WorldWideScience

Sample records for textile fabrics

  1. Smart fabric sensors and e-textile technologies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, Lina M; Flatau, Alison B

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a review of recent developments in the rapidly changing and advancing field of smart fabric sensor and electronic textile technologies. It summarizes the basic principles and approaches employed when building fabric sensors as well as the most commonly used materials and techniques used in electronic textiles. This paper shows that sensing functionality can be created by intrinsic and extrinsic modifications to textile substrates depending on the level of integration into the fabric platform. The current work demonstrates that fabric sensors can be tailored to measure force, pressure, chemicals, humidity and temperature variations. Materials, connectors, fabric circuits, interconnects, encapsulation and fabrication methods associated with fabric technologies prove to be customizable and versatile but less robust than their conventional electronics counterparts. The findings of this survey suggest that a complete smart fabric system is possible through the integration of the different types of textile based functional elements. This work intends to be a starting point for standardization of smart fabric sensing techniques and e-textile fabrication methods. (topical review)

  2. Using variable homography to measure emergent fibers on textile fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Cudel, Christophe; Kohler, Sophie; Fontaine, Stéphane; Haeberlé, Olivier; Klotz, Marie-Louise

    2011-07-01

    A fabric's smoothness is a key factor to determine the quality of textile finished products and has great influence on the functionality of industrial textiles and high-end textile products. With popularization of the 'zero defect' industrial concept, identifying and measuring defective material in the early stage of production is of great interest for the industry. In the current market, many systems are able to achieve automatic monitoring and control of fabric, paper, and nonwoven material during the entire production process, however online measurement of hairiness is still an open topic and highly desirable for industrial applications. In this paper we propose a computer vision approach, based on variable homography, which can be used to measure the emergent fiber's length on textile fabrics. The main challenges addressed in this paper are the application of variable homography to textile monitoring and measurement, as well as the accuracy of the estimated calculation. We propose that a fibrous structure can be considered as a two-layer structure and then show how variable homography can estimate the length of the fiber defects. Simulations are carried out to show the effectiveness of this method to measure the emergent fiber's length. The true lengths of selected fibers are measured precisely using a digital optical microscope, and then the same fibers are tested by our method. Our experimental results suggest that smoothness monitored by variable homography is an accurate and robust method for quality control of important industrially fabrics.

  3. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-04-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps.

  4. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-01-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps. (paper)

  5. Hydrothermally Activated Graphene Fiber Fabrics for Textile Electrodes of Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Huang, Tieqi; Gao, Weiwei; Xu, Zhen; Chang, Dan; Zhang, Chunxiao; Gao, Chao

    2017-11-28

    Carbon textiles are promising electrode materials for wearable energy storage devices owing to their conductive, flexible, and lightweight features. However, there still lacks a perfect choice for high-performance carbon textile electrodes with sufficient electrochemical activity. Graphene fiber fabrics (GFFs) are newly discovered carbon textiles, exhibiting various attractive properties, especially a large variability on the microstructure. Here we report the fabrication of hierarchical GFFs with significantly enlarged specific surface area using a hydrothermal activation strategy. By carefully optimize the activation process, the hydrothermally activated graphene fiber fabrics (HAGFFs) could achieve an areal capacitance of 1060 mF cm -2 in a very thin thickness (150 μm) and the capacitance is easily magnified by overlaying several layers of HAGFFs, even up to a record value of 7398 mF cm -2 . Meanwhile, a good rate capability and a long cycle life are also attained. As compared with other carbon textiles, including the commercial carbon fiber cloths, our HAGFFs present much better capacitive performance. Therefore, the mechanically stable, flexible, conductive, and highly active HAGFFs have provided an option for high-performance textile electrodes.

  6. 16 CFR 1611.33 - Test procedures for textile fabrics and film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for textile fabrics and film... REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations § 1611.33 Test procedures for textile fabrics and film. (a)(1) All textile fabrics (except those with a nitro-cellulose...

  7. 16 CFR 1610.33 - Test procedures for textile fabrics and film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for textile fabrics and film... for textile fabrics and film. (a)(1) All textile fabrics (except those with a nitro-cellulose fiber... under the procedures outlined in part 1611, Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film, and if...

  8. FUNCTIONALIZATION OF TEXTILE FABRICS WITH MICROENCAPSULATED VITAMIN E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPESCU Alina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study the experimental deposition of vitamin E microcapsules by padding technique on the textile support made of 50% cotton and 50% polyamide high tenacity Nm 50/1 were performed. The preliminary preparation of textile materials has been made in four consecutive sequences: hot alkaline treatment in absence of NaOH, bleaching, drying and curing. In the pretreatment of textile materials the crosslinking agent Itobinder AG is used, which is an anionic emulsion based on the acrylic copolimer, being followed by the application of a dispersion with content of vitamin E microcapsules. In the present raport the evaluation of obtained performances was made through SEM, GC and FTIR-ATR analysis. By SEM has been determined the wash durability of deposition of vitamin E microcapsules before and after one washing cycle. Following qualitative analysis by Gas-Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy with Attenuated Total Reflection absorption the related compoundes presents on the surface of the textile materials were identified. After retention time the vitamin E acetate is found with preponderance in all chromatograms at 15, 70 min with aproximation. Also by FTIR-ATR the presence of vitamin E acetate is confirmed by the apparition of a new peak at 1731 cm-1 and changes of intensity of various peaks, especially in the fingerprint region of the spectra of the functionalized fabrics.

  9. Composites of 3D-Printed Polymers and Textile Fabrics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Yasmin; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    3D printing belongs to the rapidly emerging technologies of our time. Due to its recent drawback - the technology is relatively slow compared with other primary shaping methods, such as injection molding -, 3D printing is often not used for creating complete large components but to add specific features to existing larger objects. One of the possibilities to create such composites with an additional value consists in combining 3D printed polymers with textile fabrics. Several attempts have been made to enhance the adhesion between both materials, a task which is still challenging for diverse material combinations. Our paper reports about new experiments combining 3D printed embossed designs, snap fasteners and zip fasteners with different textile base materials, showing the possibilities and technical limits of these novel composites.

  10. Manufacturing processes in the textile industry. Expert Systems for fabrics production

    OpenAIRE

    Bullon, Juan; González Arrieta, Angélica; Hernández Encinas, Ascensión; Queiruga Dios, Araceli

    2017-01-01

    The textile industry is characterized by the economic activity whose objective is the production of fibres, yarns, fabrics, clothing and textile goods for home and decoration,as well as technical and industrial purposes. Within manufacturing, the Textile is one of the oldest and most complex sectors which includes a large number of sub-sectors covering the entire production cycle, from raw materials and intermediate products, to the production of final products. Textile industry activities pr...

  11. Occupational Home Economics Education Series. Fabrics and Textiles Merchandising. Competency Based Teaching Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ruth

    This module, one of ten competency based modules developed for vocational home economics teachers, is based on a job cluster in fabric and textiles merchandising. It is designed for use with a variety of groups including grades 9-14 and adults. Focusing on the specific job title fabric and textiles salesperson, ten competencies and the student…

  12. Hand-held spectrophotometer design for textile fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcekçi, Veysel Gökhan; Yıldız, Kazım

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a hand-held spectrophotometer was designed by taking advantage of the developments in modern optoelectronic technology. Spectrophotometer devices are used to determine the color information from the optic properties of the materials. As an alternative to a desktop spectrophotometer device we have implemented, it is the first prototype, low cost and portable. The prototype model designed for the textile industry can detect the color tone of any fabric. The prototype model consists of optic sensor, processor, display floors. According to the color applied on the optic sensor, it produces special frequency information on its output at that color value. In Arduino type processor, the frequency information is evaluated by the program we have written and the color tone information between 0-255 ton is decided and displayed on the screen.

  13. China Textile Round Table Forum Fabrics:International Trend and Marketing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On April 8,2007,China Textile Round Table Forum: Profesional Market Forum (Guangzhou 2007) was held in China Fabrics & Accessories Center.Representatives from many countries and regions,leaderships from Chinese textile and garment industry,as well as experts and corporated

  14. Fabrication of superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textiles for oil–water separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Ji, Peng-Ting; Zhang, Ping; Li, Ya-Ru; Jia, Shun-Tian

    2013-01-01

    Superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textiles were fabricated by a simple sol–gel coating using tetraethoxysilane and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyl disilazane as precursors. After coating, the fibers were decorated with -Si(CH 3 ) 3 functionalized SiO 2 nanoparticles, complimenting the microscale roughness inherent in the textile weave and lowering the surface energy. The textiles indicated superhydrophobic and superoleophilic property simultaneously. Utilizing these properties, a setup was designed using the textile as a screen mesh to filter oil through down to a collector and leave water drops rolling over, realizing continuous oil–water mixture separation.

  15. Effect of fabric mounting method and backing material on bloodstain patterns of drip stains on textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J Y M; Michielsen, S

    2016-05-01

    Textiles may provide valuable bloodstain evidence to help piece together events or activities at violent crime scenes. However, in spite of over 75 years of research, there are still difficulties encountered in many cases in the interpretation and identification of bloodstains on textiles. In this study, we dripped porcine blood onto three types of fabric (plain woven, single jersey knit, and denim) that are supported in four different ways (hard, taut, loose, and semi-hard, i.e., fabric laid on denim). These four mounting methods represent different ways in which a textile may be present when blood from a violent act lands on it. This study investigates how the fabric mounting method and backing material affect the appearance of drip stains on textiles. We found that bloodstain patterns formed on fabric lying flat on a hard surface were very different from when the same fabric was suspended loosely. We also found that bloodstains formed on the technical back of single jersey knit were vastly different from those on the technical face. Interestingly, some drip stains showed blood passing through the textile and leaving a stain behind it that resembled insect stains. By observing, recording, and describing how a blood stained textile is found or presented at the scene, the analyst may be able to better understand bloodstains and bloodstain patterns on textiles, which could be useful to confirm or refute a witness's account of how blood came to be where it was found after a bloodshed event.

  16. Manufacturing processes in the textile industry. Expert Systems for fabrics production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan BULLON

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry is characterized by the economic activity whose objective is the production of fibres, yarns, fabrics, clothing and textile goods for home and decoration,as well as technical and industrial purposes. Within manufacturing, the Textile is one of the oldest and most complex sectors which includes a large number of sub-sectors covering the entire production cycle, from raw materials and intermediate products, to the production of final products. Textile industry activities present different subdivisions, each with its own traits. The length of the textile process and the variety of its technical processes lead to the coexistence of different sub-sectors in regards to their business structure and integration. The textile industry is developing expert systems applications to increase production, improve quality and reduce costs. The analysis of textile designs or structures includes the use of mathematical models to simulate the behavior of the textile structures (yarns, fabrics and knitting. The Finite Element Method (FEM has largely facilitated the prediction of the behavior of that textile structure under mechanical loads. For classification problems Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs haveproved to be a very effective tool as a quick and accurate solution. The Case-Based Reasoning (CBR method proposed in this study complements the results of the finite element simulation, mathematical modeling and neural networks methods.

  17. Study of transport properties of copper/zinc-oxide-nanorods-based Schottky diode fabricated on textile fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Azam; Hussain, Mushtaque; Abbasi, Mazhar Ali; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a copper/zinc-oxide (ZnO)-nanorods-based Schottky diode was fabricated on the textile fabric substrate. ZnO nanorods were grown on a silver-coated textile fabric substrate by using the hydrothermal route. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques were used for the structural study. The electrical characterization of copper/ZnO-nanorods-based Schottky diodes was investigated by using a semiconductor parameter analyzer and an impedance spectrometer. The current density–voltage (J–V) and capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements were used to estimate the electrical parameters. The threshold voltage (V th ), ideality factor (η), barrier height (ϕ b ), reverse saturation current density (J s ), carrier concentration (N D ) and built-in potential (V bi ) were determined by using experimental data and (simulated) curve fitting. This study describes the possible fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices on textile fabric substrate with an acceptable performance. (paper)

  18. Fabrication of superhydrophobic cotton textiles for water-oil separation based on drop-coating route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Chengyu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Jian

    2013-08-14

    In the present study, we are so excited to report a simple drop-coating method for fabricating the superhydrophobic cotton textiles which can remove the water in oil (or the oil in water). It is confirmed that the superhydrophobic composite thin film containing modified-ZnO nanoparticles and polystyren (PS) has been successfully fabricated on the cotton textiles surface by a single-step procedure, and the superhydrophobic cotton textiles displays an excellent property in water-oil separation which is rarely put forward and studied. The static water contact angle on the superhydrophobic cotton sample surface arranges from 153° to 155°, and stays almost the same after exposure to ambient air or immersion in the corrosive liquids and oil, indicating the considerable range of potential applications for the superhydrophobic cotton textiles fabricated by this simple method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Atomic layer deposition on polymer fibers and fabrics for multifunctional and electronic textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozena, Alexandra H.; Oldham, Christopher J.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: gnp@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Textile materials, including woven cotton, polymer knit fabrics, and synthetic nonwoven fiber mats, are being explored as low-cost, flexible, and light-weight platforms for wearable electronic sensing, communication, energy generation, and storage. The natural porosity and high surface area in textiles is also useful for new applications in environmental protection, chemical decontamination, pharmaceutical and chemical manufacturing, catalytic support, tissue regeneration, and others. These applications raise opportunities for new chemistries, chemical processes, biological coupling, and nanodevice systems that can readily combine with textile manufacturing to create new “multifunctional” fabrics. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has a unique ability to form highly uniform and conformal thin films at low processing temperature on nonuniform high aspect ratio surfaces. Recent research shows how ALD can coat, modify, and otherwise improve polymer fibers and textiles by incorporating new materials for viable electronic and other multifunctional capabilities. This article provides a current overview of the understanding of ALD coating and modification of textiles, including current capabilities and outstanding problems, with the goal of providing a starting point for further research and advances in this field. After a brief introduction to textile materials and current textile treatment methods, the authors discuss unique properties of ALD-coated textiles, followed by a review of recent electronic and multifunctional textiles that use ALD coatings either as direct functional components or as critical nucleation layers for active materials integration. The article concludes with possible future directions for ALD on textiles, including the challenges in materials, manufacturing, and manufacturing integration that must be overcome for ALD to reach its full potential in electronic and other emerging multifunctional textile systems.

  20. Original method to compute epipoles using variable homography: application to measure emergent fibers on textile fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Cudel, Christophe; Kohler, Sophie; Fontaine, Stéphane; Haeberlé, Olivier; Klotz, Marie-Louise

    2012-04-01

    Fabric's smoothness is a key factor in determining the quality of finished textile products and has great influence on the functionality of industrial textiles and high-end textile products. With popularization of the zero defect industrial concept, identifying and measuring defective material in the early stage of production is of great interest to the industry. In the current market, many systems are able to achieve automatic monitoring and control of fabric, paper, and nonwoven material during the entire production process, however online measurement of hairiness is still an open topic and highly desirable for industrial applications. We propose a computer vision approach to compute epipole by using variable homography, which can be used to measure emergent fiber length on textile fabrics. The main challenges addressed in this paper are the application of variable homography on textile monitoring and measurement, as well as the accuracy of the estimated calculation. We propose that a fibrous structure can be considered as a two-layer structure, and then we show how variable homography combined with epipolar geometry can estimate the length of the fiber defects. Simulations are carried out to show the effectiveness of this method. The true length of selected fibers is measured precisely using a digital optical microscope, and then the same fibers are tested by our method. Our experimental results suggest that smoothness monitored by variable homography is an accurate and robust method of quality control for important industrial fabrics.

  1. Influence of plasma modification on hygienic properties of textile fabrics with nonporous membrane coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesensky, E. F.; Ibragimov, R. G.; Vishnevskaya, O. V.; Sisoev, V. A.; Lutfullina, G. G.; Tihonova, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    The work investigated the possibility of using plasma modification to improve the hygienic properties of textile materials with nonporous membrane coating to improve vapor-, air-permeability and water-resistant. Determined that, after plasma modification changes degree of supramolecular orderliness of the polymers nonporous membrane coating and the base fabric.

  2. Washable and Reliable Textile Electrodes Embedded into Underwear Fabric for Electrocardiography (ECG Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amale Ankhili

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A medical quality electrocardiogram (ECG signal is necessary for permanent monitoring, and an accurate heart examination can be obtained from instrumented underwear only if it is equipped with high-quality, flexible, textile-based electrodes guaranteeing low contact resistance with the skin. The main objective of this article is to develop reliable and washable ECG monitoring underwear able to record and wirelessly send an ECG signal in real time to a smart phone and further to a cloud. The article focuses on textile electrode design and production guaranteeing optimal contact impedance. Therefore, different types of textile fabrics were coated with modified poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS in order to develop and manufacture reliable and washable textile electrodes assembled to female underwear (bras, by sewing using commercially available conductive yarns. Washability tests of connected underwear containing textile electrodes and conductive threads were carried out up to 50 washing cycles. The influence of standardized washing cycles on the quality of ECG signals and the electrical properties of the textile electrodes were investigated and characterized.

  3. Washable and Reliable Textile Electrodes Embedded into Underwear Fabric for Electrocardiography (ECG) Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankhili, Amale; Tao, Xuyuan; Cochrane, Cédric; Coulon, David; Koncar, Vladan

    2018-02-07

    A medical quality electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is necessary for permanent monitoring, and an accurate heart examination can be obtained from instrumented underwear only if it is equipped with high-quality, flexible, textile-based electrodes guaranteeing low contact resistance with the skin. The main objective of this article is to develop reliable and washable ECG monitoring underwear able to record and wirelessly send an ECG signal in real time to a smart phone and further to a cloud. The article focuses on textile electrode design and production guaranteeing optimal contact impedance. Therefore, different types of textile fabrics were coated with modified poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) in order to develop and manufacture reliable and washable textile electrodes assembled to female underwear (bras), by sewing using commercially available conductive yarns. Washability tests of connected underwear containing textile electrodes and conductive threads were carried out up to 50 washing cycles. The influence of standardized washing cycles on the quality of ECG signals and the electrical properties of the textile electrodes were investigated and characterized.

  4. Production of a textile reinforced concrete protective layers with non-woven polypropylene fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žák, J.; Štemberk, P.; Vodička, J.

    2017-09-01

    Textile concrete with nonwoven polypropylene fabric can be used for protective layers of reinforced concrete structures, reducing the thickness of the cover layer or reducing the water penetration rate into the structure. The material consists of cement matrix with finegrained aggregate and nonwoven textile reinforcement. The maximum grain size of the mixture suitable for the nonwoven textile infiltration is 0.25 mm. The interlayer contains larger aggregates and short fibers. Tensile loading causes a large amount of microcracks in the material. The material can withstand strain over 25% without collapsing. Increased quality and water-cement ratio reduction was achieved using the plasticizers and distribution of the mixture into a fabric using a vibrating trowel. It is possible to make flat plates and even curved structures from this material. Larger curvatures of structures should be solved by cutting and overlapping the fabric. Small curvatures can be solved within the deformability of the fabric. Proper infiltration of the cement mixture into the fabric is the most important task in producing this material.

  5. Sintering of nanoscale silver coated textiles, a new approach to attain conductive fabrics for electromagnetic shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kardarian, Kasra [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Busani, Tito [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Osório, Inês [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Domingos, Helena; Igreja, Rui [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Franco, Ricardo [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Cortez, João, E-mail: j.cortez@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-10-15

    The demand for conductive textiles is increasing, owing to the need for lightweight and flexible conductive materials for a variety of applications, including electromagnetic shielding of electronic equipment. Herein we propose a process that combines the in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles at the textile fibre surface followed by sintering of the nanoparticles to obtain highly conductive fabrics. The formation of silver particles at the nanoscale allowed for sintering to be performed efficiently, at reduced temperature and time, bestowing fabrics with high conductivity and capability of shielding electromagnetic radiation. The nanoparticle synthesis method entailed the precipitation of 2.0 g L{sup −1} silver nitrate and further reduction with citrate, with the formation of a deposit of silver nanoparticles at the fabric surface. The amount of silver deposited (up to 195 mg of silver per g of fabric) resulted in moderate electrical conductivity with sheet resistance of 803 Ω/sq. Upon sintering, this value decreased dramatically to 5.2 Ω/sq. The sintering process was monitored by SEM, which showed that sintering at 200 °C for 30 min resulted in maximal electrical conductivity with the lowest amount of silver deposited, while forming a homogenous surface. Fabrics submitted to these sintering conditions maintained their sheet resistance and shielding effectiveness values, even after eight washing cycles. - Highlights: • Assembly of highly conductive textiles capable of shielding electromagnetic radiation. • Procedure combines in situ synthesis of AgNPs at the textile surface and sintering. • AgNPs formed by precipitation of AgNO{sub 3} and reduction with citrate, as observed by SEM. • Sintering increased dramatically conductivity and shielding effectiveness. • Treated fabrics maintained conductivity and shielding effectiveness after 8 washes.

  6. Sintering of nanoscale silver coated textiles, a new approach to attain conductive fabrics for electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardarian, Kasra; Busani, Tito; Osório, Inês; Domingos, Helena; Igreja, Rui; Franco, Ricardo; Cortez, João

    2014-01-01

    The demand for conductive textiles is increasing, owing to the need for lightweight and flexible conductive materials for a variety of applications, including electromagnetic shielding of electronic equipment. Herein we propose a process that combines the in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles at the textile fibre surface followed by sintering of the nanoparticles to obtain highly conductive fabrics. The formation of silver particles at the nanoscale allowed for sintering to be performed efficiently, at reduced temperature and time, bestowing fabrics with high conductivity and capability of shielding electromagnetic radiation. The nanoparticle synthesis method entailed the precipitation of 2.0 g L −1 silver nitrate and further reduction with citrate, with the formation of a deposit of silver nanoparticles at the fabric surface. The amount of silver deposited (up to 195 mg of silver per g of fabric) resulted in moderate electrical conductivity with sheet resistance of 803 Ω/sq. Upon sintering, this value decreased dramatically to 5.2 Ω/sq. The sintering process was monitored by SEM, which showed that sintering at 200 °C for 30 min resulted in maximal electrical conductivity with the lowest amount of silver deposited, while forming a homogenous surface. Fabrics submitted to these sintering conditions maintained their sheet resistance and shielding effectiveness values, even after eight washing cycles. - Highlights: • Assembly of highly conductive textiles capable of shielding electromagnetic radiation. • Procedure combines in situ synthesis of AgNPs at the textile surface and sintering. • AgNPs formed by precipitation of AgNO 3 and reduction with citrate, as observed by SEM. • Sintering increased dramatically conductivity and shielding effectiveness. • Treated fabrics maintained conductivity and shielding effectiveness after 8 washes

  7. Functional Circuitry on Commercial Fabric via Textile-Compatible Nanoscale Film Coating Process for Fibertronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hagyoul; Jang, Byung Chul; Park, Hongkeun; Jung, Soo-Ho; Lee, Hye Moon; Park, Jun-Young; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Son, Gyeongho; Tcho, Il-Woong; Yu, Kyoungsik; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Yool; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2017-10-11

    Fabric-based electronic textiles (e-textiles) are the fundamental components of wearable electronic systems, which can provide convenient hand-free access to computer and electronics applications. However, e-textile technologies presently face significant technical challenges. These challenges include difficulties of fabrication due to the delicate nature of the materials, and limited operating time, a consequence of the conventional normally on computing architecture, with volatile power-hungry electronic components, and modest battery storage. Here, we report a novel poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (pEGDMA)-textile memristive nonvolatile logic-in-memory circuit, enabling normally off computing, that can overcome those challenges. To form the metal electrode and resistive switching layer, strands of cotton yarn were coated with aluminum (Al) using a solution dip coating method, and the pEGDMA was conformally applied using an initiated chemical vapor deposition process. The intersection of two Al/pEGDMA coated yarns becomes a unit memristor in the lattice structure. The pEGDMA-Textile Memristor (ETM), a form of crossbar array, was interwoven using a grid of Al/pEGDMA coated yarns and untreated yarns. The former were employed in the active memristor and the latter suppressed cell-to-cell disturbance. We experimentally demonstrated for the first time that the basic Boolean functions, including a half adder as well as NOT, NOR, OR, AND, and NAND logic gates, are successfully implemented with the ETM crossbar array on a fabric substrate. This research may represent a breakthrough development for practical wearable and smart fibertronics.

  8. Drop Impact on Textile Material: Effect of Fabric Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romdhani Zouhaier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of impact of water drop on a surface in a spreading regime with no splashing. Three surfaces were studied: virgin glass, coating film and woven cotton fabric at different construction parameters. All experiments were carried out using water drop with the same free fall high. Digidrop with high-resolution camera is used to measure the different parameters characterising this phenomenon. Results show an important effect of the height of the free fall on the drop profile and the spreading behaviour. An important drop deformation at the surface impact was observed. Then, fabric construction as the weft count deeply affects the drop impact. For plain weave, an increase of weft count causes a decrease in penetration and increase in the spreading rate. The same result was obtained for coated fabric. Therefore, the impact energy was modified and the drop shape was affected, which directly influenced the spreading rate.

  9. Photocatalytic and antimicrobial Ag/ZnO nanocomposites for functionalization of textile fabrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibănescu, Mariana [Centre of Nanostructures and Functional Materials-CNMF, Faculty of Materials and Environment Engineering, “Dunărea de Jos” University of Galaţi, 111 Domnească Street, 800201 Galaţi (Romania); Muşat, Viorica, E-mail: viorica.musat@ugal.ro [Centre of Nanostructures and Functional Materials-CNMF, Faculty of Materials and Environment Engineering, “Dunărea de Jos” University of Galaţi, 111 Domnească Street, 800201 Galaţi (Romania); Textor, Torsten [Deutsches Textilforschungszentrum Nord-West gGmbH, DTNW, Adlerstr. 1, 47798 Krefeld (Germany); CENIDE, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Badilita, Viorel [National R and D Institute for Non-ferrous and Rare Metals Nanostructured Materials Laboratory, Ilfov (Romania); Mahltig, Boris [Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Higher silver doping smaller nanoparticles size and weaker agglomeration. • Higher silver concentration higher optical absorbance and band gap energy. • Small amouts of silver have considerably increased the antimicobial activity. • The photocatalytic activity is consistent with the increase of antimicrobial activity. - Abstract: The utilization of ZnO nanoparticles with photocatalytic and antimicrobial activity for textile treatment has received much attention in recent years. Since silver is a well-known but more expensive antibacterial material, it is of interest to study the extent to which a small amount of silver increases the photocatalytic and antimicrobial activity of the less expensive zinc oxide nanoparticles. This paper reports on the preparation of Ag/ZnO composite nanoparticles by reducing silver on the surface of commercial ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in isopropanol. Crystalline structure, particle size and band gap energy of as-prepared composite nanoparticles were investigated by X-ray diffraction and UV–Vis absorption measurements. Long term stable sols of ZnO and Ag/ZnO nanoparticles were prepared and applied as liquid coating agent for textile treatment, in combination with inorganic–organic hybrid polymer binder sols prepared from the precursors 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The coating process was carried out on cotton fabrics and cotton/polyester blended fabrics using the pad–dry–cure method. The photocatalytic activity of the nanoparticles, as prepared or applied on textile fabrics, was studied through the degradation of the dye methylene blue (MB) in water under the UV irradiation. The antimicrobial activity of the nanoparticles applied on textile fabrics, was tested against the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus.

  10. Photocatalytic and antimicrobial Ag/ZnO nanocomposites for functionalization of textile fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibănescu, Mariana; Muşat, Viorica; Textor, Torsten; Badilita, Viorel; Mahltig, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Higher silver doping smaller nanoparticles size and weaker agglomeration. • Higher silver concentration higher optical absorbance and band gap energy. • Small amouts of silver have considerably increased the antimicobial activity. • The photocatalytic activity is consistent with the increase of antimicrobial activity. - Abstract: The utilization of ZnO nanoparticles with photocatalytic and antimicrobial activity for textile treatment has received much attention in recent years. Since silver is a well-known but more expensive antibacterial material, it is of interest to study the extent to which a small amount of silver increases the photocatalytic and antimicrobial activity of the less expensive zinc oxide nanoparticles. This paper reports on the preparation of Ag/ZnO composite nanoparticles by reducing silver on the surface of commercial ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in isopropanol. Crystalline structure, particle size and band gap energy of as-prepared composite nanoparticles were investigated by X-ray diffraction and UV–Vis absorption measurements. Long term stable sols of ZnO and Ag/ZnO nanoparticles were prepared and applied as liquid coating agent for textile treatment, in combination with inorganic–organic hybrid polymer binder sols prepared from the precursors 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The coating process was carried out on cotton fabrics and cotton/polyester blended fabrics using the pad–dry–cure method. The photocatalytic activity of the nanoparticles, as prepared or applied on textile fabrics, was studied through the degradation of the dye methylene blue (MB) in water under the UV irradiation. The antimicrobial activity of the nanoparticles applied on textile fabrics, was tested against the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus

  11. Cellulose/inorganic-composite fibers for producing textile fabrics of high X-ray absorption properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günther, Karoline; Giebing, Christina; Askani, Antonia; Leisegang, Tilmann; Krieg, Marcus; Kyosev, Yordan; Weide, Thomas; Mahltig, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Common textile materials as cotton or polyester do not possess reliable X-ray absorption properties. This is due to their morphology and chemical composition in particular. Common fibers are built up from organic polymers containing mainly the elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. These “light” elements only have low X-ray absorption coefficients. In contrast, inorganic materials composed of “heavy” elements with high atomic numbers, e.g. barium or bismuth, exhibit X-ray absorption coefficients higher by up to two orders of magnitude. To obtain a flexible yarn with high X-ray absorption properties both these materials, the organic polymer and the inorganic X-ray absorber, are combined to an inorganic/organic composite fiber material. Hence, as the organic component cellulose from modified Lyocell-process is used as carrier fiber and blended with inorganic absorber particles of low toxicity and high absorption coefficients, as bariumsulphate, bariumtitanate or bismuthoxide. A content of inorganic absorber particles equally distributed in the whole fiber of up to 20% is achieved. The composite fibers are produced as staple or filament fibers and processed to multifilament or staple fiber yarns. The staple fiber yarns are rotor-spinned to increase the comfort of the subsequent textile material. Several woven fabrics, considering multilayer structure and different warp/weft density, are developed. The energy dependent X-ray shielding properties are determined in dependence on the different yarn compositions, yarn types and structural parameters of the woven fabrics. As a result, a production process of textile materials with comfortable and dedicated X-ray absorption properties is established. It offers a promising opportunity for manufacturing of specialized textiles, working clothes or uniforms applicable for medicine, air craft and security personal, mining as well as for innovative composite materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of cellulosic

  12. Cellulose/inorganic-composite fibers for producing textile fabrics of high X-ray absorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günther, Karoline; Giebing, Christina; Askani, Antonia [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Leisegang, Tilmann [Saxray GmbH, Maria-Reiche-Str. 1, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Krieg, Marcus [TITK, Thüringisches Institut für Textil- und Kunststoff-Forschung e.V., Breitscheidstraße 97, 07407 Rudolstadt (Germany); Kyosev, Yordan; Weide, Thomas [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Mahltig, Boris, E-mail: Boris.Mahltig@hs-niederrhein.de [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    Common textile materials as cotton or polyester do not possess reliable X-ray absorption properties. This is due to their morphology and chemical composition in particular. Common fibers are built up from organic polymers containing mainly the elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. These “light” elements only have low X-ray absorption coefficients. In contrast, inorganic materials composed of “heavy” elements with high atomic numbers, e.g. barium or bismuth, exhibit X-ray absorption coefficients higher by up to two orders of magnitude. To obtain a flexible yarn with high X-ray absorption properties both these materials, the organic polymer and the inorganic X-ray absorber, are combined to an inorganic/organic composite fiber material. Hence, as the organic component cellulose from modified Lyocell-process is used as carrier fiber and blended with inorganic absorber particles of low toxicity and high absorption coefficients, as bariumsulphate, bariumtitanate or bismuthoxide. A content of inorganic absorber particles equally distributed in the whole fiber of up to 20% is achieved. The composite fibers are produced as staple or filament fibers and processed to multifilament or staple fiber yarns. The staple fiber yarns are rotor-spinned to increase the comfort of the subsequent textile material. Several woven fabrics, considering multilayer structure and different warp/weft density, are developed. The energy dependent X-ray shielding properties are determined in dependence on the different yarn compositions, yarn types and structural parameters of the woven fabrics. As a result, a production process of textile materials with comfortable and dedicated X-ray absorption properties is established. It offers a promising opportunity for manufacturing of specialized textiles, working clothes or uniforms applicable for medicine, air craft and security personal, mining as well as for innovative composite materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of cellulosic

  13. Fabrication of a Textile-Based Wearable Blood Leakage Sensor Using Screen-Offset Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Nomura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricate a wearable blood leakage sensor on a cotton textile by combining two newly developed techniques. First, we employ a screen-offset printing technique that avoids blurring, short circuiting between adjacent conductive patterns, and electrode fracturing to form an interdigitated electrode structure for the sensor on a textile. Furthermore, we develop a scheme to distinguish blood from other substances by utilizing the specific dielectric dispersion of blood observed in the sub-megahertz frequency range. The sensor can detect blood volumes as low as 15 μL, which is significantly lower than those of commercially available products (which can detect approximately 1 mL of blood and comparable to a recently reported value of approximately 10 μL. In this study, we merge two technologies to develop a more practical skin-friendly sensor that can be applied for safe, stress-free blood leakage monitoring during hemodialysis.

  14. Protease Enzyme Used for Artificial Ageing on Modern Cotton Fabric for Historic Textile Preservation and Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harby E. AHMED

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Some of Historical textiles objects in Egyptian museums are containing different types of adhesives from previous restoration processes. Furthermore, they may contain some protein stains such as blood stains, which could involve more damage for the historical textiles. In the context of removing the adhesives by various methods, one may cause damage in the textiles, therefore the biotechnological application of enzymes seems to be a very promising approach in the restoration of historical objects. Our results show that enzyme removing is the most effective method, among all tested methods, in the removing of resistant old adhesives and stains. The tested enzymes for the removing technique solved the problems caused by other traditional removing techniques of resistant old adhesives from museum textiles. The main fibers of the tested objects were cotton fibers dyed with some natural dyes. Thus, the fibers that were used in this study were cotton, dyed with Turmeric dye, madder dye mordanted with alum, CuSO4 or Ferric Citrate, as well as without mordant. Additionally,we studied the effect of the enzyme on the mechanical parameters of fibers (Tensile strength, Elongation, Crystallinity index, by FTIR, XRD and ASTM. Furthermore, the effect of enzymes on the morphology of the surface of the untreated and enzymatically treated dyed fabric was investigated by using SEM and Stereoscopy. The effect of enzymes as a function of enzyme concentration and time of treatment on the fabrics color parameters was extensively studied. There was no impact-destructive effect on cotton fibers after the enzyme treatment. Thus, we could conclude that the enzyme have a very slight effect on cotton fibers dyed with natural dyes.

  15. Smart textile framework: Photochromic and fluorescent cellulosic fabric printed by strontium aluminate pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Tawfik A; Rehan, Mohamed; Hamouda, Tamer

    2018-09-01

    Smart clothing can be defined as textiles that respond to a certain stimulus accompanied by a change in their properties. A specific class herein is the photochromic and fluorescent textiles that change color with light. A photochromic and fluorescent cotton fabric based on pigment printing is obtained. Such fabric is prepared by aqueous-based pigment-binder printing formulation containing inorganic pigment phosphor characterized by good photo- and thermal stability. It exhibits optimal excitation wavelength (365 nm) results in color and fluorescence change of the fabric surface. To prepare the transparent pigment-binder composite film, the phosphor pigment must be well-dispersed via physical immobilization without their aggregation. The pigment-binder paste is applied successfully onto cotton fabric using screen printing technique followed by thermal fixation. After screen-printing, a homogenous photochromic film is assembled on a cotton substrate surface, which represents substantial greenish-yellow color development as indicated by CIE Lab color space measurements under ultraviolet light, even at a pigment concentration of 0.08 wt% of the printing paste. The photochromic cotton fabric exhibit three excitation peaks at 272, 325 and 365 nm and three emission peaks at 418, 495 and 520 nm. The fluorescent optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, elemental mapping, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, fluorescence emission and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopic data of the printed cotton fabric are described. The printed fabric showed a reversible and rapid photochromic response during ultra-violet excitation without fatigue. The fastness properties including washing, crocking, perspiration, sublimation/heat, and light are described. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Towards seamlessly-integrated textile electronics: methods to coat fabrics and fibers with conducting polymers for electronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Linden; Hoxie, Steven; Andrew, Trisha L

    2017-06-29

    Traditional textile materials can be transformed into functional electronic components upon being dyed or coated with films of intrinsically conducting polymers, such as poly(aniline), poly(pyrrole) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). A variety of textile electronic devices are built from the conductive fibers and fabrics thus obtained, including: physiochemical sensors, thermoelectric fibers/fabrics, heated garments, artificial muscles and textile supercapacitors. In all these cases, electrical performance and device ruggedness is determined by the morphology of the conducting polymer active layer on the fiber or fabric substrate. Tremendous variation in active layer morphology can be observed with different coating or dyeing conditions. Here, we summarize various methods used to create fiber- and fabric-based devices and highlight the influence of the coating method on active layer morphology and device stability.

  17. Effect of daylight and gamma-radiation on the colour of fabricated textile polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, L.A.; Saad, M.M.; Talaat, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of gamma-irradiation (0-60 mrad) and natural daylight (0-6 months) on the color and other properties of undyed textile polymers (cotton, nylon-6, polyester/cotton blend and wool/polyester blend) were investigated using optical spectroscopy. The change in color was estimated by yellowness index (Y1) and color difference (Delta E) between the irradiated and unirradiated samples. The analysis used for dosimeter is mainly spectrophotometer in the UV and visible spectrum. Systems having a reproducible response are selected. In the case of cotton fabric the change in color and reflection are showing a promise for dosimeter of gamma-radiation. It was concluded that the whiteness (W) of synthetic and blend fabrics decreased much more than that of cotton fabrics

  18. Textile for heart valve prostheses: fabric long-term durability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Frederic; Durand, Bernard; Chakfe, Nabil

    2010-01-01

    The rapid developments and success in percutaneous vascular surgery over the last two decades with the now common stent grafts implantation, make the noninvasive surgery technique today attractive even for heart valve replacement. Less traumatic for the patient and also less time consuming, percutaneous heart valve replacement is however at its beginning and restricted to end of life patients. The noninvasive procedure expects from the heart valve prosthesis material to be resistant and adapted to folding requirements of the implantation process (catheter). Polyester fabric could be a suited material for heart valve implanted percutaneously. Highly flexible and resistant, polyester fabric proved to be well adapted to the dynamic behavior of a valve and polyester (Dacron) is also widely used for vascular grafts implantation and shows good biocompatibility and durability. However, today there's no data available on long-term durability of fabric used as heart valve material. The purpose of this work is to study the long term behavior of a microdenier polyester fabric construction under combined in vitro flexure and tension fatigue stress. In the novel in vitro testing technique presented, a fabric specimen was subjected to combined flexural and tensile fatigue generated by fluid flow under physiological pressure conditions. The results obtained show how flexural properties change with fatigue time, which reflects directly on the suitability of a fabric in such devices. It was also observed that these fabric structural changes directly influence the in vitro behavior of the textile heart valve prosthesis. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. In-process fault detection for textile fabric production: onloom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Florian; Holtermann, Timm; Schneider, Dorian; Kulczycki, Ashley; Gries, Thomas; Aach, Til

    2011-05-01

    Constant and traceable high fabric quality is of high importance both for technical and for high-quality conventional fabrics. Usually, quality inspection is carried out by trained personal, whose detection rate and maximum period of concentration are limited. Low resolution automated fabric inspection machines using texture analysis were developed. Since 2003, systems for the in-process inspection on weaving machines ("onloom") are commercially available. With these defects can be detected, but not measured quantitative precisely. Most systems are also prone to inevitable machine vibrations. Feedback loops for fault prevention are not established. Technology has evolved since 2003: Camera and computer prices dropped, resolutions were enhanced, recording speeds increased. These are the preconditions for real-time processing of high-resolution images. So far, these new technological achievements are not used in textile fabric production. For efficient use, a measurement system must be integrated into the weaving process; new algorithms for defect detection and measurement must be developed. The goal of the joint project is the development of a modern machine vision system for nondestructive onloom fabric inspection. The system consists of a vibration-resistant machine integration, a high-resolution machine vision system, and new, reliable, and robust algorithms with quality database for defect documentation. The system is meant to detect, measure, and classify at least 80 % of economically relevant defects. Concepts for feedback loops into the weaving process will be pointed out.

  20. Restrictions on Measurement of Roughness of Textile Fabrics by Laser Triangulation: A Phenomenological Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berberi, Pellumb; Tabaku, Burhan

    2010-01-01

    Laser triangulation method is one of the methods used for contactless measurement of roughness of textile fabrics. Method is based on measurement of distance between the sensor and the object by imaging the light scattered from the surface. However, experimental results, especially for high values of roughness, show a strong dependence to duration of exposure time to laser pulses. Use of very short exposure times and long exposures times causes appearance on the surface of the scanned textile of pixels with Active peak heights. The number of Active peaks increases with decrease of exposure time down to 0.1 ms, and increases with increase of exposure time up to 100 ms. Appearance of Active peaks leads to nonrealistic increase of roughness of the surface both for short exposure times and long exposure times reaching a minimum somewhere in the region of medium exposure times, 1 to 2 ms. The above effect suggests a careful analysis of experimental data and, also, becomes an important restriction to the method. In this paper we attempt to make a phenomenological approach to the mechanisms leading to these effects. We suppose that effect is related both to scattering properties of scanned surface and to physical parameters of CCD sensors. The first factor becomes more important in the region of long exposure times, while second factor becomes more important in the region of short exposure times.

  1. Error Correction and Calibration of a Sun Protection Measurement System for Textile Fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, A.R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Clothing is increasingly being labelled with a Sun Protection Factor number which indicates the protection against sunburn provided by the textile fabric. This Factor is obtained by measuring the transmittance of samples of the fabric in the ultraviolet region (290-400 nm). The accuracy and hence the reliability of the label depends on the accuracy of the measurement. Some sun protection measurement systems quote a transmittance accuracy at 2%T of ± 1.5%T. This means a fabric classified under the Australian standard (AS/NZ 4399:1996) with an Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF) of 40 would have an uncertainty of +15 or -10. This would not allow classification to the nearest 5, and a UVR protection category of 'excellent protection' might in fact be only 'very good protection'. An accuracy of ±0.1%T is required to give a UPF uncertainty of ±2.5. The measurement system then does not contribute significantly to the error, and the problems are now limited to sample conditioning, position and consistency. A commercial sun protection measurement system has been developed by Camspec Ltd which used traceable neutral density filters and appropriate design to ensure high accuracy. The effects of small zero offsets are corrected and the effect of the reflectivity of the sample fabric on the integrating sphere efficiency is measured and corrected. Fabric orientation relative to the light patch is considered. Signal stability is ensured by means of a reference beam. Traceable filters also allow wavelength accuracy to be conveniently checked. (author)

  2. Evaluation of microplastic release caused by textile washing processes of synthetic fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Francesca; Gullo, Maria Pia; Gentile, Gennaro; Di Pace, Emilia; Cocca, Mariacristina; Gelabert, Laura; Brouta-Agnésa, Marolda; Rovira, Angels; Escudero, Rosa; Villalba, Raquel; Mossotti, Raffaella; Montarsolo, Alessio; Gavignano, Sara; Tonin, Claudio; Avella, Maurizio

    2018-05-01

    A new and more alarming source of marine contamination has been recently identified in micro and nanosized plastic fragments. Microplastics are difficult to see with the naked eye and to biodegrade in marine environment, representing a problem since they can be ingested by plankton or other marine organisms, potentially entering the food web. An important source of microplastics appears to be through sewage contaminated by synthetic fibres from washing clothes. Since this phenomenon still lacks of a comprehensive analysis, the objective of this contribution was to investigate the role of washing processes of synthetic textiles on microplastic release. In particular, an analytical protocol was set up, based on the filtration of the washing water of synthetic fabrics and on the analysis of the filters by scanning electron microscopy. The quantification of the microfibre shedding from three different synthetic fabric types, woven polyester, knitted polyester, and woven polypropylene, during washing trials simulating domestic conditions, was achieved and statistically analysed. The highest release of microplastics was recorded for the wash of woven polyester and this phenomenon was correlated to the fabric characteristics. Moreover, the extent of microfibre release from woven polyester fabrics due to different detergents, washing parameters and industrial washes was evaluated. The number of microfibres released from a typical 5 kg wash load of polyester fabrics was estimated to be over 6,000,000 depending on the type of detergent used. The usage of a softener during washes reduces the number of microfibres released of more than 35%. The amount and size of the released microfibres confirm that they could not be totally retained by wastewater treatments plants, and potentially affect the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Error Correction and Calibration of a Sun Protection Measurement System for Textile Fabrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, A.R.L

    2000-07-01

    Clothing is increasingly being labelled with a Sun Protection Factor number which indicates the protection against sunburn provided by the textile fabric. This Factor is obtained by measuring the transmittance of samples of the fabric in the ultraviolet region (290-400 nm). The accuracy and hence the reliability of the label depends on the accuracy of the measurement. Some sun protection measurement systems quote a transmittance accuracy at 2%T of {+-} 1.5%T. This means a fabric classified under the Australian standard (AS/NZ 4399:1996) with an Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF) of 40 would have an uncertainty of +15 or -10. This would not allow classification to the nearest 5, and a UVR protection category of 'excellent protection' might in fact be only 'very good protection'. An accuracy of {+-}0.1%T is required to give a UPF uncertainty of {+-}2.5. The measurement system then does not contribute significantly to the error, and the problems are now limited to sample conditioning, position and consistency. A commercial sun protection measurement system has been developed by Camspec Ltd which used traceable neutral density filters and appropriate design to ensure high accuracy. The effects of small zero offsets are corrected and the effect of the reflectivity of the sample fabric on the integrating sphere efficiency is measured and corrected. Fabric orientation relative to the light patch is considered. Signal stability is ensured by means of a reference beam. Traceable filters also allow wavelength accuracy to be conveniently checked. (author)

  4. Auxetic textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rant, Darja; Rijavec, Tatjana; Pavko-Čuden, Alenka

    2013-01-01

    Common materials have Poisson's ratio values ranging from 0.0 to 0.5. Auxetic materials exhibit negative Poisson's ratio. They expand laterally when stretched longitudinally and contract laterally when compressed. In recent years the use of textile technology to fabricate auxetic materials has attracted more and more attention. It is reflected in the extent of available research work exploring the auxetic potential of various textile structures and subsequent increase in the number of research papers published. Generally there are two approaches to producing auxetic textiles. The first one includes the use of auxetic fibers to produce an auxetic textile structure, whereas the other utilizes conventional fibres to produce a textile structure with auxetic properties. This review deals with auxetic materials in general and in the specific context of auxetic polymers, auxetic fibers, and auxetic textile structures made from conventional fibers and knitted structures with auxetic potential.

  5. Multiwalled carbon nanotube coated polyester fabric as textile based flexible counter electrode for dye sensitized solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Sun, Kyung Chul; Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2015-05-21

    Textile wearable electronics offers the combined advantages of both electronics and textile characteristics. The essential properties of these flexible electronics such as lightweight, stretchable, and wearable power sources are in strong demand. Here, we have developed a facile route to fabricate multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coated polyester fabric as a flexible counter electrode (CE) for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A variety of MWCNT and enzymes with different structures were used to generate individual enzyme-dispersed MWCNT (E-MWCNT) suspensions by non-covalent functionalization. A highly concentrated colloidal suspension of E-MWCNT was deposited on polyester fabric via a simple tape casting method using an air drying technique. In view of the E-MWCNT coating, the surface structure is represented by topologically randomly assembled tubular graphene units. This surface morphology has a high density of colloidal edge states and oxygen-containing surface groups which execute multiple catalytic sites for iodide reduction. A highly conductive E-MWCNT coated fabric electrode with a surface resistance of 15 Ω sq(-1) demonstrated 5.69% power conversion efficiency (PCE) when used as a flexible CE for DSSCs. High photo voltaic performance of our suggested system of E-MWCNT fabric-based DSSCs is associated with high sheet conductivity, low charge transfer resistance (RCT), and excellent electro catalytic activity (ECA). Such a conductive fabric demonstrated stable conductivity against bending cycles and strong mechanical adhesion of E-MWCNT on polyester fabric. Moreover, the polyester fabric is hydrophobic and, therefore, has good sealing capacity and retains the polymer gel electrolyte without seepage. This facile E-MWCNT fabric CE configuration provides a concrete fundamental background towards the development of textile-integrated solar cells.

  6. Textile Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Kristy Alana

    Innovative and interdisciplinary solutions to wearable textile energy storage are explored as power sources for wearable electronics and smart textiles. Due to their long cycle life, non-toxic and inexpensive materials, supercapacitors were converted into textiles. Textile supercapacitors were developed using scalable fabrication methods including screen-printing, yarn making, and 3D computerized knitting. The electrode materials reported in this thesis undergo thorough electrochemical analysis, and are capable of storing up to 0.5 F/cm2 which is on par with conventionally solid supercapacitors (0.6 F/cm2). Capacitive yarns are capable of storing up to 37 mF/cm and are shown to be knittable on industrial knitting equipment. Both are some of the highest reported capacitance for all-carbon systems in the field. Yet both are the only systems composed of inexpensive and non-toxic activated carbon, the most commonly used electrode material used in supercapacitors, opposed to carbon nanotubes or graphene, which are typically more 10-100 times more expensive. However, all of the fabrication techniques reported here are also capable of incorporating a wide variety of materials, ultimately broadening the applications of textile energy storage as a whole. Fully machine knitted supercapacitors are also explored and electrochemically characterized in order to determine how the textile structure affects the capacitance. In conclusion, a wide variety of fabrication techniques for making textile supercapacitors were successfully explored.

  7. Protease Enzyme Used for Artificial Ageing on Modern Cotton Fabric for Historic Textile Preservation and Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Harby E. AHMED

    2013-01-01

    Some of Historical textiles objects in Egyptian museums are containing different types of adhesives from previous restoration processes. Furthermore, they may contain some protein stains such as blood stains, which could involve more damage for the historical textiles. In the context of removing the adhesives by various methods, one may cause damage in the textiles, therefore the biotechnological application of enzymes seems to be a very promising approach in the restoration of historical obj...

  8. Determination of the permeability of α-, β- and γ-radiation in textile fabrics by Gamma-Scout device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gintibidze, N.; Mardaleishvili, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present was the measurement of radiation permeability in textile fabrics by Gamma-Scout device and the comparison of the obtained results with the radiation background of the ambient air. The authors of this article have produced new fiber Fibron-3, which, according to theoretical calculations, reduces permeability of solar radiation. With this in mind, an experiment was performed. Three samples of the knitted cloth from Fibron-3 were taken, and the permeability of solar radiation in them was determined. The measurements were performed on Gamma-Scout device. The comparative analysis of the permeability of solar radiation in fabrics of different fibrous structure was performed. It was inferred that the degree of radiation permeability in fabrics depended on the thread thickness and the fiber structure. (author)

  9. Textiles and Apparel Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a seven-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on textiles and apparel design. The units cover: (1) fiber/fiber characteristics and textile development (including fabrication and dyeing, printing, and finishing); (2) textile and apparel design industries (including their history and…

  10. Digital Inkjet Textile Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Meichun

    2017-01-01

    Digital inkjet textile printing is an emerging technology developed with the rise of the digital world. It offers a possibility to print high-resolution images with unlimited color selection on fabrics. Digital inkjet printing brings a revolutionary chance for the textile printing industry. The history of textile printing shows the law how new technology replaces the traditional way of printing. This indicates the future of digital inkjet textile printing is relatively positive. Differen...

  11. Self-assembly fabrication of microencapsulated n-octadecane with natural silk fibroin shell for thermal-regulating textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Liang; Luo, Jie; Wang, Hao; Song, Guolin; Tang, Guoyi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Microencapsulated n-octadecane with silk fibroin shell was fabricated. • The microcapsules show high heat storage capability. • The microcapsules are good candidate for thermal-regulating textiles. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted - Abstract: Novel microencapsulated n-octadecane with natural silk fibroin (SF) shell was prepared using a self-assembly method in oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. The microstructures and chemical compositions of the resultant microcapsules were investigated by scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR). SEM images demonstrated that the microcapsules presented spherical shape with a median size of 4–5 µm. FT-IR results confirmed that SF shell was successfully fabricated upon n-octadecane core. According to the DSC and TGA examinations, the resultant microcapsules exhibited good phase-change performance, high thermal-storage capability and high thermal reliability. The microencapsulated n-octadecane with SF shell synthesized in the present study would be a potential candidate for the application of thermal-regulating textiles or fibers and biological medical materials, etc.

  12. 3D Printing of NinjaFlex Filament onto PEDOT:PSS-Coated Textile Fabrics for Electroluminescence Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Melkie Getnet; Dumitrescu, Delia; Loghin, Carmen; Chen, Yan; Wang, Lichuan; Nierstrasz, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) is the property of a semiconductor material pertaining to emitting light in response to an electrical current or a strong electric field. The purpose of this paper is to develop a flexible and lightweight EL device. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to observe the thermal degradation behavior of NinjaFlex. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid)—PEDOT:PSS—with ethylene glycol (EG) was coated onto polyester fabric where NinjaFlex was placed onto the coated fabric using three-dimensional (3D) printing and phosphor paste, and BendLay filaments were subsequently coated via 3D printing. Adhesion strength and flexibility of the 3D-printed NinjaFlex on textile fabrics were investigated. The TGA results of the NinjaFlex depict no weight loss up to 150°C and that the NinjaFlex was highly conductive with a surface resistance value of 8.5 ohms/sq.; the coated fabric exhibited a uniform surface appearance as measured and observed by using four-probe measurements and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, at 60% PEDOT:PSS. The results of the adhesion test showed that peel strengths of 4160 N/m and 3840 N/m were recorded for polyester and cotton specimens, respectively. No weight loss was recorded following three washing cycles of NinjaFlex. The bending lengths were increased by only a factor of 0.082 and 0.577 for polyester and cotton samples at 0.1-mm thickness, respectively; this remains sufficiently flexible to be integrated into textiles. The prototype device emitted light with a 12-V alternating current power supply.

  13. Superoleophobic cotton textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leng, B.; Shao, Z.; With, de G.; Ming, W.

    2009-01-01

    Common cotton textiles are hydrophilic and oleophilic in nature. Superhydrophobic cotton textiles have the potential to be used as self-cleaning fabrics, but they typically are not super oil-repellent. Poor oil repellency may easily compromise the self-cleaning property of these fabrics. Here, we

  14. Washable and Reliable Textile Electrodes Embedded into Underwear Fabric for Electrocardiography (ECG) Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Amale Ankhili; Xuyuan Tao; Cédric Cochrane; David Coulon; Vladan Koncar

    2018-01-01

    A medical quality electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is necessary for permanent monitoring, and an accurate heart examination can be obtained from instrumented underwear only if it is equipped with high-quality, flexible, textile-based electrodes guaranteeing low contact resistance with the skin. The main objective of this article is to develop reliable and washable ECG monitoring underwear able to record and wirelessly send an ECG signal in real time to a smart phone and further to a cloud. The ...

  15. Facile and eco-friendly fabrication of AgNPs coated silk for antibacterial and antioxidant textiles using honeysuckle extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuyang; Tang, Ren-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Recently, there is a growing trend towards the functionalization of silk through nanotechnology for the prevention of fiber damage from microbial attack and the enhancement of hygienic aspects. Considering sustainable development and environmental protection, the eco-friendly fabrication of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)-modified silk using natural extracts has currently become a hot research area. This study presents a facile strategy for the fabrication of colorful and multifunctional silk fabric using biogenic AgNPs prepared by honeysuckle extract as natural reductant and stabilizing agents. The influences of pH and reactant concentrations on the AgNPs synthesis were investigated. The color characteristics and functionalities of AgNPs treated silk were evaluated. The results revealed that the particle size of AgNPs decreased with increasing pH. The diameter of AgNPs decreased with increasing amount of honeysuckle extract and reducing amount of silver nitrate. The transmission electron microscopy image showed that the AgNPs were spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution. The treated silk showed excellent antibacterial activities against E. coli and S. aureus, and certain antioxidant activity. Both of the antibacterial and antioxidant activities were well maintained even after 30 washing cycles. This work provides a sustainable and eco-friendly approach to the fabrication of AgNPs coated silk for colorful and long-term multifunctional textiles using honeysuckle extract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vapor-Liquid Sol-Gel Approach to Fabricating Highly Durable and Robust Superhydrophobic Polydimethylsiloxane@Silica Surface on Polyester Textile for Oil-Water Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaojing; Li, Hongqiang; Lai, Xuejun; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Jing; Liao, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Xingrong

    2017-08-23

    Large-scale fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces with excellent durability by simple techniques has been of considerable interest for its urgent practical application in oil-water separation in recent years. Herein, we proposed a facile vapor-liquid sol-gel approach to fabricating highly durable and robust superhydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane@silica surfaces on the cross-structure polyester textiles. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that the silica generated from the hydrolysis-condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) gradually aggregated at microscale driven by the extreme nonpolar dihydroxyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS(OH)). This led to construction of hierarchical roughness and micronano structures of the superhydrophobic textile surface. The as-fabricated superhydrophobic textile possessed outstanding durability in deionized water, various solvents, strong acid/base solutions, and boiling/ice water. Remarkably, the polyester textile still retained great water repellency and even after ultrasonic treatment for 18 h, 96 laundering cycles, and 600 abrasion cycles, exhibiting excellent mechanical robustness. Importantly, the superhydrophobic polyester textile was further applied for oil-water separation as absorption materials and/or filter pipes, presenting high separation efficiency and great reusability. Our method to construct superhydrophobic textiles is simple but highly efficient; no special equipment, chemicals, or atmosphere is required. Additionally, no fluorinated slianes and organic solvents are involved, which is very beneficial for environment safety and protection. Our findings conceivably stand out as a new tool to fabricate organic-inorganic superhydrophobic surfaces with strong durability and robustness for practical applications in oil spill accidents and industrial sewage emission.

  17. Representación paramétrica de la transformada de Fourier de tejidos textiles Implementation of the parametric representation of the Fourier transform in fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yezid Torres Moreno

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available La naturaleza periódica de las imágenes de tejido textil permite el uso de las técnicas de la transformación de Fourier rápida para su clasificación. Debido a los patrones de repetición dentro de las imágenes del tejido textil, es posible encontrar una forma relativamente fácil de descripción para su densidad espectral de energía. Un trabajo previamente publicado permite mostrar el uso de descriptores para el espectro de Fourier de las imágenes, en particular su eficiencia a la invarianza a la rotación, traslación y cambio de escala [1].Dichos descriptores mostraron ser muy efectivos para representar un tejido textil y pueden ser utilizados para caracterizar texturas cuasi¿periódicas mediante técnicas no destructivas en tiempo real e in situ. Muestras de texturas textiles son evaluadas con esta técnica de representación paramétrica con el propósito de analizar su robustez y reproducibilidad. Finalmente, un conjunto de tejidos textiles es sometido a este modelo con el objetivo de evaluar la posibilidad de utilizarlo para la clasificación, verificación y reconocimiento de formas.The periodic nature of the fabric images allows using fast Fourier transform techniques in image processing for its characterization. Due to the repetition of patterns inside the images of textile, is possible to find a form relatively easy of description in their energy spectrum. A recent work outlines a group of geometric descriptors for the Fourier spectrum of the images; looking for this efficiency to rotation, translation and scale change invariance [1]. These descriptors showed to be very effective to represent a textile fabric and can be used to characterize the quasi periodic textures in real time and in situ non destructive techniques. Samples of textile textures are tested to this technique of parametric representation with the purpose of analyzing their robustness and reproducibility. Finally, a set of textile fabrics is subjected to

  18. ANTIMICROBIAL TEXTILE PREPARED BY SILVER DEPOSITION ON DIELECTRIC BARRIER DISCHARGE TREATED COTTON/POLYESTER FABRIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Kostić

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to impart the additional value on cotton//polyester (Co/PES fabrics (i.e. antimicrobial properties to improve the quality of life and thus to tap new markets with the product. In this paper, silver ions were incorporated in Co/PES fabrics by chemisorptions into the fabric previously treated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD. A series of the DBD fabric treatments were done in order to determine the most suitable experimental conditions for the DBD activation of the fabric surface, while the optimal conditions for silver ions sorption by Co/PES fabrics were determined by changing sorption conditions. The antimicrobial Co/PES fabrics prepared by dielectric barrier discharge mediated silver deposition show an antimicrobial activity against tested pathogens: S. aureus, E. coli, and C. albicans under in vitro conditions. The obtained results confirm the practicability of the plasma modification process and furthermore show that with some delays in the next step, i.e. silver ion sorption, we can get the increase in the amount of the sorbed silver ions; the maximum sorption capacity of modified Co/PES fabrics was 0.135 mmol of Ag+ ions per gram of a fabric.

  19. A biomimetic multilayer nanofiber fabric fabricated by electrospinning and textile technology from polylactic acid and Tussah silk fibroin as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Weili [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); He, Jianxin, E-mail: hejianxin771117@163.com [Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Han, Qiming [Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Sang, Feng [Department of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Treatment and Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou 450000 (China); Wang, Qian [Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Chen, Li [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Cui, Shizhong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); and others

    2016-10-01

    To engineer bone tissue, a scaffold with good biological properties should be provided to approximate the hierarchical structure of collagen fibrils in natural bone. In this study, we fabricated a novel scaffold consisting of multilayer nanofiber fabrics (MLNFFs) by weaving nanofiber yarns of polylactic acid (PLA) and Tussah silk fibroin (TSF). The yarns were fabricated by electrospinning, and we found that spinnability, as well as the mechanical properties of the resulting scaffold, was determined by the ratio between polylactic acid and Tussah silk fibroin. In particular, a 9:1 mixture can be spun continuously into nanofiber yarns with narrow diameter distribution and good mechanical properties. Accordingly, woven scaffolds based on this mixture had excellent mechanical properties, with Young's modulus 417.65 MPa and tensile strength 180.36 MPa. For nonwoven scaffolds fabricated from the same materials, the Young's modulus and tensile strength were 2- and 4-fold lower, respectively. Woven scaffolds also supported adhesion and proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells, and promoted biomineralization via alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition. Finally, the scaffolds significantly enhanced the formation of new bone in damaged femoral condyle in rabbits. Thus, the scaffolds are potentially suitable for bone tissue engineering because of biomimetic architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility. - Highlights: • A novel strategy to mimic the hierarchical collagen fibril in bone is proposed by electrospinning and conventional textile technology. • The tensile strength of the woven scaffold was nearly 4-fold larger than that of nonwoven mats. • The nanofiber woven scaffolds show excellent cytocompatibility and accelerate osteoblast differentiation. • The composite scaffold significantly enhanced formation of new bone in damaged condyles in rabbit femur.

  20. A biomimetic multilayer nanofiber fabric fabricated by electrospinning and textile technology from polylactic acid and Tussah silk fibroin as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Han, Qiming; Sang, Feng; Wang, Qian; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    To engineer bone tissue, a scaffold with good biological properties should be provided to approximate the hierarchical structure of collagen fibrils in natural bone. In this study, we fabricated a novel scaffold consisting of multilayer nanofiber fabrics (MLNFFs) by weaving nanofiber yarns of polylactic acid (PLA) and Tussah silk fibroin (TSF). The yarns were fabricated by electrospinning, and we found that spinnability, as well as the mechanical properties of the resulting scaffold, was determined by the ratio between polylactic acid and Tussah silk fibroin. In particular, a 9:1 mixture can be spun continuously into nanofiber yarns with narrow diameter distribution and good mechanical properties. Accordingly, woven scaffolds based on this mixture had excellent mechanical properties, with Young's modulus 417.65 MPa and tensile strength 180.36 MPa. For nonwoven scaffolds fabricated from the same materials, the Young's modulus and tensile strength were 2- and 4-fold lower, respectively. Woven scaffolds also supported adhesion and proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells, and promoted biomineralization via alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition. Finally, the scaffolds significantly enhanced the formation of new bone in damaged femoral condyle in rabbits. Thus, the scaffolds are potentially suitable for bone tissue engineering because of biomimetic architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility. - Highlights: • A novel strategy to mimic the hierarchical collagen fibril in bone is proposed by electrospinning and conventional textile technology. • The tensile strength of the woven scaffold was nearly 4-fold larger than that of nonwoven mats. • The nanofiber woven scaffolds show excellent cytocompatibility and accelerate osteoblast differentiation. • The composite scaffold significantly enhanced formation of new bone in damaged condyles in rabbit femur.

  1. Alternative to Water Based Fabric Cleaner in Textile and Detergent Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpan Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three different detergent formulations, (1 ethyl-hydro-oxides (EHOs, using ethanol + H2O2 + KOH + water, without pH adjustment, at 60°C for 1 h, (2 modified EHOs (using ethanol + H2O2 + KOH + water, with pH adjustment, at 40°C for 1 h, and (3 water based detergent (WBD, using commercial detergent T + water, at 40°C for 1 h, were analyzed for cleaning of dried biodiesel soaked cotton cloth (DBSCC samples. The effects of detergent formulations were analyzed based on cloth sample weights (residual and intact and visual (through photographic images examinations. With EHOs formulations, the increasing concentration of KOH and H2O2 had a significant effect on increasing both brightness and residual content of DBSCC samples. On the contrary, the controlled pH environments (as with modified EHOs formulations had a significant effect in decreasing residual content and increasing brightness of DBSCC samples. The implications of EHOs formulations (with and without modification are discussed with respect to current water based textile and detergent industries practices.

  2. Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of Textile Heating Fabric Based on Silver Coated Polymeric Yarn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anura Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study conducted on the thermo-mechanical properties of knitted structures, the methods of manufacture, effect of contact pressure at the structural binding points, on the degree of heating. The test results also present the level of heating produced as a function of the separation between the supply terminals. The study further investigates the rate of heating and cooling of the knitted structures. The work also presents the decay of heating properties of the yarn due to overheating. Thermal images were taken to study the heat distribution over the surface of the knitted fabric. A tensile tester having constant rate of extension was used to stretch the fabric. The behavior of temperature profile of stretched fabric was observed. A comparison of heat generation by plain, rib and interlock structures was studied. It was observed from the series of experiments that there is a minimum threshold force of contact at binding points of a knitted structure is required to pass the electricity. Once this force is achieved, stretching the fabric does not affect the amount of heat produced.

  3. Digital Textile Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Moltchanova, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly evolving technology of digital printing opens new opportunities on many markets. One of them is the printed fabric market where printing companies as well as clients benefit from new printing methods. This thesis focuses on the digital textile printing technology and its implementation for fabric-on-demand printing service in Finland. The purpose of this project was to study the technology behind digital textile printing, areas of application of this technology, the requirements ...

  4. Fabrication of Eu-TiO2 NCs functionalized cotton textile as a multifunctional photocatalyst for dye pollutants degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caschera, Daniela; Federici, Fulvio; de Caro, Tilde; Cortese, Barbara; Calandra, Pietro; Mezzi, Alessio; Lo Nigro, Raffaella; Toro, Roberta G.

    2018-01-01

    A modified one step and cost-effective chemical green route has been used to synthesize oleate-capped TiO2 anatase nanocrystals (NCs) doped with different amounts of europium, with high yields and without high-temperature post-calcination processes. Europium doping endowed TiO2 NCs with an intense red luminescence associated with the 5D0 → 7F2 transition of the electronic structure of Eu3+ and was responsible for both the morphological change of the NCs structure (from nanorods to spherical nanoparticles) and the blue shift in the absorption edge respect to the undoped TiO2 NCs. Furthermore, photocatalytic experiments revealed that a low-content (0.5 mol%) Eu3+ doped TiO2 NCs showed the best ability as photocatalyst for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under both UV and visible light irradiation, even if all the Eu3+ doped oleate-capped TiO2 NCs were more effective under visible light. Moreover, taking advantage of their photocatalytic activity, the 0.5% Eu3+ doped oleate-capped TiO2 photocatalysts has been employed on cotton fabrics. Our results highlighted that functionalization of cotton textile with Eu3+ doped oleate-capped TiO2 NCs imparted new functionalities, such as a high photocatalytic activity toward MB degradation under visible light. In addition, it determined also the change in the wetting behaviour of cotton that switches to a superhydrophobic nature. The obtained fabric also showed stable and robust superhydrophobicity against strong acid and alkaline environments. Multifunctional materials having simultaneously luminescence, superhydrophobicity and visible light photocatalysis are expected to be very useful in many technological applications.

  5. Ecosystem protection by effluent bioremediation: silver nanoparticles impregnation in a textile fabrics process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Nelson; Marcato, Priscyla D.; Alves, Oswaldo L.; Silva, Joao P. S. Da; Souza, Gabriel I. H. De; Rodrigues, Flavio A.; Esposito, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    This work studied a bioremediation process of silver nanoparticles with the bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum. These nanoparticles were obtained from several washes of cotton fabrics impregnated with silver nanoparticles produced by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. The optimized growth of C. violaceum for silver nanoparticles bioremediation was obtained. The effluents of wash process of the cotton fabric were efficiently treated with C. violaceum. This treatment was based on biosorption which was very efficient for the elimination of silver nanoparticles remaining in the wash water. The bacteria after biosorption were morphologically transformed, but the normal morphology after a new culture was completely restored. The process also allowed the recovery of silver material that was leached into the effluent for a reutilization avoiding any effect to the eco-environment.

  6. Ecosystem protection by effluent bioremediation: silver nanoparticles impregnation in a textile fabrics process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, Nelson, E-mail: duran@iqm.unicamp.br; Marcato, Priscyla D. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Biological Chemistry Laboratory, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Alves, Oswaldo L. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Silva, Joao P. S. Da; Souza, Gabriel I. H. De [Universidade de Mogi das Cruzes, Biological Chemistry and Biotechnology Laboratory, Environmental Sciences Center (Brazil); Rodrigues, Flavio A. [Universidade de Mogi das Cruzes, Material Chemistry Laboratory, Biochemical Research Center (Brazil); Esposito, Elisa [Universidade de Mogi das Cruzes, Biological Chemistry and Biotechnology Laboratory, Environmental Sciences Center (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    This work studied a bioremediation process of silver nanoparticles with the bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum. These nanoparticles were obtained from several washes of cotton fabrics impregnated with silver nanoparticles produced by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. The optimized growth of C. violaceum for silver nanoparticles bioremediation was obtained. The effluents of wash process of the cotton fabric were efficiently treated with C. violaceum. This treatment was based on biosorption which was very efficient for the elimination of silver nanoparticles remaining in the wash water. The bacteria after biosorption were morphologically transformed, but the normal morphology after a new culture was completely restored. The process also allowed the recovery of silver material that was leached into the effluent for a reutilization avoiding any effect to the eco-environment.

  7. Plasma treatment of polypropylene fabric for improved dyeability with soluble textile dyestuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaman, Necla; Ozdogan, Esen; Seventekin, Necdet; Ayhan, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    The impact of plasma treatment parameters on the surface morphology, physical-chemical, and dyeing properties of polypropylene (PP) using anionic and cationic dyestuffs were investigated in this study. Argon plasma treatment was used to activate PP fabric surfaces. Activated surfaces were grafted different compounds: 6-aminohexanoic acid (6-AHA), acrylic acid (AA), ethylendiamine (EDA), acryl amide (AAMID) and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS). Compounds were applied after the plasma treatment and the acid and basic dyeing result that was then observed, were quite encouraging in certain conditions. The possible formed oxidizing groups were emphasized by FTIR and ATR and the surface morphology of plasma treated PP fibers was also investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PP fabric could be dyed with acid and basic dyestuffs after only plasma treatment and plasma induced grafting, and fastnesses of the dyed samples were satisfactory.

  8. Scope of nanotechnology in modern textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review article demonstrates the scope and applications of nanotechnology towards modification and development of advanced textile fibers, yarns and fabrics and their processing techniques. Basically, it summarizes the recent advances made in nanotechnology and its applications to cotton textil...

  9. The Textile Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    2010-01-01

    Textile has within the last decade increasingly been regarded as an architectural material. Many new textiles have been developed and this has increased its applications in architecture. But how do textile and space meet and which spatial qualities can arise in this meeting? The paper describes...... a series of practical studies of the spatial qualities that can be established through the design of three very different fabrics. The topic is part of an ongoing Ph.D. project at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. The main theme of the Ph.D. is the inter-play between textile, space and sound. Space...... and it has a special poetry which is not to be found in any other material. Which spatial qualities can be obtained with these textile properties? Contemporary conception of space in architecture can be said still to rely on the modernist conception. In practical experiments it is investigated how...

  10. Rechargeable electronic textile battery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Kok, M.M. de; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple fabrication process that produces polymeric charge storage devices directly onto a textile surface. By using a coating of poly-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulphonic acid) (PEDOT) as a solid electrolytic layer deposited between two woven silver coated polyamide

  11. A Wearable All-Solid Photovoltaic Textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nannan; Chen, Jun; Huang, Yi; Guo, Wanwan; Yang, Jin; Du, Jun; Fan, Xing; Tao, Changyuan

    2016-01-13

    A solution is developed to power portable electronics in a wearable manner by fabricating an all-solid photovoltaic textile. In a similar way to plants absorbing solar energy for photosynthesis, humans can wear the as-fabricated photovoltaic textile to harness solar energy for powering small electronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Recent Advances in Soft E-Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Mondal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available E-textiles (electronic textiles are fabrics that possesses electronic counterparts and electrical interconnects knitted into them, offering flexibility, stretchability, and a characteristic length scale that cannot be accomplished using other electronic manufacturing methods currently available. However, knitting is only one of the technologies in e-Textile integration. Other technologies, such as sewing, embroidery, and even single fiber-based manufacture technology, are widely employed in next-generation e-textiles. Components and interconnections are barely visible since they are connected intrinsically to soft fabrics that have attracted the attention of those in the fashion and textile industries. These textiles can effortlessly acclimatize themselves to the fast-changing wearable electronic markets with digital, computational, energy storage, and sensing requirements of any specific application. This mini-review focuses on recent advances in the field of e-textiles and focuses particularly on the materials and their functionalities.

  13. Future Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Louise Degn; Jensen, Hanne Troels Fusvad; Hansen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Magasinet Future Textiles samler resultaterne fra projektet Future Textiles, der markedsfører området intelligente tekstiler. I magasinet kan man læse om trends, drivkræfter, udfordringer samt få ideer til nye produkter inden for intelligente tekstiler. Områder som bæredygtighed og kundetilpasning...

  14. Antibacterial textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Usha

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the antibacterial functionalization of textiles and its application in professional laundries. The antibacterial functionalization was meant for the various textile packages lent out by the laundry companies to their customers from hotels, hospital or food industries. The

  15. Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    Textiles can be used as building skins, adding new aesthetic and functional qualities to architecture. Just like we as humans can put on a coat, buildings can also get dressed. Depending on our mood, or on the weather, we can change coat, and so can the building. But the idea of using textiles...

  16. Textile Tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2008-01-01

    of the discipline. Inspiring time gathering some of the most exciting architects of the moment, Lars Spuybroeck, Mark Burry, Evan Douglis, Michael Hensel and Cecil Balmond were invited to discuss their understanding of tectonics. Full text available at http://textilefutures.co.uk/exchange/bin/view/TextileFutures/TextileTectonics...

  17. Textiles Quotas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Shanghai launched China’s first electronic trading platform for textiles export licenses yesterday, allowing firms to easily sell or buy quotas. The platform (www.e-tj.cn) is aimed at raising efficiency and curb-

  18. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  19. Photonic textiles for pulse oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmaier, Markus; Selm, Bärbel; Spichtig, Sonja; Haensse, Daniel; Wolf, Martin

    2008-08-18

    Biomedical sensors, integrated into textiles would enable monitoring of many vitally important physiological parameters during our daily life. In this paper we demonstrate the design and performance of a textile based pulse oximeter, operating on the forefinger tip in transmission mode. The sensors consisted of plastic optical fibers integrated into common fabrics. To emit light to the human tissue and to collect transmitted light the fibers were either integrated into a textile substrate by embroidery (producing microbends with a nominal diameter of 0.5 to 2 mm) or the fibers inside woven patterns have been altered mechanically after fabric production. In our experiments we used a two-wavelength approach (690 and 830 nm) for pulse wave acquisition and arterial oxygen saturation calculation. We have fabricated different specimens to study signal yield and quality, and a cotton glove, equipped with textile based light emitter and detector, has been used to examine movement artifacts. Our results show that textile-based oximetry is feasible with sufficient data quality and its potential as a wearable health monitoring device is promising.

  20. Investigation of Heating Behaviour of E-textile Structures

    OpenAIRE

    H. Sezgin; S. Kursun Bahadır; Y. E. Boke; F. Kalaoğlu

    2015-01-01

    By textile science incorporating with electronic industry, developed textile products start to take part in different areas such as industry, military, space, medical etc. for health, protection, defense, communication and automation. Electronic textiles (e-textiles) are fabrics that contain electronics and interconnections with them. In this study, two types of base yarns (cotton and acrylic) and three types of conductive steel yarns with different linear resistance valu...

  1. Strines Textiles make M and T pay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    Monitoring and targeting procedures at Strines Textiles, Stockport, are playing a crucial role in the company's fight to reduce energy costs. Now fully re-established, following a management buy out in 1982, Strines Textiles is earning an ever increasing reputation for quality printing in a wide range of designs on considerably varied fabrics: from light-weight dress fabrics in fashion designs to waterproof combat camouflage prints with exacting demands in quality and shade control.

  2. TEXTILE SALVAGE

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2002-01-01

    Readers are reminded that Geneva's agency for salvaging used clothing, other textiles and old shoes (Coordination d'oeuvres d'entraide pour la récupération de vêtements, textiles et chaussures usagés dans le canton de Genève) has a container in the car park outside CERN's Meyrin site. In 2001, 1000 tonnes of such items were collected in the Canton of Geneva (as compared with 840 tonnes in 2000), of which 4460 kg came from the container outside the Meyrin site. The operation's organisers (Caritas, Centre Social Protestant, the Geneva Section of the Swiss Red Cross, Terre des Hommes, the Geneva branch of Terre des Hommes Suisse and Emmaüs, Geneva) would like to thank all those who have donated clothing or otherwise supported their campaign. Relations with the Host States Service Tel. 72848 http://www.cern.ch/relations/

  3. Textile Technology Analysis Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textile Analysis Labis built for evaluating and characterizing the physical properties of an array of textile materials, but specifically those used in aircrew...

  4. Radiation-induced aftertreatment of textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Toshio

    1978-01-01

    Techniques to improve the properties of textiles by graft polymerization of acrylic acid, metacrylic acid, etc. on natural and synthetic fibers by irradiation of electron beam or γ ray were developed and put into practical use. Such graft polymerization by irradiation is effective technique to give synthetic fibers hydrophilic property, heat-shrinkage resistance, dye affinity, static electricity prevention, combustion resistance, etc.. Irradiation is also applied for adhesion of nonwoven fabric, coating processing of textiles, and printing processing of fabrics. Thus, the processing of textiles by radiation, especially electron beam, is effective to give new properties to textiles, but its importance has been also recognized as energy saving and public nuisance-avoiding processes. A great deal of energy reduction can be expected by electron beam irradiation method. (Kobatake, H.)

  5. Ray-Tracing-Based Modeling of Clad-Removed Step-Index Plastic Optical Fiber in Smart Textiles: Effect of Curvature in Plain Weave Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Moon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic optical fiber was chosen for information delivery media in smart textile. Cladding layer was peeled off by chemical and mechanical methods to find optimal peeling conditions. Both radial side illumination and longitudinal end-tip illumination were measured for visible light of 627 µm wavelength. A half-cone-shaped jig was manufactured using 3D printing to give various curvature conditions to fibers. Also POFs were embedded in plain weave textile structure to measure the light dissipation effect. The waveguide phenomenon was modeled using discrete ray tracing technique and ray-to-interface collision detection algorithm. Results from the proposed modeling technique showed linear relationship with those from experiment.

  6. Laminate mechanics for balanced woven fabrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko

    2006-01-01

    Laminate mechanics equations are presented for composites with balanced woven fabric reinforcements. It is shown that mimicking these textile composites with equivalent transversely isotropic (‘unidirectional’) layers requires disputable manipulations. Various micromechanics predictions of textile

  7. Pyroprotein-Based Electronic Textiles with High Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jun Woo; Cho, Se Youn; Jeong, Yu Jin; Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Na Rae; Yun, Young Soo; Kim, Hyun-Tae; Choi, Soo Bong; Hong, Won G; Kim, Hae Jin; Jin, Hyoung-Joon; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Thermally reducible pyroprotein-based electronic textiles (e-textiles) are fabricated using graphene oxide and a pyroprotein such as cocoon silk and spider web without any chemical agents. The electrical conductivity of the e-textile is 11.63 S cm -1 , which is maintained even in bending, washing, and temperature variation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Towards Organ Weaving

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, pore size and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important role in the effective use of textile technol...

  9. NANOTECHNOLOGY IN TEXTILE INDUSTRY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RATIU Mariana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and nanotechnology are the study and application of extremely small things and can be used across all the other science fields, such as chemistry, biology, physics, materials science, and engineering. Nanotechnology overcomes the limitation of applying conventional methods to impart certain properties to textile materials. There is no doubt that in the next few years nanotechnology will penetrate into every area of the textile industry. Nanotextiles are nanoscale fibrous materials that can be fictionalized with a vast array of novel properties, including antibiotic activity, self-cleaning and the ability to increase reaction rates by providing large surface areas to potential reactants. These materials are used not only as cloth fabric, but as filter materials, wound-healing gauzes and antibacterial food packaging agents in food industry. World demand for nano-materials will rise more than two-and-a-half times to $5.5 billion in 2016 driven by a combination of increased market penetration of existing materials, and ongoing development of new materials and applications. In recent years was demonstrated that nanotechnology can be used to enhance textile attributes, such as fabric softness, durability and breathability, water repellency, fire retardancy, antimicrobial properties in fibers, yarns and fabrics. The development of smart nanotextiles has the potential to revolutionize the production of fibers, fabrics or nonwovens and functionality of our clothing and all types of textile products and applications. Nanotechnology is considered one of the most promising technologies for the 21st century. Today is said that if the IT is the wave of the present, the nanotechnology is the wave of the present, the nanotechnology is the wave of the future.

  10. Interwoven Story: A Narrative Study of Textiles as Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Dion, Catherine-Laura

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from both narrative research and Joe Kincheloe's work of research bricolage this study inquired into how textiles have served as educator throughout my life. Weaving, as the earliest and most integral of textile fabrications, is particularly featured in this narrative inquiry. A loom, in its most basic form, consists of three components; a…

  11. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Towards Organ Weaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, pore size and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important role in the effective use of textile technologies in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the current advances in the manufacturing of biofunctional fibers. Different textile methods such as knitting, weaving, and braiding are discussed and their current applications in tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26924450

  12. The Potential of Improving Medical Textile for Cutaneous Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, C. D.; Cerempei, A.; Salariu, M.; Parteni, O.; Ulea, E.; Campagne, Chr

    2017-10-01

    The paper dwells on the prospect of medical textiles designed to release a drug/active principle to the dermis of patients suffering from cutaneous disease (allergic dermatitis, psoriasis, bacterial/infectious conditions and inflammatory conditions). The paper is an overview of general and experimental data from textile applications. An adequate medical textile may have a cellulosic structure, mainly knitted cotton fabric. In special cases, one may use woven fabric for multilayer drug-releasing systems. As far as controlled release systems are concerned, we carried out a critical comparison between the systems described in literature and our experimental findings as concerns cyclodextrin, hydrogel, film charged with active principles and multilayer system.

  13. Development and characterization of textile batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, M.; Grethe, T.; Schwarz-Pfeiffer, A.; Ehrmann, A.

    2017-02-01

    During the past years, smart textiles have gained more and more attention. Products cover a broad range of possible applications, from fashion items such as LED garments to sensory shirts detecting vital signs to clothes with included electrical stimulation of muscles. For all electrical or electronic features included in garments, a power supply is needed - which is usually the bottleneck in the development of smart textiles, since common power supplies are not flexible and often not lightweight, prohibiting their unobtrusive integration in electronic textiles. In a recent project, textile-based batteries are developed. For this, metallized woven fabrics (e.g. copper, zinc, or silver) are used in combinations with carbon fabrics. The article gives an overview of our recent advances in optimizing power storage capacity and durability of the textile batteries by tailoring the gel-electrolyte. The gel-electrolyte is modified with respect to thickness and electrolyte concentration; additionally, the influence of additives on the long-time stability of the batteries is examined.

  14. Scalable Production of Graphene-Based Wearable E-Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Nazmul; Afroj, Shaila; Tan, Sirui; He, Pei; Fernando, Anura; Carr, Chris; Novoselov, Kostya S

    2017-12-26

    Graphene-based wearable e-textiles are considered to be promising due to their advantages over traditional metal-based technology. However, the manufacturing process is complex and currently not suitable for industrial scale application. Here we report a simple, scalable, and cost-effective method of producing graphene-based wearable e-textiles through the chemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to make stable reduced graphene oxide (rGO) dispersion which can then be applied to the textile fabric using a simple pad-dry technique. This application method allows the potential manufacture of conductive graphene e-textiles at commercial production rates of ∼150 m/min. The graphene e-textile materials produced are durable and washable with acceptable softness/hand feel. The rGO coating enhanced the tensile strength of cotton fabric and also the flexibility due to the increase in strain% at maximum load. We demonstrate the potential application of these graphene e-textiles for wearable electronics with activity monitoring sensor. This could potentially lead to a multifunctional single graphene e-textile garment that can act both as sensors and flexible heating elements powered by the energy stored in graphene textile supercapacitors.

  15. RECYCLED TEXTILES USED IN AUTOMOTIVE INTERIORS. CASE STUDY- FORD MOTOR COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUC Sunhilde

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The environmental movement is affecting all industries, but the textile and automotive industries are two of the few that are constantly being criticized. The automotive industry is the subject of much research, it is the largest manufacturing activity, there is a complex supply chain, is resource intensive and emits various hazardous gases and waste products. The article reviews the current state of automotive industry regarding the textile application. Automotive textiles have been classified as belonging to a category called “Mobiltech” which is one of the main streams of technical textiles. The term means all type of textile components e.g. fibers, filaments, yarns and the fabric used in automobiles. They are classed as technical textile because of the very high performance specifications and special properties required, different from those used in clothing and other applications. The performance of the automotive textiles depends on the fibre properties, fabric structures and various finishes used in the manufacturing processes. After a short presentation of used fibres in car interiors, with advantages and disadvantages it is presented the sustainable textile solutions for the automotive industry. The paper focuses in particular of the use of recycling of textile waste to highlight how the processes of recycled textiles and sustainable textiles production are linked in the automotive sector. A case study with Ford Motor Company outlines and examines their design, development and manufacture process for automotive textiles for car seat coverings and interiors

  16. Porous textile antenna designs for improved wearability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahariar, Hasan; Soewardiman, Henry; Muchler, Clifford A.; Adams, Jacob J.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2018-04-01

    Textile antennas are an integral part of the next generation personalized wearable electronics system. However, the durability of textile antennas are rarely discussed in the literature. Typical textile antennas are prone to damage during normal wearable user scenarios, washing, and heat cycling over time. Fabricating a durable, washable, flexible, and breathable (like textile materials) antenna is challenging due to the incompatibility of the mechanical properties of conductive materials and soft textile materials. This paper describes a scalable screen printing process on an engineered nonwoven substrate to fabricate microstrip patch antennas with enhanced durability. This work used an Evolon® nonwoven substrate with low surface roughness (˜Ra = 18 μm) and high surface area (˜2.05 mm2 mm-2 of fabric area) compared to traditional textile materials, which allows the ink to penetrate evenly in the fiber bulk with its strong capillary wicking force and enhances print resolution. The composite layer of ink and fiber is conductive and enables the antennas to maintain high mechanical flexibility without varying its RF (Radio Frequency) properties. Additionally, the antennas are packaged by laminating porous polyurethane web to make the device durable and washable. The fully packaged antennas maintain the structural flexibility and RF functionality after 15 cycles of washing and drying. To improve the air permeability and enhance flexibility the antenna is also modified by incorporating holes in the both patch and ground layer of the antenna. The antennas were analyzed before and after submerging in water to observe the effect of wetting and drying with respect to frequency response. The porous antenna with holes recovered 3x times faster than the one without holes (solid) from fully wet state (saturated with water) to the dry state, demonstrating its potential use as a moisture sensor system.

  17. Textile-Based Electronic Components for Energy Applications: Principles, Problems, and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Vishakha; Lee, Jaehong; Hong, Juree; Lee, Seulah; Lee, Sanggeun; Seo, Jungmok; Mahata, Chandreswar; Lee, Taeyoon

    2015-09-07

    Textile-based electronic components have gained interest in the fields of science and technology. Recent developments in nanotechnology have enabled the integration of electronic components into textiles while retaining desirable characteristics such as flexibility, strength, and conductivity. Various materials were investigated in detail to obtain current conductive textile technology, and the integration of electronic components into these textiles shows great promise for common everyday applications. The harvest and storage of energy in textile electronics is a challenge that requires further attention in order to enable complete adoption of this technology in practical implementations. This review focuses on the various conductive textiles, their methods of preparation, and textile-based electronic components. We also focus on fabrication and the function of textile-based energy harvesting and storage devices, discuss their fundamental limitations, and suggest new areas of study.

  18. Textile-Based Electronic Components for Energy Applications: Principles, Problems, and Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha Kaushik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Textile-based electronic components have gained interest in the fields of science and technology. Recent developments in nanotechnology have enabled the integration of electronic components into textiles while retaining desirable characteristics such as flexibility, strength, and conductivity. Various materials were investigated in detail to obtain current conductive textile technology, and the integration of electronic components into these textiles shows great promise for common everyday applications. The harvest and storage of energy in textile electronics is a challenge that requires further attention in order to enable complete adoption of this technology in practical implementations. This review focuses on the various conductive textiles, their methods of preparation, and textile-based electronic components. We also focus on fabrication and the function of textile-based energy harvesting and storage devices, discuss their fundamental limitations, and suggest new areas of study.

  19. Textiles and clothing sustainability sustainable textile chemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the challenges in sustainable wet processing of textiles, natural dyes, enzymatic textiles and sustainable textile finishes. Textile industry is known for its chemical processing issues and many NGO’s are behind the textile sector to streamline its chemical processing, which is the black face of clothing and fashion sector. Sustainable textile chemical processes are crucial for attaining sustainability in the clothing sector. Seven comprehensive chapters are aimed to highlight these issues in the book.

  20. Environmental management system case study: textile wet processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasreldin, A A [Engineering Researches and Industrial Technologies Council, Sudan Academy of Sciences, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2008-10-15

    Textile industry is one of the oldest industries, it started very early in the ancient ages, its grows and improves gradually at the first and then rapidly to satisfy other different need of the mankind, even for luxury purposes, this development caused damage to environment, then its need the treatment. Textile wet processes used significant quantities of water and various kind of chemicals marketed under the name textile auxiliaries, to enhance the appearance of the fabric, serviceability, and durability. The chemical contamination of textile wet processes can be a health risk for the mill workers, consumers and for the environment as well. A number of schemes have been proposed in different countries to control the textile wet processes to create better environment and protect the ecosystem from further degradation, the developing countries need to apply their designed policies from the beginning. A theoretical study for probability of application of environmental management system in textile industry, to prevent or eliminate textile industry pollution that considered as one of the largest polluters in Sudanese environment, especially after the government (industrial ministry) support and facilitate to textile industry development. Applying environmental management system can appreciably reduce the textile industry pollution as founded from the study.(Author)

  1. Environmental management system case study: textile wet processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasreldin, A.A.

    2008-10-01

    Textile industry is one of the oldest industries, it started very early in the ancient ages, its grows and improves gradually at the first and then rapidly to satisfy other different need of the mankind, even for luxury purposes, this development caused damage to environment, then its need the treatment. Textile wet processes used significant quantities of water and various kind of chemicals marketed under the name textile auxiliaries, to enhance the appearance of the fabric, serviceability, and durability. The chemical contamination of textile wet processes can be a health risk for the mill workers, consumers and for the environment as well. A number of schemes have been proposed in different countries to control the textile wet processes to create better environment and protect the ecosystem from further degradation, the developing countries need to apply their designed policies from the beginning. A theoretical study for probability of application of environmental management system in textile industry, to prevent or eliminate textile industry pollution that considered as one of the largest polluters in Sudanese environment, especially after the government (industrial ministry) support and facilitate to textile industry development. Applying environmental management system can appreciably reduce the textile industry pollution as founded from the study.(Author)

  2. EXERGY OF TEXTILE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents solution for the task of evaluating exergy of the substance in the flow for textile and woven fabrics based on thermodynamic analysis of the corresponding technical systems. The exergy method allows estimating the energy effectiveness for the most problematic heat-technological systems of substance transformation and thus outlining the ways for decreasing the electric-power component in the production prime cost. The actuality of the issue stems from the renowned scenario alteration on the world energy market and is aggravated by necessity of retaining and building up the export potential of the light industry as an important component of the republic national-economic complex. The exergy method has been here for quite a long time and saw the interest fading and appearing again with periodicity of the research-generations alternation. Cooling down of every new generation towards the specified method is explained mostly by unresolved problem of the exergy evaluation for diverse materials, which poses a problem in the course of analysis of the substance transformation systems. The specified problem as a general rule does not create obstacles for energyconversion systems. However, the situation with substance-transformation systems is by far more complicated primarily due to diversity of the materials and respectively of the specification peculiarities of such component of the substance exergy in the flow as chemical component. Abeyance of conclusion in finding the chemical component of the substance exergy does not allow performing thermodynamic valuation of the energy provision for the heat-technological process in full measure. Which complicates the matters of decision-making and finding a medium for reduction of their energy consumption. All stated above relates to the textile industry and in the first instance to the finishing production departments.The authors present the exergy-evaluation problem solution for the

  3. Textiles and Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freney, Jean; Renaud, François N. R.

    Microbes can be carried by and even multiply on textiles. The first real, premeditated, microbiological warfare happened in 1763, during the Anglo-French wars in North America, when Native American emissaries were given blankets or handkerchiefs contaminated with smallpox. Thus, a small epidemic started and spread rapidly, causing considerable damage to the rank and file of the Native Americans. Nowadays, it could be said that textiles could be vectors of infections in hospitals or communities. The making of antimicrobial textiles could prevent them from becoming a reservoir of microbes in the transmission of infections and in cases of voluntary contamination in a terrorist threat for example. However, methods have to show that textiles are really active and do not attack the cutaneous flora they are in contact with. In this chapter, the role of textiles in the transmission of infections is summarized and the main characteristics of antimicrobial textiles are described.

  4. Ceramic coatings for water-repellent textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleoni, C.; Esposito, F.; Guido, E.; Migani, V.; Trovato, V.; Rosace, G.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, ceramic coatings have been widely studied for their potential performance in many scientific and technological fields. Ceramic coatings are also used as a textile-finishing agent to impart several properties such as anti-bacterial, anti-abrasion, flame retardant. In this study, fluoro free water repellent finishings have been developed to assess the features of the silica films on the textile fabrics. The water repellency of the treated samples has been evaluated by different tests such as water contact angle, water uptake and drop test.

  5. TEXTILE TECHNOLOGIES IN CONCRETE ENVIRONMENTS."

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Ruth; Belford, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Girli Concrete is a cross disciplinary funded research project based in the University of Ulster involving a textile designer/ researcher, an architect/ academic and a concrete manufacturing firm.Girli Concrete brings together concrete and textile technologies, testing ideas ofconcrete as textile and textile as structure. It challenges the perception of textiles as only the ‘dressing’ to structure and instead integrates textile technologies into the products of building products. Girli Concre...

  6. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  7. Textile sustainability: reuse of clean waste from the textile and apparel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broega, A. C.; Jordão, C.; Martins, S. B.

    2017-10-01

    Today societies are already experiencing changes in their production systems and even consumption in order to guarantee the survival and well-being of future generations. This fact emerges from the need to adopt a more sustainable posture in both people’s daily lives and productive systems. Within this context, textile sustainability emerges as the object of study of this work whose aim is to analyse which sustainability dimensions are being prioritized by the clean waste management systems of the textile and garment industries. This article aims to analyse solutions that are being proposed by sustainable creative business models in the reuse of discarded fabrics by the textile industry. Search also through a qualitative research by a case study (the Reuse Fabric Bank) understand the benefits generated by the re-use in environmental, economic, social and ways to add value.

  8. Caustic saving potentile in textile processing mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, M.; Rehman, A.; Ghafar, A.; Hafeez, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    The textile processing industry of pakistan has great potential of improvement in resource consumption in various production processes. One major concern is the heavy usage of caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) especially during the mercerization process which incurs a significant cost to a textile processing mill. To reduce the unit fabric production cost and stay competitive, the industry need to minimize the caustic wastage and explore the caustic saving potential. This paper describe the detailed caustic consumption practices and saving potentials in woven textile sector based on the data base of 100 industries. Region wise caustic saving potential is also investigated . Three caustic conservation option including process improvement, reuse and recycling, and caustic recovery plants are discussed. Detailed technical and and financial requirements. saving potentials and paybacks of these options are provided. (author)

  9. Hemp for textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract

    Key words: Cannabis sativa L., day length sensitivity, fibre hemp, genotype, harvest time, plant density, plant weight, primary fibres, secondary fibres, sowing date, textiles.

    Westerhuis, W. (2016) Hemp for textiles: plant

  10. CONTAINER FOR USED TEXTILES

    CERN Multimedia

    Relation with the Host States

    2001-01-01

    We should like to remind you that a special container for textiles for the Association 'Réalise/Rapid Service' of Geneva is located in the car park outside the Meyrin site. The Association has informed us that 3 306 kg of textiles were deposited in the container in 2000 and wishes to convey its warm gratitude to all donors.

  11. Flexible textile-based strain sensor induced by contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the contact effects are used as the key sensing element to develop flexible textile-structured strain sensors. The structures of the contact are analyzed theoretically and the contact resistances are investigated experimentally. The electromechanical properties of the textiles are investigated to find the key factors which determine the sensitivity, repeatability, and linearity of the sensor. The sensing mechanism is based on the change of contact resistance induced by the change of the configuration of the textiles. In order to improve the performance of the textile strain sensor, the contact resistance is designed based on the electromechanical properties of the fabric. It can be seen from the results that the performance of the sensor is largely affected by the structure of the contacts, which are determined by the morphology of fiber surface and the structures of the yarn and fabric. (paper)

  12. Antimicrobial Approaches for Textiles: From Research to Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Santos Morais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The large surface area and ability to retain moisture of textile structures enable microorganisms’ growth, which causes a range of undesirable effects, not only on the textile itself, but also on the user. Due to the public health awareness of the pathogenic effects on personal hygiene and associated health risks, over the last few years, intensive research has been promoted in order to minimize microbes’ growth on textiles. Therefore, to impart an antimicrobial ability to textiles, different approaches have been studied, being mainly divided into the inclusion of antimicrobial agents in the textile polymeric fibers or their grafting onto the polymer surface. Regarding the antimicrobial agents, different types have been used, such as quaternary ammonium compounds, triclosan, metal salts, polybiguanides or even natural polymers. Any antimicrobial treatment performed on a textile, besides being efficient against microorganisms, must be non-toxic to the consumer and to the environment. This review mainly intends to provide an overview of antimicrobial agents and treatments that can be performed to produce antimicrobial textiles, using chemical or physical approaches, which are under development or already commercially available in the form of isolated agents or textile fibers or fabrics.

  13. Effect of textiles structural parameters on surgical healing; a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwa, A. Ali

    2017-10-01

    Medical Textiles is one of the most rapidly expanding sectors in the technical textile market. The huge growth of medical textiles applications was over the last 12 years. “Biomedical Textiles” is a subcategory of medical textiles that narrows the field down to those applications that are intended for active tissue contact, tissue regeneration or surgical implantation. Since the mid-1960s, the current wave of usage is coming as a result of new fibers and new technologies for textile materials construction. “Biotextiles” term include structures composed of textile fibers designed for use in specific biological environments. Medical Textile field was utilizing different materials, textile techniques and structures to provide new medical products with high functionality in the markets. There are other processes that are associated with textiles in terms of the various treatments and finishing. The aim of this article is to draw attention to the medical field in each of Vitro and Vivo trend, and its relation with textile structural parameters, with regard to the fiber material, production techniques, and fabric structures. Also, it is focusing on some cases studies which were applied in our research which produced with different textile parameters. Finally; an overview is presented about modern and innovative applications of the medical textiles.

  14. Application of nanotechnology in antimicrobial finishing of biomedical textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zille, Andrea; Almeida, Luís; Amorim, Teresa; Carneiro, Noémia; Esteves, Maria Fátima; Souto, António Pedro; Silva, Carla J

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the antimicrobial nanofinishing of biomedical textiles has become a very active, high-growth research field, assuming great importance among all available material surface modifications in the textile industry. This review offers the opportunity to update and critically discuss the latest advances and applications in this field. The survey suggests an emerging new paradigm in the production and distribution of nanoparticles for biomedical textile applications based on non-toxic renewable biopolymers such as chitosan, alginate and starch. Moreover, a relationship among metal and metal oxide nanoparticle (NP) size, its concentration on the fabric, and the antimicrobial activity exists, allowing the optimization of antimicrobial functionality. (topical review)

  15. Application of nanotechnology in antimicrobial finishing of biomedical textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zille, Andrea; Almeida, Luís; Amorim, Teresa; Carneiro, Noémia; Fátima Esteves, Maria; Silva, Carla J.; Souto, António Pedro

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the antimicrobial nanofinishing of biomedical textiles has become a very active, high-growth research field, assuming great importance among all available material surface modifications in the textile industry. This review offers the opportunity to update and critically discuss the latest advances and applications in this field. The survey suggests an emerging new paradigm in the production and distribution of nanoparticles for biomedical textile applications based on non-toxic renewable biopolymers such as chitosan, alginate and starch. Moreover, a relationship among metal and metal oxide nanoparticle (NP) size, its concentration on the fabric, and the antimicrobial activity exists, allowing the optimization of antimicrobial functionality.

  16. Three-Dimensional Printed Thermal Regulation Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tingting; Yang, Zhi; Chen, Chaoji; Li, Yiju; Fu, Kun; Dai, Jiaqi; Hitz, Emily M; Xie, Hua; Liu, Boyang; Song, Jianwei; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-11-28

    Space cooling is a predominant part of energy consumption in people's daily life. Although cooling the whole building is an effective way to provide personal comfort in hot weather, it is energy-consuming and high-cost. Personal cooling technology, being able to provide personal thermal comfort by directing local heat to the thermally regulated environment, has been regarded as one of the most promising technologies for cooling energy and cost savings. Here, we demonstrate a personal thermal regulated textile using thermally conductive and highly aligned boron nitride (BN)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite (denoted as a-BN/PVA) fibers to improve the thermal transport properties of textiles for personal cooling. The a-BN/PVA composite fibers are fabricated through a fast and scalable three-dimensional (3D) printing method. Uniform dispersion and high alignment of BN nanosheets (BNNSs) can be achieved during the processing of fiber fabrication, leading to a combination of high mechanical strength (355 MPa) and favorable heat dispersion. Due to the improved thermal transport property imparted by the thermally conductive and highly aligned BNNSs, better cooling effect (55% improvement over the commercial cotton fiber) can be realized in the a-BN/PVA textile. The wearable a-BN/PVA textiles containing the 3D-printed a-BN/PVA fibers offer a promising selection for meeting the personal cooling requirement, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption and cost for cooling the whole building.

  17. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on a small part of the research taking place in the textile field. The article describes an ongoing PhD research project on textiles and sound and outlines the project's two main questions: how sound can be shaped by textiles and conversely how textiles can...

  18. Textile UWB Antenna Bending and Wet Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai A. R. Osman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The vision and ideas of wearable computing systems describe future electronic systems as an integral part of our everyday clothing that provides the wearer with such intelligent personal assistants. Recently, there has been growing interest in the antenna community to merge between wearable systems technology, ultrawideband (UWB technology and textile technology. This work aimed to make closer steps towards real wearability by investigating the possibilities of designing wearable UWB antenna where textile materials are used for the substrate as well as the conducting parts of the designed antenna. Two types of conducting materials have been used for conducting parts, while a nonconducting fabric has been used as antenna substrate material. A set of comparative results of the proposed design were presented and discussed. Moreover, effects on the return loss by means of measurements for each fabricated antenna prototype under bent and fully wet conditions were discussed in more details.

  19. Flexible Textile-Based Organic Transistors Using Graphene/Ag Nanoparticle Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn; Kwon, Yeon Ju; Lee, Kang Eun; Oh, Youngseok; Um, Moon-Kwang; Seong, Dong Gi; Lee, Jea Uk

    2016-01-01

    Highly flexible and electrically-conductive multifunctional textiles are desirable for use in wearable electronic applications. In this study, we fabricated multifunctional textile composites by vacuum filtration and wet-transfer of graphene oxide films on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) textile in association with embedding Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) to improve the electrical conductivity. A flexible organic transistor can be developed by direct transfer of a dielectric/semiconducting double layer on the graphene/AgNP textile composite, where the textile composite was used as both flexible substrate and conductive gate electrode. The thermal treatment of a textile-based transistor enhanced the electrical performance (mobility = 7.2 cm2·V−1·s−1, on/off current ratio = 4 × 105, and threshold voltage = −1.1 V) due to the improvement of interfacial properties between the conductive textile electrode and the ion-gel dielectric layer. Furthermore, the textile transistors exhibited highly stable device performance under extended bending conditions (with a bending radius down to 3 mm and repeated tests over 1000 cycles). We believe that our simple methods for the fabrication of graphene/AgNP textile composite for use in textile-type transistors can potentially be applied to the development of flexible large-area electronic clothes. PMID:28335276

  20. Nanotechnology in Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetisen, Ali K; Qu, Hang; Manbachi, Amir; Butt, Haider; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Hinestroza, Juan P; Skorobogatiy, Maksim; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-03-22

    Increasing customer demand for durable and functional apparel manufactured in a sustainable manner has created an opportunity for nanomaterials to be integrated into textile substrates. Nanomoieties can induce stain repellence, wrinkle-freeness, static elimination, and electrical conductivity to fibers without compromising their comfort and flexibility. Nanomaterials also offer a wider application potential to create connected garments that can sense and respond to external stimuli via electrical, color, or physiological signals. This review discusses electronic and photonic nanotechnologies that are integrated with textiles and shows their applications in displays, sensing, and drug release within the context of performance, durability, and connectivity. Risk factors including nanotoxicity, nanomaterial release during washing, and environmental impact of nanotextiles based on life cycle assessments have been evaluated. This review also provides an analysis of nanotechnology consolidation in the textiles market to evaluate global trends and patent coverage, supplemented by case studies of commercial products. Perceived limitations of nanotechnology in the textile industry and future directions are identified.

  1. High energy radiation for textiles. Assessment of a new technology. Semiannual report No. 1, May--Nov 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, W.K.

    1974-11-01

    The use of electron beam and ultraviolet radiation to catalyze reactions in textile materials is being evaluated as a possible production tool for the textile industry. Processes being studied are: non-woven fabric bonding, fabric coating, pigment printing, fiber coating for crimp stabilization, and fixation of flame retardants

  2. CONTAINER FOR USED TEXTILES

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations avec les Pays hôtes

    2000-01-01

    We should like to remind you that a special container for textiles for the Association 'Réalise/Rapid Service' of Geneva is located in the car park outside the Meyrin site.The Association has informed us that 2 530 kg of textiles were deposited in the container in 1998 and wishes to convey its warm gratitude to all donors.Relations with the Host StatesTel. 75152

  3. Transformers: Shape-Changing Space Systems Built with Robotic Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Prior approaches to transformer-like robots had only very limited success. They suffer from lack of reliability, ability to integrate large surfaces, and very modest change in overall shape. Robots can now be built from two-dimensional (2D) layers of robotic fabric. These transformers, a new kind of robotic space system, are dramatically different from current systems in at least two ways. First, the entire transformer is built from a single, thin sheet; a flexible layer of a robotic fabric (ro-fabric); or robotic textile (ro-textile). Second, the ro-textile layer is foldable to small volume and self-unfolding to adapt shape and function to mission phases.

  4. Textiles from Scythian burial complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Fialko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Northern Black Sea steppes were excavated more than three thousand Scythian burial mounds. In the studied burials were discovered large quantities of artifacts, but leather and textile items are preserved only in a few cases. Some ideas about Scythian costume are found in the works of Greek authors. In this regard, extremely important is the funerary complex dated with the 4th century BC, discovered in barrow Vishnevaja Moghila (Zaporizhia region, Ukraine. In the crypt, which remained undisturbed over time, was found a burial of a Scythian girl. The unique condition of preservation of the textiles and leather findings allowed reconstructing the entire costume of the Scythian. It consisted of six layers of clothing. Various pieces of clothing were made from different materials: white linen cloth, orange satin fabric, reddish-brown fur, black cloth, fur, red skin. This discovery is one of a kind in the Northern Black Sea region, which is currently a reference example of female costume of early nomads of the region.

  5. Large-Area All-Textile Pressure Sensors for Monitoring Human Motion and Physiological Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengmeng; Pu, Xiong; Jiang, Chunyan; Liu, Ting; Huang, Xin; Chen, Libo; Du, Chunhua; Sun, Jiangman; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-11-01

    Wearable pressure sensors, which can perceive and respond to environmental stimuli, are essential components of smart textiles. Here, large-area all-textile-based pressure-sensor arrays are successfully realized on common fabric substrates. The textile sensor unit achieves high sensitivity (14.4 kPa -1 ), low detection limit (2 Pa), fast response (≈24 ms), low power consumption (sensor is demonstrated to be able to recognize finger movement, hand gestures, acoustic vibrations, and real-time pulse wave. Furthermore, large-area sensor arrays are successfully fabricated on one textile substrate to spatially map tactile stimuli and can be directly incorporated into a fabric garment for stylish designs without sacrifice of comfort, suggesting great potential in smart textiles or wearable electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Possible Applications of 3D Printing Technology on Textile Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korger, M.; Bergschneider, J.; Lutz, M.; Mahltig, B.; Finsterbusch, K.; Rabe, M.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing is a rapidly emerging additive manufacturing technology which can offer cost efficiency and flexibility in product development and production. In textile production 3D printing can also serve as an add-on process to apply 3D structures on textiles. In this study the low-cost fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique was applied using different thermoplastic printing materials available on the market with focus on flexible filaments such as thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) or Soft PLA. Since a good adhesion and stability of the 3D printed structures on textiles are essential, separation force and abrasion resistance tests were conducted with different kinds of printed woven fabrics demonstrating that a sufficient adhesion can be achieved. The main influencing factor can be attributed to the topography of the textile surface affected by the weave, roughness and hairiness offering formlocking connections followed by the wettability of the textile surface by the molten polymer, which depends on the textile surface energy and can be specifically controlled by washing (desizing), finishing or plasma treatment of the textile before the print. These basic adhesion mechanisms can also be considered crucial for 3D printing on knitwear.

  7. An efficient process for producing economical and eco-friendly cotton textile composites for mobile industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mobile industry comprised of airplanes, automotives, and ships uses enormous quantities of various types of textiles. Just a few decades ago, most of these textile products and composites were made with woven or knitted fabrics that were mostly made with the then only available natural fibers, i...

  8. Aqueous Zinc Compounds as Residual Antimicrobial Agents for Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brandon Alexander; Gregory, Shawn Alan; Sulchek, Todd; Yee, Shannon; Losego, Mark D

    2018-03-07

    Textiles, especially those worn by patients and medical professionals, serve as vectors for proliferating pathogens. Upstream manufacturing techniques and end-user practices, such as transition-metal embedment in textile fibers or alcohol-based disinfectants, can mitigate pathogen growth, but both techniques have their shortcomings. Fiber embedment requires complete replacement of all fabrics in a facility, and the effects of embedded nanoparticles on human health remain unknown. Alcohol-based, end-user disinfectants are short-lived because they quickly volatilize. In this work, common zinc salts are explored as an end-user residual antimicrobial agent. Zinc salts show cost-effective and long-lasting antimicrobial efficacy when solution-deposited on common textiles, such as nylon, polyester, and cotton. Unlike common alcohol-based disinfectants, these zinc salt-treated textiles mitigate microbial growth for more than 30 days and withstand commercial drying. Polyester fabrics treated with ZnO and ZnCl 2 were further explored because of their commercial ubiquity and likelihood for rapid commercialization. ZnCl 2 -treated textiles were found to retain their antimicrobial coating through abrasive testing, whereas ZnO-treated textiles did not. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry analyses suggest that ZnCl 2 likely hydrolyzes and reacts with portions of the polyester fiber, chemically attaching to the fiber, whereas colloidal ZnO simply sediments and binds with weaker physical interactions.

  9. Conductive Cotton Textile from Safely Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jellur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconductive cotton textile has been prepared by a simple dipping-drying coating technique using safely functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs. Owing to the surface functional groups, the f-MWCNTs become strongly attached with the cotton fibers forming network armors on their surfaces. As a result, the textile exhibits enhanced electrical properties with improved thermal conductivity and therefore is demonstrated as a flexible electrothermal heating element. The fabricated f-MWCNTs/cotton textile can be heated uniformly from room temperature to ca. 100°C within few minutes depending on the applied voltage. The textile shows good thermal stability and repeatability during a long-term heating test.

  10. E-textiles in Clinical Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Fleury

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Electronic textiles have potential for many practical uses in clinical rehabilitation. This scoping review appraises recent and emerging developments of textile-based sensors with applications to rehabilitation. Contributions published from 2009 to 2013 are appraised with a specific focus on the measured physiological or biomechanical phenomenon, current measurement practices, textile innovations, and their merits and limitations. While fabric-based signal quality and sensor integration have advanced considerably, overall system integration (including circuitry and power has not been fully realized. Validation against clinical gold standards is inconsistent at best, and feasibility with clinical populations remains to be demonstrated. The overwhelming focus of research and development has been on remote sensing but the opportunity for textile-mediated feedback to the wearer remains unexplored. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  11. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Toward Organ Weaving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-06

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, microarchitecture, and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important roles in the effective use of textile technologies in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the current advances in the manufacturing of biofunctional fibers. Different textile methods such as knitting, weaving, and braiding are discussed and their current applications in tissue engineering are highlighted. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Energy and environmental nanotechnology in conductive paper and textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2012-01-01

    Paper and textiles have been used ubiquitously in our everyday lives, such as books and newspapers for propagating information, clothing and packaging. In this perspective, we will summarize our recent efforts in exploring these old materials for emerging energy and environmental applications. The motivations and challenges of using paper and textiles for device applications will be discussed. Various types of energy and environmental devices have been demonstrated including supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, microbial fuel cells and water filters. Due to their unique morphologies, paper and textile-based devices not only can be fabricated with simple processing, but also show outstanding device performance. Being renewable and earth-abundant materials, paper and textiles could play significant roles in addressing future energy and environmental challenges. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Facilitated Articulation of Implicit Knowledge in Textile Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2009-01-01

    This is a report from an ongoing research project and as such it is work in progress. The paper proposes an exploratory approach in order to enable end-users to contribute with their experiences of emotional values of fabrics in use. It is suggested that the textile designer with her repertoire...... of (experiential, implicit and tacit) textile design knowledge should facilitate the articulation process. The paper specifically draws on a series of workshops conducted within the collaborating company inviting all employees to participate. The series of workshops were based on a game-like setting and introduced...... - being a textile designer herself, who functioned as the facilitator. This paper uses two examples from the series of workshops to exemplify a facilitated articulation of implicit knowledge in textile design. From the examples the following themes are synthesised as being important for articulation...

  14. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, J.D.

    1992-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report

  15. Automated visual inspection of textile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rune Fisker; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    1997-01-01

    A method for automated inspection of two types of textile is presented. The goal of the inspection is to determine defects in the textile. A prototype is constructed for simulating the textile production line. At the prototype the images of the textile are acquired by a high speed line scan camera...... the protype to a production line system we only need to gain a speed factor of 4....

  16. Problems with textile wastewater discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantala, Pentti

    1987-01-01

    The general character of textile industry wastewaters is briefly discussed. General guidelines and practice in Finland when discharging textile industry wastewaters to municipal sewer systems is described. A survey revealed that most municipalities experience some problems due to textile industry wastewaters. Pretreatment is not always practiced and in some cases pretreatment is not operated efficiently. (author)

  17. Sustainability in the textile industry

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book examines in detail key aspects of sustainability in the textile industry, especially environmental, social and economic sustainability in the textiles and clothing sector. It highlights the various faces and facets of sustainability and their implications for textiles and the clothing sector.

  18. Innovation, entrepreneurship and textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton Godfrey, A.; Pourmojib, S.

    2017-10-01

    Innovation and entrepreneurship have become increasingly important parts of economic development in almost every country, region, and community. In this research we investigate the reasons people become entrepreneurs in the textile and apparel industries and compare entrepreneurship in these industries with other industries looking also at the success factors for start up companies. During our research we found many disrupters, people entering the textile and apparel industries from outside often having no prior experience in textiles or apparel. We also investigate the impact of government intervention on entrepreneurship. In recognition of the large economic impact entrepreneurial companies have on economic development and job growth, almost all federal governments, regional governments, and community governments have created support for innovation and entrepreneurship.

  19. A review of stimuli-responsive polymers for smart textile applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jinlian; Meng, Harper; Li, Guoqiang; Ibekwe, Samuel I

    2012-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs) are smart materials which can show noticeable changes in their properties with environmental stimulus variations. Novel functionalities can be delivered to textiles by integrating smart SRPs into them. SRPs inclusive of thermal-responsive polymers, moisture-responsive polymers, thermal-responsive hydrogels, pH-responsive hydrogels, and light-responsive polymers have been applied in textiles to improve or achieve textile smart functionalities. The functionalities include aesthetic appeal, comfort, textile soft display, smart controlled drug release, fantasy design with color changing, wound monitoring, smart wetting properties and protection against extreme variations in environmental conditions. In this review, the applications of SRPs in the textile and clothing sector are elucidated; the associated constraints in fabrication processes for textiles and their potential applications in the near future are discussed. (topical review)

  20. Superhydrophobic conductive textiles with antibacterial property by coating fibers with silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Chaohua; Chen Jia; Yin Wei; Jia Shuntian; Ma Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were produced on cotton fibers by reduction of [Ag(NH 3 ) 2 ] + complex with glucose. Further modification of the fibers coated by Ag NPs with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane led to superhydrophobic cotton textiles. Scanning electron microscopy images of the textiles showed that the treated fibers were covered with uniform Ag NPs, which generate a dual-size roughness on the textiles favouring the formation of superhydrophobic surfaces, and the Ag NPs formed dense coating around the fibers rendering the intrinsic insulating cotton textiles conductive. Antibacterial test showed that the as-fabricated textiles had high antibacterial activity against the gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. These multifunctional textiles might find applications in biomedical electronic devices.

  1. Textile technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bharat M.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate and select resin systems for Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Powder Towpreg Material, to develop and evaluate advanced textile processes by comparing 2-D and 3-D braiding for fuselage frame applications and develop window belt and side panel structural design concepts, to evaluate textile material properties, and to develop low cost manufacturing and tooling processes for the automated manufacturing of fuselage primary structures. This research was in support of the NASA and Langley Research Center (LaRc) Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technologies for Primary Aircraft Structures program.

  2. Indoor Decontamination Textiles by Photocatalytic Oxidation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafeezullah Memon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of researches have been made to make the textile intelligent and smarter; this is achieved by imparting functionality to the textile materials. The indoor environment possesses a variety of pollutants which do not come from the outer environment, but they come from the inner environment itself. Today, the smarter fabrics that may clean the indoor air have been studied by various researchers. The smarter fabrics contain the nanocoating of semiconductor oxides, mostly TiO2; thus the synthesis and application of these nanoparticles on the textile material have been reviewed in this paper. Moreover, there are lots of environmental and health issues regarding nanoparticles that have also been discussed in brief.

  3. Fabrication of cotton fabric with superhydrophobicity and flame retardancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Chengyu

    2013-07-25

    A simple and facile method for fabricating the cotton fabric with superhydrophobicity and flame retardancy is described in the present work. The cotton fabric with the maximal WCA of 160° has been prepared by the covalent deposition of amino-silica nanospheres and the further graft with (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetradecyl) trimethoxysilane. The geometric microstructure of silica spheres was measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cotton textiles before and after treatment were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wetting behavior of cotton samples was investigated by water contact angle measurement. Moreover, diverse performances of superhydrophobic cotton textiles have been evaluated as well. The results exhibited the outstanding superhydrophobicity, excellent waterproofing durability and flame retardancy of the cotton fabric after treatment, offering a good opportunity to accelerate the large-scale production of superhydrophobic textiles materials for new industrial applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Growing Backyard Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Eleanor Hall

    1975-01-01

    For those involved in creative work with textiles, the degree of control possible in texture, finish, and color of fiber by growing and processing one's own (perhaps with students' help) can make the experience rewarding. The author describes the processes for flax and nettles and gives tips on necessary equipment. (Author/AJ)

  5. A critical review on textile wastewater treatments: Possible approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkar, Chandrakant R; Jadhav, Ananda J; Pinjari, Dipak V; Mahamuni, Naresh M; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2016-11-01

    Waste water is a major environmental impediment for the growth of the textile industry besides the other minor issues like solid waste and resource waste management. Textile industry uses many kinds of synthetic dyes and discharge large amounts of highly colored wastewater as the uptake of these dyes by fabrics is very poor. This highly colored textile wastewater severely affects photosynthetic function in plant. It also has an impact on aquatic life due to low light penetration and oxygen consumption. It may also be lethal to certain forms of marine life due to the occurrence of component metals and chlorine present in the synthetic dyes. So, this textile wastewater must be treated before their discharge. In this article, different treatment methods to treat the textile wastewater have been presented along with cost per unit volume of treated water. Treatment methods discussed in this paper involve oxidation methods (cavitation, photocatalytic oxidation, ozone, H2O2, fentons process), physical methods (adsorption and filtration), biological methods (fungi, algae, bacteria, microbial fuel cell). This review article will also recommend the possible remedial measures to treat different types of effluent generated from each textile operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrochemical Techniques in Textile Processes and Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Sala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry uses the electrochemical techniques both in textile processes (such as manufacturing fibers, dyeing processes, and decolorizing fabrics and in wastewaters treatments (color removal. Electrochemical reduction reactions are mostly used in sulfur and vat dyeing, but in some cases, they are applied to effluents discoloration. However, the main applications of electrochemical treatments in the textile sector are based on oxidation reactions. Most of electrochemical oxidation processes involve indirect reactions which imply the generation of hypochlorite or hydroxyl radical in situ. These electrogenerated species are able to bleach indigo-dyed denim fabrics and to degrade dyes in wastewater in order to achieve the effluent color removal. The aim of this paper is to review the electrochemical techniques applied to textile industry. In particular, they are an efficient method to remove color of textile effluents. The reuse of the discolored effluent is possible, which implies an important saving of salt and water (i.e., by means of the “UVEC Cell”.

  7. Improving the appearance of all textile products from clothing to home textile using laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondogan, Ziynet; Pamuk, Oktay; Ondogan, Ece Nuket; Ozguney, Arif

    2005-11-01

    Denim trousers, commonly known as "blue jeans", have maintained their popularity for many years. For the purpose of supporting customers' purchasing behaviour and to address their aesthetic taste, companies have been trying in recent years to develop various techniques to improve the visual aspects of denim fabrics. These techniques mainly include printing on fabrics, embroidery and washing the final product. Especially, fraying certain areas of the fabric by sanding and stone washing to create designs is a popular technique. However, due to certain inconveniences caused by these procedures and in response to growing demands, research is underway to obtain a similar appearance by creating better quality and more advantageous manufacturing conditions. As is known, the laser is a source of energy which can be directed on desired objects and whose power and intensity can be easily controlled. Use of the laser enables us to cut a great variety of material from metal to fabric. Starting off from this point, we thought it would be possible to transfer certain designs onto the surface of textile material by changing the dye molecules in the fabric and creating alterations in its colour quality values by directing the laser to the material at reduced intensity. This study mainly deals with a machine specially designed for making use of laser beams to transfer pictures, figures as well as graphics of desired variety, size and intensity on all kinds of surfaces in textile manufacturing such as knitted—woven fabrics, leather, etc. at desired precision and without damaging the texture of the material. In the designed system, computer-controlled laser beams are used to change the colour of the dye material on the textile surface by directing the laser beams at a desired wavelength and intensity onto various textile surfaces selected for application. For this purpose, a laser beam source that can reach the initial level of power and that can be controlled by means of a

  8. The Academic, Administrative, Economic, Social, and Psychological Problems Faced by Students of Textile and Clothing Major at King Abdul-Aziz University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubyani, Noor Abdulhadi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the academic, administrative, economic, social, and psychological problems faced by students of Textile and fabric major at King Abdul-Aziz University. To achieve this purpose, a questionnaire was designed and distributed to a sample of students in the Textile and fabric major, after the use of…

  9. Bespoke Materials For Bespoke Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Baranovskaya, Yuliya; Holden Deleuran, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Membrane architecture uses currently off the shelf materials and produces the shapes and details through cutting and laborsome joining of textile patterns. This paper discusses investigations into an alternative material practice - knit - which engages bespoke membrane materials. A practice which...... allows for customised and graded material properties, the direct fabrication of shaped patterns and the integration of detailing directly into the membrane material. Based on two demonstrators built as hybrids of bespoke CNC knit and bending active GFRP rods this paper discusses the affordances...

  10. Copper oxide resistive switching memory for e-textile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Han

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A resistive switching memory suitable for integration into textiles is demonstrated on a copper wire network. Starting from copper wires, a Cu/CuxO/Pt sandwich structure is fabricated. The active oxide film is produced by simple thermal oxidation of Cu in atmospheric ambient. The devices display a resistance switching ratio of 102 between the high and low resistance states. The memory states are reversible and retained over 107 seconds, with the states remaining nondestructive after multiple read operations. The presented device on the wire network can potentially offer a memory for integration into smart textile.

  11. Amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells on glass fiber textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plentz, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.plentz@leibniz-ipht.de; Andrä, Gudrun; Pliewischkies, Torsten; Brückner, Uwe; Eisenhawer, Björn; Falk, Fritz

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amorphous silicon solar cells on textile glass fiber fabrics are demonstrated. • Open circuit voltages of 883 mV show shunt-free contacting on non-planar fabrics. • Short-circuit current densities of 3.7 mA/cm{sup 2} are limited by transmission losses. • Fill factors of 43.1% and pseudo fill factors of 70.2% show high series resistance. • Efficiencies of 1.4% and pseudo efficiencies of 2.1% realized on textile fabrics. - Abstract: In this contribution, amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells on textile glass fiber fabrics for smart textiles are prepared and the photovoltaic performance is characterized. These solar cells on fabrics delivered open circuit voltages up to 883 mV. This shows that shunt-free contacting of the solar cells was successful, even in case of non-planar fabrics. The short-circuit current densities up to 3.7 mA/cm{sup 2} are limited by transmission losses in a 10 nm thin titanium layer, which was used as a semi-transparent contact. The low conductivity of this layer limits the fill factor to 43.1%. Pseudo fill factors, neglecting the series resistance, up to 70.2% were measured. Efficiencies up to 1.4% and pseudo efficiencies up to 2.1% were realized on textile fabrics. A transparent conductive oxide could further improve the efficiency to above 5%.

  12. Offshoring in textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    MONTÓN GARCÍA, JORGE

    2015-01-01

    [ EN] This project is about offshoring in the textile industry, focusing in the rights violated in this process, this concept can be defined as the moving of various operations of a company to another country for reasons such as lower labor costs or more favorable economic conditions in that other country. The project describes the evolution of offshoring, which started in 1960’s and has continued since then; it was characterized primarily by the transferring of factories from the develope...

  13. A facile method to fabricate superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Shuliang; Wang, Chengyu; Li, Jian

    2012-11-01

    A facile and novel method for fabricating superhydrophobic cotton fabrics is described in the present work. The superhydrophobic surface has been prepared by utilizing cationic poly (dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) and silica particles together with subsequent modification of (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetradecyl) trimethoxysilane. The size distribution of silica particles was measured by Particle Size Analyzer. The cotton textiles before and after treatment were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wetting behavior of cotton samples was investigated by water contact angle measurement. Moreover, the superhydrophobic durability of coated cotton textiles has been evaluated by exposure, immersion and washing tests. The results show that the treated cotton fabrics exhibited excellent chemical stability and outstanding non-wettability with the WCA of 155 ± 2°, which offers an opportunity to accelerate the large-scale production of superhydrophobic textiles materials for new industrial applications.

  14. Textiles Objective and Sensory Evaluation in Rapid Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenija STRAZDIENE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Most consumer purchases nowadays are driven by sensory attraction and good feeling. From this standpoint textile and fashion industries need new methods to evaluate fabric quality and to respond to consumer expectations. Recently the implementation of sensory analysis in the process of material characterization has drawn much international attention. So, the aim of the research was to find dependencies between the results of sensory analysis and objective fabric behaviour evaluation performed using KES-F and Griff-Tester devices. The later method was developed at Kaunas University of Technology and is based on fabric extraction through a rounded hole, thus describing the behaviour of textile materials and their tactile properties by one complex criterion.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.778

  15. Textiles and clothing sustainability recycled and upcycled textiles and fashion

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the concepts of recycling and upcycling and their implications for the textiles and fashion sector. In addition to the theoretical concepts, the book also presents various options for recycling and upcycling in textiles and fashion. Although recycling is a much-developed and widely used concept, upcycling is also gaining popularity in the sector.

  16. Implementing traceability using particle randomness-based textile printed tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, T. K.; Koehl, L.; Campagne, C.

    2017-10-01

    This article introduces a random particle-based traceability tag for textiles. The proposed tag not only act as a unique signature for the corresponding textile product but also possess the features such as easy to manufacture and hard to copy. It seeks applications in brand authentication and traceability in textile and clothing (T&C) supply chain. A prototype has been developed by screen printing process, in which micron-scale particles were mixed with the printing paste and printed on cotton fabrics to attain required randomness. To encode the randomness, the image of the developed tag was taken and analyzed using image processing. The randomness of the particles acts as a product key or unique signature which is required to decode the tag. Finally, washing and abrasion resistance tests were conducted to check the durability of the printed tag.

  17. Production of anticandidal cotton textiles treated with oak gall extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Tayel

    Full Text Available Candida albicans, one of the most dreadful fungal pathogens threatening humans, could not be easily prevented. The anticandidal activity of oak gall extract, Quercus infectoria (QIE, was investigated as a potential natural alternative to synthetic and chemical fungicides. QIE anticandidal potentiality was confirmed using both qualitative and quantitative assays. Cotton textiles were treated with QIE and then evaluated as anticandidal fabrics. QIE-treated textiles had a potent anticandidal activity, which could completely inhibit the inoculated C. albicans cells. The durability of anticandidal activity in QIE-treated textiles almost completely disappeared after the fourth laundering cycle. QIE could be recommended, however, as a potent anticandidal agent for preparing antiseptic solutions and emulsions and as a finishing agent for manufacturing anticandidal disposable diapers and hygienic clothes.

  18. Flammability on textile of flight crew professional clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, M. C.; Oliveira, M. S.; Giacomin, A. M.; Laktim, M. C.; Baruque-Ramos, J.

    2017-10-01

    The issue about flammability of textile materials employed in passenger cabins of commercial aircrafts is an important part of safety routines planning. Once an in-flight emergency initiated with fire or smoke aboard, time becomes critical and the entire crew must be involved in the solution. It is part of the crew functions, notably the attendants, the in-flight firefighting. This study compares the values of textile material of flight attendant working cloths and galley curtain fabric with regard to flammability and Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI). Values to the professional clothing material indicate that they are flammable and the curtains, self-extinguishing. Thus, despite of the occurrences of fire outbreaks in aircrafts are unexceptional, the use of other materials and technologies for uniforms, such as alternative textile fibers and flame retardant finishes should be considered as well as the establishment of performance limits regarding flame and fire exposing.

  19. Flexible, wearable, and functional graphene-textile composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Kun-Ning; Zhang, Ying; Tao, Lu-Qi; Li, Yu-Xing; Wang, Dan-Yang; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a flexible, wearable, and functional graphene-textile composite is demonstrated. Laser scribing technology is applied to fabricate a graphene film. The thin layer of polydimethylsiloxane is covered on the surface of the graphene-textile film evenly, which would improve the abrasive resistance of the film, enhance the ability to adapt to environmental changes, and extend the service life, while maintaining the device's excellent flexibility and comfort. The graphene-textile composite can achieve constant temperature heating by controlling the input voltage, detect the human movement, and perceive the human pulse signal. The composite presents great commercial prospects and a large value in the medical, daily wear, and other areas that are closely related to human lives.

  20. Fabrication and characterisation of fabric supercapacitor

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Fabric supercapacitor is a flexible electrochemical device for energy storage application. It is designed to power up flexible electronic systems used for, for example, information sensing, data computation and communication. The development of a flexible supercapacitor is important for e-textiles since supercapacitor can achieve higher energy density than a standard parallel plate capacitor and a larger power density compared with a battery. This research area is currently facing barriers on...

  1. Supercritical carbon dioxide for textile applications and recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, H. A.; Avinc, O.; Eren, S.

    2017-10-01

    In textile industry, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), possessing liquid-like densities, mostly find an application on textile dyeing processes such as providing hydrophobic dyes an advantage on dissolving. Their gas-like low viscosities and diffusion properties can result in shorter dyeing periods in comparison with the conventional water dyeing process. Supercritical carbon dioxide dyeing is an anhydrous dyeing and this process comprises the usage of less energy and chemicals when compared to conventional water dyeing processes leading to a potential of up to 50% lower operation costs. The advantages of supercritical carbon dioxide dyeing method especially on synthetic fiber fabrics hearten leading textile companies to alter their dyeing method to this privileged waterless dyeing technology. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) waterless dyeing is widely known and applied green method for sustainable and eco-friendly textile industry. However, not only the dyeing but also scouring, desizing and different finishing applications take the advantage of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). In this review, not only the principle, advantages and disadvantages of dyeing in supercritical carbon dioxide but also recent developments of scCO2 usage in different textile processing steps such as scouring, desizing and finishing are explained and commercial developments are stated and summed up.

  2. Design and Integration of Wearable Devices in Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel G. TRINDADE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the design, production method, integration and characterization of textile sensors for the continuous monitoring of cardiac and respiration vital signals are presented. Textile electrodes, capacitive and piezoresistive sensors and respective interconnect plate were developed and integrated in elastic and adjustable chest bands, using a 6-needle digital embroidery machine and electrically conductive commercial threads. The signal's waveforms were recorded via PC with a data acquisition module and a LabView program. The signal to noise ratio of textile electrodes, having distinctive surface morphologies, that were either textured or smooth accordingly with the embroidery pattern used, were analyzed with Matlab. The quantitative method indicated differences between the two types of textile electrodes but performances comparable to standard Ag/AgCl gel electrodes. The sensors and interconnect plate were fully realized with the embroidery stitching method with textile fabrics and threads, and have a compact design, are lightweight and washable. The method offers great versatility for custom demand, in terms of sensor design and materials.

  3. Thermal-Insulation Properties of Multilayer Textile Packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusiak Małgorzata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-insulation properties of textile materials play a significant role in material engineering of protective clothing. Thermal-insulation properties are very important from the point of view of thermal comfort of the clothing user as well as the protective efficiency against low or high temperature. Thermal protective clothing usually is a multilayer construction. Its thermal insulation is a resultant of a number of layers and their order, as well as the thermalinsulation properties of a single textile material creating particular layers. The aim of the presented work was to investigate the relationships between the thermal-insulation properties of single materials and multilayer textile packages composed of these materials. Measurement of the thermal-insulation properties of single and multilayer textile materials has been performed with the Alambeta. The following properties have been investigated: thermal conductivity, resistance and absorptivity. Investigated textile packages were composed of two, three and four layers made of woven and knitted fabrics, as well as nonwovens. On the basis of the obtained results an analysis has been carried out in order to assess the dependency of the resultant values of the thermal-insulation properties of multilayer packages on the appropriate values of particular components.

  4. Greening textile industry in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen Thi Phuong, L.

    2011-01-01

    The textile and garment industry has made a remarkable contribution to the economic development of Vietnam and employs currently a large labor force of 2.5 million people.However, the textile industry is also seen as a most polluting and unsustainable industry due to the use of

  5. Smoldering and Flame Resistant Textiles via Conformal Barrier Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammarano, Mauro; Cazzetta, Valeria; Nazaré, Shonali; Shields, J Randy; Kim, Yeon Seok; Hoffman, Kathleen M; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Davis, Rick

    2016-12-07

    A durable and flexible silicone-based backcoating (halogen free) is applied to the backside of an otherwise smoldering-prone and flammable fabric. When exposed to fire, cyclic siloxanes (produced by thermal decomposition of the backcoating) diffuse through the fabric in the gas phase. The following oxidation of the cyclic siloxanes forms a highly conformal and thermally stable coating that fully embeds all individual fibers and shields them from heat and oxidation. As a result, the combustion of the fabric is prevented. This is a novel fire retardant mechanism that discloses a powerful approach towards textiles and multifunctional flexible materials with combined smoldering/flaming ignition resistance and fire-barrier properties.

  6. Novel Wireless-Communicating Textiles Made from Multi-Material and Minimally-Invasive Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepan Gorgutsa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to integrate multiple materials into miniaturized fiber structures enables the realization of novel biomedical textile devices with higher-level functionalities and minimally-invasive attributes. In this work, we present novel textile fabrics integrating unobtrusive multi-material fibers that communicate through 2.4 GHz wireless networks with excellent signal quality. The conductor elements of the textiles are embedded within the fibers themselves, providing electrical and chemical shielding against the environment, while preserving the mechanical and cosmetic properties of the garments. These multi-material fibers combine insulating and conducting materials into a well-defined geometry, and represent a cost-effective and minimally-invasive approach to sensor fabrics and bio-sensing textiles connected in real time to mobile communications infrastructures, suitable for a variety of health and life science applications.

  7. TEXTILE DYEING AND FINISHING JOURNAL Vol.34,No.1,Jan.2012 Contents and Abstracts%TEXTILE DYEING AND FINISHING JOURNAL Vol.34,No.1,Jan.2012 Contents and Abstracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    1 The Hydrophilic Property of Cotton Fabric Modified with Acrylamide by Ultravielet Grafting By Zhijun CHEN, Nianhua HANG, Zehui ZHANG( School of Textile Science and Engineering, Wuhan Textile, University, Wuhan,Hubei) Abstract: Acrylamide(AM) monomers were grafted onto the cotton fabric via ultraviolet(UV) radiation. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), organic element analyzer, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the grafted sample.

  8. An Investigation of the Design Potential of Thermochromic Home Textiles Used with Electric Heating Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Jen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermochromic colorants have been developed since before the 1900s. There are a large number of patents in different applications of thermochromic textiles, but many innovations leave the field of aesthetic and functional textile design unexplored in the area of smart materials. This study aims to develop thermochromic home textiles that change colors and patterns by integrating thermochromic pigments and electric conductive yarns into textile structures. Stainless steel conductive yarns were sewed on textile substrates to enable heat generation to increase fabric temperature. The heat generation and temperature rise could be controlled by monitoring the voltage applied. The experiments of this study focused on analyzing electric resistance and heating properties of the conductive yarns and observing color changing time and color changing effects of the thermochromic textiles. By using the technique in this research, an image of “tai chi” was designed and implemented in a backlighting thermochromic fabric. It illustrates a range of opportunities for thermochromic textiles in new design research directions of Chinese calligraphy and traditional Chinese painting.

  9. Recent researches concerning the obtaining of functional textiles based on conductive yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, A. L.; Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.

    2016-08-01

    Modem textile industry is influenced both by consumers' lifestyle and by novel materials. Functional textiles can be included into the group of technical textiles. The functional activity can be shortly interpreted as "sense - react - adapt" to the environment while traditional materials meet only passive protective role, a barrier between body and environment. Functional materials cross the conventional limits because they are designed for specific performances, being part of domains as: telemedicine, medicine, aeronautics, biotechnology, nanotechnology, protective clothes, sportswear, etc. This paper highlights the most recent developments in the field of using conductive yarns for obtaining functional textiles. Conductive fabrics can be done by incorporating into the textile structure the conductive fibers / yarns. The technologies differ from embroidering, sewing, weaving, knitting to braiding and obtaining nonwovens. The conductive fabrics production has a quickly growth because it is a high demand for these textiles used for data transfer in clothing, monitoring vital signs, germ-free garments, brain-computer interface, etc. Nowadays it is of high interest surface treatments of fibers/yarns which can be considered as a novel kind of textile finishing. There are presented some researches related to obtaining conductive yarns by coating PET and PP yarns with PANi conductive polymer.

  10. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes.

  11. Stimulating the Comfort of Textile Electrodes in Wearable Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yi; Chen, Wanzhen; Wu, Zhen; Zou, Haiqing; Krundel, Ludovic; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    Textile electrodes are becoming an attractive means in the facilitation of surface electrical stimulation. However, the stimulation comfort of textile electrodes and the mechanism behind stimulation discomfort is still unknown. In this study, a textile stimulation electrode was developed using conductive fabrics and then its impedance spectroscopy, stimulation thresholds, and stimulation comfort were quantitatively assessed and compared with those of a wet textile electrode and a hydrogel electrode on healthy subjects. The equivalent circuit models and the finite element models of different types of electrode were built based on the measured impedance data of the electrodes to reveal the possible mechanism of electrical stimulation pain. Our results showed that the wet textile electrode could achieve similar stimulation performance as the hydrogel electrode in motor threshold and stimulation comfort. However, the dry textile electrode was found to have very low pain threshold and induced obvious cutaneous painful sensations during stimulation, in comparison to the wet and hydrogel electrodes. Indeed, the finite element modeling results showed that the activation function along the z direction at the depth of dermis epidermis junction of the dry textile electrode was significantly larger than that of the wet and hydrogel electrodes, thus resulting in stronger activation of pain sensing fibers. Future work will be done to make textile electrodes have similar stimulation performance and comfort as hydrogel electrodes. PMID:26193273

  12. Characterising the thermoforming behaviour of glass fibre textile reinforced thermoplastic composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhtz, M.; Maron, B.; Hornig, A.; Müller, M.; Langkamp, A.; Gude, M.

    2018-05-01

    Textile reinforced thermoplastic composites are predestined for highly automated medium- and high-volume production processes. The presented work focusses on experimental studies of different types of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene (GF-PP) semi-finished thermoplastic textiles to characterise the forming behaviour. The main deformation modes fabric shear, tension, thought-thickness compression and bending are investigated with special emphasis on the impact of the textile structure, the deformation temperature and rate dependency. The understanding of the fundamental forming behaviour is required to allow FEM based assessment and improvement of thermoforming process chains.

  13. Wearable Electronics and Smart Textiles: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Stoppa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Textiles (e-textiles are fabrics that feature electronics and interconnections woven into them, presenting physical flexibility and typical size that cannot be achieved with other existing electronic manufacturing techniques. Components and interconnections are intrinsic to the fabric and thus are less visible and not susceptible of becoming tangled or snagged by surrounding objects. E-textiles can also more easily adapt to fast changes in the computational and sensing requirements of any specific application, this one representing a useful feature for power management and context awareness. The vision behind wearable computing foresees future electronic systems to be an integral part of our everyday outfits. Such electronic devices have to meet special requirements concerning wearability. Wearable systems will be characterized by their ability to automatically recognize the activity and the behavioral status of their own user as well as of the situation around her/him, and to use this information to adjust the systems’ configuration and functionality. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of Smart Textiles and pays particular attention to the materials and their manufacturing process. Each technique shows advantages and disadvantages and our aim is to highlight a possible trade-off between flexibility, ergonomics, low power consumption, integration and eventually autonomy.

  14. Synthesis of Novel UV Absorbers Bisindolylmethanes and Investigation of Their Applications on Cotton-Based Textile Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet Nil Ergindemir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays modified textiles, especially UV-protective, antibacterial and antimicrobial ones, have become the focus of great interest. In this study, several new UV absorbers, bis(indolylmethane derivatives, were synthesized and grafted onto polyvinyl alcohol polymer (PVA. Their application properties on cotton-based textile materials were determined; the UV protection factor values of the modified fabrics were measured (UPF; and the antibacterial features of the fabrics were tested.

  15. The Mycenaean Palace-Organised Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of the textile production in af tekstilprodutionen in Linear B archives. The administration of the textile prodution is compared to the administration of land holdings.......Investigation of the textile production in af tekstilprodutionen in Linear B archives. The administration of the textile prodution is compared to the administration of land holdings....

  16. Applying NISHIJIN historical textile technique for e-Textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Hirano, Kikuo; Sugimura, Kazushige; Adachi, Satoshi; Igarashi, Hidetsugu; Ueshima, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hideo; Nambu, Masayuki; Doi, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The e-Textile is the key technology for continuous ambient health monitoring to increase quality of life of patients with chronic diseases. The authors introduce techniques of Japanese historical textile, NISHIJIN, which illustrate almost any pattern from one continuous yarn within the machine weaving process, which is suitable for mixed flow production. Thus, NISHIJIN is suitable for e-Textile production, which requires rapid prototyping and mass production of very complicated patterns. The authors prototyped and evaluated a few vests to take twelve-lead electrocardiogram. The result tells that the prototypes obtains electrocardiogram, which is good enough for diagnosis.

  17. Textiles of the Phu Thai of Laos

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Linda Susan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis documents the hand-woven textiles that the Phu Thai ethnic group living in Savannakhet Province, Laos, produce. The various stages of textile production and the uses of textiles in Phu Thai society, especially as identity markers, are also examined. Textiles of neighboring groups are also investigated to how knowledge of textile technology, types, and aesthetics are transferred between the Phu Thai and other ethnicities, specifically the Lao and Katang. The study's field research ...

  18. Textile production in Quartier Mu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutler, Joanne Elisabeth; Andersson Strand, Eva Birgitta; Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2013-01-01

    , geographical and chronological factors.  In contrast, recent research has considered some aspects of shape as an expression of loom weight function. This new approach, which draws on experimental archaeology, has made it possible to render textile craft visible, even if the textiles themselves...... are not preserved (Mårtensson et al. 2009). It is this approach that has been adopted in the following analysis of the loom weights from Quartier Mu. The chapter divided into four parts. The first part gives an outline of general textile techniques and presents the methodology. The second part consists...

  19. Investigation of Thermo-regulating Properties of Multilayer Textile Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Baltušnikaitė

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort of a clothing system is one of the important goals of the developer that require an engineering approach. In this research work a thermo-regulating textile packages were developed and a wearing comfort of protective clothing consisting from those packages was improved. The microcapsules were added on the fabric surface using pad-dry-cure method. The thermal properties and stabilities were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. The results suggest that higher values of thermal resistance were obtained after incorporation of fabric, coated by PCMs, into inert layer of multilayer textile package. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.6920

  20. A novel textile characterisation approach using an embedded sensor system and segmented textile manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fial, Julian; Carosella, Stefan; Langheinz, Mario; Wiest, Patrick; Middendorf, Peter

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the application of sensors on carbon fibre textiles for the purpose of textile characterisation and draping process optimisation. The objective is to analyse a textile's condition during the draping operation and actively manipulate boundary conditions in order to create better preform qualities. Various realisations of textile integrated sensors are presented, focusing on the measurement of textile strain. Furthermore, a complex textile characterisation approach is presented where these sensors shall be implemented in.

  1. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-01-01

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  2. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-05-01

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath ("plasma shield") that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  3. A flexible inkjet printed inverted-F antenna on textile

    KAUST Repository

    Karimi, Muhammad Akram; Shamim, Atif

    2016-01-01

    This is an era of wearable gadgets which demands flexible and wearer friendly wireless components. This paper presents a modified inverted-F antenna (IFA) which has seamlessly been integrated with the fabric through inkjet printing. Surface roughness of the textile has been reduced using a rapid UV curable flexible interface layer. Smooth interface layer helps achieving very fine features which may be required for complicated antenna and circuit traces.

  4. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Textile Engineering Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  5. A flexible inkjet printed inverted-F antenna on textile

    KAUST Repository

    Karimi, Muhammad Akram

    2016-12-19

    This is an era of wearable gadgets which demands flexible and wearer friendly wireless components. This paper presents a modified inverted-F antenna (IFA) which has seamlessly been integrated with the fabric through inkjet printing. Surface roughness of the textile has been reduced using a rapid UV curable flexible interface layer. Smooth interface layer helps achieving very fine features which may be required for complicated antenna and circuit traces.

  6. Functional textiles in hospital interiors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe

    This PhD thesis explores the possibilities and design qualities of using functional textiles in the interior of hospital environments, and is the result of a three years collaboration between Aalborg University, Department of Civil Engineering, and VIA University College, VIA Design. The project...... that the physical environments affect the patients’ level of stress and influence their process of recovery and healing. However, although research in this field of hospital design has increased substantially in recent years, knowledge on the use of new materials and textiles in hospital interiors is still rather...... limited. Concerned with the design potentials of using textiles in hospital interiors, the purpose of the PhD project has been to explore the possibilities and design qualities of using these materials in hospital design. Relating to both technical and aesthetic aspects of using functional textiles...

  7. Flame Retardant and Antimicrobial Jute Textile Using Sodium Metasilicate Nonahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basak S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Flame retardant and antimicrobial functionalities were imparted in jute textile using sodium metasilicate nonahydrate (SMSN, commonly known as “water glass”. Sodium metasilicate nonahydrate (SMSN was applied in jute fabric in different concentration by padding method followed by drying. Flame retardancy of the fabric was evaluated by Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI and burning behaviour under vertical flammability tester including the char length. Burning rate was found to decrease by almost 10 times after an application of 2% SMSN compared to the control sample. Thermogravimetry (TG and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis of both the control and treated jute fabrics were utilized to understand the mechanism of developed flame retardance in jute fabric. It was observed that the SMSN treated samples showed excellent antimicrobial property against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Antimicrobial properties of both the control and treated jute fabrics were also measured quantitatively.

  8. Physical tools for textile creativity and invention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen; Lenau, Torben Anker

    2010-01-01

    Two textile research projects (one completed and one ongoing) are described, where physical inspirational tools are developed and tested with the aim of stimulating textile creativity and invention, i.e. the use of textile materials in new kinds of products, thus bringing textiles into new contexts....... The first research project (completed) concerns how textile designers use new responsive materials and technologies, whereas the second (ongoing) concerns how architects and design engineers can use textile materials. In both projects, the developed inspirational tool is tested through workshops...... with the mentioned stakeholders. In these workshops, new ways of disseminating the results from research in textiles and textile design are experimented with. The submitted contribution therefore mainly addresses the role of interdisciplinarity in textile design research as well as the impact of new materials...

  9. DPSC colonization of functionalized 3D textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Marine; Rosales-Ibáñez, Raúl; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; De Bien, Charlotte; Toye, Dominique; Flores, Héctor; Grandfils, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Fiber scaffolds are attractive materials for mimicking, within a 3D in vitro system, any living environment in which animal cells can adhere and proliferate. In three dimensions, cells have the ability to communicate and organize into complex architectures similar to those found in their natural environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in terms of cell reactivity, a new in vitro cell model: dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in a 3D polymeric textile. Scaffolds were knitted from polyglycolic acid (PGA) or polydioxanone (PDO) fibers differing in surface roughness. To promote cell adhesion, these hydrophobic fabrics were also functionalized with either chitosan or the peptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD). Cell behavior was examined 1, 10, and 21 days post-seeding with a LIVE/DEAD ® Kit. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) highlighted the biocompatibility of these materials (cell survival rate: 94% to 100%). Fiber roughness was found to influence cell adhesion and viability significantly and favorably. A clear benefit of polymeric textile functionalization with chitosan or RGD was demonstrated in terms of cell adhesion and viability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 785-794, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. SAVE ENERGY IN TEXTILE SMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCALIA Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and competitiveness in textile and clothing manufacturing sector must take into account the current and future energy challenges. Energy efficiency is a subject of critical importance for the Textile & Clothing industry, for other sectors and for the society in general. EURATEX has initiated Energy Made-to-Measure, an information campaign running until 2016 to empower over 300 textile & clothing companies, notably SMEs, to become more energy efficient. SET( Save Energy in Textile SMEs a collaborative project co-funded within the European Programme Intelligent Energy Europe II helps companies to understand their energy consumption and allows them to compare the sector benchmarks in different production processes. SET has developed the SET tool, Energy Saving and Efficiency Tool, a free of charge tool customized for textile manufacturers. The SET tool is made up of 4 elements: a stand-alone software (SET Tool for self-assessment based on an Excel application; an on-line part (SET tool Web for advanced benchmarking and comparison of the performances across years; a guiding document for the companies and overview of financial incentives and legal obligations regarding energy efficiency. Designed specifically for small and medium enterprises (SMEs, the SET tool enables the evaluation of energy consumption and recommends measures to reduce the consumption. Prior to modifying the company’s production processes and making investments to increase energy efficiency, textile SMEs need to get different type of information, including legal context, economic and technical peculiarities.

  11. Sustainability Performance of an Italian Textile Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Lenzo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Companies are more and more interested in the improvement of sustainability performance of products, services and processes. For this reason, appropriate and suitable assessment tools supporting the transition to a green economy are highly necessary. Currently, there are a number of methods and approaches for assessing products’ environmental impact and improving their performances; among these, the Life Cycle Thinking (LCT approach has emerged as the most comprehensive and effective to achieve sustainability goals. Indeed, the LCT approach aims to reduce the use of resources and emissions to the environment associated with a product’s life cycle. It can be used as well to improve socio-economic performance through the entire life cycle of a product. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA, Life Cycle Costing (LCC and Social Life Cycle Assessment (S-LCA are undoubtedly the most relevant methodologies to support product-related decision-making activities for the extraction and processing of raw materials, manufacturing, distribution, use, reuse, maintenance, recycling and final disposal. While LCA is an internationally standardized tool (ISO 14040 2006, LCC (except for the ISO related to the building sector and S-LCA have yet to attain international standardization (even if guidelines and general frameworks are available. The S-LCA is still in its experimental phase for many aspects of the methodological structure and practical implementation. This study presents the application of LCA and S-LCA to a textile product. The LCA and S-LCA are implemented following the ISO 14040-44:2006 and the guidelines from UNEP/SETAC (2009, respectively. The functional unit of the study is a cape knitted in a soft blend of wool and cashmere produced by a textile company located in Sicily (Italy. The system boundary of the study includes all phases from cradle-to-gate, from raw material production through fabric/accessory production to the manufacturing process of the

  12. A review on utilization of textile composites in transportation towards sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Nermin M.

    2017-10-01

    Transportation industry is rapidly developing owing to its size and importance which affects on various aspects of life. It includes all the transport means that facilitate mobility of people or goods either by air, land or sea like aircrafts, automotives, ships, trains, etc. The utilization of textiles in this industry is increasing as a result of moving towards achieving sustainability and enhancing performance, comfort and safety. Through substituting heavier materials with textiles of high performance specifications and textile reinforced composites to reduce weight, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. Composite materials can fulfil the demands for sustainability in the transportation sector through using renewable, recycled and lightweight materials, considering the requirements of each category of transport vehicles. Textiles used in reinforcing composites are diverse including fibers, yarns or fabric preforms such as woven, nonwoven, knitted, braided which varies from 2D to complex 3D structures. This paper presents a brief review on the utilization of textiles in reinforcing composites for various transportation applications to achieve sustainability. Also, discussing the influence of textiles structural parameters like fiber material properties, fabric production technique and construction on their mechanical behaviour. Focusing on researches findings in this area and highlighting some prospects for further developments domestically.

  13. Self-Folding Textiles through Manipulation of Knit Stitch Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea E. Knittel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a preliminary study on finding predictable methods of controlling the self-folding behaviors of weft knit textiles for use in the development of smart textiles and garment devices, such as those with shape memory, auxetic behavior or transformation abilities. In this work, Shima Seiki SDS-One Apex computer-aided knitting technology, Shima Seiki industrial knitting machines, and the study of paper origami tessellation patterns were used as tools to understand and predict the self-folding abilities of weft knit textiles. A wide range of self-folding weft knit structures was produced, and relationships between the angles and ratios of the knit and purl stitch types were determined. Mechanical testing was used as a means to characterize differences produced by stitch patterns, and to further understand the relationships between angles and folding abilities. By defining a formulaic method for predicting the nature of the folds that occur due to stitch architecture patterns, we can better design self-folding fabrics for smart textile applications.

  14. Current technologies for biological treatment of textile wastewater--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarayu, K; Sandhya, S

    2012-06-01

    The release of colored wastewater represents a serious environmental problem and public health concern. Color removal from textile wastewater has become a big challenge over the last decades, and up to now, there is no single and economically attractive treatment method that can effectively decolorize the wastewater. Effluents from textile manufacturing, dyeing, and finishing processes contain high concentrations of biologically difficult-to-degrade or even inert auxiliaries, chemicals like acids, waxes, fats, salts, binders, thickeners, urea, surfactants, reducing agents, etc. The various chemicals such as biocides and stain repellents used for brightening, sequestering, anticreasing, sizing, softening, and wetting of the yarn or fabric are also present in wastewater. Therefore, the textile wastewater needs environmental friendly, effective treatment process. This paper provides a critical review on the current technology available for decolorization and degradation of textile wastewater and also suggests effective and economically attractive alternatives.

  15. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  16. Micro-cable structured textile for simultaneously harvesting solar and mechanical energy

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Jun

    2016-09-12

    Developing lightweight, flexible, foldable and sustainable power sources with simple transport and storage remains a challenge and an urgent need for the advancement of next-generation wearable electronics. Here, we report a micro-cable power textile for simultaneously harvesting energy from ambient sunshine and mechanical movement. Solar cells fabricated from lightweight polymer fibres into micro cables are then woven via a shuttle-flying process with fibre-based triboelectric nanogenerators to create a smart fabric. A single layer of such fabric is 320 μm thick and can be integrated into various cloths, curtains, tents and so on. This hybrid power textile, fabricated with a size of 4 cm by 5 cm, was demonstrated to charge a 2 mF commercial capacitor up to 2 V in 1 min under ambient sunlight in the presence of mechanical excitation, such as human motion and wind blowing. The textile could continuously power an electronic watch, directly charge a cell phone and drive water splitting reactions. In light of concerns about global warming and energy crises, searching for renewable energy resources that are not detrimental to the environment is one of the most urgent challenges to the sustainable development of human civilization1,2,3. Generating electricity from natural forces provides a superior solution to alleviate expanding energy needs on a sustainable basis4,5,6,7,8,9. With the rapid advancement of modern technologies, developing lightweight, flexible, sustainable and stable power sources remains both highly desirable and a challenge10,11,12,13,14,15,16. Solar irradiance and mechanical motion are clean and renewable energy sources17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24. Fabric-based materials are most common for humans and fibre-based textiles can effectively accommodate the complex deformations induced by body motion25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32. A smart textile that generates electrical power from absorbed solar irradiance and mechanical motion could be an important

  17. La industria textil uruguaya (1900-1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Bertino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La industria textil uruguaya se inició a comienzos del siglo XX con la instalación de algunas fábricas de tejidos de lana y de una gran hilandería de lana peinada. Desde la crisis de 1929, sustentada en la protección cambiaría, se expandió en forma acelerada durante el periodo conocido como de industrialización por sustitución de importaciones. Alcanzó su apogeo entre fines de la segunda guerra mundial y comienzos de la década de los cincuenta, al instalar hilanderías de algodón y de fibras sintéticas y cuando las exportaciones industriales laneras adquirieron una importante dimensión. El progresivo agotamiento de la sustitución de importaciones, los frenos opuestos a las exportaciones, junto al estancamiento económico del país y el desmontaje de la protección estatal, la sumieron en una profunda crisis y en la pérdida creciente de significación en la industria y en la economía uruguaya.The Uruguayan textile industry started in the early xxth century based on the production of woven fabric and wool spinning mill (tops. From the years of the 1929's crisis onwards, it went through a great expansion due to a protectionist policy based on favourable exchange rates. Those were the times of the Import Substitutive Industrialization (ISI in the country. After the Second World War and, particularly, during the fifties it reached its height with the production of cotton fabrics and synthetic fibers. Meanwhile, wool exports would grow strongly. However, in the late fifties, the ISI strategy was in trouble and the obstacles for export's growth and the economic stagnation together with the removal of the protectionist's policies, put an end to the textile industry development. As a consequence, it experienced a deep crisis and lost importance both for the industry and for the economy as a whole.

  18. Evaluation of Whiteness in Linen and Semi-linen Fabrics

    OpenAIRE

    Liucina Kot; Eglė KUMPIKAITĖ; Audronė RAGAIŠIENĖ; Žaneta RUKUIŽIENĖ

    2015-01-01

    Whiteness of textiles is one of the main "white" product quality indicators described by the following parameters: lightness of a colour, colour tone (white shade), white uniformity and stability under the influence of physical factors. “White” textile products can be perceived by comparing them with a white standard (Pantone colour palette). On the other hand, the whiteness of the fabric can be estimated using the colorimeter and determining lightness of a fabric L. The purpose of a research...

  19. Textile materials trading center formally launched online

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Textile materials trading center was formally launched online in Wuxi City,Jiangsu Province. This is the first third-party electronic trading platform for spot trading in China textile materials professional market. The project will strive to build the most influential textile materials trading center of East China,the whole country and even the whole world China textile materials trading center will be

  20. Quantifying shedding of synthetic fibers from textiles; a source of microplastics released into the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney Almroth, Bethanie M; Åström, Linn; Roslund, Sofia; Petersson, Hanna; Johansson, Mats; Persson, Nils-Krister

    2018-01-01

    Microplastics in the environment are a subject of intense research as they pose a potential threat to marine organisms. Plastic fibers from textiles have been indicated as a major source of this type of contaminant, entering the oceans via wastewater and diverse non-point sources. Their presence is also documented in terrestrial samples. In this study, the amount of microfibers shedding from synthetic textiles was measured for three materials (acrylic, nylon, polyester), knit using different gauges and techniques. All textiles were found to shed, but polyester fleece fabrics shed the greatest amounts, averaging 7360 fibers/m -2 /L -1 in one wash, compared with polyester fabrics which shed 87 fibers/m -2 /L -1 . We found that loose textile constructions shed more, as did worn fabrics, and high twist yarns are to be preferred for shed reduction. Since fiber from clothing is a potentially important source of microplastics, we suggest that smarter textile construction, prewashing and vacuum exhaustion at production sites, and use of more efficient filters in household washing machines could help mitigate this problem.

  1. Polymorphous Supercapacitors Constructed from Flexible Three-Dimensional Carbon Network/Polyaniline/MnO2 Composite Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinjie; Dong, Liubing; Xu, Chengjun; Ren, Danyang; Ma, Xinpei; Kang, Feiyu

    2018-04-04

    Polymorphous supercapacitors were constructed from flexible three-dimensional carbon network/polyaniline (PANI)/MnO 2 composite textile electrodes. The flexible textile electrodes were fabricated through a layer-by-layer construction strategy: PANI, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and MnO 2 were deposited on activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) in turn through an electropolymerization process, "dipping and drying" method, and in situ chemical reaction, respectively. In the fabricated ACFC/PANI/CNTs/MnO 2 textile electrodes, the ACFC/CNT hybrid framework serves as a porous and electrically conductive 3D network for the rapid transmission of electrons and electrolyte ions, where ACFC, PANI, and MnO 2 are high-performance supercapacitor electrode materials. In the electrolyte of H 2 SO 4 solution, the textile electrode-based symmetric supercapacitor delivers superior areal capacitance, energy density, and power density of 4615 mF cm -2 (for single electrode), 157 μW h cm -2 , and 10372 μW cm -2 , respectively, whereas asymmetric supercapacitor assembled with the prepared composite textile as the positive electrode and ACFC as the negative electrode exhibits an improved energy density of 413 μW h cm -2 and a power density of 16120 μW cm -2 . On the basis of the ACFC/PANI/CNTs/MnO 2 textile electrodes, symmetric and asymmetric solid-state textile supercapacitors with a PVA/H 2 SO 4 gel electrolyte were also produced. These solid-state textile supercapacitors exhibit good electrochemical performance and high flexibility. Furthermore, flexible solid-state fiber-like supercapacitors were prepared with fiber bundle electrodes dismantled from the above composite textiles. Overall, this work makes a meaningful exploration of the versatile applications of textile electrodes to produce polymorphous supercapacitors.

  2. Emerging research trends in medical textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Gokarneshan, N; Rajendran, V; Lavanya, B; Ghoshal, Arundhathi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant researches reported during the recent years in the field of medical textiles. It also highlights the use of new types of fibres in developing medical textile products and their promising role in the respective areas of application. Considerable developments have taken place in the development of medical textiles for varied applications.

  3. Fashion: Apparel and Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kores, Nancy; Watson, Kathy

    This curriculum guide is designed to ensure student attainment of basic home economics content knowledges and skills that will provide a strong foundation for employment in the fashion industry. Competency/skill and task lists are followed by employability skills charts for the occupations of fashion coordinator and fabric coordinator; the charts…

  4. Combining 3D printed forms with textile structures - mechanical and geometrical properties of multi-material systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabantina, L; Kinzel, F; Ehrmann, A; Finsterbusch, K

    2015-01-01

    The 3D printing belongs to the rapidly emerging technologies which have the chance to revolutionize the way products are created. In the textile industry, several designers have already presented creations of shoes, dresses or other garments which could not be produced with common techniques. 3D printing, however, is still far away from being a usual process in textile and clothing production. The main challenge results from the insufficient mechanical properties, especially the low tensile strength, of pure 3D printed products, prohibiting them from replacing common technologies such as weaving or knitting. Thus, one way to the application of 3D printed forms in garments is combining them with textile fabrics, the latter ensuring the necessary tensile strength. This article reports about different approaches to combine 3D printed polymers with different textile materials and fabrics, showing chances and limits of this technique. (paper)

  5. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...... goemetry by analysing the sound pattern at a specific spot. This analysis is done theoretically with algorithmic systems and practical with waves in water. The paper describes the experiments and the findings, and explains how an analysis of sound can be catched in a textile form....

  6. Emotional Value of Applied Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2011-01-01

    The present PhD thesis is conducted as an Industrial PhD project in collaboration with the Danish company Gabriel A/S (Gabriel), which designs and produces furniture textiles and ‘related products’ for manufacturers of furniture. A ‘related textile product’ is e.g. processing of piece goods....... In chapter six I elaborate on the creation of the design game the Stakeholder Game. The purpose of the game is for the participants (different stakeholders) to develop emotional concepts for future design based on personal and professional experiences. The Stakeholder Game summarises and refines the Tripod...

  7. Modification of Textile Materials' Surface Properties Using Chemical Softener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgita KOŽENIAUSKIENĖ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the effect of technological treatment involving the processes of washing or washing and softening with chemical cationic softener "Surcase" produced in Great Britain on the surface properties of cellulosic textile materials manufactured from cotton, bamboo and viscose spun yarns was investigated. The changes in textile materials surface properties were evaluated using KTU-Griff-Tester device and FEI Quanta 200 FEG scanning electron microscope (SEM. It was observed that the worst hand properties and the higher surface roughness are observed of cotton materials if compared with those of bamboo and viscose materials. Also, it was shown that depending on the material structure the handle parameters of knitted materials are the better than the ones of woven fabrics.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.249

  8. Comparative analysis of colour change measurement devices in textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Gilewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the paper there is presented a trial of application of new measurement principle of colour change with the use of DigiEye device. Comparison of DigiEye with commonly use in the textile industry spectrophotometer Macbeth 2020 was an aim of determination of relationship between parameters of both measurement systems. Samples for the colour change assessment on both measurement systems were first aged in the Xenotest 150. Ageing process was done according to the method of blues scale. Results were obtained by the colour measurement devices before and after the ageing test each releasing the diaphragms during exposing the examined samples on the light. Result of colour change were obtained in the colour system CIE L*a*b*. The measurements were done for PES fabrics destined on the outer layers of clothing. [b]Keywords[/b]: textiles, spectrophotometer, colorimeter [b][/b

  9. Antimicrobial effect of medical textiles containing bioactive fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, A; Lopez-Gigosos, R M; Carnero-Varo, M; Fernandez-Crehuet, J

    2011-02-01

    Over the last few years, the textile industry has developed different methods for obtaining fabrics and fibres with an antimicrobial action for use in hospital environments and for other purposes. This study evaluates the antimicrobial action of Bioactive(®)-treated fabric (BTF), a commercially available textile containing silver for use in healthcare environments. Unlike other biocides used in hospital fabrics, the prolonged use of silver has not been related to the appearance of resistant bacteria or cross-resistance to antibiotics, in spite of being extensively used in some treatments. Thirty-three hospital strains of bacteria were tested. This study showed the capacity of BTF for significantly reducing the number of microorganisms present, compared with the reduction observed in control fabrics (CF). The antimicrobial action of BTF was expressed as log(10) reduction (LR) from an initial inoculum of about 10(5) colony-forming units (cfu). According to the bacterial species, an LR of between 2.6 and 5.0, and 4.1 and 5.0 (5.0 indicating total inhibition of bacterial growth) were observed, respectively, after 24 and 48 h for BTF. Acinetobacter strains were the most resistant to CF after 72 h (0.8 LR). All of the microorganisms, except two strains of Enterococcus faecalis, were totally inhibited after 72 h on BTF.

  10. Design Management in the Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore textile design activities and textile design management from an industrial network perspective. The textile industry is probably one of the most globalized manufacturing industries in the world and thus one of the most dispersed industries on the globe. Most studies...... on design management are framed inside the organisational context of the firm. In this study the role and practice of textile design is addressed in perspective of the global textile production network. The empirical data stems from six case studies exploring how different types of enterprises are organised...

  11. WEAR-A-BAN: INTERFAZ INALÁMBRICA DE CONTROL HOMBRE-MAQUINA INCORPORADO SOBRE UNA BASE TEXTIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Cambra Sanchez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wear-a-BAN is the development of a human to machine wireless interface able to register biomechanical data and transmit it to a receptor (machine to be used in a specific purpose.It is developed through a built-in system in textiles (clothes, which allows performing the process in an unobtrusive and natural way, has been the goal. The development has been focused in four specific scenarios: Smart fabrics interactive textiles, activity monitoring, rehabilitation robotics and gaming.

  12. Screen-Printed Washable Electronic Textiles as Self-Powered Touch/Gesture Tribo-Sensors for Intelligent Human-Machine Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ran; Pu, Xianjie; Du, Xinyu; Yang, Wei; Wang, Jiaona; Guo, Hengyu; Zhao, Shuyu; Yuan, Zuqing; Zhang, Chi; Li, Congju; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2018-05-22

    Multifunctional electronic textiles (E-textiles) with embedded electric circuits hold great application prospects for future wearable electronics. However, most E-textiles still have critical challenges, including air permeability, satisfactory washability, and mass fabrication. In this work, we fabricate a washable E-textile that addresses all of the concerns and shows its application as a self-powered triboelectric gesture textile for intelligent human-machine interfacing. Utilizing conductive carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and screen-printing technology, this kind of E-textile embraces high conductivity (0.2 kΩ/sq), high air permeability (88.2 mm/s), and can be manufactured on common fabric at large scales. Due to the advantage of the interaction between the CNTs and the fabrics, the electrode shows excellent stability under harsh mechanical deformation and even after being washed. Moreover, based on a single-electrode mode triboelectric nanogenerator and electrode pattern design, our E-textile exhibits highly sensitive touch/gesture sensing performance and has potential applications for human-machine interfacing.

  13. Stalled ERP at Random Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Robert; Kops, Eric; Little, Elizabeth; Gamble, George; Underbakke, Jesse; Havelka, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Andre Raymond, Executive Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Random Textiles Co. Inc. (RTC), stood in front of the podium to address his team of 70 sales consultants in Las Vegas, NV. The organization had increased market share and achieved record sales over the past three years; however, in the shadow of this success lurked an obstacle that…

  14. Textile Dry Cleaning Using Carbon Dioxide : Process, Apparatus and Mechanical Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutanto, S.

    2014-01-01

    Fabrics that are sensitive to water, may wrinkle or shrink when washed in regular washing machines and are usually cleaned by professional dry cleaners. Dry cleaning is a process of removing soils from substrate, in this case textile, using a non-aqueous solvent. The most common solvent in

  15. 76 FR 41148 - Care Labeling of Textile Wearing Apparel and Certain Piece Goods as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... definition for ``professional wetcleaning'' or permit manufacturers to label a garment that one can..., ``Textiles--Professional care, drycleaning and wetcleaning of fabrics and garments--Part 4: Procedure for... evidence concerning the degree of industry compliance with the Rule. Does this evidence indicate that the...

  16. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube−Textile Anode for High-Performance Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing; Hu, Liangbing; Pasta, Mauro; Wells, George F.; Kong, Desheng; Criddle, Craig S.; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) harness the metabolism of microorganisms, converting chemical energy into electrical energy. Anode performance is an important factor limiting the power density of MFCs for practical application. Improving the anode design is thus important for enhancing the MFC performance, but only a little development has been reported. Here, we describe a biocompatible, highly conductive, two-scale porous anode fabricated from a carbon nanotube-textile (CNT-textile) composite for high-performance MFCs. The macroscale porous structure of the intertwined CNT-textile fibers creates an open 3D space for efficient substrate transport and internal colonization by a diverse microflora, resulting in a 10-fold-larger anolyte-biofilm-anode interfacial area than the projective surface area of the CNT-textile. The conformally coated microscale porous CNT layer displays strong interaction with the microbial biofilm, facilitating electron transfer from exoelectrogens to the CNT-textile anode. An MFC equipped with a CNT-textile anode has a 10-fold-lower charge-transfer resistance and achieves considerably better performance than one equipped with a traditional carbon cloth anode: the maximum current density is 157% higher, the maximum power density is 68% higher, and the energy recovery is 141% greater. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Tailorable and Wearable Textile Devices for Solar Energy Harvesting and Simultaneous Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zhisheng; Zhang, Nannan; Sun, Peng; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Chuanxi; Fan, Hong Jin; Fan, Xing; Mai, Wenjie

    2016-10-05

    The pursuit of harmonic combination of technology and fashion intrinsically points to the development of smart garments. Herein, we present an all-solid tailorable energy textile possessing integrated function of simultaneous solar energy harvesting and storage, and we call it tailorable textile device. Our technique makes it possible to tailor the multifunctional textile into any designed shape without impairing its performance and produce stylish smart energy garments for wearable self-powering system with enhanced user experience and more room for fashion design. The "threads" (fiber electrodes) featuring tailorability and knittability can be large-scale fabricated and then woven into energy textiles. The fiber supercapacitor with merits of tailorability, ultrafast charging capability, and ultrahigh bending-resistance is used as the energy storage module, while an all-solid dye-sensitized solar cell textile is used as the solar energy harvesting module. Our textile sample can be fully charged to 1.2 V in 17 s by self-harvesting solar energy and fully discharged in 78 s at a discharge current density of 0.1 mA.

  18. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube−Textile Anode for High-Performance Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing

    2011-01-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) harness the metabolism of microorganisms, converting chemical energy into electrical energy. Anode performance is an important factor limiting the power density of MFCs for practical application. Improving the anode design is thus important for enhancing the MFC performance, but only a little development has been reported. Here, we describe a biocompatible, highly conductive, two-scale porous anode fabricated from a carbon nanotube-textile (CNT-textile) composite for high-performance MFCs. The macroscale porous structure of the intertwined CNT-textile fibers creates an open 3D space for efficient substrate transport and internal colonization by a diverse microflora, resulting in a 10-fold-larger anolyte-biofilm-anode interfacial area than the projective surface area of the CNT-textile. The conformally coated microscale porous CNT layer displays strong interaction with the microbial biofilm, facilitating electron transfer from exoelectrogens to the CNT-textile anode. An MFC equipped with a CNT-textile anode has a 10-fold-lower charge-transfer resistance and achieves considerably better performance than one equipped with a traditional carbon cloth anode: the maximum current density is 157% higher, the maximum power density is 68% higher, and the energy recovery is 141% greater. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. TEXTILE STRUCTURES FOR AERONAUTICS (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOLER Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D textile structures with better delamination resistance and damage impact tolerance to be applied in composites for structural components is one of the main goals of the aeronautical industry. Textile Research Centre in Canet de Mar has been working since 2008 in this field. Our staff has been designing, developing and producing different textile structures using different production methods and machinery to improve three-dimensional textile structures as fiber reinforcement for composites. This paper describes different tests done in our textile labs from unidirectional structures to woven, knitted or braided 3 D textile structures. Advantages and disadvantages of each textile structure are summarized. The first part of this paper deals with the introduction of our Textile Research Centre in the field of composites and carbon fiber as a main material to produce three – dimensional textile structures. The use of composite materials in aerospace structures has increased over the past decades. Our contribution related to this field consists of the development of three- dimensional textile structures and even the adaptation and improvement of machinery to do it possible. Carbon fiber provides advantages as volumetric fraction and minimum fault occurrence. However carbon fiber has also disadvantages as uncomfortable handling delamination and high cost of material and processing.

  20. STUDY OF UNCONVENTIONAL TEXTILES USED AS INSERTION FOR CLOTHES IN TERMS OF ITS DYNAMIC TENSILE STREGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OANA Dorina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Unconventional textiles are manufactured different from those obtained by the classic spinning weaving and knitting. They are obtained by mechanical or chemical consolidation of a textile backing up of fibrous layers or combinations of layers of fiber and yarn, fabrics and yarns, fabrics or knitted fabrics and fibers. For the apparel industry has expanded the use of unconventional fabrics especially in auxiliary materials they replace traditional materials such as woven tassel and buckram. Application of reinforcement layers have very important role in increasing the stability of form and material exploitation basic characteristics. Using unconventional fabrics used as insertions for clothing presents a desosibit advantage in terms of possible replacement joints bonded by heat sealed seam, thus saving time and using technology more accessible. For unconventional fabrics used as auxiliaries in the apparel industry is usually determined flexural stiffness, tensile strength, resistance to repeated stretches but more efficient in terms of proximity to the real conditions of the clothing is dynamic tensile resistance. Unconventional textile materials have a certain anisotropy in terms of the performed measurements. So, we followed the conducted research to highlight the anisotropy of several samples and characterization of best of unconventional materials in this regard, to be used under conditions effective as clothing industry.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORDS, TEXTS, CLOTHES AND TEXTILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STURZA Amalia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will speculate the possible relationships between “word,” “text,” “textile,” and “clothing”. Many of the terms we use to describe our interactions with words are derived from the common linguistic root and numerous other expressions associated with reading and writing are drawn from the rich vocabulary of cloth. Textiles are one of the most ubiquitous components of material culture and they are also integral to the material history of texts. The intersection between texts and textiles locates the relationship between language and dress, as together they structure the fashion scene over the century. We compare these texts and storytelling with the process of making clothes, they go from fibers that are spun and then create the fabric or the material out of which the clothes are made. Besides the similitude of the words “text” and “textile” that have four similar letters there is also the resemblance in the way they transmit a message. While texts are meant to transmit something to the reader, to enchant and to create emotions in so various ways, just in the same way clothes are also meant to transmit emotions and feelings to the wearer or to the people watching them.

  2. Semi-industrial production of methane from textile wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opwis, Klaus; Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Gutmann, Jochen S. [Deutsches Textilforschungszentrum Nord-West e.V., Krefeld (DE)] (and others)

    2012-12-15

    The enzymatic desizing of starch-sized cotton fabrics leads to wastewaters with an extremely high chemical oxygen demand due to its high sugar content. Nowadays, these liquors are still disposed without use, resulting in a questionable ecological pollution and high emission charges for cotton finishing manufacturers. In this paper, an innovative technology for the production of energy from textile wastewaters from cotton desizing was developed. Such desizing liquors were fermented by methane-producing microbes to biogas. For this purpose, a semi-industrial plant with a total volume of more than 500 L was developed and employed over a period of several weeks. The robust and trouble-free system produces high amounts of biogas accompanied by a significant reduction of the COD of more than 85%. With regard to growing standards and costs for wastewater treatment and disposal, the new process can be an attractive alternative for textile finishing enterprises in wastewater management, combining economic and ecological benefits. Moreover, the production of biogas from textile wastewaters can help to overcome the global energy gap within the next decades, especially with respect to the huge dimension of cotton pretreatment and, therefore, huge desizing activities worldwide.

  3. A Thermally Insulating Textile Inspired by Polar Bear Hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Gong, Huaxin; Wang, Yujie; Li, Dewen; Bai, Hao

    2018-04-01

    Animals living in the extremely cold environment, such as polar bears, have shown amazing capability to keep warm, benefiting from their hollow hairs. Mimicking such a strategy in synthetic fibers would stimulate smart textiles for efficient personal thermal management, which plays an important role in preventing heat loss and improving efficiency in house warming energy consumption. Here, a "freeze-spinning" technique is used to realize continuous and large-scale fabrication of fibers with aligned porous structure, mimicking polar bear hairs, which is difficult to achieve by other methods. A textile woven with such biomimetic fibers shows an excellent thermal insulation property as well as good breathability and wearability. In addition to passively insulating heat loss, the textile can also function as a wearable heater, when doped with electroheating materials such as carbon nanotubes, to induce fast thermal response and uniform electroheating while maintaining its soft and porous nature for comfortable wearing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Smart textiles for tactile sensing and energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgutsa, Stepan

    During my master's I have mainly worked on two subjects in the research area of electroactive smart textiles. My first project involved building a touch sensitive textile pad using original home-made all-polymer soft capacitor fibers. The capacitor fibers featuring relatively high capacitance and resistance were fabricated using fiber drawing technique. For the ease of connectorization, a thin copper wire was integrated into the fiber core during drawing procedure. Soft-capacitor fibers have a typical capacitance per unit length of 69 nF/m, and a typical resistivity parameter of 5 kΩ·m. Our measurements and theoretical modeling show that the fiber capacitance is a very stable, geometry defined parameter independent of the fiber diameter, and fiber fabrication parameters. In contrast, fiber resistivity has a very strong positive temperature coefficient, it is highly sensitive to stretching, and it is strongly dependent on the fiber drawing parameters. Next, an individual capacitor fiber was demonstrated to act as a slide sensor that allows determining the touch position along its length by measuring the fiber AC response at a single point at the fiber surface. Electrical response of such a sensor was described by the RC ladder model, with the modelling data in excellent agreement with experimental observations. Developed capacitor fibers are soft, small diameter, lightweight and do not use liquid electrolytes, thus they are ideally suited for the integration into textile products. At the end of the chapter, we have demonstrated that by weaving a one dimensional array of capacitor fibers (in parallel to each other) a fully woven 2D touchpad sensor could be build. Performance of a touchpad sensor was then characterised and the absence of the inter-channel crosstalk was confirmed. We also note that a 2D touchpad has a partial multi-touch functionality. My second project involved assembly of flexible and stretchable Li-ion batteries, their integration into a textile

  5. Analysis Of Students' Performance In Clothing And Textiles In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis Of Students' Performance In Clothing And Textiles In Colleges Of ... in Clothing and Textiles more than foods and Nutrition and Home Management. ... poor attitude of students towards clothing and Textiles, lack of enough time ...

  6. Comparison among Models to Estimate the Shielding Effectiveness Applied to Conductive Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lopez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a comparison among two models and its measurement to calculate the shielding effectiveness of electromagnetic barriers, applying it to conductive textiles. Each one, models a conductive textile as either a (1 wire mesh screen or (2 compact material. Therefore, the objective is to perform an analysis of the models in order to determine which one is a better approximation for electromagnetic shielding fabrics. In order to provide results for the comparison, the shielding effectiveness of the sample has been measured by means of the standard ASTM D4935-99.

  7. Textiles and clothing sustainability nanotextiles and sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the sustainability aspects of textiles and clothing sector in light of nanomaterials and technologies. The invasion of nano in every industrial sector has been important and has made remarkable changes as well as posed new challenges, including the textiles and clothing sector. There is quite a great deal of research happening in terms of nano materials for textiles across the globe, some of which are covered in this book. .

  8. Competitive situation of clothing and textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jansevičiūtė, Daina

    2010-01-01

    This paper is up for discussing the composed competitive situation of Lithuanian clothing and textile industry. Author concisely proposes aspects of competitive ability conception, explores the main statistical information illustrating importance of clothing and textile industry in all manufacturing and economics. Willing to accomplish a statistical data analysis of trade clothing and textile industry competitors and advantages which they have and which influence Lithuanian clothing and texti...

  9. Submicron Surface-Patterned Fibers and Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    www.statista.com/ statistics /263154/ worldwide -production-volume-of-textile-fibers- since-1975/ (accessed October 26, 2016). [2] W. S. Perkins, Textile coloration...Engineering. Submitted to 2 Presently, the worldwide annual production volume of textile fibers is nearly one hundred million metric tons... stress where viscous forces dominate and surface energy- driven deformations are kinetically restrained. A specific example of a surface-patterned

  10. Textile wastewater reuse after additional treatment by Fenton's reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marília Cleto Meirelles; Starling, Maria Clara V M; Leão, Mônica Maria Diniz; de Amorim, Camila Costa

    2017-03-01

    This study verifies textile wastewater reuse treated by the conventional activated sludge process and subjected to further treatment by advanced oxidation processes. Three alternative processes are discussed: Fenton, photo-Fenton, and UV/H 2 O 2 . Evaluation of treatments effects was based on factorial experiment design in which the response variables were the maximum removal of COD and the minimum concentration of residual H 2 O 2 in treated wastewater. Results indicated Fenton's reagent, COD/[H 2 O 2 ]/[Fe 2+ ] mass ratio of 1:2:2, as the best alternative. The selected technique was applied to real wastewater collected from a conventional treatment plant of a textile mill. The quality of the wastewater before and after the additional treatment was monitored in terms of 16 physicochemical parameters defined as suitable for the characterization of waters subjected to industrial textile use. The degradation of the wastewater was also evaluated by determining the distribution of its molecular weight along with the organic matter fractionation by ultrafiltration, measured in terms of COD. Finally, a sample of the wastewater after additional treatment was tested for reuse at pilot scale in order to evaluate the impact on the quality of dyed fabrics. Results show partial compliance of treated wastewater with the physicochemical quality guidelines for reuse. Removal and conversion of high and medium molecular weight substances into low molecular weight substances was observed, as well as the degradation of most of the organic matter originally present in the wastewater. Reuse tests indicated positive results, confirming the applicability of wastewater reuse after the suggested additional treatment. Graphical abstract Textile wastewater samples after additional treatment by Fenton's reagent, photo-Fenton and H 2 O 2 /UV tested in different conditions.

  11. Hybrid functional microfibers for textile electronics and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda Sahoo, Bichitra; Choi, Byungwoo; Seo, Jungmok; Lee, Taeyoon

    2018-01-01

    Fibers are low-cost substrates that are abundantly used in our daily lives. This review highlights recent advances in the fabrication and application of multifunctional fibers to achieve fibers with unique functions for specific applications ranging from textile electronics to biomedical applications. By incorporating various nanomaterials such as carbon nanomaterials, metallic nanomaterials, and hydrogel-based biomaterials, the functions of fibers can be precisely engineered. This review also highlights the performance of the functional fibers and electronic materials incorporated with textiles and demonstrates their practical application in pressure/tensile sensors, chemical/biosensors, and drug delivery. Textile technologies in which fibers containing biological factors and cells are formed and assembled into constructions with biomimetic properties have attracted substantial attention in the field of tissue engineering. We also discuss the current limitations of functional textile-based devices and their prospects for use in various future applications. Project supported by the Priority Research Centers Program (No. 2012-0006689) through the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST) and the R&D program of MOTIE/KEIT [10064081, Development of fiber-based flexible multimodal pressure sensor and algorithm for gesture/posture-recognizable wearable devices]. We gratefully acknowledge partial support from the National Research Foundation of Korea (No. NRF-2017K2A9A2A06013377, NRF-2017M3A7B4049466) and the Yonsei University Future-leading Research Initiative and Implantable artificial electronic skin for an ubiquitous healthcare system of 2016-12-0050. This work is also supported by KIST Project (Nos. 2E26900, 2E27630). Dr. Seo was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (No. 2016R1A6A3A03006491).

  12. New design of textile light diffusers for photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochrane, Cédric; Mordon, Serge R.; Lesage, Jean Claude; Koncar, Vladan

    2013-01-01

    A homogeneous and reproducible fluence delivery rate during clinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) plays a determinant role in preventing under- or overtreatment. PDT applied in dermatology has been carried out with a wide variety of light sources delivering a broad range of more or less adapted light doses. Due to the complexities of the human anatomy, these light sources do not in fact deliver a uniform light distribution to the skin. Therefore, the development of flexible light sources would considerably improve the homogeneity of light delivery. The integration of plastic optical fiber (POF) into textile structures could offer an interesting alternative. In this article, a textile light diffuser (TLD) has been developed using POF and Polyester yarns. Predetermined POF macrobending leads to side emission of light when the critical angle is exceeded. Therefore, a specific pattern based on different satin weaves has been developed in order to improve light emission homogeneity and to correct the decrease of side emitted radiation intensity along POF. The prototyped fabrics (approximately 100 cm 2 : 5 × 20 cm) were woven using a hand loom, then both ends of the POF were coupled to a laser diode (5 W, 635 nm). The fluence rate (mW/cm 2 ) and the homogeneity of light delivery by the TLD were evaluated. Temperature evolution, as a function of time, was controlled with an infrared thermographic camera. When using a power source of 5 W, the fluence rate of the TLD was 18 ± 2.5 mw/cm 2 . Due to the high efficiency of the TLD, the optical losses were very low. The TLD temperature elevation was 0.6 °C after 10 min of illumination. Our TLD meets the basic requirements for PDT: homogeneous light distribution and flexibility. It also proves that large (500 cm 2 ) textile light diffusers adapted to skin, but also to peritoneal or pleural cavity, PDTs can be easily produced by textile manufacturing processes

  13. Development of 2D and 3D structured textile batteries processing conductive material with Tailored Fiber Placement (TFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, M.; Grethe, T.; Zöll, K.; Ehrmann, A.; Schwarz-Pfeiffer, A.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years smart textiles have gained a significant increase of attention. Electrotherapeutic socks, light emitting dresses or shirts with integrated sensors, having the ability to process data of vital parameters, are just a few examples and the full potential is not yet exhausted: Smart textiles are not only used for clothing purposes. Sensors for the care of the elderly, light applications for home textiles and monitoring systems in the automotive section are promising fields for the future. For all these electrical and electronic features, the supply of power is needed. The most common used power supplies, however, are not flexible, often not lightweight and therefore a huge problem for the integration into textile products. In recent projects, textile-based batteries are being developed. Metal-coated fabrics and yarns (e.g. silver, copper, nickel, zinc) as well as carbon based materials were used to create textile based energy sources. This article gives an overview of textile based electrochemical cells by combining different conductive yarns and a gel-electrolyte. The available materials will be processed by embroidering utilizing tailored fiber placement (TFP). The electrical characteristics of different embroidered patterns and material combinations are examined.

  14. THE COMPETITIVENESS OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRUNEA ANA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of this paper is to highlight the position of the European players in the textile market and the challenges to which they are subjected. In this paper are presented ways, taking the „diamond" model of M. Porter and are adapted to the situation of the textile market. These adaptations have outlined the main existing problems and the possible solutions that can ensure the long-term competitive advantage. Gaining a competitive advantage based on innovation, the development of production and outsourcing strategies using the "diamond" model of M. Porter, we can say that is one of the viable solutions for gaining competitive advantages necessary for proper European companies to face competition from countries outside Europe. As developing countries do not meet certain environmental standards or norms of European law, but in terms of product innovation and development of new materials, they do not have the necessity for technology. We conducted an analysis of the factors that play a key role in the production of textiles, representing how they are used in the favor of European companies such investments to be supplemented can be found in how these factors act on the total costs.

  15. ShapeTex : Implementing shape-changing structures in fabric for wearable actuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Jiachun; Markopoulos, Panos; Wang, Qi; Toeters, Marina; Gong, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Research in smart textiles and garments has mostly focused on integrating sensing technology. In order to make garments that are truly interactive it is also essential to develop technologies for actuating smart garments and textiles. This paper introduces ShapeTex, a thermal shape changing fabric

  16. STAGE OF TEXTILE RECYCLE WASTE IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRIPA Simona

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this article is to examine the stage of textile recycle waste in Romania. For this purpose were analyzed the main sources of textile waste from Romania (industry of manufacture of textiles, wearing apparel, leather and related products, imports of textiles, clothing and footwear and imports of second hand clothing and also evolution of the quantity of textile waste in Romania. The benefits (economic and environmental of the collection and recycling of waste and the legislation on the waste management, have determined the diversification and increasing the number and the capacity of recovery and disposal of waste in Romania. We found the most textile waste in Romania was deposited in deposits onto or into land, in the proportion of 18.51%. This proportion is under the EU average of 34.03%, but is much higher than in other European country. Also, has been an increase in the number of incinerators, in the last years. With all of this, the interest in textile waste management in Romania is far from being to the level of European, where are associations who dealing with the collection and recycling of textiles and is achieved a selective collection of textile waste in the points especially designed for this thing. The information for this paper was gathered from literature, from the EUROSTAT database and INSSE database analysis and by Internet.

  17. Light Conversion and Scattering in UV Protective Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grancarić Ana Marija

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause of skin cancer is believed to be a long exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R crossed with the amount of skin pigmentation in the population. It is believed that in childhood and adolescence 80% of UV-R gets absorbed, whilst in the remaining 20% gets absorbed later in the lifetime. This suggests that proper and early photoprotection may reduce the risk of subsequent occurrence of skin cancer. Textile and clothing are the most suitable interface between environment and human body. It can show UV protection, but in most cases it does not provide full sun screening properties. UV protection ability highly depends on large number of factors such as type of fibre, fabric surface and construction, type and concentration of dyestuff, fluorescent whitening agent (FWA, UV-B protective agents, as well as nanoparticles, if applied. Based on electronically excited state by energy of UV-R (usually 340-370 nm, the molecules of FWAs show the phenomenon of fluorescence giving to white textiles high whiteness of outstanding brightness by reemitting the energy at the blue region (typically 420-470 nm of the spectrum. By absorbing UV-A radiation, optical brightened fabrics transform this radiation into blue fluorescence, which leads to better UV protection. Natural zeolites are rock-forming, microporous silicate minerals. Applied as nanoparticles to textile surface, it scatters the UV-R resulting in lower UV-A and UV-B transmission. If applied with other UV absorbing agents, e.g. FWAs, synergistic effect occurs. Silicones are inert, synthetic compounds with a variety of forms and uses. It provides a unique soft touch, is very resistant to washing and improves the property of fabric to protect against UV radiation. Therefore, the UV protective properties of cotton fabric achieved by light conversion and scattering was researched in this paper. For that purpose, the stilbene-derived FWAs were applied on cotton fabric in wide concentration

  18. Ag nanoparticle–ZnO nanowire hybrid nanostructures as enhanced and robust antimicrobial textiles via a green chemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhou; Yuan, Weiwei; Song, Wei; Niu, Yongshan; Yan, Ling; Yu, Min; Dai, Ming; Feng, Siyu; Wang, Menghang; Fan, Yubo; Tang, Haoying; Liu, Tengjiao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for fabrication of a long-term and recoverable antimicrobial nanostructure/textile hybrid without increasing the antimicrobial resistance is demonstrated. Using in situ synthesized Ag nanoparticles (NPs) anchored on ZnO nanowires (NWs) grown on textiles by a ‘dip-in and light-irradiation’ green chemical method, we obtained ZnONW@AgNP nanocomposites with small-size and uniform Ag NPs, which have shown superior performance for antibacterial applications. These new Ag/ZnO/textile antimicrobial composites can be used for wound dressings and medical textiles for topical and prophylactic antibacterial treatments, point-of-use water treatment to improve the cleanliness of water and antimicrobial air filters to prevent bioaerosols accumulating in ventilation, heating, and air-conditioning systems. (paper)

  19. Morphological changes in textile fibres exposed to environmental stresses: atomic force microscopic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Montiel, Kimberley; Adya, Ashok K

    2009-10-30

    The ability of the atomic force microscope (AFM) to investigate the nanoscopic morphological changes in the surfaces of fabrics was examined for the first time. This study focussed on two natural (cotton and wool), and a regenerated cellulose (viscose) textile fibres exposed to various environmental stresses for different lengths of times. Analyses of the AFM images allowed us to measure quantitatively the surface texture parameters of the environmentally stressed fabrics as a function of the exposure time. It was also possible to visualise at the nanoscale the finest details of the surfaces of three weathered fabrics and clearly distinguish between the detrimental effects of the imposed environmental conditions. This study confirmed that the AFM could become a very powerful tool in forensic examination of textile fibres to provide significant fibre evidence due to its capability of distinguishing between different environmental exposures or forced damages to fibres.

  20. Fully Textile, PEDOT:PSS Based Electrodes for Wearable ECG Monitoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Danilo; Dessi, Alessia; Saenz-Cogollo, Jose F; Barabino, Gianluca; Fraboni, Beatrice; Bonfiglio, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate a novel kind of textile electrodes based on woven fabrics treated with PSS, through an easy fabrication process, testing these electrodes for biopotential recordings. Fabrication is based on raw fabric soaking in PSS using a second dopant, squeezing and annealing. The electrodes have been tested on human volunteers, in terms of both skin contact impedance and quality of the ECG signals recorded at rest and during physical activity (power spectral density, baseline wandering, QRS detectability, and broadband noise). The electrodes are able to operate in both wet and dry conditions. Dry electrodes are more prone to noise artifacts, especially during physical exercise and mainly due to the unstable contact between the electrode and the skin. Wet (saline) electrodes present a stable and reproducible behavior, which is comparable or better than that of traditional disposable gelled Ag/AgCl electrodes. The achieved results reveal the capability of this kind of electrodes to work without the electrolyte, providing a valuable interface with the skin, due to mixed electronic and ionic conductivity of PSS. These electrodes can be effectively used for acquiring ECG signals. Textile electrodes based on PSS represent an important milestone in wearable monitoring, as they present an easy and reproducible fabrication process, very good performance in wet and dry (at rest) conditions and a superior level of comfort with respect to textile electrodes proposed so far. This paves the way to their integration into smart garments.

  1. A novel approach for the reuse of the textile bleaching wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency of used hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) bleach bath was assessed for the elimination of hydrolyzed unfixed reactive dyes from cellulosic fabrics. The aim of this study was to reuse textile wastewater and develop a new textile dyeing and wash-off method with small quantities of water and chemicals, without compromising quality of dyeing. For this purpose, spent bleach bath having H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was collected from a textile industry and used in wash-off step of fabric after dyeing with reactive dyes to determine colour fastness properties and shade strength of selected reactive dyes. Five dyeings were carried out, using C. I. Reactive Yellow 138, C. I. Reactive Orange 122, C. I. Reactive Red 195, C. I. Reactive Blue 221, and C. I. Reactive Black 5 and dyed samples were passed through both conventional wash-off and new wash-off method containing spent bleach bath. Washing fastness, rubbing fastness, change of colour, and magnitude of total colour difference ( E*) values of both washed-off fabrics were compared. The colourfastness properties and final shade of fabrics washed-off with spent bleach were found to be comparable to those washed-off conventionally. This study concludes that spent bleach bath containing H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is a potential nominee for the removal of hydrolyzed reactive dyes from cotton fabrics. (author)

  2. Machine-Washable PEDOT:PSS Dyed Silk Yarns for Electronic Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jason D; Mengistie, Desalegn Alemu; Gabrielsson, Roger; Lund, Anja; Müller, Christian

    2017-03-15

    Durable, electrically conducting yarns are a critical component of electronic textiles (e-textiles). Here, such yarns with exceptional wear and wash resistance are realized through dyeing silk from the silkworm Bombyx mori with the conjugated polymer:polyelectrolyte complex PEDOT:PSS. A high Young's modulus of approximately 2 GPa combined with a robust and scalable dyeing process results in up to 40 m long yarns that maintain their bulk electrical conductivity of approximately 14 S cm -1 when experiencing repeated bending stress as well as mechanical wear during sewing. Moreover, a high degree of ambient stability is paired with the ability to withstand both machine washing and dry cleaning. For the potential use for e-textile applications to be illustrated, an in-plane thermoelectric module that comprises 26 p-type legs is demonstrated by embroidery of dyed silk yarns onto a piece of felted wool fabric.

  3. E-Textile Embroidered Metamaterial Transmission Line for Signal Propagation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Moradi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the utilization of common fabrics for the manufacturing of e-textile metamaterial transmission lines is investigated. In order to filter and control the signal propagation in the ultra-high frequency (UHF range along the e-textile, a conventional metamaterial transmission line was compared with embroidered metamaterial particles. The proposed design was based on a transmission line loaded with one or several split-ring resonators (SRR on a felt substrate. To explore the relations between physical parameters and filter performance characteristics, theoretical models based on transmission matrices’ description of the filter constituent components were proposed. Excellent agreement between theoretical prediction, electromagnetic simulations, and measurement were found. Experimental results showed stop-band levels higher than −30 dB for compact embroidered metamaterial e-textiles. The validated results confirmed embroidery as a useful technique to obtain customized electromagnetic properties, such as filtering, on wearable applications.

  4. E-Textile Embroidered Metamaterial Transmission Line for Signal Propagation Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bahareh; Fernández-García, Raul; Gil, Ignacio

    2018-06-05

    In this paper, the utilization of common fabrics for the manufacturing of e-textile metamaterial transmission lines is investigated. In order to filter and control the signal propagation in the ultra-high frequency (UHF) range along the e-textile, a conventional metamaterial transmission line was compared with embroidered metamaterial particles. The proposed design was based on a transmission line loaded with one or several split-ring resonators (SRR) on a felt substrate. To explore the relations between physical parameters and filter performance characteristics, theoretical models based on transmission matrices' description of the filter constituent components were proposed. Excellent agreement between theoretical prediction, electromagnetic simulations, and measurement were found. Experimental results showed stop-band levels higher than -30 dB for compact embroidered metamaterial e-textiles. The validated results confirmed embroidery as a useful technique to obtain customized electromagnetic properties, such as filtering, on wearable applications.

  5. Ultraflexible and robust graphene supercapacitors printed on textiles for wearable electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Amr M.; Karim, Nazmul; Vallés, Cristina; Afroj, Shaila; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Yeates, Stephen G.

    2017-09-01

    Printed graphene supercapacitors have the potential to empower tomorrow’s wearable electronics. We report a solid-state flexible supercapacitor device printed on textiles using graphene oxide ink and a screen-printing technique. After printing, graphene oxide was reduced in situ via a rapid electrochemical method avoiding the use of any reducing reagents that may damage the textile substrates. The printed electrodes exhibited excellent mechanical stability due to the strong interaction between the ink and textile substrate. The unique hierarchical porous structure of the electrodes facilitated ionic diffusion and maximised the surface area available for the electrolyte/active material interface. The obtained device showed outstanding cyclic stability over 10 000 cycles and maintained excellent mechanical flexibility, which is necessary for wearable applications. The simple printing technique is readily scalable and avoids the problems associated with fabricating supercapacitor devices made of conductive yarn, as previously reported in the literature.

  6. Performance Study of Screen-Printed Textile Antennas after Repeated Washing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazani I.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The stability of wearable textile antennas after 20 reference washing cycles was evaluated by measuring the reflection coefficient of different antenna prototypes. The prototypes’ conductive parts were screen-printed on several textile substrates using two different silver-based conductive inks. The necessity of coating the antennas with a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU coating was investigated by comparing coated with uncoated antennas. It is shown that covering the antennas with the TPU layer not only protects the screen-printed conductive area but also prevents delamination of the multilayered textile fabric substrates, making the antennas washable for up to 20 cycles. Furthermore, it is proven that coating is not necessary for maintaining antenna operation and this up to 20 washing cycles. However, connector detachment caused by friction during the washing process was the main problem of antenna performance degradation. Hence, other flexible, durable methods should be developed for establishing a stable electrical connection.

  7. Comfort Characterization of Various Fabrics for Extremity Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    of Fabric Mechanical Properties on Drape. Textile Research Journal 1998, 68 (1), 57–64 20. Nilakantan, G.; Keefe , M.; Bogetti, T. A.; Gillespie, J. W...10), 1056–1071. 21. Keefe , M.; Wetzel, E. D. Modeling and Simulation of Fabric-Human Interactions. Proceedings of TexComp-11 Conference, Leuven

  8. Definition of the generalized criterion of estimation of ecological purity of textile products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gintibidze, N.; Valishvili, T.

    2009-01-01

    One of actual problems is the estimation of hygienic and ecological properties of fabrics on the basis of the data on the properties of initial fiber. In the present article, the definition of generalized criterion of the estimation of ecological purity of textile products is discussed. The estimation is based on the International Standard EKO-TEX-100, regulating the contents of inorganic and organic compounds in textile production. The determination of all listed substances is made according to appropriate techniques for each parameter. The quantity of substances is determined and compared with norms. The judgement about ecological purity is made by separate parameters. There is no uniform parameter which could estimate the degree of ecological purity of textile products. For calculating the generalized criterion of estimation of ecological purity of textile products, it is offered to estimate each criterion by the points corresponding to each factor. The textile product is recognized as ecologically pure (environment friendly) if the total estimate is more than 1. (author)

  9. Printing Smart Designs of Light Emitting Devices with Maintained Textile Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Verboven

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To maintain typical textile properties, smart designs of light emitting devices are printed directly onto textile substrates. A first approach shows improved designs for alternating current powder electroluminescence (ACPEL devices. A configuration with the following build-up, starting from the textile substrate, was applied using the screen printing technique: silver (10 µm/barium titanate (10 µm/zinc-oxide (10 µm and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophenepoly(styrenesulfonate (10 µm. Textile properties such as flexibility, drapability and air permeability are preserved by implementing a pixel-like design of the printed layers. Another route is the application of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs fabricated out of following layers, also starting from the textile substrate: polyurethane or acrylate (10–20 µm as smoothing layer/silver (200 nm/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophenepoly(styrenesulfonate (35 nm/super yellow (80 nm/calcium/aluminum (12/17 nm. Their very thin nm-range layer thickness, preserving the flexibility and drapability of the substrate, and their low working voltage, makes these devices the possible future in light-emitting wearables.

  10. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, A.G.; Yushkov, G.Yu.; Oks, E.M.; Oztarhan, A.; Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E.S.; Brown, I.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion implantation. • Anti-bacterial properties. • Textile polymer. • Vacuum arc ion source. - Abstract: Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal–gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the “inverse” concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of 1,3-butadiene for hydrophobic finishing of textile substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Kartick K; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of textile has both ecological and economical advantages over the wet-chemical processing. However, reaction in atmospheric pressure plasma has important challenges to be overcome before it can be successfully used for finishing applications in textile. These challenges are (i) generating stable glow plasma in presence liquid/gaseous monomer, and (ii) keeping the generated radicals active in the presence of contaminants such as oxygen and air. In this study, a stable glow plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure in the mixture of gaseous reactive monomer-1,3-butadiene and He and was made to react with cellulosic textile substrate. After 12 min of plasma treatment, the hydrophilic surface of the cellulosic substrate turned into highly hydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic finish was found to be durable to soap washing. After soap washing, a water drop of 37 μl took around 250 s to get absorbed in the treated sample compared to 0 . Both top and bottom sides of the fabric showed similar hydrophobic results in terms of water absorbency and contact angle. The results may be attributed to chemical reaction of butadiene with the cellulosic textile substrate. The surface characterization of the plasma modified samples under SEM and AFM revealed modification of the surface under <100 nm. The results showed that atmospheric pressure plasma can be successfully used for carrying out reaction of 1,3-butadiene with cellulosic textile substrates for producing hydrophobic surface finish.

  12. Printing Smart Designs of Light Emitting Devices with Maintained Textile Properties †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboven, Inge; Stryckers, Jeroen; Mecnika, Viktorija; Vandevenne, Glen; Jose, Manoj

    2018-01-01

    To maintain typical textile properties, smart designs of light emitting devices are printed directly onto textile substrates. A first approach shows improved designs for alternating current powder electroluminescence (ACPEL) devices. A configuration with the following build-up, starting from the textile substrate, was applied using the screen printing technique: silver (10 µm)/barium titanate (10 µm)/zinc-oxide (10 µm) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)poly(styrenesulfonate) (10 µm). Textile properties such as flexibility, drapability and air permeability are preserved by implementing a pixel-like design of the printed layers. Another route is the application of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) fabricated out of following layers, also starting from the textile substrate: polyurethane or acrylate (10–20 µm) as smoothing layer/silver (200 nm)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)poly(styrenesulfonate) (35 nm)/super yellow (80 nm)/calcium/aluminum (12/17 nm). Their very thin nm-range layer thickness, preserving the flexibility and drapability of the substrate, and their low working voltage, makes these devices the possible future in light-emitting wearables. PMID:29438276

  13. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A.G., E-mail: nik@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Yushkov, G.Yu.; Oks, E.M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oztarhan, A. [Izmir University, Izmir 35140 (Turkey); Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E.S. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey); Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94708 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Ion implantation. • Anti-bacterial properties. • Textile polymer. • Vacuum arc ion source. - Abstract: Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal–gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the “inverse” concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  14. New Research on Bronze Age Textile Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Eva Birgitta; Mårtensson, Linda; Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2008-01-01

    presentation of the results from the systematic tests with Bronze Age textile tools. results concerning mesurements of lenght and time consumed.......presentation of the results from the systematic tests with Bronze Age textile tools. results concerning mesurements of lenght and time consumed....

  15. Multi-Layer E-Textile Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lucy E.; Bibeau, Kaila; Mulligan, Lucie; Frith, Ashton; Simon, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Stitched e-textile circuits facilitate wearable, flexible, comfortable wearable technology. However, while stitched methods of e-textile circuits are common, multi-layer circuit creation remains a challenge. Here, we present methods of stitched multi-layer circuit creation using accessible tools and techniques.

  16. Textiles and clothing sustainability sustainable technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book to deal with the innovative technologies in the field of textiles and clothing sustainability. It details a number of sustainable and innovative technologies and highlights their implications in the clothing sector. There are currently various measures to achieve sustainability in the textiles and the clothing industry, including innovations in the manufacturing stage, which is the crux of this book.

  17. The Organization of the Mycenaean Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    Analysis of thewritten documentation for the organiztion of the Mycenaean textile industri at Pylos, Knossos, Mycenae and Thebes......Analysis of thewritten documentation for the organiztion of the Mycenaean textile industri at Pylos, Knossos, Mycenae and Thebes...

  18. Microbial degradation of textile industrial effluents | Palamthodi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Textile waste water is a highly variable mixture of many polluting substance ranging from inorganic compounds and elements to polymers and organic products. To ensure the safety of effluents, proper technologies need to be used for the complete degradation of dyes. Traditionally, treatments of textile waste water involve ...

  19. Physical Tools for Creativity with Textile Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks to develop a better understanding of how physical objects can stimulate creativity, studying the case of textile material samples employed to inspire textile designers to use new responsive materials and technologies in their designs. I show: 1) how physical objects can act both...

  20. Investigation of Flexible Textile Antennas and AMC Reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mantash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two different methods for fabric characterization are presented: a single frequency method and a broadband method. Felt and denim fabrics are characterized, and patch antennas are designed using these substrates to test both methods. Prototypes of the antennas on felt and denim are manufactured using conductive textile (called electrotextile aiming to obtain fully flexible antennas. The prototypes are characterized in anechoic chamber to be compared and obtain conclusions related to the characterization methods. A new dual-band hexagonal AMC reflector combinable with antennas is also proposed to improve their performance and reduce the backward radiation to the human body. A novel broadband CPW-fed monopole antenna is designed to be combined with the AMC. The resulted prototype is characterized and compared with the performance of the CPW-fed antenna alone.

  1. Flexible fiber batteries for applications in smart textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim; Semenikhin, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate flexible fiber-based Al–NaOCl galvanic cells fabricated using fiber drawing process. Aluminum and copper wires are used as electrodes, and they are introduced into the fiber structure during drawing of the low-density polyethylene microstructured jacket. NaOCl solution is used as electrolyte, and it is introduced into the battery after the drawing process. The capacity of a 1 m long fiber battery is measured to be ∼10 mAh. We also detail assembly and optimization of the electrical circuitry in the energy-storing fiber battery textiles. Several examples of their applications are presented including lighting up an LED, driving a wireless mouse and actuating a screen with an integrated shape-memory nitinol wire. The principal advantages of the presented fiber batteries include: ease of fabrication, high flexibility, simple electrochemistry and use of widely available materials in the battery design. (paper)

  2. Modelo de autoavaliação para suporte à gestão organizacional: experimentação em indústria do segmento de malharia Model of self-evaluation to support organizational performance: experiment performed in knitted fabric textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alvim de Rezende Vilas Boas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta um modelo para suporte à gestão organizacional com foco em autoavaliação fundamentado nos critérios dos principais prêmios de excelência em gestão internacionais e do Brasil. Esta proposta teve por finalidade permitir avaliações personalizadas de desempenho do sistema de gestão e da importância para a organização das práticas de excelência em gestão preconizadas por tais prêmios. O método de pesquisa constituiu-se em fundamentação teórica, análise comparativa de três dos principais prêmios de excelência em gestão internacionais e do Brasil e experimentação do modelo proposto em uma indústria do segmento de malharia. A aplicação do modelo proposto possibilitou uma avaliação personalizada do desempenho do sistema de gestão da organização objeto de estudo e, também, da importância atribuída às práticas de excelência em gestão abordadas nos critérios. O contraste entre desempenho e importância permitiu a identificação de pontos organizacionais prioritários de melhoria da organização.This project aims to present a sample to support organizational management focusing on self-evaluation based on the criteria of the most important international and national excellence awards in management. The objective of the sample was to allow for customized evaluations of performance regarding the management system as well as evaluations of the importance of management excellence practices to the company preconized by those awards. The research methodology was based on a theoretical foundation, comparative analysis of the three main Excellence Awards in Management in Brazil, and on the experiment of the sample proposed in a knitted fabric textile industry. The sample proposed has allowed for a customized performance evaluation of the management system of the company used as the object of study, and the importance of the management excellence practices involved in the criteria. The contrast

  3. Modelo de autoavaliação para suporte à gestão organizacional: experimentação em indústria do segmento de malharia Model of self-evaluation to support organizational performance: experiment performed in knitted fabric textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alvim de Rezende Vilas Boas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta um modelo para suporte à gestão organizacional com foco em autoavaliação fundamentado nos critérios dos principais prêmios de excelência em gestão internacionais e do Brasil. Esta proposta teve por finalidade permitir avaliações personalizadas de desempenho do sistema de gestão e da importância para a organização das práticas de excelência em gestão preconizadas por tais prêmios. O método de pesquisa constituiu-se em fundamentação teórica, análise comparativa de três dos principais prêmios de excelência em gestão internacionais e do Brasil e experimentação do modelo proposto em uma indústria do segmento de malharia. A aplicação do modelo proposto possibilitou uma avaliação personalizada do desempenho do sistema de gestão da organização objeto de estudo e, também, da importância atribuída às práticas de excelência em gestão abordadas nos critérios. O contraste entre desempenho e importância permitiu a identificação de pontos organizacionais prioritários de melhoria da organização.This project aims to present a sample to support organizational management focusing on self-evaluation based on the criteria of the most important international and national excellence awards in management. The objective of the sample was to allow for customized evaluations of performance regarding the management system as well as evaluations of the importance of management excellence practices to the company preconized by those awards. The research methodology was based on a theoretical foundation, comparative analysis of the three main Excellence Awards in Management in Brazil, and on the experiment of the sample proposed in a knitted fabric textile industry. The sample proposed has allowed for a customized performance evaluation of the management system of the company used as the object of study, and the importance of the management excellence practices involved in the criteria. The contrast

  4. Use of textiles in atopic dermatitis: care of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Patrizi, A; Bellini, F; Medri, M

    2006-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease which usually starts during the first years of life. In the management of AD, the correct approach requires a combination of multiple treatments to identify and eliminate trigger factors, and to improve the alteration of the skin barrier. In this article we try to explain the importance of skin care in the management of AD in relation to the use of textiles: they may be useful to improve disrupted skin but they are also a possible cause of triggering or worsening the lesions. Garments are in direct contact with the skin all day long, and for this reason it is important to carefully choose suitable fabrics in atopic subjects who have disrupted skin. Owing to their hygienic properties fabrics produced from natural fibres are preferential. Wool fibres are frequently used in human clothes but are irritant in direct contact with the skin. Wool fibre has frequently been shown to be irritant to the skin of atopic patients, and for this reason wool intolerance was included as a minor criterion in the diagnostic criteria of AD by Hanifin and Rajka in 1980. Cotton is the most commonly used textile for patients with AD; it has wide acceptability as clothing material because of its natural abundance and inherent properties like good folding endurance, better conduction of heat, easy dyeability and excellent moisture absorption. Silk fabrics help to maintain the body temperature by reducing the excessive sweating and moisture loss that can worsen xerosis. However, the type of silk fabric generally used for clothes is not particularly useful in the care and dressing of children with AD since it reduces transpiration and may cause discomfort when in direct contact with the skin. A new type of silk fabric made of transpiring and slightly elastic woven silk is now commercially available (Microair Dermasilk) and may be used for the skin care of children with AD. The presence of increased bacterial colonization

  5. Self-powered textile for wearable electronics by hybridizing fiber-shaped nanogenerators, solar cells, and supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Zi, Yunlong; Xu, Weidong; Deng, Jianan; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Xin; Hu, Chenguo; Zhu, Liping; Sun, Xuhui; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-10-01

    Wearable electronics fabricated on lightweight and flexible substrate are believed to have great potential for portable devices, but their applications are limited by the life span of their batteries. We propose a hybridized self-charging power textile system with the aim of simultaneously collecting outdoor sunshine and random body motion energies and then storing them in an energy storage unit. Both of the harvested energies can be easily converted into electricity by using fiber-shaped dye-sensitized solar cells (for solar energy) and fiber-shaped triboelectric nanogenerators (for random body motion energy) and then further stored as chemical energy in fiber-shaped supercapacitors. Because of the all-fiber-shaped structure of the entire system, our proposed hybridized self-charging textile system can be easily woven into electronic textiles to fabricate smart clothes to sustainably operate mobile or wearable electronics.

  6. Electrostatic Properties and Characterization of Textile Materials Affected by Ion Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranas Juozas ŽILINSKAS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the opportunities of wider characterization of textile materials, fabrics, upholstery fabrics, fibers, yarns or others, which may accumulate electric charge. A non-contact way for electrostatic properties measurement based on affecting those materials by ions with positive or negative charge is described. The method allows to measure simultaneously the time dependences of the surface voltage and the electric charge during the charging process and the time dependences of the surface voltage during the discharging process. From the measured dependencies the following set of parameters was measured or calculated: the surface voltage limiting value, the surface voltage semi-decay time, the maximum deposited charge, the layer capacitance, the energy of the accumulated charge and others. The surface voltage distribution measurement method when the investigated textile material is affected by ion flux was also described. To verify the applicability of the proposed methods for characterization of textile materials in order to determine the above-mentioned parameters of cotton, linen, wool, viscose, acetate, polyester, polyester coated with polytetrafluoroethylene, a series of experiments were performed. The surface voltage distribution measurement method based on affecting textile materials by ions with positive charge was described and a surface voltage distribution of a polyester-cotton upholstery fabric produced by a Jacquard mechanism was presented. The performed experiments demonstrate the possibilities of method application for comparison of the electrostatic properties of different textile materials used for the same tasks or the same materials produced by different technological processes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3828

  7. A new method of application of hydrated salts on textiles to achieve thermoregulating properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazemi, Zeinab; Mortazavi, Sayed Majid

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • No need to microencapsulate the salt. • New method Glauber's salt dehydration. • Supercooling decreased, heat storage increased. - Abstract: Recently there has been a lot of attention to fibers and fabrics with thermoregulatory effects. We can acquire this quality using Phase Change Materials (PCM). In this investigation a simple method was used to keep Na 2 SO 4 ·10H 2 O as an inorganic PCM on textile structure. By this method it is not necessary for PCMs to be microencapsulated. Thermophysical properties and thermal stability effects of treated fabric was checked out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) analysis were used to study the chemical structure of the fabric with PCMs. The air transfer, water permeability, and some physical properties of treated fabric were also investigated. The results showed that, silicone rubber polymer could be applied on textile structure to hold PCM without microencapsulating, and treated textile can be served as an appropriate smart thermal insulator

  8. A new method of application of hydrated salts on textiles to achieve thermoregulating properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Zeinab; Mortazavi, Sayed Majid, E-mail: mortaza@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2014-08-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • No need to microencapsulate the salt. • New method Glauber's salt dehydration. • Supercooling decreased, heat storage increased. - Abstract: Recently there has been a lot of attention to fibers and fabrics with thermoregulatory effects. We can acquire this quality using Phase Change Materials (PCM). In this investigation a simple method was used to keep Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·10H{sub 2}O as an inorganic PCM on textile structure. By this method it is not necessary for PCMs to be microencapsulated. Thermophysical properties and thermal stability effects of treated fabric was checked out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) analysis were used to study the chemical structure of the fabric with PCMs. The air transfer, water permeability, and some physical properties of treated fabric were also investigated. The results showed that, silicone rubber polymer could be applied on textile structure to hold PCM without microencapsulating, and treated textile can be served as an appropriate smart thermal insulator.

  9. Screen-Printed Photochromic Textiles through New Inks Based on SiO2@naphthopyran Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tânia V; Costa, Paula; Sousa, Céu M; Sousa, Carlos A D; Pereira, Clara; Silva, Carla J S M; Pereira, Manuel Fernando R; Coelho, Paulo J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-10-26

    Photochromic silica nanoparticles (SiO 2 @NPT), fabricated through the covalent immobilization of silylated naphthopyrans (NPTs) based on 2H-naphtho[1,2-b]pyran (S1, S2) and 3H-naphtho[2,1-b]pyran (S3, S4) or through the direct adsorption of the parent naphthopyrans (1, 3) onto silica nanoparticles (SiO 2 NPs), were successfully incorporated onto cotton fabrics by a screen-printing process. Two aqueous acrylic- (AC-) and polyurethane- (PU-) based inks were used as dispersing media. All textiles exhibited reversible photochromism under UV and solar irradiation, developing fast responses and intense coloration. The fabrics coated with SiO 2 @S1 and SiO 2 @S2 showed rapid color changes and high contrasts (ΔE* ab = 39-52), despite presenting slower bleaching kinetics (2-3 h to fade to the original color), whereas the textiles coated with SiO 2 @S3 and SiO 2 @S4 exhibited excellent engagement between coloration and decoloration rates (coloration and fading times of 1 and 2 min, respectively; ΔE* ab = 27-53). The PU-based fabrics showed excellent results during the washing fastness tests, whereas the AC-based textiles evidenced good results only when a protective transfer film was applied over the printed design.

  10. Single- and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes with Phosphorus Based Flame Retardants for Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wesolek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to growing popularity of composites, modification methods to obtain the best properties are searched for. The aim of the study is to reduce the flammability of textile materials using nanocomposite polymer back-coating. Different types of carbon nanotubes (single- and multiwalled and different phosphorus flame retardants (ammonium polyphosphates and melamine polyphosphate were introduced into the resin and then the fabrics were covered by the obtained composites. Homogeneous dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the polyurethane resin was obtained by sonification, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Flammability tests of fabrics coated by modified polyurethane resin were carried out using pyrolysis combustion flow calorimeter (PCFC and thermal stability of textiles was evaluated. Also, organoleptic estimation of coatings was conducted (flexibility and fragility. The use of polymer nanocomposites with phophorus flame retardants as a back-coating for textiles effectively reduces flammability and improves thermal stability of the fabric. Furthermore, the synergistic effect beetwen carbon nanotubes and phosphorous compound occurs. The resulting coatings are flexible and do not crack or change the feel of fabrics.

  11. Preparation of durable insecticide cotton fabrics through sol–gel treatment with permethrin

    OpenAIRE

    Ardanuy Raso, Mònica; Faccini, Mirko; Amantia, David; Aubouy, Laurent; Borja, Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an industrially viable procedure for the fabrication of durable insecticide textiles based on the sol–gel technique. Permethrin was incorporated on cotton fabrics by a silicon oxide nanocoating applied by conventional padding followed by curing. The effect of the sol–gel process parameters, such as silica solid content and the permethrin/tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) ratio on the insecticide activity and on the textile properties of the resulting fabri...

  12. Efficiency and Import Penetration on the Productivity of Textile Industry and Textile Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Basuki Rakhmawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although textile industry and textile products belong to the strategic sub-sector of manufacturing industry in Indonesia, they are facing problems on the availability of energy, old production machines, and the flooding of imported products into the domestic market. This study is aimed to analyze the efficiency and productivity as performance indicators and how the efficiency and import penetration affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The methods of data analysis used in this research are divided in two phases. The first phase, the non-metric approach of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is applied to measure the efficiency and productivity. Secondly, the fixed effect model of econometric regression approach is used to find out the effects of efficiency and import penetration on the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The result shows that the average level of efficiency of textile industry and textile products during the period of 2004 – 2008 is about 40 percent with a growth rate of average productivity increases 2.4 percent. Whereas, the econometric estimation results indicate that the increase of efficiency will positively and significantly affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. On the other hand, the increase of import penetration will negatively affect the productivity of this industry.

  13. Efficiency and Import Penetrationon the Productivity of Textile Industry and Textile Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Basuki Rakhmawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although textile industry and textile products belong to the strategic sub-sector of manufacturing industry in Indonesia, they are facing problems on the availability of energy, old production machines, and the flooding of imported products into the domestic market. This study is aimed to analyze the efficiency and productivity as performance indicators and how the efficiency and import penetration affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The methods of data analysis used in this research are divided in two phases. The first phase, the non-metric approach of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is applied to measure the efficiency and productivity. Secondly, the fixed effect model of econometric regression approach is used to find out the effects of efficiency and import penetration on the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The result shows that the ave-rage level of efficiency of textile industry and textile products during the period of 2004 – 2008 is about 40 percent with a growth rate of average productivity increases 2.4 percent. Whereas, the econometric estimation results indicate that the increase of efficiency will positively and significantly affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. On the other hand, the increase of import penetration will negatively affect the productivity of this industry.

  14. Application of membrane technologies for the treatment of textile wastewater and synthetic textile dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aouni, A.; Bes-Pia, A.; Fersi, C.; Dhahbi, M.; Cuartas-Uribe, B.; Alcaina-Miranda, M. I.

    2009-01-01

    Textile industry is characterized by using a great variety of chemicals and by large water consumption. In this way, textile effluents contains many types of dyes, detergents, solvents and salts depending on the particular textile mill processes (dyeing, printing, finishing...) and on the raw matter. For those reasons, textile industry is one of the main sources of industrial pollution, producing effluents discharges characterized by high conductivities and chemical oxygen demand (COD) values and strong colour. Process selection and operating conditions are important issues to optimize technically and economically the textile effluent treatment. This work presents the results of the laboratory-scale membrane experiments of textile industry effluents and synthetic textile dyes. Different types of Ultrafiltration (UF) and Nano filtration (NF) membranes were evaluated for permeate flux and their suitability in separating COD, colour, conductivity. Experiments demonstrated that membrane treatment is a very promising advanced treatment option for pollution control for textile industry effluents. The results of this work show that the direct ultrafiltration seems to be a realistic method in the pretreatment of the textile wastewater. In fact, NF process was successfully used to improve permeate quality of synthetic dyeing textile wastewater, but this process presented some limitations in the treatment of textile industry effluents because of membrane fouling problems. So, this process requires an efficient and appropriate technique such as ultrafiltration as a pre-treatment step for textile wastewater reuse. For direct nano filtration of synthetic textile dyes aqueous solutions, with a weak salt concentration (500 ppm), good results were obtained. More than 95 pour cent of color was removed from the treated water accompanied with a reduction of 92 pour cent of conductivity and COD. Based on the experiments; NF membranes are suitable for producing permeate of reusable

  15. the quality factor in consumers' preference of textile fabrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DGS-FUTO

    2018-06-01

    Jun 1, 2018 ... Whereas one consumer may derive much utility from a particular brand of .... companies adopt a value model and provide higher quality for less money. ..... wrappers, the difference in consumers‟ rating is slight or marginal; ...

  16. The Textile Elements in Ottoman Miniatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevser Gürcan Y A R D I M C I

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the value given to the art and the artist, high quality works of art in many fields were produced in the Ottoman Era. The art of weaving also lived its brightest period in terms of color, design, and weaving techniques in the Ottoman Empire in XVI. Ce ntury. The weaving products shaped the lifestyles of the people in those times and received great interest in the Palace as well. Silk woven fabrics had become such a great power in those times that it became the greatest symbol showing the power of the Ot toman Empire to the foreigners, and the determiner of the social standing within the society. The Ottoman Sultans used their clothing, which they made to become flamboyant with embroideries, to distinguish themselves from the public, and make them accept t heir power. Among the presents that were presented to the Sultans, clothes, kaftans, and similar fabrics as well as other precious presents, were frequent. The miniature manuscripts that were produced in the Palace are in the quality of unique documents t hat transfer yesterday’s knowledge to the modern age. It is easy to decode the dimensions of the clothing habits, decoration elements and hierarchy concepts of the Ottoman Era, as well as the weaving activities by using the miniature manuscripts. On the ot her hand, these elements constitute a rich alphabet in transferring the emotional structure of the society in those times, the traditions and habits to our world today. The greatest share in this effort belongs to the artists who depicted the miniatures by staying loyal to the texts in the manuscripts as well as to their active participation in the events of those times and their narrating the events as the very first observers. In addition, the muralists depicting the manuscripts and their undertaking the job of drawing the designs on the original fabric helped them to reflect the richness in the design of those times to the miniatures. In this study, the weavings and the accessories

  17. 16 CFR 303.24 - Pile fabrics and products composed thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pile fabrics and products composed thereof... CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.24 Pile fabrics and products composed thereof. The fiber content of pile fabrics or products composed thereof may be...

  18. Stretchable, Porous, and Conductive Energy Textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing; Pasta, Mauro; Mantia, Fabio La; Cui, LiFeng; Jeong, Sangmoo; Deshazer, Heather Dawn; Choi, Jang Wook; Han, Seung Min; Cui, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Recently there is strong interest in lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronics to meet the technological demands of modern society. Integrated energy storage devices of this type are a key area that is still significantly underdeveloped. Here, we describe wearable power devices using everyday textiles as the platform. With an extremely simple "dipping and drying" process using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ink, we produced highly conductive textiles with conductivity of 125 S cm-1 and sheet resistance less than 1 Ω/sq. Such conductive textiles show outstanding flexibility and stretchability and demonstrate strong adhesion between the SWNTs and the textiles of interest. Supercapacitors made from these conductive textiles show high areal capacitance, up to 0.48F/cm2, and high specific energy. We demonstrate the loading of pseudocapacitor materials into these conductive textiles that leads to a 24-fold increase of the areal capacitance of the device. These highly conductive textiles can provide new design opportunities for wearable electronics and energy storage applications. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  19. Stretchable, Porous, and Conductive Energy Textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2010-02-10

    Recently there is strong interest in lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronics to meet the technological demands of modern society. Integrated energy storage devices of this type are a key area that is still significantly underdeveloped. Here, we describe wearable power devices using everyday textiles as the platform. With an extremely simple "dipping and drying" process using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ink, we produced highly conductive textiles with conductivity of 125 S cm-1 and sheet resistance less than 1 Ω/sq. Such conductive textiles show outstanding flexibility and stretchability and demonstrate strong adhesion between the SWNTs and the textiles of interest. Supercapacitors made from these conductive textiles show high areal capacitance, up to 0.48F/cm2, and high specific energy. We demonstrate the loading of pseudocapacitor materials into these conductive textiles that leads to a 24-fold increase of the areal capacitance of the device. These highly conductive textiles can provide new design opportunities for wearable electronics and energy storage applications. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  20. Market Power and Unites States Sectoral Textile Imports

    OpenAIRE

    S Shahnawaz

    2004-01-01

    This paper estimates US textiles import elasticities with 20 of its largest textiles exporters by utilizing cointegration methodology. The soon-to-be-implemented abolition of quotas on textiles makes the study of these import elasticities especially relevant to many developing countries particularly to those that have a significant textiles component in their exports. The study uses disaggregated data (4 digit ISIC) to separately consider seven textiles sub-sectors and calculates income and p...

  1. STRATEGIES FOR SHAOXING TEXTILE COMPANIES IN ECONOMIC CRISIS. CASE STUDY: BOLA TEXTILE COMPANY

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Qing

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades, China witnesses the fastest growth in World’s economy, and has played the significant role, but in 2008, because of the global crisis, international market shrank dramatically. In this crisis, Shaoxing, located in the Yangtze River delta and the main area dealing with textile manufacturing and processing, got severe influence in the textile industry. Because of that, the recession on the international market results in the heavy burden to Shaoxing textile and garment ...

  2. Intelligent RF-Based Gesture Input Devices Implemented Using e-Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Hughes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an radio-frequency (RF-based approach to gesture detection and recognition, using e-textile versions of common transmission lines used in microwave circuits. This approach allows for easy fabrication of input swatches that can detect a continuum of finger positions and similarly basic gestures, using a single measurement line. We demonstrate that the swatches can perform gesture detection when under thin layers of cloth or when weatherproofed, providing a high level of versatility not present with other types of approaches. Additionally, using small convolutional neural networks, low-level gestures can be identified with a high level of accuracy using a small, inexpensive microcontroller, allowing for an intelligent fabric that reports only gestures of interest, rather than a simple sensor requiring constant surveillance from an external computing device. The resulting e-textile smart composite has applications in controlling wearable devices by providing a simple, eyes-free mechanism to input simple gestures.

  3. A WiFi Tracking Device Printed Directly on Textile for Wearable Electronics Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Krykpayev, Bauyrzhan

    2015-12-01

    Wearable technology is quickly becoming commonplace in our everyday life - fit-ness and health monitors, smart watches, and Google Glass, just to name a few. It is very clear that in near future the wearable technology will only grow. One of the biggest wearable fields is the E-textiles. E-textiles empower clothes with new functionality by enhancing fabrics with electronics and interconnects. The main obstacle to the development of E-textile field is the relative difficulty and large tolerance in its manufacturing as compared to the standard circuit production. Current methods such as the application of conductive foils, embroidering of conductive wires and treatment with conductive coatings do not possess efficient, fast and reliable mass production traits inherent to the electronic industry. On the other hand, the method of conductive printing on textile has the potential to unlock the efficiency similar to PCB production, due to its roll-to-roll and reel-to-reel printing capabilities. Further-more, printing on textiles is a common practice to realize graphics, artwork, etc. and thus adaptability to conductive ink printing will be relatively easier. Even though conductive printing is a fully additive process, the end circuit layout is very similar to the one produced via PCB manufacture. However, due to high surface roughness and porosity of textiles, efficient and reliable printing on textile has remained elusive. Direct conductive printing on textile is possible but only on specialized dense and tightly interwoven fabrics. Such fabrics are usually uncommon and expensive. Another option is to employ an interface layer that flattens the textile surface, thus allowing printing on it. The interface layer method can be used with a variety of textiles such as polyester/cotton that can be found in any store, making this method promising for wearable electronics. Very few examples and that too of simple structures such as a line, square patch or electrode have been

  4. Accelerated healing of cardiovascular textiles promoted by an RGD peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweden, K S; Harasaki, H; Jones, M; Blevitt, J M; Craig, W S; Pierschbacher, M; Helmus, M N

    1995-07-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethylene terephthalate (Dacron polyester) fabrics are used extensively in cardiovascular devices, e.g. heart valve sewing cuffs and vascular prostheses. While devices containing these fabrics are generally successful, it is recognized that fabrics cause complications prior to tissue ingrowth due to their thrombogenic nature. A surface active synthetic peptide, called PepTite Coating (PepTite), which was modeled after the cell attachment domain of human fibronectin has been marketed as a biocompatible coating. This peptide stimulates cell attachment through the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence. Modification of medical implants with PepTite has been shown to promote ingrowth of surrounding cells into the material leading to better tissue integration, reduced inflammation and reduced fibrotic encapsulation. In this study, polyester and PTFE textiles were modified with PepTite. The effectiveness of this coating in enhancing wound healing was investigated in a simple vascular and cardiac valve model. Our results indicate that the RGD-containing peptide, PepTite, promoted the formation of an endothelial-like cell layer on both polyester and PTFE vascular patches in the dog model. PepTite was also found to promote the formation of a significantly thinner neointima (pannus) on polyester as compared to that on its uncoated control. These results were corroborated in the cardiac valve model in which a greater amount of thin pannus and less thrombus were seen on coated polyester sewing cuffs than on control uncoated cuffs. This research shows the promising tissue response to RGD coated textiles and the potential role of this peptide in material passivation via accelerated healing.

  5. Photocatalytic inactivation of hospital-associated bacteria using titania nanoparticle coated textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, T.; Qazi, I.A.; Hashmi, I.; Baig, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Modification in hospital textiles to include disinfection properties may help in the reduction of nosocomial infections. In this study, antibacterial properties were imparted to cotton fabric by modifying it with pure and (1%) silver doped titania nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by liquid impregnation process and characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). These nanoparticles were attached to cotton fabric using a cross linking agent succinic acid. Samples were washed at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 90 degree C), with and without detergent and for different number of cycles to test the durability of nanoparticles to the fabric. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used for studying surface topography of fabric. Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometer was used to detect the titanium present on the fabric. Catalytic spectrophotometry using UV/visible spectrophotometer was used to determine titania concentration in washing effluent. The antibacterial activity of the modified fabric was examined against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) under UV and fluorescent light. The maximum durability of titania nanoparticles to the fabric was retained after washing without detergent at 30 degree C. The overall results of durability testing showed that coating of nanoparticles on fabric was durable against washing at various conditions, hence suitable from an environmental perspective. Antibacterial testing showed 100% photocatalytic inactivation of MRSA after 4 and 24 h of UV and fluorescent light exposure respectively. The potential of using such textiles in hospital environment was validated through the use of modified bed linen in a local hospital for a period of three days consecutively. The viable count indicated the reduced bacterial contamination on nano-coated fabric as compared to uncoated fabric. Bed linen, curtains

  6. Hybrid Nanostructured Textile Bioelectrode for Unobtrusive Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush

    Coronary heart disease, cardiovascular diseases and strokes are the leading causes of mortality in United States of America. Timely point-of-care health diagnostics and therapeutics for person suffering from these diseases can save thousands of lives. However, lack of accessible minimally intrusive health monitoring systems makes timely diagnosis difficult and sometimes impossible. To remedy this problem, a textile based nano-bio-sensor was developed and evaluated in this research. The sensor was made of novel array of vertically standing nanostructures that are conductive nano-fibers projecting from a conductive fabric. These sensor electrodes were tested for the quality of electrical contact that they made with the skin based on the fundamental skin impedance model and electromagnetic theory. The hybrid nanostructured dry electrodes provided large surface area and better contact with skin that improved electrode sensitivity and reduced the effect of changing skin properties, which are the problems usually faced by conventional dry textile electrodes. The dry electrodes can only register strong physiological signals because of high background noise levels, thus limiting the use of existing dry electrodes to heart rate measurement and respiration. Therefore, dry electrode systems cannot be used for recording complete ECG waveform, EEG or measurement of bioimpedance. Because of their improved sensitivity these hybrid nanostructured dry electrodes can be applied to measurement of ECG and bioimpedance with very low baseline noise. These textile based electrodes can be seamlessly integrated into garments of daily use such as vests and bra. In combination with embedded wireless network device that can communicate with smart phone, laptop or GPRS, they can function as wearable wireless health diagnostic systems.

  7. Total design for textile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafirova Koleta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Product development is less than 20-30 years old and a relatively new area of research compared to the other classic academic disciplines. Integrated product development is a philosophy that systematically employs the teaming of functional disciplines to integrate and concurrently apple all the necessary processes to produce an effective and efficient product that satisfies customer needs. Product development might also be understood as a multidisciplinary field of research. The disciplines directly participating in product development include engineering design, innovation, manufacturing, marketing and management. A background contribution is also generated by disciplines such as psychology, social sciences and information technology. This article is an overview that introduces this philosophy to textile product development.

  8. ROMANIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRY AND ITS COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Ioana ŞERBĂNEL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization has set up a new era of international trade flows and implicitly international competition. This is best understood by analyzing the rise and fall within certain industries. The Global Value Chains (GVC framework has emerged from its theoretical origins to become a major paradigm used by several international organizations. A detailed scrutiny of GVC highlightsthe manner in which new patterns of production, international trade and employment shape prospects for development and competitiveness.The purpose of the article is to address the important role of the textile sector in national economy development. Firstly, the paper addresses the presentation of textile industry at global, European and national level. Then, it presents a competitiveness sectorial approach and the analysis of innovation in textile industry.Finally, it is presented the value chain for the textile industry in Romania.

  9. Thin fiber and textile reinforced cementitious systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aldea, Corina-Maria

    2007-01-01

    This Special Publication (SP) contains ten papers which provide insight on the topics of state of the art of thin fiber and textile-reinforced cementitious systems both in academia and the industry...

  10. Wearable Electro-Textiles for Battlefield Awareness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winterhalter, C. A; Teverovsky, Justyna; Horowitz, Wendy; Sharma, Vikram; Lee, Kang

    2004-01-01

    This summary describes efforts to develop wearable electronic textiles and connectors to support body worn networking, communications, and battlefield awareness for future service members of the U.S. Army...

  11. Allergic Contact Dermatitis Induced by Textile Necklace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uffe Nygaard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Allergic contact dermatitis to textile dyes is considered to be a rare phenomenon. A recent review reported a prevalence of contact allergy to disperse dyes between 0.4 and 6.7%. The relevance of positive patch testing was not reported in all studies. Textile dye allergy is easily overlooked and is furthermore challenging to investigate as textile dyes are not labelled on clothing. In this report, we present a case of allergic contact dermatitis to a textile necklace. The patch test showed strong reactions to the necklace and the azo dyes Disperse Orange 1 and Disperse Yellow 3. Despite the European legislation and the reduced use of disperse dyes in Third World countries, disperse azo dyes still induce new cases of allergic contact dermatitis.

  12. Bioremediation of textile effluent using Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioremediation of textile effluent using Phanerochaete chrysosporium. ... African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS ... The discharge of these waste residues into the environment eventually poison, damage or affect one or ...

  13. Analysis of energetic efficiency in stenters of textile industry; Analise de eficiencia energetica em ramas de industria textil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Antonio Rogerio; Ferraz, Andre; Rocha, Ivan; Azevedo, Jorge; Oshiro, Hugo K.; Konishi, Ricardo; Piazza, Walter; Lehmkuhl, Willian [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-12-21

    This paper presents the research on the use of alternative energy within the textile industry: a strategy aimed at reducing costs and securing market share. The use of natural gas allows for the direct heating and drying of textiles through convection, instead of the conventional indirect heating method of thermal fluids. This measure alone reduces significantly the energy costs and grants the process superior efficiency and sustainability. This case examines the improvements to the process of drying textiles through thermal equipment called stenters, whose purpose is to remove humidity from the cloth during its fabrication. As such, SCGAS, in association with FURB, has performed an operational and technological evaluation of the drying process used by a customer enterprise. The data collected enabled the researchers to map all sources (inputs and outputs) of mass and energy for each different stenter. This composed the basis for the analysis done and the subsequent proposal of improvements, which varied from the conversion of stenter from indirect to direct heating and the development of even more energy efficient solutions for the direct heating system. The data obtained shows that, for the indirect heating system, 28% of the thermal energy produced could be recovered, given the temperature of the exhaust gases reached 360 deg C. The indirect heating stenters presented energy efficiency between 24% and 27%, whiles the direct heating ones presented between 27,4% and 34,8%. Additionally, if an automated control system for the natural gas and oxidizing air flows was to be installed, it would guarantee greater quality combustion with a significant increase in energy efficiency, as well as a decrease in carbon monoxide emissions by a factor of eight. (author)

  14. The structural coloration of textile materials using self-assembled silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weihong; Rigout, Muriel; Owens, Huw

    2017-01-01

    The work presented investigates how to produce structural colours on textile materials by applying a surface coating of silica nanoparticles (SNPs). Uniform SNPs with particle diameters in a controlled micron size range (207-350 nm) were synthesized using a Stöber-based solvent varying (SV) method which has been reported previously. Photonic crystals (PCs) were formed on the surface of a piece of textile fabric through a process of natural sedimentation self-assembly of the colloidal suspension containing uniform SNPs. Due to the uniformity and a particular diameter range of the prepared SNPs, structural colours were observed from the fabric surface due to the Bragg diffraction of white light with the ordered structure of the silica PCs. By varying the mean particle diameter, a wide range of spectral colours from red to blue were obtained. The comparison of structural colours on fabrics and on glasses suggests that a smooth substrate is critical when producing materials with high colour intensity and spatial uniformity. This work suggested a promising approach to colour textile materials without the need for traditional dyes and/or pigments. Graphical abstract.

  15. Textile materials for lightweight constructions technologies, methods, materials, properties

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    In this book, experts on textile technologies convey both general and specific informa­tion on various aspects of textile engineering, ready-made technologies, and textile chemistry. They describe the entire process chain from fiber materials to various yarn constructions, 2D and 3D textile constructions, preforms, and interface layer design. In addition, the authors introduce testing methods, shaping and simulation techniques for the characterization of and structural mechanics calculations on anisotropic, pliable high-performance textiles, including specific examples from the fields of fiber plastic composites, textile concrete, and textile membranes. Readers will also be familiarized with the potential offered by increasingly popular textile structures, for instance in the fields of composite technology, construction technology, security technology, and membrane technology. Textile materials and semi-finished products have widely varied potential characteristics, and are commonly used as essential element...

  16. Advancement in Textile Technology for Defence Application

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian Kandasubramanian; Mr. Ramdayal

    2013-01-01

    The early development of textiles involved use of natural materials like cotton, wool and flax. The advent of the new technology revolutionized textiles which enables to develop synthetic fibers like lycra®, a segmented polyurethane-urea, which has exceptional elastic properties, Kevlar®, which has ultra high strength properties and is used as bulletproof vest. For the improvement of personal mobility, health care and rehabilitation, it requires to integrate novel sensing and actuating func...

  17. Production of Banana Fiber Yarns for Technical Textile Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Ortega

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers have been used as an alternative to synthetic ones for their greener character; banana fibers have the advantage of coming from an agricultural residue. Fibers have been extracted by mechanical means from banana tree pseudostems, as a strategy to valorize banana crops residues. To increase the mechanical properties of the composite, technical textiles can be used as reinforcement, instead of short fibers. To do so, fibers must be spun and woven. The aim of this paper is to show the viability of using banana fibers to obtain a yarn suitable to be woven, after an enzymatic treatment, which is more environmentally friendly. Extracted long fibers are cut to 50 mm length and then immersed into an enzymatic bath for their refining. Conditions of enzymatic treatment have been optimized to produce a textile grade of banana fibers, which have then been characterized. The optimum treating conditions were found with the use of Biopectinase K (100% related to fiber weight at 45 °C, pH 4.5 for 6 h, with bath renewal after three hours. The first spinning trials show that these fibers are suitable to be used for the production of yarns. The next step is the weaving process to obtain a technical fabric for composites production.

  18. CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UROŠEVIĆ Snežana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is a very important industrial branch because it produces clothes for nearly seven billion people and textile materials for technical usage. It employs a huge number of competitive and qualified, mostly female work force. It is also technologically and technically challenging. Thus, it is vital to employ qualified and well trained employees with certain competences, knowledge and skills in order to respond to rapid technological and market changes. Here, we will consider the influence of the career development on doing business in the textile industry while acquiring the competitive advantage. Career development is a lifelong process and it is includes knowledge management. The term career has several meanings while nowadays it can mean advancement. The career usually reflects the professional development path of an individual during his or her working career. The career is that concept which connects and unifies most strongly and explicitly individual and organizational interests and needs. The theoretical part explains terms such as career development, importance and improvement of employees for an organization, the possibility for career development within the textile industry. The second part of the paper deals with research conducted among the employees of the textile sector in Leskovac, the town in Serbia with a long-lasting textile tradition.

  19. Evaluation of Whiteness in Linen and Semi-linen Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liucina Kot

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Whiteness of textiles is one of the main "white" product quality indicators described by the following parameters: lightness of a colour, colour tone (white shade, white uniformity and stability under the influence of physical factors. “White” textile products can be perceived by comparing them with a white standard (Pantone colour palette. On the other hand, the whiteness of the fabric can be estimated using the colorimeter and determining lightness of a fabric L. The purpose of a research is to assess the whiteness of a linen and semi-linen fabric using two different methods, to carry out a comparative analysis of the results and to associate fabric whiteness with the fabric structure parameters. Two methods were used for experiment (colorimeter Spectraflash SF450X and expert assessment of whiteness. The analysed colours of a fabric were divided into five colours: white, whitish, light grey, grey and dark grey. The examination of the two methods, different results were obtained: testing with colorimeter, white colour was found in only one fabric, while the experts found the fabrics of white colour much more. The opinions of experts vary also. Fabric lightness L was associated with fabric structure parameters – the warp and weft settings and fabric weave. It was found that these fabric structure parameters affect the lightness of a colour of a fabric L very little.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5348

  20. Wearable electronics formed on intermediate layer on textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-07-27

    One manner of producing more desirable clothing with electronic capabilities is to manufacture electronics, such as the charging wires or devices themselves, directly onto the textile materials. Textile materials generally do not support the manufacturing of electronic devices, in part because the surface of the textile is too rough for electronic devices or the processes used to manufacturing electronic devices. An intermediate layer (204) may be placed on the textile material (202) to reduce the roughness of the surface of the textile material and provide other beneficial characteristics for the placement of electronic devices (206) directly on the textile material.

  1. Resource Communication Technology and Marketing of Textile Products: A U.S. Textile Industry Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baah, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the qualitative positivistic case study was to explore whether resource communication technology has helped or would help the marketing of textile products in the U.S. textile industry. The contributions of human capital in the marketing department, the marketing-demand information system function, and the product supply chain…

  2. All-solid, flexible solar textiles based on dye-sensitized solar cells with ZnO nanorod arrays on stainless steel wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Youngjin [Department of Clothing and Textiles, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Tae; Koh, Jong Kwan [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hak, E-mail: jonghak@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eunae, E-mail: eakim@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Clothing and Textiles, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    Highlights: • All-solid, flexible solar textile fabricated with DSSCs is demonstrated. • DSSCs woven into a satin structure and transparent PET film are used. • Solar textile showed a high efficiency of 2.57%. -- Abstract: An all-solid, flexible solar textile fabricated with dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) woven into a satin structure and transparent poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film was demonstrated. A ZnO nanorod (NR) vertically grown from fiber-type conductive stainless steel (SS) wire was utilized as a photoelectrode, and a Pt-coated SS wire was used as a counter electrode. A graft copolymer, i.e. poly(vinyl chloride)-graft-poly(oxyethylene methacrylate) (PVC-g-POEM) was synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and used as a solid electrolyte. The conditions for the growth of ZnO NR and sufficient dye loading were investigated to improve cell performance. The adhesion of PET films to DSSCs resulted in physical stability improvements without cell performance loss. The solar textile with 10 × 10 wires exhibited an energy conversion efficiency of 2.57% with a short circuit current density of 20.2 mA/cm{sup 2} at 100 mW/cm{sup 2} illumination, which is the greatest account of an all-solid, ZnO-based flexible solar textile. DSSC textiles with woven structures are applicable to large-area, roll-to-roll processes.

  3. Comparative analysis of textile metal threads from liturgical vestments and folk costumes in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimić, Kristina; Zamboni, Ivana; Fazinić, Stjepko; Mudronja, Domagoj; Sović, Lea; Gouasmia, Sabrina; Soljačić, Ivo

    2018-02-01

    Textile is essential for everyday life in all societies. It is used in clothes for protection and warmth but also to indicate class and position, show wealth and social status. Threads from precious metals have also been used in combination with fibres for decoration in order to create luxury fabrics for secular and religious elites. We performed elemental analysis of 17th to 20th century metal threads from various textile articles of liturgical vestments and festive folk costumes collected in the museums of northern, southern and central Croatian regions. In order to determine elemental concentrations in threads we performed comparative X-ray Spectroscopy measurements using: (i) Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) at the Faculty of Textile Technology, (ii) X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF) at the Croatian Conservation Institute and (iii) Particle Induced X-ray Spectroscopy (PIXE) at the Ruđer Bošković Institute Tandem Accelerator Facility using ion micro beam. Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) was performed as well on selected samples. SEM-EDX investigations of cross-sections along with the surfaces were also performed. In this work we report and discuss the results obtained by the three X-ray methods and RBS for major (gold, silver, copper) and minor elements on different threads like stripes, wires and "srma" (metal thread wrapped around textile yarn).

  4. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar; Harith, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles

  5. Smart Coat with a Fully-Embedded Textile Antenna for IoT Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Lopes, Catarina; Pinho, Pedro; Salvado, Rita

    2016-06-22

    The Internet of Things (IoT) scenario is strongly related with the advance of the development of wireless sensor networks (WSN) and radio frequency identification (RFID) systems. Additionally, in the WSN context, for a continuous feed, the integration of textile antennas for energy harvesting into smart clothing is a particularly interesting solution when the replacement of batteries is not easy to practice, such as in wearable devices. This paper presents the E-Caption: Smart and Sustainable Coat. It has an embedded dual-band textile antenna for electromagnetic energy harvesting, operating at global system for mobile communication (GSM) 900 and digital cellular system (DCS) 1800 bands. This printed antenna is fully integrated, as its dielectric is the textile material composing the coat itself. The E-Caption illustrates the innovative concept of textile antennas that can be manipulated as simple emblems. Seven prototypes of these "emblem" antennas, manufactured by lamination and embroidering techniques are also presented. It is shown that the orientation of the conductive fabric does not influence the performance of the antenna. It is also shown that the direction and number of the stitches in the embroidery may influence the performance of the antenna. Moreover, the comparison of results obtained before and after the integration of the antenna into cloth shows the integration does not affect the behavior of the antenna.

  6. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar [Conservation Department, Faculty of Archaeology, Cairo University, El-Gamaa Street, El-Giza (Egypt)], E-mail: Omaa67@yahoo.com; Harith, M.A. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt)], E-mail: mharithm@niles.edu.eg

    2008-07-15

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles.

  7. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar; Harith, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles.

  8. Dosimetric properties of textile fibers: application of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry to an accidental gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.

    1988-01-01

    The dosimetric properties of some twenty textile fibers have been studied in order to develop a method for determining the dose received in the case of an accidental gamma irradiation. Three textile fibers having properties most closely satisfying our needs were selected for detailed investigations: cotton, polypropylene and quartz. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) readout techniques were used. In order to eliminate spectral anisotropy problems due to textile fiber inhomogeneities, a system has been developed to rotate samples in the resonant cavity during measurements. The structure, physical and chemical properties of cotton and polypropylene were investigated. A bibliographic study of the combined effects of light, heat and ionizing radiation on textile fibers was carried out. A linear relation exists between the EPR signal and the gamma ray dose received over a certain dose range. A method has been developed for preparing samples so as to reduce background noise not due to irradiation; in this way the detection threshold is lowered and a greater time stability obtained. Unknown doses corresponding to known spectra are determined by linear interpolation using a series of spectra obtained from the same fabric irradiated with known doses [fr

  9. Textile UV detector with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an active compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Sasiadek, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, results on the construction of a new flat textile-based UV light dosimeter are reported. As a textile support polyamide woven fabric was chosen, which was surface-modified with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). At first, spectrophotometric and dynamic laser light scattering results on the steady-state UV irradiation of aqueous TTC solutions in the presence of oxygen are discussed. If irradiated, TTC converts to the corresponding formazan molecules of red colour. The size and size distribution of the particles is related to the absorbed radiation and pH of the solution. When TTC molecules reside on polyamide textile, UV irradiation causes a colour change from white to deep red. The tinge intensity depends on the absorbed energy per unit surface area. On this basis, the calibration parameters of the detectors, such as dose sensitivity, dose range, quasi-linear dose range, were calculated. Furthermore, the improvement of the dosimeters' resistance to atmospheric conditions was achieved and assessed through washing fastness tests. Finally, the detectors were proved to be adequate for measurements of the 2D distribution of absorbed UV energy. A simple method of UV dose distribution measurements was proposed. The textile-based systems show promise as dosimeters.

  10. Smart Coat with a Fully-Embedded Textile Antenna for IoT Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Loss

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT scenario is strongly related with the advance of the development of wireless sensor networks (WSN and radio frequency identification (RFID systems. Additionally, in the WSN context, for a continuous feed, the integration of textile antennas for energy harvesting into smart clothing is a particularly interesting solution when the replacement of batteries is not easy to practice, such as in wearable devices. This paper presents the E-Caption: Smart and Sustainable Coat. It has an embedded dual-band textile antenna for electromagnetic energy harvesting, operating at global system for mobile communication (GSM 900 and digital cellular system (DCS 1800 bands. This printed antenna is fully integrated, as its dielectric is the textile material composing the coat itself. The E-Caption illustrates the innovative concept of textile antennas that can be manipulated as simple emblems. Seven prototypes of these “emblem” antennas, manufactured by lamination and embroidering techniques are also presented. It is shown that the orientation of the conductive fabric does not influence the performance of the antenna. It is also shown that the direction and number of the stitches in the embroidery may influence the performance of the antenna. Moreover, the comparison of results obtained before and after the integration of the antenna into cloth shows the integration does not affect the behavior of the antenna.

  11. Textile inspired flexible metamaterial with negative refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgnies, L.; Lheurette, É.; Lippens, D.

    2015-04-01

    This work introduces metallo-dielectric woven fabric as a metamaterial for phase-front manipulation. Dispersion diagram as well as effective medium parameters retrieved from reflection and transmission coefficients point out negative values of refractive index. By numerical simulations, it is evidenced that a pair of meandered metallic wires, arranged in a top to bottom configuration, can yield to a textile metamaterial with simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability. While the effective negative permittivity stems from the metallic grid arrangement, resonating current loop resulting from the top to bottom configuration of two meandered metallic wires in near proximity produces magnetic activity with negative permeability. By adjusting the distance between pairs of metallic wires, the electric plasma frequency can be shifted to overlap the magnetic resonance. Finally, it is shown that the woven metamaterial is insensitive to the incident angle up to around 60°.

  12. Energy harvesting “3-D knitted spacer” based piezoelectric textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S.; Soin, N.; Shah, T. H.; Siores, E.

    2016-07-01

    The piezoelectric effect in Poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVDF, was discovered over four decades ago and since then, significant work has been carried out aiming at the production of high p-phase fibres and their integration into fabric structures for energy harvesting. However, little work has been done in the area of production of “true piezoelectric fabric structures” based on flexible polymeric materials such as PVDF. In this work, we demonstrate “3-D knitted spacer” technology based all-fibre piezoelectric fabrics as power generators and energy harvesters. The knitted single-structure piezoelectric generator consists of high p-phase (~80%) piezoelectric PVDF monofilaments as the spacer yarn interconnected between silver (Ag) coated polyamide multifilament yarn layers acting as the top and bottom electrodes. The novel and unique textile structure provides an output power density in the range of 1.105.10 gWcm-2 at applied impact pressures in the range of 0.02-0.10 MPa, thus providing significantly higher power outputs and efficiencies over the existing 2-D woven and nonwoven piezoelectric structures. The high energy efficiency, mechanical durability and comfort of the soft, flexible and all-fibre based power generator is highly attractive for a variety of potential applications such as wearable electronic systems and energy harvesters charged from ambient environment or by human movement.

  13. The kinetics of colour change in textiles and fibres treated with detergent solutions Part II - Spectrophotometric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was-Gubala, Jolanta; Grzesiak, Edyta

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess colour variations that occur in several types of textiles and their constituent fibres, resulting from the long-term influence of various laundry detergents. A 14-day experiment was conducted using blue, red and grey/black cotton, wool, acrylic and polyester textiles. The spectrophotometric measurement of colour changes in fabric samples and test solutions, as well as the microspectrophotometric analysis of colour changes in single fibres were described. An evaluation of the observed colour changes from a forensic fibre analysis expert's point of view, as well as that of an average user/consumer of the textiles and laundry detergents is also provided. Copyright 2009 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of gravimetric and gas chromatographic methods for assessing performance of textile materials against liquid pesticide penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Anugrah; Abbi, Ruchika

    2004-01-01

    Penetration of liquid pesticides through textile materials is a criterion for determining the performance of protective clothing used by pesticide handlers. The pipette method is frequently used to apply liquid pesticides onto textile materials to measure penetration. Typically, analytical techniques such as Gas Chromatography (GC) are used to measure percentage penetration. These techniques are labor intensive and costly. A simpler gravimetric method was developed, and tests were conducted to compare the gravimetric and GC methods of analysis. Three types of pesticide formulations and 4 fabrics were used for the study. Diluted pesticide formulations were pipetted onto the test specimens and percentage penetration was measured using the 2 methods. For homogeneous formulation, the results of the two methods were fairly comparable. However, due to the filtering action of the textile materials, there were differences in the percentage penetration between the 2 methods for formulations that were not homogeneous.

  15. Color management in textile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Maurizio; Vannucci, Massimiliano; Buonopane, Massimo; Fabroni, Cosimo; Fabrini, Francesco

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this research was to study a system of acquisition and processing of images capable of confronting colored wool with a reference specimen, in order to define the conformity using objective parameters. The first step of the research was to comprise and to analyze in depth the problem: there has been numerous implications of technical, physical, cultural, biological and also psychological character, that come down from the attempt of giving a quantitative appraisal to the color. In the scene of the national and international scientific and technological research, little has been made as regards measurement of color through digital processing of the images through linear CCD. The reason is fundamentally of technological nature: only during the last years we found the presence on the market of low cost equipment capable of acquiring and processing images with adequate performances and qualities. The job described has permitted to create a first prototype of system for the color measuring with use of CCD linear devices. -Hardware identification to carry out a series of tests and experiments in laboratory. -Verification of such device in a textile facility. -Statistics analysis of the collected data and of the employed models.

  16. Color prediction in textile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Maurizio; Buonopane, Massimo

    2004-09-01

    Nowadays production systems of fancy yarns for knits allow the creation of extremely complex products in which many effects are obtained by means of color alteration. Current production technique consists in defining type and quantity of fibers by making preliminary samples. This samples are then compared with a reference one. This comparison is based on operator experience. Many samples are required in order to achieve a sample similar to the reference one. This work requires time and then additional costs for a textile manufacturer. In addition, the methodology is subjective. Nowadays, spectrophotometers are the only devices that seem to be able to provide objective indications. They are based on a spectral analysis of the light reflected by the knit material. In this paper the study of a new method for color evaluation of a mix of wool fibers with different colors is presented. First of all fiber characterization were carried out through scattering and absorption coefficients using the Kubelka-Munk theory. Then the estimated color was compared with a reference item, in order to define conformity by means of objective parameters. Finally, theoretical characterization was compared with the measured quantity. This allowed estimation of prediction quality.

  17. DETERMINATION OF TRACE HEAVY METALS IN SOME TEXTILE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    the environmental and industrial samples including textile products [1-5]. Textile is one of the ... Toxic and allergic metals including cadmium, copper, nickel, zinc, and chemicals like formaldehyde and chlorinated hydrocarbons can exist in ...

  18. A wearable tracking device inkjet-printed on textile

    KAUST Repository

    Krykpayev, Bauyrzhan; Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Bilal, Rana Muhammad; Vaseem, Mohammad; Shamim, Atif

    2017-01-01

    Despite the abundance of localization applications, the tracking devices have never been truly realized in E-textiles. Standard printed circuit board (PCB)-based devices are obtrusive and rigid and hence not suitable for textile based

  19. Wearable electronics formed on intermediate layer on textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    One manner of producing more desirable clothing with electronic capabilities is to manufacture electronics, such as the charging wires or devices themselves, directly onto the textile materials. Textile materials generally do not support

  20. Optimization of Dye Removal from Textile Wastewater using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWASOGO

    however, this often gets polluted through the activities of man ... study examines the treatment of effluent from a textile industry in Kano ... II. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A. Materials. The textile wastewater used in this research was collected.

  1. consumers' understanding and use of textile eco-labels dur

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    textile industry to introduce greener technology textiles (Momberg ... E mail: daleen.vandermerwe@nwu.ac.za. — Ms N le Roux ..... African market, as such products are relatively unavailable and ...... Beauty 2(1&2):117-138. CLEVELAND, M.

  2. Technological strategy in the textile sector: the natural gas adoption as an initiative which guarantees competitive advantages; Estrategia tecnologica no setor textil: a adocao do gas natural como uma iniciativa que garante vantagens competitivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Mariana Sarmanho de Oliveira; Rebelatto, Daisy Aparecida do Nascimento [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia]. E-mails: msarmanho@natal.digi.com.br; daisy@prod.eesc.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    Some problems faced by the textile industry are related with the obsolescence of the equipment and high costs with energy. The technological innovation by means about the acquisition of equipment of natural gas can be considered a solution for this problem. As a result of this innovation, companies can be more competitive and in better positions comparing with the others competitors. Therefore the gas improves the product quality, reduces the emissions of pollutants and allows the use of most rational energy, when compared with the others energetic used on the sector. Considering this context, the objectives of this article are: to identify through a bibliographical research, the importance of the innovation of process for the textile industry; to characterize the form as the energy comes being used in each stage of productive process and, finally, to identify stages of the productive process of the textile industry which would have to be contemplated investments in technological innovation. At last, it will be presented, in planning phase, a field research that will be carried through in the textiles companies of cities of the Administrative Region of Campinas (SP). The theory is supported on these subjects: technological strategies, the stages of the process of manufacture of wires and plain fabrics, the use of the energy in the textile industry and the implementation of the technological innovation process through the introduction of the natural gas. (author)

  3. Synthetic fibers as microplastics in the marine environment: A review from textile perspective with a focus on domestic washings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Cesa, Flavia; Turra, Alexander; Baruque-Ramos, Julia

    2017-11-15

    The ubiquity of plastic materials in the environment has been, for long, a matter of discussion. Smaller particles, named microplastics (textile materials are a subgroup of microplastics and can be originated from domestic washings, as machine filters and wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are not specifically designed to retain them. Once in the environment, fibers can reach concentrations up to thousands of particles per cubic meter, being available to be ingested by a broad range of species. In this scenario, this review adds and details the textile perspective to the microplastics exploring nomenclature, characteristics and factors influencing emission, but also evidencing gaps in knowledge needed to overcome this issue. Preliminarily, general information about marine litter and plastics, followed by specific aspects regarding textile fibers as microplastics, were introduced. Then fiber sources to microplastic pollution were discussed, mainly focusing on domestic washings that pass through WWTPs. Studies that reveal domestic washing as microplastic sources are scarce and there is a considerable lack of standardization in methods as well as incorporation of textile aspects in experimental design. Knowledge gaps include laundry parameters (e.g., water temperature, use of chemicals) and textile articles characteristics (e.g., yarn type, fabric structure) orchestrated by consumers' choice. The lack of information on the coverage and efficiency of sewage treatment systems to remove textile fibers also prevent a global understanding of such sources. The search of alternatives and applicable solutions should come from an integrated, synergic and global perspective, of both environmental and textile area, which still need to be fostered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Supercritical water oxidation treatment of textile sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shuzhong; Li, Yanhui; Lu, Jinling; Chen, Senlin; Luo, XingQi

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we studied the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of the textile sludge, the hydrothermal conversion of typical textile compounds and the corrosion properties of stainless steel 316. Moreover, the influence mechanisms of NaOH during these related processes were explored. The results show that decomposition efficiency for organic matter in liquid phase of the textile sludge was improved with the increment of reaction temperature or oxidation coefficient. However, the organic substance in solid phase can be oxidized completely in supercritical water. Serious coking occurred during the high pressure water at 250-450°C for the Reactive Orange 7, while at 300 and 350°C for the polyvinyl alcohol. The addition of NaOH not only accelerated the destruction of organic contaminants in the SCWO reactor, but effectively inhibited the dehydration conversion of textile compounds during the preheating process, which was favorable for the treatment system of textile sludge. The corrosion experiment results indicate that the stainless steel 316 could be competent for the body materials of the reactor and the heat exchangers. Furthermore, there was prominent enhancement of sodium hydroxide for the corrosion resistance of 316 in subcritical water. On the contrary the effect was almost none during SCWO.

  5. Application of enzymes in the textile industry: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Mojsov, Kiro

    2011-01-01

    The use of enzymes in textile industry is one of the most rapidly growing field in industrial enzymology. The enzymes used in the textile field are amylases, catalase, and laccase which are used to removing the starch, degrading excess hydrogen peroxide, bleaching textiles and degrading lignin. The use of enzymes in the textile chemical processing is rapidly gaining globally recognition because of their non-toxic and eco-friendly characteristics with the increasinly important requirements for...

  6. Methods for waste waters treatment in textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Zhezhova, Silvana; Risteski, Sanja; Golomeova, Saska

    2014-01-01

    The processes of production of textiles or wet treatments and finishing processes of textile materials are huge consumers of water with high quality. As a result of these various processes, considerable amounts of polluted water are released. This paper puts emphasis on the problem of environmental protection against waste waters generated by textile industry. The methods of pretreatment or purification of waste waters in the textile industry can be: Primary (screening, sedimentation, homo...

  7. Use of Nanostructured ZnO for Production of Antimicrobial Textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chit Ko Ko Htwe

    2011-12-01

    An awareness of general sanitation, contact disease transmission, and personal protection has led to the development of antimicrobial textiles. The development of antimicrobial fabrics using nanostructure ZnO has been investigated in this present work. The nanostructure ZnO were produced using a microwave irradiation without any other calcinations and were directly applied on to the fabric using pad-dry-cure method.Synthesized nanostructure ZnO were characterized by XRD and SEM for ZnO purification and particle size examination. The antibacterial activity of the finished fabrics was assessed qualitatively by agar diffusion method. The results show that the finished fabric demonstrated significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in qualitative test.

  8. Cost model relationships between textile manufacturing processes and design details for transport fuselage elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metschan, Stephen L.; Wilden, Kurtis S.; Sharpless, Garrett C.; Andelman, Rich M.

    1993-01-01

    Textile manufacturing processes offer potential cost and weight advantages over traditional composite materials and processes for transport fuselage elements. In the current study, design cost modeling relationships between textile processes and element design details were developed. Such relationships are expected to help future aircraft designers to make timely decisions on the effect of design details and overall configurations on textile fabrication costs. The fundamental advantage of a design cost model is to insure that the element design is cost effective for the intended process. Trade studies on the effects of processing parameters also help to optimize the manufacturing steps for a particular structural element. Two methods of analyzing design detail/process cost relationships developed for the design cost model were pursued in the current study. The first makes use of existing databases and alternative cost modeling methods (e.g. detailed estimating). The second compares design cost model predictions with data collected during the fabrication of seven foot circumferential frames for ATCAS crown test panels. The process used in this case involves 2D dry braiding and resin transfer molding of curved 'J' cross section frame members having design details characteristic of the baseline ATCAS crown design.

  9. Removal of dyes from textile wastewater by using nanofiltration polyetherimide membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karisma, Doni; Febrianto, Gabriel; Mangindaan, Dave

    2017-12-01

    Followed by rapid development of the textile industries since 19th century the dyeing technology is thriving ever since. However, its progress is followed by lack of responsibility and knowledge in treating the dye-containing wastewater. There are some emerging technologies in treating such kind of wastewater, where membrane technology is one of those technologies that has uniqueness in the performance of separating dyes from wastewater, accompanied with small amount of energy. The development of membrane technology is one of several eco-engineering developments for sustainability in water resource management. However, there are a lot of rooms for improvement for this membrane technology, especially for the application in treating textile wastewater in Indonesia. Based on the demand in Indonesia for clean water and further treatment of dye-containing wastewater, the purpose of this research is to fabricate nanofiltration (NF) membranes to accommodate those problems. Furthermore, the fabricated NF membrane will be modified by interfacial polymerization to impart a new selective layer on top of NF membrane to improve the performance of the separation of the dyes from dye-containing wastewater. This research was conducted into two phases of experiments. In the first phase the formulation of polymeric dope solution of PEI/Acetone/NMP (N-methyl-pyrollidone), using the variation of 15/65/20, 16/64/20, and 17/63/20. This research show that many areas still can be explored in textile wastewater treatment using membrane in Indonesia.

  10. Electron beam irradiation of textile effluents and non-ionic ethoxylated surfactant for toxicity and color removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Stephanie V. Del; Garcia, Vanessa S.G.; Boiani, Nathalia F.; Rosa, Jorge M.; Andrade e Silva, Leonardo G. de; Borrely, Sueli I.

    2017-01-01

    Textile industry has an expressive scenario in the world economy and Brazil is the 5"t"h in the textile production. By 2015, Brazilian textile production represented US $ 39.3 billion, accounting for more than 1.8 million tons of fabric (ABIT, 2017). The effluents from textile industry are highlighted by quantity of wastewater discharged and variety of substances (dyes, bleaching agents, surfactants, salts, acids, among others). Such compounds often prove to be toxic to aquatic biota. This present study aims to assess toxicity of whole effluents, before and after irradiation (by electron beam accelerator, EBI). In addition, the reduction of the effluent color after irradiation is also very important. Daphnia similis and Vibrio fischeri were the biological systems applied for toxicity evaluations. Previous results demonstrated the surfactant as the main toxic compound, in the untreated and irradiated forms, EC 50 = 0.44 ppm ± 0.02 (untreated); EC 50 = 0.46 % ± 0.07 (irradiated). The irradiation was effective in reducing the color of the effluent, starting from 0.5 kGy. EB radiation may be proposed as an alternative treatment for the final effluent from textile processing, mainly for reuse purposes. (author)

  11. Electron beam irradiation of textile effluents and non-ionic ethoxylated surfactant for toxicity and color removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Stephanie V. Del; Garcia, Vanessa S.G.; Boiani, Nathalia F.; Rosa, Jorge M.; Andrade e Silva, Leonardo G. de; Borrely, Sueli I., E-mail: vanessagranadeiro@gmail.com, E-mail: steh.vdsole@gmail.com, E-mail: jotarosa@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); SENAI, Faculdade de Tecnologia Antoine Skaf, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Textile industry has an expressive scenario in the world economy and Brazil is the 5{sup th} in the textile production. By 2015, Brazilian textile production represented US $ 39.3 billion, accounting for more than 1.8 million tons of fabric (ABIT, 2017). The effluents from textile industry are highlighted by quantity of wastewater discharged and variety of substances (dyes, bleaching agents, surfactants, salts, acids, among others). Such compounds often prove to be toxic to aquatic biota. This present study aims to assess toxicity of whole effluents, before and after irradiation (by electron beam accelerator, EBI). In addition, the reduction of the effluent color after irradiation is also very important. Daphnia similis and Vibrio fischeri were the biological systems applied for toxicity evaluations. Previous results demonstrated the surfactant as the main toxic compound, in the untreated and irradiated forms, EC 50 = 0.44 ppm ± 0.02 (untreated); EC 50 = 0.46 % ± 0.07 (irradiated). The irradiation was effective in reducing the color of the effluent, starting from 0.5 kGy. EB radiation may be proposed as an alternative treatment for the final effluent from textile processing, mainly for reuse purposes. (author)

  12. Failure modes of conducting yarns in electronic-textile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M. de; Vries, H. de; Pacheco, K.; Heck, G. van

    2015-01-01

    Integration of electronic functionalities into textiles adds to the value of textiles. It allows measuring, detecting, actuating and treating or communicating with a body or object. These added values can render the smart textiles very useful, fun, supporting, protecting or even lifesaving. It is,

  13. TEXTILE SURFACE MODIFICATION BY PYHSICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION – (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUCE Ismail

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile products are used in various branches of the industry from automotive to space products. Textiles produced for industrial use are generally referred to as technical textiles. Technical textiles are nowadays applied to several areas including transportation, medicine, agriculture, protection, sports, packaging, civil engineering and industry. There are rapid developments in the types of materials used in technical textiles. Therefore, modification and functionalization of textile surfaces is becoming more crucial. The improvements of the properties such as anti-bacterial properties, fire resistivity, UV radiation resistance, electrical conductivity, self cleaning, and super hydrophobic, is getting more concern with respect to developments in textile engineering. The properties of textile surfaces are closely related to the fiber structure, the differences in the polymer composition, the fiber mixture ratio, and the physical and chemical processes applied. Textile surface modifications can be examined in four groups under the name mechanical, chemical, burning and plasma. Surface modifications are made to improve the functionality of textile products. Textile surface modifications affect the properties of the products such as softness, adhesion and wettability. The purpose of this work is to reveal varieties of vapor deposition modifications to improve functionality. For this purpose, the pyhsical vapor deposition methods, their affects on textile products and their end-uses will be reviewed.

  14. Nettle as a distinct Bronze Age textile plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergfjord, C.; Mannering, Ulla; Frei, Karin Margarita

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the production of plant fibre textiles in ancient Europe, especially woven textiles for clothing, was closely linked to the development of agriculture through the use of cultivated textile plants (flax, hemp). Here we present a new investigation of the 2800 year old...

  15. Treatment of air dried archaeological wool textiles from waterlogged environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharff, Annemette Bruselius

    2014-01-01

    expanded the fibers and the yarn increased in size, resulting in more flexible and less brittle textiles. This property was kept when the textiles were dried by stepwise dehydration in ethanol, acetone, and white spirit with a final treatment in 5% lanolin. Preliminary tests on brittle textiles can...

  16. Design Management in the Textile Industry - A Network Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul Rind; Bang, Anne Louise

    In this paper we explore textile design activities and textile design management from an industrial network perspective. The textile industry is probably one of the most globalized manufacturing industries in the world and thus one of the most dispersed industries on the globe. Most studies on de...... management in order to maintain the relationships in their network of customers and suppliers....

  17. Investigation of nanoscale reinforcement into textile polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mujibur Rahman

    A dual inclusion strategy for textile polymers has been investigated to increase elastic energy storage capacity of fibers used in high velocity impact applications. Commercial fibers such as Spectra and Dyneema are made from ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Dynamic elastic energy of these fibers is still low therefore limiting their wholesale application without a secondary metallic or ceramic component. The idea in this investigation is to develop methodologies so that the elastic energy of polyethylene based fibers can be increased by several folds. This would allow manufacturing of an all-fabric system for high impact applications. The dual inclusion consists of a polymer phase and a nanoscale inorganic phase to polyethylene. The polymer phase was nylon-6 and the inorganic phase was carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Nylon-6 was blended as a minor phase into UHMWPE and was chosen because of its large fracture strain -- almost one order higher than that of UHMWPE. On the other hand, CNTs with their very high strength, modulus, and aspect ratio, contributed to sharing of load and sliding of polymer interfaces as they aligned during extrusion and strain hardening processes. A solution spinning process was developed to produce UHMWPE filaments reinforced with CNTs and nylon-6. The procedure involved dispersing of CNTs into paraffin oil through sonication followed by dissolving polymers into paraffin-CNT solution using a homogenizer. The admixture was fed into a single screw extruder for melt mixing and extrusion through an orifice. The extrudate was rinsed via a hexane bath, stabilized through a heater, and then drawn into a filament winder with controlled stretching. In the next step, the as produced filaments were strain-hardened through repeated loading unloading cycles under tension. Neat and reinforced filaments were characterized through DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), XRD (X-ray Diffraction), Raman Spectroscopy, SEM (Scanning Electron

  18. Models for Textile Composites Forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko; ten Thije, R.H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Drape of dry fabrics or prepregs was recognised as an important feature in composites forming operations from the start. In the 1950s the first mathematical models were developed based on purely kinematic arguments. The assumption of zero fibre strains and trellis deformations led to the socalled

  19. Fashion marketing in textile and clothing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alica Grilec Kaurić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fashion marketing explores connection between fashion design and marketing including development, promotion, sales and price aspects of fashion industry. Successful fashion marketing managers are aware that the most important fashion marketing elements are customer trend identification, building strong brands and creating positive image of the producers. This paper presents the findings of a research conducted for the purpose of identifying trends in marketing sector in textile and clothing industry in Croatia. The research was conducted through personal interviews with marketing and company managers in Croatia. The research identified that marketing is insufficiently implemented in Croatian textile and clothing industry, despite growing brand management importance. However, because of lack in marketing knowledge and bad brand management, development of fashion brand is the most critical factor in successful business activity in textile and clothing industry.

  20. Wearable Textile Electrodes for ECG Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiogram (ECG is one of the most important parameters for monitoring of the physiological state of a person. Currently available systems for ECG monitoring are both stationary and wearable, but the comfort of the monitored person is not at a satisfactory level because these systems are not part of standard clothing. This article is therefore devoted to the development and measurement of wearable textile electrodes for ECG measurement device with high comfort for the user. The electrode material is made of electrically conductive textile. This creates a textile composite that guarantees high comfort for the user while ensuring good quality of ECG measurements. The composite is implemented by a carrier (a T-shirt with flame retardant and sensing electrodes embroidered with yarn based on a mixture of polyester coated with silver nanoparticles and cotton. The electrodes not only provide great comfort but are also antibacterial and antiallergic due to silver nanoparticles.

  1. Fibrous and textile materials for composite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fangueiro, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the fibers and textiles used in composite materials. It presents both existing technologies currently used in commercial applications and the latest advanced research and developments. It also discusses the different fiber forms and architectures, such as short fibers, unidirectional tows, directionally oriented structures or advanced 2D- and 3D-textile structures that are used in composite materials. In addition, it examines various synthetic, natural and metallic fibers that are used to reinforce polymeric, cementitious and metallic matrices, as well as fiber properties, special functionalities, manufacturing processes, and composite processing and properties. Two entire chapters are dedicated to advanced nanofiber and nanotube reinforced composite materials. The book goes on to highlight different surface treatments and finishes that are applied to improve fiber/matrix interfaces and other essential composite properties. Although a great deal of information about fibers and textile str...

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of 1,3-butadiene for hydrophobic finishing of textile substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Kartick K; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K, E-mail: ashwini@smita-iitd.co, E-mail: manjeet.jassal@smita-iitd.co [Smart and Innovative Textile Materials Group (SMITA), Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of textile has both ecological and economical advantages over the wet-chemical processing. However, reaction in atmospheric pressure plasma has important challenges to be overcome before it can be successfully used for finishing applications in textile. These challenges are (i) generating stable glow plasma in presence liquid/gaseous monomer, and (ii) keeping the generated radicals active in the presence of contaminants such as oxygen and air. In this study, a stable glow plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure in the mixture of gaseous reactive monomer-1,3-butadiene and He and was made to react with cellulosic textile substrate. After 12 min of plasma treatment, the hydrophilic surface of the cellulosic substrate turned into highly hydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic finish was found to be durable to soap washing. After soap washing, a water drop of 37 {mu}l took around 250 s to get absorbed in the treated sample compared to < 1 s in the untreated samples. The plasma modified samples showed water contact angle of around 134{sup 0}. Both top and bottom sides of the fabric showed similar hydrophobic results in terms of water absorbency and contact angle. The results may be attributed to chemical reaction of butadiene with the cellulosic textile substrate. The surface characterization of the plasma modified samples under SEM and AFM revealed modification of the surface under <100 nm. The results showed that atmospheric pressure plasma can be successfully used for carrying out reaction of 1,3-butadiene with cellulosic textile substrates for producing hydrophobic surface finish.

  3. Solution-Processed Graphene/MnO 2 Nanostructured Textiles for High-Performance Electrochemical Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Guihua

    2011-07-13

    Large scale energy storage system with low cost, high power, and long cycle life is crucial for addressing the energy problem when connected with renewable energy production. To realize grid-scale applications of the energy storage devices, there remain several key issues including the development of low-cost, high-performance materials that are environmentally friendly and compatible with low-temperature and large-scale processing. In this report, we demonstrate that solution-exfoliated graphene nanosheets (∼5 nm thickness) can be conformably coated from solution on three-dimensional, porous textiles support structures for high loading of active electrode materials and to facilitate the access of electrolytes to those materials. With further controlled electrodeposition of pseudocapacitive MnO2 nanomaterials, the hybrid graphene/MnO2-based textile yields high-capacitance performance with specific capacitance up to 315 F/g achieved. Moreover, we have successfully fabricated asymmetric electrochemical capacitors with graphene/MnO 2-textile as the positive electrode and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)-textile as the negative electrode in an aqueous Na 2SO4 electrolyte solution. These devices exhibit promising characteristics with a maximum power density of 110 kW/kg, an energy density of 12.5 Wh/kg, and excellent cycling performance of ∼95% capacitance retention over 5000 cycles. Such low-cost, high-performance energy textiles based on solution-processed graphene/MnO2 hierarchical nanostructures offer great promise in large-scale energy storage device applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. Influence of Czech textile-makers on development of textile industry in Serbia from the beginning to the second half of the 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menković Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of this study is influence of Czech nationals, primarily as immigrants, with capital invested in production of textile and textile products or with expert knowledge and entrepreneurship ability contributing to certain special features of Yugoslav and Serbian textile industry during the period of its development between the two World Wars. In this period the first industrial businesses for ready-to-wear and knitwear clothes have appeared, due to availability of locally manufactured woven and knit fabric, mostly produced from imported thread material. Both their initial establishment and later development were crucially influenced by foreign investments and immigrant workforce, hand-in-hand with craft workshops and communal manufactures specializing in finishing the pre-made products and creating the recognizable brand products. In addition to the predominant foreign capital from Austria, primarily Vienna, the next most important share was that of capital from Czechia, only distantly followed by that from England and Italy, with a significant contribution by the Jewish community from several European countries. At the same time, most of the qualified workforce immigrated from Czechia, including both ethnic Germans and ethnic Czech.

  5. A new physical method to assess handle properties of fabrics made from wood-based fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rous, M.; Liftinger, E.; Innerlohinger, J.; Malengier, B.; Vasile, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the handfeel of fabrics made of wood-based fibers such as viscose, modal and Lyocell was investigated in relation to cotton fabrics applying the Tissue Softness Analyzer (TSA) method in comparison to other classical methods. Two different construction groups of textile were investigated. The validity of TSA in assessing textile softness of these constructions was tested. TSA results were compared to human hand evaluation as well as to classical physical measurements like drape coefficient, ring pull-through and Handle-o-meter, as well as a newer device, the Fabric Touch Tester (FTT). Physical methods as well as human hand assessments mostly agreed on the softest and smoothest range, but showed different rankings in the harder/rougher side fabrics. TSA ranking of softness and smoothness corresponded to the rankings by other physical methods as well as with human hand feel for the basic textile constructions.

  6. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudnos, E.

    1992-01-01

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C

  7. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobials for textile applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Lena; Height, Murray; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Many antimicrobial technologies are available for textiles. They may be used in many different textile applications to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Due to the biological activity of the antimicrobial compounds, the assessment of the safety of these substances is an ongoing subject of research and regulatory scrutiny. This review aims to give an overview on the main compounds used today for antimicrobial textile functionalization. Based on an evaluation of scientific publications, market data as well as regulatory documents, the potential effects of antimicrobials on the environment and on human health were considered and also life cycle perspectives were taken into account. The characteristics of each compound were summarized according to technical, environmental and human health criteria. Triclosan, silane quaternary ammonium compounds, zinc pyrithione and silver-based compounds are the main antimicrobials used in textiles. The synthetic organic compounds dominate the antimicrobials market on a weight basis. On the technical side the application rates of the antimicrobials used to functionalize a textile product are an important parameter with treatments requiring lower dosage rates offering clear benefits in terms of less active substance required to achieve the functionality. The durability of the antimicrobial treatment has a strong influence on the potential for release and subsequent environmental effects. In terms of environmental criteria, all compounds were rated similarly in effective removal in wastewater treatment processes. The extent of published information about environmental behavior for each compound varies, limiting the possibility for an in-depth comparison of all textile-relevant parameters across the antimicrobials. Nevertheless the comparative evaluation showed that each antimicrobial technology has specific risks and benefits that should be taken into account in evaluating the suitability of different antimicrobial products. The

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Three-Dimensional (3D Auxetic Textile Composite under Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifang Zeng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a finite element (FE analysis of three-dimensional (3D auxetic textile composite by using commercial software ANSYS 15 under compression. The two-dimensional (2D FE model was first developed and validated by experiment. Then, the validated model was used to evaluate effects of structural parameters and constituent material properties. For the comparison, 3D non-auxetic composite that was made with the same constituent materials and structural parameters, but with different yarn arrangement in the textile structure was also analyzed at the same time. The analysis results showed that the auxetic and non-auxetic composites have different compression behaviors and the auxetic composite has better the energy absorption capacity than the non-auxetic composite under the same compression stress. The study has provided us a guidance to design and fabricate auxetic composites with the required mechanical behavior by appropriately selecting structural parameters and constituent materials.

  9. Effect of ozonation on the biological treatability of a textile mill effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, O; Dulkadiroglu, H; Kabdasli, I; Sozen, S; Babuna, F Germirli; Orhon, D

    2002-12-01

    Ozonation applied prior to biological processes, has proved to be a very effective chemical treatment step mostly for colour removal when soluble dyes are used in textile finishing operations. Its impact on biological treatability however has not been fully evaluated yet. This study evaluates the effect of ozonation on the quality of wastewater from a textile mill involving bleaching and reactive dyeing of cotton and synthetic knit fabric. The effect of ozonation on COD fractionation and kinetic coefficients defining major biological processes is emphasised. The results indicate that the extent of ozone applied greatly affects the remaining organic carbon composition in the wastewater. The relative magnitude of different COD fractions varies as a function of the ozone dose. Ozonation does not however exert a measurable impact on the rate of major biological processes.

  10. Thickness determination in textile material design: dynamic modeling and numerical algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Dinghua; Ge, Meibao

    2012-01-01

    Textile material design is of paramount importance in the study of functional clothing design. It is therefore important to determine the dynamic heat and moisture transfer characteristics in the human body–clothing–environment system, which directly determine the heat–moisture comfort level of the human body. Based on a model of dynamic heat and moisture transfer with condensation in porous fabric at low temperature, this paper presents a new inverse problem of textile thickness determination (IPTTD). Adopting the idea of the least-squares method, we formulate the IPTTD into a function minimization problem. By means of the finite-difference method, quasi-solution method and direct search method for one-dimensional minimization problems, we construct iterative algorithms of the approximated solution for the IPTTD. Numerical simulation results validate the formulation of the IPTTD and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed numerical algorithms. (paper)

  11. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-09-29

    The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

  12. 2D net shape weaving for cost effective manufacture of textile reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, D. M. P.; Kern, M.; Hoffmann, G.; Cherif, C.

    2017-10-01

    Despite significant weight and performance advantages over metal parts, the today’s demand for fibre-reinforced polymer composites (FRPC) has been limited mainly by their large manufacturing cost. The combination of dry textile preforms and low-cost consolidation processes such as resin transfer molding (RTM) has been appointed as a promising approach to low-cost FRPC manufacture. At the current state of the art, tooling and impregnation technology is well understood whereas preform fabrication technology has not been developed effectively. This paper presents an advanced 2D net shape weaving technology developed with the aim to establish a more cost effective system for the manufacture of dry textile preforms for FRPC. 2D net shape weaving is developed based on open reed weave (ORW) technology and enables the manufacture of 2D contoured woven fabrics with firm edge, so that oversize cutting and hand trimming after molding are no longer required. The introduction of 2D net shape woven fabrics helps to reduce material waste, cycle time and preform manufacturing cost significantly. Furthermore, higher grade of automation in preform fabrication can be achieved.

  13. An investigation to adopt zero liquid discharge in textile dyeing using advanced oxidation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmd, F.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel idea of using ozone oxidation at the end of reactive dyeing process was explored in order to achieve zero discharge dyeing. An advanced oxidative treatment was given during the dyeing process to remove unfixed and hydrolyzed reactive dyes from cotton substrate. Three different shades were dyed using vinylsulphone reactive class of dyes. At the end of fixation step, washing of fabrics was carried out using appropriate quantities of ozone in the process. Ozone oxidation continued until the liquor was decolorized around 95-100% and COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) was reduced about 80-90%, thus achieving zero liquid discharge dyeing process. The decolouration efficiency of wastewater was regarded as an indicative of removal of dyes from the textile materials because fabric was being washed continuously in the same liquor. Fabric samples dyed with conventional and new methods were compared in terms of change in shade, colourfastness properties, colour stripping, and fabric appearance. Overall results showed that the use of ozone during reactive dyeing can result in less water consumption, reduced process time, and zero discharge of coloured effluents from textile dyeing factories. (author)

  14. THE BEHAVIOUR OF FABRICS USED FOR ANTIMIS PRODUCTION TO PILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHIRILĂ Mihai Maxim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study about the behaviour of plain textiles used for the production of antimis (Christian-orthodox liturgical item used in the liturgy to pilling explores the functional classification of different types of antimis as a textile product made out the following different types of fabrics: natural silk, flax, viscose, polyamide 6.6. Pilling is a phenomenon which consists of the formation of small balls made out of fibre congeries on the textile’s surface due to attrition and fatigue. For textiles used as liturgical items, the process of pilling formation includes the following stages: the emergence of the pilling surfaces (the formation of fuzzy, fibre tangle (appearance of small balls, and the detachment of small balls from the fabric’s surface. The analysis method of pilling for liturgical items made out the four types of fabrics mentioned above consists of stereoscopic microscopy techniques and electronic microscopy methods (SEM. The images of textiles samples (yarns and fabrics will be captured using a video microscope. Quantitative tests have been done to determine the metric number and the tex title of the above-mentioned fabrics. The increased resistance of silk to pilling compared to nylon, flax, and viscose can be attributed to the chemical properties of fibres and structural characteristics of silk fabric. The structural compactness of the same fiber mixture of natural silk fabric with bonded fabric will have a higher resistance coefficient to pilling compared to the other mentioned fabrics. Through this, the value of use and durability of the antimis will increase.

  15. Development and characterization of a multilayer matrix textile sensor for interface pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoli, Ilaria; Maselli, Martina; Cecchi, Francesca; Laschi, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    Matrix textile sensors hold great potential for measuring pressure distribution in applications of modern daily lives, mainly regarding the biomedical field, but also robotics, automotive systems, and wearable and consumer electronics. However, an experimental analysis of their metrological properties is lacking in the literature, thus compromising their widespread acceptance. In the present work, we report the characterization of an 8 × 8 textile sensor assembled by sandwiching a piezoresistive fabric sheet between two outer fabric layers embedding conductive rows and columns. The location of the applied pressure can be identified by detecting the position where the change of resistances occurs between the external conductive paths. The sensor structure, its electrical circuit and characteristics are described in detail, after studying both the integration levels of the hierarchical structure and the composition of the piezoresistive fabric sheet. The pressure measurement range and the calibration curve were studied by tuning circuital parameters. Repeatability, time drift, temperature dependence, signal-to-noise ratio and dynamic response were analyzed. Novel tests were employed to consider the sensor sensitivity to stretch, shear force and surface curvature. A special analysis was taken over hysteresis and dynamic accuracy, focusing on a possible compensating solution. Results indicated that the system provides overall good quality performances with the main drawback of a limited dynamic accuracy, typical of piezoresistive sensing elements. Nevertheless, the use of textiles allows the realization of lightweight, wearable, washable, thin and stretchable sensors. In addition fabric sensors are robust, cheap, easy-to-use and employable to cover large area three dimensional surfaces. The wide characterization reported here could provide precious insights and guidelines to help researchers and users in taking advantages from all of these benefits, supporting them in

  16. The future of textile production in high wage countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M.; Gloy, Y.-S.; Gries, T.

    2017-10-01

    It is undisputed that smart production in the context of industry 4.0 offers significant potential for industrial production in Germany. Exploiting this potential provides an opportunity to meet the growing competitive pressure for textile production in high-wage Germany. The complete cross-linking of textile mills towards Textile Production 4.0 means substantial savings. However, currently there are still some challenges that have to be overcome on the long way to Textile Production 4.0. This paper initially reflects the particular challenges of textile production in high-wage Germany. Later, the vision of the future of smart textile production will be outlined. In addition, first pilot solutions and current research approaches which pave the way for Textile Production 4.0 are described.

  17. Soft capacitor fibers using conductive polymers for electronic textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jian Feng; Gorgutsa, Stephan; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-11-01

    A novel, highly flexible, conductive polymer-based fiber with high electric capacitance is reported. In its cross section the fiber features a periodic sequence of hundreds of conductive and isolating plastic layers positioned around metallic electrodes. The fiber is fabricated using the fiber drawing method, where a multi-material macroscopic preform is drawn into a sub-millimeter capacitor fiber in a single fabrication step. Several kilometers of fibers can be obtained from a single preform with fiber diameters ranging between 500 and 1000 µm. A typical measured capacitance of our fibers is 60-100 nF m-1 and it is independent of the fiber diameter. Analysis of the fiber frequency response shows that in its simplest interrogation mode the capacitor fiber has a transverse resistance of 5 kΩ m L-1, which is inversely proportional to the fiber length L and is independent of the fiber diameter. Softness of the fiber materials, the absence of liquid electrolyte in the fiber structure, ease of scalability to large production volumes and high capacitance of our fibers make them interesting for various smart textile applications ranging from distributed sensing to energy storage.

  18. Soft capacitor fibers using conductive polymers for electronic textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Jian Feng; Gorgutsa, Stephan; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-01-01

    A novel, highly flexible, conductive polymer-based fiber with high electric capacitance is reported. In its cross section the fiber features a periodic sequence of hundreds of conductive and isolating plastic layers positioned around metallic electrodes. The fiber is fabricated using the fiber drawing method, where a multi-material macroscopic preform is drawn into a sub-millimeter capacitor fiber in a single fabrication step. Several kilometers of fibers can be obtained from a single preform with fiber diameters ranging between 500 and 1000 µm. A typical measured capacitance of our fibers is 60–100 nF m −1 and it is independent of the fiber diameter. Analysis of the fiber frequency response shows that in its simplest interrogation mode the capacitor fiber has a transverse resistance of 5 kΩ m L −1 , which is inversely proportional to the fiber length L and is independent of the fiber diameter. Softness of the fiber materials, the absence of liquid electrolyte in the fiber structure, ease of scalability to large production volumes and high capacitance of our fibers make them interesting for various smart textile applications ranging from distributed sensing to energy storage

  19. Textile wastewater biocoagulation by Caesalpinia spinosa extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Revelo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2014/12/06 - Accepted: 2015/03/24The textile industry in Ecuador is still a matter of concern because of the inappropriate disposal of their effluents into the local water supply. The present research was carried out in Pelileo (Tungurahua-Ecuador where textile wastewaters are discharged into waterways. An environmentally friendly solution to treat highly contaminated organic textile wastewaters is herein evaluated: a remediation process of biocoagulation was performed using extracts from the Caesalpinia spinosa plant also known as guarango or tara. It was determined that using C. spinosa extracts to treat wastewater has the same statistical effect as when applying a chemical coagulant (polyaluminum chloride 15%. Activated zeolite adsorbed color residuals from treated water to obtain turbidity removal more than 90%. A mathematical model showed that turbidity removal between 50-90% can be obtained by applying 25-45 g/L of guarango extracts and zeolite per 700 mL of textile wastewater. The natural coagulation using C. spinosa extracts produced 85% less sludge than polyaluminum chloride, and removed high organic matter content in the wastewater (1050 mg/L by 52%.

  20. Friction in textile thermoplastic composites forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko; ten Thije, R.H.W.; Sachs, Ulrich; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Binetruy, C.; Boussu, F.

    2010-01-01

    A previously developed mesoscopic friction model for glass/PP textile composite laminates during forming is evaluated for glass and carbon/PPS laminates, at higher temperatures and lower viscosities than before. Experiments were performed for tool/ply and ply/ply configurations in a new friction

  1. Treatment and recycling of textile wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciardelli, G.; Brighetti, G.

    1999-01-01

    The results of an experimental campaign involving the treatment of textile wastewaters for recycle by mean of an absorption resins pilot plant are briefly described. The case study concerned the treatment and reuse of yarns dyeing wastewaters. Results obtained indicate the possibility of an industrial scale implementation of the technique [it

  2. Textiles. Teacher Edition. Marketing Education LAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Jana

    This learning activity packet is designed to help students to acquire a competency: how to use knowledge of textile design to gain expertise in preparation for a career in the fashion industry. The unit consists of the competency, four objectives, suggested learning activities, transparency masters, and a pretest/posttest with answer keys.…

  3. 4-H Textile Science Beginner Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Jan

    This packet contains three 4-H projects for students beginning the sewing sequence of the textile sciences area. The projects cover basics of sewing using sewing machines, more difficult sewing machine techniques, and hand sewing. Each project provides an overview of what the student will learn, what materials are needed, and suggested projects…

  4. State Skill Standards: Fashion, Textiles and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rene Crepaldi; Gaudy, Glenna; Green-Jobe, Victoria; Hatch, Susan; Moen, Julianne; Sheldon, Shannon; Smith, Loree; Chessell, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The mission of Fashion, Textiles and Design Education is to prepare students for family and community life and careers in the fashion industry by creating opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors needed to: (1) Examine skills needed to effectively manage clothing decisions; (2) Evaluate the use, care and production…

  5. Water and Oil Repellent Finishing of Textiles by UV Curing: Evaluation of the Influence of Scaled-Up Process Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Ferrero

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, various textile fabrics were coated with silicone and fluorocarbon-based resins by photo-curing using ultraviolet irradiation. A great number of large fabric samples were impregnated by padding with commercial finishing agents and then irradiated in air with a high power, semi-industrial UV source. The add-on of various finishing agents was kept low to reduce the treatment cost. White and dyed samples of different textile composition were treated and evaluated in terms of conferred repellency, yellowing, or color changes. Most relevant process parameters were investigated, utilizing the thermal process normally adopted at industrial level as reference. The results were statistically evaluated by ANOVA using Minitab 16 software, in order to identify the most influential parameters and to evaluate the real possibility of replacing the thermal treatment with UV curing.

  6. All-Solid-State Textile Batteries Made from Nano-Emulsion Conducting Polymer Inks for Wearable Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapani Ryhänen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A rollable and all-solid-state textile lithium battery based on fabric matrix and polymer electrolyte that allows flexibility and fast-charging capability is reported. When immerged into poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT nano-emulsion inks, an insulating fabric is converted into a conductive battery electrode for a fully solid state lithium battery with the highest specific energy capacity of 68 mAh/g. This is superior to most of the solid-state conducting polymer primary and/or secondary batteries reported. The bending radius of such a textile battery is less than 1.5 mm while lightening up an LED. This new material combination and inherent flexibility is well suited to provide an energy source for future wearable and woven electronics.

  7. Optimisation of the recovery of carotenoids from tomato processing wastes: application on textile dyeing and assessment of its antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaka, Noureddine; El Ksibi, Imen; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2017-01-01

    The present study has been focused on the extraction of natural pigments from tomato industry waste. At first, different solvents and solvents mixture were compared to determine which one is the best for extracting carotenoids compounds from tomato by-products. A mixture of hexane and acetone gave the highest carotenoids extraction yield among the others examined. The extraction conditions were optimised using a five-level-five-factor central composite design. Under optimal conditions, solvent solid ratio 90, hexane percentage in the solvent mixture 60, extraction duration 50, number of extractions 4 and extraction temperature 35 °C, the yield of carotenoids was 80.7 μg/g. The coloured extract of tomato by-products was applied on textile fabrics to investigate the dyeing characteristics and antioxidant activities. The results indicate that extract can be applied on textile fabrics (wool, silk and polyamide) to produce coloured clothing with acceptable antioxidant properties.

  8. Carbon nanotube woven textile photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Ahmed; Wang, Xuan; Mirri, Francesca; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Fujimura, Naoki; Suzuki, Daichi; Soundarapandian, Karuppasamy P.; Kawano, Yukio; Pasquali, Matteo; Kono, Junichiro

    2018-01-01

    The increasing interest in mobile and wearable technology demands the enhancement of functionality of clothing through incorporation of sophisticated architectures of multifunctional materials. Flexible electronic and photonic devices based on organic materials have made impressive progress over the past decade, but higher performance, simpler fabrication, and most importantly, compatibility with woven technology are desired. Here we report on the development of a weaved, substrateless, and polarization-sensitive photodetector based on doping-engineered fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes. This room-temperature-operating, self-powered detector responds to radiation in an ultrabroad spectral range, from the ultraviolet to the terahertz, through the photothermoelectric effect, with a low noise-equivalent power (a few nW/Hz 1 /2) throughout the range and with a Z T -factor value that is twice as large as that of previously reported carbon nanotube-based photothermoelectric photodetectors. Particularly, we fabricated a ˜1 -m-long device consisting of tens of p+-p- junctions and weaved it into a shirt. This device demonstrated a collective photoresponse of the series-connected junctions under global illumination. The performance of the device did not show any sign of deterioration through 200 bending tests with a bending radius smaller than 100 μ m as well as standard washing and ironing cycles. This unconventional photodetector will find applications in wearable technology that require detection of electromagnetic radiation.

  9. High-Speed Coating Method for Photovoltaic Textiles with Closed-Type Die Coater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takahiko; Shibayama, Norihisa; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Shiraishi, Kenji; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2013-06-01

    We developed a closed-type die-coating method to fabricate thin films for electronic devices. We succeeded in the die-coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) water dispersions and regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) solution to fabricate thin films of these organic materials with extremely high speeds of 5 and 20 m/min, respectively. The film thicknesses were evaluated by cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The deviations of the film thicknesses from our target values were less than 5%. We fabricated Al/P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS/indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) textiles as an example of an application of the method, and the photovoltaic characteristic of the devices was confirmed.

  10. Preliminary Investigations into the Development of Textile Based Temperature Sensor for Healthcare Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kennon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Human body temperature is an important sign of physical condition in terms of comfort, heat or cold stresses, and of performance. This paper presents the preliminary investigation into the design, manufacturing and testing of the textile based temperature sensor. This sensing fabric may be employed to measure the temperature of the human body on a continuous basis over extensive periods of time, outside the clinical environment. The sensing fabric was manufactured on an industrial scale flat-bed knitting machine by laying-in the sensing element (in the form of fine metal wire into the double layer knitted structure. The operational principle of the sensing fabric is based on the inherent tendency of metal wire to change in its electrical resistance because of the change in its temperature. An experimental resistance-temperature relationship showed promising validation in comparison with their modeled counterparts.

  11. Polyester Textiles as a Source of Microplastics from Households: A Mechanistic Study to Understand Microfiber Release During Washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Edgar; Nowack, Bernd; Mitrano, Denise M

    2017-06-20

    Microplastic fibers make up a large proportion of microplastics found in the environment, especially in urban areas. There is good reason to consider synthetic textiles a major source of microplastic fibers, and it will not diminish since the use of synthetic fabrics, especially polyester, continues to increase. In this study we provide quantitative data regarding the size and mass of microplastic fibers released from synthetic (polyester) textiles during simulated home washing under controlled laboratory conditions. Consideration of fabric structure and washing conditions (use of detergents, temperature, wash duration, and sequential washings) allowed us to study the propensity of fiber shedding in a mechanistic way. Thousands of individual fibers were measured (number, length) from each wash solution to provide a robust data set on which to draw conclusions. Among all the variables tested, the use of detergent appeared to affect the total mass of fibers released the most, yet the detergent composition (liquid or powder) or overdosing of detergent did not significantly influence microplastic release. Despite different release quantities due to the addition of a surfactant (approximately 0.025 and 0.1 mg fibers/g textile washed, without and with detergent, respectively), the overall microplastic fiber length profile remained similar regardless of wash condition or fabric structure, with the vast majority of fibers ranging between 100 and 800 μm in length irrespective of wash cycle number. This indicates that the fiber staple length and/or debris encapsulated inside the fabric from the yarn spinning could be directly responsible for releasing stray fibers. This study serves as a first look toward understanding the physical properties of the textile itself to better understand the mechanisms of fiber shedding in the context of microplastic fiber release into laundry wash water.

  12. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  13. Methods of PCM microcapsules application and the thermal properties of modified knitted fabric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejman, Alicja, E-mail: anejman@iw.lodz.pl [Textile Research Institute, Scientific Department of Unconventional Technologies and Textiles, 5/15 Brzezinska St., 92-103 Lodz (Poland); Cieślak, Małgorzata [Textile Research Institute, Scientific Department of Unconventional Technologies and Textiles, 5/15 Brzezinska St., 92-103 Lodz (Poland); Gajdzicki, Bogumił [Textile Research Institute, Scientific Department of Textile Chemistry and Products Modification, 5/15 Brzezinska St., 92-103 Lodz (Poland); Goetzendorf-Grabowska, Bogna; Karaszewska, Agnieszka [Textile Research Institute, Scientific Department of Unconventional Technologies and Textiles, 5/15 Brzezinska St., 92-103 Lodz (Poland)

    2014-08-10

    Highlights: • We applied microcapsules containing n-octadecane for the modification of knitted fabric. • We used printing, coating and padding techniques for the application of microcapsules. • M-PCM application methods allow to regulate the thermal properties of textiles. • M-PCM application methods allow to regulate the air permeability properties of textiles. - Abstract: The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of application methods of microcapsules containing n-octadecane as phase change materials (M-PCM) on the thermal properties and air permeability of modified textile fabric. Polyester knitted fabric, printing, coating and padding methods and polymer pastes with 20 wt.% of M-PCM were used. For the assessment of modification effects the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used. DSC analysis showed that the highest enthalpy of phase transitions has printed fabric and the lowest padded fabric. The widest range of phase transitions temperatures was observed for printed fabric, slightly narrower for coated fabric and the narrowest for padded fabric. SEM analysis showed differences in the morphology of modified fabrics depending on incorporation techniques, which are compatible with differences in air permeability results. M-PCM application techniques allow to regulate the thermal and air permeability properties of fabric.

  14. Methods of PCM microcapsules application and the thermal properties of modified knitted fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejman, Alicja; Cieślak, Małgorzata; Gajdzicki, Bogumił; Goetzendorf-Grabowska, Bogna; Karaszewska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We applied microcapsules containing n-octadecane for the modification of knitted fabric. • We used printing, coating and padding techniques for the application of microcapsules. • M-PCM application methods allow to regulate the thermal properties of textiles. • M-PCM application methods allow to regulate the air permeability properties of textiles. - Abstract: The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of application methods of microcapsules containing n-octadecane as phase change materials (M-PCM) on the thermal properties and air permeability of modified textile fabric. Polyester knitted fabric, printing, coating and padding methods and polymer pastes with 20 wt.% of M-PCM were used. For the assessment of modification effects the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used. DSC analysis showed that the highest enthalpy of phase transitions has printed fabric and the lowest padded fabric. The widest range of phase transitions temperatures was observed for printed fabric, slightly narrower for coated fabric and the narrowest for padded fabric. SEM analysis showed differences in the morphology of modified fabrics depending on incorporation techniques, which are compatible with differences in air permeability results. M-PCM application techniques allow to regulate the thermal and air permeability properties of fabric

  15. Optimizing Polymer Infusion Process for Thin Ply Textile Composites with Novel Matrix System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somen K. Bhudolia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For mass production of structural composites, use of different textile patterns, custom preforming, room temperature cure high performance polymers and simplistic manufacturing approaches are desired. Woven fabrics are widely used for infusion processes owing to their high permeability but their localised mechanical performance is affected due to inherent associated crimps. The current investigation deals with manufacturing low-weight textile carbon non-crimp fabrics (NCFs composites with a room temperature cure epoxy and a novel liquid Methyl methacrylate (MMA thermoplastic matrix, Elium®. Vacuum assisted resin infusion (VARI process is chosen as a cost effective manufacturing technique. Process parameters optimisation is required for thin NCFs due to intrinsic resistance it offers to the polymer flow. Cycles of repetitive manufacturing studies were carried out to optimise the NCF-thermoset (TS and NCF with novel reactive thermoplastic (TP resin. It was noticed that the controlled and optimised usage of flow mesh, vacuum level and flow speed during the resin infusion plays a significant part in deciding the final quality of the fabricated composites. The material selections, the challenges met during the manufacturing and the methods to overcome these are deliberated in this paper. An optimal three stage vacuum technique developed to manufacture the TP and TS composites with high fibre volume and lower void content is established and presented.

  16. Optimizing Polymer Infusion Process for Thin Ply Textile Composites with Novel Matrix System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhudolia, Somen K; Perrotey, Pavel; Joshi, Sunil C

    2017-03-15

    For mass production of structural composites, use of different textile patterns, custom preforming, room temperature cure high performance polymers and simplistic manufacturing approaches are desired. Woven fabrics are widely used for infusion processes owing to their high permeability but their localised mechanical performance is affected due to inherent associated crimps. The current investigation deals with manufacturing low-weight textile carbon non-crimp fabrics (NCFs) composites with a room temperature cure epoxy and a novel liquid Methyl methacrylate (MMA) thermoplastic matrix, Elium ® . Vacuum assisted resin infusion (VARI) process is chosen as a cost effective manufacturing technique. Process parameters optimisation is required for thin NCFs due to intrinsic resistance it offers to the polymer flow. Cycles of repetitive manufacturing studies were carried out to optimise the NCF-thermoset (TS) and NCF with novel reactive thermoplastic (TP) resin. It was noticed that the controlled and optimised usage of flow mesh, vacuum level and flow speed during the resin infusion plays a significant part in deciding the final quality of the fabricated composites. The material selections, the challenges met during the manufacturing and the methods to overcome these are deliberated in this paper. An optimal three stage vacuum technique developed to manufacture the TP and TS composites with high fibre volume and lower void content is established and presented.

  17. Analysis of caustic soda of different manufacturers in pakistan for mercerization of cotton textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahid, B.; Faisal, S.; Siddique, S.H.

    2017-01-01

    Pakistan has sufficient production capacity of caustic soda to cater the needs of the local industry. Presently, Pakistan has four major plants with production capacity around 435,000 mega ton per year of caustic soda of various grades. Textile industry of Pakistan is the major consumer of produced high grade caustic soda; as the presence of any impurities especially dissolved salts and metals is unfavorable for wet processing of cotton. This study investigates the performance of three different local brands of caustic soda intended for use in textile wet processing of cotton fabric specifically for mercerization process. The brands were selected based on their purity grades. The selected caustic soda samples were chemically analyzed for the presence of impurities. Twenty seven cotton fabric samples (nine samples of each brand) were prepared by mercerization in slack state. The cotton fabric samples were tested for changes in surface morphology, tensile strength (warp and weft), tear strength, air permeability and K/S (Colour Strength). The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) to ascertain the statistical equivalence within and between the tested brands. The results showed no significant differences across the tested brands at a 95% confidence level except for air permeability and K/S in blue shade. (author)

  18. Polysulfone thin film composite nanofiltration membranes for removal of textile dyes wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutedja, Andrew; Aileen Josephine, Claresta; Mangindaan, Dave

    2017-12-01

    This research was conducted to produce nanofiltration (NF) membranes, which have good performance in terms of removal of textile dye (Reactive Red 120, RR120) from simulated wastewater as one of several eco-engineering developments for sustainable water resource management. Phase inversion technique was utilized to fabricate the membrane with polysulfone (PSF) support, dissolved in N-methyl-2 pyrollidone (NMP) solvent, and diethylene glycol (DEG) as non-solvent additive. The fabricated membrane then modified with the additional of dopamine coating and further modified by interfacial polymerization (IP) to form a thin film composite (TFC)-NF membrane with PSF substrate. TFC was formed from interaction between amine monomer (2 %-weight of m-phenylenediamine (MPD) in deionized water) and acyl chloride (0.2 %-weight of trimesoyl chloride (TMC) in hexane). From this study, the fabricated PSF-TFC membrane could remove dyestuff from RR120 wastewater by 88% rejection at 120 psi. The result of this study is promising to be applied in Indonesia where researches on removal of dyes from textile wastewater by using membranes are still quite rare. Therefore, this paper may open new avenues for development of eco-engineering development in Indonesia.

  19. Textile Resource Conservation Final Report CRADA No. TC-0699-93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCreight, Dan J. [Institute of Textile Technology, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    This project was undertaken to develop and demonstrate on a pilot scale the use of electro-osmotic transport to increase the efficiency of textiles wet processing operations. In particular, we sought to develop a means of rinsing textiles to remove material entrapped between the individual fibers that constitute a yarn. Material trapped within the yarn is slow to exchange with rinse water flowing primarily in the open weave are abetween the yarns. The application of an external field (strength, 5-50 kV /m) requires only a few volts for most fabric thicknesses. This field is sufficient to promote a rapid exchange of material to enhance rinsing and reduce the water required for rinsing from about 20 kg/kg-fabric to 3-6 kg/kg-fabric. We successfully developed technical and economic models of application of the process to the rinsing of many materials of industrial importance, including dyes, tints, chemicals, detergents and dye electrolytes. We demonstrated the process on a pilot plant scale using a translator designed in cooperation with Milliken and Company (Spartanburg, SC).

  20. New advances in protection against solar ultraviolet radiation in textiles for summer clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, José; de Gálvez, María Victoria; Sánchez-Roldán, Cristina; Herrera-Ceballos, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Clothing is considered one of the most important tools for photoprotection against harmful solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The standard for sun-protective clothing is based on erythema despite other biological effects of UVR on the skin. We analyzed the potential protection against UVR in fabrics destined for summer clothing based on several action spectra. We examined 50 garments classified by type of fabric composition, structure of the fiber yarn and color. The ultraviolet protection factor was calculated based on fabric ultraviolet transmittance corrected for erythema according to the EU standard E-13758 as well as the UVA transmittance of fabrics. UVR protection was also analyzed in base of different action spectra as for previtamin D3, nonmelanoma skin cancer, photoimmunosuppression and photoaging. Most knitted fabrics used for sports T-shirts offered excellent ratings for ultraviolet protection while normal shirts showed very low ratings, particularly against photoaging. The cover is the most influential variable in fabric photoprotection, having an exponential relationship with the UPF. The relation between cover and UVA protection was linearly negative. Information about ultraviolet protection in textiles used for summer clothing should be included in labeling as some types of fabrics, especially those used for shirts, offer very low UVR protection. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  1. Durable Superomniphobic Surface on Cotton Fabrics via Coating of Silicone Rubber and Fluoropolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsheen Moiz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Performance textiles that protect human from different threats and dangers from environment are in high demand, and the advancement in functionalization technology together with employing advanced materials have made this an area of research focus. In this work, silicone rubber and environmentally friendly fluoropolymers have been employed to explore superomniphobic surface on cotton fabrics without compromising comfort much. It has been found that a cross-linked network between the rubber membrane and the fluoropolymers has been formed. The surface appearance, morphology, handle, thickness and chemical components of the surface of cotton fabrics have been changed. The coated fabrics showed resistance to water, aqueous liquid, oil, chemicals and soil. The comfort of the coated fabrics is different to uncoated cotton fabrics due to the existence of coated layers on the surface of cotton fabrics. This work would benefit the development and design of the next generation of performance textiles with balanced performance and comfort.

  2. Flame retardant cotton fabrics by electron beam-induced polymerization of vinyl phosphonate oligomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Takeshi; Ametani, Kazuo; Enomoto, Ichiro

    1988-01-01

    Vinyl phosphonate oligomer is presently used commercially as a cellulosic flame retardant in conjugation with N-methylol acrylamide, using a persulfate catalyst and a thermal cure. This combination can also be cured at room temperature with electron beams, as can the vinyl phosphonate alone. For the textile application, fixation of flame retardants by electron beams with low energy is one of the most promising applications. For the purpose of preparing flame resistant cotton fabrics such as bed sheets and pajamas, flame retardant curing of vinyl phosphonate oligomer on cotton fabrics was examined using electron beams from a self-sealed electron beam processor and gamma rays from a 60 Co source. A joint investigation was undertaken by the Tokyo Metropolitan Textile Research Institute and Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center to determine the feasibility of curing vinyl phosphonate oligomer on the cotton fabrics for textile finishing. (author)

  3. A Comparative Study of Natural Fiber and Glass Fiber Fabrics Properties with Metal or Oxide Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusis, Andrej; Pentjuss, Evalds; Bajars, Gunars; Sidorovicha, Uljana; Strazds, Guntis

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing global demand for technical textiles industries is stimulated to develop new materials based on hybrid materials (yarns, fabrics) made from natural and glass fibres. The influence of moisture on the electrical properties of metal and metal oxide coated bast (flax, hemp) fibre and glass fibre fabrics are studied by electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The bast fibre and glass fiber fabrics are characterized with electrical sheet resistance. The method for description of electrical sheet resistance of the metal and metal oxide coated technical textile is discussed. The method can be used by designers to estimate the influence of moisture on technical data of new metal coated hybrid technical textile materials and products

  4. Design, fabrication and metrological evaluation of wearable pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goy, C B; Menichetti, V; Yanicelli, L M; Lucero, J B; López, M A Gómez; Parodi, N F; Herrera, M C

    2015-04-01

    Pressure sensors are valuable transducers that are necessary in a huge number of medical application. However, the state of the art of compact and lightweight pressure sensors with the capability of measuring the contact pressure between two surfaces (contact pressure sensors) is very poor. In this work, several types of wearable contact pressure sensors are fabricated using different conductive textile materials and piezo-resistive films. The fabricated sensors differ in size, the textile conductor used and/or the number of layers of the sandwiched piezo-resistive film. The intention is to study, through the obtaining of their calibration curves, their metrological properties (repeatability, sensitivity and range) and determine which physical characteristics improve their ability for measuring contact pressures. It has been found that it is possible to obtain wearable contact pressure sensors through the proposed fabrication process with satisfactory repeatability, range and sensitivity; and that some of these properties can be improved by the physical characteristics of the sensors.

  5. Preparation and Application of Conductive Textile Coatings Filled with Honeycomb Structured Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Govaert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical conductive textile coatings with variable amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. Formulations of textile coatings were prepared with up to 15 wt % of CNT, based on the solid weight of the binder. The binders are water based polyacrylate dispersions. The CNTs were mixed into the binder dispersion starting from a commercially available aqueous CNT dispersion that is compatible with the binder dispersion. Coating formulations with variable CNT concentrations were applied on polyester and cotton woven and knitted fabrics by different textile coating techniques: direct coating, transfer coating, and screen printing. The coatings showed increasing electrical conductivity with increasing CNT concentration. The coatings can be regarded to be electrically conductive (sheet resistivity<103 Ohm/sq starting at 3 wt% CNT. The degree of dispersion of the carbon nanotubes particles inside the coating was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The CNT particles form honeycomb structured networks in the coatings, proving a high degree of dispersion. This honeycomb structure of CNT particles is forming a conductive network in the coating leading to low resistivity values.

  6. Macroscale porous carbonized polydopamine-modified cotton textile for application as electrode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lizhen; Zhao, Shaofei; He, Miao

    2018-02-01

    The anode material is a crucial factor that significantly affects the cost and performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, a novel macroscale porous, biocompatible, highly conductive and low cost electrode, carbonized polydopamine-modified cotton textile (NC@CCT), is fabricated by using normal cheap waste cotton textiles as raw material via a simple in situ polymerization and carbonization treatment as anode of MFCs. The physical and chemical characterizations show that the macroscale porous and biocompatible NC@CCT electrode is coated by nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticles and offers a large specific surface area (888.67 m2 g-1) for bacterial cells growth, accordingly greatly increases the loading amount of bacterial cells and facilitates extracellular electron transfer (EET). As a result, the MFC equipped with the NC@CCT anode achieves a maximum power density of 931 ± 61 mW m-2, which is 80.5% higher than that of commercial carbon felt (516 ± 27 mW m-2) anode. Moreover, making full use of the normal cheap waste cotton textiles can greatly reduce the cost of MFCs and the environmental pollution problem.

  7. Electromagnetic shielding mechanisms using soft magnetic stainless steel fiber enabled polyester textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Shie, Jing-Wen

    2012-11-01

    This work studied the effects of conductivity, magnetic loss, and complex permittivity when using blended textiles (SSF/PET) of polyester fibers (PET) with stainless steel fibers (SSF) on electromagnetic wave shielding mechanisms at electromagnetic wave frequencies ranging from 30 MHz to 1500 MHz. The 316L stainless steel fiber used in this study had 38 vol% γ austenite and 62 vol% α' martensite crystalline phases, which was characterized by an x-ray diffractometer. Due to the magnetic and dielectric loss of soft metallic magnetic stainless steel fiber enabled polyester textiles, the relationship between the reflection/absorption/transmission behaviors of the electromagnetic wave and the electrical/magnetic/dielectric properties of the SSF and SSF/PET fabrics was analyzed. Our results showed that the electromagnetic interference shielding of the SSF/PET textiles show an absorption-dominant mechanism, which attributed to the dielectric loss and the magnetic loss at a lower frequency and attributed to the magnetic loss at a higher frequency, respectively.

  8. In Vitro Evaluation and Mechanism Analysis of the Fiber Shedding Property of Textile Pile Debridement Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Fu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fiber shedding is a critical problem in biomedical textile debridement materials, which leads to infection and impairs wound healing. In this work, single fiber pull-out test was proposed as an in vitro evaluation for the fiber shedding property of a textile pile debridement material. Samples with different structural design (pile densities, numbers of ground yarns and coating times were prepared and estimated under this testing method. Results show that single fiber pull-out test offers an appropriate in vitro evaluation for the fiber shedding property of textile pile debridement materials. Pull-out force for samples without back-coating exhibited a slight escalating trend with the supplement in pile density and number of ground yarn plies, while back-coating process significantly raised the single fiber pull-out force. For fiber shedding mechanism analysis, typical pull-out behavior and failure modes of the single fiber pull-out test were analyzed in detail. Three failure modes were found in this study, i.e., fiber slippage, coating point rupture and fiber breakage. In summary, to obtain samples with desirable fiber shedding property, fabric structural design, preparation process and raw materials selection should be taken into full consideration.

  9. A crossed dodecagonal deployable polarizer on textile and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Hidayath; Soh, Ping Jack; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Hossain, Toufiq Md; Ramli, Muhammad Nazrin; Al-Hadi, Azremi Abdullah; Sheikh, R. Ahmad; Hassan, Emad S.; Yan, Sen

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the design of a flexible using two set of flexible material classes: polymer and textiles. ShieldIt Super conductive fabric and felt are used as the textile material, and its performance is compared with another version designed on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymeric substrate. They are both built using a 4 × 4 dodecagonal unit element array backed by a rectangular patch, each sized at 54 × 64 × 3.34 mm3 (0.40 λ × 0.34 λ × 0.02λ) and 62 × 52 × 3.34 mm3 (0.35λ × 0.41λ × 0.02 λ). Both of them are validated to be operational centered at 2.2 GHz with a measured conversion efficiency of more than 90% from 1.578 to 2.578 GHz (48.12%) for the textile prototype. The results of the bending investigations suggest that the deployment mechanism must ensure a flat polarizer condition to enable its optimal performance.

  10. Simulation of textile manufacturing processes for planning, scheduling, and quality control purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, A. E.; Wang, Z.

    1995-08-01

    Simulation, as a management information tool, has been applied to engineering manufacture and assembly operations. The application of the principles to textile manufacturing (fiber to fabric) is discussed. The particular problems and solutions in applying the simulation software package to the yarn production processes are discussed with an indication of how the software achieves the production schedule. The system appears to have application in planning, scheduling, and quality assurance. The latter being a result of the traceability possibilities through a process involving mixing and splitting of material.

  11. Nanotechnology and textiles engineered by carbon nanotubes for the realization of advanced personal protective equipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andretta, Antonio, E-mail: Antonio-Andretta@klopman.com [Klopman International S.R.L., Via Mola dei Frati, 03100 Frosinone (Italy); Terranova, Maria Letizia; Lavecchia, Teresa; Gay, Stefano; Tamburri, Emanuela [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Minima lab, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Picano, Alfredo; Mascioletti, Alessandro; Stirpe, Daniele [Labor - Industrial Research Lab, Via Giacomo Peroni, 386 C/O Tecnopolo Tiburtino, 00131 Roma (Italy); Cucchiella, Cristian; Pascucci, Eddy [InfoSolution S.p.A, Via Zoe Fontana 10, 00131 Roma, Via Luigi Cadorna 67, 20090 Vimodrone (MI) (Italy); Dugnani, Giovanni; Gatti, Davide [Tpa Spa - Tecnologie e Prodotti per l' Automazione, Via Carducci 221, 20099 Sesto San Giovanni (MI) (Italy); Laria, Giuseppe [Centre of Research for Pure and Applied Mathematics, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Codenotti, Barbara [Lavanderie dell' Alto Adige S.p.A., via Nazionale 55, 39040 Ora (Italy); Maldini, Giorgio [Meta System S.p.A., Via Galimberti 8, 42124 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Roth, Siegmar [SINEUROP-Nanotech GmbH, TBC Kernerstrasse 34, 70182 Stuttgart (Germany); Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base ed Applicate per l' Ingegneria and CNIS, Sapienza Università di Roma, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-19

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and CNT-based active materials have been used to assemble the gas sensing unit of innovative platforms able to detect toxic atmospheres developing in confined workplaces. The main goal of the project was to realize a full-featured, operator-friendly safety detection and monitoring system based on multifunctional textiles nanotechnologies. The fabricated sensing platform consists of a multiple gas detector coupled with a specifically designed telecommunication infrastructure. The portable device, totally integrated in the workwear, offers several advantages over the conventional safety tools employed in industrial work activities.

  12. High-density EMG e-textile systems for the control of active prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farina, Dario; Lorrain, Thomas; Negro, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Myoelectric control of active prostheses requires electrode systems that are easy to apply for daily repositioning of the electrodes by the user. In this study we propose the use of Smart Fabric and Interactive Textile (SFIT) systems as an alternative solution for recording high-density EMG signa...... classified with linear discriminant analysis. The average classification accuracy for the nine tasks was 89.1 1.9 %. These results show that SFIT systems can be used as an effective way for muscle-machine interfacing....

  13. Health and safety aspects of textile workers from Solapur (India textile industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul B Hiremath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Textile sector in India plays an important role in the country's economy, providing employment to a significant population in rural and urban areas. Objectives: This paper focuses on health and safety aspects of textile workers in Solapur City (one of the key textile cluster in the state of Maharashtra, India. Methodology: A sample of 180 workers from the identified textile industries of Solapur city were assessed for their general physique, muscle tone, lung condition, and eyesight using different techniques. The study aimed at developing a framework for understanding risks to textile workers resulting from lack of health and safety standards in companies. Results: Findings showed that most of the workers have been affected by respiratory problems, increase in muscle tone, eye problems and musculoskeletal problem. It has been also observed that job security or regular work impacts positively to the worker’s long term body health. However, there is an immediate need to adopt and implement measures in accordance with Indian Factories Act (OHSAS 18001/ILO-OSH 2001 which includes directions and procedures in respect of industrial installations, work environment and occupational health and safety guidelines.

  14. Characterization of textile electrodes and conductors using standardized measurement setups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, L; Neuhaus, C; Medrano, G; Walter, M; Leonhardt, S; Jungbecker, N; Gries, T

    2010-01-01

    Textile electrodes and conductors are being developed and used in different monitoring scenarios, such as ECG or bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements. Compared to standard materials, conductive textile materials offer improved wearing comfort and enable long-term measurements. Unfortunately, the development and investigation of such materials often suffers from the non-reproducibility of the test scenarios. For example, the materials are generally tested on human skin which is difficult since the properties of human skin differ for each person and can change within hours. This study presents two test setups which offer reproducible measurement procedures for the systematic analysis of textile electrodes and conductors. The electrode test setup was designed with a special skin dummy which allows investigation of not only the electrical properties of textile electrodes but also the contact behavior between electrode and skin. Using both test setups, eight textile electrodes and five textile conductors were analyzed and compared

  15. Smart Textiles in Humanistic Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe; Fisker, Anna Marie; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2014-01-01

    of some of the stakeholders involved in the design process? Relating to the Danish scene of hospital design, we introduce the research project “Smart Textiles in Future Hospitals”, stating the overall hypothesis that textiles in hospital interiors possess an unexploited architectural potential in relation......Hospitalised patients’ healing process, supported by stimulating architecture. In this regard, we address focus on the potential influence of the design principle, discussing how healing architecture may contribute in making the future hospital institutions more responsive to human needs. The main...... purpose of this paper is thus to present a review of healing architecture, by considering some of the challenges in the operational use of the design principle. Associated with the methodology of evidence-based design (EBD), we in this regard question, if these challenges derive from conflicting paradigms...

  16. Dye removal from textile wastewater using bioadsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardazi, S.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Textile industries throughout the world produce huge quantities of dyes and pigments annually. Effluents from textile industries are dye wastewater, and disposal of these wastes to freshwater bodies causes damage to the environment. Among the treatment technologies, adsorption is an attractive and viable option, provided that the sorbent is inexpensive and readily available for use. In this study, a typical basic dye, methylene blue, in wastewater was treated using Melia azedarach sawdust. The effects of contact time, adsorbent amount and particle size were investigated on the removal efficiency of adsorbent for methylene blue. Complete removal of the dye were attained at higher adsorbent dose of 3 g/L with 50 mg/L initial dye concentration. The maximum adsorption was at 240 minutes, whereas more than 90% removal with 105 meu m particle size of 1 g/L adsorbent for same initial dye concentration. The experimental data best fits with 2 Langmuir adsorption isotherm (R= 0.991). (author)

  17. A New ‘T’ for Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earley, Rebecca; Vuletich, Clara; Hadridge, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The paper is based on a training programme given to researchers in the Textiles Environment Design (TED) project at the University of the Arts London (UAL). The programme took place over three years (September 2010 to October 2013) whilst the researchers were engaged as consultants and researchers...... for Hennes and Mauritz (H&M) and the Sustainable Fashion Academy (SFA) in Stockholm, Sweden. The project was developed as part of the Mistra Future Fashion research consortium, which aims to bring scientists and designers together to find sustainable and profitable industry solutions. The TED’s TEN...... sustainable design strategies for textiles and fashion was the framework for the Sustainable Design Inspiration (SDI) work at H&M – a broad and holistic approach to redesigning products including materials, process, systems, services, consumer behaviour and activism....

  18. How Associative Material Characteristics Create Textile Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasling, Karen Marie; Bang, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    and environment that corresponds to meanings and experiences. For design education it is therefore essential to discuss the diversity of material attributes that has to be considered in textile design, but also the creative process of actually designing the materials in order to obtain the desired properties...... and meanings. As educators of future designers we are concerned with teaching students, how to develop and use materials for ‘future design’ in a way that embrace multiple properties, including aesthetic, technical, functional and sustainable concerns. In this study we are specifically concerned...... with associative meanings when it comes to design of new materials and how they affect the final materials. Here students were told to translate and interpret abstract key phrases into textile materials or compositions. The educational aims of the assignment were primarily to encourage the students to explore...

  19. ASEAN Economic Community Implementation and Indonesian Textile Industry Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Susilo, Yuvensius Sri

    2013-01-01

    AbstractThis study aims to analyze the impact of ASEAN Economic Community implementation in 2015 on the competitiveness of Indonesian textile and textile products industry. It uses simulations with the GTAP model to answer the proposed research questions. The GTAP simulation results suggest that Indonesian textile industry would gain the largest trade surplus followed by Thailand and Malaysia. For apparel, Vietnam would benefit the most, followed by Indonesia and Thailand. The ratio of domest...

  20. ASEAN Economic Community Implementation and Indonesian Textile Industry Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Susilo, Yuvensius Sri

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the impact of ASEAN Economic Community implementation in 2015 on the competitiveness of Indonesian textile and textile products industry. It uses simulations with the GTAP model to answer the proposed research questions. The GTAP simulation results suggest that Indonesian textile industry would gain the largest trade surplus followed by Thailand and Malaysia. For apparel, Vietnam would benefit the most, followed by Indonesia and Thailand. The ratio of domestic to im...

  1. ASEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY IMPLEMENTATION AND INDONESIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRY COMPETITIVENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Susilo, Yuvensius Sri

    2013-01-01

    AbstractThis study aims to analyze the impact of ASEAN Economic Community implementation in 2015 on the competitiveness of Indonesian textile and textile products industry. It uses simulations with the GTAP model to answer the proposed research questions. The GTAP simulation results suggest that Indonesian textile industry would gain the largest trade surplus followed by Thailand and Malaysia. For apparel, Vietnam would benefit the most, followed by Indonesia and Thailand. The ratio of domest...

  2. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kassas, Hala Yassin; Mohamed, Laila Abdelfattah

    2014-01-01

    The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE) was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD). This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE) and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production...

  3. The Framework of Tunisian Textile and Clothing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kahia, Montassar

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we will first present the textile and the clothing sector in the Tunisian economy. It is therefore very important to situate this sector in our economy, evaluating its various features and outline its strengths and weaknesses. We also focus on the historical evolution of Tunisian textile and clothing sector. We will establish then a comparison between Tunisia and China as part of the textile and clothing industry.

  4. [Local impact of antiseptic medical textile on tissues of organism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarchuk, O A; Vernyhorods'kyĭ, S V; Paliĭ, V H; Nazarchuk, H H; Paliĭ, D V; Honchar, O O; Zadereĭ, N V

    2013-07-01

    Morphological investigation for studying of a local impact on the tissues, localized in the antiseptic textile implantation zone, was conducted. The textile was impregnated by composition of decametoxine with modified polysaccharides. Basing on the investigation result there was established the absence of a toxic impact of antiseptic medical textile on the macroorganism tissues, the regenerative processes course, the wounds epithelization, antioedematous and anti-inflammatory effects.

  5. FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE EVOLUTIONS OF TEXTILE SECTOR ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta BARBUTA MISU

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete liberalization of international trade led to important changes in financial performancesof the national enterprises. This paper has in view to present the consequences of these changes fromthe macroeconomic level to microeconomic level. Thus, indicators of the financial performance forthree enterprises at the textile sector from Galati are studied selectively. The scope of this study isboth to realize a financial performance hierarchy and to present of their evolution directions in thefuture.

  6. Fashion marketing in textile and clothing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Alica Grilec Kaurić

    2009-01-01

    Fashion marketing explores connection between fashion design and marketing including development, promotion, sales and price aspects of fashion industry. Successful fashion marketing managers are aware that the most important fashion marketing elements are customer trend identification, building strong brands and creating positive image of the producers. This paper presents the findings of a research conducted for the purpose of identifying trends in marketing sector in textile and clothing i...

  7. Textile composites based on natural fibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Li, Yan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available . The two kinds of fiber surface treatment methods were permanganate treatment and silane treatment. Vinyl ester was used as the matrix. The permeability values of sisal textile before and after fiber surface treatments are listed in Table 3. Comparisons... and more liquid resin flow through inter-bundles. Figure 4. Intra-bundle and inter-bundle flows As reported, permanganate, as an oxidant, can etch sisal fiber surface [20]. Scanning electronic micrograph of a permanganate treated sisal fiber...

  8. E-COMMERCE AREA FOR TEXTILE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    R. M. Aileni; D. Farima; M. Ciocoiu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents some management aspects concerning the e-commerce area for textile industry.Here it can have database management – customers, products and brand visualisation management. The databasemanagement can be doing by using a database management system. For database management it was use therelational model based on first-order predicate logic [1]. In this paper it was analyzed the relational databasemodel. The e-commerce area is born from need to simplify the buying and selling g...

  9. Interactive Garments: Flexible Technologies for Textile Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Anupam Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Upon reviewing the literature and the pragmatic work done in the field of E- textiles, it is observed that the applications of wearable technologies have found a steady growth in the field of military, medical, industrial, sports; whereas fashion is at a loss to know how to treat this technology and bring it to market. The purpose of this paper is to understand the practical issues of integration of electronics in garments; cutting patterns for mass production, maintaining the basic propertie...

  10. UV-durable superhydrophobic textiles with UV-shielding properties by coating fibers with ZnO/SiO2 core/shell particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Yin, Wei; Jia, Shun-Tian; Ma, Jian-Zhong

    2011-10-01

    ZnO/SiO2 core/shell particles were fabricated by successive coating of multilayer polyelectrolytes and then a SiO2 shell onto ZnO particles. The as-prepared ZnO/SiO2 core/shell particles were coated on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) textiles, followed by hydrophobization with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane, to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with UV-shielding properties. Transmission electron microscopy and ζ potential analysis were employed to evidence the fabrication of ZnO/SiO2 core/shell particles. Scanning electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis were conducted to investigate the surface morphologies of the textile and the coating of the fibers. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and contact angle measurement indicated that the incorporation of ZnO onto fibers imparted UV-blocking properties to the textile surface, while the coating of SiO2 shell on ZnO prohibited the photocatalytic degradation of hexadecyltrimethoxysilane by ZnO, making the as-treated PET textile surface show stable superhydrophobicity with good UV-shielding properties.

  11. Printing of Wearable Antenna on Textile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khirotdin Rd. Khairilhijra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A wearable antenna which is meant to be a part of the clothing used for communication purposes includes tracking, navigation and mobile computing has been seen in demand due to the recent miniaturization of wireless devices. Printing of conductive ink provides flexibility properties on electronics thus allowing it to be used on conformal surfaces. However, the current printing techniques mostly suffer from ink incompatibility and limited of substrates to be printed with. Hence, this paper intend to discloses the printing of wearable antenna using alternative technique via syringe-based deposition system with conductive ink on textile. A validation between simulation and measurement of return loss, (S11 and radiation pattern of the antenna printed is also performed. It was found that a functional antenna is successfully printed on textile since the performances obtained are as expected. The antenna resonated at a minimum resonant frequency of 1.82 GHz which the S11 gathered at-18.90 dB. The radiation pattern for both simulation and measurement is as predicted since both have a larger magnitude of the main lobe than the side lobe. The magnitude of the main lobe from measurement was observed to be 8.83 dB higher than the magnitude of the main lobe of the simulation which is only 3.77 dB. It is proven that the syringe-based deposition system is capable of printing functional antenna on textile.

  12. Degradation of textile dyes by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellamatrice, Priscila Maria; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo de; Fiore, Marli Fátima; Monteiro, Regina Teresa Rosim

    Dyes are recalcitrant compounds that resist conventional biological treatments. The degradation of three textile dyes (Indigo, RBBR and Sulphur Black), and the dye-containing liquid effluent and solid waste from the Municipal Treatment Station, Americana, São Paulo, Brazil, by the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae UTCC64, Phormidium autumnale UTEX1580 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was evaluated. The dye degradation efficiency of the cyanobacteria was compared with anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic systems in terms of discolouration and toxicity evaluations. The discoloration was evaluated by absorption spectroscopy. Toxicity was measured using the organisms Hydra attenuata, the alga Selenastrum capricornutum and lettuce seeds. The three cyanobacteria showed the potential to remediate textile effluent by removing the colour and reducing the toxicity. However, the growth of cyanobacteria on sludge was slow and discoloration was not efficient. The cyanobacteria P. autumnale UTEX1580 was the only strain that completely degraded the indigo dye. An evaluation of the mutagenicity potential was performed by use of the micronucleus assay using Allium sp. No mutagenicity was observed after the treatment. Two metabolites were produced during the degradation, anthranilic acid and isatin, but toxicity did not increase after the treatment. The cyanobacteria showed the ability to degrade the dyes present in a textile effluent; therefore, they can be used in a tertiary treatment of effluents with recalcitrant compounds. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Composite materials from new textile technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez, M. A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes in a general way the most important of the advanced textile technologies which are oriented to the manufacturing of organic matrix composite materials, the paper presents their applications and the possibilities of future development. The use of these advanced weaving techniques allows the production of near-net-shaped preforms, which results in important savings in processing costs; moreover, these textile processes offer the possibility of introducing out-of plane reinforcing fibres, so there is an important increment of the impact strength and the damage tolerance of the final material.

    En el presente artículo se describen, de forma genérica, las más importantes de las tejedurías avanzadas destinadas a la fabricación de materiales compuestos de matriz orgánica, presentándose sus aplicaciones y futuras posibilidades de desarrollo. La utilización de estos procesos de tejeduría avanzados permite la elaboración de preformas cercanas a la forma final de la pieza, lo que se traduce en importantes reducciones en los costes de fabricación; además, estos procesos textiles ofrecen la posibilidad de introducir fibras de refuerzo fuera del plano, aumentando de forma considerable la resistencia a impacto y la tolerancia al daño del material final.

  14. Role of Voluntary Employee Turnover in Textile Industry of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Nawaz, Yasir; Rahman, Tanzil ur; Siraji, Md. Naeemullah

    2009-01-01

    The role of voluntary employee turnover (VET) in textile industry has significance in this era over the globe. Textile industry is labour intensive with similar to agriculture industry in Pakistan and it has excessive VET as compared to other industries. Pakistan’s textile products are high quality and much exploit in the world. It contributes in economic growth with 8.5% share in GDP. This industry mainly based on domestic labour and major portion of cost includes in the textile garment prod...

  15. Time for a forum on terms used for textile fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawistoski, P. S.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The advances in manufactured fibers and textiles have garnered interest and excitement of textile artists and consumers alike for a myriad of reasons, including health, environmental, and fashion. The chemical and molecular nature of these advances, however leads to confusion and misunderstanding of the new fibers in the materials. This is exacerbated by the current climate of distrust for chemical words and desire for "green" products and the unregulated (misinformation and marketing on the web. Textile artists, consumers, and the clothing and household textile industry need clear names and labels to identify the materials they are using.

  16. Spatial pattern of foreign direct investment of China's textile enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2018-01-01

    China textile industry has achieved encouraging achievements, becoming the primary industry of the integration of investment, production, consumption, employment increase and foreign exchange earnings. On the basis of reviewing studies on foreign direct investment of domestic textile enterprises, this paper come up with the structure analysis framework of spatial strategies of foreign investment of China's textile enterprises with the methods of statistical information, field research and interviews of senior managers. Besides, this paper analyze the spatial distribution and industry choices of foreign direct investment of China's textile enterprises.

  17. GIITEX: investigación en la industria textil

    OpenAIRE

    Bonet Aracil, María Angeles; Bou-Belda, Eva; Montava Seguí, Ignacio José; Díaz-García, Pablo; Monllorpérez, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    [ES] El GIITEX es un grupo de investigación de la Universidad Politécnica de Valencia. Centra su labor investigación en todas aquellas investigaciones que están relacionadas con el sector textil. El la actualidad el GIITEX trabaja en las líneas de investigación siguientes: adaptación de nuevas tecnologías a procesos productivos textiles; biomateriales y procesos biotecnológicos de aplicación textil; análisis de la capacidad de cosido de un hilo; funcionalización de textiles mediante la adició...

  18. Energy-harvesting & self-actuated textiles for the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    for smart textiles by questioning how they can be implemented within a domestic context to encourage more resilient environments. More specifically investigating the potential of energyharvesting & self-actuated textiles, the project hopes to highlight new ways for thinking the home as a more permeable...... the context of rising sustainable design agendas, the role and influence of new materials and technologies on the conceptualization and making of responsive textiles. Exploring the intersection between textiles, architecture and smart technologies, this on-going research aims to map out new design territories...

  19. Roadmap to sustainable textiles and clothing regulatory aspects and sustainability standards of textiles and the clothing supply chain

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the elements involved in achieving sustainability in textiles and clothing sector. The chapters covered in three volumes of this series title cover all the distinctive areas earmarked for achieving sustainable development in textiles and clothing industry. This third volume highlights the areas pertaining to the regulatory aspects and sustainability standards applicable to textiles and clothing supply chain. There are various standards earmarked for measuring the environmental impacts and sustainability of textile products. There are also plenty of certification schemes available along with the index systems applicable to textile sector. Brands and manufactures are also venturing into new developments to achieve sustainable development in textile sector. This third volume addresses all these important aspects.

  20. Flexible and wearable electronic silk fabrics for human physiological monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Cuiping; Zhang, Huihui; Lu, Zhisong

    2017-09-01

    The development of textile-based devices for human physiological monitoring has attracted tremendous interest in recent years. However, flexible physiological sensing elements based on silk fabrics have not been realized. In this paper, ZnO nanorod arrays are grown in situ on reduced graphene oxide-coated silk fabrics via a facile electro-deposition method for the fabrication of silk-fabric-based mechanical sensing devices. The data show that well-aligned ZnO nanorods with hexagonal wurtzite crystalline structures are synthesized on the conductive silk fabric surface. After magnetron sputtering of gold electrodes, silk-fabric-based devices are produced and applied to detect periodic bending and twisting. Based on the electric signals, the deformation and release processes can be easily differentiated. Human arterial pulse and respiration can also be real-time monitored to calculate the pulse rate and respiration frequency, respectively. Throat vibrations during coughing and singing are detected to demonstrate the voice recognition capability. This work may not only help develop silk-fabric-based mechanical sensing elements for potential applications in clinical diagnosis, daily healthcare monitoring and voice recognition, but also provide a versatile method for fabricating textile-based flexible electronic devices.

  1. Investigation of the adhesion properties of direct 3D printing of polymers and nanocomposites on textiles: Effect of FDM printing process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Sanatgar, Razieh; Campagne, Christine; Nierstrasz, Vincent

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, 3D printing as a novel printing process was considered for deposition of polymers on synthetic fabrics to introduce more flexible, resource-efficient and cost effective textile functionalization processes than conventional printing process like screen and inkjet printing. The aim is to develop an integrated or tailored production process for smart and functional textiles which avoid unnecessary use of water, energy, chemicals and minimize the waste to improve ecological footprint and productivity. Adhesion of polymer and nanocomposite layers which were 3D printed directly onto the textile fabrics using fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique was investigated. Different variables which may affect the adhesion properties including 3D printing process parameters, fabric type and filler type incorporated in polymer were considered. A rectangular shape according to the peeling standard was designed as 3D computer-aided design (CAD) to find out the effect of the different variables. The polymers were printed in different series of experimental design: nylon on polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics, polylactic acid (PLA) on PA66 fabric, PLA on PLA fabric, and finally nanosize carbon black/PLA (CB/PLA) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes/PLA (CNT/PLA) nanocomposites on PLA fabrics. The adhesion forces were quantified using the innovative sample preparing method combining with the peeling standard method. Results showed that different variables of 3D printing process like extruder temperature, platform temperature and printing speed can have significant effect on adhesion force of polymers to fabrics while direct 3D printing. A model was proposed specifically for deposition of a commercial 3D printer Nylon filament on PA66 fabrics. In the following, among the printed polymers, PLA and its composites had high adhesion force to PLA fabrics.

  2. Towards reinforcement solutions for urban fibre/fabric waste using bio-based biodegradable resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Pramod; Hermes, Alina; Bapeer, Solaf; Luiken, Anton; Bouwhuis, Gerrit; Brinks, Ger

    2017-10-01

    The main research question is how to systematically define and characterize urban textile waste and how to effectively utilise it to produce reinforcement(s) with selected bio-based biodegradable resin(s). Several composite samples have been produced utilising predominantly natural and predominantly synthetic fibres by combining loose fibres with PLA, nonwoven fabric with PLA, woven fabric with PLA, two-layer composite & four-layer composite samples. Physio-chemical characterisations according to the established standards have been conducted. The present work is a step toward the circular economy and closing the loop in textile value chain.

  3. Heterogeneous in situ polymerization of polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers on cotton textiles: Improved electrical conductivity, electrical switching, and tuning properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissera, Nadeeka D; Wijesena, Ruchira N; Rathnayake, Samantha; de Silva, Rohini M; de Silva, K M Nalin

    2018-04-15

    Electrically conductive cotton fabric was fabricated by in situ one pot oxidative polymerization of aniline. Using a simple heterogeneous polymerization method, polyaniline (PANI) nano fibers with an average fiber diameter of 40-75 nm were grafted in situ onto cotton fabric. The electrical conductivity of the PANI nanofiber grafted fabric was improved 10 fold compared to fabric grafted with PANI nanoclusters having an average cluster size of 145-315 nm. The surface morphology of the cotton fibers was characterized using SEM and AFM. Electrical conductivity of PANI nanofibers on the cotton textile was further improved from 76 kΏ/cm to 1 kΏ/cm by increasing the HCl concentration from 1 M to 3 M in the polymerization medium. PANI grafted cotton fabrics were analyzed using FTIR, and the data showed the presence of polyaniline functional groups on the treated fabric. Further evidence was present for the chemical interaction of PANI with cellulose. Dopant level and morphology dependent electron transition behavior of PANI nanostructures grafted on cotton fabric was further characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy. The electrical conductivity of the PANI nano fiber grafted cotton fabric can be tuned by immersing the fabric in pH 2 and pH 6 solutions for multiple cycles. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Dual-Functional Superhydrophobic Textiles with Asymmetric Roll-Down/Pinned States for Water Droplet Transportation and Oil-Water Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaojing; Li, Hongqiang; Lai, Xuejun; Zhang, Lin; Liao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhonghua; He, Jie; Zeng, Xingrong

    2018-01-31

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable adhesion from lotus-leaf to rose-petal states have generated much attention for their potential applications in self-cleaning, anti-icing, oil-water separation, microdroplet transportation, and microfluidic devices. Herein we report a facile magnetic-field-manipulation strategy to fabricate dual-functional superhydrophobic textiles with asymmetric roll-down/pinned states on the two surfaces of the textile simultaneously. Upon exposure to a static magnetic field, fluoroalkylsilane-modified iron oxide (F-Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) moved along the magnetic field to construct discrepant hierarchical structures and roughnesses on the two sides of the textile. The positive surface (closer to the magnet, or P-surface) showed a water contact angle up to 165°, and the opposite surface (or O-surface) had a water contact angle of 152.5°. The P-surface where water droplets easily slid off with a sliding angle of 7.5° appeared in the "roll-down" state as Cassie mode, while the O-surface was in the "pinned" state as Wenzel mode, where water droplets firmly adhered even at vertical (90°) and inverted (180°) angles. The surface morphology and wetting mode were adjustable by varying the ratios of F-Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and PDMS. By taking advantage of the asymmetric adhesion behaviors, the as-fabricated superhydrophobic textile was successfully applied in no-loss microdroplet transportation and oil-water separation. Our method is simple and cost-effective. The fabricated textile has the characteristics of superhydrophobicity, magnetic responsiveness, excellent chemical stability, adjustable surface morphology, and controllable adhesion. Our findings conceivably stand out as a new tool to fabricate functional superhydrophobic materials with asymmetric surface properties for various potential applications.

  5. Antimicrobial brass coatings prepared on poly(ethylene terephthalate) textile by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Hung, E-mail: tieamo2002@gmail.com; Wu, Guo-Wei; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this work is to prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which is known to provide high-density plasma, so as to generate a strongly adherent film at a reduced substrate temperature. The results reveal that the brass film grows in a layer-plus-island mode. Independent of their deposition time, the obtained films retain a Cu/Zn elemental composition ratio of 1.86 and exhibit primarily an α copper phase structure. Oxygen plasma pre-treatment for 1 min before coating can significantly increase film adhesion such that the brass-coated fabric of Grade 5 or Grade 4–5 can ultimately be obtained under dry and wet rubbing tests, respectively. However, a deposition time of 1 min suffices to provide effective antimicrobial properties for both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. As a whole, the feasibility of using such advanced HIPIMS coating technique to develop durable antimicrobial textile was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on PET fabric by HIPIMS • Brass-coated fabric with excellent durability, even undergone rubbing and washing tests • Brass-coated fabric provides effective antimicrobial properties for E. coli and S. aureus. • After brass coating, PET fabric still retained its mechanical property.

  6. Antimicrobial brass coatings prepared on poly(ethylene terephthalate) textile by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying-Hung; Wu, Guo-Wei; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work is to prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which is known to provide high-density plasma, so as to generate a strongly adherent film at a reduced substrate temperature. The results reveal that the brass film grows in a layer-plus-island mode. Independent of their deposition time, the obtained films retain a Cu/Zn elemental composition ratio of 1.86 and exhibit primarily an α copper phase structure. Oxygen plasma pre-treatment for 1 min before coating can significantly increase film adhesion such that the brass-coated fabric of Grade 5 or Grade 4–5 can ultimately be obtained under dry and wet rubbing tests, respectively. However, a deposition time of 1 min suffices to provide effective antimicrobial properties for both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. As a whole, the feasibility of using such advanced HIPIMS coating technique to develop durable antimicrobial textile was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on PET fabric by HIPIMS • Brass-coated fabric with excellent durability, even undergone rubbing and washing tests • Brass-coated fabric provides effective antimicrobial properties for E. coli and S. aureus. • After brass coating, PET fabric still retained its mechanical property

  7. Fundamental and practical aspects concerning the characterization of smart textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broasca Gianina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research aims towards a novel methodology of ZnO impregnation onto polyamide supports, in order to attain a special inorganic-organic hybrid polymer material, with increased UV-barrier attributes and high hydrophobicity. The experimental approach employed ZnO micro particles powder. Solutions with different concentrations of ZnO powder dispersed in methanol are prepared as anti-UV finishing agent and applied onto polyamide fabric. The responsive behaviour of this complex polymer network to UV irradiation, the photo protective performance and its time stability, also the hydrophobic character are assessed by different characterization techniques. The proposed method has advantages, like: easy standardization, at lower production cost, resulting a high homogeneity and dispersion of ZnO micro particles into the textile polymeric network. The covered polymeric supports show better photo protective response, higher hydrophobicity and control on the surface charge induced by irradiation. This method granted enhanced quality, comfort and long term stability of the intelligent/smart garments.

  8. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, 14 C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ 14 C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of 14 C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS 14 C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages

  9. Fabrication of superhydrophobic cotton fabrics by silica hydrosol and hydrophobization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihui; Zhuang, Wei; Xu, Bi; Cai, Zaisheng

    2011-04-01

    Superhydrophobic cotton fabrics were prepared by the incorporation of silica nanoparticles and subsequent hydrophobization with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTMS). The silica nanoparticles were synthesized via sol-gel reaction with methyl trimethoxy silane (MTMS) as the precursor in the presence of the base catalyst and surfactant in aqueous solution. As for the resulting products, characterization by particle size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning probe microscopy (SPM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed respectively. The size of SiO2 nanoparticles can be controlled by adjusting the catalyst and surfactant concentrations. The wettability of cotton textiles was evaluated by the water contact angle (WCA) and water shedding angle (WSA) measurements. The results showed that the treated cotton sample displayed remarkable water repellency with a WCA of 151.9° for a 5 μL water droplet and a WSA of 13° for a 15 μL water droplet.

  10. Researches on the development of new composite materials complete / partially biodegradable using natural textile fibers of new vegetable origin and those recovered from textile waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, M. P.; Bulei, C.; Heput, T.; Kiss, I.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the research is to develop new fully / partially biodegradable composite materials by using new natural fibers and those recovered from various wastes. Thus, the research aims to obtain some composites with matrix of various types of polymeric materials and the reinforcement phase of textile materials (of different natures, morphologies and composites) so that the resulting products to be (bio)degradable. The textile inserts used as raffle are ecological, non-toxic and biodegradable and they contain (divided or in combination) bast fibers (flax, hemp, jute) and other vegetable fibers (cotton, wool) as plain yarn or fabric, which can replace fibers of glass commonly used in polymeric composites. The main activities described in this article are carried out during the first phase of the research (phase I - initiation of research) and they are oriented towards the choice of types of textile inserts from which the composites will be obtained (the materials needed for the raffle), the choice of the types of polymers (the necessary materials for matrices) and choosing the variants of composites with different types and proportions of the constituent content (proposals and working variants) and choosing the right method for obtaining samples of composite materials (realization technology). The purpose of the research is to obtain composite materials with high structural, thermo-mechanical and / or tribological performances, according to ecological norms and international requirements in order to replace the existing classical materials, setting up current, innovative and high performance solutions, for applications in top areas such as automotive industry and not only.

  11. Fabrication of Durably Superhydrophobic Cotton Fabrics by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment with a Siloxane Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface treatment of fabrics in an atmospheric environment may pave the way for commercially viable plasma modifications of fibrous matters. In this paper, we demonstrate a durably superhydrophobic cotton cellulose fabric prepared in a single-step graft polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO by N2 and O2 atmospheric pressure plasma. We systematically investigated effects on contact angle (CA and surface morphology of the cotton fabric under three operational parameters: precursor value; ionization gas flow rate; and plasma cycle time. Surface morphology, element composition, chemical structure and hydrophobic properties of the treated fabric were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, EDS, FTIR and CA on the fabrics. The results indicated that a layer of thin film and nano-particles were evenly deposited on the cotton fibers, and graft polymerization occurred between cellulose and HMDSO. The fabric treated by O2 plasma exhibited a higher CA of 162° than that treated by N2 plasma which was about 149°. Furthermore, the CA of treated fabrics decreased only 0°~10° after storing at the ambient conditions for four months, and treated fabrics could also endure the standard textile laundering procedure in AATCC 61-2006 with minimum change. Therefore, this single-step plasma treatment method is shown to be a novel and environment-friendly way to make durable and superhydrophobic cotton fabrics.

  12. Energy analysis for the textile and clothing industry branch; Brancheenergianalyse for textil- og beklaedningsindustrien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J.; Hart, M.; Moeller, J. [DTI, Beklaedning og Tekstil, Herning (Denmark)

    1995-09-01

    Energy analysis and energy saving measures are proposed for the textile branch. Spinning, weaving, knitting and dye mills are analyzed as well as carpet production industry and clothing industry. Mechanical equipment, drying equipment, processing lines are investigated with regard to the possible energy savings. (EG) 19 refs.

  13. Highly Sensitive Multifilament Fiber Strain Sensors with Ultrabroad Sensing Range for Textile Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehong; Shin, Sera; Lee, Sanggeun; Song, Jaekang; Kang, Subin; Han, Heetak; Kim, SeulGee; Kim, Seunghoe; Seo, Jungmok; Kim, DaeEun; Lee, Taeyoon

    2018-05-22

    Highly stretchable fiber strain sensors are one of the most important components for various applications in wearable electronics, electronic textiles, and biomedical electronics. Herein, we present a facile approach for fabricating highly stretchable and sensitive fiber strain sensors by embedding Ag nanoparticles into a stretchable fiber with a multifilament structure. The multifilament structure and Ag-rich shells of the fiber strain sensor enable the sensor to simultaneously achieve both a high sensitivity and largely wide sensing range despite its simple fabrication process and components. The fiber strain sensor simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh gauge factors (∼9.3 × 10 5 and ∼659 in the first stretching and subsequent stretching, respectively), a very broad strain-sensing range (450 and 200% for the first and subsequent stretching, respectively), and high durability for more than 10 000 stretching cycles. The fiber strain sensors can also be readily integrated into a glove to control a hand robot and effectively applied to monitor the large volume expansion of a balloon and a pig bladder for an artificial bladder system, thereby demonstrating the potential of the fiber strain sensors as candidates for electronic textiles, wearable electronics, and biomedical engineering.

  14. Electrochemical Impedance Analysis of a PEDOT:PSS-Based Textile Energy Storage Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Nuramdhani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A textile-based energy storage device with electroactive PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene/poly(4-styrenesulfonate polymer functioning as a solid-state polyelectrolyte has been developed. The device was fabricated on textile fabric with two plies of stainless-steel electroconductive yarn as the electrodes. In this study, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance analysis were used to investigate ionic and electronic activities in the bulk of PEDOT:PSS and at its interfaces with stainless steel yarn electrodes. The complex behavior of ionic and electronic origins was observed in the interfacial region between the conductive polymer and the electrodes. The migration and diffusion of the ions involved were confirmed by the presence of the Warburg element with a phase shift of 45° (n = 0.5. Two different equivalent circuit models were found by simulating the model with the experimental results: (QR(QR(QR for uncharged and (QR(QR(Q(RW for charged samples. The analyses also showed that the further the distance between electrodes, the lower the capacitance of the cell. The distribution of polymer on the cell surface also played important role to change the capacitance of the device. The results of this work may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism and how to improve the performance of the device.

  15. Highly conductive templated-graphene fabrics for lightweight, flexible and foldable supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Hanzhi; Yan, Casey; Zheng, Zijian; Yu, You

    2017-07-01

    The templated-rGO fabric, featuring high conductivity (<1.0 Ω □-1) and low density (160 mg cm-2), is prepared by a simple dip-coating technique with sequentially coating nickel via polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD) and reduced-graphene oxide (rGO) on textile fabric templates at very mild conditions and is used in the fabrication of energy storage devices. As a proof of concept, both the layered and planar supercapacitors (SCs) are successfully fabricated using the rGO fabrics as templates, and both exhibit excellent electrochemical performance, ultrahigh stability with 2000 charge-discharge cycles and mechanical flexibility at bending (r  =  3 mm) and even folding states. It is found that the material of textile fabric used has a profound effect on the electrochemical property of SCs. The comparison result reveals that loose natural cotton fabrics are more suitable than tight man-made nylon fabrics for preparing high-performance SCs. In addition, such supercapacitor can be sewed into commercial textiles and powers a LED light, indicating promising applications in wearable electronics.

  16. High-Thermal-Conductivity Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibante, L. P. Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Heat management with common textiles such as nylon and spandex is hindered by the poor thermal conductivity from the skin surface to cooling surfaces. This innovation showed marked improvement in thermal conductivity of the individual fibers and tubing, as well as components assembled from them. The problem is centered on improving the heat removal of the liquid-cooled ventilation garments (LCVGs) used by astronauts. The current design uses an extensive network of water-cooling tubes that introduces bulkiness and discomfort, and increases fatigue. Range of motion and ease of movement are affected as well. The current technology is the same as developed during the Apollo program of the 1960s. Tubing material is hand-threaded through a spandex/nylon mesh layer, in a series of loops throughout the torso and limbs such that there is close, form-fitting contact with the user. Usually, there is a nylon liner layer to improve comfort. Circulating water is chilled by an external heat exchanger (sublimator). The purpose of this innovation is to produce new LCVG components with improved thermal conductivity. This was addressed using nanocomposite engineering incorporating high-thermalconductivity nanoscale fillers in the fabric and tubing components. Specifically, carbon nanotubes were added using normal processing methods such as thermoplastic melt mixing (compounding twin screw extruder) and downstream processing (fiber spinning, tubing extrusion). Fibers were produced as yarns and woven into fabric cloths. The application of isotropic nanofillers can be modeled using a modified Nielsen Model for conductive fillers in a matrix based on Einstein s viscosity model. This is a drop-in technology with no additional equipment needed. The loading is limited by the ability to maintain adequate dispersion. Undispersed materials will plug filtering screens in processing equipment. Generally, the viscosity increases were acceptable, and allowed the filled polymers to still be

  17. Sustainability Knowledge and Behaviors of Apparel and Textile Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller Connell, Kim Y.; Kozar, Joy M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze changes in undergraduate student knowledge of issues of sustainability relevant to the apparel and textiles industry. Assessment occurred prior to and upon completion of a course that addressed topics specific to the global production and distribution of apparel and textile goods. The study also…

  18. Apparel and Textiles Production, Management, and Services. Reference Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    Developed with input from personnel in the industries, this reference book complements a matching curriculum guide for a course on the textiles and apparel industries. The book emphasizes job skills and the attitudes and interpersonal skills needed for successful employment in the textiles/apparel industry. Each of the 22 chapters of the book…

  19. Craft qualities translated from traditional crafts to smart textile services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuusk, K.; Wensveen, S.A.G.; Tomico Plasencia, O.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we suggest craft and craftsmanship as an inspiration to design more sustainable smart textile services. We look into the opportunities that interactive properties and services bring into the textile and garment life cycle. We use traditional crafts as a source of inspiration for the

  20. Trans-Americas leads the way into municipal textile recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgley, H.

    1998-08-01

    Most textile waste in the US still goes to the landfill--an estimated 6.6 million tons each year. But thanks to the efforts of textile recycles--such as Trans-Americas Textile Recycling CO. (Brooklyn, NY)--another 1.25 million tons gets salvaged for reuse overseas or as a feedstock for the wiping and fiber industries, according to the Council for Textile Recycling. In an era where global population levels are increasing the demand for textile waste from the Western world and municipalities are struggling to reach their waste diversion goals, boosting textile recovery rates makes sense. And it`s a waste that can be easily incorporated into existing municipal curbside or drop-off recycling programs. Since 1942, when the company first opened its doors in Brooklyn, NY, it purchased textile discards from charities. While those discards still make up the majority of Trans-Americas` supply, in the last two years, the company also began purchasing post-consumer material from municipalities. Textiles are definitely going to be an increasingly important part of recycling, as states look to meet their mandates.

  1. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  2. Stories in the Cloth: Art Therapy and Narrative Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, Lisa Raye

    2016-01-01

    In this article I weave together the relevance of narrative textile work in therapeutic and human rights contexts; showcase Common Threads, an international nonprofit that uses story cloths with survivors of gender-based violence; outline a master's level art therapy course in story cloths; and relate how textiles helped build a sibling…

  3. Effectiveness of business strategies in Brazilian textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Paulo César de Sousa; Lisboa, João Veríssimo de Oliveira; Augusto, Mário Gomes; Almeida, Fátima Evaneide Barbosa de

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This research analyses how the interaction between strategy capabilities, strategy types, strategy formulation quality and implementation capability affect organizational performance in Brazilian textiles companies. This article proposes and tests a conceptual framework, using a structural equation modeling of a set of 211 valid questionnaires on Brazilian textiles firms. The results support links between focus strategy and marketing capabilities, and between cost leadership strategy...

  4. Textile labelling : A concern for the EU consumer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsoedh, A.

    2017-01-01

    The textile and clothing sector constitutes a major segment in the European manufacturing industry and plays an essential role in the EU economy as such and in the social welfare of its consumers. The development of new applications of textile fibres and products demonstrate the need for uniform

  5. Prevalence of noise induced hearing loss in textile industries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross sectional study measured the prevalence of Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in textile industries in Dar Es Salaam city and Morogoro municipality. Data were collected from 125 employees randomly selected from each of the textile factory mill in each region through structured questionnaires and audiogram ...

  6. Lithium-Ion Textile Batteries with Large Areal Mass Loading

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing; La Mantia, Fabio; Wu, Hui; Xie, Xing; McDonough, James; Pasta, Mauro; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    We integrate Li-ion battery electrode materials into a 3D porous textile conductor by using a simple process. When compared to flat metal current collectors, our 3D porous textile conductor not only greatly facilitates the ability for a high active material mass loading on the battery electrode but also leads to better device performance.

  7. Vocational Home Economics Curriculum Guide for Occupational Clothing and Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Margaret R.

    The training program outlined in this guide focuses upon the development of students for gainful employment through a two-year course of study in clothing and textiles. Instructional topics are provided in six areas: clothing and textiles careers; alterationist; custom dressmaker; industrial sewing; getting, keeping, and using the paycheck; and…

  8. Application of the mixture design to decolourise effluent textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Important pollutants in textile effluents are mainly recalcitrant organics, colours, toxicants and inhibitory compounds, surfactants, chlorinated compounds (AOX), pH and salts. An aerobic system using a continuous stirred bed reactor (SBR) was continuously operated at constant temperature and fed with textile wastewater ...

  9. Lithium-Ion Textile Batteries with Large Areal Mass Loading

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2011-10-06

    We integrate Li-ion battery electrode materials into a 3D porous textile conductor by using a simple process. When compared to flat metal current collectors, our 3D porous textile conductor not only greatly facilitates the ability for a high active material mass loading on the battery electrode but also leads to better device performance.

  10. Experimental Study on Strain Reliability of Embroidered Passive UHF RFID Textile Tag Antennas and Interconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present embroidered antennas and interconnections in passive UHF RFID textile tags and test their strain reliability. Firstly, we fabricate tag antennas on two different stretchable fabric substrates by five different embroidery patterns and choose the most stretchable ones for testing. Next, the tag ICs are attached by sewing and gluing, and the tag reliability during repeated stretching cycles is evaluated through wireless measurements. Initially, the chosen tags achieve read ranges of 6–8 meters and can strain up to 140–150% of their original length. After 100 stretching cycles to 80% of their maximum strain, the read ranges of the tags with glued interconnections are similar to the initial values. In addition, also the read ranges of the tags with sewed interconnections are still more than 70%–85% of their initial values. However, some challenges with the reproducibility need to be solved next.

  11. Textile-Based, Interdigital, Capacitive, Soft-Strain Sensor for Wearable Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Atalay

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The electronic textile area has gained considerable attention due to its implementation of wearable devices, and soft sensors are the main components of these systems. In this paper, a new sensor design is presented to create stretchable, capacitance-based strain sensors for human motion tracking. This involves the use of stretchable, conductive-knit fabric within the silicone elastomer matrix, as interdigitated electrodes. While conductive fabric creates a secure conductive network for electrodes, a silicone-based matrix provides encapsulation and dimensional-stability to the structure. During the benchtop characterization, sensors show linear output, i.e., R2 = 0.997, with high response time, i.e., 50 ms, and high resolution, i.e., 1.36%. Finally, movement of the knee joint during the different scenarios was successfully recorded.

  12. Elements for a Comparative Study of Textile Production and Use in Hittite Anatolia and Neighbouring Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Matteo; Bellucci, Benedetta; Baccelli, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    . Finally the information provided by the diplomatic and administrative texts will be compared with iconography, in order to better understand the recipients of the finished products, often luxury goods. The main goal of this introductory exploration is to propose this comparative study and evaluate its...... prices, workmanship, quality and shape of the fabrics. Thanks to the information provided by other cuneiform texts found in Anatolia, such as administrative accounts of goods hoarded in the Hittite palaces and inventories of daily economic activities of Hittite court officers, the Hittitologists have...... drawn up indexes of realia (i.e. a presentation of the evidence of everyday objects used by the Hittites), in which luxurious textiles (or fabrics) and clothes often occur. Moreover Hittite official texts, such as the accounts of royal victories, the descriptions of cultic activities and the diplomatic...

  13. Exploring dynamic lighting, colour and form with smart textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, I.; Silva, C.; Worbin, L.; Souto, A. P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses an ongoing research, aiming at the development of smart textiles that transform the incident light that passes through them - light transmittance - to design dynamic light without acting upon the light source. A colour and shape change prototype was developed with the objective of studying textile changes in time; to explore temperature as a dynamic variable through electrical activation of the smart materials and conductive threads integrated in the textile substrate; and to analyse the relation between textile chromic and morphologic behaviour in interaction with light. Based on the experiments conducted, results have highlighted some considerations of the dynamic parameters involved in the behaviour of thermo-responsive textiles and demonstrated design possibilities to create interactive lighting scenarios.

  14. Heat Transfer in Directional Water Transport Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Directional water transport fabrics can proactively transfer moisture from the body. They show great potential in making sportswear and summer clothing. While moisture transfer has been previously reported, heat transfer in directional water transport fabrics has been little reported in research literature. In this study, a directional water transport fabric was prepared using an electrospraying technique and its heat transfer properties under dry and wet states were evaluated, and compared with untreated control fabric and the one pre-treated with NaOH. All the fabric samples showed similar heat transfer features in the dry state, and the equilibrium temperature in the dry state was higher than for the wet state. Wetting considerably enhanced the thermal conductivity of the fabrics. Our studies indicate that directional water transport treatment assists in moving water toward one side of the fabric, but has little effect on thermal transfer performance. This study may be useful for development of “smart” textiles for various applications.

  15. PRODUCTION WITH 3D PRINTERS IN TEXTILES [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KESKIN Reyhan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 3D printers are gaining more attention, finding different applications and 3D printing is being regarded as a ‘revolution’ of the 2010s for production. 3D printing is a production method that produces 3-dimensional objects by combining very thin layers over and over to form the object using 3D scanners or via softwares either private or open source. 3D printed materials find application in a large range of fields including aerospace, automotive, medicine and material science. There are several 3D printing methods such as fused deposition modeling (FDM, stereolithographic apparatus (SLA, selective laser sintering (SLS, inkjet 3D printing and laminated object manufacturing (LOM. 3D printing process involves three steps: production of the 3D model file, conversion of the 3D model file into G-code and printing the object. 3D printing finds a large variety of applications in many fields; however, textile applications of 3D printing remain rare. There are several textile-like 3D printed products mostly for use in fashion design, for research purposes, for technical textile applications and for substituting traditional textiles suchas weft-knitted structures and lace patterns. 3D printed textile-like structures are not strong enough for textile applications as they tend to break easily and although they have the drape of a textile material, they still lack the flexibility of textiles. 3D printing technology has to gain improvement to produce materials that will be an equivalent for textile materials, and has to be a faster method to compete with traditional textile production methods.

  16. Developing a national programme for textiles and clothing recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Mohammad Abdullatif; Carrasco-Gallego, Ruth; Ponce-Cueto, Eva

    2018-04-01

    Textiles waste is relatively small in terms of weight as compared to other waste streams, but it has a large impact on human health and environment, and its rate is increasing due to the 'fast fashion' model. In this paper, we examine the French national programme for managing post-consumer textiles and clothing through a case study research. To date, France is the only country in the world implementing an extended producer responsibility (EPR) policy for end-of-use clothing, linen and shoes. The case highlights the benefits of using an EPR policy and provides interesting insights about the challenges faced by the textiles waste sector. For instance, the EPR policy has contributed to a threefold increase in the collection and recycling rates of post-consumer textiles since 2006. In addition, the material recovery rate of the post-consumer textiles can reach 90%, 50% of which can be directly reused. However, the 'reuse' stream is facing some challenges because its main market is in Africa and many African countries are considering banning the import of used textiles to encourage a competitive textiles industry locally and internationally. The EPR policy shows a great potential to identify new markets for 'reuse' and to improve the textiles waste sector. Such an EPR policy also could drive societies to financially support innovation and research to provide feasible solutions for fashion producers to adopt eco-design and design for recycling practices. This paper provides guidance for policy makers, shareholders, researchers and practitioners interested in diverting post-consumer textiles and clothing waste from landfills and promoting circular textiles transition.

  17. Diagnosis of two textile pieces from Santarém Diocesan Museum: a multi-analytical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Florentino Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aim was to study two composite textile pieces from Santarém Diocesan Museum, including their historic context, their conservation condition and the characterization of their constituent parts, which established the date of production. Both pieces belonged to the First Bishop of Daman (1840-1900 and were selected for their historic interest and originality, and for representing a case study in terms of materials, techniques and decoration. They are also a good example of the conservation problems that can occur in liturgical textiles. The diagnosis was extended using optical microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. These techniques allowed the identification of the fibres, binder, metals and pigments, confirming that the pieces date back to the late nineteenth century. Among the main forms of degradation, it was observed: structural deformations, dirt and material losses, not only in areas with fabric but also with metallic embroidery and painted layers.

  18. Design of a Circularly Polarized Galileo E6-Band Textile Antenna by Dedicated Multiobjective Constrained Pareto Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaut Dierck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing textile antennas for real-life applications requires a design strategy that is able to produce antennas that are optimized over a wide bandwidth for often conflicting characteristics, such as impedance matching, axial ratio, efficiency, and gain, and, moreover, that is able to account for the variations that apply for the characteristics of the unconventional materials used in smart textile systems. In this paper, such a strategy, incorporating a multiobjective constrained Pareto optimization, is presented and applied to the design of a Galileo E6-band antenna with optimal return loss and wide-band axial ratio characteristics. Subsequently, different prototypes of the optimized antenna are fabricated and measured to validate the proposed design strategy.

  19. Design and Development of a Flexible Strain Sensor for Textile Structures Based on a Conductive Polymer Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Dufour

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a smart flexible sensor adapted to textile structures, able to measure their strain deformations. The sensors are “smart” because of their capacity to adapt to the specific mechanical properties of textile structures that are lightweight, highly flexible, stretchable, elastic, etc. Because of these properties, textile structures are continuously in movement and easily deformed, even under very low stresses. It is therefore important that the integration of a sensor does not modify their general behavior. The material used for the sensor is based on a thermoplastic elastomer (Evoprene/carbon black nanoparticle composite, and presents general mechanical properties strongly compatible with the textile substrate. Two preparation techniques are investigated: the conventional melt-mixing process, and the solvent process which is found to be more adapted for this particular application. The preparation procedure is fully described, namely the optimization of the process in terms of filler concentration in which the percolation theory aspects have to be considered. The sensor is then integrated on a thin, lightweight Nylon fabric, and the electromechanical characterization is performed to demonstrate the adaptability and the correct functioning of the sensor as a strain gauge on the fabric. A normalized relative resistance is defined in order to characterize the electrical response of the sensor. Finally, the influence of environmental factors, such as temperature and atmospheric humidity, on the sensor performance is investigated. The results show that the sensor’s electrical resistance is particularly affected by humidity. This behavior is discussed in terms of the sensitivity of the carbon black filler particles to the presence of water.

  20. Digital fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Winter 2012 (vol. 14 no. 3) issue of the Nexus Network Journal features seven original papers dedicated to the theme “Digital Fabrication”. Digital fabrication is changing architecture in fundamental ways in every phase, from concept to artifact. Projects growing out of research in digital fabrication are dependent on software that is entirely surface-oriented in its underlying mathematics. Decisions made during design, prototyping, fabrication and assembly rely on codes, scripts, parameters, operating systems and software, creating the need for teams with multidisciplinary expertise and different skills, from IT to architecture, design, material engineering, and mathematics, among others The papers grew out of a Lisbon symposium hosted by the ISCTE-Instituto Universitario de Lisboa entitled “Digital Fabrication – A State of the Art”. The issue is completed with four other research papers which address different mathematical instruments applied to architecture, including geometric tracing system...

  1. Frictorq, a novel fabric surface tester: a progress report

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Mário Filipe Araújo Gonçalves; Hes, Lubos; Vasconcelos, Rosa; Martins, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    A new method to characterise the coefficient of friction of textile fabrics is proposed. The principle is based on the dry clutch, where an annular shaped flat upper body that is kept still, rubs against a lower flat surface, which rotates around a vertical axis at a constant angular velocity. Friction coefficient between the two contacting surfaces is then proportional to the level of the dragging torque between them, measured by means of a precision reaction torque sensor. Contact pressure ...

  2. Plasma Sterilization: New Epoch in Medical Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, P.; Arun, N.; Vigneswaran, C.

    2015-04-01

    Clothing is perceived to be second skin to the human body since it is in close contact with the human skin most of the times. In hospitals, use of textile materials in different forms and sterilization of these materials is an essential requirement for preventing spread of germs. The need for appropriate disinfection and sterilization techniques is of paramount importance. There has been a continuous demand for novel sterilization techniques appropriate for use on various textile materials as the existing sterilization techniques suffer from various technical and economical drawbacks. Plasma sterilization is the alternative method, which is friendlier and more effective on the wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Basically, the main inactivation factors for cells exposed to plasma are heat, UV radiation and various reactive species. Plasma exposure can kill micro-organisms on a surface in addition to removing adsorbed monolayer of surface contaminants. Advantages of plasma surface treatment are removal of contaminants from the surface, change in the surface energy and sterilization of the surface. Plasma sterilization aims to kill and/or remove all micro-organisms which may cause infection of humans or animals, or which can cause spoilage of foods or other goods. This review paper emphasizes necessity for sterilization, essentials of sterilization, mechanism of plasma sterilization and the parameters influencing it.

  3. NONWOVEN TEXTILES WITH MEDICAL DESTINATION ROMANIAN PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BULACU Romulus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The widest range of medical disposable from nonwoven textiles are: absorbent and hygiene products : (diapers, feminine care, incontinence from the layered structures absorbent or impervious; use products such as hospital operating theaters sterile clothing (caps, gowns, masks, shoe coverings, materials for field operators, lab coats, packaging materials for hot or cold treatments, sterile materials (wipes, bandages, sterile bandages, etc.. Currently these materials, in their majority, are imported. This paper presents research done for getting, with the country equipment, disposable medical products from 40 g/m2 nonwoven textile materials. The technology adopted for the purpose, in SC "Minet" S.A. Ramnicu Valcea, Romania consisted of the following steps:Carding - folding, the aggregate Spinnbau-Hergeth type, Germany, with major changes carding technology adjustment and folding, to obtain a fibrous layer with a mass per unit surface of about 40-50 g / m2 and a width of 2,1 m;Pre-heat consolidation by pre-heating required only to ensure product stability required minimal interphase transport to final consolidation. Final thermal consolidation of the fibrous layer by thermal calendering at a temperature of 110°C and calenders cylinder speed of 2 m / min. The processing of the fiber by carding - folding and preliminary thermally consolidation and final by calendering.

  4. Nanopatterned textile-based wearable triboelectric nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Wanchul; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Lee, Keun Young; Shin, Kyung-Sik; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lin, Jianjian; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a fully flexible, foldable nanopatterned wearable triboelectric nanogenerator (WTNG) with high power-generating performance and mechanical robustness. Both a silver (Ag)-coated textile and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanopatterns based on ZnO nanorod arrays on a Ag-coated textile template were used as active triboelectric materials. A high output voltage and current of about 120 V and 65 μA, respectively, were observed from a nanopatterned PDMS-based WTNG, while an output voltage and current of 30 V and 20 μA were obtained by the non-nanopatterned flat PDMS-based WTNG under the same compressive force of 10 kgf. Furthermore, very high voltage and current outputs with an average value of 170 V and 120 μA, respectively, were obtained from a four-layer-stacked WTNG under the same compressive force. Notably it was found there are no significant differences in the output voltages measured from the multilayer-stacked WTNG over 12 000 cycles, confirming the excellent mechanical durability of WTNGs. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the self-powered operation of light-emitting diodes, a liquid crystal display, and a keyless vehicle entry system only with the output power of our WTNG without any help of external power sources.

  5. Product Diversification of Turmeric (Curcuma Domestica Val) for TextileDyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuntari-Sasas; Syafril-Nurdiansyah

    2000-01-01

    In order to increase the use of natural source and variation of naturalpigment for textile dyes, research activity has been carried out in productdiversification of turmeric for textile dyes however its fixation ability tocotton fibre in this dyes does not have strong fixation ability to cottonfibre in order to improve its colour fastness it was necessary to do aftertreatment with mordant. Up to present time, it has been well known thatturmeric was used as raw material for medicine and cosmetic. Considering thatturmeric contains of carbonyl as chromophore in natural pigment. it has highpossibility to serve it as textile dyes. In this study, turmeric wasextracted with water and used its yields for dyeing cotton fabrics. Theextraction was carried out by using water as medium with ratio of 1 : 4 byboiling until reaching the medium ratio of 1 : 2. The extracted turmeric wasre-extracted again with fresh water in the same condition as the previousextraction and repeating the process up to several times until no more dyeswill be extracted out. The mixture of the extracted dyes were then put intoevaporation to obtain dry pigment and was grinned to obtain powder dyes.Color measurement by means of spectrophotometry was subjected to the dyespowder from known various concentrations to obtain the linear calibrationcurve between dyes concentrations and absorbance. The linear equationobtained from this experiment was : Y = 0.0075 + 0.0435 X. From this equationit was calculated that the dyes yields from the whole turmeric extraction was2.6805 %, and from 3 times repeating extraction was 2.2648 % or 84.49 % fromthe whole extracted dyes. Dyeing experiment for cotton fabrics were carriedout at 60 o C for various times of dyeing (30 minutes to 120 minutes). Thedyed fabrics were then mordanted or after treatment with respected potassiumbichromate, aluminum potassium sulphate (Tawas), and diazonium salt (Red SaltB). The dyed fabrics and the mordanted ones were tested for color fastness

  6. A Strategy for Material-specific e-Textile Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gowrishankar, Ramyah; Bredies, Katharina; Ylirisku, Salu

    2017-01-01

    The interaction design of e-Textile products are often characterized by conventions adopted from electronic devices rather than developing interactions that can be specific to e-Textiles. We argue that textile materials feature a vast potential for the design of novel digital interactions....... Especially the shape-reformation capabilities of textiles may inform the design of expressive and aesthetically rewarding applications. In this chapter, we propose ways in which the textileness of e-Textiles can be better harnessed. We outline an e-Textile Interaction Design strategy that is based...... on defining the material-specificity of e-Textiles as its ability to deform in ways that match the expectations we have of textile materials. It embraces an open-ended exploration of textile-related interactions (for e.g. stretching, folding, turning-inside-out etc.) and their potential for electronic...

  7. Towards Automated and Objective Assessment of Fabric Pilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Furferi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pilling is a complex property of textile fabrics, representing, for the final user, a non-desired feature to be controlled and measured by companies working in the textile industry. Traditionally, pilling is assessed by visually comparing fabrics with reference to a set of standard images, thus often resulting in inconsistent quality control. A number of methods using machine vision have been proposed all over the world, with almost all sharing the idea that pilling can be assessed by determining the number of pills or the area occupied by the pills on the fabric surface. In the present work a different approach is proposed: instead of determining the number of pills, a machine vision-based procedure is devised with the aim of extracting a number of parameters characterizing the fabric. These are then used to train an artificial neural network to automatically grade the fabrics in terms of pilling. Tested against a set of differently pilled fabrics, the method shows its effectiveness.

  8. THE DYNAMICS OF THE TEXTILE MARKET. ANALYTICAL REFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliona CERNOVA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the transition to a market economy, the state of many countries’ economies and the international textile industry face considerable challenges. There are many uncertainties surrounding the global textile market, exacerbated by gloomy predictions that for a decade should have been eliminated, resulting in “free” trade flows. There is no doubt that manufacturers which have created niche markets will be better positioned to compete in the global marketplace and achieve higher margins for products while yielding greater profitability. This paper is an introduction of a reasearch that examines how some textile market niches have evolved. The goal of this paper is research and the role that textile niche markets will play by 2025. Specific objectives are: to give a broad overview of various trade theories, including classical, neo-classical, post-neo-classical, and modern, in order to determine what are the possibilities for development and protection. In particular, emphasis will be focused the special problems, due to the vector exchanges and commercial conjuncture, to illustrate how traditional marketing methods differ from market to market and to examine what role will play niche markets in the textiles industry and textile apparel industry in 2050. The results of this research study will help formulate a business strategy that can be used in market capitalization and will provide a framework for research for textile researchers at a global level.

  9. Long-term respiratory health effects in textile workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Peggy S; Christiani, David C

    2013-03-01

    Over 60 million people worldwide work in the textile or clothing industry. Recent studies have recognized the contribution of workplace exposures to chronic lung diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Early studies in textile workers have focused on the relationship between hemp or cotton dust exposure and the development of a syndrome termed byssinosis. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effect of long-term exposure to organic dust in textile workers on chronic respiratory disease in the broader context of disease classifications, such as reversible or irreversible obstructive lung disease (i.e. asthma or COPD), and restrictive lung disease. Cessation of exposure to cotton dust leads to improvement in lung function. Recent animal models have suggested a shift in the lung macrophage:dendritic cell population ratio as a potential mechanistic explanation for persistent inflammation in the lung due to repeated cotton dust-related endotoxin exposure. Other types of textile dust, such as silk, may contribute to COPD in textile workers. Textile dust-related obstructive lung disease has characteristics of both asthma and COPD. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of chronic lung disease due to organic dust exposure in textile workers.

  10. A wearable tracking device inkjet-printed on textile

    KAUST Repository

    Krykpayev, Bauyrzhan

    2017-05-20

    Despite the abundance of localization applications, the tracking devices have never been truly realized in E-textiles. Standard printed circuit board (PCB)-based devices are obtrusive and rigid and hence not suitable for textile based implementations. An attractive option would be direct printing of circuit layout on the textile itself, negating the use of rigid PCB materials. However, high surface roughness and porosity of textiles prevents efficient and reliable printing of electronics on textile. In this work, by printing an interface layer on the textile first, a complete localization circuit integrated with an antenna has been inkjet-printed on the textile for the first time. Printed conductive traces were optimized in terms of conductivity and resolution by controlling the number of over-printed layers. The tracking device determines the wearer\\'s position using WiFi and this information can be displayed on any internet-enabled device, such as smart phone. The device is compact (55mm×45mm) and lightweight (22g with 500mAh battery) for people to comfortably wear it and can be easily concealed in case discretion is required. The device operates at 2.4GHz communicated up to a distance of 55m, with localization accuracy of up to 8m.

  11. Dermal exposure potential from textiles that contain silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Thomas, Treye A; LeBouf, Ryan F; Wade, Eleanor E; Virji, M Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Factors that influence exposure to silver particles from the use of textiles are not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of product treatment and physiological factors on silver release from two textiles. Atomic and absorbance spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were applied to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the textiles and evaluate silver release in artificial sweat and saliva under varying physiological conditions. One textile had silver incorporated into fiber threads (masterbatch process) and the other had silver nanoparticles coated on fiber surfaces (finishing process). Several complementary and confirmatory analytical techniques (spectroscopy, microscopy, etc.) were required to properly assess silver release. Silver released into artificial sweat or saliva was primarily in ionic form. In a simulated "use" and laundering experiment, the total cumulative amount of silver ion released was greater for the finishing process textile (0·51±0·04%) than the masterbatch process textile (0·21±0·01%); Pmasterbatch vs finishing) used to treat textile fibers was a more influential exposure factor than physiological properties of artificial sweat or saliva.

  12. Health and safety concerns of textiles with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L.; Ramos, D.

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing concern related to the effects of nanomaterials in health and safety.Nanotechnologies are already present in many consumer products, including textiles. “Nanotextiles” can be considered as traditional textiles with the incorporation of nanoparticles. They present often functionalities such as antibacterial, ultraviolet radiation protection, water and dirt repellency, self-cleaning or flame retardancy. Nanoparticles can be released from the textile materials due to different effects (abrasion and other mechanical stresses, sweat, irradiation, washing, temperature changes, etc.). It is then expectable that “nanotextiles” may release individual nanoparticles, agglomerates of nanoparticles or small particles of textile with or without nanoparticles, depending on the type of integration of the nanoparticles in textiles. The most important exposure route of the human body to nanoparticles in case of textiles is skin contact. Several standards are being developed under the auspices of the European Committee for Standardization. In this paper, it is presented the development and application of a test method to evaluate the skin exposure to nanoparticles, to evaluate the transfer of the nanoparticles from the textile to the skin by the effect of abrasion and sweat.

  13. Online Fabric Defect Inspection Using Smart Visual Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Sun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fabric defect inspection is necessary and essential for quality control in the textile industry. Traditionally, fabric inspection to assure textile quality is done by humans, however, in the past years, researchers have paid attention to PC-based automatic inspection systems to improve the detection efficiency. This paper proposes a novel automatic inspection scheme for the warp knitting machine using smart visual sensors. The proposed system consists of multiple smart visual sensors and a controller. Each sensor can scan 800 mm width of web, and can work independently. The following are considered in dealing with broken-end defects caused by a single yarn: first, a smart visual sensor is composed of a powerful DSP processor and a 2-megapixel high definition image sensor. Second, a wavelet transform is used to decompose fabric images, and an improved direct thresholding method based on high frequency coefficients is proposed. Third, a proper template is chosen in a mathematical morphology filter to remove noise. Fourth, a defect detection algorithm is optimized to meet real-time demands. The proposed scheme has been running for six months on a warp knitting machine in a textile factory. The actual operation shows that the system is effective, and its detection rate reaches 98%.

  14. Blue and grey water footprint of textile industry in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Laili; Ding, Xuemei; Wu, Xiongying

    2013-01-01

    Water footprint (WF) is a newly developed idea that indicates impacts of freshwater appropriation and wastewater discharge. The textile industry is one of the oldest, longest and most complicated industrial chains in the world's manufacturing industries. However, the textile industry is also water intensive. In this paper, we applied a bottom-up approach to estimate the direct blue water footprint (WFdir,blue) and direct grey water footprint (WFdir,grey) of China's textile industry at sector level based on WF methodology. The results showed that WFdir,blue of China's textile industry had an increasing trend from 2001 to 2010. The annual WFdir,blue surpassed 0.92 Gm(3)/yr (giga cubic meter a year) since 2004 and rose to peak value of 1.09 Gm(3)/yr in 2007. The original and residuary WFdir,grey (both were calculated based on the concentration of chemical oxygen demand (CODCr)) of China's textile industry had a similar variation trend with that of WFdir,blue. Among the three sub-sectors of China's textile industry, the manufacture of textiles sector's annual WFdir,blue and WFdir,grey were much larger than those of the manufacture of textile wearing apparel, footware and caps sector and the manufacture of chemical fibers sector. The intensities of WFdir,blue and WF(res)dir,grey of China's textile industry were year by year decreasing through the efforts of issuing restriction policies on freshwater use and wastewater generation and discharge, and popularization of water saving and wastewater treatment technologies.

  15. New objective system of pilling evaluation for various types of fabrics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Techniková, L.; Tunák, M.; Janáček, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2017), s. 123-131 ISSN 0040-5000 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : objective pilling evaluation * 3D fabric surface reconstruction * image analysis * pill characteristics * pilling grade Subject RIV: JS - Reliability ; Quality Management, Testing OBOR OECD: Textiles Impact factor: 1.007, year: 2016

  16. Analysis and Comparison of Thickness and Bending Measurements from Fabric Touch Tester (FTT and Standard Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Atiyyah Binti Haji

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fabric Touch Tester (FTT is a relatively new device from SDL Atlas to determine touch properties of fabrics. It simultaneously measures 13 touch-related fabric physical properties in four modules that include bending and thickness measurements. This study aims to comparatively analyze the thickness and bending measurements made by the FTT and the common standard methods used in the textile industry. The results obtained with the FTT for 11 different fabrics were compared with that of standard methods. Despite the different measurement principle, a good correlation was found between the two methods used for the assessment of thickness and bending. As FTT is a new tool for textile comfort measurement and no standard yet exists, these findings are essential to determine the reliability of the measurements and how they relate to the well-established standard methods.

  17. Textile sector:a study of the effects of the commercial openingon the Brazilian textile sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Vilela Marquezini

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of commercial opening occurred in 1990 during the Collor’s govern­ment made the transformation industry get into a restructuring process. The ob­jective of this paper is to present the effects of the commercial opening of the textile sector during the period of 1993-2004 and main strategies adopted for the enterprises. The study was based on interview of the executives and institutions related to the textile sector. After ten years, the commercial opening is considered positive to the improvement of the productive structure of the sector. Besides the reduction on tariffs and the devaluation of the exchange rate in 1999, was pointed of the responsible factors of the adjusting process.

  18. Engineering mechanical gradients in next generation biomaterials - Lessons learned from medical textile design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joanna L; Collins, Ciara E; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2017-07-01

    facilitate transport of molecules and cells during tissue genesis within tissue defects (surgical membranes). External and internal biomaterial membranes prescribe boundary conditions for treatment of medical disorders, from oedema to tissue defects. Studies are needed to guide the design of next generation biomaterials and devices that incorporate gradient engineering approaches, which offer great potential to enhance function in a dynamic and physiological context. Mechanical gradients intrinsic to currently implemented biomaterials such as medical textiles and surgical interface membranes are poorly understood. Here we characterise quantitatively the mechanics of textile and nonwoven biomaterial membranes for external and internal use. The lack of seamless gradients in compression medical textiles contrasts with the graded mechanical effects achieved by elastomeric exercise bands, which are designed to deliver controlled, incremental increases in loading to facilitate healing as injured tissues return to normal structure and function. Engineering textiles with a prescient choice of fibre composition/size, type of knit/weave and inlay fibres, and weave density/anisotropy will enable creation of fabrics that can deliver spatially and temporally controlled mechanical gradients to maintain force balances at tissue boundaries, e.g. to treat oedema or tissue defects. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biodegradability enhancement of textile wastewater by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tak-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Lee, Myun-Joo

    2007-01-01

    Textile wastewater generally contains various pollutants, which can cause problems during biological treatment. Electron beam radiation technology was applied to enhance the biodegradability of textile wastewater for an activated sludge process. The biodegradability (BOD 5 /COD) increased at a 1.0 kGy dose. The biorefractory organic compounds were converted into more easily biodegradable compounds such as organic acids having lower molecular weights. In spite of the short hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the activated sludge process, not only high organic removal efficiencies, but also high microbial activities were achieved. In conclusion, textile wastewater was effectively treated by the combined process of electron beam radiation and an activated sludge process

  20. Environmental assessment of end-of-life textiles in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koligkioni, Athina; Parajuly, Keshav; Sørensen, Birgitte Lilholt

    2018-01-01

    The European Union is on its way to a circular economy through eco-design, waste prevention, reuse and recycling of products and materials. This study analyzes the environmental effects of end-of-life textile management in Denmark. First, a Mass Flow Analysis was performed for textile flows from...... sales to consumers to end processes, which revealed that absolute consumption has grown significantly over the last years. Data on generation and management of used textiles indicated that around 40% are discarded with residual waste, another 40% are captured by collection for reuse channels, and around...

  1. Ecological modernisation and institutional transformations in the Danish textile industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Bent; Hansen, Ole Erik; Holm, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The interplay of environmental regulation programs and environmental transformations in the Danish textile industry is analysed. The result of the interplay is summarised as an ecological modernisation process, which has established distributed environmental competences at enterprises and institu......The interplay of environmental regulation programs and environmental transformations in the Danish textile industry is analysed. The result of the interplay is summarised as an ecological modernisation process, which has established distributed environmental competences at enterprises...... and institutional actors in the textile industry, and has established new environmental perceptions and agendas in the industry....

  2. Neural activity based biofeedback therapy for Autism spectrum disorder through wearable wireless textile EEG monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahi, Ahna; Rai, Pratyush; Oh, Sechang; Ramasamy, Mouli; Harbaugh, Robert E.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    Mu waves, also known as mu rhythms, comb or wicket rhythms are synchronized patterns of electrical activity involving large numbers of neurons, in the part of the brain that controls voluntary functions. Controlling, manipulating, or gaining greater awareness of these functions can be done through the process of Biofeedback. Biofeedback is a process that enables an individual to learn how to change voluntary movements for purposes of improving health and performance through the means of instruments such as EEG which rapidly and accurately 'feedback' information to the user. Biofeedback is used for therapeutic purpose for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) by focusing on Mu waves for detecting anomalies in brain wave patterns of mirror neurons. Conventional EEG measurement systems use gel based gold cup electrodes, attached to the scalp with adhesive. It is obtrusive and wires sticking out of the electrodes to signal acquisition system make them impractical for use in sensitive subjects like infants and children with ASD. To remedy this, sensors can be incorporated with skull cap and baseball cap that are commonly used for infants and children. Feasibility of Textile based Sensor system has been investigated here. Textile based multi-electrode EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system with embedded electronics for data acquisition and wireless transmission has been seamlessly integrated into fabric of these items for continuous detection of Mu waves. Textile electrodes were placed on positions C3, CZ, C4 according to 10-20 international system and their capability to detect Mu waves was tested. The system is ergonomic and can potentially be used for early diagnosis in infants and planning therapy for ASD patients.

  3. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-12-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg for radiocarbon dating in contrast to earlier counting techniques. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating that was difficult to do before AMS because of sample size limitations of decay counting. Some of the many applications of AMS include paleoclimatic studies, archaeological research and the age of first settlement of North America by man, dating of art works and artifacts, fall times and terrestrial residence ages of meteorites, production of {sup 14}C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ {sup 14}C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of {sup 14}C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages.

  4. Miniature photometric stereo system for textile surface structure reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Kampouris, Christos; Malassiotis, Sotiris

    2013-04-01

    In this work a miniature photometric stereo system is presented, targeting the three-dimensional structural reconstruction of various fabric types. This is a supportive module to a robot system, attempting to solve the well known "laundry problem". The miniature device has been designed for mounting onto the robot gripper. It is composed of a low-cost off-the-shelf camera, operating in macro mode, and eight light emitting diodes. The synchronization between image acquisition and lighting direction is controlled by an Arduino Nano board and software triggering. The ambient light has been addressed by a cylindrical enclosure. The direction of illumination is recovered by locating the reflection or the brightest point on a mirror sphere, while a flatfielding process compensates for the non-uniform illumination. For the evaluation of this prototype, the classical photometric stereo methodology has been used. The preliminary results on a large number of textiles are very promising for the successful integration of the miniature module to the robot system. The required interaction with the robot is implemented through the estimation of the Brenner's focus measure. This metric successfully assesses the focus quality with reduced time requirements in comparison to other well accepted focus metrics. Besides the targeting application, the small size of the developed system makes it a very promising candidate for applications with space restrictions, like the quality control in industrial production lines or object recognition based on structural information and in applications where easiness in operation and light-weight are required, like those in the Biomedical field, and especially in dermatology.

  5. Bacterial cellulose production from cotton-based waste textiles: enzymatic saccharification enhanced by ionic liquid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng; Guo, Xiang; Zhang, Shuo; Han, Shi-fen; Yang, Guang; Jönsson, Leif J

    2012-01-01

    Cotton-based waste textiles were explored as alternative feedstock for production of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The cellulosic fabrics were treated with the ionic liquid (IL) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl). [AMIM]Cl caused 25% inactivation of cellulase activity at a concentration as low as of 0.02 g/mL and decreased BC production during fermentation when present in concentrations higher than 0.0005 g/mL. Therefore, removal of residual IL by washing with hot water was highly beneficial to enzymatic saccharification as well as BC production. IL-treated fabrics exhibited a 5-7-fold higher enzymatic hydrolysis rate and gave a seven times larger yield of fermentable sugars than untreated fabrics. BC from cotton cloth hydrolysate was obtained at an yield of 10.8 g/L which was 83% higher than that from the culture grown on glucose-based medium. The BC from G. xylinus grown on IL-treated fabric hydrolysate had a 79% higher tensile strength than BC from glucose-based culture medium which suggests that waste cotton pretreated with [AMIM]Cl has potential to serve as a high-quality carbon source for BC production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Smart textile plasmonic fiber dew sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Hamid; Rivard, Maxime; Arzi, Ezatollah; Légaré, François; Hassani, Alireza

    2015-06-01

    We propose a novel Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR)-based sensor that detects dew formation in optical fiber-based smart textiles. The proposed SPR sensor facilitates the observation of two phenomena: condensation of moisture and evaporation of water molecules in air. This sensor detects dew formation in less than 0.25 s, and determines dew point temperature with an accuracy of 4%. It can be used to monitor water layer depth changes during dew formation and evaporation in the range of a plasmon depth probe, i.e., 250 nm, with a resolution of 7 nm. Further, it facilitates estimation of the relative humidity of a medium over a dynamic range of 30% to 70% by measuring the evaporation time via the plasmon depth probe.

  7. Smart Textiles in Humanistic Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe Emil; Fisker, Anna Marie; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2013-01-01

    in Future Hospitals”, stating the overall hypothesis that textiles in hospital interiors possess an unexploited architectural potential in relation to the humanistic visions of healing architecture. Concerned with the operational challenge of unfolding the visionary design principle, we suggest to re......With the construction of new hospitals, the design principle healing architecture is introduced, representing the humanistic vision of improving hospitalised patients’ healing process, supported by stimulating architecture. In this regard, we address focus on the potential influence of the design...... principle, discussing how healing architecture may contribute in making the future hospital institutions more responsive to human needs. The main purpose of this paper is thus to present a review of healing architecture, by considering some of the challenges in the operational use of the design principle...

  8. Optical spectroscopy of ancient paper and textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missori, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient paper and textiles represent a striking example of optically inhomogenous materials whose optical responses are strongly governed by scattering effects. In order to recover the absorption coefficient from non-invasive and nondestructive reflectance measurements a specific approach based on Kubelka-Munk two-flux theory must be applied. In this way quantitative chemical information, such as chromophores concentration, can be obtained, as well as quantitative spectra of additional substances such as pigments or dyes. Results on a folio of the Codex on the Flight of Birds by Leonardo da Vinci and a linen cloth dated back to 1653 and called the Shroud of Arquata, a copy of the Shroud of Turin, will be presented.

  9. Individual customizable in-store textile production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M.; Bücher, D.; Gloy, Y.-S.; Gries, T.

    2017-10-01

    The target of every company is to satisfy customer demands. Especially the clothing industry has to serve individual customer requirements. Textile products always have been and still are the defining attributes of people’s appearance. Consumer’s demands towards commercial clothing companies have been changing rapidly during the recent years. Two global megatrends have supported this change: Individualization and digitalization. Individualization created demand for frequent collection changes, while still keeping availability high. Digitalization supported the quick distribution of new trends and forced a higher amount of request during peak periods. This paper outlines how a highly individual and customizable fashion product can be produced in a store environment. It focuses on the conceptual design, taking into account the interdisciplinary approach combining production technology with IT-systems, but also addresses the economical challenge with help of a value stream analysis.

  10. Energy conservation potential in Taiwanese textile industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Gui-Bing; Su, Te-Li; Lee, Jenq-Daw; Hsu, Tsung-Chi; Chen, Hua-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Since Taiwan lacks sufficient self-produced energy, increasing energy efficiency and energy savings are essential aspects of Taiwan's energy policy. This work summarizes the energy savings implemented by 303 firms in Taiwan's textile industry from the on-line Energy Declaration System in 2008. It was found that the total implemented energy savings amounted to 46,074 ton of oil equivalent (TOE). The energy saving was equivalent to 94,614 MWh of electricity, 23,686 kl of fuel oil and 4887 ton of fuel coal. It represented a potential reduction of 143,669 ton in carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual carbon dioxide absorption capacity of a 3848 ha plantation forest. This study summarizes energy-saving measures for energy users and identifies the areas for making energy saving to provide an energy efficiency baseline.

  11. The US textile industry: An energy perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badin, J. S.; Lowitt, H. E.

    1988-01-01

    This report investigates the state of the US textile industry in terms of energy consumption and conservation. Specific objectives were: To update and verify energy and materials consumption data at the various process levels in 1984; to determine the potential energy savings attainable with current (1984), state-of-the-art, and future production practices and technologies (2010); and to identify new areas of research and development opportunity that will enable these potential future savings to be achieved. Results of this study concluded that in the year 2010, there is a potential to save between 34% and 53% of the energy used in current production practices, dependent on the projected technology mix. RandD needs and opportunities were identified for the industry in three categories: process modification, basic research, and improved housekeeping practices that reduce energy consumption. Potential RandD candidates for DOE involvement with the private sector were assessed and selected from the identified list.

  12. Treatment of Textile Wastewaterby Adsorption and Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Patel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite of wastewater treatment was carried out using activated charcoal as adsorbent to remove COD, BOD, color in which various parameters like adsorbent dose, contact duration, temperature and agitator speed were considered. The adsorbent behavior can be explained on the basis of Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. Maximum removal (87.6, 81.0 and 90.0% of COD, BOD and color respectively was found at adsorbent dosage of 11 g/L. Also, the textile mill wastewater was treated with different doses of coagulants like alum, ferric sulphate and ferrous sulphate at constant contact duration (4 hours and room temperature (300 K. Percentage reduction (maximum corresponds to 80.2, 74.0 and 84.9% was obtained for removal of COD, BOD and color respectively.

  13. Roadmap Textile 2030; Routekaart Textiel 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintermans, J. [MODINT, Zeist (Netherlands); Van den Berg, F. [BECO, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Van Hooijdonk, G. [The Bridge, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Luiken, A. [Alcon Advies, Wierden (Netherlands); Brinks, G. [BMA Techne, Almelo (Netherlands); Op den Brouw, H. [Agentschap NL, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    For the Roadmap Textile the future market demand was chosen as a starting point Trends in the following five sectors are depicted: Care, Construction, Mobility, Sports and Entertainment, Safety. Opportunities are defined and translated into development targets. Based on 'technological readiness levels' and perceived market opportunities, five new or innovative product market combinations (PMCs) are assigned and calculated for potential savings in energy and raw materials [Dutch] Voor de Routekaart Textiel is de toekomstige marktvraag als vertrekpunt gekozen. Trends in de volgende vijf sectoren zijn in beeld gebracht: Zorg, Bouw, Mobiliteit, Sport en ontspanning, Veiligheid. Vanuit deze trends zijn kansen gedefinieerd, die vervolgens zijn doorvertaald naar ontwikkelingsdoelen. Op basis van de bijbehorende 'technological readiness levels' en de gepercipieerde marktkansen, zijn een vijftal nieuwe dan wel vernieuwende product markt combinaties (pmc's) benoemd en doorgerekend op besparingspotentieel in energie en grondstoffen.

  14. La industria textil uruguaya (1900-1960)

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena Bertino

    2009-01-01

    La industria textil uruguaya se inició a comienzos del siglo XX con la instalación de algunas fábricas de tejidos de lana y de una gran hilandería de lana peinada. Desde la crisis de 1929, sustentada en la protección cambiaría, se expandió en forma acelerada durante el periodo conocido como de industrialización por sustitución de importaciones. Alcanzó su apogeo entre fines de la segunda guerra mundial y comienzos de la década de los cincuenta, al instalar hilanderías de algodón y de fibras s...

  15. Direct Integration of Dynamic Emissive Displays into Knitted Fabric Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingham, Alyssa

    Smart textiles are revolutionizing the textile industry by combining technology into fabric to give clothing new abilities including communication, transformation, and energy conduction. The advent of electroluminescent fibers, which emit light in response to an applied electric field, has opened the door for fabric-integrated emissive displays in textiles. This thesis focuses on the development of a flexible and scalable emissive fabric display with individually addressable pixels disposed within a fabric matrix. The pixels are formed in areas where a fiber supporting the dielectric and phosphor layers of an electroluminescent structure contacts a conductive surface. This conductive surface can be an external conductive fiber, yarn or wire, or a translucent conductive material layer deposited at set points along the electroluminescent fibers. Different contacting methods are introduced and the different ways the EL yarns can be incorporated into the knitted fabric are discussed. EL fibers were fabricated using a single yarn coating system with a custom, adjustable 3D printed slot die coater for even distribution of material onto the supporting fiber substrates. These fibers are mechanically characterized inside of and outside of a knitted fabric matrix to determine their potential for various applications, including wearables. A 4-pixel dynamic emissive display prototype is fabricated and characterized. This is the first demonstration of an all-knit emissive display with individually controllable pixels. The prototype is composed of a grid of fibers supporting the dielectric and phosphor layers of an electroluminescent (EL) device structure, called EL fibers, and conductive fibers acting as the top electrode. This grid is integrated into a biaxial weft knit structure where the EL fibers make up the rows and conductive fibers make up the columns of the reinforcement yarns inside the supporting weft knit. The pixels exist as individual segments of

  16. Bioremediation of textile effluent polluted soil using kenaf (Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR BADA

    Bioremediation of textile effluent polluted soil using kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus Linn.) and composted ... Lead, Cadmium, Chromium and Zinc levels in plants and soil were determined using Atomic ..... Contaminated land in the EC: Report of ...

  17. Auxiliaries for the textile industry and environmental protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda VISAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry is an industrial field that affects the environment, from the plant growth until the production process. The obtaining of environmental licence for Romanian companies that produce textile products is related to elaboration and implementation of a modern system for an environmental management, that consist in utilization of ecological technologies for finishing, in diminution the water and energy consumption, cleaning of waste waters, reutilization of cleaned waters, sustainable management of wastes. In this study, the surfactant categories used in the textile industry that fulfil the conditions of environment protection, are presented. Some exemplifications were made involving the existing surfactants in Romanian textile industry, obtained from both domestic and external production. Also, some recommendation are suggested regarding the utilization of surfactants manufactured from either vegetal oils or chemical/petrochemical wastes, with similar properties as those from import having decreased prices an that affect as small as possible the environment.

  18. Energy and environmental nanotechnology in conductive paper and textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    for emerging energy and environmental applications. The motivations and challenges of using paper and textiles for device applications will be discussed. Various types of energy and environmental devices have been demonstrated including supercapacitors, Li

  19. Bioremediation of textile effluent polluted soil using kenaf ( Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioremediation of textile effluent polluted soil using kenaf ( Hibiscus cannabinus Linn.) and composted ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management. Journal Home ... Twelve-litre plastic pots were filled with 10 kg soil.

  20. Fundamental Aspects on Conductive Textiles Implemented in Intelligent System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.; Ene, D.; Amariei, N.; Popa, A.

    2017-06-01

    Conductive fibers, which are electrically conductive elements having the structure of a fiber, have a fairly long history and have been used for applications in electronic textiles as well as for aesthetics, anti-static and shielding purposes. Electrically conducting textile fibers, such as gold-coated threads, were produced in antiquity for aesthetic purposes, before the discovery of electricity, using various manufacturing methods. The textile intelligent systems, which comprise conducting textile structures (electroconducting wires or structures), present a dynamic behavior which favors the self regulation of the thermal insulation and vapor permeability with the purpose to maintain the thermo-physiological balance; the clothing assembly aims at monitoring the biologic potential, used only in critical situation (ex. accidents, falling down in a precipice etc.).