif. The motif is attractive for designing artificial transcription factors with desired DNA binding specificities because of its characteristic DNA binding properties: (1) recognition of 3 bp per motif, (2) tandemly connected modular structure, and (3) binding to non-palindrome sequences as a monomer. Taking advantage of these properties, artificial DNA binding proteins with new DNA binding characteristics have been designed. By changing the linker region between two 3-zinc finger domains, artificial 6-zinc finger proteins were developed and shown to skip DNA sequences. Zinc-responsive transcription factors were created by altering one of the zinc ligands. An artificial zinc finger transcription factor targeting a core clock gene induced phase shifts of the cellular "circadian rhythm". Herein, I will summarize creation and function of the above-mentioned artificial zinc finger-type DNA binding proteins and transcription factors.

  6. Cellular binding proteins for vitamin A in the normal human uterine cervix and in dysplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, P R; Romney, S L

    1979-08-01

    Cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) and cellular retinoic acid-binding protein are present in the cytosol of normal human uterine cervical tissues, as detected by ultracentrifugation analysis. Both binding proteins have characteristically high specificity for their respective ligands. In sucrose gradients, both proteins sediment in the 2S region and are of similar molecular weight (M.W. approximately 14,000). In blind analyses of cervical biopsies, obtained under direct vision by colposcopy of normal women (control) or from patients histopathologically diagnosed to have dysplasias or carcinoma in situ (study group), CRBP was not detectable by sucrose gradient analysis in 78.8% of the 33 abnormal biopsies, compared to 23.5% of the 34 controls. This difference was statistically significant (p less than 0.005). In biopsies in which CRBP was detected, the mean levels were 2.76 and 0.72 pmol/mg protein in the cytosol for the control and study groups, respectively. In some subjects from each group, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein but not CRBP was detected in the biopsied tissue. The presence and role of these binding proteins in vitamin A metabolism, epithelial maturation and differentiation in cervical dysplasias, and in situ lesions remain to be investigated.

  7. Glucose phosphorylated on carbon 6 suppresses lipopolysaccharide binding to lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and inhibits its bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuu; Yagi, Kiyohito

    2017-04-01

    Lipid A comprises the active region of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and its phosphate group is required for LPS activities. Additionally, it is essential for effects of inhibitors of LPS-induced coagulation activity in limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) tests. Lipid A has phosphorylated glucosamine residues, which are structurally similar to glucose 1-phosphate (G1P) and glucose 6-phosphate (G6P). This study focused on the antagonistic effects of glucose phosphates on the action of protein or non-protein inhibitors against LAL coagulation, LPS-LPS-binding protein (LBP) interaction, and LPS bioactivities. These effects of glucose phosphates were evaluated and compared with those of other charged sugars such as fructose 6-phosphate and glucuronic acid by LAL tests, ELISA-based LPS-LBP binding assay, cell-based assay, and using a mouse endotoxin shock model. G6P neutralized the interfering actions of drug substances and plasma proteins on LPS coagulation activity in LAL tests. Compared to other sugars, G6P more strongly inhibited LPS binding to LBP, leading to significant inhibition of LPS-induced cellular responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and in the THP-1 human leukemic line. Consistent herewith, G6P inhibited inflammatory cytokine release and decreased serum alanine aminotransferase and hepatic caspase-3/7 activities and mortality in LPS-stimulated d-galactosamine-sensitized mice. These data indicated that the structural properties of G6P, such as its glucose moiety and phosphorylation on carbon 6, are important for suppressing the interaction of proteins with LPS. Therefore, G6P is useful to improve sensitivity and accuracy of plasma and drug LPS assays, and such structural property is more suitable to antagonize LPS activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Alcohol-Binding Sites in Distinct Brain Proteins: The Quest for Atomic Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Slesinger, Paul A.; Davies, Daryl L.; Das, Joydip; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2011-01-01

    Defining the sites of action of ethanol on brain proteins is a major prerequisite to understanding the molecular pharmacology of this drug. The main barrier to reaching an atomic-level understanding of alcohol action is the low potency of alcohols, ethanol in particular, which is a reflection of transient, low-affinity interactions with their targets. These mechanisms are difficult or impossible to study with traditional techniques such as radioligand binding or spectroscopy. However, there has been considerable recent progress in combining X-ray crystallography, structural modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to define the sites and mechanisms of action of ethanol and related alcohols on key brain proteins. We review such insights for several diverse classes of proteins including inwardly rectifying potassium, transient receptor potential, and neurotransmit-ter-gated ion channels, as well as protein kinase C epsilon. Some common themes are beginning to emerge from these proteins, including hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group and van der Waals interactions of the methylene groups of ethanol with specific amino acid residues. The resulting binding energy is proposed to facilitate or stabilize low-energy state transitions in the bound proteins, allowing ethanol to act as a “molecular lubricant” for protein function. We discuss evidence for characteristic, discrete alcohol-binding sites on protein targets, as well as evidence that binding to some proteins is better characterized by an interaction region that can accommodate multiple molecules of ethanol. PMID:21676006

  9. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV......-lipodystrophy. These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... concentration were increased (>90%, P protease were similar between groups (all P > .5), whereas, in LIPO, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 were reduced (-36%, P

  10. Complex regulation of CREB-binding protein by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2

    KAUST Repository

    Kovács, Krisztián A.

    2015-11-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are transcriptional coactivators involved in numerous biological processes that affect cell growth, transformation, differentiation, and development. In this study, we provide evidence of the involvement of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) in the regulation of CBP activity. We show that HIPK2 interacts with and phosphorylates several regions of CBP. We demonstrate that serines 2361, 2363, 2371, 2376, and 2381 are responsible for the HIPK2-induced mobility shift of CBP C-terminal activation domain. Moreover, we show that HIPK2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional activity of CBP. However, our data suggest that HIPK2 activates CBP mainly by counteracting the repressive action of cell cycle regulatory domain 1 (CRD1), located between amino acids 977 and 1076, independently of CBP phosphorylation. Our findings thus highlight a complex regulation of CBP activity by HIPK2, which might be relevant for the control of specific sets of target genes involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Evolutionary history of selenocysteine incorporation from the perspective of SECIS binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Copeland Paul R

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-translational incorporation of selenocysteine into nascent polypeptides by recoding the UGA stop codon occurs in all domains of life. In eukaryotes, this event requires at least three specific factors: SECIS binding protein 2 (SBP2, a specific translation elongation factor (eEFSec, selenocysteinyl tRNA, and a cis-acting selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS element in selenoprotein mRNAs. While the phylogenetic relationships of selenoprotein families and the evolution of selenocysteine usage are well documented, the evolutionary history of SECIS binding proteins has not been explored. Results In this report we present a phylogeny of the eukaryotic SECIS binding protein family which includes SBP2 and a related protein we herein term SBP2L. Here we show that SBP2L is an SBP2 paralogue in vertebrates and is the only form of SECIS binding protein in invertebrate deuterostomes, suggesting a key role in Sec incorporation in these organisms, but an SBP2/SBP2L fusion protein is unable to support Sec incorporation in vitro. An in-depth phylogenetic analysis of the conserved L7Ae RNA binding domain suggests an ancestral relationship with ribosomal protein L30. In addition, we describe the emergence of a motif upstream of the SBP2 RNA binding domain that shares significant similarity with a motif within the pseudouridine synthase Cbf5. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that SECIS binding proteins arose once in evolution but diverged significantly in multiple lineages. In addition, likely due to a gene duplication event in the early vertebrate lineage, SBP2 and SBP2L are paralogous in vertebrates.

  12. Identification of novel amelogenin-binding proteins by proteomics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Fukuda

    Full Text Available Emdogain (enamel matrix derivative, EMD is well recognized in periodontology. It is used in periodontal surgery to regenerate cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying periodontal regeneration are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the proteins bound to amelogenin, which are suggested to play a pivotal role in promoting periodontal tissue regeneration. To identify new molecules that interact with amelogenin and are involved in osteoblast activation, we employed coupling affinity chromatography with proteomic analysis in fractionated SaOS-2 osteoblastic cell lysate. In SaOS-2 cells, many of the amelogenin-interacting proteins in the cytoplasm were mainly cytoskeletal proteins and several chaperone molecules of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 family. On the other hand, the proteomic profiles of amelogenin-interacting proteins in the membrane fraction of the cell extracts were quite different from those of the cytosolic-fraction. They were mainly endoplasmic reticulum (ER-associated proteins, with lesser quantities of mitochondrial proteins and nucleoprotein. Among the identified amelogenin-interacting proteins, we validated the biological interaction of amelogenin with glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78/Bip, which was identified in both cytosolic and membrane-enriched fractions. Confocal co-localization experiment strongly suggested that Grp78/Bip could be an amelogenin receptor candidate. Further biological evaluations were examined by Grp78/Bip knockdown analysis with and without amelogenin. Within the limits of the present study, the interaction of amelogenin with Grp78/Bip contributed to cell proliferation, rather than correlate with the osteogenic differentiation in SaOS-2 cells. Although the biological significance of other interactions are not yet explored, these findings suggest that the differential effects of amelogenin-derived osteoblast activation could be of

  13. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1 Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins.

  14. A histone-mimicking interdomain linker in a multidomain protein modulates multivalent histone binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrhon, Sebastian; Kontaxis, Georg; Kaufmann, Tanja; Schirghuber, Erika; Kubicek, Stefan; Konrat, Robert; Slade, Dea

    2017-10-27

    N-terminal histone tails are subject to many posttranslational modifications that are recognized by and interact with designated reader domains in histone-binding proteins. BROMO domain adjacent to zinc finger 2B (BAZ2B) is a multidomain histone-binding protein that contains two histone reader modules, a plant homeodomain (PHD) and a bromodomain (BRD), linked by a largely disordered linker. Although previous studies have reported specificity of the PHD domain for the unmodified N terminus of histone H3 and of the BRD domain for H3 acetylated at Lys14 (H3K14ac), the exact mode of H3 binding by BAZ2B and its regulation are underexplored. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy, we report that acidic residues in the BAZ2B PHD domain are essential for H3 binding and that BAZ2B PHD-BRD establishes a polyvalent interaction with H3K14ac. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the disordered interdomain linker modulates the histone-binding affinity by interacting with the PHD domain. In particular, lysine-rich stretches in the linker, which resemble the positively charged N terminus of histone H3, reduce the binding affinity of the PHD finger toward the histone substrate. Phosphorylation, acetylation, or poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the linker residues may therefore act as a cellular mechanism to transiently tune BAZ2B histone-binding affinity. Our findings further support the concept of interdomain linkers serving a dual role in substrate binding by appropriately positioning the adjacent domains and by electrostatically modulating substrate binding. Moreover, inhibition of histone binding by a histone-mimicking interdomain linker represents another example of regulation of protein-protein interactions by intramolecular mimicry. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Cloning of ovocalyxin-36, a novel chicken eggshell protein related to lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins, bactericidal permeability-increasing proteins, and plunc family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautron, Joël; Murayama, Emi; Vignal, Alain; Morisson, Mireille; McKee, Marc D; Réhault, Sophie; Labas, Valérie; Belghazi, Maya; Vidal, Mary-Laure; Nys, Yves; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2007-02-23

    The avian eggshell is a composite biomaterial composed of noncalcifying eggshell membranes and the overlying calcified shell matrix. The shell is deposited in a uterine fluid where the concentration of different protein species varies at different stages of its formation. The role of avian eggshell proteins during shell formation remains poorly understood, and we have sought to identify and characterize the individual components in order to gain insight into their function during elaboration of the eggshell. In this study, we have used direct sequencing, immunochemistry, expression screening, and EST data base mining to clone and characterize a 1995-bp full-length cDNA sequence corresponding to a novel chicken eggshell protein that we have named Ovocalyxin-36 (OCX-36). Ovocalyxin-36 protein was only detected in the regions of the oviduct where egg-shell formation takes place; uterine OCX-36 message was strongly up-regulated during eggshell calcification. OCX-36 localized to the calcified eggshell predominantly in the inner part of the shell, and to the shell membranes. BlastN data base searching indicates that there is no mammalian version of OCX-36; however, the protein sequence is 20-25% homologous to proteins associated with the innate immune response as follows: lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins, bactericidal permeability-increasing proteins, and Plunc family proteins. Moreover, the genomic organization of these proteins and OCX-36 appears to be highly conserved. These observations suggest that OCX-36 is a novel and specific chicken eggshell protein related to the superfamily of lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins/bactericidal permeability-increasing proteins and Plunc proteins. OCX-36 may therefore participate in natural defense mechanisms that keep the egg free of pathogens.

  16. Binding properties of HABA-type azo derivatives to avidin and avidin-related protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Susanna; Paldanius, Tiina A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Halling, Katrin K; Huuskonen, Juhani; Pentikäinen, Olli T; Rissanen, Kari; Slotte, J Peter; Airenne, Tomi T; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Johnson, Mark S

    2006-10-01

    The chicken genome encodes several biotin-binding proteins, including avidin and avidin-related protein 4 (AVR4). In addition to D-biotin, avidin binds an azo dye compound, 4-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid (HABA), but the HABA-binding properties of AVR4 are not yet known. Differential scanning calorimetry, UV/visible spectroscopy, and molecular modeling were used to analyze the binding of 15 azo molecules to avidin and AVR4. Significant differences are seen in azo compound preferences for the two proteins, emphasizing the importance of the loop between strands beta3 and beta4 for azo ligand recognition; information on these loops is provided by the high-resolution (1.5 A) X-ray structure for avidin reported here. These results may be valuable in designing improved tools for avidin-based life science and nanobiotechnology applications.

  17. Fe-nitrilotriacetic acid--binding proteins associated with rat liver plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisani, D; Wessling-Resnick, M

    1996-10-01

    The uptake of nontransferrin-bound iron by hepatocytes is known to occur and may contribute to the deposition of iron and resulting injury during hemochromatosis. To examine the proteins that may function in the transport of nontransferrin-bound iron, the properties of FeNTA-binding to rat liver basolateral plasma membranes were characterized. The binding of 55FeNTA to purified liver basolateral plasma membranes was measured using a simple centrifugation assay. The binding activity could be solubilized with 0.1% octylglucoside; apparent molecular weight Mapp approximately 210 kd for the binding complex was determined by gel filtration chromatography. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography was used to further purify binding protein(s) from rat liver plasma membranes and at least six polypeptides were identified by silver staining. If associated in a stoichiometric complex, the molecular mass of these proteins would predict a size of approximately 227 kd in fairly close agreement with the gel filtration experiments. The characterization of FeNTA-binding proteins associated with basolateral membranes is the first step towards understanding elements responsible for the uptake of nontransferrin-bound iron by the liver.

  18. Multiple DNA binding proteins contribute to timing of chromosome replication in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. Dna...... replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology...... in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on ori...

  19. Evaluation of water displacement energetics in protein binding sites with grid cell theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerogiokas, G; Southey, M W Y; Mazanetz, M P; Heifetz, A; Hefeitz, A; Bodkin, M; Law, R J; Michel, J

    2015-04-07

    Excess free energies, enthalpies and entropies of water in protein binding sites were computed via classical simulations and Grid Cell Theory (GCT) analyses for three pairs of congeneric ligands in complex with the proteins scytalone dehydratase, p38α MAP kinase and EGFR kinase respectively. Comparative analysis is of interest since the binding modes for each ligand pair differ in the displacement of one binding site water molecule, but significant variations in relative binding affinities are observed. Protocols that vary in their use of restraints on protein and ligand atoms were compared to determine the influence of protein-ligand flexibility on computed water structure and energetics, and to assess protocols for routine analyses of protein-ligand complexes. The GCT-derived binding affinities correctly reproduce experimental trends, but the magnitude of the predicted changes in binding affinities is exaggerated with respect to results from a previous Monte Carlo Free Energy Perturbation study. Breakdown of the GCT water free energies into enthalpic and entropic components indicates that enthalpy changes dominate the observed variations in energetics. In EGFR kinase GCT analyses revealed that replacement of a pyrimidine by a cyanopyridine perturbs water energetics up three hydration shells away from the ligand.

  20. The calcium binding protein ALG-2 binds and stabilizes Scotin, a p53-inducible gene product localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draeby, Ingrid; Woods, Yvonne L; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand

    2007-01-01

    ALG-2 (apoptosis linked gene 2 product) is a calcium binding protein for which no clear cellular function has been established. In this study we identified Scotin as a novel ALG-2 target protein containing 6 PXY and 4 PYP repeats, earlier identified in the ALG-2 binding regions of AIP1/ALIX and TSG...

  1. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  2. A microscopic insight from conformational thermodynamics to functional ligand binding in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Samapan; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-12-01

    We show that the thermodynamics of metal ion-induced conformational changes aid to understand the functions of protein complexes. This is illustrated in the case of a metalloprotein, alpha-lactalbumin (aLA), a divalent metal ion binding protein. We use the histograms of dihedral angles of the protein, generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, to calculate conformational thermodynamics. The thermodynamically destabilized and disordered residues in different conformational states of a protein are proposed to serve as binding sites for ligands. This is tested for β-1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT) binding to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex, in which the binding residues are known. Among the binding residues, the C-terminal residues like aspartate (D) 116, glutamine (Q) 117, tryptophan (W) 118 and leucine (L) 119 are destabilized and disordered and can dock β4GalT onto Ca(2+)-aLA. No such thermodynamically favourable binding residues can be identified in the case of the Mg(2+)-aLA complex. We apply similar analysis to oleic acid binding and predict that the Ca(2+)-aLA complex can