WorldWideScience

Sample records for textiles

  1. Smart textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Langenhove, Lieva; Hertleer, Carla; Catrysse, Michael; Puers, Robert; Van Egmond, Harko; Matthijs, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    After technical textiles and functional textiles, also smart textiles came into force a few years ago. The term 'smart textiles' covers a broad range. The application possibilities are only limited by our imagination and creativity. In this presentation, it is further explored what smart textiles precisely mean. In a second part, an analysis is made of the possibilities, the state of affairs and the needs for further research.

  2. Textile dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Guaratini, Cláudia C. I. [UNESP; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin [UNESP

    2000-01-01

    A dye is a colored substance used to impart permanent color to other substances. Its most important use is in coloring textile fibers and fabrics. The removal of colour from dyehouse waste waters is currently a major problem in the textile sector. This paper provides an overview of the treatment technologies that can currently be used by the textile processor and the developments over the past decade with respect to the toxicological and ecotoxicological properties of synthetic organic dyes.

  3. Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    Textiles can be used as building skins, adding new aesthetic and functional qualities to architecture. Just like we as humans can put on a coat, buildings can also get dressed. Depending on our mood, or on the weather, we can change coat, and so can the building. But the idea of using textiles...

  4. Antibacterial textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Usha

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the antibacterial functionalization of textiles and its application in professional laundries. The antibacterial functionalization was meant for the various textile packages lent out by the laundry companies to their customers from hotels, hospital or food industries. The

  5. Future Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Louise Degn; Jensen, Hanne Troels Fusvad; Hansen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Magasinet Future Textiles samler resultaterne fra projektet Future Textiles, der markedsfører området intelligente tekstiler. I magasinet kan man læse om trends, drivkræfter, udfordringer samt få ideer til nye produkter inden for intelligente tekstiler. Områder som bæredygtighed og kundetilpasning...

  6. Textile Tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2008-01-01

    The meeting of architecture and textiles is a continuous but too often forgotten story of intimate exchange. However, the 2nd Ventulett Symposium hosted by the College of Architecture, within Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, was one of these precious moments celebrating such a marriage....... Organized by Lars Spuybroeck, principal of Nox, Rotterdam, and current Thomas W. Ventulett III distinguished chair of Architectural Design, the event was embracing the textile tectonics as a core topic, praising textiles as the key component of architecture, relying on Gottfried Semper’s understanding...... of the discipline. Inspiring time gathering some of the most exciting architects of the moment, Lars Spuybroeck, Mark Burry, Evan Douglis, Michael Hensel and Cecil Balmond were invited to discuss their understanding of tectonics. Full text available at http://textilefutures.co.uk/exchange/bin/view/TextileFutures/TextileTectonics...

  7. Textile Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Kristy Alana

    Innovative and interdisciplinary solutions to wearable textile energy storage are explored as power sources for wearable electronics and smart textiles. Due to their long cycle life, non-toxic and inexpensive materials, supercapacitors were converted into textiles. Textile supercapacitors were developed using scalable fabrication methods including screen-printing, yarn making, and 3D computerized knitting. The electrode materials reported in this thesis undergo thorough electrochemical analysis, and are capable of storing up to 0.5 F/cm2 which is on par with conventionally solid supercapacitors (0.6 F/cm2). Capacitive yarns are capable of storing up to 37 mF/cm and are shown to be knittable on industrial knitting equipment. Both are some of the highest reported capacitance for all-carbon systems in the field. Yet both are the only systems composed of inexpensive and non-toxic activated carbon, the most commonly used electrode material used in supercapacitors, opposed to carbon nanotubes or graphene, which are typically more 10-100 times more expensive. However, all of the fabrication techniques reported here are also capable of incorporating a wide variety of materials, ultimately broadening the applications of textile energy storage as a whole. Fully machine knitted supercapacitors are also explored and electrochemically characterized in order to determine how the textile structure affects the capacitance. In conclusion, a wide variety of fabrication techniques for making textile supercapacitors were successfully explored.

  8. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  9. Textile terminologies

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Cécile; Nosch, Marie Louise Bech

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Written sources from the ancient Near East and eastern Mediterranean, from the third to the first millennia BC, provide a wealth of terms for textiles. The twenty-two chapters in the present volume offer the first comprehensive survey of this important material, with special attention to evidence for significant interconnections in textile terminology among languages and cultures, across space and time. For example, the Greek word for a long shirt, khiton , ki-to in Li...

  10. Textile Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Maurin, Bernard; Motro, René

    2013-01-01

    The basic idea for a textile architecture project originates during early meetings between the architect and the engineer. The morphologic richness of such projects is provided by the varying curvatures of shapes, in contradiction with a classical straight line and orthogonal architecture. However the rules of construction are quite different in terms of realisation and of mechanical behaviour: textile membranes are subjected to a pre-stress conferring them their rigidity, and a major objecti...

  11. Textile Dampfbremse

    OpenAIRE

    Saur, A.; Holm, A.

    2006-01-01

    DE 102005020295 A1 UPAB: 20061218 NOVELTY - Manufactured from a textile membrane and made airtight and wind-proof, a vapor barrier seal is attached as an outermost layer on a room side and/or external side of walls, ceilings or floors. It is designed as a carpet or is integrated in a carpet. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - An INDEPENDENT CLAIM is also included for a means of transport with a vapor barrier seal. USE - As a vapor barrier seal manufactured from textile for an interior space/indoors to be...

  12. TEXTILE SALVAGE

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2002-01-01

    Readers are reminded that Geneva's agency for salvaging used clothing, other textiles and old shoes (Coordination d'oeuvres d'entraide pour la récupération de vêtements, textiles et chaussures usagés dans le canton de Genève) has a container in the car park outside CERN's Meyrin site. In 2001, 1000 tonnes of such items were collected in the Canton of Geneva (as compared with 840 tonnes in 2000), of which 4460 kg came from the container outside the Meyrin site. The operation's organisers (Caritas, Centre Social Protestant, the Geneva Section of the Swiss Red Cross, Terre des Hommes, the Geneva branch of Terre des Hommes Suisse and Emmaüs, Geneva) would like to thank all those who have donated clothing or otherwise supported their campaign. Relations with the Host States Service Tel. 72848 http://www.cern.ch/relations/

  13. Textile Technology Analysis Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textile Analysis Labis built for evaluating and characterizing the physical properties of an array of textile materials, but specifically those used in aircrew...

  14. Textiles and clothing sustainability sustainable textile chemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the challenges in sustainable wet processing of textiles, natural dyes, enzymatic textiles and sustainable textile finishes. Textile industry is known for its chemical processing issues and many NGO’s are behind the textile sector to streamline its chemical processing, which is the black face of clothing and fashion sector. Sustainable textile chemical processes are crucial for attaining sustainability in the clothing sector. Seven comprehensive chapters are aimed to highlight these issues in the book.

  15. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  16. Smart Electronic Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei; Chen, Peining; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-05-17

    This Review describes the state-of-the-art of wearable electronics (smart textiles). The unique and promising advantages of smart electronic textiles are highlighted by comparing them with the conventional planar counterparts. The main kinds of smart electronic textiles based on different functionalities, namely the generation, storage, and utilization of electricity, are then discussed with an emphasis on the use of functional materials. The remaining challenges are summarized together with important new directions to provide some useful clues for the future development of smart electronic textiles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. CONTAINER FOR USED TEXTILES

    CERN Document Server

    Relation with the Host States

    2001-01-01

    We should like to remind you that a special container for textiles for the Association 'Réalise/Rapid Service' of Geneva is located in the car park outside the Meyrin site. The Association has informed us that 3 306 kg of textiles were deposited in the container in 2000 and wishes to convey its warm gratitude to all donors.

  18. NIR Analysis for Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been found to be a useful technique to characterize raw materials and finished textile products, and NIR methods and techniques continue to find increasingly diverse and wide-ranging quantitative and qualitative applications in the textile industry. NIR methods ...

  19. The Textile Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    2010-01-01

    Textile has within the last decade increasingly been regarded as an architectural material. Many new textiles have been developed and this has increased its applications in architecture. But how do textile and space meet and which spatial qualities can arise in this meeting? The paper describes...... a series of practical studies of the spatial qualities that can be established through the design of three very different fabrics. The topic is part of an ongoing Ph.D. project at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. The main theme of the Ph.D. is the inter-play between textile, space and sound. Space...... and it has a special poetry which is not to be found in any other material. Which spatial qualities can be obtained with these textile properties? Contemporary conception of space in architecture can be said still to rely on the modernist conception. In practical experiments it is investigated how...

  20. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on a small part of the research taking place in the textile field. The article describes an ongoing PhD research project on textiles and sound and outlines the project's two main questions: how sound can be shaped by textiles and conversely how textiles can...

  1. Smart textiles: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenack, Kunigunde; van Pieterson, Liesbeth

    2012-11-01

    Smart textiles research represents a new model for generating creative and novel solutions for integrating electronics into unusual environments and will result in new discoveries that push the boundaries of science forward. A key driver for smart textiles research is the fact that both textile and electronics fabrication processes are capable of functionalizing large-area surfaces at very high speeds. In this article we review the history of smart textiles development, introducing the main trends and technological challenges faced in this field. Then, we identify key challenges that are the focus of ongoing research. We then proceed to discuss fundamentals of smart textiles: textile fabrication methods and textile interconnect lines, textile sensor, and output device components and integration of commercial components into textile architectures. Next we discuss representative smart textile systems and finally provide our outlook over the field and a prediction for the future.

  2. CONTAINER FOR USED TEXTILES

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations avec les Pays hôtes

    2000-01-01

    We should like to remind you that a special container for textiles for the Association 'Réalise/Rapid Service' of Geneva is located in the car park outside the Meyrin site.The Association has informed us that 2 530 kg of textiles were deposited in the container in 1998 and wishes to convey its warm gratitude to all donors.Relations with the Host StatesTel. 75152

  3. Synergy of Uli Symbols and Textiles: An Exploration in Textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study explorative experiments were carried out in sculptural form using textile and textile related materials (Textile Sculpture) in order to invigorate these symbols adopting their meanings but giving them different place through innovative and creative process. Uli, a symbolic painting of female body provides unique ...

  4. Sustainability in the textile industry

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book examines in detail key aspects of sustainability in the textile industry, especially environmental, social and economic sustainability in the textiles and clothing sector. It highlights the various faces and facets of sustainability and their implications for textiles and the clothing sector.

  5. Innovation, entrepreneurship and textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton Godfrey, A.; Pourmojib, S.

    2017-10-01

    Innovation and entrepreneurship have become increasingly important parts of economic development in almost every country, region, and community. In this research we investigate the reasons people become entrepreneurs in the textile and apparel industries and compare entrepreneurship in these industries with other industries looking also at the success factors for start up companies. During our research we found many disrupters, people entering the textile and apparel industries from outside often having no prior experience in textiles or apparel. We also investigate the impact of government intervention on entrepreneurship. In recognition of the large economic impact entrepreneurial companies have on economic development and job growth, almost all federal governments, regional governments, and community governments have created support for innovation and entrepreneurship.

  6. Hemp for textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Key words: Cannabis sativa L., day length sensitivity, fibre hemp, genotype, harvest time, plant density, plant weight, primary fibres, secondary fibres, sowing date, textiles. Westerhuis, W. (2016)

  7. Novel antimicrobial textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Unchin

    2003-10-01

    Many microorganisms can survive, and perhaps proliferate on textiles, generating adverse effects such as: disease transmission, odor generation, pH changes, staining, discoloration and loss of performance. These adverse effects may threaten users' health, deteriorate textile properties and degrade service quality. It may, therefore, be desirable to incorporate antimicrobials on textiles for controlling the growth of microorganisms. This dissertation focuses on the development of antimicrobial fibers and fabrics by integration of antimicrobials with these textiles. The applications of hydantoin-based halamines were mainly investigated in the research. The typical process is that hydantoin containing compounds are grafted onto textiles and transformed to halamine by chlorination. Hydantoin-based halamines are usually chloramines that release chlorine (Cl+) via cleavage of the -NCl functional group which attacks and kills microbes. The antimicrobial behavior is rechargeable many times by rinsing the fiber or fabric with chlorine-containing solution. Some quaternary ammonium type antimicrobials were also investigated in this research. The choice of integrating techniques is dependant on both the textile and antimicrobial compounds. In this dissertation, the nine approaches were studied for incorporating antimicrobial with various textiles: (1) co-extrusion of fibers with halamine precursor additive; (2) grafting of the quaternary ammonium compounds onto ethylene-co-acrylic acid fiber for creating quaternary ammonium type antimicrobial fiber; (3) entrapment of the additives in thermally bonded bicomponent nonwoven fabrics; (4) attaching antimicrobial additives to surfaces with latex adhesive coating; (5) grafting of antimicrobial compounds onto rubber latex via UV exposure; (6) reaction of halamine with needle-punched melamine formaldehyde nonwoven fabric and laminates; (7) coating melamine resin onto tent fabrics and laminates; (8) synthesis of super absorbent polymer

  8. Textile industry and occupational cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Zorawar; Chadha, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of workers are engaged in textile industry worldwide. Textile industry involves the use of different kinds of dyes which are known to possess carcinogenic properties. Solvents used in these industries are also associated with different health related hazards including cancer. In previous studies on textile and iron industries, the authors have reported genotoxicity among them and observed occurrence of cancer deaths among textile industry workers. Thus, an attempt has been made to compile the studies on the prevalence of different types of cancers among textile industry workers. A wide literature search has been done for compiling the present paper. Papers on cancer occurrence among textile industry workers have been taken from 1976 to 2015. A variety of textile dyes and solvents, many of them being carcinogenic, are being used worldwide in the textile industry. The textile industry workers are therefore, in continuous exposure to these dyes, solvents, fibre dusts and various other toxic chemicals. The present study evaluates the potential of different chemicals and physical factors to be carcinogenic agents among occupationally exposed workers by going through various available reports and researches. Papers were collected using different databases and a number of studies report the association of textile industry and different types of cancer including lung, bladder, colorectal and breast cancer. After going through the available reports, it can be concluded that workers under varied job categories in textile industries are at a higher risk of developing cancer as various chemicals used in the textile industry are toxic and can act as potential health risk in inducing cancer among them. Assessing the cancer risk at different job levels in textile industries may be found useful in assessing the overall risk to the workers and formulating the future cancer preventive strategies.

  9. Emotional Value of Applied Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2011-01-01

    textiles. 2) Understanding and exploring emotional value related to design of applied textiles. In chapter four I argue – based on Jesse Prinz’s and Antonio Damasio’s emotion research – for a perception of emotional value of applied textiles which acknowledges bodily feedback as a core concept...... at Gabriel face while trying to implement an innovative and process-oriented business strategy. The focal point has been the section of the strategy which aims at developing Blue Ocean products, which have a functional and an emotional value for the user. The thesis examines and explores emotional value...... of applied textiles. The objective is to operationalise the strategic term ‘emotional value’ as it relates to applied textiles. The procedure includes the development of user- and stakeholder-centred approaches, which are valuable for the textile designer in the design process. The research approach...

  10. Treatment of textile wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Krsteva, Silvana; Golomeova, Saska

    2013-01-01

    The production of a textile requires several stages of mechanical processing such as spinning, weaving, knitting, and garment production, which seem to be insulated from the wet treatment processes like pretreatment, dyeing, printing, and finishing operations. Тhere is a strong interrelation between treatment processes in the dry state and consecutive wet treatments. Most of the processes and products have a negative impact on the environment. Laws and standards for environmental protection a...

  11. 21 CFR 177.2800 - Textiles and textile fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Textiles and textile fibers. 177.2800 Section 177.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use...

  12. Textiles and clothing sustainability recycled and upcycled textiles and fashion

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the concepts of recycling and upcycling and their implications for the textiles and fashion sector. In addition to the theoretical concepts, the book also presents various options for recycling and upcycling in textiles and fashion. Although recycling is a much-developed and widely used concept, upcycling is also gaining popularity in the sector.

  13. Greening textile industry in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen Thi Phuong, L.

    2011-01-01

        The textile and garment industry has made a remarkable contribution to the economic development of Vietnam and employs currently a large labor force of 2.5 million people.However, the textile industry is also seen as a most polluting and unsustainable industry due to the use of

  14. Physical tools for textile creativity and invention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen; Lenau, Torben Anker

    2010-01-01

    Two textile research projects (one completed and one ongoing) are described, where physical inspirational tools are developed and tested with the aim of stimulating textile creativity and invention, i.e. the use of textile materials in new kinds of products, thus bringing textiles into new contexts...

  15. The Mycenaean Palace-Organised Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of the textile production in af tekstilprodutionen in Linear B archives. The administration of the textile prodution is compared to the administration of land holdings.......Investigation of the textile production in af tekstilprodutionen in Linear B archives. The administration of the textile prodution is compared to the administration of land holdings....

  16. Textile production in Quartier Mu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutler, Joanne Elisabeth; Andersson Strand, Eva Birgitta; Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2013-01-01

    , geographical and chronological factors.  In contrast, recent research has considered some aspects of shape as an expression of loom weight function. This new approach, which draws on experimental archaeology, has made it possible to render textile craft visible, even if the textiles themselves...... are not preserved (Mårtensson et al. 2009). It is this approach that has been adopted in the following analysis of the loom weights from Quartier Mu. The chapter divided into four parts. The first part gives an outline of general textile techniques and presents the methodology. The second part consists...

  17. Auxetic warp knit textile structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderson, Kim; Alderson, Andrew; Anand, Subhash; Simkins, Virginia; Nazare, Shonali; Ravirala, Naveen [Institute for Materials Research and Innovation, The University of Bolton, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5AB (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    The design, manufacturing and characterization of warp knit textile structures with enhanced drapeability and energy absorption is reported in this paper. Four textile structures were produced, all based on a triangular or double arrowhead structure, which is known to lead to a negative Poisson's ratio {nu}. Mechanical testing has confirmed that textile structures can be produced which are auxetic at {+-} 45 to the warp direction, with {nu} of up to -0.22 {+-} 0.03. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. TEXTILE IMPACT PLATES FOR NANOPARTICLES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    VISILEANU Emilia; DUMITRESCU Iuliana; VARZARU Elena; MITRAN Cornelia; CHIRIAC Laura

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents textile materials with destination impact plates, having different surface architectures and active treatments for functionalization, with influence upon the aging process of nano-Ag and nano-CeO2...

  19. Textile Manufacturing Sector (NAICS 313)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for the textile and leather manufacturing sector, including NESHAPs for leather tanning and fabric printing, and small business guidance for RCRA hazardous waste requirements.

  20. EXERGY OF TEXTILE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents solution for the task of evaluating exergy of the substance in the flow for textile and woven fabrics based on thermodynamic analysis of the corresponding technical systems. The exergy method allows estimating the energy effectiveness for the most problematic heat-technological systems of substance transformation and thus outlining the ways for decreasing the electric-power component in the production prime cost. The actuality of the issue stems from the renowned scenario alteration on the world energy market and is aggravated by necessity of retaining and building up the export potential of the light industry as an important component of the republic national-economic complex. The exergy method has been here for quite a long time and saw the interest fading and appearing again with periodicity of the research-generations alternation. Cooling down of every new generation towards the specified method is explained mostly by unresolved problem of the exergy evaluation for diverse materials, which poses a problem in the course of analysis of the substance transformation systems. The specified problem as a general rule does not create obstacles for energyconversion systems. However, the situation with substance-transformation systems is by far more complicated primarily due to diversity of the materials and respectively of the specification peculiarities of such component of the substance exergy in the flow as chemical component. Abeyance of conclusion in finding the chemical component of the substance exergy does not allow performing thermodynamic valuation of the energy provision for the heat-technological process in full measure. Which complicates the matters of decision-making and finding a medium for reduction of their energy consumption. All stated above relates to the textile industry and in the first instance to the finishing production departments.The authors present the exergy-evaluation problem solution for the

  1. North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proceedings of the Tenth North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles, held in Copenhagen, 14-17 May 2008......Proceedings of the Tenth North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles, held in Copenhagen, 14-17 May 2008...

  2. Scope of nanotechnology in modern textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review article demonstrates the scope and applications of nanotechnology towards modification and development of advanced textile fibers, yarns and fabrics and their processing techniques. Basically, it summarizes the recent advances made in nanotechnology and its applications to cotton textil...

  3. Textile paper as a circular material

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Increasing resource efficiency by utilising secondary raw material is one of the key characteristics of a circular economy. Textile dust fibre, a waste generated from textile mechanical recycling has the prospect to be utilised as secondary raw material for producing novel material: textile paper suitable for packaging and other applications. A comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of carrier bags made from one ton of virgin paper, recycled paper and novel textile paper (~22584paper bags wi...

  4. Textiles for protection against microorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauperl, O.

    2016-04-01

    Concerning micro-organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, there is a huge progress in the development of textile materials and procedures which should effectively protect against these various pathogens. In this sense there is especially problematic hospital environment, where it is necessary to take into account properly designed textile material which, when good selected and composed, act as a good barrier against transfer of micro-organisms through material mainly in its wet state. Respect to this it is necessary to be familiar with the rules regarding selection of the input material, the choice of proper yarn construction, the choice of the proper weaving mode, the rules regarding selection of antimicrobial-active compound suitable for (eco-friendly) treatment, and the choice of the most appropriate test method by which it is possible objectively to conclude on the reduction of selected microorganism. As is well known, fabrics are three-dimensional structures with void and non-void areas. Therefore, the physical-chemical properties of the textile material/fabric, the surface characteristics together with the shape of microorganism, and the carriers' characteristics contribute to control the transfer of microorganism through textile material. Therefore, careful planning of textile materials and treatment procedure with the compound which is able to reduce micro-organism satisfactory is particularly important, especially due to the fact that in hospital environment population with impaired immune system is mainly presented.

  5. Bioremediation of textile effluent using Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enormous volumes of effluent are generated at different stages of textile manufacturing, as a result of the use of copious amounts of chemicals and dyes. Several tons of textiles required to meet up with societal demands are produced daily in this industry. Effluent derived from the textile and dyestuff activities can provoke ...

  6. Emerging research trends in medical textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Gokarneshan, N; Rajendran, V; Lavanya, B; Ghoshal, Arundhathi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant researches reported during the recent years in the field of medical textiles. It also highlights the use of new types of fibres in developing medical textile products and their promising role in the respective areas of application. Considerable developments have taken place in the development of medical textiles for varied applications.

  7. Electrical Conductivity in Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Copper is the most widely used electrical conductor. Like most metals, though, it has several drawbacks: it is heavy, expensive, and can break. Fibers that conduct electricity could be the solutions to these problems, and they are of great interest to NASA. Conductive fibers provide lightweight alternatives to heavy copper wiring in a variety of settings, including aerospace, where weight is always a chief concern. This is an area where NASA is always seeking improved materials. The fibers are also more cost-effective than metals. Expenditure is another area where NASA is always looking to make improvements. In the case of electronics that are confined to small spaces and subject to severe stress, copper is prone to breaking and losing connection over time. Flexible conductive fibers eliminate that problem. They are more supple and stronger than brittle copper and, thus, find good use in these and similar situations. While clearly a much-needed material, electrically conductive fibers are not readily available. The cost of new technology development, with all the pitfalls of troubleshooting production and the years of testing, and without the guarantee of an immediate market, is often too much of a financial hazard for companies to risk. NASA, however, saw the need for electrical fibers in its many projects and sought out a high-tech textile company that was already experimenting in this field, Syscom Technology, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio. Syscom was founded in 1993 to provide computer software engineering services and basic materials research in the areas of high-performance polymer fibers and films. In 1999, Syscom decided to focus its business and technical efforts on development of high-strength, high-performance, and electrically conductive polymer fibers. The company developed AmberStrand, an electrically conductive, low-weight, strong-yet-flexible hybrid metal-polymer YARN.

  8. Design Management in the Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore textile design activities and textile design management from an industrial network perspective. The textile industry is probably one of the most globalized manufacturing industries in the world and thus one of the most dispersed industries on the globe. Most studies...... on design management are framed inside the organisational context of the firm. In this study the role and practice of textile design is addressed in perspective of the global textile production network. The empirical data stems from six case studies exploring how different types of enterprises are organised...

  9. Los textiles rituales de Nasca en Cahuachi

    OpenAIRE

    Bastiand Atto, María Soledad

    2010-01-01

    El estudio de los textiles arqueológicos nos conduce a entender a una de las actividades productivas de mayor antigüedad en nuestro país, la actividad productiva textil, desarrollada durante 5 000 años. Tal es el caso, de la producción textil de la cultura Nasca desarrollada en el período Intermedio Temprano, de la época prehispánica. Una de las culturas más conocidas por su cerámica polícroma y sus complejos textiles. El presente estudio muestra una Colección Textil de Nasca Temprano,...

  10. Textile effluent biodegradation potentials of textile effluent-adapted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental pollution has been recognized as one of the major problems of the modern world. The increasing demand for water and the dwindling supply has made the treatment and reuse of industrial effluents an attractive option. Textile effluents are of concern because they colour the drains and ultimately the water ...

  11. TEXTILE STRUCTURES FOR AERONAUTICS (PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOLER Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D textile structures with better delamination resistance and damage impact tolerance to be applied in composites for structural components is one of the main goals of the aeronautical industry. Textile Research Centre in Canet de Mar has been working since 2008 in this field. Our staff has been designing, developing and producing different textile structures using different production methods and machinery to improve three-dimensional textile structures as fiber reinforcement for composites. This paper describes different tests done in our textile labs from unidirectional structures to woven, knitted or braided 3 D textile structures. Advantages and disadvantages of each textile structure are summarized. The second part of this paper deals with our know-how in the manufacturing and assessing of three-dimensional textile structures during this last five years in the field of textile structures for composites but also in the development of structures for other applications. In the field of composites for aeronautic sector we have developed textile structures using the main methods of textile production, that is to say, weaving, warp knitting, weft knitting and braiding. Comparing the advantages and disadvantages it could be said that braided fabrics, with a structure in the three space axes are the most suitable for fittings and frames.

  12. Textile allergic contact dermatitis: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Garrett; Blattner, Collin M; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Andersen, Rosa; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a thorough review of Pubmed search results for "textile percutaneous penetration" and "textile absorption". We also determined relevant articles that discussed percutaneous penetration of textiles into the skin and their associated disease states. Due to limitations in current and past publications, we are uncertain of the extent of the clinical problem; however, for patients allergic to textile dye, it is of practical importance, both clinically and in their everyday life. There are many challenges to correctly identifying the offending textile products in a patient with suspected textile dye dermatitis. Different populations may exhibit varying degrees of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), but more studies must be done to draw further conclusions. This is further complicated when counseling the patient on how to avoid the textile products most likely to cause a recurrence of ACD skin lesions.

  13. Perception of naturalness in textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvliet, Krista E.; Karana, Elvin; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    In many daily contexts, we prefer natural 'materials' over un-natural ones. Textiles embodied in garments that are worn on the body all day, or in bed sheets slept under every night touch us literally, on a daily basis. Hence among all other materials, 'naturalness perception' has a strong impact on

  14. NICE3: Textile Brine Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the significant energy and waste savings that can be realized by using nanofiltration technology to reuse textile dyebath brines. Read this new fact sheet to learn how this new membrane technology can benefit your business.

  15. Stalled ERP at Random Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Robert; Kops, Eric; Little, Elizabeth; Gamble, George; Underbakke, Jesse; Havelka, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Andre Raymond, Executive Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Random Textiles Co. Inc. (RTC), stood in front of the podium to address his team of 70 sales consultants in Las Vegas, NV. The organization had increased market share and achieved record sales over the past three years; however, in the shadow of this success lurked an obstacle that…

  16. Durable and Rechargeable Antimicrobial Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    textiles, to achieve powerful antimicrobial effiacy (see the following tasks). Reaction conditions have significant effects on grafting yields and...efficacy tests, all the microbial species were provided by the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis...non-resistant bacteria. Candida albicans (C. albicans, ATCC 10231, fungi), a diploid fungus , was used as a representative example of fungi. As shown

  17. Textiles and Training in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrez, Jaime Serrao; Dias, Mario Caldeira

    Analyzing the role of vocational training in an economic sector that is declining in Portugal, this document consists of five chapters, a bibliography, and a list of training organizations. An introduction tells why the study is important and explains that the major obstacles to development of the Portuguese textile and clothing sector are the…

  18. Integrated microelectronics for smart textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Christl; Glaser, Rupert; Savio, Domnic; Schnell, Markus; Weber, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The combination of textile fabrics with microelectronics will lead to completely new applications, thus achieving elements of ambient intelligence. The integration of sensor or actuator networks, using fabrics with conductive fibres as a textile motherboard enable the fabrication of large active areas. In this paper we describe an integration technology for the fabrication of a "smart textile" based on a wired peer-to-peer network of microcontrollers with integrated sensors or actuators. A self-organizing and fault-tolerant architecture is accomplished which detects the physical shape of the network. Routing paths are formed for data transmission, automatically circumventing defective or missing areas. The network architecture allows the smart textiles to be produced by reel-to-reel processes, cut into arbitrary shapes subsequently and implemented in systems at low installation costs. The possible applications are manifold, ranging from alarm systems to intelligent guidance systems, passenger recognition in car seats, air conditioning control in interior lining and smart wallpaper with software-defined light switches.

  19. TEXTILE STRUCTURES FOR AERONAUTICS (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOLER Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D textile structures with better delamination resistance and damage impact tolerance to be applied in composites for structural components is one of the main goals of the aeronautical industry. Textile Research Centre in Canet de Mar has been working since 2008 in this field. Our staff has been designing, developing and producing different textile structures using different production methods and machinery to improve three-dimensional textile structures as fiber reinforcement for composites. This paper describes different tests done in our textile labs from unidirectional structures to woven, knitted or braided 3 D textile structures. Advantages and disadvantages of each textile structure are summarized. The first part of this paper deals with the introduction of our Textile Research Centre in the field of composites and carbon fiber as a main material to produce three – dimensional textile structures. The use of composite materials in aerospace structures has increased over the past decades. Our contribution related to this field consists of the development of three- dimensional textile structures and even the adaptation and improvement of machinery to do it possible. Carbon fiber provides advantages as volumetric fraction and minimum fault occurrence. However carbon fiber has also disadvantages as uncomfortable handling delamination and high cost of material and processing.

  20. The Textile Industry at Thebes in the Light of the Textile Industries at Pylos and Knossos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2001-01-01

    The paper investigates the textile production at Thebes, Greece, according to the Linear B tablets......The paper investigates the textile production at Thebes, Greece, according to the Linear B tablets...

  1. Thermoset composites reinforced with recycled cotton textile residues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zonatti, Welton Fernando; Guimarães, Bárbara Maria Gama; Duleba, Wânia; Ramos, Júlia Baruque

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of textiles is an issue that requires immediate attention in order to address the management of textiles derived from household waste, as well as scraps generated throughout manufacturing textile processes...

  2. Textile electrodes and integrated smart textile for reliable biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, R; Pacelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Since birth the first and the most natural interface for the body is fabric, a soft, warm and reassuring material. Cloth is usually covering more than 80 % of the skin; which leads us to consider textile material as the most appropriate interface where new sensorial and interactive functions can be implemented. The new generation of personalised monitoring systems is based on this paradigm: functions like sensing, transmission and elaboration are implementable in the materials through the textile technology. Functional yarns and fibres are usable to realise garments where electrical and computing properties are combined with the traditional mechanical characteristics, giving rise to textile platforms that are comparable with the cloths that are normally used to produce our garments. The feel of the fabric is the same, but the functionality is augmented. Nowadays, consumers demand user-friendly connectivity and interactivity; sensing clothes are the most natural and ordinary interface able to follow us, everywhere in a non-intrusive way, in natural harmony with our body.

  3. Textiles and clothing sustainability nanotextiles and sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the sustainability aspects of textiles and clothing sector in light of nanomaterials and technologies. The invasion of nano in every industrial sector has been important and has made remarkable changes as well as posed new challenges, including the textiles and clothing sector. There is quite a great deal of research happening in terms of nano materials for textiles across the globe, some of which are covered in this book. .

  4. Bespoke Materials For Bespoke Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Baranovskaya, Yuliya; Holden Deleuran, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Membrane architecture uses currently off the shelf materials and produces the shapes and details through cutting and laborsome joining of textile patterns. This paper discusses investigations into an alternative material practice - knit - which engages bespoke membrane materials. A practice which...... how design and engineering practices change, when material properties move from given and constant into the area of design and gradient. Bespoke materials for bespoke textile architecture. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/306401612_Bespoke_materials_for_bespoke_textile...

  5. Treatment of effluent textiles with ultraviolet light

    OpenAIRE

    Tinoco Gómez, Oscar Rafael; UNMSM; Medina Escudero, Ana María; UNMSM; Zapata Gamarra, Hernán

    2014-01-01

    The use of clean technologies for the treatment of textile effluents is essential to achieve a significant contribution by the textile industry, environmental treatment of them. According to the literature, the dyes used in textile industry are hardly degradable and have strong opposition to biological treatments are subjected to appropriate wastewater. At lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (oxygenated water) leads to better dye fading. It also shows that lower concentrations of titani...

  6. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    of sound. This issue is a part of a Ph.D. study at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. Sound diffusion in architecture is a complex phenomenon. From the sound source the sound spreads in all directions as a sphere of wave fronts. When the sound is reflected from room boundaries or furniture, complex...... goemetry by analysing the sound pattern at a specific spot. This analysis is done theoretically with algorithmic systems and practical with waves in water. The paper describes the experiments and the findings, and explains how an analysis of sound can be catched in a textile form.......Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...

  7. [When textiles help your recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Bernard; Campagne, Christine; Behary Massika, Nemeshwaree

    2017-01-01

    Textiles are widely used in the biomedical domain, particularly in wound dressings or as implantable devices for strengthening or even replacing some damaged organs. Nowadays they present more and more sophisticated functionalities contributing to the healing process, to the organs regeneration, and fight against infection or thrombosis. Advanced spinning technologies of biostable or bioresorbable polymers and surface treatment technologies are often used, as well as nanotechnologies, to implement two main strategies for development of bio-active textiles. A long or medium term technology is obtained by grafting the bio-active molecule through stable chemical bonds while a short term activity is produced by using "reservoir" systems such as hydrogels and cyclodextrins that release the active agents in situ. ‡. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  8. On-line inspection of textile geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahners, Thomas; Ringens, Werner; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    1993-02-01

    Two examples of specific design philosophies for low-cost on-line inspection systems for textiles are described in this paper: The application of the moire-technique can heavily enhance the imaging of textile surfaces as a filter for the assessment of geometric variations of the textile `grating' with extremely simple algorithms for image analysis. Blinded for color shades triangulation sensors have been developed into powerful tools for fast profiling of textile surfaces. Curtailed for certain applications fiber optical modifications of the basic triangulation principle have been developed for aereal inspection.

  9. STAGE OF TEXTILE RECYCLE WASTE IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRIPA Simona

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this article is to examine the stage of textile recycle waste in Romania. For this purpose were analyzed the main sources of textile waste from Romania (industry of manufacture of textiles, wearing apparel, leather and related products, imports of textiles, clothing and footwear and imports of second hand clothing and also evolution of the quantity of textile waste in Romania. The benefits (economic and environmental of the collection and recycling of waste and the legislation on the waste management, have determined the diversification and increasing the number and the capacity of recovery and disposal of waste in Romania. We found the most textile waste in Romania was deposited in deposits onto or into land, in the proportion of 18.51%. This proportion is under the EU average of 34.03%, but is much higher than in other European country. Also, has been an increase in the number of incinerators, in the last years. With all of this, the interest in textile waste management in Romania is far from being to the level of European, where are associations who dealing with the collection and recycling of textiles and is achieved a selective collection of textile waste in the points especially designed for this thing. The information for this paper was gathered from literature, from the EUROSTAT database and INSSE database analysis and by Internet.

  10. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1 μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3 μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4 months storage at 25 °C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8 °C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32 °C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. NANOTECHNOLOGY IN TEXTILE INDUSTRY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RATIU Mariana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and nanotechnology are the study and application of extremely small things and can be used across all the other science fields, such as chemistry, biology, physics, materials science, and engineering. Nanotechnology overcomes the limitation of applying conventional methods to impart certain properties to textile materials. There is no doubt that in the next few years nanotechnology will penetrate into every area of the textile industry. Nanotextiles are nanoscale fibrous materials that can be fictionalized with a vast array of novel properties, including antibiotic activity, self-cleaning and the ability to increase reaction rates by providing large surface areas to potential reactants. These materials are used not only as cloth fabric, but as filter materials, wound-healing gauzes and antibacterial food packaging agents in food industry. World demand for nano-materials will rise more than two-and-a-half times to $5.5 billion in 2016 driven by a combination of increased market penetration of existing materials, and ongoing development of new materials and applications. In recent years was demonstrated that nanotechnology can be used to enhance textile attributes, such as fabric softness, durability and breathability, water repellency, fire retardancy, antimicrobial properties in fibers, yarns and fabrics. The development of smart nanotextiles has the potential to revolutionize the production of fibers, fabrics or nonwovens and functionality of our clothing and all types of textile products and applications. Nanotechnology is considered one of the most promising technologies for the 21st century. Today is said that if the IT is the wave of the present, the nanotechnology is the wave of the present, the nanotechnology is the wave of the future.

  12. A Wearable All-Solid Photovoltaic Textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nannan; Chen, Jun; Huang, Yi; Guo, Wanwan; Yang, Jin; Du, Jun; Fan, Xing; Tao, Changyuan

    2016-01-13

    A solution is developed to power portable electronics in a wearable manner by fabricating an all-solid photovoltaic textile. In a similar way to plants absorbing solar energy for photosynthesis, humans can wear the as-fabricated photovoltaic textile to harness solar energy for powering small electronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Berg River Textiles - Cleaner Production Option Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Schneider, Zsig

    In October and November 2002 meetings were held between Berg River Textiles, Mr. Juan Laubscher, and external consultants from the South African – Danish Cleaner Textile Production Project, Mr. Zsig Schneider and Mr. Henrik Wenzel. This team of people collected information on recipes and flow...

  14. Environmental Considerations for Flame Resistant Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtually all common textiles will ignite and burn. There are mandatory and voluntary cigarette and open-flame ignition regulations to address unreasonable fire risks associated with textile products that require them to be treated with and/or contain flame retardant chemicals to make them flame res...

  15. Textiles and clothing sustainability sustainable technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book to deal with the innovative technologies in the field of textiles and clothing sustainability. It details a number of sustainable and innovative technologies and highlights their implications in the clothing sector. There are currently various measures to achieve sustainability in the textiles and the clothing industry, including innovations in the manufacturing stage, which is the crux of this book.

  16. New Research on Bronze Age Textile Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Eva Birgitta; Mårtensson, Linda; Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2008-01-01

    presentation of the results from the systematic tests with Bronze Age textile tools. results concerning mesurements of lenght and time consumed.......presentation of the results from the systematic tests with Bronze Age textile tools. results concerning mesurements of lenght and time consumed....

  17. The Organization of the Mycenaean Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    Analysis of thewritten documentation for the organiztion of the Mycenaean textile industri at Pylos, Knossos, Mycenae and Thebes......Analysis of thewritten documentation for the organiztion of the Mycenaean textile industri at Pylos, Knossos, Mycenae and Thebes...

  18. Tips for Teaching Textiles and Clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    This guide was prepared to help instructors of adult textiles and clothing programs improve their teaching; it is designed to be used with other department publications: Clothing Services Training Guide, Resource Courses for Planning Local Adult Homemaking Programs, and Resource Kit Tips for Teaching Textiles and Clothing (see AC 008 741). Each…

  19. Multi-Layer E-Textile Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lucy E.; Bibeau, Kaila; Mulligan, Lucie; Frith, Ashton; Simon, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Stitched e-textile circuits facilitate wearable, flexible, comfortable wearable technology. However, while stitched methods of e-textile circuits are common, multi-layer circuit creation remains a challenge. Here, we present methods of stitched multi-layer circuit creation using accessible tools and techniques.

  20. Simulation of magnetic coatings on textile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachowicz, T.; Ehrmann, A.

    2016-08-01

    While the properties of conductive fibres and coatings on textiles can easily be measured and calculated, magnetic coatings of fibres, yarns and fabrics still lack descriptions of their physical properties. Since magnetic textiles can be used for a variety of applications, from magnetic filters to invisible water-marks to magnetic coils and sensors, simulations would be supportive to understand and utilize their properties. The article gives an overview of different coatings on textile fibres, varying the magnetic materials as well as the fibre composition, giving rise to the interactions between neighbouring coated fibres. In this way, it is possible to understand the strong shape anisotropy which must be taken into account when the magnetic properties of textiles are to be tailored. Additionally, the differences between several possible magnetic coating materials become visible. This study can help adjusting the magnetic properties of textile fabrics to a desired application.

  1. 16 CFR 1610.4 - Requirements for classifying textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for classifying textiles. 1610... REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.4 Requirements for classifying textiles. (a) Class 1, Normal Flammability. Class 1 textiles exhibit normal flammability and are...

  2. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel goods...

  3. Cost benefit of patch testing with textile finish resins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1982-01-01

    Eleven years experience of textile finish resin patch testing of suspected textile dermatitis patients revealed 15 cases of allergic textile dermatitis among 428 patients tested. Ten of the 15 patients had a relevant positive patch test to one or more of a limited series of textile finishes; 1 wa...

  4. TEXTILE IMPACT PLATES FOR NANOPARTICLES

    OpenAIRE

    VISILEANU Emilia; Dumitrescu, Iuliana; Varzaru, Elena; MITRAN Cornelia; CHIRIAC Laura

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents textile materials with destination impact plates, having different surface architectures and active treatments for functionalization, with influence upon the aging process of nano-Ag and nano-CeO2. The woven and knitted samples from 100% cotton, cotton/PES blend and 100% PES were treated by impregnation on the laboratory padding machine, drying and condensing on the machine for drying-condensing-heat setting, with the following recipes: 50g/l RUCOSTAR EEE6+20 ml 5% nano-A...

  5. Functional textiles in hospital interiors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe

    is overall related to the construction of new Danish hospitals, where the design concept healing architecture is introduced in a national context, representing the vision of a promoted healing process of hospitalised patients, supported by design related influence. Past research studies provides evidence...... that the physical environments affect the patients’ level of stress and influence their process of recovery and healing. However, although research in this field of hospital design has increased substantially in recent years, knowledge on the use of new materials and textiles in hospital interiors is still rather...

  6. Efficiency and Import Penetrationon the Productivity of Textile Industry and Textile Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Basuki Rakhmawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although textile industry and textile products belong to the strategic sub-sector of manufacturing industry in Indonesia, they are facing problems on the availability of energy, old production machines, and the flooding of imported products into the domestic market. This study is aimed to analyze the efficiency and productivity as performance indicators and how the efficiency and import penetration affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The methods of data analysis used in this research are divided in two phases. The first phase, the non-metric approach of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is applied to measure the efficiency and productivity. Secondly, the fixed effect model of econometric regression approach is used to find out the effects of efficiency and import penetration on the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The result shows that the ave-rage level of efficiency of textile industry and textile products during the period of 2004 – 2008 is about 40 percent with a growth rate of average productivity increases 2.4 percent. Whereas, the econometric estimation results indicate that the increase of efficiency will positively and significantly affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. On the other hand, the increase of import penetration will negatively affect the productivity of this industry.

  7. Efficiency And Import Penetration On The Productivity Of Textile Industry And Textile Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur B Rakhmawan, Djoni Hartono, Agni A Awirya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although textile industry and textile products belong to the strategic sub sector of manufacturing industry in Indonesia, they are facing pro-blems on the availability of energy, old production machines, and the flooding of imported products into the domestic market. This study is aimed to analyze the efficiency and productivity as performance indicators and how the efficiency and import penetration affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The methods of data analysis used in this research are divided in two phases. The first phase, the non-metric approach of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is applied to measure the efficiency and productivity. Secondly, the fixed effect model of econometric regression approach is used to find out the effects of efficiency and import penetration on the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The result shows that the average level of efficiency of textile industry and textile products during the period of 2004 – 2008 is about 40 percent with a growth rate of average productivity increases 2.4 percent. Whereas, the econometric estimation results indicate that the increase of efficiency will positively and significantly affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. On the other hand, the increase of import penetration will negatively affect the productivity of this industry.Keywords:Efficiency, Productivity, Import Penetration, DEA, Fixed Effect

  8. Efficiency and Import Penetration on the Productivity of Textile Industry and Textile Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Basuki Rakhmawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although textile industry and textile products belong to the strategic sub-sector of manufacturing industry in Indonesia, they are facing problems on the availability of energy, old production machines, and the flooding of imported products into the domestic market. This study is aimed to analyze the efficiency and productivity as performance indicators and how the efficiency and import penetration affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The methods of data analysis used in this research are divided in two phases. The first phase, the non-metric approach of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is applied to measure the efficiency and productivity. Secondly, the fixed effect model of econometric regression approach is used to find out the effects of efficiency and import penetration on the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The result shows that the average level of efficiency of textile industry and textile products during the period of 2004 – 2008 is about 40 percent with a growth rate of average productivity increases 2.4 percent. Whereas, the econometric estimation results indicate that the increase of efficiency will positively and significantly affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. On the other hand, the increase of import penetration will negatively affect the productivity of this industry.

  9. Textile Messages: Dispatches from the World of E-Textiles and Education. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies. Volume 62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechley, Leah, Ed.; Peppler, Kylie, Ed.; Eisenberg, Michael, Ed.; Yasmin, Kafai, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    "Textile Messages" focuses on the emerging field of electronic textiles, or e-textiles--computers that can be soft, colorful, approachable, and beautiful. E-textiles are articles of clothing, home furnishings, or architectures that include embedded computational and electronic elements. This book introduces a collection of tools that…

  10. Printing of organic light emitting diodes on textile

    OpenAIRE

    Verboven, Inge; Gilissen, Koen; Vandevenne, Glen; Troia, Mariagrazia; Leins, Martina; Walker, Matthias; Schulz, Andreas; Deferme, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Smart textiles with light-emitting properties open a whole new world of innovative textile applications such as indoor and outdoor design and safety clothing. To achieve light-emitting properties on textiles, organic light emitting diodes are printed or integrated onto textile substrates. The advantage of this approach is that typical textile properties like flexibility and drapabilty are maintained. The authors would like to thank the research and funding partners of the European CORNET p...

  11. Stretchable, Porous, and Conductive Energy Textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2010-02-10

    Recently there is strong interest in lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronics to meet the technological demands of modern society. Integrated energy storage devices of this type are a key area that is still significantly underdeveloped. Here, we describe wearable power devices using everyday textiles as the platform. With an extremely simple "dipping and drying" process using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ink, we produced highly conductive textiles with conductivity of 125 S cm-1 and sheet resistance less than 1 Ω/sq. Such conductive textiles show outstanding flexibility and stretchability and demonstrate strong adhesion between the SWNTs and the textiles of interest. Supercapacitors made from these conductive textiles show high areal capacitance, up to 0.48F/cm2, and high specific energy. We demonstrate the loading of pseudocapacitor materials into these conductive textiles that leads to a 24-fold increase of the areal capacitance of the device. These highly conductive textiles can provide new design opportunities for wearable electronics and energy storage applications. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  12. Stretchable, porous, and conductive energy textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liangbing; Pasta, Mauro; Mantia, Fabio La; Cui, Lifeng; Jeong, Sangmoo; Deshazer, Heather Dawn; Choi, Jang Wook; Han, Seung Min; Cui, Yi

    2010-02-10

    Recently there is strong interest in lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronics to meet the technological demands of modern society. Integrated energy storage devices of this type are a key area that is still significantly underdeveloped. Here, we describe wearable power devices using everyday textiles as the platform. With an extremely simple "dipping and drying" process using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ink, we produced highly conductive textiles with conductivity of 125 S cm(-1) and sheet resistance less than 1 Omega/sq. Such conductive textiles show outstanding flexibility and stretchability and demonstrate strong adhesion between the SWNTs and the textiles of interest. Supercapacitors made from these conductive textiles show high areal capacitance, up to 0.48F/cm(2), and high specific energy. We demonstrate the loading of pseudocapacitor materials into these conductive textiles that leads to a 24-fold increase of the areal capacitance of the device. These highly conductive textiles can provide new design opportunities for wearable electronics and energy storage applications.

  13. Mechanical Properties Of Traditional And Nanofibre Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursíny Petr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with a comparison of mechanical properties of a conventional yarn and a textile from nanofibres. The conventional yarn represents the textile objects with high degree of orientation of fibres and the textile from nanofibres represents the textile objects with low degree of orientation of fibres. The theoretical section is concerned with the issue of internal structure of plied yarn and resulting differences in the orientation and straightening of fibres and in utilisation of deformation properties of fibres in comparison to the referred nano textile. The experimental section describes the manner of realisation of both static and dynamic tests of conventional yarn and strips of nanofibres. The results show differences in the mechanical properties of conventional yarn and textile strip from nanofibres under static and dynamic loading conditions. The processing technology of conventional yarn has been verified in the long term. But textiles from nanofibres are a relatively new material and mechanical properties of the detected differences point out possible problems with their behaviour during standard technological processes.

  14. Textile effluent & waste water: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Mojsov, Kiro

    2013-01-01

    Textile processing is a growing industry that traditionally has used a lot of water, energy and harsh chemicals. Textile industries consume over 7 x 105tons of dyes annually and use up to 1 litre of water per kg of dye processed and arethird largest polluters in the world. As a characteristic of the textile processing industry, a wide range of structurally diverse dyes can be used in a single factory, and therefore effluents from the industry are extremely variable in composition. This needed...

  15. 76 FR 79166 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements ACTION: Determination to add a product... 21, 2011. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  16. 76 FR 78249 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: December 16, 2011. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  17. 75 FR 75664 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: December 6, 2010. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  18. 76 FR 16734 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... Publication. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined...

  19. 78 FR 16662 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability... Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a product in...: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined that certain...

  20. 78 FR 39713 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a..., 2013. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined...

  1. 77 FR 8221 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: February 14, 2012. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  2. 75 FR 65609 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... 26, 2010. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  3. 78 FR 7414 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: February 1, 2013. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  4. 75 FR 48931 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') August 9, 2010. AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination... Date: August 12, 2010. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA...

  5. 78 FR 17642 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... 22, 2013. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  6. 76 FR 52640 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to remove a.... SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined that an...

  7. 78 FR 18561 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability... Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a product in...: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined that certain...

  8. 76 FR 67424 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: November 1, 2011. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  9. 78 FR 16661 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... 18, 2013. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  10. Textile materials for lightweight constructions technologies, methods, materials, properties

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    In this book, experts on textile technologies convey both general and specific informa­tion on various aspects of textile engineering, ready-made technologies, and textile chemistry. They describe the entire process chain from fiber materials to various yarn constructions, 2D and 3D textile constructions, preforms, and interface layer design. In addition, the authors introduce testing methods, shaping and simulation techniques for the characterization of and structural mechanics calculations on anisotropic, pliable high-performance textiles, including specific examples from the fields of fiber plastic composites, textile concrete, and textile membranes. Readers will also be familiarized with the potential offered by increasingly popular textile structures, for instance in the fields of composite technology, construction technology, security technology, and membrane technology. Textile materials and semi-finished products have widely varied potential characteristics, and are commonly used as essential element...

  11. Dermatotoxicologic clinical solutions: textile dye dermatitis patch testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas; Edwards, Ashley; Maibach, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The authors provide a framework for working up and counseling a patient with suspected textile dermatitis, focusing on identifying which textile materials are most likely to be the cause of the eczematous lesions, the current clinical guidelines, the utility and appropriateness of patch testing, the limitations of these guidelines, and our pro tempore recommendations. While there are many challenges to correctly identify and counsel patients on how to avoid the offending textile products in a patient with suspected textile dye dermatitis, there is value in following the guidelines set forth to help identify the causative textile(s). Although patch tests can be useful, dermatologists should understand the limitations of standardized patch testing for patients with suspected textile dye-induced dermatitis. These guidelines are expected to increase the likelihood of identifying the causative textile(s), so that patch testing can be supplemented with swatch testing and chemical dye extraction to help discover the allergenic dye.

  12. Nettle as a distinct Bronze Age textile plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfjord, C; Mannering, U; Frei, K M; Gleba, M; Scharff, A B; Skals, I; Heinemeier, J; Nosch, M-L; Holst, B

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the production of plant fibre textiles in ancient Europe, especially woven textiles for clothing, was closely linked to the development of agriculture through the use of cultivated textile plants (flax, hemp). Here we present a new investigation of the 2800 year old Lusehøj Bronze Age Textile from Voldtofte, Denmark, which challenges this assumption. We show that the textile is made of imported nettle, most probably from the Kärnten-Steiermark region, an area which at the time had an otherwise established flax production. Our results thus suggest that the production of woven plant fibre textiles in Bronze Age Europe was based not only on cultivated textile plants but also on the targeted exploitation of wild plants. The Lusehøj find points to a hitherto unrecognized role of nettle as an important textile plant and suggests the need for a re-evaluation of textile production resource management in prehistoric Europe.

  13. Thin fiber and textile reinforced cementitious systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aldea, Corina-Maria

    2007-01-01

    This Special Publication (SP) contains ten papers which provide insight on the topics of state of the art of thin fiber and textile-reinforced cementitious systems both in academia and the industry...

  14. Nanomaterials for Functional Textiles and Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rivero, Pedro J; Urrutia, Aitor; Goicoechea, Javier; Arregui, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    ... macroscopic properties. This article reviews the most relevant approaches for incorporating such nanoparticles into synthetic fibers used traditionally in the textile industry allowing to give a solution to traditional...

  15. Wearable Electro-Textiles for Battlefield Awareness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winterhalter, C. A; Teverovsky, Justyna; Horowitz, Wendy; Sharma, Vikram; Lee, Kang

    2004-01-01

    This summary describes efforts to develop wearable electronic textiles and connectors to support body worn networking, communications, and battlefield awareness for future service members of the U.S. Army...

  16. ROMANIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRY AND ITS COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Ioana ŞERBĂNEL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization has set up a new era of international trade flows and implicitly international competition. This is best understood by analyzing the rise and fall within certain industries. The Global Value Chains (GVC framework has emerged from its theoretical origins to become a major paradigm used by several international organizations. A detailed scrutiny of GVC highlightsthe manner in which new patterns of production, international trade and employment shape prospects for development and competitiveness.The purpose of the article is to address the important role of the textile sector in national economy development. Firstly, the paper addresses the presentation of textile industry at global, European and national level. Then, it presents a competitiveness sectorial approach and the analysis of innovation in textile industry.Finally, it is presented the value chain for the textile industry in Romania.

  17. Textile composites based on natural fibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Li, Yan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available composites based on natural fibers are investigated, which includes the manufacuring techniques, fracture and mechanical properties and other behaviours. Consolidation and permeability of the textiles based on natural fibers are specially addressed...

  18. Allergic Contact Dermatitis Induced by Textile Necklace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uffe Nygaard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Allergic contact dermatitis to textile dyes is considered to be a rare phenomenon. A recent review reported a prevalence of contact allergy to disperse dyes between 0.4 and 6.7%. The relevance of positive patch testing was not reported in all studies. Textile dye allergy is easily overlooked and is furthermore challenging to investigate as textile dyes are not labelled on clothing. In this report, we present a case of allergic contact dermatitis to a textile necklace. The patch test showed strong reactions to the necklace and the azo dyes Disperse Orange 1 and Disperse Yellow 3. Despite the European legislation and the reduced use of disperse dyes in Third World countries, disperse azo dyes still induce new cases of allergic contact dermatitis.

  19. Possibilities and applications of smart textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotari Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of creating of new clothing products, the designers choose textiles which have: appearance, comfort, durability, shape retention, protection from bad weather, etc. These aspects not fully satisfy the new factors, such automatic regulation of body temperature; signs of heart attack; fever and others. Smart textiles possess such advanced properties. The functionality of smart textiles consists in informing, protecting and relaxing the wearer. In this research, we approached and revealed the application of e-textile materials and their importance in clothing. The research methodology consists in the efficacy of applying Cu wires to the fabric and the result obtained. The results obtained are positive and they are revealed in the research.

  20. Green piezoelectric for autonomous smart textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, E.; Borsa, C. J.; Briand, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the fabrication of Rochelle salt based piezoelectric textiles are shown. Structures composed of fibers and Rochelle salt are easily produced using green processes. Both manufacturing and the material itself are really efficient in terms of environmental impact, considering the fabrication processes and the material resources involved. Additionally Rochelle salt is biocompatible. In this green paradigm, active sensing or actuating textiles are developed. Thus processing method and piezoelectric properties have been studied: (1) pure crystals are used as acoustic actuator, (2) fabrication of the textile-based composite is detailed, (3) converse effective d33 is evaluated and compared to lead zirconate titanate ceramic. The utility of textile-based piezoelectric merits its use in a wide array of applications.

  1. Total design for textile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafirova Koleta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Product development is less than 20-30 years old and a relatively new area of research compared to the other classic academic disciplines. Integrated product development is a philosophy that systematically employs the teaming of functional disciplines to integrate and concurrently apple all the necessary processes to produce an effective and efficient product that satisfies customer needs. Product development might also be understood as a multidisciplinary field of research. The disciplines directly participating in product development include engineering design, innovation, manufacturing, marketing and management. A background contribution is also generated by disciplines such as psychology, social sciences and information technology. This article is an overview that introduces this philosophy to textile product development.

  2. TEXTILE IMPACT PLATES FOR NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VISILEANU Emilia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents textile materials with destination impact plates, having different surface architectures and active treatments for functionalization, with influence upon the aging process of nano-Ag and nano-CeO2. The woven and knitted samples from 100% cotton, cotton/PES blend and 100% PES were treated by impregnation on the laboratory padding machine, drying and condensing on the machine for drying-condensing-heat setting, with the following recipes: 50g/l RUCOSTAR EEE6+20 ml 5% nano-Ag dispersion, or 10% nano-CeO2 in ethylene glycol, respectively water and 0,5ml acetic acid 60% for products from 100% cotton and PES/cotton and 50g/l NUVA N 2114 liquid with the same percent of nanoparticles but with 1 ml/l acetic acid 60%, in case of 100% PES samples. The samples were treated in 2 steps – hydrophobic/ oleo phobic in the first stage and hydrophobic/ oleo phobic/ functionalization with nano-Ag and nano-CeO2 in the second stage. The complex characterization of both type of materials : hydrophobic and oleo phobic properties, color change, whitening degree, DCS, FT-IR, SEM and microbiology, evidenced through the obtained results the justness of the selection for: the raw materials (100% cotton, cotton/PES, 100% PES, the weave (plain, twill, rib, pique, the fabric tightness and fabric cover etc. These data allowed the elaboration of textile material’s specifications for impact plates.

  3. Characterization of Textile-Insulated Capacitive Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charn Loong; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2017-01-01

    Capacitive biosensors are an emerging technology revolutionizing wearable sensing systems and personal healthcare devices. They are capable of continuously measuring bioelectrical signals from the human body while utilizing textiles as an insulator. Different textile types have their own unique properties that alter skin-electrode capacitance and the performance of capacitive biosensors. This paper aims to identify the best textile insulator to be used with capacitive biosensors by analysing the characteristics of 6 types of common textile materials (cotton, linen, rayon, nylon, polyester, and PVC-textile) while evaluating their impact on the performance of a capacitive biosensor. A textile-insulated capacitive (TEX-C) biosensor was developed and validated on 3 subjects. Experimental results revealed that higher skin-electrode capacitance of a TEX-C biosensor yields a lower noise floor and better signal quality. Natural fabric such as cotton and linen were the two best insulating materials to integrate with a capacitive biosensor. They yielded the lowest noise floor of 2 mV and achieved consistent electromyography (EMG) signals measurements throughout the performance test. PMID:28287493

  4. Characterization of Textile-Insulated Capacitive Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charn Loong; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2017-03-12

    Capacitive biosensors are an emerging technology revolutionizing wearable sensing systems and personal healthcare devices. They are capable of continuously measuring bioelectrical signals from the human body while utilizing textiles as an insulator. Different textile types have their own unique properties that alter skin-electrode capacitance and the performance of capacitive biosensors. This paper aims to identify the best textile insulator to be used with capacitive biosensors by analysing the characteristics of 6 types of common textile materials (cotton, linen, rayon, nylon, polyester, and PVC-textile) while evaluating their impact on the performance of a capacitive biosensor. A textile-insulated capacitive (TEX-C) biosensor was developed and validated on 3 subjects. Experimental results revealed that higher skin-electrode capacitance of a TEX-C biosensor yields a lower noise floor and better signal quality. Natural fabric such as cotton and linen were the two best insulating materials to integrate with a capacitive biosensor. They yielded the lowest noise floor of 2 mV and achieved consistent electromyography (EMG) signals measurements throughout the performance test.

  5. Greensilica® vectors for smart textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Joana C; Avelar, Inês; Martins, M Bárbara F; Gonçalves, M Clara

    2017-01-20

    The present work aims developing a versatile Greensilica® vector/carrier, able to bind to a wide range of textile matrices of carbohydrate polymers and susceptible of being loaded with chemicals/drugs/therapeutic molecules, to create a green tailor-made (multi)functional high-tech textile. A green, eco-friendly, ammonia-free, easily scalable, time-saving sol-gel process was established for the production of those silica-based colloidal particles (SiO2, amine-SiO2, diamine-SiO2, and epoxy-SiO2). Two different textile matrices (cotton, polyester) were functionalized, through the impregnation of Greensilica® particles. The impregnation was performed with and without cure. Diamine-SiO2 colloidal particles exhibited the higher bonding efficiency in cured textile matrices (both cotton and polyester), while with no cure the best adherence to cotton and polyester textile matrices was achieved with diamine-SiO2 and amine-SiO2, respectively. Use once and throw away and continued use applications were envisaged and screened through washing tests. The efficiency of the textiles impregnation was confirmed by SEM, and quantified by ICP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UROŠEVIĆ Snežana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is a very important industrial branch because it produces clothes for nearly seven billion people and textile materials for technical usage. It employs a huge number of competitive and qualified, mostly female work force. It is also technologically and technically challenging. Thus, it is vital to employ qualified and well trained employees with certain competences, knowledge and skills in order to respond to rapid technological and market changes. Here, we will consider the influence of the career development on doing business in the textile industry while acquiring the competitive advantage. Career development is a lifelong process and it is includes knowledge management. The term career has several meanings while nowadays it can mean advancement. The career usually reflects the professional development path of an individual during his or her working career. The career is that concept which connects and unifies most strongly and explicitly individual and organizational interests and needs. The theoretical part explains terms such as career development, importance and improvement of employees for an organization, the possibility for career development within the textile industry. The second part of the paper deals with research conducted among the employees of the textile sector in Leskovac, the town in Serbia with a long-lasting textile tradition.

  7. Research and development in the textile industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1987-06-01

    Included in the portfolio of IP's projects are the R and D activities for several advanced technologies targeted at the textile industry, one of the top ten energy intensive industries in the country. These R and D projects have primarily been aimed at improving the energy efficiency and productivity of textile production processes. Many projects in this area have been successfully completed, and some have resulted in the development and implementation of new technologies (e.g., foam processing) for various process steps. Other projects have produced technical results that have later been utilized by the industry in other capacities (e.g., hyperfiltration). Several projects at various stages of development are currently underway. This brochure describes the Office of Industrial Programs' R and D activities relevant to the textile industry. The brochure is comprised of the following: Industry Update, Energy Consumption in the Textile Industry, Energy Consumption in the Textile Industry, Potential Energy Savings in the Textile Industry, Office of Industrial Programs, R and D Efforts, and R and D Data Base.

  8. Wearable electronics formed on intermediate layer on textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-07-27

    One manner of producing more desirable clothing with electronic capabilities is to manufacture electronics, such as the charging wires or devices themselves, directly onto the textile materials. Textile materials generally do not support the manufacturing of electronic devices, in part because the surface of the textile is too rough for electronic devices or the processes used to manufacturing electronic devices. An intermediate layer (204) may be placed on the textile material (202) to reduce the roughness of the surface of the textile material and provide other beneficial characteristics for the placement of electronic devices (206) directly on the textile material.

  9. Resource Communication Technology and Marketing of Textile Products: A U.S. Textile Industry Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baah, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the qualitative positivistic case study was to explore whether resource communication technology has helped or would help the marketing of textile products in the U.S. textile industry. The contributions of human capital in the marketing department, the marketing-demand information system function, and the product supply chain…

  10. Coping with arsenic-based pesticides on Dine (Navajo) textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jae R.

    Arsenic-based pesticide residues have been detected on Arizona State Museum's (ASM) Dine (Navajo) textile collection using a handheld portable X-ray (pXRF) spectrometer. The removal of this toxic pesticide from historic textiles in museums collections is necessary to reduce potential health risks to Native American communities, museum professionals, and visitors. The research objective was divided into three interconnected stages: (1) empirically calibrate the pXRF instrument for arsenic contaminated cotton and wool textiles; (2) engineer an aqueous washing treatment exploring the effects of time, temperature, agitation, and pH conditions to efficiently remove arsenic from wool textiles while minimizing damage to the structure and properties of the textile; (3) demonstrate the devised aqueous washing treatment method on three historic Navajo textiles known to have arsenic-based pesticide residues. The preliminary results removed 96% of arsenic from a high arsenic concentration (~1000 ppm) textile opposed to minimal change for low arsenic concentration textiles (<100 ppm).

  11. Submicrometre particle filtration with a dc activated plasma textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasipuram, S. C.; Wu, M.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Levine, J. F.; Jasper, W. J.; Saveliev, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma textiles are novel fabrics incorporating the advantages of cold plasma and low-cost non-woven or woven textile fabrics. In plasma textiles, electrodes are integrated into the fabric, and a corona discharge is activated within and on the surface of the fabric by applying high voltages above 10 kV between the electrodes. When the plasma textile is activated, submicrometre particles approaching the textile are charged by the deposition of ions and electrons produced by the corona, and then collected by the textile material. A stable plasma discharge was experimentally verified on the surface of the textile that was locally smooth but not rigid. A filtration efficiency close to 100% was observed in experiments conducted on salt particles with diameters ranging from 50 to 300 nm. Unlike conventional fibrous filters, the plasma textile provided uniform filtration in this range, without exhibiting a maximum particle penetration size.

  12. Properties of Matter of Awa Textile from Linden Bark

    OpenAIRE

    宮本, 栞; 山下, そのみ

    2003-01-01

    The fabric structure, the mechanical properties and the sanitary properties of Awa textile from linden bark were compared with those of shirting and linen cloth. The form of fiber of weaving yarns of Awa textile from linden bark was observed by a scanning electron microscope. The change in whiteness of Awa textile with washing times through colorimetry. The results obtained were as followed. 1) Awa textile resembled linen cloth in the fiber surface and shirting in the fiber cross section. But...

  13. Methods for waste waters treatment in textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Zezova, Silvana; Spasova, Sanja; Golomeova, Saska

    2014-01-01

    The processes of production of textiles or wet treatments and finishing processes of textile materials are huge consumers of water with high quality. As a result of these various processes, considerable amounts of polluted water are released. This paper puts emphasis on the problem of environmental protection against waste waters generated by textile industry. The methods of pretreatment or purification of waste waters in the textile industry can be: Primary (screening, sedimentation, homo...

  14. Electrical Textile Valves for Paper Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainla, Alar; Hamedi, Mahiar M; Güder, Firat; Whitesides, George M

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes electrically-activated fluidic valves that operate based on electrowetting through textiles. The valves are fabricated from electrically conductive, insulated, hydrophobic textiles, but the concept can be extended to other porous materials. When the valve is closed, the liquid cannot pass through the hydrophobic textile. Upon application of a potential (in the range of 100-1000 V) between the textile and the liquid, the valve opens and the liquid penetrates the textile. These valves actuate in less than 1 s, require low energy (≈27 µJ per actuation), and work with a variety of aqueous solutions, including those with low surface tension and those containing bioanalytes. They are bistable in function, and are, in a sense, the electrofluidic analog of thyristors. They can be integrated into paper microfluidic devices to make circuits that are capable of controlling liquid, including autonomous fluidic timers and fluidic logic. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Supercritical water oxidation treatment of textile sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shuzhong; Li, Yanhui; Lu, Jinling; Chen, Senlin; Luo, XingQi

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we studied the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of the textile sludge, the hydrothermal conversion of typical textile compounds and the corrosion properties of stainless steel 316. Moreover, the influence mechanisms of NaOH during these related processes were explored. The results show that decomposition efficiency for organic matter in liquid phase of the textile sludge was improved with the increment of reaction temperature or oxidation coefficient. However, the organic substance in solid phase can be oxidized completely in supercritical water. Serious coking occurred during the high pressure water at 250-450°C for the Reactive Orange 7, while at 300 and 350°C for the polyvinyl alcohol. The addition of NaOH not only accelerated the destruction of organic contaminants in the SCWO reactor, but effectively inhibited the dehydration conversion of textile compounds during the preheating process, which was favorable for the treatment system of textile sludge. The corrosion experiment results indicate that the stainless steel 316 could be competent for the body materials of the reactor and the heat exchangers. Furthermore, there was prominent enhancement of sodium hydroxide for the corrosion resistance of 316 in subcritical water. On the contrary the effect was almost none during SCWO.

  16. Development and characterization of textile batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, M.; Grethe, T.; Schwarz-Pfeiffer, A.; Ehrmann, A.

    2017-02-01

    During the past years, smart textiles have gained more and more attention. Products cover a broad range of possible applications, from fashion items such as LED garments to sensory shirts detecting vital signs to clothes with included electrical stimulation of muscles. For all electrical or electronic features included in garments, a power supply is needed - which is usually the bottleneck in the development of smart textiles, since common power supplies are not flexible and often not lightweight, prohibiting their unobtrusive integration in electronic textiles. In a recent project, textile-based batteries are developed. For this, metallized woven fabrics (e.g. copper, zinc, or silver) are used in combinations with carbon fabrics. The article gives an overview of our recent advances in optimizing power storage capacity and durability of the textile batteries by tailoring the gel-electrolyte. The gel-electrolyte is modified with respect to thickness and electrolyte concentration; additionally, the influence of additives on the long-time stability of the batteries is examined.

  17. Dermatophyte susceptibility varies towards antimicrobial textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Timo R; Mucha, Helmut; Hoefer, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Dermatophytoses are a widespread problem worldwide. Textiles in contact with infected skin can serve as a carrier for fungus propagation. Hitherto, it is unknown, whether antifungal textiles could contribute in controlling dermatophytes e.g. by disrupting the chain of infection. Testing of antimicrobial fabrics for their antifungal activities therefore is a fundamental prerequisite to assess the putative clinical relevance of textiles for dermatophyte prevention. Fabrics finished with either didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), poly-hexamethylenbiguanide, copper and two silver chloride concentrations were tested for their antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Candida albicans. To prove dermatophyte susceptibility towards the textiles, swatches were subjected to DIN EN 14199 (Trichophyton sp.) or DIN EN ISO 20743 (C. albicans) respectively. In addition, samples were embedded, and semi-thin sections were analysed microscopically. While all samples showed a clear inhibition of C. albicans, activity against Trichophyton sp. varied significantly: For example, DDAC completely inhibited T. rubrum growth, whereas T. mentagrophytes growth remained unaffected even in direct contact to the fibres. The results favour to add T. mentagrophytes as a test organism in textile dermatophyte efficacy tests. Microscopic analysis of swatches allowed detailed evaluation of additional parameters like mycelium thickness, density and hyphae penetration depth into the fabric. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. TEXTILE SURFACE MODIFICATION BY PYHSICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION – (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUCE Ismail

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile products are used in various branches of the industry from automotive to space products. Textiles produced for industrial use are generally referred to as technical textiles. Technical textiles are nowadays applied to several areas including transportation, medicine, agriculture, protection, sports, packaging, civil engineering and industry. There are rapid developments in the types of materials used in technical textiles. Therefore, modification and functionalization of textile surfaces is becoming more crucial. The improvements of the properties such as anti-bacterial properties, fire resistivity, UV radiation resistance, electrical conductivity, self cleaning, and super hydrophobic, is getting more concern with respect to developments in textile engineering. The properties of textile surfaces are closely related to the fiber structure, the differences in the polymer composition, the fiber mixture ratio, and the physical and chemical processes applied. Textile surface modifications can be examined in four groups under the name mechanical, chemical, burning and plasma. Surface modifications are made to improve the functionality of textile products. Textile surface modifications affect the properties of the products such as softness, adhesion and wettability. The purpose of this work is to reveal varieties of vapor deposition modifications to improve functionality. For this purpose, the pyhsical vapor deposition methods, their affects on textile products and their end-uses will be reviewed.

  19. Failure modes of conducting yarns in electronic-textile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M. de; Vries, H. de; Pacheco, K.; Heck, G. van

    2015-01-01

    Integration of electronic functionalities into textiles adds to the value of textiles. It allows measuring, detecting, actuating and treating or communicating with a body or object. These added values can render the smart textiles very useful, fun, supporting, protecting or even lifesaving. It is,

  20. Aerobic Bacterial degraders in effluent from Itoku textile industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The local textile industry in Itokun village is one major textile industry in Abeokuta Ogun state, known for “adire” production whose processes are not maintained at regulatory standards. This study involves isolating and identifying aerobic microorganisms in waste water effluents from this textile Industry and screening for ...

  1. Nettle as a distinct Bronze Age textile plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergfjord, C.; Mannering, Ulla; Frei, Karin Margarita

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the production of plant fibre textiles in ancient Europe, especially woven textiles for clothing, was closely linked to the development of agriculture through the use of cultivated textile plants (flax, hemp). Here we present a new investigation of the 2800 year old...

  2. Woven sculptural piece as added dimension to textile design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Woven sculptural piece as added dimension to textile design. ... Mgbakoigba: Journal of African Studies ... However, if adequate attention is given to it, it can be combined with other textile materials, independently to create desirable design, which can compete favorably in the international textile and arts market. Keywords: ...

  3. 19 CFR 11.12b - Labeling textile fiber products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling textile fiber products. 11.12b Section 11... THE TREASURY PACKING AND STAMPING; MARKING Marking § 11.12b Labeling textile fiber products. (a) Textile fiber products imported into the United States shall be labeled or marked in accordance with the...

  4. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.12 Trimmings of household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household...

  5. 19 CFR 10.771 - Textile or apparel goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile or apparel goods. 10.771 Section 10.771... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.771 Textile or apparel goods. (a) De minimis. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, a textile or apparel good that is not an originating good under the MFTA...

  6. 19 CFR 102.21 - Textile and apparel products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel products. 102.21 Section 102... THE TREASURY RULES OF ORIGIN Rules of Origin § 102.21 Textile and apparel products. (a) Applicability... control the determination of the country of origin of imported textile and apparel products for purposes...

  7. 19 CFR 10.811 - Textile or apparel goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile or apparel goods. 10.811 Section 10.811... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.811 Textile or apparel goods. (a) De minimis—(1) General. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a textile or apparel good that is not an originating good under...

  8. Multilevel modelling of mechanical properties of textile composites: ITOOL Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broucke, Bjorn; Drechsler, Klaus; Hanisch, Vera; Hartung, Daniel; Ivanov, Dimitry S.; Koysin, V.; Lomov, Stepan V.; Middendorf, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the multi-level modelling of textile composites in the ITOOL project, focusing on the models of textile reinforcements, which serve as a basis for micromechanical models of textile composites on the unit cell level. The modelling is performed using finite element

  9. Fibrous and textile materials for composite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fangueiro, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the fibers and textiles used in composite materials. It presents both existing technologies currently used in commercial applications and the latest advanced research and developments. It also discusses the different fiber forms and architectures, such as short fibers, unidirectional tows, directionally oriented structures or advanced 2D- and 3D-textile structures that are used in composite materials. In addition, it examines various synthetic, natural and metallic fibers that are used to reinforce polymeric, cementitious and metallic matrices, as well as fiber properties, special functionalities, manufacturing processes, and composite processing and properties. Two entire chapters are dedicated to advanced nanofiber and nanotube reinforced composite materials. The book goes on to highlight different surface treatments and finishes that are applied to improve fiber/matrix interfaces and other essential composite properties. Although a great deal of information about fibers and textile str...

  10. Wearable Textile Electrodes for ECG Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiogram (ECG is one of the most important parameters for monitoring of the physiological state of a person. Currently available systems for ECG monitoring are both stationary and wearable, but the comfort of the monitored person is not at a satisfactory level because these systems are not part of standard clothing. This article is therefore devoted to the development and measurement of wearable textile electrodes for ECG measurement device with high comfort for the user. The electrode material is made of electrically conductive textile. This creates a textile composite that guarantees high comfort for the user while ensuring good quality of ECG measurements. The composite is implemented by a carrier (a T-shirt with flame retardant and sensing electrodes embroidered with yarn based on a mixture of polyester coated with silver nanoparticles and cotton. The electrodes not only provide great comfort but are also antibacterial and antiallergic due to silver nanoparticles.

  11. How Associative Material Characteristics Create Textile Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasling, Karen Marie; Bang, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    and meanings. As educators of future designers we are concerned with teaching students, how to develop and use materials for ‘future design’ in a way that embrace multiple properties, including aesthetic, technical, functional and sustainable concerns. In this study we are specifically concerned......Product design, and especially relevant for this study textiles design, is concerned with designing not only the product itself, but just as much the material, which forms the product. It is further highly relevant that designers relate their materials and product to an existing context...... materials and to reflect on, how personal associations can be embodied in [textile] materials. The discussion and results of the study stressed the coherence and differences of textile techniques used to express the given keywords and how the assignment has influenced the students’ material practice. How...

  12. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-09-29

    The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

  13. Smart Textiles in Humanistic Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe; Fisker, Anna Marie; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalised patients’ healing process, supported by stimulating architecture. In this regard, we address focus on the potential influence of the design principle, discussing how healing architecture may contribute in making the future hospital institutions more responsive to human needs. The main...... of some of the stakeholders involved in the design process? Relating to the Danish scene of hospital design, we introduce the research project “Smart Textiles in Future Hospitals”, stating the overall hypothesis that textiles in hospital interiors possess an unexploited architectural potential in relation...

  14. A New ‘T’ for Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earley, Rebecca; Vuletich, Clara; Hadridge, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The paper is based on a training programme given to researchers in the Textiles Environment Design (TED) project at the University of the Arts London (UAL). The programme took place over three years (September 2010 to October 2013) whilst the researchers were engaged as consultants and researchers...... sustainable design strategies for textiles and fashion was the framework for the Sustainable Design Inspiration (SDI) work at H&M – a broad and holistic approach to redesigning products including materials, process, systems, services, consumer behaviour and activism....

  15. TEXTILE PATTERNS BASED ON ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ORNAMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElSayed ElNashar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A developed digital collection of textile patterns is presented Iin the report. As objects in this collection designed modern textile prints developed on the basis of elements of ancient Egyptian costume are included. Software tools are developed to obtain colors, shapes and descriptions of the used ancient Egyptian elements. The resulting elements are in vector format, and can be used in CAD systems and spreadsheets. Descriptions of these motifs can be used for comparison with such elements from other national costumes.

  16. Antioxidant cosmeto-textiles: skin assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina; Martí, Meritxell; Martínez, Vanessa; Rubio, Laia; Parra, José L; Coderch, Luisa

    2013-05-01

    Resveratrol, a natural product, has been reported to have antioxidant activities such as the scavenging of free radicals. This compound could be used in the dermocosmetic field to protect the skin from oxidative stress. In this work, the percutaneous profile of resveratrol in ethanol solutions through pig skin was determinated by an in vitro methodology. The percutaneous absorption of resveratrol was measured and compared with trolox, an analogous of Vitamin E. Both antioxidants were found in all skin sections (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis). Besides, the free radical scavenging activity of resveratrol and trolox has been evaluated using DPPH method. The effective dose (ED₅₀) of compounds and DPPH radical inhibition in each skin layer were evaluated. Under the conditions used for these experiments, it can be deduced that resveratrol is more efficient than trolox as an antioxidant, also in the inner skin layers. The cosmeto-textiles with an active substance incorporated into their structure are increasingly used in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. The action of several cosmeto-textiles on the skin was assessed by in vitro and in vivo methodologies. Samples of these cosmeto-textiles were prepared with resveratrol incorporated into cotton and polyamide fabrics. An in vitro percutaneous absorption was used to demonstrate the delivery of the resveratrol from the textile to the different skin layers (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis). Additionally, these cosmeto-textiles containing the antioxidant were applied onto the forearms of volunteers to evaluate the textiles' efficacy in skin penetration. The antioxidant's antiradical capacity was evaluated using the DPPH method. Results showed that resveratrol could be detected in the dermis, epidermis, and stratum corneum (SC) by an in vitro percutaneous absorption method and was also detected in the outermost layers of the SC by an in vivo method (stripping). A smaller amount of resveratrol was

  17. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobials for textile applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Lena; Height, Murray; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Many antimicrobial technologies are available for textiles. They may be used in many different textile applications to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Due to the biological activity of the antimicrobial compounds, the assessment of the safety of these substances is an ongoing subject of research and regulatory scrutiny. This review aims to give an overview on the main compounds used today for antimicrobial textile functionalization. Based on an evaluation of scientific publications, market data as well as regulatory documents, the potential effects of antimicrobials on the environment and on human health were considered and also life cycle perspectives were taken into account. The characteristics of each compound were summarized according to technical, environmental and human health criteria. Triclosan, silane quaternary ammonium compounds, zinc pyrithione and silver-based compounds are the main antimicrobials used in textiles. The synthetic organic compounds dominate the antimicrobials market on a weight basis. On the technical side the application rates of the antimicrobials used to functionalize a textile product are an important parameter with treatments requiring lower dosage rates offering clear benefits in terms of less active substance required to achieve the functionality. The durability of the antimicrobial treatment has a strong influence on the potential for release and subsequent environmental effects. In terms of environmental criteria, all compounds were rated similarly in effective removal in wastewater treatment processes. The extent of published information about environmental behavior for each compound varies, limiting the possibility for an in-depth comparison of all textile-relevant parameters across the antimicrobials. Nevertheless the comparative evaluation showed that each antimicrobial technology has specific risks and benefits that should be taken into account in evaluating the suitability of different antimicrobial products. The

  18. Design Management in the Textile Industry - A Network Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul Rind; Bang, Anne Louise

    In this paper we explore textile design activities and textile design management from an industrial network perspective. The textile industry is probably one of the most globalized manufacturing industries in the world and thus one of the most dispersed industries on the globe. Most studies...... on design management are framed inside the organisational context of the firm. In this study the role and practice of textile design is addressed in perspective of the global textile production network. The empirical data stems from six case studies exploring how different types of enterprises are organised...

  19. Functional textiles driven by transforming NiTi wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heller Luděk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over last ten years, we have carried out extensive research on the use of thin NiTi wires for advanced functional textiles. In this work we discuss general challenges and opportunities in the design, production and processing of NiTi textiles stemming from the fact that NiTi is martensitically transforming metal. As a case example, application of weft knitting technology to NiTi wires is discussed in detail covering technological aspects related to textile processing, shape setting as well as multiaxial thermomechanical properties of final products. Finally, two weft knitted NiTi textile proof-of-concepts with a promising application potential are presented. First, a textile based actuator with large strokes and low forces characteristics is introduced. Second, 3D textiles with temperature-adaptive cross-section height for applications in technical or protective textiles are described.

  20. Role of alginate in antibacterial finishing of textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; He, Jinmei; Huang, Yudong

    2017-01-01

    Antibacterial finishing of textiles has been introduced as a necessary process for various purposes especially creating a fabric with antimicrobial activities. Currently, the textile industry continues to look for textiles antimicrobial finishing process based on sustainable biopolymers from the viewpoints of environmental friendliness, industrialization, and economic concerns. This paper reviews the role of alginate, a sustainable biopolymer, in the development of antimicrobial textiles, including both basic physicochemical properties of alginate such as preparation, chemical structure, molecular weight, solubility, viscosity, and sol-gel transformation property. Then different processing routes (e.g. nanocomposite coating, ionic cross-linking coating, and Layer-by-Layer coating) for the antibacterial finishing of textiles by using alginate are revised in some detail. The achievements in this area have increased our knowledge of alginate application in the field of textile industry and promoted the development of green textile finishing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textiles finished with siloxane sulfopropylbetaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Xiong, Meiling; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a novel environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textile finished with reactive siloxane sulfopropylbetaine(SSPB). The results show that SSPB can be covalently bound onto the cotton textile surface, imparting perdurable antibacterial activity. The textiles finished with SSPB have been investigated systematically from the mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydrophilic properties and antibacterial properties. It is found that the hydrophilicity and breaking strength are improved greatly after the cotton textiles are finished with SSPB. Additionally, the cotton textiles finished with SSPB exhibit good antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus, ATCC 6538), gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E.coli, 8099) and fungi Candida albicans (C.albicans, ATCC 10231). Moreover, SSPB is nonleachable from the textiles, and it does not induce skin stimulation and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is ideal candidate for environmentally friendly antibacterial textile applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. The future of textile production in high wage countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M.; Gloy, Y.-S.; Gries, T.

    2017-10-01

    It is undisputed that smart production in the context of industry 4.0 offers significant potential for industrial production in Germany. Exploiting this potential provides an opportunity to meet the growing competitive pressure for textile production in high-wage Germany. The complete cross-linking of textile mills towards Textile Production 4.0 means substantial savings. However, currently there are still some challenges that have to be overcome on the long way to Textile Production 4.0. This paper initially reflects the particular challenges of textile production in high-wage Germany. Later, the vision of the future of smart textile production will be outlined. In addition, first pilot solutions and current research approaches which pave the way for Textile Production 4.0 are described.

  3. Environmental Assessment of Textile Material Recovery Techniques : Examining Textile Flows in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Youhanan, Lena

    2013-01-01

    The production of textiles, focusing on cotton and polyester, carries with it major environmental concerns such as significant water and chemical use as well as the use of non-renewable resources. Measures need to be taken to decrease those environmental burdens. The present study investigates four different recovery techniques in terms of specific environmental factors. The investigated recovery methods are the Re:newcell method, polyester recycling, textile to insulation material and biogas...

  4. Health Risk Assessment for Organotins in Textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen PJCM; Veen MP van; Speijers GJA; CSR; LBM

    2000-01-01

    In January 1998 RIVM was asked to carry out a preliminary risk assessment on organic tin compounds (organotins) in textiles. Measurements carried out by the Dutch Health Protection Inspectorate had shown these potentially toxic compounds to be present in several consumer products, including items of

  5. Three-Dimensional Printed Thermal Regulation Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tingting; Yang, Zhi; Chen, Chaoji; Li, Yiju; Fu, Kun; Dai, Jiaqi; Hitz, Emily M; Xie, Hua; Liu, Boyang; Song, Jianwei; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-11-01

    Space cooling is a predominant part of energy consumption in people's daily life. Although cooling the whole building is an effective way to provide personal comfort in hot weather, it is energy-consuming and high-cost. Personal cooling technology, being able to provide personal thermal comfort by directing local heat to the thermally regulated environment, has been regarded as one of the most promising technologies for cooling energy and cost savings. Here, we demonstrate a personal thermal regulated textile using thermally conductive and highly aligned boron nitride (BN)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite (denoted as a-BN/PVA) fibers to improve the thermal transport properties of textiles for personal cooling. The a-BN/PVA composite fibers are fabricated through a fast and scalable three-dimensional (3D) printing method. Uniform dispersion and high alignment of BN nanosheets (BNNSs) can be achieved during the processing of fiber fabrication, leading to a combination of high mechanical strength (355 MPa) and favorable heat dispersion. Due to the improved thermal transport property imparted by the thermally conductive and highly aligned BNNSs, better cooling effect (55% improvement over the commercial cotton fiber) can be realized in the a-BN/PVA textile. The wearable a-BN/PVA textiles containing the 3D-printed a-BN/PVA fibers offer a promising selection for meeting the personal cooling requirement, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption and cost for cooling the whole building.

  6. Textile wastewater biocoagulation by Caesalpinia spinosa extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Revelo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2014/12/06 - Accepted: 2015/03/24The textile industry in Ecuador is still a matter of concern because of the inappropriate disposal of their effluents into the local water supply. The present research was carried out in Pelileo (Tungurahua-Ecuador where textile wastewaters are discharged into waterways. An environmentally friendly solution to treat highly contaminated organic textile wastewaters is herein evaluated: a remediation process of biocoagulation was performed using extracts from the Caesalpinia spinosa plant also known as guarango or tara. It was determined that using C. spinosa extracts to treat wastewater has the same statistical effect as when applying a chemical coagulant (polyaluminum chloride 15%. Activated zeolite adsorbed color residuals from treated water to obtain turbidity removal more than 90%. A mathematical model showed that turbidity removal between 50-90% can be obtained by applying 25-45 g/L of guarango extracts and zeolite per 700 mL of textile wastewater. The natural coagulation using C. spinosa extracts produced 85% less sludge than polyaluminum chloride, and removed high organic matter content in the wastewater (1050 mg/L by 52%.

  7. COLOR POLLUTION CONTROL IN TEXTILE DYEING INDUSTRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    E-mail: ssreedharreddy@yahoo.com. COLOR POLLUTION CONTROL IN TEXTILE DYEING INDUSTRY EFFLUENTS. USING TANNERY SLUDGE DERIVED ACTIVATED CARBON. Sajjala Sreedhar Reddy1∗, Bijjam Kotaiah2 and Nanaga Siva Prasad Reddy3. 1Adama University, Faculty of Technology, Post Box No. 1888 ...

  8. Robust fabric substrates for photonic textile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Pieterson, L.; Bouten, P.C.P.; Kriege, J.C.; Bhattacharya, R.

    2010-01-01

    A fabric substrate is described for electronic textile with robust interwoven connections between the conductive yarns in it. The fabric's robustness, as a function of the electrical reliability of its conductive yarn connections, is shown to hold over large deformations.This fabric is then used to

  9. Strain mapping analysis of textile composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, Dimitry; Ivanov, S.; Lomov, Stepan; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the work is meso-scale analysis (scale level of the fabric unit cell) of textile composite deformation and failure. The surface strain measurement is used for: (1) experimental investigation, which includes study of strain distribution at various stages of deformation, plasticity

  10. Masters and Apprentices of Textile Craft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelie Holmberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how the craftsmen at the workroom at Handarbetets vänner, Stockholm, learned their craft skills during the years 1948‒2012. What this knowledge consisted of and how the apprentices’ knowledge grows into skillfulness. Interviews with 15 weavers and embroiderers who have worked during the time period form the empirical material. The period of time was chosen according to the informants´ times of employment.The strategies for learning are affected by dialogue between the craftsmen, both a verbal and a silent dialogue. The dialogue is an important part of the learning even though the making is central. The workroom forms its own way of making textile art, a way of doing that is learned from master to apprentice. In this situated knowledge, the different masters have their own ways of for instance mixing color and material, all corresponding with core values. The learning is also affected by the artistic leader and the artist.The learning within the workroom occurs in the making of objects, but never at the cost of the quality of the objects. The core values of the establishments, and the fact that there is a strive to be profitable, makes the circumstances. The collaboration with the artist in creating unique textile art is the primary goal; the learning is something that is taken for granted in order to withhold the competence in the establishment.Keywords: textile craft, master and apprentice, craftsmen, textile art, workroom

  11. Contactless EMG sensors embroidered into textile

    OpenAIRE

    Linz, Torsten; Gourmelon, L.; Langereis, G.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain maximum unobtrusiveness with sensors for monitoring health parameters on the human body, two technical solutions are combined. First we propose contactless sensors for capacitive electromyography measurements. Secondly, the sensors are integrated into textile, so complete fusion with a wearable garment is enabled. We are presenting the first successful measurements with such sensors.

  12. Textile finishing chemicals: an industrial guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flick, Ernest W

    1990-01-01

    ..., hand modifiers, antistatic agents, biocides, fixatives, scouring agents, leveling agents, dispersants, defoamers, anticracking agents, binders, lubricating agents, stiffeners, and sequestering agents. The chemicals may constitute a substantial portion of the finished textile. In many cases 10% or more of the fabric's final weight may derive fro...

  13. State Skill Standards: Fashion, Textiles and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rene Crepaldi; Gaudy, Glenna; Green-Jobe, Victoria; Hatch, Susan; Moen, Julianne; Sheldon, Shannon; Smith, Loree; Chessell, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The mission of Fashion, Textiles and Design Education is to prepare students for family and community life and careers in the fashion industry by creating opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors needed to: (1) Examine skills needed to effectively manage clothing decisions; (2) Evaluate the use, care and production…

  14. Microbial degradation of textile industrial effluents | Palamthodi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the in situ degradation of textile industrial effluent was carried out. The degradation of two different dyes, blue and green colour has ... The degradation of dye was confirmed via the decolourisation assay and by the measurement of COD and BOD values. A trickling bed reactor was designed and the treatment of ...

  15. Biotechnology In The Mauritian Textile Industry | Kistamah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Mauritius Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1 (1998) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Biotechnology In The Mauritian Textile Industry. N Kistamah, S Rosunee ...

  16. Friction in textile thermoplastic composites forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko; ten Thije, R.H.W.; Sachs, Ulrich; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Binetruy, C.; Boussu, F.

    2010-01-01

    A previously developed mesoscopic friction model for glass/PP textile composite laminates during forming is evaluated for glass and carbon/PPS laminates, at higher temperatures and lower viscosities than before. Experiments were performed for tool/ply and ply/ply configurations in a new friction

  17. Recycling of textiles: the South African scene *

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seugnet

    image of plastics, 1992). Larney et al (1996) recommended that a study should be undertaken to assess the situation regarding the recycling of textiles in South Africa, a study that they undertook shortly afterwards. This study is reported in this article. OBJECTIVES. The specific objectives of the study were to investigate.

  18. NASA CPAS Drogue Textile Riser Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Elsa J.; Petersen, Michael L.; Anderson, Brian; Johnson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Steel cable was chosen for the lower end of the drogue and main parachute risers on NASA's Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) to protect the risers from extreme temperatures and abrasion should they contact the crew module during deployment, as was done for Apollo. Due to the weight and deployment complexity inherent in steel, there was significant interest in the possibility of substituting textile for steel for the drogue and main parachute risers. However, textile risers could be damaged when subjected to high temperature and abrasion. Investigations were consequently performed by a subset of the authors to determine whether sacrificial, non-load-bearing textile riser covers could be developed to mitigate the thermal and abrasion concerns. Multiple material combinations were tested, resulting in a cover design capable of protecting the riser against severe riser/crew module contact interactions. A feasibility study was then conducted to evaluate the performance of the textile drogue riser cover in relevant abrasive environments. This paper describes the testing performed and documents the results of this feasibility study.

  19. Characterization of textile electrodes and conductors using standardized measurement setups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, L; Neuhaus, C; Medrano, G; Jungbecker, N; Walter, M; Gries, T; Leonhardt, S

    2010-02-01

    Textile electrodes and conductors are being developed and used in different monitoring scenarios, such as ECG or bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements. Compared to standard materials, conductive textile materials offer improved wearing comfort and enable long-term measurements. Unfortunately, the development and investigation of such materials often suffers from the non-reproducibility of the test scenarios. For example, the materials are generally tested on human skin which is difficult since the properties of human skin differ for each person and can change within hours. This study presents two test setups which offer reproducible measurement procedures for the systematic analysis of textile electrodes and conductors. The electrode test setup was designed with a special skin dummy which allows investigation of not only the electrical properties of textile electrodes but also the contact behavior between electrode and skin. Using both test setups, eight textile electrodes and five textile conductors were analyzed and compared.

  20. Stretchable biofuel cell with enzyme-modified conductive textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yudai; Takai, Yuki; Kato, Yuto; Kai, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Takeo; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko

    2015-12-15

    A sheet-type, stretchable biofuel cell was developed by laminating three components: a bioanode textile for fructose oxidation, a hydrogel sheet containing fructose as fuel, and a gas-diffusion biocathode textile for oxygen reduction. The anode and cathode textiles were prepared by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT)-decorated stretchable textiles with fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) and bilirubin oxidase (BOD), respectively. Enzymatic reaction currents of anode and cathode textiles were stable for 30 cycles of 50% stretching, with initial loss of 20-30% in the first few cycles due to the partial breaking of the CNT network at the junction of textile fibers. The assembled laminate biofuel cell showed power of ~0.2 mW/cm(2) with 1.2 kΩ load, which was stable even at stretched, twisted, and wrapped forms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Health and safety aspects of textile workers from Solapur (India textile industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul B Hiremath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Textile sector in India plays an important role in the country's economy, providing employment to a significant population in rural and urban areas. Objectives: This paper focuses on health and safety aspects of textile workers in Solapur City (one of the key textile cluster in the state of Maharashtra, India. Methodology: A sample of 180 workers from the identified textile industries of Solapur city were assessed for their general physique, muscle tone, lung condition, and eyesight using different techniques. The study aimed at developing a framework for understanding risks to textile workers resulting from lack of health and safety standards in companies. Results: Findings showed that most of the workers have been affected by respiratory problems, increase in muscle tone, eye problems and musculoskeletal problem. It has been also observed that job security or regular work impacts positively to the worker’s long term body health. However, there is an immediate need to adopt and implement measures in accordance with Indian Factories Act (OHSAS 18001/ILO-OSH 2001 which includes directions and procedures in respect of industrial installations, work environment and occupational health and safety guidelines.

  2. Textile-based sampling for potentiometric determination of ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Arnebrant, Thomas; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Bobacka, Johan

    2015-06-02

    Potentiometric sensing utilizing textile-based micro-volume sampling was applied and evaluated for the determination of clinically (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)) and environmentally (Cd(2+), Pb(2+) and pH) relevant analytes. In this technological design, calibration solutions and samples were absorbed into textiles while the potentiometric cells (ion-selective electrodes and reference electrode) were pressed against the textile. Once the liquid, by wicking action, reached the place where the potentiometric cell was pressed onto the textile, hence closing the electric circuit, the potentiometric response was obtained. Cotton, polyamide, polyester and their blends with elastane were applied for micro-volume sampling. The textiles were found to influence the determination of pH in environmental samples with pH close to neutral and Pb(2+) at low analyte concentrations. On the other hand, textile-based micro-volume sampling was successfully applied in measurements of Na(+) using solid-contact sodium-selective electrodes utilizing all the investigated textiles for sampling. It was found that in order to extend the application of textile-based sampling toward environmental analysis of ions it will be necessary to tailor the physio-chemical properties of the textile materials. In general, textile-based sampling opens new possibilities for direct chemical analysis of small-volume samples and provide a simple and low-cost method to screen various textiles for their effects on samples to identify which textiles are the most suitable for on-body sensing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial Growth on Chitosan-Coated Polypropylene Textile

    OpenAIRE

    D. Erben; V. Hola; J. Jaros; J. Rahel

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerge...

  4. Nanolevel Functionalization of Natural Fiber Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihodceva, S.; Kukle, S.; Barloti, J.

    2011-06-01

    One of the main tasks of presented research are to impact the additional value on natural fabrics by adding them new properties with a metal nano-level coating, evaluate coating technologies. Having the ability to control the surface of a natural fiber offers great rewards that go far beyond pure economics as natural fibers are renewable and biodegradable. The paper describes the process of vacuum evaporation and magnetron sputtering of copper coatings on cotton textile materials, analysis of the metal coated textile surface by laser laboratory complex and SEM. The investigation results evince that laser laboratory complex measurements of reflected and through covered material transmitted light can be applied to trace the unevenness of deposited metal film on the covered fabric surface and its changes from exploitation impacts without samples destruction.

  5. Optical textile tests MRI patients from afar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Paula

    2008-11-01

    Researchers in Europe have developed a wearable textile fitted with optical sensors that could be used to remotely monitor a patient's breathing patterns while they undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The new textile will allow medical staff to keep an eye on children and other vulnerable patients who often have to be calmed with sedatives or anaesthetic drugs to keep them still during a scan. The technique will be particularly useful if proposed European Union (EU) legislation that is designed to protect medical staff from being exposed to the high magnetic fields of MRI systems comes into force in 2012. The new rules would prevent nurses from being in the room where the scan is taking place.

  6. Smart Textiles in Humanistic Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe Emil; Fisker, Anna Marie; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2013-01-01

    With the construction of new hospitals, the design principle healing architecture is introduced, representing the humanistic vision of improving hospitalised patients’ healing process, supported by stimulating architecture. In this regard, we address focus on the potential influence of the design....... Associated with the methodology of evidence-based design (EBD), we in this regard question, if these challenges derive from conflicting paradigms of some of the stakeholders involved in the design process? Relating to the Danish scene of hospital design, we introduce the research project “Smart Textiles...... in Future Hospitals”, stating the overall hypothesis that textiles in hospital interiors possess an unexploited architectural potential in relation to the humanistic visions of healing architecture. Concerned with the operational challenge of unfolding the visionary design principle, we suggest to re...

  7. Applications of cyclodextrins in medical textiles - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Cezar-Doru; Parteni, Oana; Ochiuz, Lacramioara

    2016-02-28

    This paper presents data on the general properties and complexing ability of cyclodextrins and assessment methods (phase solubility, DSC tests and X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectra, analytical method). It focuses on the formation of drug deposits on the surface of a textile underlayer, using a cyclodextrin compound favoring the inclusion of a drug/active principle and its release onto the dermis of patients suffering from skin disorders, or for protection against insects. Moreover, it presents the kinetics, duration, diffusion flow and release media of the cyclodextrin drug for in vitro studies, as well as the release modeling of the active principle. The information focuses on therapies: antibacterial, anti-allergic, antifungal, chronic venous insufficiency, psoriasis and protection against insects. The pharmacodynamic agents/active ingredients used on cotton, woolen and synthetic textile fabrics are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of test methods for textile composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, John E.; Ifju, Peter G.; Fedro, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program was initiated in 1990 with the purpose of developing less costly composite aircraft structures. A number of innovative materials and processes were evaluated as a part of this effort. Chief among them are composite materials reinforced with textile preforms. These new forms of composite materials bring with them potential testing problems. Methods currently in practice were developed over the years for composite materials made from prepreg tape or simple 2-D woven fabrics. A wide variety of 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit preforms were suggested for application in the ACT program. The applicability of existing test methods to the wide range of emerging materials bears investigation. The overriding concern is that the values measured are accurate representations of the true material response. The ultimate objective of this work is to establish a set of test methods to evaluate the textile composites developed for the ACT Program.

  9. GIITEX: investigación en la industria textil

    OpenAIRE

    Bonet Aracil, María Angeles; BOU-BELDA Eva; Montava Seguí, Ignacio José; Díaz-García, Pablo; Monllorpérez, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    [ES] El GIITEX es un grupo de investigación de la Universidad Politécnica de Valencia. Centra su labor investigación en todas aquellas investigaciones que están relacionadas con el sector textil. El la actualidad el GIITEX trabaja en las líneas de investigación siguientes: adaptación de nuevas tecnologías a procesos productivos textiles; biomateriales y procesos biotecnológicos de aplicación textil; análisis de la capacidad de cosido de un hilo; funcionalización de textiles mediante la adició...

  10. Energy-harvesting & self-actuated textiles for the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    for smart textiles by questioning how they can be implemented within a domestic context to encourage more resilient environments. More specifically investigating the potential of energyharvesting & self-actuated textiles, the project hopes to highlight new ways for thinking the home as a more permeable...... the context of rising sustainable design agendas, the role and influence of new materials and technologies on the conceptualization and making of responsive textiles. Exploring the intersection between textiles, architecture and smart technologies, this on-going research aims to map out new design territories...

  11. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Towards Organ Weaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, pore size and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important role in the effective use of textile technologies in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the current advances in the manufacturing of biofunctional fibers. Different textile methods such as knitting, weaving, and braiding are discussed and their current applications in tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26924450

  12. Comparison of Quantitative Antifungal Testing Methods for Textile Fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Yasuo; Seino, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A

    2017-01-01

     Quantitative antifungal testing methods for textile fabrics under growth-supportive conditions were studied. Fungal growth activities on unfinished textile fabrics and textile fabrics modified with Ag nanoparticles were investigated using the colony counting method and the luminescence method. Morphological changes of the fungi during incubation were investigated by microscopic observation. Comparison of the results indicated that the fungal growth activity values obtained with the colony counting method depended on the morphological state of the fungi on textile fabrics, whereas those obtained with the luminescence method did not. Our findings indicated that unique characteristics of each testing method must be taken into account for the proper evaluation of antifungal activity.

  13. Roadmap to sustainable textiles and clothing regulatory aspects and sustainability standards of textiles and the clothing supply chain

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the elements involved in achieving sustainability in textiles and clothing sector. The chapters covered in three volumes of this series title cover all the distinctive areas earmarked for achieving sustainable development in textiles and clothing industry. This third volume highlights the areas pertaining to the regulatory aspects and sustainability standards applicable to textiles and clothing supply chain. There are various standards earmarked for measuring the environmental impacts and sustainability of textile products. There are also plenty of certification schemes available along with the index systems applicable to textile sector. Brands and manufactures are also venturing into new developments to achieve sustainable development in textile sector. This third volume addresses all these important aspects.

  14. Textile UWB Antenna Bending and Wet Performances

    OpenAIRE

    Mai A.R.Osman; Rahim, M. K. A.; N. A. Samsuri; M. K. Elbasheer; M. E. Ali

    2012-01-01

    The vision and ideas of wearable computing systems describe future electronic systems as an integral part of our everyday clothing that provides the wearer with such intelligent personal assistants. Recently, there has been growing interest in the antenna community to merge between wearable systems technology, ultrawideband (UWB) technology and textile technology. This work aimed to make closer steps towards real wearability by investigating the possibilities of designing wearable UWB antenna...

  15. Kaleidoscope – Printed Textiles by Neil Bottle

    OpenAIRE

    Bottle, Neil

    2013-01-01

    One man show at Rochester Art Gallery. In the Kaleidoscope series, Neil Bottle explores the relationship between digital textile printing and craft printing techniques and how these seemingly opposing practices can coexist. A combination of the latest cutting-edge digital print techniques such as dye sublimation combined with craft traditions such as screen printing, discharge printing, pleating and shibori have been developed in the work. The Kaleidoscope series of wallhangings is pr...

  16. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  17. Mechanics Methodology for Textile Preform Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poe, Clarence C., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    NASA and its contractors have completed a program to develop a basic mechanics underpinning for textile composites. Three major deliverables were produced by the program: 1. A set of test methods for measuring material properties and design allowables; 2. Mechanics models to predict the effects of the fiber preform architecture and constituent properties on engineering moduli, strength, damage resistance, and fatigue life; and 3. An electronic data base of coupon type test data. This report describes these three deliverables.

  18. Interactive educational software of textile desing

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Abad, Francisco; Rojas Sola, José Ignacio; Hernández Abad, Vicente; Ochoa Vives, Manuel; Font Andreu, Jorge; Hernández Díaz, David; Villar Ribera, Ricardo Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel educational software package which develops an Interactive Didactic Application (IDA) created in the Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), and which contains the essentials of Textile Design. It is an open application which uses a database in ASCII format. The principal elements of this database are lists of whole numbers structured according to indexed colors in standard RGB format. This generates a rational system of indexes of numerical lists, which a...

  19. FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE EVOLUTIONS OF TEXTILE SECTOR ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta BARBUTA MISU

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete liberalization of international trade led to important changes in financial performancesof the national enterprises. This paper has in view to present the consequences of these changes fromthe macroeconomic level to microeconomic level. Thus, indicators of the financial performance forthree enterprises at the textile sector from Galati are studied selectively. The scope of this study isboth to realize a financial performance hierarchy and to present of their evolution directions in thefuture.

  20. Influence of textile properties on thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marolleau, A.; Salaun, F.; Dupont, D.; Gidik, H.; Ducept, S.

    2017-10-01

    This study reports on the impact of textile properties on thermal comfort. The fabric weight, thickness, porosity, moisture regain, air permeability and density have been considered and correlated to the thermal and water vapour resistance, permeability index, thermal conductivity and effusivity, and moisture management capacity. Results suggest that moisture transfer is affected by thickness, density and moisture regain whereas thermal transfer by air permeability and density.

  1. Textile sustainability: reuse of clean waste from the textile and apparel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broega, A. C.; Jordão, C.; Martins, S. B.

    2017-10-01

    Today societies are already experiencing changes in their production systems and even consumption in order to guarantee the survival and well-being of future generations. This fact emerges from the need to adopt a more sustainable posture in both people’s daily lives and productive systems. Within this context, textile sustainability emerges as the object of study of this work whose aim is to analyse which sustainability dimensions are being prioritized by the clean waste management systems of the textile and garment industries. This article aims to analyse solutions that are being proposed by sustainable creative business models in the reuse of discarded fabrics by the textile industry. Search also through a qualitative research by a case study (the Reuse Fabric Bank) understand the benefits generated by the re-use in environmental, economic, social and ways to add value.

  2. Degradation of textile dyes by cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Maria Dellamatrice

    Full Text Available Abstract Dyes are recalcitrant compounds that resist conventional biological treatments. The degradation of three textile dyes (Indigo, RBBR and Sulphur Black, and the dye-containing liquid effluent and solid waste from the Municipal Treatment Station, Americana, São Paulo, Brazil, by the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae UTCC64, Phormidium autumnale UTEX1580 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was evaluated. The dye degradation efficiency of the cyanobacteria was compared with anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic systems in terms of discolouration and toxicity evaluations. The discoloration was evaluated by absorption spectroscopy. Toxicity was measured using the organisms Hydra attenuata, the alga Selenastrum capricornutum and lettuce seeds. The three cyanobacteria showed the potential to remediate textile effluent by removing the colour and reducing the toxicity. However, the growth of cyanobacteria on sludge was slow and discoloration was not efficient. The cyanobacteria P. autumnale UTEX1580 was the only strain that completely degraded the indigo dye. An evaluation of the mutagenicity potential was performed by use of the micronucleus assay using Allium sp. No mutagenicity was observed after the treatment. Two metabolites were produced during the degradation, anthranilic acid and isatin, but toxicity did not increase after the treatment. The cyanobacteria showed the ability to degrade the dyes present in a textile effluent; therefore, they can be used in a tertiary treatment of effluents with recalcitrant compounds.

  3. Degradation of textile dyes by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellamatrice, Priscila Maria; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo de; Fiore, Marli Fátima; Monteiro, Regina Teresa Rosim

    Dyes are recalcitrant compounds that resist conventional biological treatments. The degradation of three textile dyes (Indigo, RBBR and Sulphur Black), and the dye-containing liquid effluent and solid waste from the Municipal Treatment Station, Americana, São Paulo, Brazil, by the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae UTCC64, Phormidium autumnale UTEX1580 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was evaluated. The dye degradation efficiency of the cyanobacteria was compared with anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic systems in terms of discolouration and toxicity evaluations. The discoloration was evaluated by absorption spectroscopy. Toxicity was measured using the organisms Hydra attenuata, the alga Selenastrum capricornutum and lettuce seeds. The three cyanobacteria showed the potential to remediate textile effluent by removing the colour and reducing the toxicity. However, the growth of cyanobacteria on sludge was slow and discoloration was not efficient. The cyanobacteria P. autumnale UTEX1580 was the only strain that completely degraded the indigo dye. An evaluation of the mutagenicity potential was performed by use of the micronucleus assay using Allium sp. No mutagenicity was observed after the treatment. Two metabolites were produced during the degradation, anthranilic acid and isatin, but toxicity did not increase after the treatment. The cyanobacteria showed the ability to degrade the dyes present in a textile effluent; therefore, they can be used in a tertiary treatment of effluents with recalcitrant compounds. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Toward a systematic classification of textile damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, T G; Samlal-Soedhoe, R S; van der Weerd, J

    2018-01-01

    The accuracy of textile damage analyses was evaluated by laboratory tests carried out by trained experts. The analyzed damages were prepared by various methods, including stabbing, cutting, shooting, heating/burning, etc. A number of damages were aged by household washing and tumble-drying procedures, addition of blood, or burying. The samples were analyzed by routine laboratory evaluation. The results indicate that the properties of a damage provide a good indication of the way a textile had been damaged. Nevertheless, scoring of the answers is not straightforward. Results indicated that examiners evaluated damages on different levels of specificity and thereby showed the latent need for a more systematic approach to damage classification. The second part of the current contribution therefore presents the classification scheme we developed. This classification scheme aims to guide examiners during examination and accommodates the vast majority of textile damages observed in forensic casework. Each of the proposed classes is defined, relevant literature in each of the classes is reviewed, and the characteristics that can be expected after different damaging actions are explained. Finally, we share some ideas for further investigations. Copyright © 2018 Central Police University.

  5. Smart Textiles for Strengthening of Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Marcin; Krzywoń, Rafał; Dawczyński, Szymon; Szojda, Leszek; Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Araujo, Pedro; Velez, Fernando Jose; Castro-Gomes, Joao

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents results of mechanical tests on a prototype of an innovative structural strengthening in form of self-monitoring fabric. Smart textile employs carbon fibers conductivity for measuring strains while monitoring changes of electric resistance under increasing load. A general solution was tested in a series of calibrating tests on strengthening of small size concrete slabs. Promising results of simple specimen, has encouraged the research team to perform the next tests using mastered carbon fibre reinforced fabric. Main tests were performed on natural scale RC beam. Smart textile proved its efficiency in both: strengthening and monitoring of strains during load increase. New strengthening proposal was given 10% increase of loading capacity and the readings of strain changes were similar to those obtained in classical methods. In order to calibrate the prototype and to define range limits of solution usability, textile sensor was tested in areas of large deformations (timber beam) and aswell as very small strains (bridge bearing block). In both cases, the prototype demonstrated excellent performance in the range of importance for structural engineering. This paper also presents an example of use of the smart strengthening in situ, in a real life conditions.

  6. Propiedades generales de los suavizantes textiles catiónicos: especificaciones de producto y sus efectos en los textiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Carrión Fité, Francisco Javier

    1988-01-01

    Tras la introducción de los suavizantes como productos auxiliares textiles, se recalca la importancia comercial de los suavizantes textiles catiónicos, incidiendo tanto en los aspectos relacionados con la formulacion del producto como en su efecto sobre los textiles, comentando el cambio de propiedades táctiles, mecánicas, funcionales y de aspecto de los mismos. Se resumen aspectos generales físico-químicos relativos a su adsorción por parte de los textiles, citando por ultimo algunos metodos...

  7. Biotreatment of effluent from 'Adire' textile factories in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okareh, Oladapo T; Ademodi, Tuntunlade F; Igbinosa, Etinosa O

    2017-11-10

    In this present study, bacteria were isolated from wastewater and polluted soil collected from two cottage textile factories in Ibadan. These bacteria isolates were used for the biotreatment of textile mill effluent. The physicochemical parameters of the textile mill effluent before treatment were carried out and percentage decolourisation of the effluent was analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis technique). The degradation products of the textile mill effluent characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The pH values of the effluent were within the permissible limit of Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA) and National Environmental Standards and Regulations Enforcement Agency (NESREA), while temperature and electric conductivity of the effluents were below the permissible limit of FEPA and NESREA. The BOD, COD, TSS, TDS and chloride of the textile mill effluent from the two cottage textile factories were above the permissible limits of FEPA and NESREA. Twelve bacteria isolates were screened, effective in decolourising commercial dyes and used to decolourise the textile mill effluent. The bacteria isolates were characterised and identified as Bacillus sp., Micrococcus sp., Erwinia sp., Acinetobacter sp. and Nocardia sp. The decolourisation of textile effluent was observed through the changes of spectra of UV-visible spectrophotometer. The following bacteria revealed different percentage proportion of decolouration profile:- Bacillus sp., had the highest percentage decolourisation of 57.7%, whereas Micrococcus sp. and Acinetobacter sp. had percentage decolourisation of 32.8 and 26.3%, respectively. The degradation profile of textile effluent was revealed through FTIR spectral analysis. The changes in the position of major peaks revealed from the textile effluent through FTIR spectral analysis, appearances of new peaks and the disappearances of existing peaks signify the degradation of the wastewater. Thus, some native

  8. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Helen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments.

  9. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments. PMID:22616934

  10. Synthesis and characterization of textile azo dyes derivatives of methoxyphenols

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Queiroz, Maria João R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Azo dyes are used extensively in the textile and dyestuff industries and effluents from these industrial processes are usually resistant to biological treatment. Textile azo dyes with bioaccessible groups such as guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and 2,6--dimethoxyphenol, for lignin-degrading fungus were synthesized using aminobenzoic and aminosulfonic acids as diazocomponents.

  11. Biodegradation of textile Azo Dyes by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Santos, Isabel M.; Queiroz, Maria João R.P.; Lima, Nelson

    1998-01-01

    Azo dyes are used extensively in the textile and dyestuff industries and effluents from these industrial processes are usually resistant to biological treatment. Textile azo dyes with bioaccessible groups such as guaiacol and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, for lignin-degrading fungus as P. chrysosporium were synthesised.

  12. Biomarkers For Rheumatoid Arthritis In Textile Workers And The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown origin. There was an evidence of increased rate of RA in textile workers, and was higher among women. Fifty two textile workers (have worked for more than two years) and sixty two control subjects of both sexes were ...

  13. Interwoven Story: A Narrative Study of Textiles as Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Dion, Catherine-Laura

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from both narrative research and Joe Kincheloe's work of research bricolage this study inquired into how textiles have served as educator throughout my life. Weaving, as the earliest and most integral of textile fabrications, is particularly featured in this narrative inquiry. A loom, in its most basic form, consists of three components; a…

  14. Ecological modernisation and institutional transformations in the Danish textile industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Bent; Hansen, Ole Erik; Holm, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The interplay of environmental regulation programs and environmental transformations in the Danish textile industry is analysed. The result of the interplay is summarised as an ecological modernisation process, which has established distributed environmental competences at enterprises...... and institutional actors in the textile industry, and has established new environmental perceptions and agendas in the industry....

  15. Application of the mixture design to decolourise effluent textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Important pollutants in textile effluents are mainly recalcitrant organics, colours, toxicants and inhibitory compounds, surfactants, chlorinated compounds (AOX), pH and salts. An aerobic system using a continuous stirred bed reactor (SBR) was continuously operated at constant temperature and fed with textile wastewater ...

  16. Environmental assessment of end-of-life textiles in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koligkioni, Athina; Parajuly, Keshav; Sørensen, Birgitte Lilholt

    2017-01-01

    The European Union is on its way to a circular economy through eco-design, waste prevention, reuse and recycling of products and materials. This study analyzes the environmental effects of end-of-life textile management in Denmark. First, a Mass Flow Analysis was performed for textile flows from...

  17. DETERMINATION OF TRACE HEAVY METALS IN SOME TEXTILE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    People want to be able to buy clothing, bedding and household textiles that have been tested and are not dyed in any way with harmful substances [6-8]. Textile products contain some organic and inorganic substance including trace metal ions. Especially, reactive and pigment dyes contain trace heavy metals at high level.

  18. Advanced microgel-functionalized polyester textiles adaptive to ambient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glampedaki, P.

    2011-01-01

    A new approach toward textile-based multi-functional and stimuli-responsive materials is proposed. Polyelectrolyte microgel technology is combined with conventional functionalization methods of photo- and thermo-crosslinking to activate the surface of polyester textiles, making them interactive with

  19. Lithium-Ion Textile Batteries with Large Areal Mass Loading

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2011-10-06

    We integrate Li-ion battery electrode materials into a 3D porous textile conductor by using a simple process. When compared to flat metal current collectors, our 3D porous textile conductor not only greatly facilitates the ability for a high active material mass loading on the battery electrode but also leads to better device performance.

  20. 16 CFR 423.6 - Textile wearing apparel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Textile wearing apparel. 423.6 Section 423.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES CARE LABELING OF TEXTILE WEARING APPAREL... the outside of the package or on a hang tag fastened to the product. (b) Care labels must state what...

  1. Stories in the Cloth: Art Therapy and Narrative Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, Lisa Raye

    2016-01-01

    In this article I weave together the relevance of narrative textile work in therapeutic and human rights contexts; showcase Common Threads, an international nonprofit that uses story cloths with survivors of gender-based violence; outline a master's level art therapy course in story cloths; and relate how textiles helped build a sibling…

  2. Assessing the Suitability of Woven Fabric and Composite Textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This art studio experimental study explored the suitability of woven cotton fabric as alternative material for creating pictorial designs for murals based on the batik, tie-and-dye, screen printing, appliqué and embroidery techniques in textiles. While painted and sculpted murals abound in Ghana, the study found textile murals a ...

  3. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  4. Toxicity assessment of treated effluents from a textile industry in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Veejay

    Key words: Textile effluent, toxicity, surface waters, growth inhibition, Celosia argentea. INTRODUCTION. Industrial effluents are undesirable by-products of economic development and technological advancement. When improperly disposed off, they imperil human health and the environment. Effluents from textile industries ...

  5. Evaluation of Microbial Systems for Biotreatment of Textile Waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of some microbial species for the decolourization and degradation of textile dye has been investigated. Six microbial strains were isolated from soil contaminated with textile waste effluents using the spread plate technique and the isolates were identified as bacterial isolates (Pseudomonas fluorescence, ...

  6. Textile and fashion production skills for sustainable development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria is a country with abundant wealth in human, cultural and natural resources. It is one country noted for its people's penchant for textiles, fashion and style. On the basis of Nigeria's rich, vibrant and viable traditional textile and fashion industry vis-à-vis the need to keep Niger Delta youths out of violence, this paper this ...

  7. Prevalence of noise induced hearing loss in textile industries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross sectional study measured the prevalence of Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in textile industries in Dar Es Salaam city and Morogoro municipality. Data were collected from 125 employees randomly selected from each of the textile factory mill in each region through structured questionnaires and audiogram ...

  8. Experimental Studies on Durability of Concrete Using Textile Effluent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt was made to use the waste water from textile industry for construction purpose, so that the shortage in water can be greatly reduced and the waste water can be suitably disposed for safe guarding the environment. The basic properties of the treated and untreated water from the textile industry were tested and the ...

  9. Industrial Design Management: The Focal Development for Textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian textiles are on the downward trend for the past ten years. This had been blamed on the importation of second hand clothing and the inability of the textile industry to adjust to the technological growth. This has affected designs, productions, fastness of fabrics and the market forces. This paper suggest possible ...

  10. Development of smart conductive 2D-3D textile grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, P. (Pramod); Bottenberg, E. (Eliza); Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Gooijer, H. (Henk)

    2013-01-01

    The conductive textile grid is a large-scale (226 x 115 cm) multi-layer demonstrator exhibiting different conductive textile materials with certain outputs (such as LEDs, thermo-chromic ink and shape memory alloy) can be connected onto a base conductive fabric. Various conductive materials such as

  11. Antimicrobial Approaches for Textiles: From Research to Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Santos Morais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The large surface area and ability to retain moisture of textile structures enable microorganisms’ growth, which causes a range of undesirable effects, not only on the textile itself, but also on the user. Due to the public health awareness of the pathogenic effects on personal hygiene and associated health risks, over the last few years, intensive research has been promoted in order to minimize microbes’ growth on textiles. Therefore, to impart an antimicrobial ability to textiles, different approaches have been studied, being mainly divided into the inclusion of antimicrobial agents in the textile polymeric fibers or their grafting onto the polymer surface. Regarding the antimicrobial agents, different types have been used, such as quaternary ammonium compounds, triclosan, metal salts, polybiguanides or even natural polymers. Any antimicrobial treatment performed on a textile, besides being efficient against microorganisms, must be non-toxic to the consumer and to the environment. This review mainly intends to provide an overview of antimicrobial agents and treatments that can be performed to produce antimicrobial textiles, using chemical or physical approaches, which are under development or already commercially available in the form of isolated agents or textile fibers or fabrics.

  12. Adapting the Jukun Traditional Symbols for Textile Design and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adapting the Jukun Traditional Symbols for Textile Design and Production. ... Mgbakoigba: Journal of African Studies ... This research work on adaptation of the Jukun cultural symbols for textile design gives a brief introduction of the Jukun people, which are called the “karorofawas” with their rich cultural symbols.

  13. Sustainability Knowledge and Behaviors of Apparel and Textile Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller Connell, Kim Y.; Kozar, Joy M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze changes in undergraduate student knowledge of issues of sustainability relevant to the apparel and textiles industry. Assessment occurred prior to and upon completion of a course that addressed topics specific to the global production and distribution of apparel and textile goods. The study also…

  14. Identification and Characterization of Textile Fibers by Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Fiona M.; Smith, Michael J.; Silva, Magda B.

    2011-01-01

    Textile fibers are ubiquitous in the sense that they are present in the fabric of clothing, furniture, and floor and wall coverings. A remarkable variety of textile fibers with different chemical compositions are produced for many different commercial applications. As fibers are readily transferred, they are frequently recovered from crime scenes…

  15. Bioremediation of textile effluent polluted soil using kenaf ( Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the performance and heavy metals uptake of kenaf at different levels of compost application in textile effluent polluted soil. Polluted soil was collected from the vicinity of a textile company in Nigeria. Twelve-litre plastic pots were filled with 10 kg soil. Soil amendments applied were: 0 (control), 60 Kg N ...

  16. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY OF RESP I RATORY CONDITION IN NON TEXTILE AND TEXTILE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among cotton - ginning workers. Byssinosis is a respiratory disease caused by inhalation of cotton dust for prolonged period of time. This is most frequently occurs in the cotton mill workers. The Aim of the study is 1. Determining the proportion of workers experiencing difficulty in breathing, chest tightness, chest pain, coughing, wheezing and phlegm. 2. To evaluate the pulmonary function test variation in textile workers with non - textile workers. The present study was conducted on three groups (I, II, III of male subjects of age ranging 30 to 40 yrs, 41 to 50 yrs & 51 to 60 yrs. And each of the group is divided again into textile workers & non - textile workers. A structured questionnaire enquiring about the respiratory health was administered to the employees. And our result shows the Byssinotic symptoms were too high in cotton mill workers than control group. The pulmonary function test shows a significant reduction in lung capacity, and the mean values of FVC, FEV1, FEV1%, FEF 50%, were on negative side among cotton mill workers compared to control group and which is statistically significant.

  17. Scalable and Environmentally Benign Process for Smart Textile Nanofinishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jicheng; Hontañón, Esther; Blanes, Maria; Meyer, Jörg; Guo, Xiaoai; Santos, Laura; Paltrinieri, Laura; Ramlawi, Nabil; Smet, Louis C P M de; Nirschl, Hermann; Kruis, Frank Einar; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas; Biskos, George

    2016-06-15

    A major challenge in nanotechnology is that of determining how to introduce green and sustainable principles when assembling individual nanoscale elements to create working devices. For instance, textile nanofinishing is restricted by the many constraints of traditional pad-dry-cure processes, such as the use of costly chemical precursors to produce nanoparticles (NPs), the high liquid and energy consumption, the production of harmful liquid wastes, and multistep batch operations. By integrating low-cost, scalable, and environmentally benign aerosol processes of the type proposed here into textile nanofinishing, these constraints can be circumvented while leading to a new class of fabrics. The proposed one-step textile nanofinishing process relies on the diffusional deposition of aerosol NPs onto textile fibers. As proof of this concept, we deposit Ag NPs onto a range of textiles and assess their antimicrobial properties for two strains of bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae). The measurements show that the logarithmic reduction in bacterial count can get as high as ca. 5.5 (corresponding to a reduction efficiency of 99.96%) when the Ag loading is 1 order of magnitude less (10 ppm; i.e., 10 mg Ag NPs per kg of textile) than that of textiles treated by traditional wet-routes. The antimicrobial activity does not increase in proportion to the Ag content above 10 ppm as a consequence of a "saturation" effect. Such low NP loadings on antimicrobial textiles minimizes the risk to human health (during textile use) and to the ecosystem (after textile disposal), as well as it reduces potential changes in color and texture of the resulting textile products. After three washes, the release of Ag is in the order of 1 wt %, which is comparable to textiles nanofinished with wet routes using binders. Interestingly, the washed textiles exhibit almost no reduction in antimicrobial activity, much as those of as-deposited samples. Considering that a realm

  18. Integrated measure and control system for textile machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuantao; Zhao, Jinzhi; Zhao, Zexiang

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, textile mechanical drive control is researched. Textile machinery integrated measure and control system is established. The system is composed of micro-computer, PLC, transducer, implement device, all kinds of detective components and industrial Ethernet etc. Technology of industrial field bus control and Internet technique are applied. The system is on a background of textile production technique, such as spring, woven, chemical fiber, non-woven, dyeing and finishing. A network based open integrated control system is developed. Various characteristics of production technique flow and textile machinery movement discipline are presented. Configuration software is introduced according to user's control tasks. Final remote automatic controls are finished. This may make development cost reduced, and development periods shortened. Some problems in textile machinery development process are solved, which may make transparency factory and remote development realized.

  19. Towards conductive textiles: coating polymeric fibres with graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Ana I S; Rodrigues, Daniela P; De Sanctis, Adolfo; Alonso, Elias Torres; Pereira, Maria S; Amaral, Vitor S; Melo, Luis V; Russo, Saverio; de Schrijver, Isabel; Alves, Helena; Craciun, Monica F

    2017-06-26

    Conducting fibres are essential to the development of e-textiles. We demonstrate a method to make common insulating textile fibres conductive, by coating them with graphene. The resulting fibres display sheet resistance values as low as 600 Ωsq-1, demonstrating that the high conductivity of graphene is not lost when transferred to textile fibres. An extensive microscopic study of the surface of graphene-coated fibres is presented. We show that this method can be employed to textile fibres of different materials, sizes and shapes, and to different types of graphene. These graphene-based conductive fibres can be used as a platform to build integrated electronic devices directly in textiles.

  20. The Role of Textiles in Dermatitis: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobolaji-Lawal, Motunrayo; Nedorost, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Dermatitis has important implications for individuals who are affected. It can significantly impair function and quality of life. Dermatitis is multi-factorial and often includes elements of atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and irritant contact dermatitis in a co-existent manner. Textiles are in contact with the human skin for extended periods of time and as a result, they are an important part of the cutaneous environment. Thus, it is not surprising that textiles play a major role in both the etiology and the treatment of various types of dermatitis. This review discusses the role of textiles in dermatitis with an emphasis on interesting and recent advances, trends, perspectives, gaps, and conflicts in the field. In addition, we mention other disease processes to be aware of as they can often mimic textile pattern dermatitis. Lastly, we provide a diagnostic approach for patients presenting with textile pattern dermatitis.

  1. Exploring dynamic lighting, colour and form with smart textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, I.; Silva, C.; Worbin, L.; Souto, A. P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses an ongoing research, aiming at the development of smart textiles that transform the incident light that passes through them – light transmittance – to design dynamic light without acting upon the light source. A colour and shape change prototype was developed with the objective of studying textile changes in time; to explore temperature as a dynamic variable through electrical activation of the smart materials and conductive threads integrated in the textile substrate; and to analyse the relation between textile chromic and morphologic behaviour in interaction with light. Based on the experiments conducted, results have highlighted some considerations of the dynamic parameters involved in the behaviour of thermo-responsive textiles and demonstrated design possibilities to create interactive lighting scenarios.

  2. Textile dye degradation using nano zero valent iron: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Chandra Devi; Kanmani, S

    2016-07-15

    Water soluble unfixed dyes and inorganic salts are the major pollutants in textile dyeing industry wastewater. Existing treatment methods fail to degrade textile dyes and have limitations too. The inadequate treatment of textile dyeing wastewater is a major concern when effluent is directly discharged into the nearby environment. Long term disposal threatens the environment, which needs reclamation. This article reviews the current knowledge of nano zero valent iron (nZVI) technique in the degradation of textile dyes. The application of nZVI on textile dye degradation is receiving great attention in the recent years because nZVI particles are highly reactive towards the pollutant, less toxic, and economical. The nZVI particles aggregate quickly with respect to time and the addition of supports such as resin, nickel, zinc, bentonite, biopolymer, kaolin, rectorite, nickel-montmorillonite, bamboo, cellulose, biochar, graphene, and clinoptilolite enhanced the stability of iron nanoparticles. Inclusion of supports may in turn introduce additional toxic pollutants, hence green supports are recommended. The majority of investigations concluded dye color removal as textile dye compound removal, which is not factual. Very few studies monitored the removal of total organic carbon and observed the products formed. The results revealed that partial mineralization of the textile dye compound was achieved. Instead of stand alone technique, nZVI can be integrated with other suitable technique to achieve complete degradation of textile dye and also to treat multiple pollutants in the real textile dyeing wastewater. It is highly recommended to perform more bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to apply this technique to the textile effluent contaminated sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. PRODUCTION WITH 3D PRINTERS IN TEXTILES [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KESKIN Reyhan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 3D printers are gaining more attention, finding different applications and 3D printing is being regarded as a ‘revolution’ of the 2010s for production. 3D printing is a production method that produces 3-dimensional objects by combining very thin layers over and over to form the object using 3D scanners or via softwares either private or open source. 3D printed materials find application in a large range of fields including aerospace, automotive, medicine and material science. There are several 3D printing methods such as fused deposition modeling (FDM, stereolithographic apparatus (SLA, selective laser sintering (SLS, inkjet 3D printing and laminated object manufacturing (LOM. 3D printing process involves three steps: production of the 3D model file, conversion of the 3D model file into G-code and printing the object. 3D printing finds a large variety of applications in many fields; however, textile applications of 3D printing remain rare. There are several textile-like 3D printed products mostly for use in fashion design, for research purposes, for technical textile applications and for substituting traditional textiles suchas weft-knitted structures and lace patterns. 3D printed textile-like structures are not strong enough for textile applications as they tend to break easily and although they have the drape of a textile material, they still lack the flexibility of textiles. 3D printing technology has to gain improvement to produce materials that will be an equivalent for textile materials, and has to be a faster method to compete with traditional textile production methods.

  4. MILITARY TEXTILE MATERIALS FOR EXTREME WEATHER CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TSOUTSEOS Athanasios

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the leaps in technology in warfare and modern weaponry, the human soldier remains the most important aspect of a competitive army. Military textile materials are an essential, yet often neglected, factor that protect the soldier and enable his or her actions in varying fields around the globe. The participation of most countries in larger military or peacekeeping organisations like the NATO and the UN involves the extension of the geographical areas of activity in environments varying greatly from the soldiers’ country of origin. Protection from the varying weather conditions and comfort are important factors for the optimal operational ability of a person in humanitarian actions or at combat field. Research in performance textiles has given rise to various forms of multilayered clothing and functional membranes with several commercial tradenames. These performance textiles aim at specialized sports and recreational activities as mountain climbing, hiking and cycling, among others. Additional advancements involve even more specialized function like the incorporation of microelectronics monitoring of vital signals of the human body or for the control of equipment. The incorporation of such technological advancements is a current challenge for the national and international military forces that inherit a set of strict procedures. These procedures involve standardization, detailed technical descriptions, cost and of course customs particular to each force. On the other hand, the advancements cannot be neglected and the numbers of soldiers involved are significant to enable the need for change. Current paper is concentrated on the clothing and fabric developments relating to the protection of the soldiers from extreme weather conditions.

  5. Surface-Roughness-Based Virtual Textiles: Evaluation Using a Multi-Contactor Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Matthew; Summers, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Virtual textiles, generated in response to exploratory movements, are presented to the fingertip via a 24-contactor vibrotactile array. Software models are based on surface-roughness profiles from real textiles. Results suggest that distinguishable "textile-like" surfaces are produced, but these lack the necessary accuracy for reliable matching to real textiles.

  6. A structural lattice model for electronic textile: an experimental and computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, C.W.; Van Os, K.; Luitjens, S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic textiles combine textiles with the functionality of electronic applications.To understand the mechanical issues of reliability, mechanical failure and compatibility of these electronic textiles, research has to be performed that focusses on the interplay of the textile with the electronic

  7. 76 FR 68690 - Rules and Regulations Under the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... applicable to written advertising, including Internet advertising; clarify or revise the list of exclusions... Textile Fiber Products Identification Act (``Textile Act''), 15 U.S.C. 70-70k, requires marketers to... Textile Act also contains advertising and record-keeping provisions. Section 7(c) of the Textile Act...

  8. 16 CFR 303.42 - Arrangement of information in advertising textile fiber products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... textile fiber products. 303.42 Section 303.42 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.42 Arrangement of information in advertising textile fiber products. (a) Where a textile...

  9. 78 FR 52907 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined that certain polyester/nylon cut corduroy fabric...

  10. 16 CFR 303.30 - Textile fiber products in form for consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Textile fiber products in form for consumer... CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.30 Textile fiber products in form for consumer. A textile fiber product shall be considered to be in the form intended for...

  11. A New ‘T’ for Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earley, Rebecca; Vuletich, Clara; Hadridge, Phil

    2016-01-01

    for Hennes and Mauritz (H&M) and the Sustainable Fashion Academy (SFA) in Stockholm, Sweden. The project was developed as part of the Mistra Future Fashion research consortium, which aims to bring scientists and designers together to find sustainable and profitable industry solutions. The TED’s TEN...... sustainable design strategies for textiles and fashion was the framework for the Sustainable Design Inspiration (SDI) work at H&M – a broad and holistic approach to redesigning products including materials, process, systems, services, consumer behaviour and activism....

  12. From magnetic textiles to micromagnetic simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrmann née Tillmanns, Andrea; Weber, Marcus O.; Kammermeier, Tom; Błachowicz, Tomasz; Pawela, Łukasz; Ehrmann née Tillmanns, Andrea; Weber, Marcus O.; Kammermeier, Tom; Błachowicz, Tomasz; Pawela, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    Pewne układy magnetyczne, jak warstwy Fe/MnFe2, wykazują nieoczekiwane anizotropie. Podjęto próby odtworzenia tychże zjawisk w układach makroskopowych na bazie materiałów tekstylnych Plakat naukowy Some magnetic systems (e.g. 4-fold Fe/MnF2 thin film samples) show unexpected anisotropies – common simulations not valid, new phenomenological approaches lack support by physics-based simulations. Tailoring magnetic anisotropies by textile processing (weaving, braiding, warp knitting) of mag...

  13. Flexural Behavior of Textile-Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the flexural behaviour of textile-reinforced concrete (TRC. Two samples of TRC made of high strength reinforcing fabrics made of glass and carbon rovings were produced. Three-point bending test was carried out to examine the flexural performance of the developed samples. The maximum flexural strength and reinforcement efficiency were calculated. Experimental results showed that that all types of applied fabric reinforcement contributed to increases strength as compared to nonreinforced concrete. Furthermore, the deformation behavior of reinforced concrete was analyzed. The advantage is in higher residual load-bearing capacity, which allows maintaining the integrity of the structure.

  14. A Strategy for Material-specific e-Textile Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gowrishankar, Ramyah; Bredies, Katharina; Ylirisku, Salu

    2017-01-01

    The interaction design of e-Textile products are often characterized by conventions adopted from electronic devices rather than developing interactions that can be specific to e-Textiles. We argue that textile materials feature a vast potential for the design of novel digital interactions....... Especially the shape-reformation capabilities of textiles may inform the design of expressive and aesthetically rewarding applications. In this chapter, we propose ways in which the textileness of e-Textiles can be better harnessed. We outline an e-Textile Interaction Design strategy that is based...... on defining the material-specificity of e-Textiles as its ability to deform in ways that match the expectations we have of textile materials. It embraces an open-ended exploration of textile-related interactions (for e.g. stretching, folding, turning-inside-out etc.) and their potential for electronic...

  15. Nanopatterned textile-based wearable triboelectric nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Wanchul; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Lee, Keun Young; Shin, Kyung-Sik; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lin, Jianjian; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a fully flexible, foldable nanopatterned wearable triboelectric nanogenerator (WTNG) with high power-generating performance and mechanical robustness. Both a silver (Ag)-coated textile and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanopatterns based on ZnO nanorod arrays on a Ag-coated textile template were used as active triboelectric materials. A high output voltage and current of about 120 V and 65 μA, respectively, were observed from a nanopatterned PDMS-based WTNG, while an output voltage and current of 30 V and 20 μA were obtained by the non-nanopatterned flat PDMS-based WTNG under the same compressive force of 10 kgf. Furthermore, very high voltage and current outputs with an average value of 170 V and 120 μA, respectively, were obtained from a four-layer-stacked WTNG under the same compressive force. Notably it was found there are no significant differences in the output voltages measured from the multilayer-stacked WTNG over 12 000 cycles, confirming the excellent mechanical durability of WTNGs. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the self-powered operation of light-emitting diodes, a liquid crystal display, and a keyless vehicle entry system only with the output power of our WTNG without any help of external power sources.

  16. NONWOVEN TEXTILES WITH MEDICAL DESTINATION ROMANIAN PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BULACU Romulus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The widest range of medical disposable from nonwoven textiles are: absorbent and hygiene products : (diapers, feminine care, incontinence from the layered structures absorbent or impervious; use products such as hospital operating theaters sterile clothing (caps, gowns, masks, shoe coverings, materials for field operators, lab coats, packaging materials for hot or cold treatments, sterile materials (wipes, bandages, sterile bandages, etc.. Currently these materials, in their majority, are imported. This paper presents research done for getting, with the country equipment, disposable medical products from 40 g/m2 nonwoven textile materials. The technology adopted for the purpose, in SC "Minet" S.A. Ramnicu Valcea, Romania consisted of the following steps:Carding - folding, the aggregate Spinnbau-Hergeth type, Germany, with major changes carding technology adjustment and folding, to obtain a fibrous layer with a mass per unit surface of about 40-50 g / m2 and a width of 2,1 m;Pre-heat consolidation by pre-heating required only to ensure product stability required minimal interphase transport to final consolidation. Final thermal consolidation of the fibrous layer by thermal calendering at a temperature of 110°C and calenders cylinder speed of 2 m / min. The processing of the fiber by carding - folding and preliminary thermally consolidation and final by calendering.

  17. Plasma Sterilization: New Epoch in Medical Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, P.; Arun, N.; Vigneswaran, C.

    2015-04-01

    Clothing is perceived to be second skin to the human body since it is in close contact with the human skin most of the times. In hospitals, use of textile materials in different forms and sterilization of these materials is an essential requirement for preventing spread of germs. The need for appropriate disinfection and sterilization techniques is of paramount importance. There has been a continuous demand for novel sterilization techniques appropriate for use on various textile materials as the existing sterilization techniques suffer from various technical and economical drawbacks. Plasma sterilization is the alternative method, which is friendlier and more effective on the wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Basically, the main inactivation factors for cells exposed to plasma are heat, UV radiation and various reactive species. Plasma exposure can kill micro-organisms on a surface in addition to removing adsorbed monolayer of surface contaminants. Advantages of plasma surface treatment are removal of contaminants from the surface, change in the surface energy and sterilization of the surface. Plasma sterilization aims to kill and/or remove all micro-organisms which may cause infection of humans or animals, or which can cause spoilage of foods or other goods. This review paper emphasizes necessity for sterilization, essentials of sterilization, mechanism of plasma sterilization and the parameters influencing it.

  18. Tubular Steel Arch Stabilized by Textile Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Svoboda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tubular steel arch supporting textile membrane roofing is investigated experimentally and numerically. The stabilization effects of the textile membrane on in-plane and out-of-plane behavior of the arch is of primary interest. First a model of a large membrane structure tested in laboratory is described. Prestressed membranes of PVC coated polyester fabric Ferrari® Précontraint 702S were used as a currently standard and excellent material. The test arrangement, loading and resulting load/deflection values are presented. The supporting structure consisted of two steel arch tubes, outer at edge of the membrane and inner supporting interior of the membrane roofing. The stability and strength behavior of the inner tube under both symmetrical and asymmetrical loading was monitored and is shown in some details. Second the SOFiSTiK software was employed to analyze the structural behavior in 3D, using geometrically nonlinear analysis with imperfections (GNIA. The numerical analysis, FE mesh sensitivity, the membrane prestressing and common boundary conditions are validated by test results. Finally a parametrical study concerning stability of mid arch with various geometries in a membrane structure with several supporting arches is presented, with recommendations for a practical design.

  19. Nanomaterials for Functional Textiles and Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Pedro J.; Urrutia, Aitor; Goicoechea, Javier; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles are very interesting because of their surface properties, different from bulk materials. Such properties make possible to endow ordinary products with new functionalities. Their relatively low cost with respect to other nano-additives make them a promising choice for industrial mass-production systems. Nanoparticles of different kind of materials such as silver, titania, and zinc oxide have been used in the functionalization of fibers and fabrics achieving significantly improved products with new macroscopic properties. This article reviews the most relevant approaches for incorporating such nanoparticles into synthetic fibers used traditionally in the textile industry allowing to give a solution to traditional problems for textiles such as the microorganism growth onto fibers, flammability, robustness against ultraviolet radiation, and many others. In addition, the incorporation of such nanoparticles into special ultrathin fibers is also analyzed. In this field, electrospinning is a very promising technique that allows the fabrication of ultrathin fiber mats with an extraordinary control of their structure and properties, being an ideal alternative for applications such as wound healing or even functional membranes.

  20. Health and safety concerns of textiles with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L.; Ramos, D.

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing concern related to the effects of nanomaterials in health and safety.Nanotechnologies are already present in many consumer products, including textiles. “Nanotextiles” can be considered as traditional textiles with the incorporation of nanoparticles. They present often functionalities such as antibacterial, ultraviolet radiation protection, water and dirt repellency, self-cleaning or flame retardancy. Nanoparticles can be released from the textile materials due to different effects (abrasion and other mechanical stresses, sweat, irradiation, washing, temperature changes, etc.). It is then expectable that “nanotextiles” may release individual nanoparticles, agglomerates of nanoparticles or small particles of textile with or without nanoparticles, depending on the type of integration of the nanoparticles in textiles. The most important exposure route of the human body to nanoparticles in case of textiles is skin contact. Several standards are being developed under the auspices of the European Committee for Standardization. In this paper, it is presented the development and application of a test method to evaluate the skin exposure to nanoparticles, to evaluate the transfer of the nanoparticles from the textile to the skin by the effect of abrasion and sweat.

  1. Long term respiratory health effects in textile workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Peggy S.; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Over 60 million people worldwide work in the textile or clothing industry. Recent studies have recognized the contribution of workplace exposures to chronic lung diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Early studies in textile workers have focused on the relationship between hemp or cotton dust exposure and the development of a syndrome termed Byssinosis. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effect of long term exposure to organic dust in textile workers on chronic respiratory disease in the broader context of disease classifications such as reversible or irreversible obstructive lung disease (i.e. asthma or COPD), and restrictive lung disease. Recent findings Cessation of exposure to cotton dusts leads to improvement in lung function. Recent animal models have suggested a shift in the lung macrophage:dendritic cell population as a potential mechanistic explanation for persistent inflammation in the lung due to repeated cotton-dust related endotoxin exposure. Other types of textile dust, such as silk, may contribute to COPD in textile workers. Summary Textile dust related obstructive lung disease has characteristics of both asthma and COPD. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of chronic lung disease due to organic dust exposure in textile workers. PMID:23361196

  2. A wearable tracking device inkjet-printed on textile

    KAUST Repository

    Krykpayev, Bauyrzhan

    2017-05-20

    Despite the abundance of localization applications, the tracking devices have never been truly realized in E-textiles. Standard printed circuit board (PCB)-based devices are obtrusive and rigid and hence not suitable for textile based implementations. An attractive option would be direct printing of circuit layout on the textile itself, negating the use of rigid PCB materials. However, high surface roughness and porosity of textiles prevents efficient and reliable printing of electronics on textile. In this work, by printing an interface layer on the textile first, a complete localization circuit integrated with an antenna has been inkjet-printed on the textile for the first time. Printed conductive traces were optimized in terms of conductivity and resolution by controlling the number of over-printed layers. The tracking device determines the wearer\\'s position using WiFi and this information can be displayed on any internet-enabled device, such as smart phone. The device is compact (55mm×45mm) and lightweight (22g with 500mAh battery) for people to comfortably wear it and can be easily concealed in case discretion is required. The device operates at 2.4GHz communicated up to a distance of 55m, with localization accuracy of up to 8m.

  3. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) contamination from textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supreeyasunthorn, Phenpimuk; Boontanon, Suwanna K; Boontanon, Narin

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in textiles and to determine PFOS and PFOA contamination in textile washing water. Quantification analysis was performed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of 32 textile samples by methanol extraction revealed that the average concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were 0.18 µg m(-2) (0.02 to 0.61 µg m(-2)) and 2.74 µg m(-2) (0.31 to 14.14 µg m(-2)), respectively. Although the average concentration of PFOS found in textile samples was below European Union (EU) Commission regulations (textile samples had PFOA concentrations exceeding 1 µg m(-2). Thus, based on these results, the concentration of PFOA in products should also be regulated. Experiments on PFOS and PFOA leaching into washing water were conducted. The maximum concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were measured after the first washing; the concentrations gradually decreased with each subsequent washing. PFOS and PFOA migrated from textiles and were released into the environment, with disappearance percentages of 29.8% for PFOS and 99% for PFOA. The data presented in this study showed that textiles could be a significant direct and indirect source of PFOS and PFOA exposure for both humans and the environment.

  4. Electric energy consumption in the cotton textile processing stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palamutcu, S. [Textile Engineering Department, Pamukkale University, Engineering Faculty, 20070 Kinikli, Denizli (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    Electric energy is one of the primary energy sources consumpted in cotton textile processing. Current energy cost rate is reported about 8-10% in the total production cost of an ordinary textile product manufactured in Turkey. Significantly important share of this energy cost is electric energy. The aim of this paper was to investigate unit electric energy consumption of cotton textile processing stages using real-time measurements method. Actual and estimated Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) values for electric energy was calculated in the cotton textile processing stages of spinning, warping-sizing, weaving, wet processing and clothing manufacturing. Actual electric energy consumption data are gathered from monthly records of the involved plant managements. Estimated electric energy consumption data is gathered through on-site measurement. Actual and estimated electric energy consumption data and monthly production quantities of the corresponding months are used to facilitate specific electric energy consumption of the plants. It is found that actual electric energy consumption amount per unit textile product is higher than the estimated electric energy consumption amount per unit textile product of each involved textile processing stages. (author)

  5. THE DYNAMICS OF THE TEXTILE MARKET. ANALYTICAL REFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliona CERNOVA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the transition to a market economy, the state of many countries’ economies and the international textile industry face considerable challenges. There are many uncertainties surrounding the global textile market, exacerbated by gloomy predictions that for a decade should have been eliminated, resulting in “free” trade flows. There is no doubt that manufacturers which have created niche markets will be better positioned to compete in the global marketplace and achieve higher margins for products while yielding greater profitability. This paper is an introduction of a reasearch that examines how some textile market niches have evolved. The goal of this paper is research and the role that textile niche markets will play by 2025. Specific objectives are: to give a broad overview of various trade theories, including classical, neo-classical, post-neo-classical, and modern, in order to determine what are the possibilities for development and protection. In particular, emphasis will be focused the special problems, due to the vector exchanges and commercial conjuncture, to illustrate how traditional marketing methods differ from market to market and to examine what role will play niche markets in the textiles industry and textile apparel industry in 2050. The results of this research study will help formulate a business strategy that can be used in market capitalization and will provide a framework for research for textile researchers at a global level.

  6. Dermal exposure potential from textiles that contain silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Thomas, Treye A; LeBouf, Ryan F; Wade, Eleanor E; Abbas Virji, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Factors that influence exposure to silver particles from the use of textiles are not well understood. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of product treatment and physiological factors on silver release from two textiles. Methods: Atomic and absorbance spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were applied to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the textiles and evaluate silver release in artificial sweat and saliva under varying physiological conditions. One textile had silver incorporated into fiber threads (masterbatch process) and the other had silver nanoparticles coated on fiber surfaces (finishing process). Results: Several complementary and confirmatory analytical techniques (spectroscopy, microscopy, etc.) were required to properly assess silver release. Silver released into artificial sweat or saliva was primarily in ionic form. In a simulated “use” and laundering experiment, the total cumulative amount of silver ion released was greater for the finishing process textile (0.51±0.04%) than the masterbatch process textile (0.21±0.01%); P<0.01. Conclusions: We found that the process (masterbatch vs finishing) used to treat textile fibers was a more influential exposure factor than physiological properties of artificial sweat or saliva. PMID:25000110

  7. Blue and grey water footprint of textile industry in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Laili; Ding, Xuemei; Wu, Xiongying

    2013-01-01

    Water footprint (WF) is a newly developed idea that indicates impacts of freshwater appropriation and wastewater discharge. The textile industry is one of the oldest, longest and most complicated industrial chains in the world's manufacturing industries. However, the textile industry is also water intensive. In this paper, we applied a bottom-up approach to estimate the direct blue water footprint (WFdir,blue) and direct grey water footprint (WFdir,grey) of China's textile industry at sector level based on WF methodology. The results showed that WFdir,blue of China's textile industry had an increasing trend from 2001 to 2010. The annual WFdir,blue surpassed 0.92 Gm(3)/yr (giga cubic meter a year) since 2004 and rose to peak value of 1.09 Gm(3)/yr in 2007. The original and residuary WFdir,grey (both were calculated based on the concentration of chemical oxygen demand (CODCr)) of China's textile industry had a similar variation trend with that of WFdir,blue. Among the three sub-sectors of China's textile industry, the manufacture of textiles sector's annual WFdir,blue and WFdir,grey were much larger than those of the manufacture of textile wearing apparel, footware and caps sector and the manufacture of chemical fibers sector. The intensities of WFdir,blue and WF(res)dir,grey of China's textile industry were year by year decreasing through the efforts of issuing restriction policies on freshwater use and wastewater generation and discharge, and popularization of water saving and wastewater treatment technologies.

  8. Finite element based micro-mechanics modeling of textile composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Textile composites have the advantage over laminated composites of a significantly greater damage tolerance and resistance to delamination. Currently, a disadvantage of textile composites is the inability to examine the details of the internal response of these materials under load. Traditional approaches to the study fo textile based composite materials neglect many of the geometric details that affect the performance of the material. The present three dimensional analysis, based on the representative volume element (RVE) of a plain weave, allows prediction of the internal details of displacement, strain, stress, and failure quantities. Through this analysis, the effect of geometric and material parameters on the aforementioned quantities are studied.

  9. The Potential of Improving Medical Textile for Cutaneous Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, C. D.; Cerempei, A.; Salariu, M.; Parteni, O.; Ulea, E.; Campagne, Chr

    2017-10-01

    The paper dwells on the prospect of medical textiles designed to release a drug/active principle to the dermis of patients suffering from cutaneous disease (allergic dermatitis, psoriasis, bacterial/infectious conditions and inflammatory conditions). The paper is an overview of general and experimental data from textile applications. An adequate medical textile may have a cellulosic structure, mainly knitted cotton fabric. In special cases, one may use woven fabric for multilayer drug-releasing systems. As far as controlled release systems are concerned, we carried out a critical comparison between the systems described in literature and our experimental findings as concerns cyclodextrin, hydrogel, film charged with active principles and multilayer system.

  10. Stimuli-responsive Hydrogels for Textile Functionalisation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štular Danaja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews hydrogels used for the functionalisation of textile materials. Hydrogels are reviewed according to their reason for incorporation, aspects of crosslinking, stimuli-responsive characteristics and particle size. A more in-depth focus on the effect of hydrogel particle size is provided, where macrogels, microgels and nanogels for textile functionalisation are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of each size group are presented. Furthermore, the correlation between synthesis conditions and the sizes of hydrogel particles is discussed, in addition to the applications of macro-, micro- and nanogels to textile materials and their intended uses.

  11. MUSEOS TEXTILES EN CANADÁ, GUATEMALA Y MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco López Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Los productos textiles no suelen ser protagónicos en las prácticas museográficas tradicionales; se les considera objetos decorativos, piezas de arte popular o elementos etnográficos, pero generalmente apoyan discursos de otras tipologías museales, más convencionales y establecidas. Por ello, este texto compara los fondos y los sistemas expositivos de tres instituciones dedicadas exclusivamente al objeto textil: el Textile Museum of Canada (fundado en Toronto en 1975; el Museo Ixchel del Traje Indígena (inaugurado en Guatemala en 1977; y el Museo Textil de Oaxaca (abierto al público en 2008. Se propone que los museos textiles son entidades híbridas y sugerentes, con frágiles acervos que requieren soluciones museográficas provenientes de la antropología, la historia del arte occidental “culta” y las artes populares. Si bien el discurso curatorial de los museos textiles ha sido relativamente periférico, también es polivalente: (reafirma identidades nacionales, pero construye nuevas visiones —más incluyentes— de diversidad cultural. Textile artifacts are not central devices in generalized curatorial practices: even if these objects might be considered simultaneously as decorative items, popular art pieces or ethnographical resources, they are certainly not independent from more traditionalist and established kinds of exhibits. For those reasons, this article will compare the collections and displays of three important institutions exclusively related to textile artifacts: the Textile Museum of Canada (inaugurated in Toronto in 1975; the Museum Ixchel of the Indigenous Garment (opened to the public in 1977 in Guatemala; and the Museum Textil of Oaxaca, Mexico (founded in 2008. Some institutional, architectonical and technical aspects of these three museums will be compared. The article will suggest some patrimonial possibilities latent in textile museums, according to their precise typological traits, with the main idea that

  12. Study of energy optimization in textile sector; Estudo de otimizacao energetica setorial textil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, N.W.B.; Camargos, J.O. [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Morais, F.M. de; Mattos Silva, E. de [Centro de Apoio a Pequena e Media Empresa, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1990-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study carried by CEMIG (electric power public utility of Minas Gerais state) and CEAG (support center for the medium and small company of Minas Gerais State) on the energy optimization in the textile sector. The main results were the following: characterization of the sector`s productive process; consumption distribution of electric power and alternative sources of energy; specific consumptions; recommendations for energy conservation and technologic situation of the sector. 11 refs., 4 tabs

  13. La industria textil uruguaya (1900-1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Bertino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La industria textil uruguaya se inició a comienzos del siglo XX con la instalación de algunas fábricas de tejidos de lana y de una gran hilandería de lana peinada. Desde la crisis de 1929, sustentada en la protección cambiaría, se expandió en forma acelerada durante el periodo conocido como de industrialización por sustitución de importaciones. Alcanzó su apogeo entre fines de la segunda guerra mundial y comienzos de la década de los cincuenta, al instalar hilanderías de algodón y de fibras sintéticas y cuando las exportaciones industriales laneras adquirieron una importante dimensión. El progresivo agotamiento de la sustitución de importaciones, los frenos opuestos a las exportaciones, junto al estancamiento económico del país y el desmontaje de la protección estatal, la sumieron en una profunda crisis y en la pérdida creciente de significación en la industria y en la economía uruguaya.The Uruguayan textile industry started in the early xxth century based on the production of woven fabric and wool spinning mill (tops. From the years of the 1929's crisis onwards, it went through a great expansion due to a protectionist policy based on favourable exchange rates. Those were the times of the Import Substitutive Industrialization (ISI in the country. After the Second World War and, particularly, during the fifties it reached its height with the production of cotton fabrics and synthetic fibers. Meanwhile, wool exports would grow strongly. However, in the late fifties, the ISI strategy was in trouble and the obstacles for export's growth and the economic stagnation together with the removal of the protectionist's policies, put an end to the textile industry development. As a consequence, it experienced a deep crisis and lost importance both for the industry and for the economy as a whole.

  14. The friction property of super-hydrophobic cotton textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Changhong; Li, Jun

    2010-04-01

    Two kinds of super-hydrophobic cotton textiles were prepared via dip-coating cotton textiles with nano-silica suspensions, and the cotton textiles exhibits high contact angle more than 160° and low sliding angle lower than 4°. A friction method was used to evaluate the durability of the as-prepared super-hydrophobic cotton textiles, the results shows that one of the as-prepared super-hydrophobic cottons exhibits better stability property against friction, and its contact angle remained higher than 150° and sliding angle remained lower than 15° after 1000 times friction. SEM analysis shows the reduction of hydrophobic property was resulted from the damage of surface structure during friction cycle.

  15. Energy and environmental nanotechnology in conductive paper and textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2012-01-01

    Paper and textiles have been used ubiquitously in our everyday lives, such as books and newspapers for propagating information, clothing and packaging. In this perspective, we will summarize our recent efforts in exploring these old materials for emerging energy and environmental applications. The motivations and challenges of using paper and textiles for device applications will be discussed. Various types of energy and environmental devices have been demonstrated including supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, microbial fuel cells and water filters. Due to their unique morphologies, paper and textile-based devices not only can be fabricated with simple processing, but also show outstanding device performance. Being renewable and earth-abundant materials, paper and textiles could play significant roles in addressing future energy and environmental challenges. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Indoor Decontamination Textiles by Photocatalytic Oxidation: A Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Memon, Hafeezullah; Yasin, Sohail; Ali Khoso, Nazakat; Hussain, Munir

    2015-01-01

    ...; this is achieved by imparting functionality to the textile materials. The indoor environment possesses a variety of pollutants which do not come from the outer environment, but they come from the inner environment itself...

  17. E-textiles in Clinical Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Fleury

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Electronic textiles have potential for many practical uses in clinical rehabilitation. This scoping review appraises recent and emerging developments of textile-based sensors with applications to rehabilitation. Contributions published from 2009 to 2013 are appraised with a specific focus on the measured physiological or biomechanical phenomenon, current measurement practices, textile innovations, and their merits and limitations. While fabric-based signal quality and sensor integration have advanced considerably, overall system integration (including circuitry and power has not been fully realized. Validation against clinical gold standards is inconsistent at best, and feasibility with clinical populations remains to be demonstrated. The overwhelming focus of research and development has been on remote sensing but the opportunity for textile-mediated feedback to the wearer remains unexplored. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  18. Fundamental Aspects on Conductive Textiles Implemented in Intelligent System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.; Ene, D.; Amariei, N.; Popa, A.

    2017-06-01

    Conductive fibers, which are electrically conductive elements having the structure of a fiber, have a fairly long history and have been used for applications in electronic textiles as well as for aesthetics, anti-static and shielding purposes. Electrically conducting textile fibers, such as gold-coated threads, were produced in antiquity for aesthetic purposes, before the discovery of electricity, using various manufacturing methods. The textile intelligent systems, which comprise conducting textile structures (electroconducting wires or structures), present a dynamic behavior which favors the self regulation of the thermal insulation and vapor permeability with the purpose to maintain the thermo-physiological balance; the clothing assembly aims at monitoring the biologic potential, used only in critical situation (ex. accidents, falling down in a precipice etc.).

  19. Auxiliaries for the textile industry and environmental protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda VISAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry is an industrial field that affects the environment, from the plant growth until the production process. The obtaining of environmental licence for Romanian companies that produce textile products is related to elaboration and implementation of a modern system for an environmental management, that consist in utilization of ecological technologies for finishing, in diminution the water and energy consumption, cleaning of waste waters, reutilization of cleaned waters, sustainable management of wastes. In this study, the surfactant categories used in the textile industry that fulfil the conditions of environment protection, are presented. Some exemplifications were made involving the existing surfactants in Romanian textile industry, obtained from both domestic and external production. Also, some recommendation are suggested regarding the utilization of surfactants manufactured from either vegetal oils or chemical/petrochemical wastes, with similar properties as those from import having decreased prices an that affect as small as possible the environment.

  20. Development of a luminous textile for reflective pulse oximetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehel, Marek; Wolf, Martin; Boesel, Luciano F.; Rossi, René M.; Bona, Gian-Luca; Scherer, Lukas J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a textile-based sensing principle for long term photopletysmography (PPG) monitoring is presented. Optical fibers were embroidered into textiles such that out-coupling and in-coupling of light was possible. The “light-in light-out” properties of the textile enabled the spectroscopic characterization of human tissue. For the optimization of the textile sensor, three different carrier fabrics and different fiber modifications were compared. The sample with best light coupling efficiency was successfully used to measure heart rate and SpO2 values of a subject. The latter was determined by using a modified Beer-Lambert law and measuring the light attenuation at two different wavelengths (632 nm and 894 nm). Moreover, the system was adapted to work in reflection mode which makes the sensor more versatile. The measurements were additionally compared with commercially available system and showed good correlation. PMID:25136484

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF KLEBSIELLA FROM TEXTILE FINISHING PLANT EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella strains are found in abnormally high numbers in a stream receiving wastewater from a textile finishing plant. Representative strains are randomly selected to determine biochemical, serotype, and virulence patterns. All strains conform to the commonly accepted biochemic...

  2. consumers' understanding and use of textile eco-labels dur

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Glock .... Questions were adapted from Van der Merwe and Campbell. (2008) and some questions were also based on literature. Questions focused on the use of. Consumers' ... Need recognition for green textile products. Important information ...

  3. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Toward Organ Weaving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-06

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, microarchitecture, and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important roles in the effective use of textile technologies in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the current advances in the manufacturing of biofunctional fibers. Different textile methods such as knitting, weaving, and braiding are discussed and their current applications in tissue engineering are highlighted. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Optical correlator for textile web defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Nathalie; Prevost, Donald; Sheng, Yunlong

    2000-05-01

    Cost-effective optical correlators are now available for industrial applications. One such application field is the real-time automatic inspection of textile web, in which the high data throughput of the optical correlator over-performs that of the electronic computer. Two approaches for defect enhancement using of wavelet and Wiener filters are proposed. The band-pass wavelet filter is designed to give higher weights in the frequency band, where the energy of defect is higher than that of the web, and to suppress the zero, first and all higher diffracted orders. The Wiener filters are designed based on an average defect shape, with the web texture considered as noise. Using the technique developed at INO (National Optics Institute), a set up of the Vander Lugt type correlator demonstrates experimentally the relevancy of the algorithms. Simulation and optical results are presented.

  5. Membrane contactors for textile wastewater ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardelli, Gianluca; Ciabatti, Ingrid; Ranieri, Laura; Capannelli, Gustavo; Bottino, Aldo

    2003-03-01

    This paper deals with the application of a membrane contactor for the ozone treatment of textile wastewater. Ceramic (alpha-Al(2)O(3)) membranes were chosen because of their ozone resistance. A thin metal oxide (TiO(2) and gamma-Al(2)O(3)) layer was deposited on the membrane surface to eliminate large defects. Membranes were characterized by bubble pressure and gas permeability tests. Mass transfer coefficients were calculated by using the double-film theory. Decolorization kinetics were studied with model dye solutions. Decolorization experiments with a real exhausted dyebath (untreated and after biological treatment) were also carried out. The potential advantages of membrane contactors for the treatment of these types of effluents are demonstrated.

  6. Treatment of Textile Wastewaterby Adsorption and Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Patel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite of wastewater treatment was carried out using activated charcoal as adsorbent to remove COD, BOD, color in which various parameters like adsorbent dose, contact duration, temperature and agitator speed were considered. The adsorbent behavior can be explained on the basis of Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. Maximum removal (87.6, 81.0 and 90.0% of COD, BOD and color respectively was found at adsorbent dosage of 11 g/L. Also, the textile mill wastewater was treated with different doses of coagulants like alum, ferric sulphate and ferrous sulphate at constant contact duration (4 hours and room temperature (300 K. Percentage reduction (maximum corresponds to 80.2, 74.0 and 84.9% was obtained for removal of COD, BOD and color respectively.

  7. Generation of methane from textile desizing liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opwis, Klaus; Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Schollmeyer, Eckhard [Deutsches Textilforschungszentrum Nord-West e.V., Krefeld (Germany); Dammer, Christoph; Titscher, Tanja; Nickisch-Hartfiel, Anna [Hochschule Niederrhein, Frankenring, Krefeld (Germany); Gruen, Oliver; Spurk, Christoph [OeKOBiT GmbH, Foehren (Germany); Schloderer, Christine; Koeppe, Axel [Textilveredlung an der Wiese, Loerrach (Germany); Doerfler, Christian; Bachus, Herbert [CHT R. Beitlich GmbH, Bismarckstr, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    A new strategy for the biological transformation of sugar-containing wastewaters from the textile desizing process to biogas was developed. Here, industrial liquors were separated from the following washing step by squeezing the impregnated fabrics after desizing. These waters exhibit a chemical oxygen demand of 40 g/L and allow a direct use in microbial biogas reactors without further treatment or accumulation. After reaching balanced conditions, the microbes continuously produce biogas. Moreover, the chemical oxygen demand can be reduced up to 75%. This new technology seems to be practicable and even attractive for small- and medium-sized enterprises with an annual cotton production down to 2000 t. At this stage, a reliable eco-balance of the overall process is still pending. Further investigations will be carried out soon. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Energy conservation potential in Taiwanese textile industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gui-Bing; Su, Te-Li; Chen, Hua-Wei [Department of Cosmetic Application and Management, St. Mary' s Medicine Nursing and Management College, 100, Lane. 265, Section 2, Sanxing Road, Sanxing Township, Yilan County (China); Lee, Jenq-Daw; Hsu, Tsung-Chi [Technology Center for Service Industries, Industrial Technology Research Institute, 195, Section 4, Chung Hsing Road, Chutung, Hsinchu (China)

    2010-11-15

    Since Taiwan lacks sufficient self-produced energy, increasing energy efficiency and energy savings are essential aspects of Taiwan's energy policy. This work summarizes the energy savings implemented by 303 firms in Taiwan's textile industry from the on-line Energy Declaration System in 2008. It was found that the total implemented energy savings amounted to 46,074 ton of oil equivalent (TOE). The energy saving was equivalent to 94,614 MWh of electricity, 23,686 kl of fuel oil and 4887 ton of fuel coal. It represented a potential reduction of 143,669 ton in carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual carbon dioxide absorption capacity of a 3848 ha plantation forest. This study summarizes energy-saving measures for energy users and identifies the areas for making energy saving to provide an energy efficiency baseline. (author)

  9. Individual customizable in-store textile production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M.; Bücher, D.; Gloy, Y.-S.; Gries, T.

    2017-10-01

    The target of every company is to satisfy customer demands. Especially the clothing industry has to serve individual customer requirements. Textile products always have been and still are the defining attributes of people’s appearance. Consumer’s demands towards commercial clothing companies have been changing rapidly during the recent years. Two global megatrends have supported this change: Individualization and digitalization. Individualization created demand for frequent collection changes, while still keeping availability high. Digitalization supported the quick distribution of new trends and forced a higher amount of request during peak periods. This paper outlines how a highly individual and customizable fashion product can be produced in a store environment. It focuses on the conceptual design, taking into account the interdisciplinary approach combining production technology with IT-systems, but also addresses the economical challenge with help of a value stream analysis.

  10. Roadmap Textile 2030; Routekaart Textiel 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintermans, J. [MODINT, Zeist (Netherlands); Van den Berg, F. [BECO, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Van Hooijdonk, G. [The Bridge, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Luiken, A. [Alcon Advies, Wierden (Netherlands); Brinks, G. [BMA Techne, Almelo (Netherlands); Op den Brouw, H. [Agentschap NL, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    For the Roadmap Textile the future market demand was chosen as a starting point Trends in the following five sectors are depicted: Care, Construction, Mobility, Sports and Entertainment, Safety. Opportunities are defined and translated into development targets. Based on 'technological readiness levels' and perceived market opportunities, five new or innovative product market combinations (PMCs) are assigned and calculated for potential savings in energy and raw materials [Dutch] Voor de Routekaart Textiel is de toekomstige marktvraag als vertrekpunt gekozen. Trends in de volgende vijf sectoren zijn in beeld gebracht: Zorg, Bouw, Mobiliteit, Sport en ontspanning, Veiligheid. Vanuit deze trends zijn kansen gedefinieerd, die vervolgens zijn doorvertaald naar ontwikkelingsdoelen. Op basis van de bijbehorende 'technological readiness levels' en de gepercipieerde marktkansen, zijn een vijftal nieuwe dan wel vernieuwende product markt combinaties (pmc's) benoemd en doorgerekend op besparingspotentieel in energie en grondstoffen.

  11. The US textile industry: An energy perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badin, J. S.; Lowitt, H. E.

    1988-01-01

    This report investigates the state of the US textile industry in terms of energy consumption and conservation. Specific objectives were: To update and verify energy and materials consumption data at the various process levels in 1984; to determine the potential energy savings attainable with current (1984), state-of-the-art, and future production practices and technologies (2010); and to identify new areas of research and development opportunity that will enable these potential future savings to be achieved. Results of this study concluded that in the year 2010, there is a potential to save between 34% and 53% of the energy used in current production practices, dependent on the projected technology mix. RandD needs and opportunities were identified for the industry in three categories: process modification, basic research, and improved housekeeping practices that reduce energy consumption. Potential RandD candidates for DOE involvement with the private sector were assessed and selected from the identified list.

  12. Perancangan Program Aplikasi Pembelian pada PT Indo Taichen Textile Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Yakub, Yakub; Hermanto, Shirly

    2010-01-01

    PT Indo Taichen Textile Industry is a company in the textile industry producing cloth. Activities and operations personnel administration, payroll systems, purchasing systems, and inventory systems are conducted manually. Problems begin to become fairly complex on the company's purchasing system so that a software application is required. Purchasing system is made by Data Flow Diagram (DFD) as a model of the process or system and Entity Relation Diagram (ERD) as a data model. The purchasing a...

  13. PERANCANGAN PROGRAM APLIKASI PEMBELIAN PADA PT INDO TAICHEN TEXTILE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Yakub Yakub; Shirly Hermanto

    2010-01-01

    PT Indo Taichen Textile Industry is a company in the textile industry producing cloth. Activities and operations personnel administration, payroll systems, purchasing systems, and inventory systems are conducted manually. Problems begin to become fairly complex on the company’s purchasing system so that a software application is required. Purchasing system is made by Data Flow Diagram (DFD) as a model of the process or system and Entity Relation Diagram (ERD) as a data model. The purchasing a...

  14. Sustainability in Textiles and Fashion – The Current Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Hann, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with sustainability in textiles and fashion and identifies the problems and challenges faced by the international textile and fashion industry. Traditional product end uses as well as novel applications associated with the minority natural fibres such as jute, ramie and hemp are identified, and the potential advantages of focusing on developing the applicability of such in fashion applications is assessed. A series of strategic proposals, aimed at gaining attention in ...

  15. Applied TRIZ in Improving Productivity in Textile Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Aminah; Miswan Nor Hamizah; Said Rahaini Mohd; Abdullah Rohana

    2017-01-01

    TRIZ is a methodology and a collection of problem solving tools and strategies that has been used in many other fields. Therefore, this paper proposes TRIZ method for improving the productivity in a textile industry. It focuses at the packing department in a textile company situated in Malaysia. The process was monitored and the problem was observed. TRIZ method is applied in this problem using Functional Analysis and trimming method. A comparison between before and after implementation is do...

  16. Comparative toxicity of leachates from 52 textiles to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Göran; Aspegren, Pia

    2010-10-01

    The environmental aspects of textiles are very complex and include production, processing, transport, usage, and recycling. Textiles are made from a variety of materials and can contain a large number of chemicals. Chemicals are used during production of fibres, for preservation and colouring and they are released during normal wear and during washing. The aim of this study was to investigate the release to water of toxic chemicals from various textiles. Altogether 52 samples of textiles made from cotton (21), linen (4), cotton and linen (7), cellulose (3), synthetic fibres (7), cotton and synthetic fibres (8) and wool (2). Seven were eco-labelled. All textiles were cut into squares and placed into Petri dishes with 50 ml ISO test medium in a concentration series (4-256 cm(2)/50 ml) and tested for acute toxicity to Daphnia magna. Estimated EC50s were converted into weight/volume, and 48-h EC50s ranged between 182 g/L. It was not possible to detect any difference between fibre type and toxicity (ANOVA), but a significantly higher toxicity was found for printed versus unprinted cotton and cotton/linen textiles, while the opposite was found for synthetic textiles. Eco-labelled products were evenly distributed on a toxicity scale, which means that eco-labelling in its present form does not necessarily protect users or the environment from exposure to toxic chemicals. Therefore, the results from the present study suggest that bioassays and toxicity tests should become an integrated part of textile environmental quality control programs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Textile structures from hyaluronan based core-shell fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitucha, T.; Lipenska, K.; Kubickova, J.; Zapotocky, V.; Velebny, V.

    2017-10-01

    Core-shell fibers based on the combination of soluble and insoluble types of hyaluronan were successfully created using wet-spinning method. High swelling of the fibers in synergy with tight textile structures were employed to ensure release of the dissolved fiber core through local cracks in the fiber shell. Thanks to the biocompatibility and resorbability of hyaluronan, the braided or knitted textile structures made from these fibers have a potential to be employed as a drug carrier in medical applications.

  18. Lithium-ion textile batteries with large areal mass loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Liangbing; La Mantia, Fabio; Wu, Hui; Xie, Xing; McDonough, James; Pasta, Mauro; Cui, Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We integrate Li-ion battery electrode materials into a 3D porous textile conductor by using a simple process. When compared to flat metal current collectors, our 3D porous textile conductor not only greatly facilitates the ability for a high active material mass loading on the battery electrode but also leads to better device performance. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Towards textile energy storage from cotton T-shirts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Lihong; Li, Xiaodong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2012-06-26

    A simple chemical activation route is developed to convert insulating cotton T-shirt textiles into highly conductive and flexible activated carbon textiles (ACTs) for energy-storage applications. Such conversion gives these ACTs an ideal electrical double-layer capacitive behavior. The constructed asymmetric supercapacitors based on the ACTs and MnO{sub 2}/ACT composite show superior electrochemical performances. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Detecting Defects in Textile Fabrics with Optimal Gabor Filters

    OpenAIRE

    K. L. Mak; P. Peng

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of automated defect detection for textile fabrics and proposes a new optimal filter design method to solve this problem. Gabor Wavelet Network (GWN) is chosen as the major technique to extract the texture features from textile fabrics. Based on the features extracted, an optimal Gabor filter can be designed. In view of this optimal filter, a new semi-supervised defect detection scheme is proposed, which consists of one real-valued Gabor...

  1. Mass Customized Technical Textiles in the B2B Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, R.; Barteld, M.; Grafmüller, L.; Mosig, T.; Weiß, M.

    2017-10-01

    Mass Customization is a great opportunity for textile companies for both staying competitive in high-wage countries and offering inexpensive, customized products. Within the area of Technical Textiles, this study focuses on the B2B sector and shows the status quo, potentials and strengths. Both management and technological issues are addressed. For the former, business models and the value co-creation process are dealt with, for the latter, the focus is on modelling.

  2. Removal of textile dyes with biopolymers xanthan and alginic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano-Alvarez, J.; Jauregui-Rincon, J.; Mendoza-Diaz, G.; Rodriguez-Vazquez, G.; Frausto-Reyes, C.

    2009-07-01

    Textile industry is an important activity that provides considerable benefits to people, but unfortunately dyeing of yarn and cloth produces pollution of water, a resource that is valuable and scarce. Dyeing of textiles fibers is an inefficient process, in view of the fact that approximately ten percent of total dye is thrown to municipal sewage. Although different treatment systems are applied to wastewater, dyes are resistant to physical, chemical and biological factors because of the way they are designed. (Author)

  3. DETERMINATION OF TRACE HEAVY METALS IN SOME TEXTILE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    The results of the present work for textile products are compared with literature values. KEY WORDS: Trace metals, ... only for the safety of consumers but also for the textile industry. The reliability of trace ... digested with 6 mL of HNO3 (65 %) and 2 mL of H2O2 (30 %) in microwave digestion system and diluted to 10 mL with ...

  4. Improving the appearance of all textile products from clothing to home textile using laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondogan, Ziynet; Pamuk, Oktay; Ondogan, Ece Nuket; Ozguney, Arif

    2005-11-01

    Denim trousers, commonly known as "blue jeans", have maintained their popularity for many years. For the purpose of supporting customers' purchasing behaviour and to address their aesthetic taste, companies have been trying in recent years to develop various techniques to improve the visual aspects of denim fabrics. These techniques mainly include printing on fabrics, embroidery and washing the final product. Especially, fraying certain areas of the fabric by sanding and stone washing to create designs is a popular technique. However, due to certain inconveniences caused by these procedures and in response to growing demands, research is underway to obtain a similar appearance by creating better quality and more advantageous manufacturing conditions. As is known, the laser is a source of energy which can be directed on desired objects and whose power and intensity can be easily controlled. Use of the laser enables us to cut a great variety of material from metal to fabric. Starting off from this point, we thought it would be possible to transfer certain designs onto the surface of textile material by changing the dye molecules in the fabric and creating alterations in its colour quality values by directing the laser to the material at reduced intensity. This study mainly deals with a machine specially designed for making use of laser beams to transfer pictures, figures as well as graphics of desired variety, size and intensity on all kinds of surfaces in textile manufacturing such as knitted—woven fabrics, leather, etc. at desired precision and without damaging the texture of the material. In the designed system, computer-controlled laser beams are used to change the colour of the dye material on the textile surface by directing the laser beams at a desired wavelength and intensity onto various textile surfaces selected for application. For this purpose, a laser beam source that can reach the initial level of power and that can be controlled by means of a

  5. Activated Carbon Textile via Chemistry of Metal Extraction for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Do Van; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2016-12-27

    Carbothermic reduction in the chemistry of metal extraction (MO(s) + C(s) → M(s) + CO(g)) using carbon as a sacrificial agent has been used to smelt metals from diverse oxide ores since ancient times. Here, we paid attention to another aspect of the carbothermic reduction to prepare an activated carbon textile for high-rate-performance supercapacitors. On the basis of thermodynamic reducibility of metal oxides reported by Ellingham, we employed not carbon, but metal oxide as a sacrificial agent in order to prepare an activated carbon textile. We conformally coated ZnO on a bare cotton textile using atomic layer deposition, followed by pyrolysis at high temperature (C(s) + ZnO(s) → C'(s) + Zn(g) + CO(g)). We figured out that it leads to concurrent carbonization and activation in a chemical as well as mechanical way. Particularly, the combined effects of mechanical buckling and fracture that occurred between ZnO and cotton turned out to play an important role in carbonizing and activating the cotton textile, thereby significantly increasing surface area (nearly 10 times) compared with the cotton textile prepared without ZnO. The carbon textiles prepared by carbothermic reduction showed impressive combination properties of high power and energy densities (over 20-fold increase) together with high cyclic stability.

  6. E-learning for textile enterprises innovation improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaga, M.; Harpa, R.; Radulescu, I. R.; Stepjanovic, Z.

    2017-10-01

    The Erasmus Plus project- TEXMatrix: “Matrix of knowledge for innovation and competitiveness in textile enterprises”, financed through the Erasmus+ Programme, Strategic partnerships– KA2 for Vocational Education and Training, aims at spreading the creative and innovative organizational culture inside textile enterprises by transferring and implementing methodologies, tools and concepts for improved training. Five European partners form the project consortium: INCDTP – Bucharest, Romania (coordinator), TecMinho - Portugal, Centrocot - Italy, University Maribor, Slovenia, and “Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Romania. These will help the textile enterprises involved in the project, to learn how to apply creative thinking in their organizations and how to develop the capacity for innovation and change. The project aims to bridge the gap between textile enterprises need for qualified personnel and the young workforce. It develops an innovative knowledge matrix for the tangible and intangible assets of an enterprise and a benchmarking study, based on which a dedicated software tool will be created. This software tool will aid the decision-making enterprise staff (managers, HR specialists, professionals) as well as the trainees (young employees, students, and scholars) to cope with the new challenges of innovation and competitiveness for the textile field. The purpose of this paper is to present the main objectives and achievements of the project, according to its declared goals, with the focus on the presentation of the knowledge matrix of innovation, which is a powerful instrument for the quantification of the intangible assets of textile enterprises.

  7. ASEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY IMPLEMENTATION AND INDONESIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRY COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuvensius Sri Susilo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study aims to analyze the impact of ASEAN Economic Community implementation in 2015 on the competitiveness of Indonesian textile and textile products industry. It uses simulations with the GTAP model to answer the proposed research questions. The GTAP simulation results suggest that Indonesian textile industry would gain the largest trade surplus followed by Thailand and Malaysia. For apparel, Vietnam would benefit the most, followed by Indonesia and Thailand. The ratio of domestic to import prices analysis suggests that Indonesian textile products have higher competitiveness than the other ASEAN’s. For the apparel products, Indonesia is as competitive as both Malaysia and the Philippines.Keywords: AEC 2015, Competitiveness, Textile dan Textile Products Industry, IndonesiaJEL Classification: C68, F15AbstrakPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis dampak penerapan Masyarakat Ekonomi ASEAN pada 2015 pada daya saing industri tekstil dan produk tekstil Indonesia. Alat analisis yang digunakan deskriptif dan simulasi dengan model GTAP. Hasil simulasi GTAP menyarankan bahwa industri tekstil Indonesia akan memperoleh surplus perdagangan terbesar, diikuti oleh Thailand dan Malaysia. Untuk produk pakaian, Vietnam memperoleh manfaat terbesar diikuti Indonesia dan Thailand. Berdasarkan rasio harga domestik terhadap harga impor, daya saing produk tekstil Indonesia relatif lebih tinggi dibandingkan negara-negara ASEAN lainnya. Untuk produk pakaian, Indonesia kompetitif, sejajar dengan Malaysia dan Filipina.Kata kunci: AEC 2015, Daya Saing, Tekstil dan Produk Tekstil JEL Classification: C68, F15

  8. Forecast and Analyzis Electricity Consumption in Textile Industry in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piltan, Mehdi; Farahani, Mohammad Reza; Ghaderi, S. Farid [University of Tehran, Faculty of Engineering (Iran)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN) approach for annual electricity consumption in textile Industry in Iran. It is claimed that, due to high fluctuations of energy consumption in textile industries, conventional regression models do not forecast energy consumption correctly and precisely. On the other hand, Iranian textile industries are facing numerous problems, such as lack of liquidity and lack of foreign exchange to import raw materials and spare parts; outdated and ageing machinery because of the impossibility of renovating production lines; rise in wages; and, finally, the inefficiency of the industry. This industry uses about 8.5% of electricity and 6.4% energy of Iran industrial sector and employs about 10.9 % of all workers in manufacturing. Textile industry provides about 5.4% of Iran industries added value. Energy consumption in Iran's textile industry is inefficient, with a huge possibility of improvement. This paper aims to analyze energy demand in the current condition and in the new government's plan. This paper has simulated these models with neural network. The comparison between results of these two models illustrates the effects of this plan on the electricity consumption in textile industry in Iran. Results show that with current electricity price, the most effective parameter on electricity consumption in Iran is added value.

  9. Acoustic Emission Technique Applied in Textiles Mechanical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rios-Soberanis Carlos Rolando

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The common textile architecture/geometry are woven, braided, knitted, stitch boded, and Z-pinned. Fibres in textile form exhibit good out-of-plane properties and good fatigue and impact resistance, additionally, they have better dimensional stability and conformability. Besides the nature of the textile, the architecture has a great role in the mechanical behaviour and mechanisms of damage in textiles, therefore damage mechanisms and mechanical performance in structural applications textiles have been a major concern. Mechanical damage occurs to a large extent during the service lifetime consequently it is vital to understand the material mechanical behaviour by identifying its mechanisms of failure such as onset of damage, crack generation and propagation. In this work, textiles of different architecture were used to manufacture epoxy based composites in order to study failure events under tensile load by using acoustic emission technique which is a powerful characterization tool due to its link between AE data and fracture mechanics, which makes this relation a very useful from the engineering point of view.

  10. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Yassin El-Kassas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD. This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production and for the removal of colour and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD by this microalga. The cultivation of C. vulgaris, presented maximum cellular concentrations Cmax and maximum specific growth rates μmax in the wastewater concentration of 5.0% and 17.5%, respectively. The highest colour and COD removals occurred with 17.5% of textile waste effluent. The results of C. vulgaris culture in the textile waste effluent demonstrated the possibility of using this microalga for the colour and COD removal and for biomass production. There was a significant negative relationship between textile waste effluent concentration and Cmax at 0.05 level of significance. However, sodium bicarbonate concentration did not significantly influence the responses of Cmax and the removal of colour and COD.

  11. Dermal exposure potential from textiles that contain silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Thomas, Treye A; LeBouf, Ryan F; Wade, Eleanor E; Virji, M Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Factors that influence exposure to silver particles from the use of textiles are not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of product treatment and physiological factors on silver release from two textiles. Atomic and absorbance spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were applied to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the textiles and evaluate silver release in artificial sweat and saliva under varying physiological conditions. One textile had silver incorporated into fiber threads (masterbatch process) and the other had silver nanoparticles coated on fiber surfaces (finishing process). Several complementary and confirmatory analytical techniques (spectroscopy, microscopy, etc.) were required to properly assess silver release. Silver released into artificial sweat or saliva was primarily in ionic form. In a simulated "use" and laundering experiment, the total cumulative amount of silver ion released was greater for the finishing process textile (0·51±0·04%) than the masterbatch process textile (0·21±0·01%); Ptextile fibers was a more influential exposure factor than physiological properties of artificial sweat or saliva.

  12. Microencapsulated citronella oil for mosquito repellent finishing of cotton textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specos, M M Miró; García, J J; Tornesello, J; Marino, P; Vecchia, M Della; Tesoriero, M V Defain; Hermida, L G

    2010-10-01

    Microcapsules containing citronella essential oil were prepared by complex coacervation and applied to cotton textiles in order to study the repellent efficacy of the obtained fabrics. Citronella released from treated textiles was indirectly monitored by the extractable content of its main components. Repellent activity was assessed by exposure of a human hand and arm covered with the treated textiles to Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Fabrics treated with microencapsulated citronella presented a higher and longer lasting protection from insects compared to fabrics sprayed with an ethanol solution of the essential oil, assuring a repellent effect higher than 90% for three weeks. Complex coacervation is a simple, low cost, scalable and reproducible method of obtaining encapsulated essential oils for textile application. Repellent textiles were achieved by padding cotton fabrics with microcapsules slurries using a conventional pad-dry method. This methodology requires no additional investment for textile finishing industries, which is a desirable factor in developing countries. Copyright © 2010 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. Textile Raw Material Quality and Ecological Security Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semak Bohdan B.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in showing the role of management and marketing in formation and assessment of quality and ecological security of the domestic textile raw material and use of the obtained information for the needs of development of this raw material market and products manufactured on its basis. It was established in the result of the conducted study that the process of marketing management should be built on the basis of a deep study of needs of textile raw material and manufactured on its basis products consumers and is a key factor of successful development of the market of ecological textile in Ukraine. The article shows the role and justifies a necessity of introduction of ecological standardisation as a necessary prerequisite of formation of the system of textile raw material quality and ecological security management for manufacturing ecological textile. Further studies should be carried out in spheres of development of systems of control over the textile raw material quality and ecological security level for ensuring its correspondence with domestic and international regulatory documents.

  14. Bacterial growth on chitosan-coated polypropylene textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, D; Hola, V; Jaros, J; Rahel, J

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerged into a growth medium inoculated with green fluorescein protein labelled Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After overnight incubation at 33°C, the textile was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy for bacterial enumeration and biofilm structure characterisation. In the second stage, the textile was used as a filter medium for prefiltered river water, and the pressure development on the in-flow side was measured to quantify the overall level of biofouling. In both cases, nontreated textile samples were used as a control. The results indicate that the chitosan coating exhibits antibacterial properties. The developed method is applicable for the evaluation of the ability to inhibit biofilm formation.

  15. THE NEED TO RECYCLE TEXTILE WASTES. LEGISLATIVE ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIMOFTE Claudia Simona

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents arguments and examples regarding the need to reuse, sort, manage and recycle more efficiently the textile wastes. Waste are increasing from a quantitative point of view and represent a major problem in each European country and the textile waste represent 5% of the total quantity of waste at a global level. It is estimated that about 95% of what it reaches the landfill could be reused so that the necessity of recycling is obvious. The constant need of transforming the wastes into by-products represents a priority because the textile waste have a special characteristic in the way that they can be reused or even repurposed. The paper also syhthesizes the legislation that makes reference to the textile waste, their classification and the obligations of the local community members, natural or legal persons. It is also presents the current situation of the textile waste with respect to Romania and Bihor county, but there are also presented other numerous cases, examples and situations in which the waste is recovered/collected properly. The examples have the role of showing and emphasizing the concerns of some companies, brands, institutions or local authorities, specialists and specialized personnel within the agencies of environmental protection to encourage recycling or reuse of the textile products that are inappropriately considered as wastes. The information for this paper was collected from literature, from the Agency of Environmental Protection Bihor and on the Internet.

  16. Bacterial Growth on Chitosan-Coated Polypropylene Textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, D.; Hola, V.; Jaros, J.; Rahel, J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerged into a growth medium inoculated with green fluorescein protein labelled Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After overnight incubation at 33°C, the textile was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy for bacterial enumeration and biofilm structure characterisation. In the second stage, the textile was used as a filter medium for prefiltered river water, and the pressure development on the in-flow side was measured to quantify the overall level of biofouling. In both cases, nontreated textile samples were used as a control. The results indicate that the chitosan coating exhibits antibacterial properties. The developed method is applicable for the evaluation of the ability to inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:23724330

  17. A critical review on textile wastewater treatments: Possible approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkar, Chandrakant R; Jadhav, Ananda J; Pinjari, Dipak V; Mahamuni, Naresh M; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2016-11-01

    Waste water is a major environmental impediment for the growth of the textile industry besides the other minor issues like solid waste and resource waste management. Textile industry uses many kinds of synthetic dyes and discharge large amounts of highly colored wastewater as the uptake of these dyes by fabrics is very poor. This highly colored textile wastewater severely affects photosynthetic function in plant. It also has an impact on aquatic life due to low light penetration and oxygen consumption. It may also be lethal to certain forms of marine life due to the occurrence of component metals and chlorine present in the synthetic dyes. So, this textile wastewater must be treated before their discharge. In this article, different treatment methods to treat the textile wastewater have been presented along with cost per unit volume of treated water. Treatment methods discussed in this paper involve oxidation methods (cavitation, photocatalytic oxidation, ozone, H2O2, fentons process), physical methods (adsorption and filtration), biological methods (fungi, algae, bacteria, microbial fuel cell). This review article will also recommend the possible remedial measures to treat different types of effluent generated from each textile operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxicity evaluation of textile effluents and role of native soil bacterium in biodegradation of a textile dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sana; Malik, Abdul

    2017-11-28

    Water pollution caused by the discharge of hazardous textile effluents is a serious environmental problem worldwide. In order to assess the pollution level of the textile effluents, various physico-chemical parameters were analyzed in the textile wastewater and agricultural soil irrigated with the wastewater (contaminated soil) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis that demonstrated the presence of several toxic heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, and Zn) and a large number of organic compounds. Further, in order to get a comprehensive idea about the toxicity exerted by the textile effluent, mung bean seed germination test was performed that indicated the reduction in percent seed germination and radicle-plumule growth. The culturable microbial populations were also enumerated and found to be significantly lower in the wastewater and contaminated soil than the ground water irrigated soil, thus indicating the biotic homogenization of indigenous microflora. Therefore, the study was aimed to develop a cost effective and ecofriendly method of textile waste treatment using native soil bacterium, identified as Arthrobacter soli BS5 by 16S rDNA sequencing that showed remarkable ability to degrade a textile dye reactive black 5 with maximum degradation of 98% at 37 °C and pH in the range of 5-9 after 120 h of incubation.

  19. Release of titanium dioxide from textiles during washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, L; Lorenz, C; von Goetz, N; Hungerbühler, K; Amberg, M; Heuberger, M; Nowack, B

    2012-08-07

    Nano-TiO(2) has the highest production of all nanomaterials, and pigment-TiO(2) is a commodity used on the million tons/year scale. Information on the release of TiO(2) from consumer products is therefore an important part of analyzing the potential environmental exposure to TiO(2). For this study, we investigated the release of TiO(2) from six different functional textiles during washing. TiO(2) is used in textiles because of its UV-absorbing properties and as pigment. Analysis of fiber cross sections showed that the TiO(2) was contained in the fiber matrix. The sun-protection textiles had Ultraviolet Protection Factors that were between 58 and 6100 after washing and therefore above the labeled factor of 50+. Five of the textiles (sun-protection clothes) released low amounts of Ti (0.01 to 0.06 wt % of total Ti) in one wash cycle. One textile (with antimicrobial functionality) released much higher amounts of Ti (5 mg/L, corresponding to 3.4 wt % of total Ti in one wash cycle). Size fractionation showed that about equal amounts were released as particles below and above 0.45 μm. After 10 washings, only in two textiles significantly lower Ti contents were measured. Electron microscopy showed that the TiO(2) particles released into washing solution had a roundish appearance with primary particle sizes between 60 and 350 nm that formed small aggregates with up to 20 particles. The results indicate that functional textiles release some TiO(2) particles, but that the amounts are relatively low and mostly not in the nanoparticulate range.

  20. Hospital Textiles, Are They a Possible Vehicle for Healthcare-Associated Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijan, Sabina; Šostar Turk, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Textiles are a common material in healthcare facilities; therefore it is important that they do not pose as a vehicle for the transfer of pathogens to patients or hospital workers. During the course of use hospital textiles become contaminated and laundering is necessary. Laundering of healthcare textiles is most commonly adequate, but in some instances, due to inappropriate disinfection or subsequent recontamination, the textiles may become a contaminated inanimate surface with the possibility to transfer pathogens. In this review we searched the published literature in order to answer four review questions: (1) Are there any reports on the survival of microorganisms on hospital textiles after laundering? (2) Are there any reports that indicate the presence of microorganisms on hospital textiles during use? (3) Are there any reports that microorganisms on textiles are a possible source infection of patients? (4) Are there any reports that microorganisms on textiles are a possible source infection for healthcare workers? PMID:23202690

  1. Textile-Based Electronic Components for Energy Applications: Principles, Problems, and Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Vishakha; Lee, Jaehong; Hong, Juree; Lee, Seulah; Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Mahata, Chandreswar; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-01-01

    Textile-based electronic components have gained interest in the fields of science and technology. Recent developments in nanotechnology have enabled the integration of electronic components into textiles while retaining desirable characteristics such as flexibility, strength, and conductivity. Various materials were investigated in detail to obtain current conductive textile technology, and the integration of electronic components into these textiles shows great promise for common everyday applications. The harvest and storage of energy in textile electronics is a challenge that requires further attention in order to enable complete adoption of this technology in practical implementations. This review focuses on the various conductive textiles, their methods of preparation, and textile-based electronic components. We also focus on fabrication and the function of textile-based energy harvesting and storage devices, discuss their fundamental limitations, and suggest new areas of study. PMID:28347078

  2. Hospital Textiles, Are They a Possible Vehicle for Healthcare-Associated Infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Fijan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Textiles are a common material in healthcare facilities; therefore it is important that they do not pose as a vehicle for the transfer of pathogens to patients or hospital workers. During the course of use hospital textiles become contaminated and laundering is necessary. Laundering of healthcare textiles is most commonly adequate, but in some instances, due to inappropriate disinfection or subsequent recontamination, the textiles may become a contaminated inanimate surface with the possibility to transfer pathogens. In this review we searched the published literature in order to answer four review questions: (1 Are there any reports on the survival of microorganisms on hospital textiles after laundering? (2 Are there any reports that indicate the presence of microorganisms on hospital textiles during use? (3 Are there any reports that microorganisms on textiles are a possible source infection of patients? (4 Are there any reports that microorganisms on textiles are a possible source infection for healthcare workers?

  3. Approach on environmental risk assessment of nanosilver released from textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelker, Doris, E-mail: doris.voelker@uba.de [Federal Environment Agency Germany, Section IV 2.2, Wörlitzer Platz 1, 06844 Dessau-Rosslau (Germany); Schlich, Karsten [Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology, Department of Ecotoxicology, Auf dem Aberg 1, 57392 Schmallenberg (Germany); Hohndorf, Lars; Koch, Wolfgang; Kuehnen, Ute [Federal Environment Agency Germany, Section IV 2.2, Wörlitzer Platz 1, 06844 Dessau-Rosslau (Germany); Polleichtner, Christian; Kussatz, Carola [Federal Environment Agency Germany, Section IV 2.4, Schichauweg 58, 12307 Berlin (Germany); Hund-Rinke, Kerstin [Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology, Department of Ecotoxicology, Auf dem Aberg 1, 57392 Schmallenberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Based on the increased utilization of nanosilver (silver nanomaterials=AgNM) as antibacterial agent, there is the strong need to assess the potential environmental implication associated with its new application areas. In this study an exemplary environmental risk assessment (ERA) of AgNM applied in textiles was performed. Environmental exposure scenarios (via municipal sewage treatment plant (STP)) with wastewater supply from domestic homes) were developed for three different types of textiles equipped with AgNM. Based on these scenarios predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were deduced for STPs and for the environmental compartments surface water, sediment as well as soil. These PECs were related to PNECs (predicted no effect concentrations). PNECs were deduced from results of ecotoxicity tests of a selected AgNM (NM-300K). Data on ecotoxicology were derived from various tests with activated sludge, cyanobacteria, algae, daphnids, fish, duckweed, macrophytes, chironomids, earthworms, terrestrial plants as well as soil microorganisms. Emission data for the AgNM NM-300K from textiles were derived from washing experiments. The performed ERA was based on the specifications defined in the ECHA Guidances on information requirements and chemical safety assessment. Based on the chosen scenarios and preconditions, no environmental risk of the AgNM NM-300K released from textiles was detected. Under conservative assumptions a risk quotient for surface water close to 1 indicated that the aquatic compartment may be affected by an increased emission of AgNM to the environment due to the high sensitivity of aquatic organisms to silver. Based on the successful retention of AgNM in the sewage sludge and the still ongoing continual application of sewage sludge on farmland it is recommended to introduce a threshold for total silver content in sewage sludge into the respective regulations. Regarding potential risk mitigation measures, it is emphasized to preferably directly

  4. Wearable textile battery rechargeable by solar energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hee; Kim, Joo-Seong; Noh, Jonghyeon; Lee, Inhwa; Kim, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Sunghun; Seo, Jeongmin; Jeon, Seokwoo; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Jung-Yong; Choi, Jang Wook

    2013-01-01

    Wearable electronics represent a significant paradigm shift in consumer electronics since they eliminate the necessity for separate carriage of devices. In particular, integration of flexible electronic devices with clothes, glasses, watches, and skin will bring new opportunities beyond what can be imagined by current inflexible counterparts. Although considerable progresses have been seen for wearable electronics, lithium rechargeable batteries, the power sources of the devices, do not keep pace with such progresses due to tenuous mechanical stabilities, causing them to remain as the limiting elements in the entire technology. Herein, we revisit the key components of the battery (current collector, binder, and separator) and replace them with the materials that support robust mechanical endurance of the battery. The final full-cells in the forms of clothes and watchstraps exhibited comparable electrochemical performance to those of conventional metal foil-based cells even under severe folding-unfolding motions simulating actual wearing conditions. Furthermore, the wearable textile battery was integrated with flexible and lightweight solar cells on the battery pouch to enable convenient solar-charging capabilities.

  5. Angora Wool Asthma in Textile Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Sartorelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to now the exposures to hair and skin derivatives of animals have not yet been the subject of systematic studies. The observation of a clinical case has provided the opportunity for a review of the literature. The inpatient was a 49-year-old man, a carder in a textile factory, exposed to angora wool. He noticed the appearance of dyspnea during working hours. There was no eosinophilia in blood, and the results of pulmonary function tests were normal. The nonspecific bronchial provocation test with methacholine demonstrated an abnormal bronchial reactivity. The challenge test with angora wool was positive (decrease in FEV1 of more than 40% as well as total IGE and specific IgE to rabbit epithelium (433 KU/l and 12.1 KUA/l, resp.. Several sources of allergens were found in the rabbit, and the main allergen was represented by proteins from epithelia, urine, and saliva. Most of these proteins belong to the family of lipocalin, they function as carriers for small hydrophobic molecules (vitamins and pheromones. If the diagnosis of occupational asthma caused by animal hair and skin derivatives may be relatively easy by means of the challenge test, defining etiology is complicated because of the lack of in vitro tests.

  6. Electrochemical Techniques in Textile Processes and Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Sala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry uses the electrochemical techniques both in textile processes (such as manufacturing fibers, dyeing processes, and decolorizing fabrics and in wastewaters treatments (color removal. Electrochemical reduction reactions are mostly used in sulfur and vat dyeing, but in some cases, they are applied to effluents discoloration. However, the main applications of electrochemical treatments in the textile sector are based on oxidation reactions. Most of electrochemical oxidation processes involve indirect reactions which imply the generation of hypochlorite or hydroxyl radical in situ. These electrogenerated species are able to bleach indigo-dyed denim fabrics and to degrade dyes in wastewater in order to achieve the effluent color removal. The aim of this paper is to review the electrochemical techniques applied to textile industry. In particular, they are an efficient method to remove color of textile effluents. The reuse of the discolored effluent is possible, which implies an important saving of salt and water (i.e., by means of the “UVEC Cell”.

  7. Thermal-Insulation Properties of Multilayer Textile Packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusiak Małgorzata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-insulation properties of textile materials play a significant role in material engineering of protective clothing. Thermal-insulation properties are very important from the point of view of thermal comfort of the clothing user as well as the protective efficiency against low or high temperature. Thermal protective clothing usually is a multilayer construction. Its thermal insulation is a resultant of a number of layers and their order, as well as the thermalinsulation properties of a single textile material creating particular layers. The aim of the presented work was to investigate the relationships between the thermal-insulation properties of single materials and multilayer textile packages composed of these materials. Measurement of the thermal-insulation properties of single and multilayer textile materials has been performed with the Alambeta. The following properties have been investigated: thermal conductivity, resistance and absorptivity. Investigated textile packages were composed of two, three and four layers made of woven and knitted fabrics, as well as nonwovens. On the basis of the obtained results an analysis has been carried out in order to assess the dependency of the resultant values of the thermal-insulation properties of multilayer packages on the appropriate values of particular components.

  8. Design and Integration of Wearable Devices in Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel G. TRINDADE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the design, production method, integration and characterization of textile sensors for the continuous monitoring of cardiac and respiration vital signals are presented. Textile electrodes, capacitive and piezoresistive sensors and respective interconnect plate were developed and integrated in elastic and adjustable chest bands, using a 6-needle digital embroidery machine and electrically conductive commercial threads. The signal's waveforms were recorded via PC with a data acquisition module and a LabView program. The signal to noise ratio of textile electrodes, having distinctive surface morphologies, that were either textured or smooth accordingly with the embroidery pattern used, were analyzed with Matlab. The quantitative method indicated differences between the two types of textile electrodes but performances comparable to standard Ag/AgCl gel electrodes. The sensors and interconnect plate were fully realized with the embroidery stitching method with textile fabrics and threads, and have a compact design, are lightweight and washable. The method offers great versatility for custom demand, in terms of sensor design and materials.

  9. Hydrothermally Activated Graphene Fiber Fabrics for Textile Electrodes of Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Huang, Tieqi; Gao, Weiwei; Xu, Zhen; Chang, Dan; Zhang, Chunxiao; Gao, Chao

    2017-11-28

    Carbon textiles are promising electrode materials for wearable energy storage devices owing to their conductive, flexible, and lightweight features. However, there still lacks a perfect choice for high-performance carbon textile electrodes with sufficient electrochemical activity. Graphene fiber fabrics (GFFs) are newly discovered carbon textiles, exhibiting various attractive properties, especially a large variability on the microstructure. Here we report the fabrication of hierarchical GFFs with significantly enlarged specific surface area using a hydrothermal activation strategy. By carefully optimize the activation process, the hydrothermally activated graphene fiber fabrics (HAGFFs) could achieve an areal capacitance of 1060 mF cm -2 in a very thin thickness (150 μm) and the capacitance is easily magnified by overlaying several layers of HAGFFs, even up to a record value of 7398 mF cm -2 . Meanwhile, a good rate capability and a long cycle life are also attained. As compared with other carbon textiles, including the commercial carbon fiber cloths, our HAGFFs present much better capacitive performance. Therefore, the mechanically stable, flexible, conductive, and highly active HAGFFs have provided an option for high-performance textile electrodes.

  10. Carbon nanotubes polymer nanoparticles inks for healthcare textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush; Lee, Jungmin; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-10-01

    Healthcare textiles are ambient health monitoring systems that can contribute towards medical aid as well as general fitness of the populace. These are textile based products that have sensor systems mounted on them or are electrically functionalized to act as sensors. While embedded sensor chipsets and connection wires have been shown as working prototypes of this concept, there is a need for seamless integration of sensor technologies without hindering the inherent properties of the textile. Screen printing or stamping with electrically conductive inks have been demonstrated as technologies for fabricating electronics on flexible substrates. They are applicable to textile manufacturing as well. Printing technology allows for fabrication of nanocomposite based electronics elements in a bottom-up fashion. This has advantages such as low material consumption, high speed fabrication and low temperature processing. In this research, Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and polyaniline nanoparticles (PANP) core shell based nanocomposites were synthesized and formulated into colloidal ink. Printed MWCNTs-PANP traces were electrically characterized and compared with traces made with those made by other composites such as Silver, and Carbon Black. The nanocomposite based inks are compared for proposed applications as sensor systems and conductive tracks on smart textile for pervasive wireless healthcare system that can be mass produced using low cost printing processes.

  11. Smart fabric sensors and e-textile technologies: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Lina M.; Flatau, Alison B.

    2014-05-01

    This paper provides a review of recent developments in the rapidly changing and advancing field of smart fabric sensor and electronic textile technologies. It summarizes the basic principles and approaches employed when building fabric sensors as well as the most commonly used materials and techniques used in electronic textiles. This paper shows that sensing functionality can be created by intrinsic and extrinsic modifications to textile substrates depending on the level of integration into the fabric platform. The current work demonstrates that fabric sensors can be tailored to measure force, pressure, chemicals, humidity and temperature variations. Materials, connectors, fabric circuits, interconnects, encapsulation and fabrication methods associated with fabric technologies prove to be customizable and versatile but less robust than their conventional electronics counterparts. The findings of this survey suggest that a complete smart fabric system is possible through the integration of the different types of textile based functional elements. This work intends to be a starting point for standardization of smart fabric sensing techniques and e-textile fabrication methods.

  12. Effects of WTO on the Textile Industry on Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abdul Sattar Shah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The current investigates the Effects of WTO on the Textile Industry on Developing Countries. Data were collected from various secondary sources and data is analyzed by using SPSS-20 version statistical software. It was revealed that WTO more industrialized countries consented to export fewer textiles while less industrialized countries enjoyed increased quotas for exporting their textiles. Bangladesh was expected to suffer the most from the ending of the MFA because it was expected to face more competition, particularly from China, it has tried to maintain its competitiveness in the post-quota era. It was further revealed that It has also been examined that all over the world textile industries are facing high inflation which is the hottest issue due to which the cost of doing business is going higher and higher day by day. The Chinese, Indian, Sri Lankan and Bangladeshi textile manufacturers are also out of those affected ones whose major issues are associated with increased cost of production. China’s dominance of the global garments trade has also been affected due to the rise in the costs of material, labour, energy, environmental protection and high interest rate. Furthermore, the environmental standard is also a barrier to many Chinese enterprises; even most of the Chinese enterprises have inputted environmental Standard.

  13. Supercritical carbon dioxide for textile applications and recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, H. A.; Avinc, O.; Eren, S.

    2017-10-01

    In textile industry, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), possessing liquid-like densities, mostly find an application on textile dyeing processes such as providing hydrophobic dyes an advantage on dissolving. Their gas-like low viscosities and diffusion properties can result in shorter dyeing periods in comparison with the conventional water dyeing process. Supercritical carbon dioxide dyeing is an anhydrous dyeing and this process comprises the usage of less energy and chemicals when compared to conventional water dyeing processes leading to a potential of up to 50% lower operation costs. The advantages of supercritical carbon dioxide dyeing method especially on synthetic fiber fabrics hearten leading textile companies to alter their dyeing method to this privileged waterless dyeing technology. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) waterless dyeing is widely known and applied green method for sustainable and eco-friendly textile industry. However, not only the dyeing but also scouring, desizing and different finishing applications take the advantage of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). In this review, not only the principle, advantages and disadvantages of dyeing in supercritical carbon dioxide but also recent developments of scCO2 usage in different textile processing steps such as scouring, desizing and finishing are explained and commercial developments are stated and summed up.

  14. Detection of formaldehyde in textiles by chromotropic acid method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Sanath

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The common causes of textile dermatitis are formaldehyde resins and disperse dyes. There are various methods to detect the presence of formaldehyde in clothing. AIM: To detect the presence of formaldehyde in various types of textiles by the chromotropic acid method and to assess the effect of washing on the formaldehyde content. METHODS: Twenty randomly selected textiles from a local cloth store were tested for formaldehyde by the chromotropic acid method. A purple ring indicated a positive reaction. The intensity of the purple ring was graded from 1+ to 3+ and reassessed after washing the clothes. RESULTS: Eleven out of the 20 textiles tested positive for formaldehyde. The fully synthetic clothes were free from formaldehyde. After the first and second washes the majority did not show a reduction in the formaldehyde content. CONCLUSIONS: This is a simple and rapid test which can be used in the practical management of patients with textile allergy. Washing the clothes may not have an effect on the formaldehyde content.

  15. Fabrication of biodegradable textile scaffold based on hydrophobized hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotocky, Vojtech; Pospisilova, Martina; Janouchova, Katerina; Svadlak, Daniel; Batova, Jana; Sogorkova, Jana; Cepa, Martin; Betak, Jiri; Stepankova, Veronika; Sulakova, Romana; Kulhanek, Jaromir; Pitucha, Tomas; Vranova, Jana; Duffy, Garry; Velebny, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report on the preparation of a novel biodegradable textile scaffold made of palmitoyl-hyaluronan (palHA). Monofilament fibres of palHA with a diameter of 120μm were prepared by wet spinning. The wet-spun fibres were subsequently processed into a warp-knitted textile. To find a compromise between swelling in water and degradability of the final textile scaffold, a series of palHA derivatives with different degrees of substitution of the palmitoyl chain was synthesized. Freeze-drying not only provided shape fixation, but also speeded up scaffold degradation in vitro. Fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin and collagen IV were physically adsorbed on the textile surface to enhance cell adhesion on the material. The highest amount of adsorbed cell-adhesive proteins was achieved with fibronectin (89%), followed by fibrinogen (81%). Finally, textiles modified with fibronectin or fibrinogen both supported the adhesion and proliferation of normal human fibroblasts in vitro, proving to be a useful cellular scaffold for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Silver speciation and release in commercial antimicrobial textiles as influenced by washing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of nanoscale Ag in textiles is one the most often mentioned uses of nano-Ag. It has previously been shown that significant amounts of the Ag in the textiles are released upon washing. However, the form of Ag present in the textiles remains largely unknown as product label...

  17. 16 CFR 1611.33 - Test procedures for textile fabrics and film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for textile fabrics and film... REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations § 1611.33 Test procedures for textile fabrics and film. (a)(1) All textile fabrics (except those with a nitro-cellulose...

  18. 16 CFR 1610.33 - Test procedures for textile fabrics and film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for textile fabrics and film... for textile fabrics and film. (a)(1) All textile fabrics (except those with a nitro-cellulose fiber... under the procedures outlined in part 1611, Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film, and if...

  19. 40 CFR 427.80 - Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. 427.80 Section 427.80 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Coating or Finishing of Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.80 Applicability; description of the coating or finishing of asbestos textiles subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  20. RECYCLED TEXTILES USED IN AUTOMOTIVE INTERIORS. CASE STUDY- FORD MOTOR COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUC Sunhilde

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The environmental movement is affecting all industries, but the textile and automotive industries are two of the few that are constantly being criticized. The automotive industry is the subject of much research, it is the largest manufacturing activity, there is a complex supply chain, is resource intensive and emits various hazardous gases and waste products. The article reviews the current state of automotive industry regarding the textile application. Automotive textiles have been classified as belonging to a category called “Mobiltech” which is one of the main streams of technical textiles. The term means all type of textile components e.g. fibers, filaments, yarns and the fabric used in automobiles. They are classed as technical textile because of the very high performance specifications and special properties required, different from those used in clothing and other applications. The performance of the automotive textiles depends on the fibre properties, fabric structures and various finishes used in the manufacturing processes. After a short presentation of used fibres in car interiors, with advantages and disadvantages it is presented the sustainable textile solutions for the automotive industry. The paper focuses in particular of the use of recycling of textile waste to highlight how the processes of recycled textiles and sustainable textiles production are linked in the automotive sector. A case study with Ford Motor Company outlines and examines their design, development and manufacture process for automotive textiles for car seat coverings and interiors

  1. 16 CFR 303.23 - Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Textile fiber products containing superimposed or added fibers. 303.23 Section 303.23 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.23 Textile fiber products containing...

  2. 76 FR 14575 - Country of Origin of Textile and Apparel Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... considered textile and apparel products (e.g., valves with mesh fabric filters, jump ropes, hats, and... (Formerly RIN 1505-AB60) Country of Origin of Textile and Apparel Products AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border...'') regulations relating to the country of origin of textile and apparel products. The regulatory amendments...

  3. Effect of textiles structural parameters on surgical healing; a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwa, A. Ali

    2017-10-01

    Medical Textiles is one of the most rapidly expanding sectors in the technical textile market. The huge growth of medical textiles applications was over the last 12 years. “Biomedical Textiles” is a subcategory of medical textiles that narrows the field down to those applications that are intended for active tissue contact, tissue regeneration or surgical implantation. Since the mid-1960s, the current wave of usage is coming as a result of new fibers and new technologies for textile materials construction. “Biotextiles” term include structures composed of textile fibers designed for use in specific biological environments. Medical Textile field was utilizing different materials, textile techniques and structures to provide new medical products with high functionality in the markets. There are other processes that are associated with textiles in terms of the various treatments and finishing. The aim of this article is to draw attention to the medical field in each of Vitro and Vivo trend, and its relation with textile structural parameters, with regard to the fiber material, production techniques, and fabric structures. Also, it is focusing on some cases studies which were applied in our research which produced with different textile parameters. Finally; an overview is presented about modern and innovative applications of the medical textiles.

  4. 19 CFR 102.24 - Entry of textile or apparel products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry of textile or apparel products. 102.24...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES OF ORIGIN Rules of Origin § 102.24 Entry of textile or apparel products. (a) General. Separate shipments of textile or apparel products, including samples, which originate from a...

  5. 75 FR 11845 - Exporters' Textile Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... International Trade Administration Exporters' Textile Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting A meeting of the Exporters' Textile Advisory Committee will be held on Tuesday, April 20th, 2010. The meeting will... officials on the identification and surmounting of barriers to the expansion of textile exports, and on...

  6. 19 CFR 102.22 - Rules of origin for textile and apparel products of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rules of origin for textile and apparel products... textile and apparel products of Israel. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section will control for purposes of determining whether a textile or apparel product, as defined in § 102.21(b)(5), is considered a...

  7. 19 CFR 10.472 - Verification in the United States of textile and apparel goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification in the United States of textile and... the United States of textile and apparel goods. (a) Procedures to determine whether a claim of origin... for the purpose of determining that a claim of origin for a textile or apparel good is accurate. A...

  8. 19 CFR 10.453 - Treatment of textile and apparel sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of textile and apparel sets. 10.453... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.453 Treatment of textile and apparel sets. Notwithstanding the specific rules specified in General Note 26(n), HTSUS, textile and apparel goods classifiable as...

  9. 76 FR 16531 - Country of Origin of Textile and Apparel Products; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ..., and 163 RIN 1515-AD57 (Formerly RIN 1505-AB60) Country of Origin of Textile and Apparel Products... the country of origin of textile and apparel products. The final rule document contained two errors in... March 24, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roberts Abels, Textile Operations, Office of...

  10. 16 CFR 303.33 - Country where textile fiber products are processed or manufactured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Country where textile fiber products are... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.33 Country where textile fiber products are processed or manufactured. (a) In addition to...

  11. 16 CFR 1610.35 - Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... textile fabrics under the standard. 1610.35 Section 1610.35 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Rules and Regulations § 1610.35 Procedures for testing special types of textile fabrics under the standard. (a) Fabric...

  12. 19 CFR 10.554 - Exclusion of textile or apparel goods for intentional circumvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of textile or apparel goods for....554 Exclusion of textile or apparel goods for intentional circumvention. (a) General. If CITA finds... directed by CITA, exclude from the customs territory of the United States textile or apparel goods produced...

  13. Mecanique et mecanisme de la dechirure des materiaux textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triki, Ennouri

    Cette thèse vise à apporter une contribution à l’étude et à la modélisation de la déchirure des textiles et des textiles enduits. Notons que la résistance à la déchirure est l’une des caractéristiques mesurées pour les équipements de protection contre les agresseurs mécaniques en milieu de travail. Jusqu'à présent, ce comportement en déchirure a été étudié en mesurant la force de déchirure et le travail de déchirure. De fait, aucun critère de rupture en déchirure n’existe actuellement. Par conséquent, en s’inspirant de la théorie du Griffith et de la mécanique de la rupture, une formulation d’un nouveau critère de rupture des structures textiles a été proposée. Cette approche offre la possibilité de déterminer d’une manière plus précise l’énergie nécessaire pour la création d’une nouvelle surface de rupture. Ce critère nous permet d’analyser l’effet des caractéristiques des tissus sur la variation de l’énergie de rupture. Cette étude montre que la résistance au glissement des fils dans la structure est le principal facteur qui contrôle la propagation de la fissure. En se basant sur la théorie de la mécanique de la rupture, un modèle de calcul de l’énergie de rupture par déchirure a été aussi élaboré. Ce modèle de déchirure relie l’énergie aux paramètres caractérisant les phénomènes affectant la déchirure des tissus, notamment la force de glissement et la force à la rupture des fils. Cette modélisation a tenu compte de certaines caractéristiques des tissus tels que l’épaisseur du matériau, la densité des fils, etc. Par l’étude de la variation de l’énergie de rupture par déchirure en fonction du rapport établi entre la force à la rupture et la force de glissement d’un fil ( FYB/FS), l’effet des mécanismes de la propagation de la fissure dans les tissus sur leur comportement en déchirure a été aussi observé. Les résultats obtenus permettent de distinguer

  14. Treatment of textile wastewater with membrane bioreactor: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheesan, Veeriah; Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Chen, Jingyu; Navaratna, Dimuth; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Shu, Li

    2016-03-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology has been used widely for various industrial wastewater treatments due to its distinct advantages over conventional bioreactors. Treatment of textile wastewater using MBR has been investigated as a simple, reliable and cost-effective process with a significant removal of contaminants. However, a major drawback in the operation of MBR is membrane fouling, which leads to the decline in permeate flux and therefore requires membrane cleaning. This eventually decreases the lifespan of the membrane. In this paper, the application of aerobic and anaerobic MBR for textile wastewater treatment as well as fouling and control of fouling in MBR processes have been reviewed. It has been found that long sludge retention time increases the degradation of pollutants by allowing slow growing microorganisms to establish but also contributes to membrane fouling. Further research aspects of MBR for textile wastewater treatment are also considered for sustainable operations of the process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomimicry in textiles: past, present and potential. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, Leslie; Ghosh, Tushar K

    2011-06-06

    The natural world around us provides excellent examples of functional systems built with a handful of materials. Throughout the millennia, nature has evolved to adapt and develop highly sophisticated methods to solve problems. There are numerous examples of functional surfaces, fibrous structures, structural colours, self-healing, thermal insulation, etc., which offer important lessons for the textile products of the future. This paper provides a general overview of the potential of bioinspired textile structures by highlighting a few specific examples of pertinent, inherently sustainable biological systems. Biomimetic research is a rapidly growing field and its true potential in the development of new and sustainable textiles can only be realized through interdisciplinary research rooted in a holistic understanding of nature. © 2011 The Royal Society

  16. PhD Thesis: Functional Textiles in Hospital Interiors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe Emil

    logistic processes are developed. In the aesthetic part of the project, the aesthetic qualities of using textiles in hospital interiors are explored and accentuated through a theoretical framework, related to the concept of atmospheres. Familiarity and tactility are here deduced as two main design......The PhD thesis explores the possibilities and design qualities of using functional textiles in the interior of hospital environments, and is the result of a three-year collaboration between Aalborg University, Department of Civil Engineering, and VIA University College, VIA Design. The thesis...... environments. However, in architectural and design related theory, materials are linked closely to the perceived atmosphere of spaces, and a better awareness on the aesthetic material qualities are considered needed to accommodate the visions of healing architecture. Traditional textiles that earlier have been...

  17. Indoor Decontamination Textiles by Photocatalytic Oxidation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafeezullah Memon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of researches have been made to make the textile intelligent and smarter; this is achieved by imparting functionality to the textile materials. The indoor environment possesses a variety of pollutants which do not come from the outer environment, but they come from the inner environment itself. Today, the smarter fabrics that may clean the indoor air have been studied by various researchers. The smarter fabrics contain the nanocoating of semiconductor oxides, mostly TiO2; thus the synthesis and application of these nanoparticles on the textile material have been reviewed in this paper. Moreover, there are lots of environmental and health issues regarding nanoparticles that have also been discussed in brief.

  18. Production of anticandidal cotton textiles treated with oak gall extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Tayel

    Full Text Available Candida albicans, one of the most dreadful fungal pathogens threatening humans, could not be easily prevented. The anticandidal activity of oak gall extract, Quercus infectoria (QIE, was investigated as a potential natural alternative to synthetic and chemical fungicides. QIE anticandidal potentiality was confirmed using both qualitative and quantitative assays. Cotton textiles were treated with QIE and then evaluated as anticandidal fabrics. QIE-treated textiles had a potent anticandidal activity, which could completely inhibit the inoculated C. albicans cells. The durability of anticandidal activity in QIE-treated textiles almost completely disappeared after the fourth laundering cycle. QIE could be recommended, however, as a potent anticandidal agent for preparing antiseptic solutions and emulsions and as a finishing agent for manufacturing anticandidal disposable diapers and hygienic clothes.

  19. Transformers: Shape-Changing Space Systems Built with Robotic Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Prior approaches to transformer-like robots had only very limited success. They suffer from lack of reliability, ability to integrate large surfaces, and very modest change in overall shape. Robots can now be built from two-dimensional (2D) layers of robotic fabric. These transformers, a new kind of robotic space system, are dramatically different from current systems in at least two ways. First, the entire transformer is built from a single, thin sheet; a flexible layer of a robotic fabric (ro-fabric); or robotic textile (ro-textile). Second, the ro-textile layer is foldable to small volume and self-unfolding to adapt shape and function to mission phases.

  20. Biomimicry in textiles: past, present and potential. An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, Leslie; Ghosh, Tushar K.

    2011-01-01

    The natural world around us provides excellent examples of functional systems built with a handful of materials. Throughout the millennia, nature has evolved to adapt and develop highly sophisticated methods to solve problems. There are numerous examples of functional surfaces, fibrous structures, structural colours, self-healing, thermal insulation, etc., which offer important lessons for the textile products of the future. This paper provides a general overview of the potential of bioinspired textile structures by highlighting a few specific examples of pertinent, inherently sustainable biological systems. Biomimetic research is a rapidly growing field and its true potential in the development of new and sustainable textiles can only be realized through interdisciplinary research rooted in a holistic understanding of nature. PMID:21325320

  1. Flammability on textile of flight crew professional clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, M. C.; Oliveira, M. S.; Giacomin, A. M.; Laktim, M. C.; Baruque-Ramos, J.

    2017-10-01

    The issue about flammability of textile materials employed in passenger cabins of commercial aircrafts is an important part of safety routines planning. Once an in-flight emergency initiated with fire or smoke aboard, time becomes critical and the entire crew must be involved in the solution. It is part of the crew functions, notably the attendants, the in-flight firefighting. This study compares the values of textile material of flight attendant working cloths and galley curtain fabric with regard to flammability and Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI). Values to the professional clothing material indicate that they are flammable and the curtains, self-extinguishing. Thus, despite of the occurrences of fire outbreaks in aircrafts are unexceptional, the use of other materials and technologies for uniforms, such as alternative textile fibers and flame retardant finishes should be considered as well as the establishment of performance limits regarding flame and fire exposing.

  2. Implementing traceability using particle randomness-based textile printed tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, T. K.; Koehl, L.; Campagne, C.

    2017-10-01

    This article introduces a random particle-based traceability tag for textiles. The proposed tag not only act as a unique signature for the corresponding textile product but also possess the features such as easy to manufacture and hard to copy. It seeks applications in brand authentication and traceability in textile and clothing (T&C) supply chain. A prototype has been developed by screen printing process, in which micron-scale particles were mixed with the printing paste and printed on cotton fabrics to attain required randomness. To encode the randomness, the image of the developed tag was taken and analyzed using image processing. The randomness of the particles acts as a product key or unique signature which is required to decode the tag. Finally, washing and abrasion resistance tests were conducted to check the durability of the printed tag.

  3. Flexible fiber batteries for applications in smart textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Hang; Rolland, Julien; Vlad, Alexandru; Gohy, Jean-François; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    Here we discuss two alternative approaches for building flexible batteries for applications in smart textiles. The first approach uses well-studied inorganic electrochemistry (Al-NaOCl galvanic cell) and innovative packaging in order to produce batteries in a slender and flexible fiber form that can be further weaved directly into the textiles. During fabrication process the battery electrodes are co-drawn within a microstructured polymer fiber, which is later filled with liquid electrolyte. The second approach describes Li-ion chemistry within solid polymer electrolytes that are used to build a fully solid and soft rechargeable battery that can be furthermore stitched onto a textile, or integrated as stripes during weaving process.

  4. Production of anticandidal cotton textiles treated with oak gall extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F; Abdel-Monem, Omnia A; El-Sabbagh, Sabha M; Alsohim, Abdullah S; El-Refai, Elham M

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans, one of the most dreadful fungal pathogens threatening humans, could not be easily prevented. The anticandidal activity of oak gall extract, Quercus infectoria (QIE), was investigated as a potential natural alternative to synthetic and chemical fungicides. QIE anticandidal potentiality was confirmed using both qualitative and quantitative assays. Cotton textiles were treated with QIE and then evaluated as anticandidal fabrics. QIE-treated textiles had a potent anticandidal activity, which could completely inhibit the inoculated C. albicans cells. The durability of anticandidal activity in QIE-treated textiles almost completely disappeared after the fourth laundering cycle. QIE could be recommended, however, as a potent anticandidal agent for preparing antiseptic solutions and emulsions and as a finishing agent for manufacturing anticandidal disposable diapers and hygienic clothes. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Microscopic contact area and friction between medical textiles and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derler, S; Rotaru, G-M; Ke, W; El Issawi-Frischknecht, L; Kellenberger, P; Scheel-Sailer, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical contact between medical textiles and skin is relevant in the health care for patients with vulnerable skin or chronic wounds. In order to gain new insights into the skin-textile contact on the microscopic level, the 3D surface topography of a normal and a new hospital bed sheet with a regular surface structure was measured using a digital microscope. The topographic data was analysed concerning material distribution and real contact area against smooth surfaces as a function of surface deformations. For contact conditions that are relevant for the skin of patients lying in a hospital bed it was found that the order of magnitude of the ratio of real and apparent contact area between textiles and skin or a mechanical skin model lies between 0.02 and 0.1 and that surface deformations, i.e. penetration of the textile surface asperities into skin or a mechanical skin model, range from 10 to 50µm. The performed analyses of textile 3D surface topographies and comparisons with previous friction measurement results provided information on the relationship between microscopic surface properties and macroscopic friction behaviour of medical textiles. In particular, the new bed sheet was found to be characterised by a trend towards a smaller microscopic contact area (up to a factor of two) and by a larger free interfacial volume (more than a factor of two) in addition to a 1.5 times lower shear strength when in contact with counter-surfaces. The applied methods can be useful to develop improved and skin-adapted materials and surfaces for medical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ethanol production from cotton-based waste textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeihanipour, Azam; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol production from cotton linter and waste of blue jeans textiles was investigated. In the best case, alkali pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in almost complete conversion of the cotton and jeans to glucose, which was then fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ethanol. If no pretreatment applied, hydrolyses of the textiles by cellulase and beta-glucosidase for 24 h followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) in 4 days, resulted in 0.140-0.145 g ethanol/g textiles, which was 25-26% of the corresponding theoretical yield. A pretreatment with concentrated phosphoric acid prior to the hydrolysis improved ethanol production from the textiles up to 66% of the theoretical yield. However, the best results obtained from alkali pretreatment of the materials by NaOH. The alkaline pretreatment of cotton fibers were carried out with 0-20% NaOH at 0 degrees C, 23 degrees C and 100 degrees C, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis up to 4 days. In general, higher concentration of NaOH resulted in a better yield of the hydrolysis, whereas temperature had a reverse effect and better results were obtained at lower temperature. The best conditions for the alkali pretreatment of the cotton were obtained in this study at 12% NaOH and 0 degrees C and 3 h. In this condition, the materials with 3% solid content were enzymatically hydrolyzed at 85.1% of the theoretical yield in 24 h and 99.1% in 4 days. The alkali pretreatment of the waste textiles at these conditions and subsequent SSF resulted in 0.48 g ethanol/g pretreated textiles used.

  7. Sensing textile seam-line for wearable multimodal physiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, M; Agcayazi, T; Kausche, H; Ghosh, T; Bozkurt, A

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates a novel multimodal sensing method by forming seam-lines of conductive textile fibers into commercially available fabrics. The proposed ultra-low cost micro-electro-mechanical sensor would provide, wearable, flexible, textile based biopotential signal recording, wetness detection and tactile sensing simultaneously. Three types of fibers are evaluated for their array-based sensing capability, including a 3D printed conductive fiber, a multiwall carbon nanotube based fiber, and a commercially available stainless steel conductive thread. The sensors were shown to have a correlation between capacitance and pressure; impedance and wetness; and recorded potential and ECG waveforms.

  8. Micromagnetic Simulation of Fibers and Coatings on Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Andrea; Blachowicz, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of mechanical or comfort properties of fibers, yarns and textile fabrics have been developed for a long time. In the course of increasing interest in smart textiles, models for conductive fabrics have also been developed. The magnetic properties of fibers or magnetic coatings, however, are almost exclusively being examined experimentally. This article thus describes different possibilities of micromagnetically modeling magnetic fibers or coatings. It gives an overview of calculation times for different dimensions of magnetic materials, indicating the limits due to available computer performance and shows the influence of these dimensions on the simulated magnetic properties for magnetic coatings on fibers and fabrics.

  9. Caracterización de microencapsulados aplicados sobre materiales textiles

    OpenAIRE

    Monllor Pérez, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    La aplicación de microencapsulados a los textiles no es una aplicación que esté tan extendida como en otros campos, como puedan ser las industrias farmacéuticas, agroalimentarias y cosméticas. Los microencapsulados son una nueva forma de obtener acabados textiles que resultan de la aplicaciónsobre los tejidos de estos productos lo que proporciona "acabados no convencionales". La microencapsulación ha permitido la obtención de tejidos con fragancias y perfumes resistentes a los lavados. Los...

  10. Colour Fading of Textile Fabric by Plasma Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    H. F. Cheung; C. W. Kan; C. W. M. YUEN; J. Yip; Law, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Colour fading of a reactive dye (C.I. Reactive Blue 19) dyed textile fabric was performed by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment with the use of plasma jet. Under the APP treatment condition of treatment time = 5 sec/mm; ignition power = 160 W; oxygen concentration = 1%; jet distance = 3 mm, significant colour-fading effect was achieved. For comparison purpose, the reactive dye dyed textile fabric was subjected to conventional enzymatic colour-fading process. Experimental results reve...

  11. Virucidal Nanofiber Textiles Based on Photosensitized Production of Singlet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotáková, Yveta; Plíštil, Lukáš; Morávková, Alena; Kubát, Pavel; Lang, Kamil; Forstová, Jitka; Mosinger, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Novel biomaterials based on hydrophilic polycaprolactone and polyurethane (Tecophilic®) nanofibers with an encapsulated 5,10,5,20-tetraphenylporphyrin photosensitizer were prepared by electrospinning. The doped nanofiber textiles efficiently photo-generate O2(1Δg), which oxidize external chemical and biological substrates/targets. Strong photo-virucidal effects toward non-enveloped polyomaviruses and enveloped baculoviruses were observed on the surface of these textiles. The photo-virucidal effect was confirmed by a decrease in virus infectivity. In contrast, no virucidal effect was detected in the absence of light and/or the encapsulated photosensitizer. PMID:23139839

  12. Nonwoven textile for use in a nanoparticle respiratory deposition sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosburgh, Donna J H; Park, Jae Hong; Mines, Levi W D; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Anthony, T Renée; Peters, Thomas M

    2017-05-01

    The nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler is a personal sampler that combines a cyclone, impactor, and a nylon mesh diffusion stage to measure a worker's exposure to nanoparticles. The concentration of titanium in the nylon mesh of the diffusion stage complicates the application of the NRD sampler for assessing exposures to titanium dioxide nanoparticles. This study evaluated commercially available nonwoven textiles for use as an alternative media in the diffusion stage of the NRD sampler. Three textiles were selected as containing little titanium from an initial screening of 11 textiles by field portable x-ray fluorescence (FPXRF). Further evaluation on these three textiles was conducted to determine the concentration of titanium and other metals by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), the number of layers required to achieve desired collection characteristics for use as the diffusion stage in the NRD sampler (i.e., the nanoparticulate matter, NPM, criterion), and the pressure drop associated with that number of layers.  Only three (two composed of cotton fibers, C1 and C2; and one of viscose bamboo and cotton fibers, BC) of 11 textiles screened had titanium concentrations below the limit of detection the XRF device (0.15 µg/cm 2 ). Multiple metals, including small amounts of titanium, were found in each of the three nonwoven textiles using ICP-OES. The number of 25-mm-diameter layers required to achieve the collection efficiency by size required for the NRD sampler was three for C1 (R 2 = 0.95 with reference to the NPM criterion), two for C2 (R 2 = 0.79), and three for BC (R 2 = 0.87). All measured pressure drops were less than theoretical and even the greatest pressure drop of 65.4 Pa indicated that a typical personal sampling pump could accommodate any of the three nonwoven textiles in the NRD sampler. The titanium concentration, collection efficiency, and measured pressure drops show there is a potential for

  13. Applied TRIZ in Improving Productivity in Textile Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Aminah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available TRIZ is a methodology and a collection of problem solving tools and strategies that has been used in many other fields. Therefore, this paper proposes TRIZ method for improving the productivity in a textile industry. It focuses at the packing department in a textile company situated in Malaysia. The process was monitored and the problem was observed. TRIZ method is applied in this problem using Functional Analysis and trimming method. A comparison between before and after implementation is done in order to evaluate the productivity effectiveness.

  14. Flat knitting of a light emitting textile with optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2009-01-01

    in the practice of weft knitting. This paper is about the experimental product development of a light radiating textile lamp in which optical fibres are used as the only illumination source. The lampshade is produced on an electronic flat knitting machine with special equipment suitable for the feeding of yarn...... of knitting production equipment and experimental work on a flat knitting machine at The Swedish School of Textiles, Boras, Sweden. Results show that the diamond shaped structure can be knitted in one piece with transparent monofilament yarns. Furthermore it also shows that difficulties occur when knitting...

  15. PERANCANGAN PROGRAM APLIKASI PEMBELIAN PADA PT INDO TAICHEN TEXTILE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakub Yakub

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available PT Indo Taichen Textile Industry is a company in the textile industry producing cloth. Activities and operations personnel administration, payroll systems, purchasing systems, and inventory systems are conducted manually. Problems begin to become fairly complex on the company’s purchasing system so that a software application is required. Purchasing system is made by Data Flow Diagram (DFD as a model of the process or system and Entity Relation Diagram (ERD as a data model. The purchasing application is programmed using the programming language Visual Basic 6.0 and SQL Server database.Keywords: data base, purchasing, system, information system

  16. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-04-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps.

  17. Copper oxide resistive switching memory for e-textile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Han

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A resistive switching memory suitable for integration into textiles is demonstrated on a copper wire network. Starting from copper wires, a Cu/CuxO/Pt sandwich structure is fabricated. The active oxide film is produced by simple thermal oxidation of Cu in atmospheric ambient. The devices display a resistance switching ratio of 102 between the high and low resistance states. The memory states are reversible and retained over 107 seconds, with the states remaining nondestructive after multiple read operations. The presented device on the wire network can potentially offer a memory for integration into smart textile.

  18. Manual Control de calidad en productos textiles y afines

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Felipe, Jose Vicente

    2015-01-01

    El campo de los materiales textiles y afines no suele estar incluido dentro de la disciplina de Conocimiento de materiales o en ocasiones suele estar mínimamente contemplado dentro del área de materiales plásticos y polímeros; por lo cual en general suele ser muy desconocido en la formación de ingenieros y técnicos. Históricamente en las escuelas de ingenieros industriales se encontraba la especialización en industrias textiles, aunque con posterioridad pasó a formar una carrera propia como t...

  19. Strategies for incorporation of polymer photovoltaics into garments and textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Biancardo, M.; Winther-Jensen, B.

    2006-01-01

    The incorporation of polymer photovoltaics into textiles was demonstrated following two different strategies. Simple incorporation of a polyethyleneterphthalate (PET) substrate carrying the polymer photovoltaic device prepared by a doctor blade technique necessitated the use of the photovoltaic...... device as a structural element. The total area of the device on PET was typically much smaller than the active area due to the decorative design of the aluminium electrode. Elaborate integration of the photovoltaic device into the textile material involved the lamination of a polyethylene (PE) film onto...

  20. Carbon fibers and textiles and some of their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaluđerović Branka V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Production process and characteristics of PAN based carbon fibers and cellulose based carbon textile are presented. In the case of carbon fibers attention is paid to changes during the carbonization process in the range of 400-1000°C. The change of diameter and weight loss as well as tensile strength and Young's modulus were examined. For carbon textile it was interesting to show their adsorption characteristics as activated material. The nitrogen adsorption isotherms correspond to the microporous adsorbent which is suitable for adsorption of both gaseous and liquid adsorbats.

  1. Surface modification and preparation techniques for textile materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available origin (wool, silk), plant fibres of cellulosic origin and mineral fibres. Man-made fibres include three main categories: 2 Surface modification of textiles W oo dh ea d Pu bl is hi ng L im ite d123 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14... synthesised fibres engineered for high-performance end uses, for example, aramid and polysulfide fibres. Figures 1.1 and 1.2 give the detailed classification of textile fibres. 1.2 Natural fibres 1.2.1 Plant origin Plant fibres include bast (or stem...

  2. Reutilización de los efluentes textiles en Europa.

    OpenAIRE

    Crespi Rosell, Martin

    1989-01-01

    Este articulo, es un resumen de los 40 trabajos presentados al I Simposio Europeo sobre "Efluentes Textiles: Reutilización, reciclado y disminución de la contaminación" celebrado en Terrassa el mes de septiembre de 1988. En el se describen los diferentes procesos y técnicas que puede utilizar la Industria Textil para reciclar y reutilizar sus efluentes. Las estrategias a adoptar se han dividido en dos grandes bloques: a) Medidas que requieren una inversión mínima, b) Medidas que requieren inv...

  3. Phytoremediation in education: textile dye teaching experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbini, Jwan H; Davis, Lawrence C; Erickson, Larry E

    2009-07-01

    Phytoremediation, the use of plants to clean up contaminated soil and water, has a wide range of applications and advantages, and can be extended to scientific education. Phytoremediation of textile dyes can be used as a scientific experiment or demonstration in teaching laboratories of middle school, high school and college students. In the experiments that we developed, students were involved in a hands-on activity where they were able to learn about phytoremediation concepts. Experiments were set up with 20-40 mg L(-1) dye solutions of different colors. Students can be involved in the set up process and may be involved in the experimental design. In its simplest forms, they use two-week-old sunflower seedlings and place them into a test tube of known volume of dye solution. Color change and/or dye disappearance can be monitored by visual comparison or with a spectrophotometer. Intensity and extent of the lab work depends on student's educational level, and time constraints. Among the many dyes tested, Evan's Blue proved to be the most readily decolorized azo dye. Results could be observed within 1-2 hours. From our experience, dye phytoremediation experiments are suitable and easy to understand by both college and middle school students. These experiments help visual learners, as students compare the color of the dye solution before and after the plant application. In general, simple phytoremediation experiments of this kind can be introduced in many classes including biology, biochemistry and ecological engineering. This paper presents success stories of teaching phytoremediation to middle school and college students.

  4. FROM LEGENDARY TEXTILES TO FIBRE ART, CULTURAL FINGERPRINTS IN TEXTILE ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Mária ORBÁN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In his Manifest pour métamorphose du monde (Manifest for the metamorphosis of the world the great philosopher Edgar Morin, Pierre Gonod and the artist Paskua declared in 2009 that unders tanding the world is becoming impossible on account of the current fragmentation of thinking. They preach the development of a global conscience and the safeguarding of human unity and diversity. Metamorphosis implies the wish to transform visions and perc eptions. Our vision is fragmentary, as our mental barriers can often be stronger. In enhancing this vision, it seemed essential that on should discover, contemplate and reflect so as to be able to appreciate the particularity but also the diversity of text ile arts, of fibres and techniques in fibre art. In a more and more globalised world, textile arts can offer representations of society and humanity in search of a new identity.

  5. Fuel-oil cogeneration plant for textile Industry. Central de cogeneracion a fueloleo para industria textil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Larrauri, M.; Diez Hernandez, J.; Villasante Diaz, A. (IDOM, Ingenieria y Consultoria, S.A. (Spain))

    1993-10-01

    Aznar S.A. is a textile factory especially sensitive to electricity distribution failures. They produce the subsequent shut down at the manufacturing process and several hours of maintenance tasks. A cogeneration plant has been installed to provide electricity and thermal energy to the process. Since the location is far from Natural Gas pipelines the system includes fuel-oil as energy source. Annual electricity production will be 23.300 MWh and 6.400 MWh of them will be exported into the grid. Fuel-oil consumption at the heat exchanger is reduced by 47%, but the whole factory consumption increases a 247% due to the high consumption of the engine. This increase is compensated by revenues from selling electricity and electricity savings. These facts, together with maintenance cost saving leads to a pay back time of 3.3. years. (Author)

  6. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  7. Textiles in a social context. Textile production in Europe and the Mediterranean in the 4th and 3rd millennia BCE (Session report)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siennicka, Malgorzata; Rahmstorf, Lorenz; Ulanowska, Agata

    2015-01-01

    A report of the regular session "Textiles in a social context. Textile production in Europe and the Mediterranean in the 4th and 3rd millennia BCE" at the 20th Annual EAA Conference in Istanbul, Turkey, 10-14/09/2014......A report of the regular session "Textiles in a social context. Textile production in Europe and the Mediterranean in the 4th and 3rd millennia BCE" at the 20th Annual EAA Conference in Istanbul, Turkey, 10-14/09/2014...

  8. Evaluating the combined efficacy of polymers with fungicides for protection of museum textiles against fungal deterioration in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Fungal deterioration is one of the highest risk factors for damage of historical textile objects in Egypt. This paper represents both a study case about the fungal microflora deteriorating historical textiles in the Egyptian Museum and the Coptic museum in Cairo, and evaluation of the efficacy of several combinations of polymers with fungicides for the reinforcement of textiles and their prevention against fungal deterioration. Both cotton swab technique and biodeteriorated textile part technique were used for isolation of fungi from historical textile objects. The plate method with the manual key was used for identification of fungi. The results show that the most dominant fungi isolated from the tested textile samples belong to Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Penicillium and Trichoderma species. Microbiological testing was used for evaluating the usefulness of the suggested conservation materials (polymers combined with fungicides) in prevention of the fungal deterioration of ancient Egyptian textiles. Textile samples were treated with 4 selected polymers combined with two selected fungicides. Untreated and treated textile samples were deteriorated by 3 selected active fungal strains isolated from ancient Egyptian textiles. This study reports that most of the tested polymers combined with the tested fungicides prevented the fungal deterioration of textiles. Treatment of ancient textiles by suggested polymers combined with the suggested fungicides not only reinforces these textiles, but also prevents fungal deterioration and increases the durability of these textiles. The tested polymers without fungicides reduce the fungal deterioration of textiles but do not prevent it completely.

  9. Determination of trace heavy metals in some textile products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentrations of trace heavy metals in textile samples collected from Tokat, Turkey, were determined by flame and/or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The relative standard deviations for the determinations were found to be lower than 10 %. The concentrations of trace metals ...

  10. Deformability of a textile reinforcement modified with nanofibres

    OpenAIRE

    Koysin, V.; Kotanjac, Zeljko; Lomov, S.V.; Gorbatikh, L.; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko; Binetruy, C.; F. Boussu

    2010-01-01

    Deformability of a textile fabric is studied experimentally using a) friction test, b) out-of-plane compression, and c) bending. These tests reveal that a grafting of the fabric with carbon nano-fibres can significantly deteriorate its deformability. Therefore an optimal CNF mass fraction should be chosen for a particular production case, to obtain a compromise between improved strength and decreased drapability.

  11. In-Vivo Human Skin to Textiles Friction Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfarr, Lukas; Zagar, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    We report on a measurement system to determine highly reliable and accurate friction properties of textiles as needed for example as input to garment simulation software. Our investigations led to a set-up that allows to characterize not just textile to textile but also textile to in-vivo human skin tribological properties and thus to fundamental knowledge about genuine wearer interaction in garments. The method of test conveyed in this paper is measuring concurrently and in a highly time resolved manner the normal force as well as the resulting shear force caused by a friction subject intending to slide out of the static friction regime and into the dynamic regime on a test bench. Deeper analysis of various influences is enabled by extending the simple model following Coulomb's law for rigid body friction to include further essential parameters such as contact force, predominance in the yarn's orientation and also skin hydration. This easy-to-use system enables to measure reliably and reproducibly both static and dynamic friction for a variety of friction partners including human skin with all its variability there might be.

  12. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu, Florentina-Daniela; Dinca, Nicolae; Paulo, Artur Cavaco

    2008-01-01

    In this paper are presented the possibilities of using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry in textile industry. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry it is a convenient, versatile method for characterization and identification of dyes and pigments, and also for characterization of fibers and contaminants of the fabrics.

  13. Improving Knowledge for Green Textile Products: Life Cycle Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jinhee

    2012-01-01

    Textile products are used heavily every day. The apparel industry is one of the largest industrial polluters, causing damage to both human health and the environment. Despite increasing consumer concern about environmental issues and a growing trend toward supporting sustainable production, consumers are often unable to evaluate accurately which…

  14. Introducing Textiles as Material of Construction of Ethanol Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osagie A. Osadolor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The conventional materials for constructing bioreactors for ethanol production are stainless and cladded carbon steel because of the corrosive behaviour of the fermenting media. As an alternative and cheaper material of construction, a novel textile bioreactor was developed and examined. The textile, coated with several layers to withstand the pressure, resist the chemicals inside the reactor and to be gas-proof was welded to form a 30 L lab reactor. The reactor had excellent performance for fermentative production of bioethanol from sugar using baker’s yeast. Experiments with temperature and mixing as process parameters were performed. No bacterial contamination was observed. Bioethanol was produced for all conditions considered with the optimum fermentation time of 15 h and ethanol yield of 0.48 g/g sucrose. The need for mixing and temperature control can be eliminated. Using a textile bioreactor at room temperature of 22 °C without mixing required 2.5 times longer retention time to produce bioethanol than at 30 °C with mixing. This will reduce the fermentation investment cost by 26% for an ethanol plant with capacity of 100,000 m3 ethanol/y. Also, replacing one 1300 m3 stainless steel reactor with 1300 m3 of the textile bioreactor in this plant will reduce the fermentation investment cost by 19%.

  15. Advanced treatment of textile wastewater for reuse using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    2005-01-01

    Jan 1, 2005 ... 31 No. 1 January 2005. 132. Available on website http://www.wrc.org.za. LIN S and PENG C (1996) Continuous treatment of textile wastewater by combined coagulation electrochemical oxidation and activated sludge. Water Res. 30 (3) 587-592. NAOHIDE T, YUKIO M, MASATAKA Y, SHIN-ICHI W, SAHORI.

  16. Promising flame retardant textile in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since carbon dioxide is non-toxic, non-flammable and cost-effective, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is widely used in textile dyeing applications. Due to its environmentally benign character, scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical reactions. O...

  17. Facilitated Articulation of Implicit Knowledge in Textile Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2009-01-01

    This is a report from an ongoing research project and as such it is work in progress. The paper proposes an exploratory approach in order to enable end-users to contribute with their experiences of emotional values of fabrics in use. It is suggested that the textile designer with her repertoire o...

  18. The Application of Smart Textiles in the Brand Fashion Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Hong-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the economic and social development, material life in the era of abundance is not only in meeting the basic needs of life, but also modern consumers become forced to pursue the spiritual and cultural needs. On the other side, clothing will not just fulfill the basic functions of beauty and suitability, thus, more consumers begin to pay closer attentions to apparel textile’s individuation expression and technological elements, or to some other deeper emotional requirements etc. Smart textiles originally belongs to the cutting-edge scientific field of fashion industry, however, with the booming development of internet industry and smart phone devices, acute apparel manufacturers must have to take a ride on advanced tech-trends and launch a wide expansion of smart textile fibres’s applications into the clothing industry. This thesis would present a basic introduction on the concept and classifications of the smart textile fibres, and then like to deploy a profound analysis of smart textiles applied in the brand fashion design.

  19. Industrial Design Management: The Focal Development for Textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper suggest possible solution to this problem by examining the performance of the Nigerian textile industry, which includes, the workforce, appreciation of the end products at the market level, and the technological advancement of the industry. Design management is suggested as the solution to this problem. Design ...

  20. Analysis of environmental violations by some textile industries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of environmental violations by some textile industries in Nigeria. EJ Ekanem, BA Fodeke. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research Vol. 1 1996: 1-7. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics ...

  1. Treatment of some Textile Industrial Effluents using Dry Corn Stalk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corn stalk ground to various mesh sizes was used to treat textile effluents obtained from three different industries. These effluents were first pretreated with alum and then charcoal; passing the water through a column, (20cm long and 5cm diameter) containing the ground corn stalk of size diameters of 300mm, 355mm ...

  2. Local textile industry wastewater effect on freshwater fish species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of local tie-dye textile industry wastewater on two selected fish species (Clarias gariepinus and Oreochromis niloticus) of economic importance was investigated using static renewal bioassay method to determine the acute and sub-lethal effects on the test fish species. The physico-chemical parameters of the ...

  3. Textiles: Some technocal information and data VI: fusing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cawood, MP

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available TEXTILES : SOME TECHNICAL INFORMATION AND DATA PART YI : FUSING by M P CA WOOD PREAMBLE In April, 1979, SA WTRI extended its activities to include Clothing Technology. One of thefirstpriorities, in any ventureof thisnatureis to identify areas which...

  4. A novel linear direct drive system for textile winding applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jakeman, N; Bullough, W; Bingham, Chris; Mellor, Phillip

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the specification, modelling, magnetic design, thermal characteristics and control of a novel, high acceleration (up to 82g) brushless PM linear actuator with Halbach array, for textile package winding applications. Experimental results demonstrate the realisation of the actuator and induced performance advantages afforded to the phase lead, closed-loop position control scheme.

  5. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  6. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Massaroni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  7. Sensitization to reactive textile dyes in patients with contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, B M; Motolese, A; Conti, A; Ferdani, G; Seidenari, S

    1996-03-01

    Reactive dyes are used especially for colouring natural fibres (cotton, silk and wool) that are widely used in Western countries, particularly Italy, in the production of clothes. The aim of our study was to investigate sensitization to the most commonly used reactive textile dyes in patients undergoing patch tests, and to assess the clinical relevance of contact sensitization to these dyes. 1813 consecutive patients underwent patch tests with the GIRDCA standard series and an additional textile series of 12 reactive dyes. 18 of these patients were sensitized to reactive dyes (0.99%) (4 only to reactive dyes). The dyes most frequently responsible for positive patch tests were Red Cibacron CR and Violet Remazol 5R (respectively, 8 and 5 positivities). In 5 cases only was a history of intolerance to particular garments given; of 4 patch tests performed with pieces of garment, 2 were positive. In 1 occupationally-exposed patient, airborne contact dermatitis was suspected. Owing to the lack of up-to-date patch test series, some cases of allergic contact dermatitis from textile dyes are probably misdiagnosed: new colouring agents are continuously introduced to the market, so that a close relationship with textile industry is necessary to improve our diagnostic tools.

  8. Assessing Botswana's Textiles Export Trade Potential Using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through the application of the gravity trade model technique, the study investigates countries for which Botswana has unrealized export trade potential in textile products. The estimated results indicate that Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ghana, Mozambique and Switzerland are the export destinations to which Botswana ...

  9. Textile & Apparel Production, Management, and Services: Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killman, Letitia

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a course that provides occupationally specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the textile and apparel industries. Contents include an introduction; the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) covered; sample course outlines; instructional strategies organized…

  10. The characters of the modern Igbo textile art | Dike | Mgbakoigba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six conceptual attributes; the ethnocentric, technological, impressionistic, metaphorical, and the painterly and sculptural are identified. Though they are individualized, they nevertheless can be seen as the characters of the modern Igbo textile art. While some of the artists build their concepts on a number of these attributes, ...

  11. FUNCTIONALIZATION OF TEXTILE FABRICS WITH MICROENCAPSULATED VITAMIN E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPESCU Alina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study the experimental deposition of vitamin E microcapsules by padding technique on the textile support made of 50% cotton and 50% polyamide high tenacity Nm 50/1 were performed. The preliminary preparation of textile materials has been made in four consecutive sequences: hot alkaline treatment in absence of NaOH, bleaching, drying and curing. In the pretreatment of textile materials the crosslinking agent Itobinder AG is used, which is an anionic emulsion based on the acrylic copolimer, being followed by the application of a dispersion with content of vitamin E microcapsules. In the present raport the evaluation of obtained performances was made through SEM, GC and FTIR-ATR analysis. By SEM has been determined the wash durability of deposition of vitamin E microcapsules before and after one washing cycle. Following qualitative analysis by Gas-Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy with Attenuated Total Reflection absorption the related compoundes presents on the surface of the textile materials were identified. After retention time the vitamin E acetate is found with preponderance in all chromatograms at 15, 70 min with aproximation. Also by FTIR-ATR the presence of vitamin E acetate is confirmed by the apparition of a new peak at 1731 cm-1 and changes of intensity of various peaks, especially in the fingerprint region of the spectra of the functionalized fabrics.

  12. The Importance of Attendance in an Introductory Textile Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcketti, Sara B.; Wang, Xinxin; Greder, Kate

    2013-01-01

    At Iowa State University, the introductory textile science course is a required 4-credit class for all undergraduate students enrolled in the Apparel, Merchandising, and Design Program. Frustrated by a perceived gap between students who easily comprehended course material and those who complained and struggled, the instructor implemented an…

  13. Vocational Training in the Textiles and Clothing Industries in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drimousis, I.; Zisimopoulos, A.

    This document examines the circumstances under which vocational training in Greece is provided for jobs in the textile and clothing industries. Its objective is to identify guidelines for vocational training for a skilled work force at regional and national levels and to contribute to job mobility between industries. Statistical data,…

  14. Workplace Literacy: Impacting the Textile Industry. Final Report. Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, William R.; Peck, Nancy L.

    Workers in five departments of the J.P. Stevens Plant in Clemson, South Carolina, participated in a workplace literacy project that was designed to increase participants' literacy and job skills and increase the literacy training efforts of textile plants in the Southeast. Major project activities included the following: identification of the…

  15. Learning with a Website for the Textile Industry in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbambo, Buhle; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a locally initiated investigation into the suitability of the Internet in helping to meet the information needs of women in small, medium, and micro enterprises (SMMEs) in the textile industry in Botswana. The background is the stated government policy to encourage the development of SMMEs and the Internet infrastructure. The…

  16. Color pollution control in textile dyeing industry effluents using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Color pollution control in textile dyeing industry effluents using tannery sludge derived activated carbon. ... The leachate of heavy metals from tannery sludge derived activated carbon to the environment is very low, which are within the standard limit of industrial effluent and leachable substances. KEY WORDS: Adsorption ...

  17. Analysis Of Students' Performance In Clothing And Textiles In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the factors that are responsible for the poor performance of college of Education students in Clothing and Textiles in Rivers State. The study adopted the ex-post factor descriptive research design. A sample of 120 students was drawn from the target population of 400 students ...

  18. Self-Folding Textiles through Manipulation of Knit Stitch Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea E. Knittel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a preliminary study on finding predictable methods of controlling the self-folding behaviors of weft knit textiles for use in the development of smart textiles and garment devices, such as those with shape memory, auxetic behavior or transformation abilities. In this work, Shima Seiki SDS-One Apex computer-aided knitting technology, Shima Seiki industrial knitting machines, and the study of paper origami tessellation patterns were used as tools to understand and predict the self-folding abilities of weft knit textiles. A wide range of self-folding weft knit structures was produced, and relationships between the angles and ratios of the knit and purl stitch types were determined. Mechanical testing was used as a means to characterize differences produced by stitch patterns, and to further understand the relationships between angles and folding abilities. By defining a formulaic method for predicting the nature of the folds that occur due to stitch architecture patterns, we can better design self-folding fabrics for smart textile applications.

  19. Wearable Electronics and Smart Textiles: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppa, Matteo; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Electronic Textiles (e-textiles) are fabrics that feature electronics and interconnections woven into them, presenting physical flexibility and typical size that cannot be achieved with other existing electronic manufacturing techniques. Components and interconnections are intrinsic to the fabric and thus are less visible and not susceptible of becoming tangled or snagged by surrounding objects. E-textiles can also more easily adapt to fast changes in the computational and sensing requirements of any specific application, this one representing a useful feature for power management and context awareness. The vision behind wearable computing foresees future electronic systems to be an integral part of our everyday outfits. Such electronic devices have to meet special requirements concerning wearability. Wearable systems will be characterized by their ability to automatically recognize the activity and the behavioral status of their own user as well as of the situation around her/him, and to use this information to adjust the systems' configuration and functionality. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of Smart Textiles and pays particular attention to the materials and their manufacturing process. Each technique shows advantages and disadvantages and our aim is to highlight a possible trade-off between flexibility, ergonomics, low power consumption, integration and eventually autonomy. PMID:25004153

  20. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  1. The added value of 3D polymer deposition on textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Warmoeskerken, M.M.C.G. (Marijn)

    2013-01-01

    The working hypothesis for this research project is that it is possible to develop a new functional polymer printing process for the direct application of conductive polymer onto textiles. We will use the basic extrusion technology that is currently applied in 3D printing. Thus the aim is also

  2. Information seeking-pattern of Nigerian textile market women and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the information seeking-pattern of Nigerian textile market women and strategies for improvement of which the study was an ex-post-facto type and adopted survey research design. Disproportional stratified random technique was used to select markets for the study while questionnaire was used to ...

  3. Impact of Transport Costs on Vietnamese Textile Exports

    OpenAIRE

    Huong, Trinh Thi Thu

    2017-01-01

    Transport cost is a critical component that structure price of goods at destination points in international trade. This research explored and analysed transport cost and its impact on export by investigating the relationship between transport cost and export of textile (a specific sector) in Vietnam (a developing country) from 2012 to 2014.

  4. A review of symbolism in indigenous West African textiles | Ulzen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the C 20th, those which are both cherished in their local context and increasingly sought after by collectors and museums world-wide. Finally, the picture will be brought up to date through a consideration of the role of cloth traditions in contemporary dress and fashion design. Keywords: imagery, symbolism, motifs, textiles

  5. Reverse osmosis treatment of wastes from the textile industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audran, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Frizzarin, L.

    1995-09-01

    Reserve osmosis has been used in the textile industry for cleaning up effluent before sending it to the treatment plant. This process was preceded by a combination of flocculation and sedimentation. This system reduced water consumption since part of the water was reused, and also reduced the quantity of effluent to be dealt with by the treatment plant. (authors). 2 figs.

  6. Impacts des usines textiles sur l'environnement au Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Textile factories in Benin have consequences on the environment, in spite of the advantages which they offer. resent research aims to analyze the sources of pollution and the nature of the pollutants in worn water and the sediments and identifies the impacts of these pollutants on the resources of the region. In order to ...

  7. Advanced treatment of textile wastewater for reuse using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After these two steps, all the wastewater indices decrease to low levels; in particular, COD levels are reduced to 18.2 mg•l-1. The treated water can be reused in many production areas of the textile dyehouse factory. To take best advantage of this disposal system, the two processes should run in a rational sequence, with ...

  8. Short Communication Assessment of the acute toxicity of textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Static assessment of the acute toxicity of textile effluent against hermit crab Clibanarius afrianus and fish Poecilia reticulata was conducted in the laboratory. The effluent was found to be differentially toxic to the test species, the computed 96h LC50 values being 333.311 ml/l and 70.711 ml/l for C. africanus and P. reticulata, ...

  9. Methylene blue removal by carbonized textile sludge-based adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ari; Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Urabe, Takeo; Ikeda, Kazuki

    2017-12-01

    Colored effluent and a large amount of sludge are major pollutant sources derived from textile industry activity. In this research, the idea for converting textile sludge into a potential adsorbent was conducted through a carbonization process in order to solve the colored effluent problem. Textile sludge was carbonized at a temperature ranging from 400 to 800 °C in the absence of oxygen. Maximum adsorption capacity of carbonized sludge for methylene blue removal reached 60.30 mg/g when the sludge was carbonized at 600 °C with specific surface area of 138.9 m 2 /g and no significant alteration was observed until 800 °C. Experimental research by using a real wastewater also showed that there was almost no disruption during adsorption of methylene blue into surface of carbonized sludge. While reactivation process revealed that the regeneration of carbonized sludge was applicable by secondary heating at the same carbonization temperature. Furthermore, the application of this research demonstrated that the carbonized textile sludge was a good adsorbent for methylene blue removal and had a capability to be reactivated.

  10. Gamma radiation treatment of waste waters from textile industries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of gamma irradiation alone, and in combination with chemical treatment on color, odor, chemical oxyg-en demand (COD) and suspended solids in waste waters from textile industries in Ghana were studied to explore the potential of alternative and innovative processes for treatment of industrial waste waters. Waste ...

  11. Decolourisation and degradation of textile dyes using a sulphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful decolourisation and degradation of textile dyes was achieved in a biosulphidogenic batch reactor using biodigester sludge from a local municipality waste treatment plant as a source of carbon and microflora that augmented a sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium. Orange II (O II) was decolourised by ...

  12. 49 CFR 178.520 - Standards for textile bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for textile bags. 178.520 Section 178.520 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging...

  13. Toxicity assessment of treated effluents from a textile industry in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water pollution caused by industrial effluent discharges has become a worrisome phenomenon due to its impact on environmental health and safety. Textile industries contribute immensely to surface water deterioration and are categorized among the most polluting in all industrial sectors. For this reason, the toxicity of ...

  14. Assessment of respiratory symptoms and lung function among textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The number of textile industries in Nigeria with large work force is on the rise. There is thus the need to assess medical challenges of its workers, one of which is respiratory ailments. Although much has been written about the subject globally, only few studies have been done in Nigeria. This study aims to ...

  15. Textile designs and fashion as strategic resource tools for economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Textile designs and fashion no doubt should be a part of the culture and economy of the development of a nation like Nigeria. There is no gainsaying the fact that all of the instruments of advancement of any nation, economy is predominant. The economic drive of any nation is majorly routed on generation of income from ...

  16. Deformability of a textile reinforcement modified with nanofibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koysin, V.; Kotanjac, Zeljko; Lomov, S.V.; Gorbatikh, L.; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko; C. Binetruy,; F. Boussu,

    2010-01-01

    Deformability of a textile fabric is studied experimentally using a) friction test, b) out-of-plane compression, and c) bending. These tests reveal that a grafting of the fabric with carbon nano-fibres can significantly deteriorate its deformability. Therefore an optimal CNF mass fraction should be

  17. Flow resistance of textile materials. Part I: Monofilament fabrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooijer, H.; Gooijer, H.; Warmoeskerken, Marinus; Groot Wassink, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the relation between the flow resistance of a textile material and its geometry. A literature survey reveals that the orifice model is most suited to modeling the flow resistance of woven fabrics, but applications of this model were, until now, restricted to relatively open

  18. Decolourisation and degradation of textile dyes using a sulphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other azo dyes, Reactive black 5 (RB 5), Reactive red 120 ... successfully degraded with the exception of Amido black 10B (AB 10B). The Orange II ... Therefore bioremediation of textile effluent with sludge and SRB can concomitantly treat two wastes while providing a cheaper alternative of the carbon source. However, the ...

  19. Analysis of parallel collaboration assignments in smart textile design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Toeters, M. (Marina)

    2012-01-01

    Many interesting smart textile concepts have been developed, however there are only a few relevant examples of concepts that are producible and valuable for our society. The so-called ‘killer application’ has not been found yet. That is why it is extremely important that

  20. Functionally active silicones as modifiers of polyurethane textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modification of application and service properties of polyurethane textile coatings and cast polyurethane films using polysiloxanes (functionally active silicones) have been studied. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of silicon additives on processing, adhesion, water repellence, and resistance to tea and ...

  1. Textile impregnation with thermoplastic resin - models and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, Richard; Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Lamers, E.A.D.; Wijskamp, Sebastiaan; Kelly, P.A.; Bickerton, S.; Lescher, P.; Govignon, Q.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues of the development of cost-effective thermoplastic composites for the aerospace industry is the process quality control. A complete, void free impregnation of the textile reinforcement by the thermoplastic resin is an important measure of the quality of composites. The

  2. Wearable electronics and smart textiles: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppa, Matteo; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2014-07-07

    Electronic Textiles (e-textiles) are fabrics that feature electronics and interconnections woven into them, presenting physical flexibility and typical size that cannot be achieved with other existing electronic manufacturing techniques. Components and interconnections are intrinsic to the fabric and thus are less visible and not susceptible of becoming tangled or snagged by surrounding objects. E-textiles can also more easily adapt to fast changes in the computational and sensing requirements of any specific application, this one representing a useful feature for power management and context awareness. The vision behind wearable computing foresees future electronic systems to be an integral part of our everyday outfits. Such electronic devices have to meet special requirements concerning wearability. Wearable systems will be characterized by their ability to automatically recognize the activity and the behavioral status of their own user as well as of the situation around her/him, and to use this information to adjust the systems' configuration and functionality. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of Smart Textiles and pays particular attention to the materials and their manufacturing process. Each technique shows advantages and disadvantages and our aim is to highlight a possible trade-off between flexibility, ergonomics, low power consumption, integration and eventually autonomy.

  3. Textile azo dye degradation by Candida rugosa INCQS 71011 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Textile azo dye degradation by Candida rugosa INCQS 71011 isolated from a non-impacted area in Semi-Arid Region of Brazilian Northeast. Carlos Roberto S. do Nascimento, Marília M. Nishikawa, Aline B. M. Vaz, Carlos Augusto Rosa, Manuela da Silva ...

  4. The Textile and Clothing Sector in Botswana: Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper considers the performance of the Textile and Clothing (TC) sector in Botswana and reviews various .... developing countries such as Pakistan, India and the world's clothing manufacturing powerhouse .... to harness the potential of improved trade, investment and employment opportunities offered by AGOA.

  5. assessing the suitability of woven fabric and composite textile

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ASSESSING THE SUITABILITY OF WOVEN FABRIC AND. COMPOSITE TEXTILE TECHNIQUES FOR MURAL. PRODUCTION. E. K. Howard1 and N. A. Opoku-Asare2. 1 Department of Industrial Art, KNUST, Kumasi. 2 Department of General Art Studies, KNUST, Kumasi. ABSTRACT: This art studio experimental study ...

  6. Assessment of respiratory symptoms and lung function among textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-06

    Apr 6, 2011 ... Objective:A cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary functions among Textile Workers in ... creating the need for a system of protecting workers' health and ensuring their ..... cigarette smoking among the exposed workers. Lung function tests.

  7. Functional Inkjet Printing on Textiles : Challenges and Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, P. (Pramod); Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Gooijer, H. (Henk)

    2012-01-01

    The main challenge for the Dutch and European textile and clothing sector is to make a paradigm shift from labour intensive industry to knowledge based industry. This shift is essential for gaining a competitive edge and to develop innovative products and eco-friendly processes. A promising

  8. Advanced nanofibrous textile-based dressing material for treating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... and the delivery of PA are anticipated to speed up the impaired healing process of chronic wounds. Keywords. Advanced textiles; chronic wound ... infections and the formation of biofilms (drug-resistant). Con- secutively, the recruited ... To control the loss of life, nowa- days, the traditional dressings such as ...

  9. Effect of textile factory effluent on otolith and somatic growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Are otolith parameters more sensitive than somatic indices in detecting stress conditions in fish? This question was investigated using juvenile-sized Clarias gariepinus in a 30-day exposure bioassay to a textile factory effluent. A series of static bioassays were initially conducted with concentrations of 0.00-40.00% and the ...

  10. Pollutant levels in effluent samples from tanneries and textiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effluent samples from tanneries and textile industries from Kano industrial area of Challawa, Bompai and Sharada industrial area were collected on quarterly basis from June to September, 2007 (Rainy season), November, 2007 – February, 2008 (Harmattan season) and March – May, 2008 (Dry season) to reflect the ...

  11. Surface adsorption technique for the treatment of textile wastewaters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surface adsorption technique has been employed for the treatment of textile wastewater by electrolyzing the effluent with a current of 4 A for 200 minutes. Reductions in color and pH variation of the effluent were monitored through absorbance and pH measurements throughout the process. Concentration levels of Ni2+ in ...

  12. RESEARCH REGARDING DIFFERENT APPLICATIONS OF SILVER IN TEXTILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRALEA Jeni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research presented in this paper are based on septic properties of silver. The experiment creates premises for developing of project concepts, products and inscriptions (applications of graphic signs, ionization treatments with silver ions, which ensures the quality of the septic product in an ecological way (no preservatives and no toxic chemicals, characterized by a modern design. Thus developing concepts of textile products, the development of accessories needed for manufacturing textile products that ensure the property of being septic, development of eco-friendly products without thermochemical treatments, are applications that the designer can achieve based on the properties of silver. The paper presents both technological capabilities and properties of silver to be able to be used in the field of textiles, as well as the creativity of designers to generate ideas for new applications of this material in the field of industrial products in the textile, garments. The importance of the designer's involvement in creating septic and ecological products, which respects the environment represent the focus of this work. The deformability properties of silver are the inspiration for designer even when it shows major deformities, caused as a result of tests of endurance. Surface modifications of this material can cause identification of applications of this precious metal, turning in esthetic product, scrap, samples, test specimens subjected to various tests

  13. Surface and Bulk Modification of Synthetic Textiles to Improve Dyeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, P. (Pramod); Parvinzadeh Gashti, M.; Willoughby, J.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic fibers, mainly polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyamide (PA), polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polypropylene (PP), are the most widely used polymers in the textile industry. These fibers surpass the production of natural fibers with a market share of 54.4%. The advantages of these fibers are

  14. Assessment of effluents discharged from textiles industries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of effluents discharged from textiles industries in selected villages in Kaduna State, Nigeria. ... The study recommend the need for the intervention of appropriate regulatory agencies to ensure production of high quality treated final effluents by wastewater treatment facilities in selected villages of Kaduna.

  15. Investigation of nanoscale reinforcement into textile polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mujibur Rahman

    A dual inclusion strategy for textile polymers has been investigated to increase elastic energy storage capacity of fibers used in high velocity impact applications. Commercial fibers such as Spectra and Dyneema are made from ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Dynamic elastic energy of these fibers is still low therefore limiting their wholesale application without a secondary metallic or ceramic component. The idea in this investigation is to develop methodologies so that the elastic energy of polyethylene based fibers can be increased by several folds. This would allow manufacturing of an all-fabric system for high impact applications. The dual inclusion consists of a polymer phase and a nanoscale inorganic phase to polyethylene. The polymer phase was nylon-6 and the inorganic phase was carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Nylon-6 was blended as a minor phase into UHMWPE and was chosen because of its large fracture strain -- almost one order higher than that of UHMWPE. On the other hand, CNTs with their very high strength, modulus, and aspect ratio, contributed to sharing of load and sliding of polymer interfaces as they aligned during extrusion and strain hardening processes. A solution spinning process was developed to produce UHMWPE filaments reinforced with CNTs and nylon-6. The procedure involved dispersing of CNTs into paraffin oil through sonication followed by dissolving polymers into paraffin-CNT solution using a homogenizer. The admixture was fed into a single screw extruder for melt mixing and extrusion through an orifice. The extrudate was rinsed via a hexane bath, stabilized through a heater, and then drawn into a filament winder with controlled stretching. In the next step, the as produced filaments were strain-hardened through repeated loading unloading cycles under tension. Neat and reinforced filaments were characterized through DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), XRD (X-ray Diffraction), Raman Spectroscopy, SEM (Scanning Electron

  16. The Textile Elements in Ottoman Miniatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevser Gürcan Y A R D I M C I

    2015-07-01

    , decoration elements, tents and furnishing elements used by the civilian people around the Palace, and the weaving of the textile industry which covered the 16 th and 17 th Ottoman Era mainly, have been examined in relation with the embroidery and embellishment arts of those times. In the scope of the topic, while the miniatures were being selected, special attention was given to the selection process in selecting the miniatures that included the messages in terms of color - model of the decorative elements and the clothes that emphasized the importance given to the weaving art and were worn on special occasions in the Palace like births, circumcision ceremonies, cülû s ceremonies and funerals.

  17. Approach on environmental risk assessment of nanosilver released from textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Doris; Schlich, Karsten; Hohndorf, Lars; Koch, Wolfgang; Kuehnen, Ute; Polleichtner, Christian; Kussatz, Carola; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin

    2015-07-01

    Based on the increased utilization of nanosilver (silver nanomaterials=AgNM) as antibacterial agent, there is the strong need to assess the potential environmental implication associated with its new application areas. In this study an exemplary environmental risk assessment (ERA) of AgNM applied in textiles was performed. Environmental exposure scenarios (via municipal sewage treatment plant (STP)) with wastewater supply from domestic homes) were developed for three different types of textiles equipped with AgNM. Based on these scenarios predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were deduced for STPs and for the environmental compartments surface water, sediment as well as soil. These PECs were related to PNECs (predicted no effect concentrations). PNECs were deduced from results of ecotoxicity tests of a selected AgNM (NM-300K). Data on ecotoxicology were derived from various tests with activated sludge, cyanobacteria, algae, daphnids, fish, duckweed, macrophytes, chironomids, earthworms, terrestrial plants as well as soil microorganisms. Emission data for the AgNM NM-300K from textiles were derived from washing experiments. The performed ERA was based on the specifications defined in the ECHA Guidances on information requirements and chemical safety assessment. Based on the chosen scenarios and preconditions, no environmental risk of the AgNM NM-300K released from textiles was detected. Under conservative assumptions a risk quotient for surface water close to 1 indicated that the aquatic compartment may be affected by an increased emission of AgNM to the environment due to the high sensitivity of aquatic organisms to silver. Based on the successful retention of AgNM in the sewage sludge and the still ongoing continual application of sewage sludge on farmland it is recommended to introduce a threshold for total silver content in sewage sludge into the respective regulations. Regarding potential risk mitigation measures, it is emphasized to preferably directly

  18. The status of water reuse in European textile sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajnhandl, Simona; Valh, Julija Volmajer

    2014-08-01

    The textile finishing industry is known as a very fragmented and heterogeneous industrial sector dominated mainly by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). As with many other industrial sectors in Europe, it is obliged to act more sustainably in regard to increasingly limited natural resources such as water. This paper presents in-depth survey of wastewater reuse programmes over the last ten years covering the European textile finishing industry. Different wastewater treatment solutions developed are presented and discussed. Special attention is given to the project AquaFit4Use (7th Framework Programme), where almost five years of project work has resulted in valuable know-how practices in water reuse for the most water consuming sectors in Europe i.e. paper, food, chemical and textile. Only the latter is discussed in this paper. The main negative impacts by the textile finishing sector on the environment are still related to intensive water consumption and wastewater discharge, characterised by greater amounts of organic chemicals and colouring agents, low biodegradability, and high salinity. End of pipe treatment of such complex effluents in order to produce reusable water is not feasible. Therefore, separation of waste effluents regarding their pollution level and their separate treatment was the basic approach used in the project. As a result waste effluents with a big reuse potential could be effectively treated by combination of conventional treatment technologies. Proposed water treatment scenarios enable more than 40% reduction in fresh water consumption. Since different guidelines of minimum water quality to be safely reuse in textile processes exist at this stage this issue is discussed as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Particle-Based Geometric and Mechanical Modelling of Woven Technical Textiles and Reinforcements for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Reza

    Technical textiles are increasingly being engineered and used in challenging applications, in areas such as safety, biomedical devices, architecture and others, where they must meet stringent demands including excellent and predictable load bearing capabilities. They also form the bases for one of the most widespread group of composite materials, fibre reinforced polymer-matrix composites (PMCs), which comprise materials made of stiff and strong fibres generally available in textile form and selected for their structural potential, combined with a polymer matrix that gives parts their shape. Manufacturing processes for PMCs and technical textiles, as well as parts and advanced textile structures must be engineered, ideally through simulation, and therefore diverse properties of the textiles, textile reinforcements and PMC materials must be available for predictive simulation. Knowing the detailed geometry of technical textiles is essential to predicting accurately the processing and performance properties of textiles and PMC parts. In turn, the geometry taken by a textile or a reinforcement textile is linked in an intricate manner to its constitutive behaviour. This thesis proposes, investigates and validates a general numerical tool for the integrated and comprehensive analysis of textile geometry and constitutive behaviour as required toward engineering applications featuring technical textiles and textile reinforcements. The tool shall be general with regards to the textiles modelled and the loading cases applied. Specifically, the work aims at fulfilling the following objectives: 1) developing and implementing dedicated simulation software for modelling textiles subjected to various load cases; 2) providing, through simulation, geometric descriptions for different textiles subjected to different load cases namely compaction, relaxation and shear; 3) predicting the constitutive behaviour of the textiles undergoing said load cases; 4) identifying parameters

  20. Doing Textiles Experiments in Game-Based Virtual Reality: A Design of the Stereoscopic Chemical Laboratory (SCL) for Textiles Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kung Wong; Kan, Chi Wai; Lee, Pui Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of stereoscopic virtual technology in textile and fashion studies in particular to the area of chemical experiment. The development of a designed virtual platform, called Stereoscopic Chemical Laboratory (SCL), is introduced. Design/methodology/approach: To implement the suggested…

  1. Part I. Improved flame retardant textiles. Part II. Novel approach to layer-by-layer processing for flame retardant textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, new approaches for flame retardant textile by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and layer-by-layer processing will be discussed. Due to its environmentally benign character, the scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical re...

  2. Flexible Textile-Based Organic Transistors Using Graphene/Ag Nanoparticle Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Highly flexible and electrically-conductive multifunctional textiles are desirable for use in wearable electronic applications. In this study, we fabricated multifunctional textile composites by vacuum filtration and wet-transfer of graphene oxide films on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET textile in association with embedding Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs to improve the electrical conductivity. A flexible organic transistor can be developed by direct transfer of a dielectric/semiconducting double layer on the graphene/AgNP textile composite, where the textile composite was used as both flexible substrate and conductive gate electrode. The thermal treatment of a textile-based transistor enhanced the electrical performance (mobility = 7.2 cm2·V−1·s−1, on/off current ratio = 4 × 105, and threshold voltage = −1.1 V due to the improvement of interfacial properties between the conductive textile electrode and the ion-gel dielectric layer. Furthermore, the textile transistors exhibited highly stable device performance under extended bending conditions (with a bending radius down to 3 mm and repeated tests over 1000 cycles. We believe that our simple methods for the fabrication of graphene/AgNP textile composite for use in textile-type transistors can potentially be applied to the development of flexible large-area electronic clothes.

  3. Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the textile-mill-products industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    The Congress, in the National Energy Conservation and Policy Act of 1978 (NECPA), directed the Department of Energy to establish materials recovery targets for the metals and metal products, paper and allied products, rubber, and textile-mill-products industries. The targets were developed to provide incentives for using energy-saving recorded materials and to provied a yardstick for measuring progress and improvement in this endeavor. The NECPA indicates that the targets should represent the maximum technically and economically feasible increase in the use of energy-saving recovered materials that each industry can achieve progressively by January 1, 1987. Materials affected by recovered-materials targets include and are limited to aluminum, copper, lead, zinc, iron, steel, paper and associated products, textile-mill, products, and rubber. Using information gathered from the textile-mill-products industry and from other textile-relaed sources, DOE has developed recovered materials targets for that industry. This report presents those targets and their basis and justification. Following an overview of the textile industry, the chapters are: Textile-Mill-Products Industry Operations; Economic Analysis of the Textile-Mill-Products Industry; Governmental and Regulatory Influence on the US Textile Industry; Current Mill Use of Recovered Materials in the Textile-Mill-Products Industry; Limitations on the Use of Recovered Materials in the US Textile-Mill-Products Industry; Materials-Recovery Targets; and Government and Industry Actions That Could Increase the Use of Recovered Materials.

  4. Textile Functionalization and Its Effects on the Release of Silver Nanoparticles into Artificial Sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Sandra; Dommershausen, Nils; Jungnickel, Harald; Laux, Peter; Mitrano, Denise; Nowack, Bernd; Schneider, Gregor; Luch, Andreas

    2016-06-07

    This study addresses the release of total silver (Ag) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) from textiles into artificial sweat, particularly considering the functionalization technology used in textile finishing. Migration experiments were conducted for four commercially available textiles and for six laboratory-prepared textiles. Two among these lab-prepared textiles represent materials in which Ag-NPs were embedded within the textile fibers (composites), whereas the other lab-prepared textiles contain Ag particles on the respective fiber surfaces (coatings). The results indicate a smaller release of total Ag from composites in comparison to surface-coated textiles. The particulate fraction determined within the artificial sweat was negligible for most textiles, meaning that the majority of the released Ag is present as dissolved Ag. It is also relevant to note that nanotextiles do not release more particulate Ag than conventional Ag textiles. The results rather indicate that the functionalization type is the most important parameter affecting the migration. Furthermore, after measuring different Ag-NP types in their pristine form with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the single particle mode, there is evidence that particle modifications, like surface coating, may also influence the dissolution behavior of the Ag-NPs in the sweat solutions. These factors are important when discussing the likelihood of consumer exposure.

  5. Flexible Textile-Based Organic Transistors Using Graphene/Ag Nanoparticle Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn; Kwon, Yeon Ju; Lee, Kang Eun; Oh, Youngseok; Um, Moon-Kwang; Seong, Dong Gi; Lee, Jea Uk

    2016-01-01

    Highly flexible and electrically-conductive multifunctional textiles are desirable for use in wearable electronic applications. In this study, we fabricated multifunctional textile composites by vacuum filtration and wet-transfer of graphene oxide films on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) textile in association with embedding Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) to improve the electrical conductivity. A flexible organic transistor can be developed by direct transfer of a dielectric/semiconducting double layer on the graphene/AgNP textile composite, where the textile composite was used as both flexible substrate and conductive gate electrode. The thermal treatment of a textile-based transistor enhanced the electrical performance (mobility = 7.2 cm2·V−1·s−1, on/off current ratio = 4 × 105, and threshold voltage = −1.1 V) due to the improvement of interfacial properties between the conductive textile electrode and the ion-gel dielectric layer. Furthermore, the textile transistors exhibited highly stable device performance under extended bending conditions (with a bending radius down to 3 mm and repeated tests over 1000 cycles). We believe that our simple methods for the fabrication of graphene/AgNP textile composite for use in textile-type transistors can potentially be applied to the development of flexible large-area electronic clothes. PMID:28335276

  6. Unitized Stiffened Composite Textile Panels: Manufacturing, Characterization, Experiments, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztowny, Cyrus Joseph Robert

    Use of carbon fiber textiles in complex manufacturing methods creates new implementations of structural components by increasing performance, lowering manufacturing costs, and making composites overall more attractive across industry. Advantages of textile composites include high area output, ease of handling during the manufacturing process, lower production costs per material used resulting from automation, and provide post-manufacturing assembly mainstreaming because significantly more complex geometries such as stiffened shell structures can be manufactured with fewer pieces. One significant challenge with using stiffened composite structures is stiffener separation under compression. Axial compression loading conditions have frequently observed catastrophic structural failure due to stiffeners separating from the shell skin. Characterizing stiffener separation behavior is often costly computationally and experimentally. The objectives of this research are to demonstrate unitized stiffened textile composite panels can be manufactured to produce quality test specimens, that existing characterization techniques applied to state-of-the-art high-performance composites provide valuable information in modeling such structures, that the unitized structure concept successfully removes stiffener separation as a primary structural failure mode, and that modeling textile material failure modes are sufficient to accurately capture postbuckling and final failure responses of the stiffened structures. The stiffened panels in this study have taken the integrally stiffened concept to an extent such that the stiffeners and skin are manufactured at the same time, as one single piece, and from the same composite textile layers. Stiffener separation is shown to be removed as a primary structural failure mode for unitized stiffened composite textile panels loaded under axial compression well into the postbuckling regime. Instead of stiffener separation, a material damaging and

  7. Work in the textile industry in Spain and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, C; Kogevinas, M; Silverman, D T; Turuguet, D; Tardon, A; Garcia-Closas, R; Carrato, A; Castaño-Vinyals, G; Fernandez, F; Stewart, P; Benavides, F G; Gonzalez, S; Serra, A; Rothman, N; Malats, N; Dosemeci, M

    2008-08-01

    Textile manufacturing is a complex industry that has frequently been associated with bladder cancer. However, results have not been consistent. This study investigated the risk of bladder cancer in Spanish textile workers. We analysed data from a multicentre hospital-based case-control study carried out in Spain (1998-2001) including 1219 cases of bladder cancer and 1271 controls. Of those, 126 cases and 122 controls reported a history of employment in the textile industry. Lifetime occupational history was obtained using a computer-assisted personal interview. Occupations, locations and materials used in the textile industry were assessed using a detailed questionnaire and expert assessment. Overall, no increased risk of bladder cancer was found for textile workers, including duration of employment analysis. Increased risks were observed for weavers (OR = 1.82, 95% CI 0.95 to 3.47), for workers in winding/warping/sizing (OR 4.11, 95% CI 1.58 to 10.71) and for those exposed to synthetic materials (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.00 to 3.56). Working for more than 10 years appeared to be associated with an increased risk for weavers (OR 2.27, 95% CI 0.97 to 5.34), for those who had ever worked in winding/warping/sizing (OR 11.03, 95% CI 1.37, 88.89), for workers in the weaving room (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.24 to 7.01) and for those exposed to synthetic (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.14 to 6.01) or cotton (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.87) materials. Statistically significant higher risks were also found for specific combinations of occupations or locations with exposure to synthetics and cotton. There was no overall increased risk for textile workers, but increased risks were found for specific groups of workers. Our findings indicate that observed risks in previous studies may be better evaluated by analysis of materials used or section worked within the industry and occupation.

  8. Viking and early Middle Ages northern Scandinavian textiles proven to be made with hemp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, G; Nockert, M; Holst, B

    2013-10-18

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia.

  9. Superhydrophobic conductive textiles with antibacterial property by coating fibers with silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Chen, Jia; Yin, Wei; Jia, Shun-Tian; Ma, Jian-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were produced on cotton fibers by reduction of [Ag(NH3)2]+ complex with glucose. Further modification of the fibers coated by Ag NPs with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane led to superhydrophobic cotton textiles. Scanning electron microscopy images of the textiles showed that the treated fibers were covered with uniform Ag NPs, which generate a dual-size roughness on the textiles favouring the formation of superhydrophobic surfaces, and the Ag NPs formed dense coating around the fibers rendering the intrinsic insulating cotton textiles conductive. Antibacterial test showed that the as-fabricated textiles had high antibacterial activity against the gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. These multifunctional textiles might find applications in biomedical electronic devices.

  10. Measuring Export Competitiveness of Yarn Commodities and Textile Industry of Central Java in World Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertiana Ikasari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yarn commodities and textile industries are the main export commodities of Central Java. Nevertheless, there are still some problems to face. The purpose of this research is to analyze the market share and competitive advantages position of the yarn commodities and the textile industries of Central Java in the world market. The Acceleration Ratio (AR and Trade Specialization Index (TSI are used to analyze the export competitiveness of the yarn commodities and the textile industries. The results obtained indicates that AR of the export of yarn commodities and textile industries of Central Java is greater than 1 (AR> 1. TSI of yarn commodities and textile industries in Central Java is 0.45 and has positive value. These results indicates that Central Java has a strong market share and tends to be a regional exporter of yarn and textile commodities in the world market.

  11. Large-Area All-Textile Pressure Sensors for Monitoring Human Motion and Physiological Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengmeng; Pu, Xiong; Jiang, Chunyan; Liu, Ting; Huang, Xin; Chen, Libo; Du, Chunhua; Sun, Jiangman; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-11-01

    Wearable pressure sensors, which can perceive and respond to environmental stimuli, are essential components of smart textiles. Here, large-area all-textile-based pressure-sensor arrays are successfully realized on common fabric substrates. The textile sensor unit achieves high sensitivity (14.4 kPa -1 ), low detection limit (2 Pa), fast response (≈24 ms), low power consumption (<6 µW), and mechanical stability under harsh deformations. Thanks to these merits, the textile sensor is demonstrated to be able to recognize finger movement, hand gestures, acoustic vibrations, and real-time pulse wave. Furthermore, large-area sensor arrays are successfully fabricated on one textile substrate to spatially map tactile stimuli and can be directly incorporated into a fabric garment for stylish designs without sacrifice of comfort, suggesting great potential in smart textiles or wearable electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Textile electrode characterization: dependencies in the skin-clothing-electrode interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, R.; Fernández, M.; Bragós, R.

    2013-04-01

    Given the advances in the technology known as smart textiles, the use of textile electrodes is more and more common. However this kind of electrodes presents some differences regarding the standard ones as the Ag-AgCl electrodes. Therefore to characterize them as best as possible is required. In order to make the characterization reproducible and repetitive, a skin dummy made of agar-agar and a standardized measurement set-up is used in this article. Thus, some dependencies in the skin-electrode interface are described. These dependencies are related to the surface of the textile electrode, the conductive material and the applied pressure. Furthermore, the dependencies on clothing in the skin-textile electrode interface are also analyzed. Thus, based on some parameters such as textile material, width and number of layers, the behavior of the interface made up by the skin, the textile electrode and clothing is depicted.

  13. A review of stimuli-responsive polymers for smart textile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinlian; Meng, Harper; Li, Guoqiang; Ibekwe, Samuel I.

    2012-05-01

    Stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs) are smart materials which can show noticeable changes in their properties with environmental stimulus variations. Novel functionalities can be delivered to textiles by integrating smart SRPs into them. SRPs inclusive of thermal-responsive polymers, moisture-responsive polymers, thermal-responsive hydrogels, pH-responsive hydrogels, and light-responsive polymers have been applied in textiles to improve or achieve textile smart functionalities. The functionalities include aesthetic appeal, comfort, textile soft display, smart controlled drug release, fantasy design with color changing, wound monitoring, smart wetting properties and protection against extreme variations in environmental conditions. In this review, the applications of SRPs in the textile and clothing sector are elucidated; the associated constraints in fabrication processes for textiles and their potential applications in the near future are discussed.

  14. Electrical characterization of conductive textile materials and its evaluation as electrodes for venous occlusion plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goy, C B; Dominguez, J M; Gómez López, M A; Madrid, R E; Herrera, M C

    2013-08-01

    The ambulatory monitoring of biosignals involves the use of sensors, electrodes, actuators, processing tools and wireless communication modules. When a garment includes these elements with the purpose of recording vital signs and responding to specific situations it is call a 'Smart Wearable System'. Over the last years several authors have suggested that conductive textile material (e-textiles) could perform as electrode for these systems. This work aims at implementing an electrical characterization of e-textiles and an evaluation of their ability to act as textile electrodes for lower extremity venous occlusion plethysmography (LEVOP). The e-textile electrical characterization is carried out using two experimental set-ups (in vitro evaluation). Besides, LEVOP records are obtained from healthy volunteers (in vivo evaluation). Standard Ag/AgCl electrodes are used for comparison in all tests. Results shown that the proposed e-textiles are suitable for LEVOP recording and a good agreement between evaluations (in vivo and in vitro) is found.

  15. The solar textile challenge: how it will not work and where it might.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Hösel, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Solar textiles are highlighted as a future technology with transformative power within the fields of both textiles and solar cells provided that developments are made in critical areas. Specifically, these are fundamental solutions to materials and material combinations with mechanical stability and flexibility imposed by textile architectures, scientific solutions to achieve high carrier transport efficiency and optical transmission in a textile topology, technical solutions to controlling the physical disposition of the anode and cathode along with their specific and error-free contacting and, finally, practical solutions to fast and efficient manufacture and integration. The areas of application and the penetration of solar textiles into our everyday life are expected to be explosive pending efficient developments within these four key areas. A shortcoming in one or more of these will, however, lead to the solar textiles being banned to academic existence. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. METHOD OF MANUFACTURING A COMPOSITE STRUCTURE INCLUDING A TEXTILE FABRIC ASSEMBLY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    of manufacturing a composite structure (10). The method may comprise providing a form (8) that has a shape corresponding to a desired shape of an internal cavity in the composite structure (10) to be manufactured. The textile fabric assembly (1) is arranged around the form (8), and a curable material (9) is filled......The invention relates to a textile fabric assembly (1) comprising at least two textile layers (2). The textile layers (2) are joined at a plurality of points (3) and/or along a plurality of lines (6) so that they form inner and outer walls, respectively. The invention also relates to a method...... into the at least one inner space (4) between the textile layers (2). The form (8) may be inflatable. Alternatively, the method may comprise arranging the textile fabric assembly (1) around an initial structure and/or mechanically fastened to a surface of an initial structure to be reinforced and then filling...

  17. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE REGENERATION WASTE TEXTILES USED TO THERMAL INSULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Horga; Mihaela Horga; Ioan Hossu; Dorin Avram; Florin Breaban

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical and experimental studies on the behavior thermal conductivity of textiles made from regeneration fiber used to make the shells for insulation of pipelines. Was investigated the behavior of textile fibers regeneration at densities, temperatures and different layer thickness, in two structures: material in the form of fibers in the form of flock, named blanket and textile material in the form of fiber layer consolidated named, no woven material.Measurements were ...

  18. Infrared technology and its applications in textile recycling technology : improving sustainability in clothing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ishfaq, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The textile industry is the oldest branch of consumer goods manufacturing, it is a diverse and heterogeneous sector which consume natural resources to fulfil the requirements. Virgin and raw materials are required to make new clothes and textiles. The production of virgin fibres while utilizing natural resources are not efficient and environmental friendly in anyway. Thus, to meet the present and future demand of textile managing textile’s waste and recycling it in efficiently is demand at th...

  19. Nano-structured textiles as high-performance aqueous cathodes for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing

    2011-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-textile-Pt cathode for aqueous-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was prepared by electrochemically depositing Pt nanoparticles on a CNT-textile. An MFC equipped with a CNT-textile-Pt cathode revealed a 2.14-fold maximum power density with only 19.3% Pt loading, compared to that with a commercial Pt coated carbon cloth cathode. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. A novel method for applying reduced graphene oxide directly to electronic textiles from yarns to fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yong Ju; Hong, Won G; Kim, Wan-Joong; Jun, Yongseok; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2013-10-25

    Conductive, flexible, and durable reduced RGO textiles with a facile preparation method are presented. BSA proteins serve as universal adhesives for improving the adsorption of GO onto any textile, irrespective of the materials and the surface conditions. Using this method, we successfully prepared various RGO textiles based on nylon-6 yarns, cotton yarns, polyester yarns, and nonwoven fabrics. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Functionalization of textiles with silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulit-Prociak, Jolanta; Chwastowski, Jarosław; Kucharski, Arkadiusz; Banach, Marcin

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents a method for functionalization of textile materials using fabric dyes modified with silver or zinc oxide nanoparticles. Embedding of these nanoparticles into the structure of other materials makes that the final product is characterized by antimicrobial properties. Indigo and commercially available dye were involved in studies. It is worth to note that silver nanoparticles were obtained in-situ in the reaction of preparing indigo dye and in the process of preparing commercial dye baths. Such a method allows reducing technological steps. The modified dyes were used for dyeing of cotton fibers. The antimicrobial properties of final textile materials were studied. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain was used in microbiological test. The results confirmed biocidal activity of prepared materials.

  2. Radiative human body cooling by nanoporous polyethylene textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Song, Alex Y; Catrysse, Peter B; Liu, Chong; Peng, Yucan; Xie, Jin; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2016-09-02

    Thermal management through personal heating and cooling is a strategy by which to expand indoor temperature setpoint range for large energy saving. We show that nanoporous polyethylene (nanoPE) is transparent to mid-infrared human body radiation but opaque to visible light because of the pore size distribution (50 to 1000 nanometers). We processed the material to develop a textile that promotes effective radiative cooling while still having sufficient air permeability, water-wicking rate, and mechanical strength for wearability. We developed a device to simulate skin temperature that shows temperatures 2.7° and 2.0°C lower when covered with nanoPE cloth and with processed nanoPE cloth, respectively, than when covered with cotton. Our processed nanoPE is an effective and scalable textile for personal thermal management. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Composites of 3D-Printed Polymers and Textile Fabrics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Yasmin; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    3D printing belongs to the rapidly emerging technologies of our time. Due to its recent drawback - the technology is relatively slow compared with other primary shaping methods, such as injection molding -, 3D printing is often not used for creating complete large components but to add specific features to existing larger objects. One of the possibilities to create such composites with an additional value consists in combining 3D printed polymers with textile fabrics. Several attempts have been made to enhance the adhesion between both materials, a task which is still challenging for diverse material combinations. Our paper reports about new experiments combining 3D printed embossed designs, snap fasteners and zip fasteners with different textile base materials, showing the possibilities and technical limits of these novel composites.

  4. Investigation of Thermo-regulating Properties of Multilayer Textile Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Baltušnikaitė

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort of a clothing system is one of the important goals of the developer that require an engineering approach. In this research work a thermo-regulating textile packages were developed and a wearing comfort of protective clothing consisting from those packages was improved. The microcapsules were added on the fabric surface using pad-dry-cure method. The thermal properties and stabilities were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. The results suggest that higher values of thermal resistance were obtained after incorporation of fabric, coated by PCMs, into inert layer of multilayer textile package. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.6920

  5. Use of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sing-Lai; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi

    2010-10-01

    The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001 for bioremediation of textile wastewater (TW) was investigated using four batches of cultures in high rate algae ponds (HRAP) containing textile dye (Supranol Red 3BW) or TW. The biomass attained ranged from 0.17 to 2.26 mg chlorophyll a/L while colour removal ranged from 41.8% to 50.0%. There was also reduction of NH(4)-N (44.4-45.1%), PO(4)-P (33.1-33.3%) and COD (38.3-62.3%) in the TW. Supplementation of the TW with nutrients of Bold's Basal Medium (BBM) increased biomass production but did not improve colour removal or reduction of pollutants. The mechanism of colour removal by C. vulgaris is biosorption, in accordance with both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The HRAP using C. vulgaris offers a good system for the polishing of TW before final discharge. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An investigation into creative design methodologies for textiles and fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, Alison

    2017-10-01

    Understanding market intelligence, trends, influences and personal approaches are essential tools for design students to develop their ideas in textiles and fashion. Identifying different personal approaches including, visual, process-led or concept by employing creative methodologies are key to developing a brief. A series of ideas or themes start to emerge and through the design process serve to underpin and inform an entire collection. These investigations ensure that the design collections are able to produce a diverse range of outcomes. Following key structures and coherent stages in the design process creates authentic collections in textiles and fashion. A range of undergraduate students presented their design portfolios (180) and the methodologies employed were mapped against success at module level, industry response and graduate employment.

  7. Comparative analysis of colour change measurement devices in textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Gilewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the paper there is presented a trial of application of new measurement principle of colour change with the use of DigiEye device. Comparison of DigiEye with commonly use in the textile industry spectrophotometer Macbeth 2020 was an aim of determination of relationship between parameters of both measurement systems. Samples for the colour change assessment on both measurement systems were first aged in the Xenotest 150. Ageing process was done according to the method of blues scale. Results were obtained by the colour measurement devices before and after the ageing test each releasing the diaphragms during exposing the examined samples on the light. Result of colour change were obtained in the colour system CIE L*a*b*. The measurements were done for PES fabrics destined on the outer layers of clothing. [b]Keywords[/b]: textiles, spectrophotometer, colorimeter [b][/b

  8. Rapid decolorization of textile wastewater by green synthesized iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Z Y; Cakirgoz, M; Kaymak, E S; Erdim, E

    2018-01-01

    The effectiveness of green tea (Camellia sinensis) and pomegranate (Punica granatum) extracts for the production of iron nanoparticles and their application for color removal from a textile industry wastewater was investigated. Polyphenols in extracts act as reducing agents for iron ions in aqueous solutions, forming iron nanoparticles. Pomegranate extract was found to have almost a 10-fold higher polyphenolic content than the same amount of green tea extract on a mass basis. However, the size of the synthesized nanoparticles did not show a correlation with the polyphenolic content. 100 ppm and 300 ppm of iron nanoparticles were evaluated in terms of color removal efficiency from a real textile wastewater sample. 300 ppm of pomegranate nanoscale zero-valent iron particles showed more than 95% color removal and almost 80% dissolved organic carbon removal. The degradation mechanisms are is considered to be adsorption and precipitation to a major extent, and mineralization to a minor extent.

  9. Entangled inequalities, divergent struggles: migration and the Argentine textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Caggiano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the economic recovery that followed the 2001-2002 crisis in Argentina, sectors that rely on a significant migrant worker presence, such as textiles, have maintained and consolidated previously-existing forms of exploitation and discrimination. In this context, trade unions and other civil society actors are fighting against the inequalities that affect Bolivian migrant workers in the textile industry in Buenos Aires and La Plata. This article seeks to understand some of the limitations of that struggle. Such limitations relate to the difficulty of acting on entangled inequalities, and respond to the seemingly irreconcilable forms of association in terms of class, nationality or ethnicity of these organisations, which generate divergent characterisations of the inequalities and of the actors involved.

  10. A mobile information management system used in textile enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.-R.; Yu, W.-D.

    2008-02-01

    The mobile information management system (MIMS) for textile enterprises is based on Microsoft Visual Studios. NET2003 Server, Microsoft SQL Server 2000, C++ language and wireless application protocol (WAP) and wireless markup language (WML) technology. The portable MIMS is composed of three-layer structures, i.e. showing layer; operating layer; and data visiting layer corresponding to the port-link module; processing module; and database module. By using the MIMS, not only the information exchanges become more convenient and easier, but also the compatible between the giant information capacity and a micro-cell phone and functional expansion nature in operating and designing can be realized by means of build-in units. The development of MIMS is suitable for the utilization in textile enterprises.

  11. Utilizing electromagnetic shielding textiles in wireless body area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Grace H H; Aoyagi, Takahiro; Hernandez, Marco; Hamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Kohno, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    For privacy and radio propagation controls, electromagnetic shielding textile could be adopted in WBANs. The effect of including a commercially available electromagnetic shielding apron in WBANs was examined in this paper. By having both the coordinator and the sensor covered by the shielding apron, signal could be confined around the body; however signal strength can be greatly influenced by body movements. Placing the shielding apron underneath both antennas, the transmission coefficient could be on average enhanced by at least 10dB, with less variation comparing to the case when apron does not exist. Shielding textiles could be utilized in designing a smart suit to enhance WBANs performance, and to prevent signals travelling beyond its intended area.

  12. Effectiveness of business strategies in Brazilian textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César de Sousa Batista

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This research analyses how the interaction between strategy capabilities, strategy types, strategy formulation quality and implementation capability affect organizational performance in Brazilian textiles companies. This article proposes and tests a conceptual framework, using a structural equation modeling of a set of 211 valid questionnaires on Brazilian textiles firms. The results support links between focus strategy and marketing capabilities, and between cost leadership strategy and management capabilities. However, the relationship between technologic capabilities and differentiation strategy was not statistically significant. The existence of an inter-relationship between generic strategies of focus, cost leadership and differentiation indicates the use of combined strategies. Concerning the firms' financial performance, the results show that management capability and market performance have a statistically significant relationship with financial performance.

  13. Textiles Objective and Sensory Evaluation in Rapid Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenija STRAZDIENE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Most consumer purchases nowadays are driven by sensory attraction and good feeling. From this standpoint textile and fashion industries need new methods to evaluate fabric quality and to respond to consumer expectations. Recently the implementation of sensory analysis in the process of material characterization has drawn much international attention. So, the aim of the research was to find dependencies between the results of sensory analysis and objective fabric behaviour evaluation performed using KES-F and Griff-Tester devices. The later method was developed at Kaunas University of Technology and is based on fabric extraction through a rounded hole, thus describing the behaviour of textile materials and their tactile properties by one complex criterion.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.778

  14. A mobile information management system used in textile enterprises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C-R; Yu, W-D [College of Textiles, Donghua University, 1882 west Yan-an Road, Shanghai 200051 (China)], E-mail: wdyu@dhu.edu.cn

    2008-02-15

    The mobile information management system (MIMS) for textile enterprises is based on Microsoft Visual Studios. NET2003 Server, Microsoft SQL Server 2000, C{sup ++} language and wireless application protocol (WAP) and wireless markup language (WML) technology. The portable MIMS is composed of three-layer structures, i.e. showing layer; operating layer; and data visiting layer corresponding to the port-link module; processing module; and database module. By using the MIMS, not only the information exchanges become more convenient and easier, but also the compatible between the giant information capacity and a micro-cell phone and functional expansion nature in operating and designing can be realized by means of build-in units. The development of MIMS is suitable for the utilization in textile enterprises.

  15. Functional Textiles – From Research and Development to Innovations and Industrial Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiekens Paul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Functional textiles are one of the most important fields in textile industry and textile materials science. They include breathable, heat and cold-resistant materials, ultra-strong fabrics (e.g. as reinforcement for composites, new flameretardant fabrics (e.g. intumescent materials, optimisation of textile fabrics for acoustic properties, etc. Functional textiles became more and more important materials for various applications and interest in them grew year by year; and more and more conferences are focused on functional textiles, as well as the events which are not only textile conferences but encompass various fields of Material Science. This paper presents a short overview about the European Materials Research Society 2014 Fall meeting conference Symposium M “Functional textiles - from research and development to innovations and industrial uptake” and the projects which participated as symposium co-organisers: the European Coordination Action 2BFUNTEX funded by the EC 7th Framework Programme NMP, the COST Action MP1105 on “Sustainable flame retardancy for textiles and related materials based on nanoparticles substituting conventional chemicals (FLARETEX” and the COST Action MP1206 on “Electrospun Nano-fibres for bio inspired composite materials and innovative industrial applications”.

  16. Manufacturing processes in the textile industry. Expert Systems for fabrics production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan BULLON

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry is characterized by the economic activity whose objective is the production of fibres, yarns, fabrics, clothing and textile goods for home and decoration,as well as technical and industrial purposes. Within manufacturing, the Textile is one of the oldest and most complex sectors which includes a large number of sub-sectors covering the entire production cycle, from raw materials and intermediate products, to the production of final products. Textile industry activities present different subdivisions, each with its own traits. The length of the textile process and the variety of its technical processes lead to the coexistence of different sub-sectors in regards to their business structure and integration. The textile industry is developing expert systems applications to increase production, improve quality and reduce costs. The analysis of textile designs or structures includes the use of mathematical models to simulate the behavior of the textile structures (yarns, fabrics and knitting. The Finite Element Method (FEM has largely facilitated the prediction of the behavior of that textile structure under mechanical loads. For classification problems Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs haveproved to be a very effective tool as a quick and accurate solution. The Case-Based Reasoning (CBR method proposed in this study complements the results of the finite element simulation, mathematical modeling and neural networks methods.

  17. Detection of the Deformation of an Intelligent Textile in a Specific Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Maria; Escudero, Francesc; Margalef, Jordi; Cambra, Vicente; Gisbert, José

    2007-01-01

    An intelligent textile is a textile structure that measures and reacts in front of external agents or stimulus with or without integrated electronic equipment. The finality of the present textile is to take one more step towards intelligent textile, considering the integration of electronics and textile needs, to be industrially viable and to keep up the necessary competitiveness, raising the final price as little as possible. The finality of these experiments is to develop a textile that varies in conductivity and resistance in relation to the elongation of the textile, detecting changes caused by the alteration of a piece of clothing, from the pressure of a finger on the material, for example. One of the most important characteristics of textile is the capacity of reproducing measures, of varying the response in different tests. Two lines of research were opened: the study of the most adequate structure to achieve a response that can be reproduced and the study of the best way of taking measures without altering the behavior of the textile.

  18. Investigation of the influence of heat transfer on screen printed textile conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazani, I.; De Mey, G.; Hertleer, C.; Guxho, G.; Van Langenhove, L.

    2017-10-01

    Two different textile substrates were screen printed with silver-based inks in order to be electrically conductive. In every textile four conductors were printed with different widths in order to investigate the influence of heat transfer on each conductor. This was done, by using the thermo graphic camera and through the evaluation of each conductor’s profile. It was found that the conductors printed on the white textile had higher values of heat transfer compared to the other conductors printed on the dark textiles.

  19. Fungal Biosorption, An Innovative Treatment for the Decolourisation and Detoxification of Textile Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Pannocchia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Textile effluents are among the most difficult-to-treat wastewaters, due to their considerable amount of recalcitrant and toxic substances. Fungal biosorption is viewed as a valuable additional treatment for removing pollutants from textile wastewaters. In this study the efficiency of Cunninghamella elegans biomass in terms of contaminants, COD and toxicity reduction was tested against textile effluents sampled in different points of wastewater treatment plants. The results showed that C. elegans is a promising candidate for the decolourisation and detoxification of textile wastewaters and its versatility makes it very competitive compared with conventional sorbents adopted in industrial processes.

  20. Fabrication of superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textiles for oil–water separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Chao-Hua, E-mail: xuech@zju.edu.cn [College of Resource and Environment, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Xi’an 710021 (China); Shaanxi Research Institute of Agricultural Products Processing Technology, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Xi’an 710021 (China); Ji, Peng-Ting; Zhang, Ping; Li, Ya-Ru; Jia, Shun-Tian [College of Resource and Environment, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Xi’an 710021 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textiles were fabricated by a simple sol–gel coating using tetraethoxysilane and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyl disilazane as precursors. After coating, the fibers were decorated with -Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} functionalized SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, complimenting the microscale roughness inherent in the textile weave and lowering the surface energy. The textiles indicated superhydrophobic and superoleophilic property simultaneously. Utilizing these properties, a setup was designed using the textile as a screen mesh to filter oil through down to a collector and leave water drops rolling over, realizing continuous oil–water mixture separation.