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Sample records for texas 1979-1981 volume

  1. The history of reindeer in Iceland and reindeer study 1979 - 1981

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skarphédinn Thórisson

    1984-05-01

    Full Text Available This report deals with the history of reindeer in Iceland and reindeer study in East Iceland in the years 1979 - 1981. The study included about half of the Icelandic reindeer population, i.e. that part of it affected by the proposed Austurlandsvirkjun hydro-electric power scheme. The study was originally based on «Proposal for study of reindeer and ranges in Iceland» by Eldar Gaare and Eigil Reimers (1978. A summary of the investigation plan is shown in Table 1.Reinens historie på Island og reinundersøkelser 1979 - 1981.Abstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Denne rapport omhandler historien om reinsdyr på Island samt undersøkelser over reinen på Øst-Island i årene 1979 - 1981. Disse studier omfatter omlag halvdelen av den islandske reinpopulasjon, d.v.s. den del som blir berørt av den foreslåtte hydroelektriske utbygging i Austurlandsvirkjun. Undersøkelsene ble opprinnelig planlagt etter et forslag om undersøkelser av rein og reinbeiter på Island utarbeidet av Eldar Gaare og Eigil Reimers. En oversikt over denne plan er vist i Tabell 1.Porojen historiaa Islannissa ja porojen tutkimusta vuosina 1979 - 1981.Abstract in Finnish / Yhteenveto: Raportti kåsittelee porojen historiaa Islannissa ja ne porotutkimukset, jotka suoritettiin Itå-Islannissa vuosina 1979-1981. Tutkimukset kåsittåvåt suunnilleen puolet Islannin porokannasta tai siitå sen osan, johon Austurlandsvirkjuniin ehdotettu voimalaitossuunnitelma vaikuttaa. Alunpitåen tutkimukset ovat perustuneet Eldar Gaaren ja Eigil Reimersin tyohon: «Ehdotus porojen ja porolaidunten tutkimuksesta Islannissa». Katsaus projektisuunnitelmista on nåytetty taulukossa 1.

  2. [Annual distribution of serotypes of Salmonella, Shigella, and infantile enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in the Republic of Argentina, 1979-1981].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiguer, T; Butta, N

    1983-01-01

    We report data of isolation of 3,665 strains of Salmonella, 1,855 of Shigella and 697 of E. coli infantile enteropathogenic (EPI) from different sources: human, animal, food and water, in Argentina during the triennium 1979-1981, considering their importance in the chain of transmission of enterobacteria. It appears that S. typhimurium is the most common among all the isolated serotypes of Salmonella, following in order of importance, S. oranienburg, S. derby, S. panama, S. agona, S. anatum, S. newport, S. bredeney and S. montevideo. It is important to emphasize the appearance of new Shigella serotypes in Argentina, particularly Sh. dysenteriae 2. We found that E. coli EPI 0111:B4 was the most frequent serotype and in 1981 the serotype 0112:B13 was also found.

  3. Diferenciais regionais de mortalidade por câncer no Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, 1979-1981 Regional differentials in cancer mortality in a region of, Brazil, 1979-1981

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Boschi

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available A partir do fato de que os neoplasmas malignos foram a terceira causa de morte no Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, no ano de 1980, apresentando taxa bruta igual a 89,8 por 100.000 habitantes, foi analisada a mortalidade por câncer segundo suas principais localizações anatômicas, no período 1979-1981. Dividiu-se o Estado em três regiões distintas: Capital, Cinturão Metropolitano e Interior. Foram calculados coeficientes de mortalidade trienais, posteriormente padronizados pelo método direto utilizando-se, para tal, a população mundial. Para cumprir o objetivo de comparar diferentes regiões geográficas foram calculadas razões padronizadas de mortalidade. Observou-se que as principais localizações anatômicas foram pulmão, estômago, próstata, esôfago e fígado, nos homens; e mama, estômago, pulmão, cérvix uterino e útero (não especificado, nas mulheres. Encontrou-se que as maiores taxas para o total de tumores ocorreram na Capital e as menores no Interior, sendo as maiores razões padronizadas de mortalidade aquelas para mama (1,88, cólon (1,71 e pulmão (1,70. A mortalidade por neoplasmas malignos de esôfago e de fígado foi maior no Interior do que nas demais regiões, em ambos os sexos. Concluiu-se que existe comportamento distinto da mortalidade por câncer entre as diferentes regiões, apontando, mais uma vez, na direção da determinação ambiental de grande parte dos neoplasmas malignos.In 1980, malignant neoplasms ranked 3rd as a cause of death in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a crude mortality rate of 89.8 per 100,000. Cancer mortality data for 1979-1981 are presented for the State, with the objective of analyzing regional differentials. For the purpose of comparing mortality from the most important cancers, the State was divided into three regions: Capital, Metropolitan Belt and Interior, on the basis of the geographical structure of the State - which gave rise to the present urbanization patterns

  4. Texas Emergency Resource Management. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    surgical. Catheter , urethral. Sutures, nonabsorbable, with Morphine and substitutes. Containers for sterilization. attached needle. Oral electrolytes...Sulfa drugs. Forceps, dressing. Tracheotomy tube. Synthetic plasma volume Forceps, hemostatic. Tube, nasogastric expanders. Forceps, obstetrical...g) in the event of attack or upon advice from higher authority, institute plans to insure austere distribution of essential survival Item . (h

  5. Permian Basin, Texas: Volume 1, Text: Final preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report is a description of the preliminary design for an Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) at the proposed 49 acre site located 21 miles north of Hereford, Texas in Deaf Smith County. Department of Energy must conduct in situ testing at depth to ascertain the engineering and environmental suitability of the site for further consideration for nuclear waste repository development. The ESF includes the construction of two 12-ft diameter engineered shafts for accessing the bedded salt horizon to conduct in situ tests to ascertain if the site should be considered a candidate site for the first High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. This report includes pertinent engineering drawings for two shafts and all support facilities necessary for shaft construction and testing program operation. Shafts will be constructed by conventional drill-and-blast methods employing ground freezing prior to shaft construction to stabilize the existing groundwater and soil conditions at the site. A watertight liner and seal system will be employed to prevent intermingling of aquifers and provide a stable shaft throughout its design life. 38 refs., 37 figs., 14 tabs

  6. Proceedings of second geopressured geothermal energy conference, Austin, Texas, February 23--25, 1976. Volume V. Legal, institutional, and environmental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanston, J.H.; Elmer, D.B.; Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.; Letlow, K.; Lopreato, S.C.; Meriwether, M.; Ramsey, P.; Rogers, K.E.; Williamson, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Three separate abstracts were prepared for Volume V of the Proceedings of the Conference. Sections are entitled: Legal Issues in the Development of Geopressured--Geothermal Resources of Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast; The Development of Geothermal Energy in the Gulf Coast; Socio-economic, Demographic, and Political Considerations; and Geothermal Resources of the Texas Gulf Coast--Environmental Concerns arising from the Production and Disposal of Geothermal waters. (MCW)

  7. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Forty-five. Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of Texas governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  8. Application of the Streamflow Prediction Tool to Estimate Sediment Dredging Volumes in Texas Coastal Waterways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, E.; Dreaper, G.; Afshari, S.; Tavakoly, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past six fiscal years, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has contracted an average of about a billion dollars per year for navigation channel dredging. To execute these funds effectively, USACE Districts must determine which navigation channels need to be dredged in a given year. Improving this prioritization process results in more efficient waterway maintenance. This study uses the Streamflow Prediction Tool, a runoff routing model based on global weather forecast ensembles, to estimate dredged volumes. This study establishes regional linear relationships between cumulative flow and dredged volumes over a long-term simulation covering 30 years (1985-2015), using drainage area and shoaling parameters. The study framework integrates the National Hydrography Dataset (NHDPlus Dataset) with parameters from the Corps Shoaling Analysis Tool (CSAT) and dredging record data from USACE District records. Results in the test cases of the Houston Ship Channel and the Sabine and Port Arthur Harbor waterways in Texas indicate positive correlation between the simulated streamflows and actual dredging records.

  9. Texas trip generation manual : 1st edition-volume 1 : user's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this Manual is to provide a summary of Texas trip generation data for various : Land Use Codes (LUCs) and time periods, for data obtained from workplace and special : generator (WSG) surveys performed as part of the Texas Travel Survey...

  10. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Large-Scale Operations Management Test (LSOMT) of Insects and Pathogens for Control of Waterhyacinth in Louisiana. Volume 1. Results for 1979-1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    is accelerated by the endotoxin, cercosporin . Symptoms on waterhyacinth 43. The leaf spot disease caused by C. rodmanii is characterized by the... cercosporin , which produces a general necrosis of plant tissues and hastens S senescence of waterhyacinth leaves. This decreases the total photosynthate

  11. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1997. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1996-30 September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-12-03

    Water-resources data for the 1997 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 790 observation wells and 245 water-quality data for monitoring wells.

  12. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1996-11-22

    Water-resources data for the 1996 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 845 observation wells and 187 water-quality data for monitoring wells.

  13. Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

  14. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Van Horn and Pecos Quadrangles, Texas. Volume I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    A high sensitivity, airborne radiometric and magnetic survey of portions of the Big Bend, Texas area was conducted. The project area comprising the Van Horn and Pecos 1:250,000 NTMS sheets, consists of approximately 16,400 square miles. A total of 6,666 line miles of high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic data were collected. Traverse lines were flown at a spacing of 3.125 miles in an east/west direction with tie lines flown in a north/south direction at a 18.375 miles separation. All data were collected utilizing a fixed wing aircraft, Grumman G-89 and over 3,500 cubic inches of NaI crystal detector. Magnetometer data were collected utilizing a high sensitivity, 0.25 gamma, proton magnetometer. Data were digitally recorded at 0.5 second intervals. All field data were returned to the computer facilities for processing, statistical analysis, and interpretation. Other data are presented which include corrected profiles of all radiometric variables, magnetic data, radar altimeter data, barometric altimeter data, air temperature and airborne Bismuth contributions. Data presented have been summed to provide 1.0 second equivalent sample intervals, corrected for Compton Scatter, altitude dependence and atmospheric Bismuth. These data are presented in the form of strip charts, microfiche, and digital magnetic tapes containing raw spectral data, single record data, magnetic data, and statistical analysis results. In addition, computer generated anomaly maps along with interpretation maps are presented relating mapped geology to the collected radiometric data

  15. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Van Horn and Pecos Quadrangles, Texas. Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-10-01

    A high sensitivity, airborne radiometric and magnetic survey of portions of the Big Bend, Texas area was conducted. The project area comprising the Van Horn and Pecos 1:250,000 NTMS sheets, consists of approximately 16,400 square miles. A total of 6,666 line miles of high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic data were collected. Traverse lines were flown at a spacing of 3.125 miles in an east/west direction with tie lines flown in a north/south direction at a 18.375 miles separation. All data were collected utilizing a fixed wing aircraft, Grumman G-89 and over 3,500 cubic inches of NaI crystal detector. Magnetometer data were collected utilizing a high sensitivity, 0.25 gamma, proton magnetometer. Data were digitally recorded at 0.5 second intervals. All field data were returned to the computer facilities for processing, statistical analysis, and interpretation. Other data are presented which include corrected profiles of all radiometric variables, magnetic data, radar altimeter data, barometric altimeter data, air temperature and airborne Bismuth contributions. Data presented have been summed to provide 1.0 second equivalent sample intervals, corrected for Compton Scatter, altitude dependence and atmospheric Bismuth. These data are presented in the form of strip charts, microfiche, and digital magnetic tapes containing raw spectral data, single record data, magnetic data, and statistical analysis results. In addition, computer generated anomaly maps along with interpretation maps are presented relating mapped geology to the collected radiometric data.

  16. Gulf Coast Salt Domes geologic Area Characterization Report, East Texas Study Area. Volume II. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The East Texas Area Characterization Report (ACR) is a compilation of data gathered during the Area Characterization phase of the Department of Energy's National Waste Terminal Storage program in salt. The characterization of Gulf Coast Salt Domes as a potential site for storage of nuclear waste is an ongoing process. This report summarizes investigations covering an area of approximately 2590 km 2 (1000 mi 2 ). Data on Oakwood, Keechi, and Palestine Domes are given. Subsequent phases of the program will focus on smaller land areas and fewer specific salt domes, with progressively more detailed investigations, possibly culminating with a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The data in this report are a result of drilling and sampling, geophysical and geologic field work, and intensive literature review. The ACR contains text discussing data usage, interpretations, results and conclusions based on available geologic and hydrologic data, and figures including diagrams showing data point locations, geologic and hydrologic maps, geologic cross sections, and other geologic and hydrologic information. An appendix contains raw data gathered during this phase of the project and used in the preparation of these reports

  17. Texas' forests, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bentley; Consuelo Brandeis; Jason A. Cooper; Christopher M. Oswalt; Sonja N. Oswalt; KaDonna Randolph

    2014-01-01

    This bulletin describes forest resources of the State of Texas at the time of the 2008 forest inventory. This bulletin addresses forest area, volume, growth, removals, mortality, forest health, timber product output, and the economy of the forest sector.

  18. Pulmonary Edema and Plasma Volume Changes in Dysbarism. M.S. Thesis - Texas Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joki, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Two groups of anesthetized, fasted pigs were utilized. One group of 13 animals (8.5 to 16.6 kilograms) was exposed to a high-pressure environment, and the other group of eight animals (6.9 to 20.0 kilograms) constituted the control group. The experimental group was subjected to an atmosphere of 90 percent nitrogen and 10 percent oxygen at a pressure of 50 psig for 30 minutes and then decompressed at a rate 10 psi/min. Plasma volumes, using both iodine-125-tagged-albumin and chromium-51-tagged-cell dilution techniques, were measured before, immediately after, and at 30 and 60 minutes after decompression. Aortic and right-ventricular systolic pressures were also recorded. At 60 minutes after decompression, blood samples were taken, the animals were sacrificed, and the water content of the lungs, kidneys, livers, and spleens was estimated by measuring tissue wet weight and dry weight. Protein extravasation and tissue blood volumes were determined by measuring the iodine-125-tagged-albumin and chromium-51-tagged-cell spaces in homo-genates of the organs under investigation.

  19. Environmental and Cultural Impact. Proposed Tennessee Colony Reservoir, Trinity River, Texas. Volume II. Appendices A, B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Texas. These include Forestiera (Forestiera ligustrina), netleaf hackberry (Celtis reticulata), and honey mesquite ( Prosopis glandulosa ) (Correll and...Walt.) Water elm J. F. Gmel Platanus occidentalis L. Sycamore Populus deltoides Marsh. Eastern cottonwood 4Prosopis glandulosa Torr. Honey mesquite

  20. Environmental and Cultural Impact. Proposed Tennessee Colony Reservoir, Trinity River, Texas. Volume III. Appendices D and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    mouthed frog Bufonidae Bufo, speciosus Texas toad Bufo vallices Gulf Coast toad Bufo woodhousei woodhousei Rocky Mt. toad Hylidae Acris, crepitans...crepitans Northern cricket frog Hyla cinera cinera Green tree frog Hyla chrysoscelis Gray tree frog Pseudacris clarki Spotted chorus frog Pseudacris...salamander Manculus guadridigitatus Dwarf salamander Notophthalmus viridescens Central newt Frogs Hyla cinera Green treefrog Hyla chrysoscelis Gray

  1. Temperature of ground water at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1979- 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulachok, Gary N.

    1986-01-01

    Anthropogenic heat production has undoubtedly caused increased ground-water temperatures in many parts of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as shown by temperatures of 98 samples and logs of 40 wells measured during 1979-81. Most sample temperatures were higher than 12.6 degrees Celsius (the local mean annual air temperature), and many logs depict cooling trends with depth (anomalous gradients). Heating of surface and shallow-subsurface materials has likely caused the elevated temperatures and anomalous gradients. Solar radiation on widespread concrete and asphalt surfaces, fossil-fuel combustion, and radiant losses from buried pipelines containing steam and process chemicals are believed to be the chief sources of heat. Some heat from these and other sources is transferred to deeper zones, mainly by conduction. Temperatures in densely urbanized areas are commonly highest directly beneath the land surface and decrease progressively with depth. Temperatures in sparsely urbanized areas generally follow the natural geothermal gradient and increase downward at about that same rate.

  2. Germany's foreign trade with nuclear products, 1979-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The survey on the foreign trade of the Federal Republic of Germany with nuclear-technical products which was set up by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) shows for 1981 (with comparative figures for 1979 and 1980) an increase by 35.5% or from 0,5 billion DM to 2.1 billion DM if compared to the previous year while there had been a regression by 23.2%, 0.5 billion DM resp. from 1979 to 1980. (orig./UA) [de

  3. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Indian Wells, Texas. Final report. Detail area, Volume IIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume IIB contains appendices for: flight line maps; geology maps; explanation of geologic legend; flight line/geology maps; radiometric contour maps; magnetic contour maps; geochemical factor analysis maps

  4. Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources

  5. Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume II. Palo Duro basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and high variable precipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources

  6. Simulation of storm peaks and storm volumes for selected subbasins in the West Fork Trinity River Basin, Texas, water years 1993-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    A model parameter set for use with the Hydrologic Simulation Program FORTRAN watershed model was developed to simulate storm peaks and storm volumes for the 28 subbasins of the West Fork Trinity River Basin upstream from Lake Worth, northwest of Fort Worth, Texas, from the calibration and testing of 5 gaged subbasins. These parameters can be transferred to the 23 ungaged subbasins. The model simulates storm runoff for a channel-routing model that can be used to improve reservoir operation during floods in the basin. Rainfall and runoff data were collected from October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1994. A total of 55 storms were recorded at the 5 streamgage stations during the 24 months. Twelve different pervious land segments were defined based on types of soil, land cover, and watershed slope. A total of 20 process-related parameters were defined for each land segment, and 6 basin-related parameters were defined for each stream reach. The mean absolute errors for the 5 subbasins for simulation of storm peaks range from 48.0 to 470 percent and for simulation of storm volumes range from 34.4 to 416 percent. A sensitivity analysis was done to determine what a change in a parameter value has on the largest storm peak and on the total storm volume. The model then was recalibrated and tested on the basis of the analysis of the sensitivity of parameters and on the analysis of the errors from the initial model calibration and testing. The mean absolute errors for the 5 subbasins using the recalibrated parameters for simulation of storm peaks range from 47.1 to 297 percent, and for simulation of storm volumes range from 27.6 to 193 percent. The model produced better results for simulation of the larger storm peaks and storm volumes than for simulation of the smaller storm peaks and storm volumes, especially after an extended period of no runoff. The same range in errors can be expected when transferring the parameters to the 23 ungaged subbasins. Additional data collection

  7. Technical procedures for water resources: Volume 4, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This volume contains Technical Procedures pursuant to the water Resources Site Study Plan: including Collection, Preservation, and Shipment of Ground-Water Samples; Inventory Current Water Use and Estimating Projected Water Use; Estimation of Precipitation Depth, Duration, Frequence; Estimation of Probable Maximum Precipitation; Calculation of Floodplains

  8. Technical procedures for water resources, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Volume 1: Environmental Field Program: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This volume contains Technical Procedures pursuant to the Water Resources Site Study Plan including, determination of basin topographic characteristics, determination of channel and playa lake characteristics, operation of a stream gaging station, operation of a playa lake stage gaging system, and processing of data from a playa lake stage gaging system

  9. Texas Yehaa !!!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Indtryk fra et besøg på SLA, Special Libraries Associations årlige konference, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 9.-13. juni 2001. "An Information Odyssey: Seizing the Competitive Advantage"......Indtryk fra et besøg på SLA, Special Libraries Associations årlige konference, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 9.-13. juni 2001. "An Information Odyssey: Seizing the Competitive Advantage"...

  10. Texas situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avant, R.V. Jr.; Bowmer, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority was formed in 1981 to address the Texas low-level radioactive waste problem consistent with the direction of P.L. 96-573. The Authority has completed technical tasks, including source term evaluations, preliminary conceptual designs, economic assessments, and long-range planning, and has work in progress on facility design, site selection, operating procedures, and licensing. Site selection has been the major technical activity and will be completed in 1987 after on-site evaluations of potential sites. The Authority expects to have its site licensed and operating in 1992. Texas has been the leader in site selection. Political concerns and the uncertainty of the national agenda led Texas policy makers to slow down the state's progress. The lessons learned through the Texas situation should be instructive to other states and compacts and may well be a prediction of events for these other groups. This paper discusses the background and status of Texas development activities, future plans, and lessons learned

  11. Technical procedures for water resources, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Volume 2: Environmental Field Program: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This volume contains the following Technical Procedures pursuant to the Water Resources Site Study Plan operation of a Playa Lake conductivity monitoring station and processing of data from a Playa Lake conductivity monitoring station. This procedure defines steps and methods for the installation, operation, and maintenance of the Playa Lake conductivity monitoring stations. Conductivity measurements will be taken at six playa lakes in the site study area to record changes in total dissolved solids as a function of stage. Playa lake conductivity and stage (volume) measurements will be used, in conjunction with other water quality data collected at the Playa Lake and precipitation stations, to determine the mass of dissolved solids entering and leaving the playas. This baseline information on the pollutant mass balance of the playas will be used to assess potential changes in playa lake water quality and the magnitude of those changes due to site development. The pollutant mass balances will also be used on determining the source of pollutants. 2 refs., 5 figs

  12. Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

    1981-09-01

    This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II

  13. Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

    1981-09-01

    This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

  14. Crosbyton Solar Power Project. Volume 8: Preliminary design of 55-MWe solar-fossil hybrid electric power plant at Crosbyton, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary design and the construction cost for a 5 MWe Solar Hybrid Electric Energy Plant (SHEEP) to be built at Crosbyton, Texas. The plant has been designed to serve as a small size, commercially operable power plant which fully demonstrates the function, performance, and cost of this solar technology and integrated steam management concept. Good lifetime performance at minimum cost were the critical design objectives. The major solar components of this plant are ten 203 foot diameter stationary tilted quartersphere solar bowls. Each with a slender 58 foot solar receiver which tracks the solar focus produced by the bowl. At peak insolation the ten bowls will produce sufficient steam to generate 5 MWe. This plant has only a few minutes of thermal storage capability. The plant has a fossil boiler (oil or gas fired) which is integrated into the solar-turbine steam loop to provide supplemental steam for electric generation at night or during periods of low insolation.

  15. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Louisiana and Texas. Volume 3, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the states of Louisiana and Texas. Individual reports for six other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS).

  16. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Louisiana and Texas. Volume 3, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC's effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD ampersand D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the states of Louisiana and Texas. Individual reports for six other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS)

  17. Treasured Texas Theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Dallas artist Jon Flaming's deep love of Texas is evident in his paintings and sculpture. Although he has created one sculptural Texas theater, his work primarily showcases old Texas barbershops, vacant homes, and gas stations. In this article, the author describes how her students, inspired by Flaming's works, created three-dimensional historical…

  18. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic-reconnaissance survey portions of New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas. Volume I. Instrumentation and data reduction. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, a rotary-wing high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic survey was flown covering portions of the State of New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. The survey encompassed six 1:250,000 scale quadrangles, Holbrook, El Paso, Las Cruces, Carlsbad, Fort Sumner and Roswell. The survey was flown with a Sikorsky S58T helicopter equipped with a high sensitivity gamma ray spectrometer which was calibrated at the DOE calibration facilities at Walker Field in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the Dynamic Test Range at Lake Mead, Arizona. The radiometric data were processed to compensate for Compton scattering effects and altitude variations. The data were normalized to 400 feet terrain clearance. The reduced data is presented in the form of stacked profiles, standard deviation anomaly plots, histogram plots and microfiche listings. The results of the geologic interpretation of the radiometric data together with the profiles, anomaly maps and histograms are presented in the individual quadrangle reports. The survey was awarded to LKB Resources, Inc. which completed the data acquisition. In April, 1980 Carson Helicopters, Inc. and Carson Geoscience Company agreed to manage the project and complete delivery of this final report

  19. Furthering Medical Education in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Surendra K; Jennings, John

    2016-02-01

    Medical education in Texas is moving in the right direction. The Texas Medical Association has been a major partner in advancing medical education initiatives. This special symposium issue on medical education examines residency training costs, the Next Accreditation System, graduate medical education in rural Texas, Texas' physician workforce needs, the current state of education reform, and efforts to retain medical graduates in Texas.

  20. Maternal Mortality in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeva, Sonia; Archer, Natalie P; Ruggiero, Karen; Hall, Manda; Stagg, Julie; Interis, Evelyn Coronado; Vega, Rachelle; Delgado, Evelyn; Hellerstedt, John; Hankins, Gary; Hollier, Lisa M

    2017-05-01

    A commentary on maternal mortality in Texas is provided in response to a 2016 article in Obstetrics & Gynecology by MacDorman et al. While the Texas Department of State Health Services and the Texas Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Task Force agree that maternal mortality increased sharply from 2010 to 2011, the percentage change or the magnitude of the increase in the maternal mortality rate in Texas differs depending on the statistical methods used to compute and display it. Methodologic challenges in identifying maternal death are also discussed, as well as risk factors and causes of maternal death in Texas. Finally, several state efforts currently underway to address maternal mortality in Texas are described. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Texas motorcycle crash countermeasure workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) contracted with the Texas A&M : Transportation Institute (TTI) to develop a 5-year strategic plan for improving motorcycle safety : in the State of Texas. The Texas Strategic Action Plan for Motorcycl...

  2. Financial policy and speculative runs with a crawling peg: Argentina 1979-1981

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen, S.J.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a model of a balance-of-payment crisis and examines the financial policy of the Argentine government in dealing with the speculative runs on the peg between December 1978 and February 1981. The evolution of a crisis when a collapse is not perfectly foreseen; The factors that

  3. Texas freight 2055 roundtable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Participants were welcomed to the Roundtable discussion and to the Dallas/Fort Worth region by : Mr. Michael Morris (Director of Transportation, North Central Texas Council of Governments : (NCTCOG)). Mr. Morris began his remarks by noting the import...

  4. Typhus in Texas

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    Dr. Kristy Murray, an associate professor in pediatrics and assistant dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, discusses increased cases of typhus in southern Texas.  Created: 7/6/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  5. Texas Emergency Resource Management. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    mittens 3151 METALWORKING EQUIPMENT (MEQ) Welding equipment and supplies (electric and 3623 acetylene) Light equipment and hand tools (including electric...raincoats 2337 Women’s etc. outerwear n.e.c. 2339 Girls, childrens & infants dresses, blouses, waists & shirts 2361 Girls. etc. coats & suits 2363 Girls...etc. outerwear, n.e.c. 2369 Underwear: Knit (in knitting mills) 2254 Hens, youths, & boys 2322 Womens, misses, childrens & infants 2341 Corsets & all

  6. Transforming Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Developmental Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with support from the Texas Legislature, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has funded various developmental education initiatives, including research and evaluation efforts, to help Texas public institutions of higher education provide more effective programs and services to underprepared students. Based on evaluation…

  7. Forests of east Texas, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry Dooley

    2018-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station (SRS) in cooperation with Texas A&M Forest Service. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—Southeast (unit 1),...

  8. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  9. Can Texas' Physicians Be as Diverse as Texas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sean

    2017-07-01

    The United States and Texas have a chronic shortage of doctors, but the shortage of minority physicians is even more acute. To address this, and the health disparities that come with it, Texas medical schools are working to increase minority enrollment, but challenges remain.

  10. Forests of East Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Brandeis

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas derived from an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. These estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are...

  11. Forests of east Texas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.J.W. Dooley; T.J. Brandeis

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. Forest resource estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and...

  12. Texas Academic Library Statistics, 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Library, Austin. Dept. of Library Development.

    The statistics in this report on Texas academic libraries are based on data collected and verified for the national Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) by the Texas State Library. The brief introduction notes some of the advantages and disadvantages of using IPEDS data for this report, which is intended to be a comprehensive…

  13. The Texas We Create: State of Texas Children 2012--Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviney, Frances; Hattemer, Kori

    2012-01-01

    The 2012 data book explores how our kids have fared during the last decade--some outcomes are positive, some negative. But positive or negative outcomes for kids don't just happen. They are the inevitable results of effective or failed policy choices. The State of Texas Children 2012 combines data and policy to tell the story of Texas kids. It's…

  14. Fiebre petequial en Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwik Anigstein

    1943-03-01

    Full Text Available El ilustre hombre de ciencia Ludwik Anigstein, antiguo y sabio profesor de Varsovia quien hoy se encuentra en la Universidad de Texas de los Estados Unidos de Norteamérica, al proseguir sus estudios universalmente conocidos sobre Ríckettsiasis, encontró en asocio de Madero N. Bader, un foco de fiebre petequial en Texas con nuevos e interesantes aspectos epidemiológicos. Siendo esta una cuestión tan vivamente interesante para los médicos colombianos, porque la Rickettsia transmitida por garrapatas o sea la fiebre petequial de Tobia, es enfermedad mortifera de varias zonas campesinas de nuestras tierras cálidas, publicamos con su asentimiento, para los lectores de la Revista de la Facultad de Medicina de Bogotá, la traducción de la nota informativa del ilustre Profesor Anigstein, aparecida en el No 2.494 del Vol. 96, año 1942 de la Revista "Science".

  15. Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program: A Collaboration between the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, South Texas College, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. CBE Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Glancey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This case study is part of a series on newer competency-based degree programs that have been emerging in recent years. In January 2014, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), South Texas College (STC), and Texas A&M University-Commerce (A&M Commerce) launched the Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program, the state's first…

  16. Texas floods of 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, Seth D.

    1948-01-01

    Floods occurred in Texas during, June, July, and November 1940 that exceeded known stages on many small streams and at a few places on the larger streams. Stages at several stream-gaging stations exceeded the maximum known at those places since the collection of daily records began. A storm, haying its axis generally on a north-south line from Cameron to Victoria and extending across the Brazos, Colorado, Lavaca, and Guadalupe River Basins, caused heavy rainfall over a large part of south-central Texas. The maximum recorded rain of 22.7 inches for the 2-day period June 29-30 occurred at Engle. Of this amount, 17.5 inches fell in the 12-hour period between 8 p.m. June 29, and 8 a.m. June 30. Light rains fell at a number of places on June 28, and additional light rains fell at many places within the area from July 1 to 4. During the period June 28 to July 4 more than 20 inches of rain fell over an area of 300 square miles, more than 15 inches over 1,920 square miles, and more than 10 inches over 5,100 square miles. The average annual rainfall for the area experiencing the heaviest rainfall during this storm is about 35 inches. Farming is largely confined to the fertile flood plains in much of the area subjected to the record-breaking floods in June and July. Therefore these floods, coming at the height of the growing season, caused severe losses to crops. Much damage was done also to highways and railways. The city of Hallettsville suffered the greatest damage of any urban area. The Lavaca River at that place reached a stage 8 feet higher than ever known before, drowned several people, destroyed many homes, and submerged almost the entire business district. The maximum discharge there was 93,100 second-feet from a drainage area of 101 square miles. Dry Creek near Smithville produced a maximum discharge of 1,879 second-feet from an area of 1.48 square miles and a runoff of 11.3 inches in a 2-day period from a rainfall of 19.5 inches. The area in the Colorado River

  17. Sitaxsentan (ICOS-Texas Biotechnology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Wong, J R

    2001-04-01

    ICOS-Texas Biotechnology is developing the endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist, sitaxsentan, for the potential treatment of pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and subarachnoid hemorrhage [205713], [302200]. The compound is in phase IIa trials as an iv formulation for CHF and has completed phase I safety trials as an oral formulation [272071]. Phase II/III trials for pulmonary hypertension are planned for the first quarter of 2001 [3945711]. In June 2000, ICOS and Texas Biotechnology established a joint venture to develop and commercialize endothelin antagonists [370007]. US-05591761 was issued to Texas in January 1997, covering TBC-11251 and several related isomers [2309301.

  18. Texas' performance assessment work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbeneau, R.J.; Hertel, N.E.; Pollard, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority is completing two years of detailed on-site suitability studies of a potential low-level radioactive waste disposal site in Hudspeth County, Texas. The data from these studies have been used to estimate site specific parameters needed to do a performance assessment of the site. The radiological impacts of the site have been analyzed as required for a license application. The approach adopted for the performance assessment was to use simplified and yet conservative assumptions with regard to releases, radionuclide transport, and dose calculations. The methodologies employed in the performance assessment are reviewed in the paper. Rather than rely on a single computer code, a modular approach to the performance assessment was selected. The HELP code was used to calculate the infiltration rate through the trench covers and the amount of leachate released from this arid site. Individual pathway analyses used spreadsheet calculations. These calculations were compared with those from other computer models including CRRIS, INGDOS, PATHRAE, and MICROSHIELD copyright, and found to yield conservative estimates of the effective whole body dose. The greatest difficulty in performing the radiological assessment of the site was the selection of reasonable source terms for release into the environment. A surface water pathway is unreasonable for the site. Though also unlikely, the groundwater pathway with exposure through a site boundary well was found to yield the largest calculated dose. The more likely pathway including transport of leachate from the facility through the unsaturated zone and returning to the ground surface yields small doses. All calculated doses associated with normal releases of radioactivity are below the regulatory limits

  19. Technical Training seminar: Texas Instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Monday 6 November TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR 14:00 to 17:30 - Training Centre Auditorium (bldg. 593) Texas Instruments Technical Seminar Michael Scholtholt, Field Application Engineer / TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (US, D, CH) POWER - A short approach to Texas Instruments power products Voltage mode vs. current mode control Differentiating DC/DC converters by analyzing control and compensation schemes: line / load regulation, transient response, BOM, board space, ease-of-use Introduction to the SWIFT software FPGA + CPLD power solutions WIRELESS / CHIPCON Decision criteria when choosing a RF platform Introduction to Texas Instruments wireless products: standardized platforms proprietary platforms ( 2.4 GHz / sub 1 GHz) development tools Antenna design: example for 2.4 GHz questions, discussion Industrial partners: Robert Medioni, François Caloz / Spoerle Electronic, CH-1440 Montagny (VD), Switzerland Phone: +41 24 447 0137, email: RMedioni@spoerle.com, http://www.spoerle.com Language: English. Free s...

  20. Texas pavement preservation center four-year summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-04

    The Texas Pavement Preservation Center (TPPC), in joint collaboration with the Center for Transportation Research (CTR) of the University of Texas at Austin and the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) of Texas A&M University, promotes the use of pav...

  1. Early Environmental Adult Education: An Oral History of Citizen Researchers' Learning in the Appalachian Land Ownership Study, 1979-1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodano, Keara

    2013-01-01

    The Appalachian Land Ownership Study was a participatory action research project in one of our nation's poorest regions suffering from absenteeism, poverty, powerlessness, and improper taxation. In discovering who owned the region's land, the participants sought to organize against the social, economic and environmental injustices imposed on the…

  2. The Economist’s Perception of the U.S.-Soviet Strategic Balance: An Update for 1979-1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    defence (oborona), not deterrence (the word exists in Russian--ustrashenie--but is seldom used), is the cornerstone of Soviet strategy . In the stark prose...letters from publicists .. or military specialists. o The Economist was sometimes present at U.S. weapons demonstrat ons . . . 3"There was no evidence...journals for some telling comments about Soviet strategy on nuclear war."’ From time to time, The Economist gave space in its correspondence columns

  3. 21 CFR 808.93 - Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas. 808.93 Section 808.93 Food and Drugs FOOD... and Local Exemptions § 808.93 Texas. (a) The following Texas medical device requirement is enforceable... that, in enforcing this requirement, Texas apply the definition of “used hearing aid” in § 801.420(a)(6...

  4. Texas, 2008 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Bentley

    2011-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the first statewide annual inventory conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas Forest Service of the forest resource attributes in Texas. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—southeast (unit 1), the northeast (unit 2), the north...

  5. Ready Texas: Stakeholder Convening. Proceedings Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercultural Development Research Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    With the adoption of substantial changes to Texas high school curricula in 2013 (HB5), a central question for Texas policymakers, education and business leaders, families, and students is whether and how HB5 implementation impacts the state of college readiness and success in Texas. Comprehensive research is needed to understand the implications…

  6. Texas, 2010 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bentley

    2012-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the statewide annual inventory conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas Forest Service of the forest resource attributes in Texas. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units – southeast (unit 1), northeast (unit 2), north central (unit 3...

  7. The Demographics of Corporal Punishment in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the student discipline policies of 1,025 Texas school districts, as well as data from the Texas Education Agency's Academic Excellence Indicator System in order to identify demographic patterns regarding corporal punishment policies in Texas schools. The study also studied the relationship between a district's corporal…

  8. Texas Real Estate Curriculum Workshop Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert

    The Texas Real Estate Research Center-Texas Education Agency (TRERC-TEA) curriculum workshop was attended by over 40 participants representing 26 Texas community colleges. These participants divided into eight small groups by real estate specialty area and developed curriculum outlines and learning objectives for the following real estate courses:…

  9. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 2. San Jacinto River basin, Brazos River basin, San Bernard River basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 2 contains records for water discharge at 74 gaging stations; stage only at 6 gaging stations; stage and contents at 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 41 gaging stations; and data for 44 partial-record stations comprised of 18 flood-hydrograph, 10 low-flow, and 16 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  10. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Texas single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  11. Lessons from past experiences: Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, T.W. III

    1986-01-01

    A site selection study was conducted in which technical criteria were developed and potential sites numerically ranked. Three candidate sites were chosen, two in south Texas and one in west Texas. Adamant public opposition to the two sites forced a reevaluation and redirection of the siting process. Three sites on state owned lands in west Texas have been identified under the second site selection study. The following are recommended guidelines to incorporate in any public participation program: use multiple approaches at both the regional and local level; identify the public and their true concerns; approach the public at their level and their style; use a slow, deliberate process, siting cannot be forced; be honest and available; give the public an active part in the decision making process; keep elected officials informed and active and encourage information exchange; and be prepared for surprises. Two ranking exercises were also undertaken and are briefly described. The first ranked eleven major issues in order of perceived importance. The second ranked waste disposal technologies. Detailed information on both ranking exercises can be obtained from the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority

  12. South Texas Maquiladora Suppliers Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, J. Michael

    This project was undertaken to assist South Texas industries in improving export to nearby Mexican maquiladoras (factories). The maquiladora program is based on co-production by two plants under a single management, one on each side of the border. Activities addressed four objectives: (1) to determine the dollar value, quantity, and source of the…

  13. Bushland, Texas Reference ET Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bushland Reference Evapotranspiration (ET) Calculator was developed at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, for calculating grass and alfalfa reference ET. It uses the ASCE Standardized Reference ET Equation for calculating reference ET at hourly and dai...

  14. Redmedial Action Plan for the Risk-Based Remediation of Site ST14 (SWMU 68), LPSTID 104819; the Former Base Refueling Area (A0C7); the French Underdrain System (SWMU 64); and the North Oil/Water Separator (SWMU 67), Carswell Air Force Base, Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas. Volume 1: Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    ...) to prepare a remedial action plan (RAP) in support of a risk-based remediation decision for soil and groundwater contaminated with fuel hydrocarbons at Site ST14 at Carswell Air Force Base (AFB), Texas...

  15. Cotton irrigation timing with variable seasonal irrigation capacities in the Texas south plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the Ogallala Aquifer Region of Texas, the irrigation capacity (IC) for a given field often changes within a growing season due to seasonal depletion of the aquifer, in season changes in crop irrigation needs in dry years, or consequences of irrigation volume limits imposed by irrigation distr...

  16. Optimization of Influenza Antiviral Response in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    originated 38 from Texas- Mexico border counties, TAVRS would average the 150 treatable curves that apply to that influenza scenario to be used in... INFLUENZA ANTIVIRAL RESPONSE IN TEXAS by Travis L. Chambers March 2015 Advisor: Nedialko B. Dimitrov Co-Advisor: Michael Atkinson Second...DATES COVERED March 2015 Master ’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE OPTIMIZATION OF INFLUENZA ANTIVIRAL RESPONSE IN TEXAS 6. AUTHOR(S) Travis L. Chambers

  17. 78 FR 12010 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Pearsall, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Broadcasting Services; Pearsall, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule... (``Petitioner''), licensee of FM Station KSAG, Channel 277A, Pearsall, Texas. Petitioner proposes to amend the... be allotted at Pearsall, Texas, in compliance with the Commission's minimum distance separation...

  18. Oceanographic measurements from the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Texas Automated Buoy System contains daily oceanographic measurements from seven buoys off the Texas coast from Brownsville to Sabine. The Texas General Land...

  19. Clone of EPA Approved Regulations in the Texas SIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    changed name to EPA Approved Regulations in the Texas SIP, Add links to:Texas Read Me; Texas SIP History;Current/Previous SIP-Approved Regulations; Delete regulations--now in /node/191099, removed tables

  20. 75 FR 68398 - Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Texas, Oklahoma...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35430] Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad Company Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC (TOE), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption...

  1. Center for Space Power, Texas A and M University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ken

    Johnson Controls is a 106 year old company employing 42,000 people worldwide with $4.7 billion annual sales. Though we are new to the aerospace industry we are a world leader in automobile battery manufacturing, automotive seating, plastic bottling, and facilities environment controls. The battery division produces over 24,000,000 batteries annually under private label for the new car manufacturers and the replacement market. We are entering the aerospace market with the nickel hydrogen battery with the help of NASA's Center for Space Power at Texas A&M. Unlike traditional nickel hydrogen battery manufacturers, we are reaching beyond the space applications to the higher volume markets of aircraft starting and utility load leveling. Though space applications alone will not provide sufficient volume to support the economies of scale and opportunities for statistical process control, these additional terrestrial applications will. For example, nickel hydrogen batteries do not have the environmental problems of nickel cadmium or lead acid and may someday start your car or power your electric vehicle. However you envision the future, keep in mind that no manufacturer moves into a large volume market without fine tuning their process. The Center for Space Power at Texas A&M is providing indepth technical analysis of all of the materials and fabricated parts of our battery as well as thermal and mechanical design computer modeling. Several examples of what we are doing with nickel hydrogen chemistry to lead to these production efficiencies are presented.

  2. Geothermal and heavy-oil resources in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seni, S.J.; Walter, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group lie below medium- to heavy-oil reservoirs in the Eocene Jackson Group. This fortuitous association suggests the use of geothermal fluids for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR). Geothermal fairways are formed where thick deltaic sandstones are compartmentalized by growth faults. Wilcox geothermal reservoirs in South Texas are present at depths of 11,000 to 15,000 ft (3,350 to 4,570 m) in laterally continuous sandstones 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) thick. Permeability is generally low (typically 1 md), porosity ranges from 12 to 24 percent, and temperature exceeds 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C). Reservoirs containing medium (20{degrees} to 25{degrees} API gravity) to heavy (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) oil are concentrated along the Texas Coastal Plain in the Jackson-Yegua Barrier/Strandplain (Mirando Trend), Cap Rock, and Piercement Salt Dome plays and in the East Texas Basin in Woodbine Fluvial/Deltaic Strandplain and Paluxy Fault Line plays. Injection of hot, moderately fresh to saline brines will improve oil recovery by lowering viscosity and decreasing residual oil saturation. Smectite clay matrix could swell and clog pore throats if injected waters have low salinity. The high temperature of injected fluids will collapse some of the interlayer clays, thus increasing porosity and permeability. Reservoir heterogeneity resulting from facies variation and diagenesis must be considered when siting production and injection wells within the heavy-oil reservoir. The ability of abandoned gas wells to produce sufficient volumes of hot water over the long term will also affect the economics of TEOR.

  3. [Sybil Scott and East Texas Baseball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfin, Samantha, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This issue of "Loblolly Magazine" is dedicated to Sybil Scott, born in 1910 and still going at the age of 85. She shares some interesting tales of what it was like growing up in the '10's and '20's in Texas, including her school years. She remembers, very vividly, her childhood and teenage years in East Texas. Among the many interesting…

  4. Consumer Education in Texas High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, James U.

    The study sought to determine a statewide status profile of consumer education in Texas public secondary schools and to obtain an attitudinal profile of Texas secondary teachers and administrators regarding consumer education. An introductory chapter traces the historical development of consumerism and consumer education. Two different sets of 10…

  5. Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hammoud, Roukaya; Nayes, Stacy L; Murphy, James R; Heresi, Gloria P; Butler, Ian J; Pérez, Norma

    2017-06-01

    Infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis roundworms is endemic in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. A. cantonensis meningitis and myelitis occurred in summer 2013 in a child with no history of travel outside of Texas, USA. Angiostrongyliasis is an emerging neurotropic helminthic disease in Texas and warrants increased awareness among healthcare providers.

  6. 40 CFR 81.429 - Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Texas. 81.429 Section 81.429 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.429 Texas. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land...

  7. Overview: Texas College and Career Readiness Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Texas College and Career Readiness Standards define what students should know and be able to accomplish in order to succeed in entry-level college courses or skilled workforce opportunities upon graduation from high school. This paper answers the following questions: (1) Who developed the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards?; (2) What…

  8. Motorcycle helmet use in Texas.

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, A K; Williams, A F; Womack, K N

    1991-01-01

    Helmets worn by motorcyclists decrease head injuries and the likelihood of being killed in a crash by about 30 percent. From 1968 to 1977, Texas had a comprehensive motorcycle helmet use law, which was estimated to have saved 650 lives. But the law was amended in 1977 to apply only to motorcycle operators and passengers under age 18. In September 1989, a new law was passed that required helmets for all motorcycle operators and passengers. Observations of helmet use were conducted before and a...

  9. RCRA Facility Investigation Report Texas Solid Waste Management Units Fort Bliss El Paso, Texas. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    New Mexico line, and east to southeast from the Sierra de I Juarez. The general direction of water movement was toward the valley of the Rio Grande...Range Wel 2 4 - - - Bldg. 8101; Dona Ana Target Range Well 3 5 - - - Humo Firing Point Wll 3 I6 886 1141 256 Bldg. 1170; Fort Bliss Well 5 I 7 984 1092...SWMU. This monitoring was performed by the SSO using a Foxboro Model 128 flame ionization detector (FID) organic vapor analyzer (OVA), or an HNU Model

  10. 27 CFR 9.136 - Texas Hill Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas Hill Country. 9.136... Texas Hill Country. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Hill Country.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the “Texas Hill...

  11. The Texas Ten Percent Plan's Impact on College Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Martorell, Paco; McFarlin, Isaac, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The Texas Ten Percent Plan (TTP) provides students in the top 10 percent of their high-school class with automatic admission to any public university in the state, including the two flagship schools, the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M. Texas created the policy in 1997 after a federal appellate court ruled that the state's previous…

  12. 78 FR 27342 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Moran, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Broadcasting Services; Moran, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... service at Moran, Texas. Channel 281A can be allotted at Moran, Texas, in compliance with the Commission's... parties should serve petitioner as follows: Katherine Pyeatt, 215 Cedar Springs Rd., 1605, Dallas, Texas...

  13. 9 CFR 72.5 - Area quarantined in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Area quarantined in Texas. 72.5... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.5 Area quarantined in Texas. The area quarantined in Texas is the quarantined area...

  14. Draft Environmental Impact Statement Disposal and Reuse of Carswell AFB, Texas. Disposal and Reuse of Carswell Air Force Base, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    State University, Northridge M.S., 1990, Experimental Psychology, California State University, Northridge Years of Experience: 6 Christopher Clayton...Biology, California State University, San Bernardino Years of Experience: 10 Christopher D. Hobbins, HQ AFCEE, Base Closure Restoration Division, Team...Texas. Bureau of Economic Geology, 1987. Geologic Atlas of Texas, Dallas Sheet, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas. Camp Dresser

  15. 75 FR 45695 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ...-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... proposed transportation project, TTC-35, extending from the Texas- Oklahoma line to the City of Laredo, generally paralleling existing I- 35 in the State of Texas. DATES: By this notice, the FHWA is advising the...

  16. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone. (a) The following is a safety zone: (1) The west and northwest shores of Snake Island; (2) The...

  17. Precipitation and Evaporation Trends in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R. W.

    2009-05-01

    Texas is a large land area with at least three different climate types. As such it is expected that the results of climate change will not be homogenous. This paper presents results of a study of long trends in Texas precipitation and evaporation using data from the US Historical Climatology Network and the Texas Water Development Board. It shows that the long term trends of these variables is not homogenous and exhibits great variability in both spatial extent and magnitude. This variability must be considered in planning for future water supply or other mitigation projects.

  18. Transnational licensure: view from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Diane

    2003-01-01

    Texas has a diverse population with many underserved communities and a dentist-to-population ratio only 80% of the national average. Currently dentists trained in other countries can be licensed after completing four years of dental school and passing either the Western or Central Regional Testing Association's examination or by completing a graduate program in an ADA-accredited specialty. Although there have been careful and lengthy analyses of comparability of training across countries, a fundamental issue is that standards for education are developed by a national voluntary organization (Commission on Dental Accreditation) and standards for licensure are determined by individual states in the United States. Elsewhere in the world, the federal government performs these roles.

  19. Solar Leasing Summary, Houston Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Mary [City of San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-02-14

    A relatively new option for homeowners looking to add solar to their home is the solar lease. At present, the solar lease option can be found in California, Arizona, Texas, Colorado, Hawaii, New York and Oregon. The most active companies currently offering solar leases are NRG Energy, Sungevity, Solar City and Sun Run. With the uncertainty and/or lack of subsidies the states participating in these programs have ebbed and flowed over the last few years. However, there is an expectation that in the current market solar leasing will make solar viable without the utility and federal subsidies. NRG Energy is currently testing this expectation in Houston, TX where currently no subsidies or incentives beyond the federal tax incentives, exist. Following is an explanation on the state of solar leasing in Houston, TX and explanation of the current financing options.

  20. Texas RPO workshop implementation project summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This report documents rural planning organization (RPO) workshops conducted throughout Texas. An RPO is a voluntary organization created and governed by locally elected officials responsible for transportation decisions at the local level. RPOs addre...

  1. Noise measurements of highway pavements in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    This report presents the results of noise testing performed on Texas pavements between May of 2006 and the : summer of 2008. Two field test methodologies were used: roadside noise measurement with SPL meters and onvehicle : sound intensity measuremen...

  2. Estimating Texas motor vehicle operating costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    A specific Vcost model was developed for Texas conditions based on a sophisticated fuel model for light : duty vehicles, several excellent sources of secondary vehicle cost data, and the ability to measure heavy truck fuel : consumption through both ...

  3. Exploratory study : vehicle mileage fees in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This project evaluates Vehicle Mileage (VM) fees as a possible funding mechanism for meeting the State of Texas : long-term transportation needs. Researchers conducted listening sessions with the general public and stakeholders to : gather input o...

  4. Achieving the Texas Higher Education Vision

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benjamin, Roger

    2000-01-01

    The Texas higher education system faces severe challenges in responding to the twin demands placed on it by economic growth and by the increasing problems of access to higher education that many Texans experience...

  5. Exploring sustainable transportation for Texas Southern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Texas Southern University is a commuter campus with students, faculty, and staff traveling from the : Greater Houston area to the university. Over the past few years, the TSU campus has made marked : improvements to move towards a greener more ...

  6. The Brucellosis Eradication Program in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    2 Distribution of Brucellosis Bovine Infected Herds in Texas . . 75 Figure 3 Comparison of Infected Herds-Initial Testing vs FY 󈨖 . . .. 76 Figure...The temporary injunction was issued 28 January 1976, and was amended twice to enforce the new Texas Bovine Brucellosis Regulations dated 29 February...Projected Changes In Number• of Affected Nerds and Cows, and Weaner Calf and Milk Losses Associated With The 1962 TANC Bovine Brucellosis Program By Region

  7. Making Texas Restaurants Healthier for Children

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-30

    Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Professor of Nutrition at Texas State University, discusses her study which details the success of a community-based program in Texas aimed at combatting childhood obesity by improving children’s menus in restaurants.  Created: 12/30/2014 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/30/2014.

  8. Isolation of avian influenza virus in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, S E; Naqi, S A; Grumbles, L C

    1981-01-01

    An avian influenza virus with surface antigens similar to those of fowl plague virus (Hav 1 Nav 2) was isolated in 1979 from 2 commercial turkey flocks in Central Texas. Two flocks in contact with these infected flocks developed clinical signs, gross lesions, and seroconversion but yielded no virus. This was the first recorded incidence of clinical avian influenza in Texas turkeys and only the second time that an agent with these surface antigens was isolated from turkeys in U.S.

  9. Rising Above the Storm: DIG TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Miller, K. C.; Bednarz, S. W.; Mosher, S.

    2011-12-01

    For a decade Texas educators, scientists and citizens have shown a commitment to earth science education through planning at the national and state levels, involvement in earth science curriculum and teacher professional development projects, and the creation of a model senior level capstone Earth and Space Science course first offered in 2010 - 2011. The Texas state standards for Earth and Space Science demonstrate a shift to rigorous content, career relevant skills and use of 21st century technology. Earth and Space Science standards also align with the Earth Science, Climate and Ocean Literacy framework documents. In spite of a decade of progress K-12 earth science education in Texas is in crisis. Many school districts do not offer Earth and Space Science, or are using the course as a contingency for students who fail core science subjects. The State Board for Educator Certification eliminated Texas' secondary earth science teacher certification in 2009, following the adoption of the new Earth and Space Science standards. This makes teachers with a composite teacher certification (biology, physics and chemistry) eligible to teach Earth and Space Science, as well other earth science courses (e.g., Aquatic Science, Environmental Systems/Science) even if they lack earth science content knowledge. Teaching materials recently adopted by the State Board of Education do not include Earth and Space Science resources. In July 2011 following significant budget cuts at the 20 Education Service Centers across Texas, the Texas Education Agency eliminated key staff positions in its curriculum division, including science. This "perfect storm" has created a unique opportunity for a university-based approach to confront the crisis in earth science education in Texas which the Diversity and Innovation in the Geosciences (DIG) TEXAS alliance aims to fulfill. Led by the Texas A&M University College of Geosciences and The University of Texas Jackson School of Geosciences, with

  10. Use of trees by the Texas ratsnake (Elaphe obsoleta) in eastern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josh B. Pierce; Robert R. Fleet; Lance McBrayer; D. Craig Rudolph

    2008-01-01

    We present information on the use of trees by Elaphe obsoleta (Texas Ratsnake) in a mesic pine-hardwood forest in eastern Texas. Using radiotelemetry, seven snakes (3 females, 4 males) were relocated a total of 363 times from April 2004 to May 2005, resulting in 201 unique locations. Snakes selected trees containing cavities and used hardwoods and...

  11. Identification of sites within the Palo Duro Basin. Volume 1. Palo Duro Location A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This three-volume document narrows to two sites for continued investigations for potential nuclear waste repository sites in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Volume 1 narrows a site previously identified in Deaf Smith County, Texas; Volume 2 narrows a site previously identified in Swisher County, Texas; and Volume 3 contains responses to comments received regarding the drafts of Volumes 1 and 2 (BMI/ONWI-531). These volumes discuss the methodology and logic used as well as the results that narrowed these sites. Each of the 10 site performance criteria was divided into descriptors related to site performance characteristics. Each descriptor was evaluated by a systematic logic to determine if it could be used as a discriminator. Then more- and less-preferred areas for groups of discriminators were defined and composite maps were prepared and evaluated to identify the sites

  12. Identification of sites within the Palo Duro Basin. Volume 2. Palo Duro Location B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This three-volume document narrows to two sites for continued investigations for potential nuclear waste repository sites in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Volume 1 narrows a site previously identified in Deaf Smith County, Texas; Volume 2 narrows a site previously identified in Swisher County, Texas; and Volume 3 contains responses to comments received regarding the drafts of Volumes 1 and 2 (BMI/ONWI-531). These volumes discuss the methodology and logic used as well as the results that narrowed these sites. Each of the 10 site performance criteria was divided into descriptors related to site performance characteristics. Each descriptor was evaluated by a systematic logic to determine if it could be used as a discriminator. Then more- and less-preferred areas for groups of discriminators were defined and composite maps were prepared and evaluated to identify the sites

  13. Alternatives for the disposal of NORM [naturally occurring radioactive materials] wastes in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.; Pollard, C.G.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the Texas wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have been disposed of in a uranium mill tailings impoundment. There is currently no operating disposal facility in Texas to accept these wastes. As a result, some wastes containing extremely small amounts of radioactivity are sent to elaborate disposal sites at extremely high costs. The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has sponsored a study to investigate lower cost, alternative disposal methods for certain wastes containing small quantities of NORM. This paper presents the results of a multipathway safety analysis of various scenarios for disposing of wastes containing limited quantities of NORM in Texas. The wastes include pipe scales and sludges from oil and gas production, residues from rare-earth mineral processing, and water treatment resins, but exclude large-volume, diffuse wastes (coal fly ash, phosphogypsum). The purpose of the safety analysis is to define concentration and quantity limits for the key nuclides of NORM that will avoid dangerous radiation exposures under different waste disposal scenarios

  14. Monitoring work zone safety and mobility impacts in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    In this report, Texas Transportation Institute researchers identify key work zone safety and mobility : performance measures that the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) should target as part of a work : zone monitoring program within a distri...

  15. The economic efficiency of allowing longer combination vehicles in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This paper shows the economic efficiency of allowing longer combination vehicles in Texas. First, an : overview of the truck size and weight policies is explained, with an emphasis on those that affect : Texas. Next, LCV operations in other countries...

  16. Commercial truck platooning demonstration in Texas – level 2 automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Through this project, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) funded the creation of a comprehensive truck platooning demonstration in Texas, serving as a proactive effort in assessing innovative operational strategies to position TxDOT as a l...

  17. Effect of a "pill mill" law on opioid prescribing and utilization: The case of Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapustina, Tatyana; Rutkow, Lainie; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Daubresse, Matthew; Ramji, Alim F; Faul, Mark; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Alexander, G Caleb

    2016-02-01

    States have attempted to reduce prescription opioid abuse through strengthening the regulation of pain management clinics; however, the effect of such measures remains unclear. We quantified the impact of Texas's September 2010 "pill mill" law on opioid prescribing and utilization. We used the IMS Health LRx LifeLink database to examine anonymized, patient-level pharmacy claims for a closed cohort of individuals filling prescription opioids in Texas between September 2009 and August 2011. Our primary outcomes were derived at a monthly level and included: (1) average morphine equivalent dose (MED) per transaction; (2) aggregate opioid volume; (3) number of opioid prescriptions; and (4) quantity of opioid pills dispensed. We compared observed values with the counterfactual, which we estimated from pre-intervention levels and trends. Texas's pill mill law was associated with declines in average MED per transaction (-0.57 mg/month, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.09, -0.057), monthly opioid volume (-9.99 kg/month, CI -12.86, -7.11), monthly number of opioid prescriptions (-12,200 prescriptions/month, CI -15,300, -9,150) and monthly quantity of opioid pills dispensed (-714,000 pills/month, CI -877,000, -550,000). These reductions reflected decreases of 8.1-24.3% across the outcomes at one year compared with the counterfactual, and they were concentrated among prescribers and patients with the highest opioid prescribing and utilization at baseline. Following the implementation of Texas's 2010 pill mill law, there were clinically significant reductions in opioid dose, volume, prescriptions and pills dispensed within the state, which were limited to individuals with higher levels of baseline opioid prescribing and utilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rain-related Fatal Crashes in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Hatim; Jackson, Terrance

    2013-04-01

    Weather has a direct impact on traffic safety. This study focuses on fatal crashes in the presence of rain. We reviewed information related to the events that lead to rain- related crashes in the Texas since 1982. Analysis of the data reveals that 12.4% of crashes in Texas were rain-related. Most rain-related crashes are located in Texas "Flash Flood Alley" which includes major urban centers. Fatal crash data and GIS are used to explore and identify the spatio-temporal distribution of the crashes. Spatial statistical techniques are used to identify significant patterns of rain-related fatal crashes. Logistic and nonlinear regression is used to identify and rank all environmental and non-environmental factors that contribute to fatal crashes. Focus will be on factors that amplify the rain effect. Identifying the variables contributing to these fatal crash types is necessary for the implementation of effective countermeasures for road weather safety purposes.

  19. Using Workforce Information for Degree Program Planning in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Butterfield, Lindsay; Lavery, Diana; Miller, Trey; Daugherty, Lindsay; Beleche, Trinidad; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    In May 2013, the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 1296, requiring a report on Texas's future workforce needs that would help inform decisions to develop or expand postsecondary education programs. Educators and policymakers in Texas and elsewhere have a wide variety of quantitative and qualitative workforce information available for planning…

  20. Texas Instruments : Veiligheid is niet iets om over te stemmen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijswijk, M. van; Pennekamp, E.

    1990-01-01

    In dit artikel wordt het VGW-beleid bij Texas Instruments beschreven. Hiertoe zijn interviews gehouden met B. Veekamp, hoofd opleidingen bij Texas Instruments Holland BV (TIH) en de J. Stapel, voorzitter van de VGW-commissie. Occupational health and safety policy of Texas Instruments Holland B.V.

  1. Organizational Behavior Analysis Focusing on the University of Texas System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Bobby K.

    2011-01-01

    This project analyzes the organizational behavior of the University of Texas System. The University of Texas System is comprised of nine academic and six health institutions. The University of Texas System has over 85,000 employees; the student enrollment is 202,240 with a budget of $2.25 billion dollars. This project has a total of four parts and…

  2. 76 FR 67397 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Llano, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ...] Radio Broadcasting Services; Llano, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed... substituting Channel 242C3 for vacant Channel 293C3, at Llano, Texas. The proposal is part of a contingently... required for the allotment of Channel 242C3 at Llano, Texas, because the proposed allotment is located...

  3. 75 FR 14359 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Stonewall, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Stonewall, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule... allotment of Channel 280A at Stonewall, Texas, as the community's first local transmission service. The..., Texas. It is Commission policy to protect applications against subsequently-filed and conflicting rule...

  4. East Texas, 2012—Forest Inventory and Analysis Factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Brandeis; Jason A. Cooper; James W. Bentley

    2014-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the statewide annual inventory of the forest resource attributes in Texas conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—southeast (unit 1), northeast (unit 2), north central (...

  5. 78 FR 42700 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Matagorda, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... Broadcasting Services; Matagorda, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... FM Channel 252A at Matagorda, Texas. This allotment change is part of a hybrid rule making and FM... 291A at Matagorda, Texas, is located within 320 kilometers (199 miles) of the U.S.-Mexican border...

  6. East Texas, 2011 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason A. Cooper; James W. Bentley

    2012-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the annual inventory conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas Forest Service of the forest resource attributes in east Texas. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into 7 FIA survey units—southeast (unit 1), northeast (unit 2), north central (unit 3), south (...

  7. The State of Texas Children: Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book--The Importance of Investing in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviney, Frances; Phillips, Pace; Dickerson, Carrie; Tibbitt, Laura

    2011-01-01

    On February 4, the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) released the 18th annual Texas KIDS COUNT data book, "The State of Texas Children 2011." The annual data book and free data warehouse provide the latest look at more than 80 different measures of child well-being in Texas and every county in the state. This year, the opening…

  8. The Best Choice for a Prosperous Texas: A Texas-Style Personal Income Tax. Policy Brief No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Public Policy Priorities, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Part one of this trilogy of policy briefs explains the challenge facing Texas in funding public education. This policy brief explains why a Texas-style personal income tax is the best way to meet the needs of Texas. Only a personal income tax can significantly reduce reliance on property taxes--cutting the school operations tax from $1.50 to…

  9. A comparison of crashes and fatalities in Texas by age group : selected cities in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    In recent decades, great strides have been made to lower the number of accidents that occur on Texas roadways through graduated drivers licensing programs, messages against texting and driving, and discouraging drunk driving. Statistics show that you...

  10. 76 FR 7187 - East Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc., Texas; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... environmental assessment (EA) that analyzes the potential environmental effects of licensing the project, and concludes that licensing the project, with appropriate environmental protective measures, would not... Electric Cooperative, Inc., Texas; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment February 2, 2011. In...

  11. Status report on Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avant, R.V. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    In 1981, the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority was created by Article 4590f-1 to site, develop, operate, decommission, and close a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility for Texas generated waste. In 1989, the Authority's act was recodified by the Texas legislature in the Health and Safety Code., Title 5. Sanitation and Environmental Quality, Subtitle D. Nuclear and Radioactive Materials, Chapter 402. The Authority is governed by a Board of Directors appointed by the Governor, composed of a certified health physicist, geologist, attorney, medical doctor, and two private citizens. Under the statute, low-level radioactive waste is defined as any radioactive material with a half-life of 35 years or less or having less than 10 nanocuries per gram of transuranics. Materials with half-lives of greater than 35 years may be classed as low-level waste if special criteria are established by the Texas Department of Health Bureau of Radiation Control. Subsequent sessions of the legislature have amended the act to revise siting criteria, require consideration of state land, create a Citizen's Advisory Committee, incorporate alternative designs, and establish a special low-level radioactive waste account in the state treasury. The Authority began its activities in 1982. The Authority has proposed a site in far West Texas near Fort Hancock, but El Paso County, the neighboring county to the west, has instituted three separate lawsuits to slow or stop the site selection process. Particular attention was paid early in the site selection process to items which could be fatal flaws from a licensing standpoint. This paper discusses the Fort Hancock site description, site evaluation studies, siting issues, waste volume projections, facility design, license application, cost and schedule

  12. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Solar Energy System located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas was designed to supply 63% of the total hot water load. The Solar Energy System consists of a 2100 square foot Raypack Liquid Flat Plate Collector Subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10/sup 8/ Btu/y. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  13. Property Tax Laws of Texas. A Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jay D., Jr.

    This booklet is basically a summary of a law book on the same subject by the same author. Although the 25 chapters of the larger work correspond directly to the chapters of the summary, this publication is not a law book in the usual sense. Rather, it is intended primarily to provide a simplified view of the property tax laws of Texas for tax…

  14. 76 FR 50708 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... Texas proposes to add new language clarifying the need to maintain liability insurance on a site if the... seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, or other work in order to assure compliance with that subdivision, if..., fertilizing, irrigation, or other work in order to assure compliance with that subdivision, if the land is...

  15. Researching Transfronterizo Literacies in Texas Border Colonias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick H.; Murillo, Luz A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines literacies practiced in bilingual households located in emerging communities along the Texas-Mexico border known as border colonias. Drawing on theoretical notions of space as geographic and temporal, the simultaneity of global and local forces at work in colonias, and expressions of agency that are "in between"…

  16. Lake Aquilla - Habitat Survey Hill County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    resources for particular phases of their life cycles . If possible, select an appropriate mix of forb species with varying flowering periods that...Livestock Management. Austin, TX. (https://tpwd.texas.gov/landwater/land/habitats/post_oak/habitat_manageme nt/ cow /index.phtml). Accessed July, 2016

  17. Sound Levels in East Texas Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Aaron Lynn

    A survey of sound levels was taken in several Texas schools to determine the amount of noise and sound present by size of class, type of activity, location of building, and the presence of air conditioning and large amounts of glass. The data indicate that class size and relative amounts of glass have no significant bearing on the production of…

  18. Working Together for Transition in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Theresa; Serrano, John A.

    2016-01-01

    When Texas state budgets resulted in a loss of direct funding for the transition of deaf and hard of hearing students', collaboration efforts for assisting these students became critical. Theresa Johnson, MEd, outreach specialist at the Educational Resource Center on Deafness in Austin, and John A. Serrano, MA, director of Academic Affairs at the…

  19. South Texas Native Plant Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The South Texas Native Plant Restoration Project was a resounding success in that the primary goal of : developing commercial sources of native seed has been substantially met. By the conclusion of the project : on August 31, 2011, 20 native seed sou...

  20. Texas perpetual pavements : new design guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Since 2001, the State of Texas has been designing and constructing perpetual pavements : on some of its heavily trafficked highways where the expected 20-year truck-traffic estimate of : 18 kip ESALs is in excess of 30 million (TxDOT, 2001). To date,...

  1. Integrated Curriculum in a Tiny Texas Garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Sarah K.

    1995-01-01

    Describes how a first-grade class in East Texas learned to garden in a project that allows children to plant seeds and watch their plants mature while developing skills in mathematics, science, reading and writing, and interpreting a calendar. (SW)

  2. 77 FR 66574 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... submitting comments. Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name and docket number... Responsibilities Texas proposes to remove the word ``renewal'' from the provision that places the burden on the... applicant and operator information, permit history information, property interest information, violation...

  3. Classification of six ordinary chondrites from Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Arthur J.; Keil, Klaus

    1988-12-01

    Based on optical microscopy, modal and electron microprobe analyses, six ordinary chondrites from Texas were classified in compositional groups, petrologic types, and shock facies. These meteorites are Comanche (stone), L5c; Haskell, L5c; Deport (a), H4b; Naruna (a), H4b; Naruna (b), H4b; and Clarendon (b), H5d.

  4. Teenage Pregnancy in the Texas Panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Myles, Rosa; Myles, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares rural and small-city teenage and adult pregnancies, with respect to complication rates and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Chart review of Medicaid patients (513 teenage [under 20 years] and 174 adult controls [ages 25-34]) delivered (excluding multiple gestation) in Amarillo, Texas, from January 1999 to April 2001.…

  5. 3D seismic data interpretation of Boonsville Field, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhakeem, Aamer Ali

    The Boonsville field is one of the largest gas fields in the US located in the Fort Worth Basin, north central Texas. The highest potential reservoirs reside in the Bend Conglomerate deposited during the Pennsylvanian. The Boonsville data set is prepared by the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas, Austin, as part of the secondary gas recovery program. The Boonsville field seismic data set covers an area of 5.5 mi2. It includes 38 wells data. The Bend Conglomerate is deposited in fluvio-deltaic transaction. It is subdivided into many genetic sequences which include depositions of sandy conglomerate representing the potential reserves in the Boonsville field. The geologic structure of the Boonsville field subsurface are visualized by constructing structure maps of Caddo, Davis, Runaway, Beans Cr, Vineyard, and Wade. The mapping includes time structure, depth structure, horizon slice, velocity maps, and isopach maps. Many anticlines and folds are illustrated. Karst collapse features are indicated specially in the lower Atoka. Dipping direction of the Bend Conglomerate horizons are changing from dipping toward north at the top to dipping toward east at the bottom. Stratigraphic interpretation of the Runaway Formation and the Vineyard Formation using well logs and seismic data integration showed presence of fluvial dominated channels, point bars, and a mouth bar. RMS amplitude maps are generated and used as direct hydrocarbon indicator for the targeted formations. As a result, bright spots are indicated and used to identify potential reservoirs. Petrophysical analysis is conducted to obtain gross, net pay, NGR, water saturation, shale volume, porosity, and gas formation factor. Volumetric calculations estimated 989.44 MMSCF as the recoverable original gas in-place for a prospect in the Runaway and 3.32 BSCF for a prospect in the Vineyard Formation.

  6. Reemergence of Dengue in Southern Texas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dana L.; Santiago, Gilberto A.; Abeyta, Roman; Hinojosa, Steven; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Adam, Jessica K.; Evert, Nicole; Caraballo, Elba; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Smith, Brian; Banicki, Alison; Tomashek, Kay M.; Gaul, Linda

    2016-01-01

    During a dengue epidemic in northern Mexico, enhanced surveillance identified 53 laboratory-positive cases in southern Texas; 26 (49%) patients acquired the infection locally, and 29 (55%) were hospitalized. Of 83 patient specimens that were initially IgM negative according to ELISA performed at a commercial laboratory, 14 (17%) were dengue virus positive by real-time reverse transcription PCR performed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue virus types 1 and 3 were identified, and molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated close identity with viruses that had recently circulated in Mexico and Central America. Of 51 household members of 22 dengue case-patients who participated in household investigations, 6 (12%) had been recently infected with a dengue virus and reported no recent travel, suggesting intrahousehold transmission. One household member reported having a recent illness consistent with dengue. This outbreak reinforces emergence of dengue in southern Texas, particularly when incidence is high in northern Mexico. PMID:27191223

  7. Qualifying cogeneration in Texas and Louisiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, S.C.; Cabe, R.; Stauffaeher, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that cogeneration of electricity and useful thermal energy by industrials along the Gulf Coast grew significantly more rapidly than in other parts of the country during and immediately following World War II as a result of the concentration of chemical and plastics processing facilities there. In 1982, Texas passed its version of PURPA, the Public Utility Regulatory Act (PURA) and designated those non-utility generators from which public utilities must purchase electricity as Qualifying Cogenerators. In 1991, there were nearly 7,500 MW of QF power generated for inside-the-fence use or firm capacity sale to utilities, with the two largest utilities in Texas purchasing over half that amount

  8. John Holt Stanway: Gone to Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, J.

    2008-01-01

    John Holt Stanway (1799Ð1872) was an amateur astronomer who lived in Manchester, England until 1845. He was in contact with the English Ôgrand amateurÕ astronomer, William Henry Smyth, who supported him for Fellowship of the Royal Astronomical Society and evidently advised him on how to build and equip an observatory. Apparently, Stanway had an observatory at Chorlton-cum-Hardy in 1837. In 1845, Stanway left for the United States in response to serious business problems. En route, he met Ashbel Smith, a representative of the government of the Republic of Texas, who convinced Stanway to go to Texas. There he changed his name to John H. Smythe Stanley and settled in Houston, where he re-established his observatory. He became a commercial photographer and wrote about astronomy and other scientific subjects in Houston newspapers until his death in 1872.

  9. Iguana bites reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-09-01

    Although thousands of iguanas are kept as pets in the United States, information on their bites is limited. The intent of this investigation was to describe the pattern of iguana bites reported to Texas poison centers. Iguana bites reported during 1998-2008 were identified. The distribution of cases by various factors was determined. Of 59 total bites, 71% were managed on-site, 17% of the patients were at or en route to a health care facility when the poison center was contacted, and 10% were referred to a health care facility. The medical outcome was no effect in 9% of the cases, minor effect in 24%, moderate effect in 2%, not followed but minimal effects possible in 64%, and unable to follow but potentially toxic in 2%. Most iguana bites reported to Texas poison centers did not result in serious effects and were managed on-site. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biogenic emissions modeling for Southeastern Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, M.; Jacob, D.; Jarvie, J. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) modeling staff performed biogenic hydrocarbon emissions modeling in support of gridded photochemical modeling for ozone episodes in 1992 and 1993 for the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) modeling domain. This paper summarizes the results of the biogenic emissions modeling and compares preliminary photochemical modeling results to ambient air monitoring data collected during the 1993 COAST study. Biogenic emissions were estimated using BIOME, a gridded biogenic emissions model that uses region-specific land use and biomass density data, and plant species-specific emission factor data. Ambient air monitoring data were obtained by continuous automated gas chromatography at two sites, one-hour canister samples at 5 sites, and 24-hour canister samples at 13 other sites. The concentrations of Carbon Bond-IV species (as determined from urban airshed modeling) were compared to measured hydrocarbon concentrations. In this paper, we examined diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as spatial variations.

  11. The Texas petawatt laser and current experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Mikael; Bang, Woosuk; Dyer, Gilliss; Wang Xiaoming; Gaul, Erhard; Borger, Teddy; Ringuette, Martin; Spinks, Michael; Quevedo, Hernan; Bernstein, Aaron; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The Texas Petawatt Laser is operational with experimental campaigns executed in both F/40 and F3 target chambers. Recent improvements have resulted in intensities of >2×10 21 W/cm 2 on target. Experimental highlights include, accelerated electron energies of >2 GeV, DD fusion ion temperatures >25 keV and isochorically heated solids to 10-50 eV.

  12. The Texas petawatt laser and current experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Mikael; Bang, Woosuk; Dyer, Gilliss; Wang Xiaoming; Gaul, Erhard; Borger, Teddy; Ringuette, Martin; Spinks, Michael; Quevedo, Hernan; Bernstein, Aaron; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd [Center for High Energy Density Science, University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Laser Plasma Acceleration Group, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Center for High Energy Density Science, University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    The Texas Petawatt Laser is operational with experimental campaigns executed in both F/40 and F3 target chambers. Recent improvements have resulted in intensities of >2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} on target. Experimental highlights include, accelerated electron energies of >2 GeV, DD fusion ion temperatures >25 keV and isochorically heated solids to 10-50 eV.

  13. The Texas petawatt laser and current experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mikael; Bang, Woosuk; Dyer, Gilliss; Wang, Xiaoming; Gaul, Erhard; Borger, Teddy; Ringuette, Martin; Spinks, Michael; Quevedo, Hernan; Bernstein, Aaron; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd

    2012-12-01

    The Texas Petawatt Laser is operational with experimental campaigns executed in both F/40 and F3 target chambers. Recent improvements have resulted in intensities of >2×1021 W/cm2 on target. Experimental highlights include, accelerated electron energies of >2 GeV, DD fusion ion temperatures >25 keV and isochorically heated solids to 10-50 eV.

  14. Developing emission reduction credit trading in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Texas Air Control Board has begun to develop a system of emission reduction credit training. The system will be developed incrementally over time. The first step, banking of VOC and NO x Emission Reduction Credits, began March 15, 1993. Additional programs under study and development include NO x RACT trading, emission credits for motor vehicle scrappage and alternative fuel conversion, and establishment of community organizations to generate and acquire emission reduction credits for economic development purposes

  15. Sediment Management Options for Galveston Island, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Galveston Island is a major tourist and commercial center on the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The shoreline along the...approximately 235°. The island is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico , the Galveston Entrance Channel to the northeast, West Bay to the northwest, and San...plants on both ends of the island are the best strategies to widen the beaches of Galveston Island, improve tourism , and better protect the island

  16. Floods in central Texas, August 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, E.E.; Massey, B.C.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    1979-01-01

    Catastrophic floods, which resulted in millions of dollars in property damages and the loss of 33 lives, occurred in Central Texas during August 1-4, 1978, as a result of intense rainfall produced by the remnants of tropical storm Amelia. Rainfall in excess of 30 inches was unofficially reported at several locations, while the highest 24-hour amount recorded by the National·Weather Service was 29.05 inches at Albany in Shackelford County.

  17. High-level radioactive-waste-disposal investigations in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Texas Energy and Natural Resources Advisory Council (TENRAC) was designated in 1980 to coordinate the interaction between the State of Texas and the federal government relating to the high-level radioactive waste disposal issue. This report was prepared to summarize the many aspects of that issue with particular emphasis on the activities in Texas. The report is intended to provide a comprehensive introduction for individuals with little or no previous exposure to the issue and to provide a broader perspective for those individuals who have addressed specific aspects of the issue but have not had the opportunity to study it in a broader context. Following the introduction, contents of this report are as follows: (1) general status of major repository siting investigations in the US; (2) detailed review of Texas studies; (3) possible facilities to be sited in Texas; (4) current Texas policy; (5) federal regulations; and (6) federal legislation. 9 figures, 2 tables

  18. Status on Texas Secondary Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Jennifer; Fuller, Ed

    2009-10-01

    One of the most important challenges today facing public schools is the recruitment and retention of highly qualified science teachers. Policy makers in Texas adopted the 4x4 requirements for graduation, which will create an increase in the supply of science teachers. Dr. Fuller analyzed the topics concerning the shortage of secondary math and science teachers. Dr. Fuller's study clearly shows an acute shortage of well-qualified and adequately prepared secondary math and science teachers in Texas schools. The study also explains that schools serving large percentages of poor, minority, and/or low-achieving students have the least qualified teachers and the greatest shortages compared to other non-minority students. Recently, there has been a shift in teacher preparation programs. Most future teachers are being prepared by alternative certification programs and certification by exam. The attrition rates vary depending on teachers' route of certification. There is a shortage of math and science teachers in Texas, but is part of this shortage due to teacher migration? My research will expand on Dr. Fuller's study by looking at the attrition and migration rates on the subgroups of chemistry and physics teachers. Migration is typically overlooked in analytical studies because it does not change the overall supply of teachers. My study will investigate if science teachers are migrating to wealthier districts and/or higher achieving school. This presentation will summarize results found by Dr. Fuller's study as well as look at further research in science teacher attrition and migration rates.

  19. Redotex ingestions reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-09-01

    Although the multi-component weight loss supplement Redotex is banned in the United States, the supplement can be obtained in Mexico. The intent of this report was to describe the pattern of Redotex calls received by a statewide poison center system. Cases were all Redotex calls received by Texas poison centers during 2000-2008. The distribution of total calls and those involving ingestion of the supplement were determined for selected demographic and clinical factors. Of 34 total Redotex calls received, 55.9% came from the 14 Texas counties that border Mexico. Of the 22 reported Redotex ingestions, 77.3% of the patients were female and 45.5% 20 years or more. Of the 17 ingestions involving no co-ingestants, 52.9% were already at or en route to a health care facility, 41.2% were managed on site, and 5.9% was referred to a health care facility. The final medical outcome was no effect in 23.5% cases, minor effect in 5.9%, moderate effect in 11.8%, not followed but minimal clinical effects possible in 47.1%, and unable to follow but judged to be potentially toxic in 11.8%. Most Redotex calls to the Texas poison center system originated from counties bordering Mexico.

  20. RAP workshop : Buda-TxAPA, Texas, August 27, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-27

    Presentation Outline : RAP overview : RAP stockpile survey: state of practice : RAP processing and RAP variability : RAP characterization : RAP mix design : Field performance of Texas high RAP test sections

  1. National environmental/energy workforce assessment. Texas. Final report on phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    This study is one of 70 volumes assessing the workforce needs (manpower needs) for pollution control and abatement in the United States for the five-year period of 1976 through 1981. Seven fields for pollution control -- air, noise, pesticides, potable water, radiation, solid waste, and wastewater -- are analyzed, together with energy-related programs currently accentuated by the national effort to solve energy supply problems. The report identifies existing workforce levels, training programs, career opportunities, and future staffing level projections (1976 to 1982) based on the information available for the state of Texas

  2. Commercial Space Port Planning in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L.; Looke, B.

    2002-01-01

    The Texas Legislature is providing funding to support research and planning activities aimed at creating a commercial spaceport in the state. These monies have been allocated to regional Spaceport Development Corporations that have been established in three countries containing candidate site locations: Willacy County (in South Texas); Brazoria County (East Texas); and Pecos County (West Texas). This program is being sponsored and coordinated by the Texas Aerospace Commission (TAC). The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) at the University of Houston is providing research, planning and design support to TAC and is a member of each of the three regional development teams. Planning must carefully consider special support requirements and operational characteristics of all prospective launch systems along with geographic, infrastructure and environmental factors at each site. Two of the candidate sites are in coastal areas; a priority for certain launch service providers; whereas the third inland site is more attractive to others. Candidate launch systems include winged horizontal takeoff air-launch vehicles, vertical multi-stage reusable launch vehicles, and expendable sub-orbital surrounding rockets. Important research and planning activities include environmental impact assessments, analyses of overflight hazards, investigations of economic impacts and business plan development. The results of these activities will guide master plan development for each site, including: a physical plan (site layout, infrastructure improvements and facility construction); and a strategic plan (user agreements, licenses, finance sources and participants). Commercial spaceport development demands compliance with stringent FAA regulations established by the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) which exceed minimum standards allowed for U.S. Government spaceport facilities. Key among these requirements are 15,000 ft. radius on-site clear zones

  3. Crustal deformation and seismic measurements in the region of McDonald Observatory, West Texas. [Texas and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The arrival times of regional and local earthquakes and located earthquakes in the Basin and Range province of Texas and in the adjacent areas of Chihuahua, Mexico from January 1976 to August 1980 at the UT'NASA seismic array are summarized. The August 1931 Texas earthquake is reevaluated and the seismicity and crustal structure of West Texas is examined. A table of seismic stations is included.

  4. Public Outreach of the South Texas Health Physic Society and Texas A&M University Nuclear Engineering Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R. O.

    2003-02-24

    In a cooperative effort of the members of the South Texas Chapter of the Heath Physics Society (STC-HPS) and the Texas A&M University Nuclear Engineering Department, great efforts have been made to reach out and provide educational opportunities to members of the general public, school age children, and specifically teachers. These efforts have taken the form of Science Teacher Workshops (STW), visits to schools all over the state of Texas, public forums, and many other educational arenas. A major motivational factor for these most recent efforts can be directly tied to the attempt of the State of Texas to site a low-level radioactive waste facility near Sierra Blanca in West Texas. When the State of Texas first proposed to site a low level radioactive waste site after the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 was passed, many years of political struggle ensued. Finally, a site at Sierra Blanca in far West Texas was selected for study and characterization for a disposal site for waste generated in the Texas Compact states of Maine, Vermont and Texas. During this process, the outreach to and education of the local public became a paramount issue.

  5. Public Outreach of the South Texas Health Physic Society and Texas A and M University Nuclear Engineering Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, R. O.

    2003-01-01

    In a cooperative effort of the members of the South Texas Chapter of the Heath Physics Society (STC-HPS) and the Texas A and M University Nuclear Engineering Department, great efforts have been made to reach out and provide educational opportunities to members of the general public, school age children, and specifically teachers. These efforts have taken the form of Science Teacher Workshops (STW), visits to schools all over the state of Texas, public forums, and many other educational arenas. A major motivational factor for these most recent efforts can be directly tied to the attempt of the State of Texas to site a low-level radioactive waste facility near Sierra Blanca in West Texas. When the State of Texas first proposed to site a low level radioactive waste site after the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 was passed, many years of political struggle ensued. Finally, a site at Sierra Blanca in far West Texas was selected for study and characterization for a disposal site for waste generated in the Texas Compact states of Maine, Vermont and Texas. During this process, the outreach to and education of the local public became a paramount issue

  6. Texas Disasters II: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Assist the Texas Forest Service in Mapping and Analyzing Fuel Loads and Phenology in Texas Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Michael; Williams, Meredith; Fenn, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The risk of severe wildfires in Texas has been related to weather phenomena such as climate change and recent urban expansion into wild land areas. During recent years, Texas wild land areas have experienced sequences of wet and dry years that have contributed to increased wildfire risk and frequency. To prevent and contain wildfires, the Texas Forest Service (TFS) is tasked with evaluating and reducing potential fire risk to better manage and distribute resources. This task is made more difficult due to the vast and varied landscape of Texas. The TFS assesses fire risk by understanding vegetative fuel types and fuel loads. To better assist the TFS, NASA Earth observations, including Landsat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Specrtoradiometer (MODIS) data, were analyzed to produce maps of vegetation type and specific vegetation phenology as it related to potential wildfire fuel loads. Fuel maps from 2010-2011 and 2014-2015 fire seasons, created by the Texas Disasters I project, were used and provided alternating, complementary map indicators of wildfire risk in Texas. The TFS will utilize the end products and capabilities to evaluate and better understand wildfire risk across Texas.

  7. Fog chemistry in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Suresh; Raghunathan, Ravikrishna; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Chen, Jing; Kommalapati, Raghava R.; Murugesan, Karthik; Shen, Xinhua; Qingzhong, Yuan; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    Fog samples were collected in two population centers of the US Gulf Coast (Houston, Texas and Baton Rouge, Louisiana) using Caltech active strand cloud collectors. A total of 32 fogwater samples were collected in Baton Rouge (November 2004-February 2005) and Houston (February 2006). These samples were analyzed for pH, total and dissolved organic carbon, major inorganic ions, and a variety of organic compounds including organic acids, aromatics, carbonyls, and linear alkanes. Fogs in both environments were of moderate density, with typical fog liquid water contents <100 mg m -3. Fog samples collected in Houston reflect a clear influence of marine and anthropogenic inputs, while Baton Rouge samples also reflect agricultural inputs. The volume-weighted mean fog pH was somewhat more acidic (˜4.3) in Houston than in Baton Rouge (˜5.0). A wide pH range was observed in fog at both locations. Houston fog had higher concentrations of Cl -, NO 3-, Na +, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+. Sulfate to nitrate ratios were high in fogs at both locations, typical of many clouds in the eastern US. Total organic carbon concentrations were much higher in Houston fogs than in Baton Rouge fogs. Efforts to speciate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reveal large contributions from organic acids and carbonyls, with smaller contributions from other organic compound families including aromatics, alkanes, amides, and alcohols. Approximately 40% of the fog DOC was unspeciated in samples from both study locations.

  8. The impact of the New Panama Canal Locks on Texas ports and the Texas economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This report examines the first year transits through the new Panama Canal locks and its impact on Texas deep water ports. It finds that the canal is operating efficiently and can accommodate 14,000 TEU containerships and bulk vessels up to 125,000 to...

  9. Changing rainfall and humidity within Southeast Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert Kennedy

    2015-01-01

    Southeast Texas houses a precipitation transition zone between drier conditions to the North and West and some of the wettest parts of the continental U.S. to the East. The Region has seen an increase in its reported normal annual precipitation totals in recent decades. In order to determine if the additional rainfall has been influenced by warming temperatures or is within the variability of the State's long-term drought cycles, several analyses were performed on historical climate data. The analyses answered several questions: Have global and regional climate change models predicted precipitation increases in Southeast Texas and are future increases expected? Do historical monthly precipitation totals at various sites in the region provide clear trends of wetter conditions that can be discerned from long-term drought cycles? Are rainfall patterns changing with less frequent, heavier rain events? Do the reported increases in annual rainfall actually lead to wetter conditions in the region? Climate models have not predicted larger annual average precipitation totals nor do they forecast increases for Southeast Texas. While recent decades may have seen more rain relative to earlier periods, a combined analysis of observation stations across different parts of the Region shows that long-term trends are dependent on when the data is selected relative to a drought cycle. While some stations show larger amounts of rain falling during fewer days, these trends do not hold across all periods. An examination of hourly data does not show an increase in extreme rainfall events or a decrease in the number of hours during which rain has fallen. Even though rainfall has not decreased, average relative humidity has fallen. This suggests that the area is drying even with steady or increasing amounts of rain.

  10. Population trends of red-cockaded woodpeckers in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph

    2006-01-01

    tracked population trends of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) in eastern Texas from 1983 through 2004. After declining precipitously during the 1980s, woodpecker population trends on federal lands (National Forests and Grasslands in Texas, but excluding the Big Thicket National Preserve) increased between 1990 and 2000, and have been...

  11. Comal County, Texas: Preparing for Life after High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Comal County, Texas, may be rural but its students face many of the same challenges as students in urban districts. Communities In Schools of South Central Texas works with the local school district to identify student needs and provide critical supports to help young people prepare for life after high school.

  12. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... viticultural area are six U.S.G.S. topographical maps of the 1:250,000 scale. They are titled: (1) “Clovis, New... Clovis, New Mexico; Texas, where it intersects the Texas-New Mexico border; (7) The boundary then follows...

  13. 78 FR 40402 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Roaring Springs, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... Broadcasting Services; Roaring Springs, Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule... Channel 249A at Roaring Springs, Texas, and allots FM Channel 249C3 and deletes FM Channel 276C3 at Roaring Springs. These allotment changes are part of a rule making and hybrid application proposal...

  14. Regulating Abortion: Impact on Patients and Providers in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Silvie; Joyce, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The State of Texas began enforcement of the Woman's Right to Know (WRTK) Act on January 1, 2004. The law requires that all abortions at or after 16 weeks' gestation be performed in an ambulatory surgical center (ASC). In the month the law went into effect, not one of Texas's 54 nonhospital abortion providers met the requirements of a surgical…

  15. Magical Mysteries. Texas Reading Club, 1984. A Librarian's Planning Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jim

    Designed to encourage library use by Texas youth, the Texas Reading Club programs usually include a structured reading program and a variety of entertaining literature-related storyhours, puppet shows, films, and other attractive happenings. This handbook for the 1984 theme--"magical mysteries"--focuses on mysteries, magic, and adventure…

  16. Enrollment in Texas Public Schools, 2014-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This report provides information on enrollment in the Texas public school system from the 2004-05 through 2014-15 school years, based on data collected through the Texas Public Education Information Management System. Enrollment data are provided by grade, race/ethnicity, gender, and economically disadvantaged status, and for special populations…

  17. Enrollment in Texas Public Schools, 2016-17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This report provides information on enrollment in the Texas public school system from the 2006-07 through 2016-17 school years, based on data collected through the Texas Student Data System. Enrollment data are provided by grade, race/ethnicity, gender, and economically disadvantaged status, and for special populations and instructional programs.…

  18. Enrollment in Texas Public Schools, 2015-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This report provides information on enrollment in the Texas public school system from the 2005-06 through 2015-16 school years, based on data collected through the Texas Public Education Information Management System. Enrollment data are provided by grade, race/ethnicity, gender, and economically disadvantaged status, and for special populations…

  19. 78 FR 8960 - Texas (Splenetic) Fever in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    .... APHIS-2012-0069] Texas (Splenetic) Fever in Cattle AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are amending the Texas (Splenetic) Fever regulations by updating... Fever Tick Eradication Program Manager, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231...

  20. Implementation of Texas asphalt concrete overlay design system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    An asphalt overlay design system was developed for Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) under : Research Project 0-5123. The new overlay design system, named the Texas Asphalt Concrete Overlay : Design System (TxACOL), can help pavement enginee...

  1. Instructional Technology Practices in Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Nara M.; Kennon, J. Lindsey; Saxon, D. Patrick; Edmonson, Stacey L.; Skidmore, Susan T.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current state of technology integration in developmental education in Texas higher education. Analyzing survey data from developmental education faculty members in 70 2- and 4-year colleges in Texas, researchers identified instructor-reported best instructional technology practices in developmental…

  2. The Political Economy of Education Finance: The Case of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Thomas; Kenny, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Texas has one of the largest primary and secondary school systems in the United States. Funding equity has been a concern in the state courts, and significant legislative actions have been taken. We examine two votes taken in the Texas State Legislature in 1993 and 2006 that follow the directives from a series of education finance equity legal…

  3. Pulling Success from Failure: The Texas War for Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    contrast to the South’s defeat. What I have done is simply apply tenants of Marine Corps doctrine to the Texas Revolution. As much as it pains me...March 2, 1836, those elected officials, among them Sam Houston, signed the Texas Declaration of Independence. 69 The apparition of loyalty to Mexico

  4. Noteworthy: Fortune 500: Texas ties California for national lead

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Nicholson

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2010 Fortune 500, released in April, Texas hosts the headquarters of 57 of the nation's 500 largest companies, ranked by gross revenues. Texas secured its place as a Fortune 500 leader through its position as focal point of the domestic energy industry, its relatively strong economic growth over the past decade, and its relatively low tax rates and living costs.

  5. Delivery of workshops on corridor management and preservation in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes the delivery and outcome of a series of workshops conducted at 23 Texas : Department of Transportation (TxDOT) districts across the state on corridor management and preservation : in Texas. The workshops served as follow-up imp...

  6. 75 FR 49506 - Texas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... in certain areas of the State of Texas resulting from Hurricane Alex beginning on June 30, 2010, and... for Public Facility and Public Housing Assistance, 42 U.S.C. 5153, shall be for a period not to exceed... disaster. The following areas of the State of Texas have been designated as adversely affected by this...

  7. Kratom exposures reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2013-01-01

    Kratom use is a growing problem in the United States. Kratom exposures reported to Texas poison centers between January 1998 and September 2013 were identified. No kratom exposures were reported from 1998 to 2008 and 14 exposures were reported from 2009 to September 2013. Eleven patients were male, and 11 patients were in their 20s. The kratom was ingested in 12 patients, inhaled in 1, and both ingested and inhaled in 1. Twelve patients were managed at a healthcare facility and the remaining 2 were managed at home.

  8. 75 FR 36710 - The Texas Engineering Experiment Station/Texas A&M University System; Notice of Acceptance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... COMMISSION The Texas Engineering Experiment Station/Texas A&M University System; Notice of Acceptance for... to the E-Filing system no later than 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on the due date. Upon receipt of a... receipt of the document. The E-Filing system also distributes an e-mail notice that provides access to the...

  9. Amount and nature of occluded water in bedded salt, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The quantity and types of fluids within bedded salt cores from the Permian San Andres Formation, Palo Duro, Texas, were evaluated at the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Bedded halite from the San Andres Formation and other salt-bearing units were selected to represent the variety of salt types present, and were then analyzed. The mean water content of ''pure'' samples (more than 90% halite) is 0.4 weight percent, with none observed greater than 1.0 weight percent. Samples that contain more than 10 weight percent clay or mudstone display a trend of increasing water content with increasing clastic material. Chaotic mudstone-halite samples have as much as 5 weight percent water; halite-cemented mudstone interlayers, common throughout the bedded salts, may have water content values as high as 10 to 15 weight percent based on extrapolation of existing data that range from 0 to about 6%. No significant difference exists between the mean water content values of ''pure salt'' from the upper San Andres, lower San Andres Cycle 5, and lower San Andres Cycle 4 salt units. The fraction of total water present as mobile intergranular water is highly variable and not readily predicted from observed properties of the salt sample. The amount of water that would be affected by a high-level nuclear waste repository can be estimated if the volume of halite, the volume of clastic interlayers, and the amount and type of impurity in halite are known. Appendix contains seven vugraphs

  10. The University of Texas Cold Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, Kenan; Rios-Martinez, Carlos; Wehring, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    A cold neutron source has been designed, constructed, and tested by the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at The University of Texas at Austin. The Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) is located in one of the beam ports of the NETL 1-MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor. The main components of the TCNS are a cooled moderator, a heat pipe, a cryogenic refrigerator, and a neutron guide. 80 ml of mesitylene moderator are maintained at about 30 K in a chamber within the reactor graphite reflector by the heat pipe and cryogenic refrigerator. The heat pipe is a 3-m long aluminum tube that contains neon as the working fluid. The cold neutrons obtained from the moderator are transported by a curved 6-m long neutron guide. This neutron guide has a radius of curvature of 300 m, a 50x15 mm cross-section, 58 Ni coating, and is separated into three channels. The TCNS will provide a low-background subthermal neutron beam for neutron capture and scattering research. After the installation of the external portion of the neutron guide, a neutron focusing system and a Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis facility will be set up at the TCNS. ((orig.))

  11. An updated understanding of Texas bumble bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae species presence and potential distributions in Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Beckham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Texas is the second largest state in the United States of America, and the largest state in the contiguous USA at nearly 700,000 sq. km. Several Texas bumble bee species have shown evidence of declines in portions of their continental ranges, and conservation initiatives targeting these species will be most effective if species distributions are well established. To date, statewide bumble bee distributions for Texas have been inferred primarily from specimen records housed in natural history collections. To improve upon these maps, and help inform conservation decisions, this research aimed to (1 update existing Texas bumble bee presence databases to include recent (2007–2016 data from citizen science repositories and targeted field studies, (2 model statewide species distributions of the most common bumble bee species in Texas using MaxEnt, and (3 identify conservation target areas for the state that are most likely to contain habitat suitable for multiple declining species. The resulting Texas bumble bee database is comprised of 3,580 records, to include previously compiled museum records dating from 1897, recent field survey data, and vetted records from citizen science repositories. These data yielded an updated state species list that includes 11 species, as well as species distribution models (SDMs for the most common Texas bumble bee species, including two that have shown evidence of range-wide declines: B. fraternus (Smith, 1854 and B. pensylvanicus (DeGeer, 1773. Based on analyses of these models, we have identified conservation priority areas within the Texas Cross Timbers, Texas Blackland Prairies, and East Central Texas Plains ecoregions where suitable habitat for both B. fraternus and B. pensylvanicus are highly likely to co-occur.

  12. Report of the Advisory Committee on Agriculturally Derived Fuels to the Texas Energy and Natural Resources Advisory Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Reagan V.; Clayton, Bill; Armstrong, Bob; Walton, Bill; Baen, Jr., Spencer; Carmichael, Jack; Cowley, Raymond; Quick, Joe; King, Carl; Harp, Elbert; Nelson, Bill; Wagoner, Ed; McDonald, Dr., Richard; Swanson, Stan

    1979-09-03

    For the purpose of the Committee, biomass was defined as the volume of living material or residues of living material (organic material) available in Texas for conversion into energy. Statistical reports from the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and other sources indicate that in addition to surplus and distressed grains and certain other crops, there are roughly 27 million tons of agricultural residues currently being left in the fields or at the processing plants after harvest. The average annual residue from five crops - sorghum, corn, wheat, rice and cotton - is more than 20 million tons with a theoretical heat value of 270 trillion Btus. This represents 64 percent of the total energy input for Texas agriculture in 1973. Additionally, 4.1 million tons of dry manure is economically recoverable from Texas feedlots which could be converted into 14 trillion Btus of energy each year in the form of methane gas. Municipal solid waste, much of which is comprised of residues of living materials, currently amounts to about 13 million tons annually. The principal processes for converting the referenced resources into energy include: (1) direct combustion; (2) fermentation; (3) gasification/pyrolysis; (4) anaerobic digestion; and (5) petroculture - the production of certain non-traditional plants. Texas produces huge quantities of biomass, and has the potential of producing even more, which can be converted through various processes into significant quantities of usable energy to help meet the needs of the agricultural industry and the general public. Some of the technology required for the conversion processes is already sufficiently advanced to support immediate production and use while others will require additional research and development. The report discusses the current level of development of the relevant technologies.

  13. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 3. Colorado River basin, Lavaca River basin, Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 110 gaging stations; stage only at 1 gaging station; stage and contents at 12 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 53 gaging stations; and data for 38 partial-record stations comprised of 9 flood-hydrograph, 17 low-flow, and 12 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations.

  14. 75 FR 18061 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Control of Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles AGENCY... School Bus Program, amend the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), and amend the Locally Enforced Motor... Process B. Texas Clean School Bus Program C. The Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) D. Locally Enforced...

  15. Quantitative assessment of different phenolic compounds in Texas olive oils versus foreign oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Olive Ranch is the first one to produce olive oil and has the sole product in the Texas market place; several growers are now starting to cultivate olive at various sites in Texas. The quality of olive oil produced and pressed in Texas has never been explored. This study was conducted to inv...

  16. Rural southeast Texas air quality measurements during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Gunnar W; Khan, Siraj; Park, Changhyoun; Boedeker, Ian

    2011-10-01

    The authors conducted air quality measurements of the criteria pollutants carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and ozone together with meteorological measurements at a park site southeast of College Station, TX, during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study II (TexAQS). Ozone, a primary focus of the measurements, was above 80 ppb during 3 days and above 75 ppb during additional 8 days in summer 2006, suggestive of possible violations of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in this area. In concordance with other air quality measurements during the TexAQS II, elevated ozone mixing ratios coincided with northerly flows during days after cold front passages. Ozone background during these days was as high as 80 ppb, whereas southerly air flows generally provided for an ozone background lower than 40 ppb. Back trajectory analysis shows that local ozone mixing ratios can also be strongly affected by the Houston urban pollution plume, leading to late afternoon ozone increases of as high as 50 ppb above background under favorable transport conditions. The trajectory analysis also shows that ozone background increases steadily the longer a southern air mass resides over Texas after entering from the Gulf of Mexico. In light of these and other TexAQS findings, it appears that ozone air quality is affected throughout east Texas by both long-range and regional ozone transport, and that improvements therefore will require at least a regionally oriented instead of the current locally oriented ozone precursor reduction policies.

  17. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, Trinity River basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 112 gaging stations; stage only at 4 gaging stations; stage and contents at 34 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 76 gaging stations; and data for 15 partial-record stations comprised of 9 flood-hydrograph, 3 low-flow, and 3 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  18. Fluid mechanics of mathematics testing in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The performance of Texas high school students on mathematics exams is tightly connected to the level of poverty in the school. I will employ the coarse-graining techniques that lead from molecular motions to fluid mechanics in order to find how student scores evolve over time. I will show that the points of divergence between well-off and low-income kids are particularly clear when viewed as streamlines of a flow in the space of grade-level and score. The results can also be cast in the form of a Fokker-Planck equation, which highlights the separate roles of convection and diffusion. I will use the results the assess the plausibility of using charter schools, highly qualified teachers, and accountability systems as primary agents of school reform.

  19. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  20. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines

  1. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  2. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs

  3. The Texas Advanced Directive Law: Unfinished Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapottos, Michael; Youngner, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The Texas Advance Directive Act allows physicians and hospitals to overrule patient or family requests for futile care. Purposefully not defining futility, the law leaves its determination in specific cases to an institutional process. While the law has received several criticisms, it does seem to work constructively in the cases that come to the review process. We introduce a new criticism: While the law has been justified by an appeal to professional values such as avoiding harm to patients, avoiding the provision of unseemly care, and good stewardship of medical resources, it is applied incompletely. It allows physicians and institutional committees to refuse "futile" treatments desired by patients and families while at the same time providing no way of regulating physicians who recommend or even push "futile" treatments in similar cases. In this sense, the TADA is incomplete on its own terms.

  4. Biostratigraphy of Echinoid spines, Cretaceous of Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, P.L.

    1984-04-01

    Echinoid (sea urchin) spines from Cretaceous strata have widely varying morphology. They are common, and most are small enough to be recovered from well cuttings. Many forms have restricted ranges; consequently, echinoid spine have substantial biostratigraphic utility. There have been established 115 form taxa of echinoid spines and 14 form taxa of ophiuroid-asteroid spines for the Cretaceous of Texas. The specimens used for establishing the form taxa were processed from 533 outcrop samples (78 localities) from 30 Cretaceous formations, each with a well-defined age based on faunal zones of ammonites and Foraminifera. A dichotomous key in 9 parts and a catalog of scanning electron micrographs (87 plates) have been set up to assist identification of the form taxa. Range charts for the echinoid and ophiuroid-asteroid form taxa have utility through the Cretaceous of much of the Gulf Coastal area. The most precise zonation has been possible for the Albian.

  5. Recycling measurements in the Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowan, W.L.; Klepper, C.C.; Patterson, D.M.; Richards, B.

    1987-01-01

    Recycling was investigated as a function of density, plasma current, and toroidal field in the Texas Experimental Tokamak, an ohmically heated, edge-fueled device with a full aperture poloidal limiter. Estimates for the recycling contribution to the plasma particle inventory were inferred from a particle accounting which employed measurements of the number of ionization events in the plasma and in the scrape-off layer, the total number of electrons in the plasma, and the neutral gas influx from the gas feed. Isotopic changeover experiments were used to further characterize recycling and to derive the contribution to the plasma particle inventory from the neutrals held both in the wall bulk and on the wall surface. A model was used to estimate the number of neutrals trapped in the wall as well as to examine the interactions of the major plasma participants in recycling - ions, fast neutrals, and slow neutrals. (orig.)

  6. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  7. Development of Texas intense positron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeymen, A.R.; Uenlue, K.; Jacobsen, F.M.; Goektepeli, S.; Wehring, B.W.

    1999-01-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a reactor-based low-energy positron beam facility utilizing some novel techniques in positron beam production. This facility will be located at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) and is being developed by UT Austin and UT Arlington researchers. TIPS will use a large area (total area of 900-1800 cm 2 ) 64 Cu source to supply fast β + particles for subsequent moderation to form an intense monoenergetic positron beam in the energy range of 0-50 keV with an expected intensity of 10 8 e + /s. Natural copper will be neutron activated near the core of the NETL 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor to produce the 64 Cu isotope. The activated source will be transported to the moderator/remoderator assembly, outside the biological shield of the reactor. This assembly combines the primary moderation and posterior remoderation of the fast β + particles into one stage using solid Kr to produce a low-energy positron source of a few eV with a diameter of 8 mm. The low-energy positron beam is then extracted by an electrostatic modified SOA gun and after further acceleration to 5 keV, the beam is focused onto the object slit of a 90 deg. bending magnet. After further focusing and another 90 deg. bend, the beam enters the main accelerator/decelerator that transports the beam onto the target for experimentation. The components of TIPS have been manufactured and are currently being optimized. In this communication we present some of the details of the TIPS facility and furthermore briefly discuss its intended applications

  8. Distributed Hydrologic Modeling of LID in The Woodlands, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedient, P.; Doubleday, G.; Sebastian, A.; Fang, N.

    2012-12-01

    As early as the 1960s, the Woodlands, TX employed stormwater management similar to modern Low Impact Development (LID) design. Innovative for its time, the master drainage plan attempted to minimize adverse impact to the 100-year floodplain and reduce the impact of development on the natural environment. Today, it is Texas's most celebrated master-planned community. This paper employs the use of NEXRAD radar rainfall in the distributed hydrologic model, VfloTM, to evaluate the effectiveness of The Woodlands master drainage design as a stormwater management technique. Three models were created in order to analyze the rainfall-runoff response of The Woodlands watershed under different development conditions: two calibrated, fully distributed hydrologic models to represent the (A) undeveloped and (B) 2006-development conditions and (C) a hypothetical, highly urbanized model, representing Houston-style development. Parameters, such as imperviousness and land cover, were varied in order to represent the different developed conditions. The A and B models were calibrated using NEXRAD radar rainfall for two recent storm events in 2008 and 2009. All three models were used to compare peak flows, discharge volumes and time to peak of hydrographs for the recent radar rainfall events and a historical gaged rainfall event that occurred in 1974. Results show that compared to pre-developed conditions, the construction of The Woodlands resulted in an average increase in peak flows of only 15% during small storms and 27% during a major event. Furthermore, when compared to the highly urbanized model, peak flows are often two to three times smaller for the 2006-model. In the 2006-model, the peak flow of the 100 year event was successfully attenuated, suggesting that the design of The Woodlands effectively protects the development from the 1% occurrence storm event using LID practices and reservoirs. This study uses a calibrated hydrologic distributed-model supported by NEXRAD radar

  9. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Sabine Lake, Texas Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The toxicity of sediments in Sabine Lake, Texas, and adjoining Intracoastal Waterway canals was determined as part of bioeffects assessment studies managed by NOAA's...

  10. Simulation of atmospheric oxidation capacity in Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air quality model simulations are performed and evaluated for Houston using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. The simulations use two different emissions estimates: the EPA 2005 National Emissions Inventory (NEI) and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality ...

  11. Verification of Texas superheavy load criteria for bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This report evaluates TxDOT criteria for the superheavy loads that trigger bridge analyses to determine : whether the criteria adequately protects Texas bridges. Researchers used solid modeling calibrated with a : bridge test of a 3-span continuous s...

  12. Site specific wave parameters for Texas coastal bridges : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    There are about 20 coastal bridges located in hurricane evacuation routes in the State of Texas that are : vulnerable to hurricane surge and wave action. Damage to these bridges could hamper emergency response : and other services, and also cause tre...

  13. Irradiation experience at Texas A and M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.G.; Godsey, T.A.

    1970-01-01

    This paper relates some of the past experiences that have been encountered with sample encapsulation and handling at the Nuclear Science Center Reactor at Texas A and M University over the past eight years of operation

  14. Texas pavement preservation center two-year summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Established August 11, 2005, The TPPC serves the broad range of needs of the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), and other agencies within the highway community by promoting awareness of pavement preservation as a feasible and practical maint...

  15. Toward a best practice model for managed lanes in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Increasing implementation of managed lanes in the : United States : Katy Freeway Managed Lanes : (KML) offers lessons learned : for other projects : First operational, multilane, : variably priced, managed facility : in Texas : Became oper...

  16. Performance comparison of various seal coat grades used in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This report documents research efforts to provide comparative quantitative performance information for various grades of seal coat aggregate available in the Texas Department of Transportations standard specifications. Length of service before rep...

  17. Texas cracking performance prediction, simulation, and binder recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies show some mixes with softer binders used outside of Texas (e.g., Minnesotas Cold Weather Road Research Facility mixes) have both good rutting and cracking performance. However, the current binder performance grading (PG) system fail...

  18. Facilitating outreach programs for students in rural Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Since 1998, the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) has expanded its efforts to build dynamic partnerships among the : business, industry, and education sectors. Previous grants from the Southwest University Transportation Center : (SWUTC) created p...

  19. Development of guidelines for cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  20. Mississippian depositional history of the Texas Panhandle: A reappraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppel, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic study of subsurface Mississippian rocks of the Texas Panhandle indicates that previous interpretations of the sequence and timing of depositional events in the area need revision. Early Mississippian (Kinderhookian to Osagean) deposition in the area was restricted to the northeastern Panhandle (Anadarko Basin). The Texas Arch, a Devonian structure, remained positive and effectively limited sediment accumulation throughout the remainder of the area at this time. Major inundation of the southern Panhandle did not occur until the Meramecian. At that time shallow platform conditions developed in the area of the submerged Texas Arch; carbonate buildups formed locally on the outer ramp along the previous margin of the Arch. This marine transgression correlates with drowning of platform margins throughout the midcontinent region. The Texas Arch continued intermittently to control deposition until the end of the Mississippian Period. 20 refs., 2 figs

  1. Texas strategic action plan for motorcycles : 2013-2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Texas Strategic Action Plan for Motorcycles: 2013-2018 provides an integrated : approach to identify implementable strategies and action steps to make the : road environment and infrastructure safer for motorcyclists and other powered : two- and ...

  2. Texas flexible pavements overlays : review and analysis of existing databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Proper calibration of pavement design and rehabilitation performance models to : conditions in Texas is essential for cost-effective flexible pavement design. The degree of : excellence with which TxDOTs pavement design models is calibrated will d...

  3. Paris, Texas. Saksamaal ja sinu peas / Kairi Prints

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Prints, Kairi

    2010-01-01

    6.- 12. oktoobrini Tallinnas ja Tartus toimuval filmifestivalil "Uus Saksa Kino" saab vaadata Wim Wendersi muusikadokumentaale. "Film ja filosoofia" rubriigis koha- ja rahvusespetsiifika eksistentsist tänapäeva filmikunstis ja W. Wendersi filmist "Paris, Texas" (USA 1984)

  4. Performance evaluation of cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  5. Data Reports for Retrospective Case Study in Wise County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data reports from sampling events collected in wise county, texas as part of EPA's Study of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources, retrospective case study.

  6. Parent-taught driver education in Texas : a comparative evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    An evaluation of the Parent-Taught Driver Education (PTDE) program in Texas was conducted using three different research techniques: (1) focus groups with driver education instructors, teen drivers, and their parents; (2) statewide mail survey of you...

  7. Develop metrics of tire debris on Texas highways : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This research effort estimated the amount, characteristics, costs, and safety implications of tire debris on Texas highways. The metrics developed by this research are based on several sources of data, including a statewide survey of debris removal p...

  8. Texas transportation planning for future renewable energy projects : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    There will be a significant increase in the number of renewable energy production facilities in Texas. The : construction of wind farms requires the transport of wind turbine components that create increased loads on : rural roads and bridges. These ...

  9. Project Level Performance Database for Rigid Pavements in Texas, II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Over the years, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has built a number of CRCP (continuously reinforced : concrete pavement) experimental sections to investigate the effects of design, materials, and construction variables on CRCP : struct...

  10. Trends in Playa Inundation and Water Storage in the Ogallala Aquifer on the Texas High Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Gitz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ogallala Aquifer is an important source of irrigation water on the Texas High plains; however, significant decreases in saturated thickness threaten its future use for irrigation. A better understanding of the roles of playas, ephemeral surface ponds, in aquifer recharge is needed to establish levels of withdrawals that will meet either established desired future conditions or sustainability. In this study, data regarding playa inundation, depth to groundwater, precipitation and land cover from 2001 to 2011 were collected and analyzed to ascertain associations between these characteristics for four study areas on the Texas High plains. Each area covered 40,000–70,000 ha. Three of the study areas in Hockley, Floyd and Swisher counties were chosen because their center contained a playa instrumented to measure weather and depth of inundation. There were 20 distinct inundation events at the three instrumented playas between 2006 and 2010. For each of these inundations, water loss exceeded rates of potential evapotranspiration (ET by a factor of 1.6–15.7 times, implying that infiltration was occurring. Playa inundation in all four study areas was also assessed by analyzing images from the National Agricultural Imaginary program. Data on depth to groundwater were analyzed from 2000 to 2010 to determine annual changes of stored water. Annual changes in groundwater were weakly associated with surface area of inundated playas in late summer, but was strongly associated with annual rainfall. Rates of infiltration based on playa water loss versus potential ET, and volume of water in playas was more than sufficient to account for annual changes in groundwater. Land use adjoining the playas had less of influence on playa inundation than annual rainfall. These results strengthen the argument that water storage in playas on the Texas High Plains is an important source of water for aquifer recharge.

  11. Radar-based Flood Warning System for Houston, Texas and Its Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P.

    2009-12-01

    Houston has a long history of flooding problems as a serious nature. For instance, Houstonians suffered from severe flood inundation during Tropical Storm Allison in 2001 and Hurricane Ike in 2008. Radar-based flood warning systems as non-structural tools to provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities are greatly needed for urban areas prone to flash floods. Fortunately, the advent of GIS, radar-based rainfall estimation using NEXRAD, and real-time delivery systems on the internet have allowed flood alert systems to provide important advanced warning of impending flood conditions. Thus, emergency personnel can take proper steps to mitigate against catastrophic losses. The Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS2) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 40 events since 1997. The system performed well during these major rainfall events with R square value of 93%. The current system has been improved by incorporating a new hydraulic prediction tool - FloodPlain Map Library (FPML). The FPML module aims to provide visualized information such as floodplain maps and water surface elevations instead of just showing hydrographs in real time based on NEXRAD radar rainfall data. During Hurricane Ike (September, 2008), FAS2 successfully provided precise and timely flood warning information to TMC with the peak flow difference of 3.6% and the volume difference of 5.6%; timing was excellent for this double-peaked event. With the funding from the Texas Department of Transportation, a similar flood warning system has been developed at a critical transportation pass along Highway 288 in Houston, Texas. In order to enable emergency personnel to begin flood preparation with as much lead time as possible, FAS2 is being used as a prototype to develop warning system for other flood-prone areas such as City of Sugar Land.

  12. Paleocene coal deposits of the Wilcox group, central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Robert W.; Warwick, Peter D.; SanFilipo, John R.; Schultz, Adam C.; Nichols, Douglas J.; Swanson, Sharon M.; Warwick, Peter D.; Karlsen, Alexander K.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Valentine, Brett J.

    2011-01-01

    Coal deposits in the Wilcox Group of central Texas have been regarded as the richest coal resources in the Gulf Coastal Plain. Although minable coal beds appear to be less numerous and generally higher in sulfur content (1 percent average, as-received basis; table 1) than Wilcox coal deposits in the Northeast Texas and Louisiana Sabine assessment areas (0.5 and 0.6 percent sulfur, respectively; table 1), net coal thickness in coal zones in central Texas is up to 32 ft thick and more persistent along strike (up to 15 mi) at or near the surface than coals of any other Gulf Coast assessment area. The rank of the coal beds in central Texas is generally lignite (table 1), but some coal ranks as great as subbituminous C have been reported (Mukhopadhyay, 1989). The outcrop of the Wilcox Group in central Texas strikes northeast, extends for approximately 140 mi between the Trinity and Colorado Rivers, and covers parts of Bastrop, Falls, Freestone, Lee, Leon, Limestone, Milam, Navarro, Robertson, and Williamson Counties (Figure 1). Three formations, in ascending order, the Hooper, Simsboro, and Calvert Bluff, are recognized in central Texas (Figure 2). The Wilcox Group is underlain conformably by the Midway Group, a mudstone-dominated marine sequence, and is overlain and scoured locally by the Carrizo Sand, a fluvial unit at the base of the Claiborne Group.

  13. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  14. Texas Bull Nettle (Cnidoscolus texanus) Exposures Reported to Texas Poison Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2017-06-01

    Texas bull nettle (Cnidoscolus texanus) is covered in bristly hairs similar to stinging nettle. Contact with the plant may result in intense dermal pain, burning, itching, cellulitis, and allergic reaction. This study characterizes C texanus exposures reported to a large state-wide poison center system. Cases were C texanus exposures reported to Texas poison centers during 2000-2015. The distribution of cases was determined for patient demographics, exposure circumstances, and patient outcome. A total of 140 C texanus exposures were identified. Twenty percent of the patients were aged ≤5 years, 21% were 6 to 12 years, 5% were 13 to 19 years, and 51% were ≥20years; and 51% of the patients were male. Eighty-one percent of the exposures occurred at the patient's own residence, 11% in a public area, 2% at another residence, and 1% at school. Seventy-eight percent of the patients were managed on site, 13% were already at or en route to a health care facility, and 6% were referred to a health care facility. Eighty-eight percent of the exposures resulted in dermal effects: irritation or pain (56%), erythema or flushing (31%), edema (27%), pruritus (24%), rash (19%), puncture or wound (19%), and hives or welts (11%). C texanus exposures reported to Texas poison centers were most likely to be unintentional and occur at the patient's own residence. The outcomes of the exposures tended not to be serious and could be managed successfully outside of health care facilities. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Compliance problems of small utility systems with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978: volume II - appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    A study of the problems of compliance with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 experienced by electric utility systems which have a total generating capacity of less than 2000 MW is presented. This volume presents the following appendices: (A) case studies (Farmington, New Mexico; Lamar, Colorado; Dover, Delaware; Wolverine Electric Cooperative, Michigan; Central Telephone and Utilities, Kansas; Sierra Pacific Power Company, Nevada; Vero Beach, Florida; Lubbock, Texas; Western Farmers Cooperative, Oklahoma; and West Texas Utilities Company, Texas); (B) contacts and responses to study; (C) joint action legislation chart; (D) Texas Municipal Power Agency case study; (E) existing generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (F) future generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (G) Federal Register Notice of April 17, 1980, and letter of inquiry to utilities; (H) small utility responses; and (I) Section 744, PIFUA. (WHK)

  16. Strong reinforcing selection in a Texas wildflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Robin; Guerrero, Rafael F; Rausher, Mark D; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2014-09-08

    Reinforcement, the process of increased reproductive isolation due to selection against hybrids, is an important mechanism by which natural selection contributes to speciation [1]. Empirical studies suggest that reinforcement has generated reproductive isolation in many taxa (reviewed in [2-4]), and theoretical work shows it can act under broad selective conditions [5-11]. However, the strength of selection driving reinforcement has never been measured in nature. Here, we quantify the strength of reinforcing selection in the Texas wildflower Phlox drummondii using a strategy that weds a population genetic model with field data. Reinforcement in this system is caused by variation in two loci that affect flower color [12]. We quantify sharp clines in flower color where this species comes into contact with its congener, Phlox cuspidata. We develop a spatially explicit population genetic model for these clines based on the known genetics of flower color. We fit our model to the data using likelihood, and we searched parameter space using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We find that selection on flower color genes generated by reinforcement is exceptionally strong. Our findings demonstrate that natural selection can play a decisive role in the evolution of reproductive isolation through the process of reinforcement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Geothermal resources, Vicksburg Formation, Texas Gulf Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loucks, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    The potential for discovering geopressured geothermal reservoirs in the Vicksburg Formation is limited to Hidalgo County along the Lower Texas Gulf Coast. In Hidalgo County, an area of approximately 385 square miles (designated the Vicksburg Fairway) contains up to 1,300 feet of geopressured sandstones with fluid temperatures greater than 300/sup 0/F. In-place effective permeability, however, averages less than 1 millidarcy in the Vicksburg sandstones because of fine grain size and extensive late carbonate cementation. Also, areal extent of individual reservoirs is limited in a dip direction by growth faults and in a strike direction by the lenticular morphology of the sandstone bodies. In conclusion, under the present specifications set for a geothermal fairway, the Vicksburg has minimal potential because of low reservoir deliverability, which is constrained by low permeability and somewhat limited reservoir continuity. If future tests indicate that lower permeabilities are acceptable, the Vicksburg Fairway should be reconsidered because of the presence of extremely thick sandstone bodies.

  18. Adderall abuse in Texas, 1998-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2007-04-01

    Adderall is used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and is subject to abuse. This study describes the patterns of Adderall abuse calls received by several poison control centers in Texas during 1998-2004. Drug abuse calls were assessed by call year and geographic location. Drug abuse calls were then compared to all other human exposure (nonabuse) calls with respect to various factors. Of all Adderall exposure calls, 12% involved abuse. The number of drug abuse calls received per year increased during the first part of 7-yr period but then declined. Male patients accounted for almost 60% of both drug abuse and nonabuse calls. Adolescent patients comprised 69% of drug abuse calls and children less than 13 yr old comprised 66% of nonabuse calls. Although the majority of both types of human exposures occurred at the patient's own residence, drug abuse calls were more likely than nonabuse calls to involve exposures at another residence (6% vs. 3%), school (22% vs. 5%) and public areas (2% vs. 0.4%). Drug abuse calls were less likely than nonabuse calls to be managed outside of a health care facility (18% vs. 51%) and to be classified as no adverse effect (23% vs. 48%). Adderall abusers are more likely to be adolescents. Adderall abuse as compared to other exposures is more likely to occur outside of the person's home and involve more serious medical outcomes.

  19. Neighborhood Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms among Mexican-descent residents of Texas City, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Alyssa Marie; Peek, M. Kristen; Eschbach, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Substantial research shows that increased Hispanic neighborhood concentration is associated with several beneficial health outcomes including lower adult mortality, better self-rated health, and fewer respiratory problems. Literature on the relationship of Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms is more equivocal. In addition, few studies have directly investigated hypothesized mechanisms of this relationship. This study uses data from a probability sample of 1,238 Mexican-descent adults living in 48 neighborhoods in Texas City, Texas. Multilevel regression models investigate whether Hispanic neighborhood composition is associated with fewer depressive symptoms. This study also investigates whether social support, perceived discrimination, and perceived stress mediate or moderate the relationship, and whether results differ by primary language used at home. We find that individuals living in high Hispanic composition neighborhoods experience fewer depressive symptoms than individuals in low Hispanic composition neighborhoods. In addition, we find that these beneficial effects only apply to respondents who speak English. Social support, perceived discrimination, and perceived stress mediate the Hispanic composition-depressive symptoms relationship. In addition, discrimination and stress moderate the relationship between Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms. Our findings support theories linking higher neighborhood Hispanic composition and better mental health, and suggest that Spanish language use, social support, discrimination and stress may play important roles in the Hispanic composition-depressive symptoms relationship. PMID:24355471

  20. Rock property estimates using multiple seismic attributes and neural networks; Pegasus Field, West Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuelke, J.S.; Quirein, J.A.; Sarg, J.F.

    1998-12-31

    This case study shows the benefit of using multiple seismic trace attributes and the pattern recognition capabilities of neural networks to predict reservoir architecture and porosity distribution in the Pegasus Field, West Texas. The study used the power of neural networks to integrate geologic, borehole and seismic data. Illustrated are the improvements between the new neural network approach and the more traditional method of seismic trace inversion for porosity estimation. Comprehensive statistical methods and interpretational/subjective measures are used in the prediction of porosity from seismic attributes. A 3-D volume of seismic derived porosity estimates for the Devonian reservoir provide a very detailed estimate of porosity, both spatially and vertically, for the field. The additional reservoir porosity detail provided, between the well control, allows for optimal placement of horizontal wells and improved field development. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Why Do Top 10% South Texas Latino High School Seniors Choose to Forego Automatic Admission to Texas A&M University and the University of Texas at Austin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the influential factors that contribute to pathway decisions of high achieving Latino students from South Texas. The theoretical frameworks of Hossler & Gallagher (1987) and Yosso (2005) are utilized as foundational pieces to denote various factors and networks of "capital" which impact the decision making process…

  2. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Testing Activity, Frio Formation, Texas and Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to provide the environmental input into the Division of Geothermal Energy's decisions to expand the geothermal well testing activities to include sites in the Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana. It is proposed that drilling rigs be leased before they are removed from sites in the formation where drilling for gas or oil exploration has been unsuccessful and that the rigs be used to complete the drilling into the geopressured zone for resource exploration. This EA addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environment, and the possible impacts in a broad sense as they apply to the Gulf Coast well testing activity of the Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram of the Department of Energy. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay, Atlas) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. in the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Texas. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Texas.

  4. Study of Statewide Type II Noise Abatement Program for the Texas Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    This project will provide sufficient information to the Texas Department of Transportation and the Texas Transportation Commission to make an informed decision regarding the development and implementation of a statewide Type II Noise Abatement Progra...

  5. It's about time : investing in transportation to keep Texas economically competitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    This current report, It's About Time: Investing in Transportation to Keep Texas : Economically Competitive, updates the February 2009 report by providing : an enhanced analysis of the current state of the Texas transportation system, : determining th...

  6. BLM/OCS South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (STOCS) Project Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The South Texas Outer Continental Shelf Project (STOCS) conducted by the University of Texas and the USGS with funding from BLM/NOAA. The USGS produced geochemical...

  7. Dog Bite Rates and Biting Dog Breeds in Texas, 1995-1997

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blocker, David

    2000-01-01

    .... The first aim of this study was to summarize descriptive characteristics of biting dogs and dog bite victims in Texas from 1995 through 1997 using the Texas Department of Health severe animal bite...

  8. Xylazine Exposures Reported to Texas Poison Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2016-10-01

    Xylazine is a sedative, analgesic, anesthetic, and central muscle relaxant approved for animals but not humans. Although xylazine is an emerging drug of abuse, there are limited data on potentially adverse exposures to the drug. The intent of this study was to describe potentially adverse xylazine exposures reported to a large poison center system. All xylazine exposures reported to Texas poison centers between 2000 and 2014 were included. The distribution of cases by select variables was determined. Of 76 total cases, 93% of the patients were ≥20 years of age, and 54% were male. Fifty-one percent of the exposures occurred by injection, 28% by ingestion, 16% were dermal, 14% were ocular, and 3% by inhalation. Sixty-four percent of the exposures were unintentional, 32% were intentional, and 1% each was related to malicious use and adverse reaction. Sixty-seven percent of the patients were already at or en route to a health care facility when the poison center was contacted, 21% were managed on-site, and 9% were referred to a health care facility. The most common clinical effects were drowsiness or lethargy (47%), bradycardia (20%), hypotension (11%), hypertension (9%), puncture or wound (8%), and slurred speech (8%). Xylazine exposures tended to involve patients who were adult males, exposures were typically unintentional; and most often occurred by injection. Most of the patients were already at or en route to a health care facility when a poison center was contacted. The most frequently reported adverse effects were cardiovascular or neurologic in nature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A retrospective analysis of meningioma in Central Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekokobe Fonkem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Documented meningioma cases in Central Texas (USA from 1976 to 2013 were studied utilizing the Scott & White Brain Tumor Registry. All the cases examined were histologically diagnosed as meningiomas. Of the 372 cases, most were benign tumors (p 45 years of age superseded the younger patients in meningioma incidence (p < 0.05. Previous data regarding meningioma epidemiology in Texas showed a higher incidence in black patients when compared to white patients. By contrast, this study’s findings of Central Texas meningioma demographics show increased incidence of meningiomas in white patients (p < 0.05. This interesting find in meningioma prevalence warrants further investigation with a larger sample size, in order to establish validity and further parse out possible causes of meningioma development among white individuals.

  10. Detection of Mycoplasma agassizii in the Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Amanda L.; White, C. LeAnn; Brown, Mary B.; deMaar, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma agassizii causes upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in Texas tortoises (Gopherus berlandieri). To determine exposure to and shedding of M. agassizii, we collected blood samples and nasal swabs from 40 free-ranging Texas tortoises on public and private lands in Texas, USA, from May to October 2009. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect M. agassizii–specific antibodies. Eleven (28%) tortoises were antibody positive, three (8%) were suspect, and the remaining 26 (65%) were negative. Nasal lavage samples were collected from 35 of the 40 tortoises for M. agassizii culture and PCR to detect shedding of M. agassizii. Current infection with M. agassizii was confirmed in one tortoise that had mild clinical signs of URTD and was positive by ELISA (antibody titer >512), PCR, and culture. The clinical isolate was confirmed as M. agassizii by restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunobinding.

  11. Texstar: The all-Texas educational satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Longhorn Satellite Company (LSC) has designed Texstar, and educational satellite communications system which will be considered as a means of equalizing the distribution of educational resources throughout the state of Texas. Texstar will be capable of broadcasting live lectures and documentaries in addition to transmitting data from a centralized receiving-transmitting station. Included in the design of Texstar is the system and subsystem design for the satellite and the design of the ground stations. The launch vehicle used will be the Texas-built Conestoga 421-48. The Texstar system incorporates three small satellites in slightly inclined geosynchronous orbits. Due to the configuration and spacing of these satellites, the system will be accessed as if it were one large, geostationary satellite. Texstar is shown to be a viable option to the educational crisis in the state of Texas.

  12. Public perceptions and information gaps in solar energy in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Varun; Beck, Ariane L.

    2015-07-01

    Studying the behavioral aspects of the individual decision-making process is important in identifying and addressing barriers in the adoption of residential solar photovoltaic (PV). However, there is little systematic research focusing on these aspects of residential PV in Texas, an important, large, populous state, with a range of challenges in the electricity sector including increasing demand, shrinking reserve margins, constrained water supply, and challenging emissions reduction targets under proposed federal regulations. This paper aims to address this gap through an empirical investigation of a new survey-based dataset collected in Texas on solar energy perceptions and behavior. The results of this analysis offer insights into the perceptions and motivations influencing intentions and behavior toward solar energy in a relatively untapped market and help identify information gaps that could be targeted to alleviate key barriers to adopting solar, thereby enabling significant emissions reductions in the residential sector in Texas.

  13. Part Time Alternative Program, Graduate Social Work Education in Texas: Nibblers at the Feast of Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman-Munke, Peggy

    A study was made of the way part-time students are served by the four graduate schools of social work in Texas: University of Texas in Austin (UT), University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), University of Houston, and the Worden School of Social Service of Our Lady of the Lake University (OLLU). Each school offers at least one type of part-time…

  14. Effects of Year-Round Education on Texas Middle School Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of the year-round calendar on student performance in Texas middle schools as measured by achievement on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) test. In the State of Texas, 15 schools served students in grades six through eight using the year-round calendar in 2009-2010. The 15…

  15. 78 FR 36523 - Foreign-Trade Zone 84-Houston, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Toshiba International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-17-2013] Foreign-Trade Zone 84--Houston, Texas... Generators Production); Houston, Texas On February 11, 2013, the Port of Houston Authority, grantee of FTZ 84..., located in Houston, Texas. The notification was processed in accordance with the regulations of the FTZ...

  16. 27 CFR 9.125 - Fredericksburg in the Texas Hill Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Texas Hill Country. 9.125 Section 9.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... Viticultural Areas § 9.125 Fredericksburg in the Texas Hill Country. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Fredericksburg in the Texas Hill Country.” (b) Approved maps. The...

  17. 75 FR 19645 - Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-14-000] Enterprise..., 2010, Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC (Enterprise Texas) filed a petition for rate approval pursuant to section 284.123(b)(2) of the Commission's regulations. Enterprise Texas proposes rates of $0.6090 per...

  18. 75 FR 18200 - Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR07-12-005] Enterprise..., Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC (Enterprise Texas), filed its Statement of Operating Conditions in compliance... Commission's regulations. Enterprise Texas states that the revisions include modifications consistent with...

  19. 76 FR 73618 - Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. PR11-92-001] Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing Take notice that on November 22, 2011, Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC (Enterprise Texas) filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions to comply with a...

  20. 75 FR 18496 - Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR07-12-005] Enterprise..., Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC (Enterprise Texas), filed its Statement of Operating Conditions in compliance... Commission's regulations. Enterprise Texas states that the revisions include modifications consistent with...

  1. 76 FR 13610 - Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. PR10-14-002; PR11-92-000] Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing Take notice that on March 1, 2011, Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC (Enterprise Texas) filed a revised Statement of Rates to its Statement of Operating...

  2. Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science: 25 Years of Early College STEM Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The University of North Texas's Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science began admitting students to its 2-year early college entrance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) program in the fall of 1988. This program provided accelerated entry for top students in Texas in the areas of mathematics and science. Approximately 200…

  3. Texas Schools, Inc.: A Case Study of the Transfer of Technology at a Pilot Bilingual Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Vangie L.

    Texas Schools, Inc. (TSI) developed a pilot program in bilingual education for Mexican-American vocational workers in the Department of Diesel Mechanics at Texas Tech University. This study assesses the transfer of technology in that environment using quantitative and qualitative measures. TSI, a technical and vocational school in Lubbock, Texas,…

  4. 75 FR 18142 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Control of Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Control of Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles AGENCY... (TAC), Chapter 114, Control of Air Pollution from Motor Vehicles. The State submitted these revisions... the Rebate Grant Process and the Texas Clean School Bus Program under the Texas Emissions Reduction...

  5. 76 FR 15 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Emissions Banking and Trading of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Emissions Banking and Trading of Allowances Program AGENCY... to the Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP) that create and amend the Emissions Banking and Trading... revisions to the Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP) that create and amend the Emissions Banking and...

  6. Perceptions of Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors on Career Development, Higher Education, and Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolini, William F.; Rayfield, John; Ripley, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Selected 4-H youth participated in the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassador program. Forty-five youth participated in the 3-day program delivered by university professors and staff, Texas AgriLife Extension faculty and industry representatives. An instrument was developed and administered to the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors at the end of their first…

  7. 76 FR 28885 - Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis-Free States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ...-0005] Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis- Free States AGENCY: Animal and... amending the brucellosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of swine by adding Texas to the list of validated brucellosis-free States. We have determined that Texas meets the criteria for...

  8. Monitoring and Mapping the Hurricane Harvey Flooding in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji Bhaskar, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring and Mapping the Hurricane Harvey Flooding in Houston, Texas.Urban flooding is a hazard that causes major destruction and loss of life. High intense precipitation events have increased significantly in Houston, Texas in recent years resulting in frequent river and bayou flooding. Many of the historical storm events such as Allison, Rita and Ike have caused several billion dollars in losses for the Houston-Galveston Region. A category 4 Hurricane Harvey made landfall on South Texas resulting in heavy precipitation from Aug 25 to 29 of 2017. About 1 trillion gallons of water fell across Harris County over a 4-day period. This amount of water covers Harris County's 1,800 square miles with an average of 33 inches of water. The long rain event resulted in an average 40inch rainfall across the area in several rain gauges and the maximum rainfall of 49.6 inches was recorded near Clear Creek. The objectives of our study are to 1) Process the Geographic Information System (GIS) and satellite data from the pre and post Hurricane Harvey event in Houston, Texas and 2) Analyze the satellite imagery to map the nature and pattern of the flooding in Houston-Galveston Region. The GIS data of the study area was downloaded and processed from the various publicly available resources such as Houston Galveston Area Council (HGAC), Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and Texas Natural Resource Information Systems (TNRIS). The satellite data collected soon after the Harvey flooding event were downloaded and processed using the ERDAS image processing software. The flood plain areas surrounding the Brazos River, Buffalo Bayou and the Addicks Barker reservoirs showed severe inundation. The different watershed areas affected by the catastrophic flooding in the wake of Hurricane Harvey were mapped and compared with the pre flooding event.

  9. Description of floodplains and wetlands, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Floodplains and wetlands are important features of the Texas Panhandle landscape, and are found on the Deaf Smith County site and in its vicinity. Use or disturbance of floodplains and wetlands in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is subject to environmental review requirements implementing two Executive Orders. This report provides general information on playa wetlands in the Texas Panhandle, and describes and maps floodplains and wetlands on the Deaf Smith site and in its vicinity. The report is based on the published literature, with information from limited field reconnaissance included

  10. Wineries' Involvement in Promoting Tourism Online: The Case of Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch, Leslie

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Wine tourism has become an important driver of business for wineries in many regions around the world, while Texas wine regions are only starting to emerge as important tourism destinations. A study was conducted to investigate how effectively Texas wineries market tourism to their own establishments as well as in a regional context. A specific focus was placed on indications of collaborative wine tourism marketing practices on winery websites. The results indicate that wineries provide basic visitor information but are missing out on strategic opportunities to market wine tourism to their areas.

  11. Texas Hydrogen Education Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, David; Bullock, Dan

    2011-06-30

    The Texas Hydrogen Education project builds on past interest in hydrogen and fuel cells to help create better informed leaders and stakeholders and thereby improve decision making and planning for inclusion of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as energy alternatives in Texas. In past years in Texas, there was considerable interest and activities about hydrogen and fuel cells (2000-­2004). During that time, the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) created a fuel cell consortium and a fuel cell testing lab. Prior to 2008, interest and activities had declined substantially. In 2008, in cooperation with the Texas H2 Coalition and the State Energy Conservation Office, HARC conducted a planning process to create the Texas Hydrogen Roadmap. It was apparent from analysis conducted during the course of this process that while Texas has hydrogen and fuel cell advantages, there was little program and project activity as compared with other key states. Outreach and education through the provision of informational materials and organizing meetings was seen as an effective way of reaching decision makers in Texas. Previous hydrogen projects in Texas had identified the five major urban regions for program and project development. This geographic targeting approach was adopted for this project. The project successfully conducted the five proposed workshops in four of the target metropolitan areas: San Antonio, Houston, Austin, and the Dallas-­Ft. Worth area. In addition, eight outreach events were included to further inform state and local government leaders on the basics of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The project achieved its primary objectives of developing communication with target audiences and assembling credible and consistent outreach and education materials. The major lessons learned include: (1) DOE’s Clean Cities programs are a key conduit to target transportation audiences, (2) real-­world fuel cell applications (fuel cell buses, fuel cell fork lifts

  12. Position coincidence optical identifications using Texas interferometer radio positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozyan, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    1048 radio source positions measured with the Texas Interferometer were searched for optical identifications on glass copies of the Palomar Sky Survey E and O plates, resulting in 242 identifications and 806 blank fields. Finding charts are presented for 124 of the 125 new identifications not previously reported in the literature, and for 73 blank fields containing nearby optical objects which may be real identifications. This brings the cumulative number of Texas radio positions searched to 2015, producing 864 optical identifications and 1151 blank fields

  13. Fast neutron activation analysis at Texas A and M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    Fast neutron generators are used at Texas A and M University to provide a supply of high energy neutrons for nuclear analytical measurements. A series of neutron activation analysis procedures have been developed for determining various major, minor and trace constituents in a variety of materials. These procedures are primarily developed to compliment our reactor based NAA program, thereby expanding the list of determinable elements to include those difficult or impossible to measure using thermal neutrons. A few typical methods are discussed. The unique implementation of the methodologies at Texas A and M are explained. (author)

  14. Energy Policy Case Study - Texas: Wind, Markets, and Grid Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrell, Alice C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Homer, Juliet S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bender, Sadie R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-19

    This document presents a case study of energy policies in Texas related to power system transformation, renewable energy and distributed energy resources (DERs). Texas has experienced a dramatic increase in installed wind capacity, from 116 MW in 2000 to over 15,000 MW in 2015. This achievement was enabled by the designation of Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZs) and new transmission lines that transmit wind to load centers. This report highlights nascent efforts to include DERs in the ERCOT market. As costs decline and adoption rates increase, ERCOT expects distributed generation to have an increasing effect on grid operations, while bringing potentially valuable new resources to the wholesale markets.

  15. Texas LPG fuel cell development and demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2004-07-26

    The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix's LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power's residential-scale GenSys(TM) 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program's primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation's TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units

  16. Seminar at the University of Texas

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, Haskell

    1988-01-01

    The articles in this volume are based on talks given in a seminar at Austin during 1986-87. They range from those dealing with fresh research and discoveries to exposition and new proofs of older results. The main topics and themes include geometric and analytic properties of infinite-dimensional Banach spaces and their convex subsets as well as some aspects of Banach spaces associated with harmonic analysis and Banach algebras.

  17. Catahoula formation as a source of sedimentary uranium deposits in east Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledger, E.B.; Tieh, T.T.

    1983-01-01

    Volcanic glass-rich mudstone and siltstone samples from the Oligocene/Miocene Catahoula formation of Jasper County, Texas, and coeval volcaniclastic rock samples from Trans-Pecos, Texas, have been compared as to U, Th, Zr, Ti, K, Rb, and Sr contents. Uranium is slightly greater in the distal ash (5.85 ppM U) compared to the Trans-Pecos samples (average 5.41 ppM U). Diagenetic and pedogenetic alteration of Catahoula volcanic glass releases uranium to solution and, under favorable conditions, this uranium may accumulate to form ore bodies. Uranium has been produced from such ore bodies in south Texas, but economic deposits are not known in east Texas. Significant differences between south and east Texas include: (1) a greater amount of volcanic debris delivered to south Texas, both as air-fall ash and stream-transported material, (2) delivery of only air-fill ash to east Texas, (3) the possibility of more petroleum-related reductants such as H 2 S in south Texas, and (4) pervasive glass alteration with subsequent uranium release in south Texas due to late calichification. These differences argue against economic deposits of the south Texas type being found in east Texas. If economic deposits occur they are likely to be far downdip making exploration difficult and expensive

  18. Infrastructure-friendly vehicles to support Texas economic competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The researchers reviewed and extended the work done under Project 0-6736, Rider 36 OS/OW Vehicle Fees : Study, and other similar efforts currently underway in Texas and other states and at the federal and international : level to evaluate the effects...

  19. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Texas. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  20. Bioretention for stormwater quality improvement in Texas : pilot experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of pilot-scale bioretention experiments. Five steel boxes of 6 ft (L) 6 ft : (W) 4 ft (D) were constructed, each of which has a different type of vegetation: (1) shrubs, (2) grass : species in Texas Department...

  1. Report on Adolescent Pregnancy in Fort Worth, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tees, Sandra

    Teenage pregnancy is an overwhelming problem in Fort Worth, Texas. To examine the problem of teenage pregnancy, figures on total live births by age, race, repeat pregnancy, and at-risk infants were gathered from 1981 and 1982 Department of Public Health data. In addition, consequences of teenage pregnancy and motivation factors were examined. An…

  2. Evaluating Educational Efficiency in Texas Schools Utilizing Data Envelopment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Policymakers and professional educators attempt to be good stewards of public funds while simultaneously raising expectations for student outcomes that reflect academic excellence in the public school system. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of Texas public school districts and the factors influencing the inefficiency of…

  3. The Freshman Integrated Curriculum at Texas A&M University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malave, Cesar O.; Watson, Karan L.

    This paper presents implementation details related to the freshman integrated curriculum at Texas A&M University. Specifically, the need for strong integration between physics, calculus, engineering problem solving, engineering design graphics, and English is emphasized. The paper presents a brief summary of the design and pilot implementation…

  4. 75 FR 59711 - Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... responsible corporate citizens. This Audit Program reflects the purpose and incentives of EPA's Audit Policy... AGENCY Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final Notice of Clean Air Act (CAA) voluntary audit compliance program for flexible permit...

  5. Living on a Cotton Farm: Mexican American Life in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Mary S.

    This packet of six lesson plans highlights Mexican-American life on a Texas cotton farm in the early 20th century. Each lesson provides a lesson overview; states educational objectives; cites materials needed; details the procedure for classroom implementation; offers a closure activity; and suggests an extension activity. The packet is divided…

  6. Principal Communities of Practice Inspire Learning in Texas District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Steven; Hughes, Holly; Bockart, Scott; Silva, Susan; McBride, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    In Texas--specifically in the greater Houston area--Clear Creek Independent School District is a destination district. Families with young children seek to move into the Clear Creek ISD district boundaries when looking for housing in the area. State accountability requirements, coupled with slow changes in student demographics, have caused Clear…

  7. Floristics of ephemeral ponds in east-central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara R. MacRoberts; Michael H. MacRoberts; D. Craig Rudolph; David W. Peterson

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in 2009, we surveyed the vegetation of ephemeral ponds in Sabine and Nacogdoches counties in east-central Texas. These ponds are shallow and flat-bottomed, with a small but distinct flora dominated by grasses (Poaceae) and sedges (Cyperaceae). The floras of these ponds are most similar to those of flatwoods ponds located on the lower coastal plain. Once more...

  8. Identification Strategies of a Texas Rebel: Frances (Sissy) Farenthold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Eva M.

    The identification techniques in Herbert C. Kelman's schema of identification were used to analyze the near, and perhaps surprising, success of Rep. Frances (Sissy) Farenthold's bid for the Democratic Texas gubernatorial nomination in 1972. Opposing government corruption, Farenthold overcame the potential obstacles of being a politically liberal…

  9. Texas Hold'em, a game of skill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borm, Peter; van der Genugten, B.B.

    The methodology of relative skill, by means of a detailed mathematical analysis of realistic approximations of Texas Hold’em cash games and tournaments as provided in van der Genugten and Borm [2012], and Borm and van der Genugten [2009] respectively, reconfirms the findings of the court in The

  10. Texas Hold’em : A Game of Skill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Genugten, B.B.; Borm, P.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the detailed mathematical analysis of realistic approximations of Texas Hold’em cash games and tournaments as provided in [1] and [2], respectively, this paper reconfirms the findings of the court in The Hague [3] that on the basis of the methodology of relative skill it can be

  11. Everything's Bigger in Texas: Except the Medmal Settlements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Baker (Tom); E. Helland (Eric); J.M. Klick (Jonathan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRecent work using Texas closed claim data finds that physicians are rarely required to use personal assets in medical malpractice settlements even when plaintiffs secure judgments above the physician's insurance limits. In equilibrium, this should lead physicians to purchase less

  12. Outbreak of Tagosodes orizicolus (Muir) in Texas rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rice planthopper, Tagosodes orizicolus, is reported for the first time in Texas, where it is superabundant in rice fields in four counties (Brazoria, Colorado, Harris, and Wharton). The species is a known vector of the viral disease hoja blanca, which can reduce yields up to 50%, and hopper burn...

  13. Reforming Preparation Programs for Leadership Improvement: The Case of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Byng, June; Garza, Encarnacion; Thompson, David P.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a case of how changes in standards for principal certification--as required by the State Board of Educator Certification since its establishment in 1995--were meant to promote changes in principal preparation programs in the state of Texas. The examination considers whether the changes were significant in terms of intended…

  14. The Texas physician workforce: current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomaker, T Samuel

    2009-11-01

    The United States is facing serious physician workforce challenges. These include a shortage of physicians; declining interest in primary care; a maldistribution of doctors, particularly in inner-city and rural areas; the lack of a coherent workforce planning mechanism; and a workforce that does not reflect the diversity of the general population. Texas has many of the same issues, but problems are magnified by a historically low physician-to-population ratio; a rapidly growing and increasingly diverse population; and significant access-to-care issues, driven by a large uninsured population. This article reviews the current status of the US physician workforce and the challenges facing the nation over the next 20 years, and compares the national situation with prevailing and future conditions in Texas. Unless current trends are altered, Texas will face a growing shortage of physicians (particularly in primary care and certain specialty areas) that will be worse in rural and border areas. Although Texas medical schools are increasing enrollment, the growth in their graduate medical education slots is not keeping pace, creating a bottleneck that will constrain growth in the number of practicing physicians.

  15. Financial assurance for decontamination and decommissioning: a Texas perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, C.D.; Etter, S.D.; Dziuk, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Texas Department of Health (TDH) has the regulatory responsibility to ensure that funds are available for decontamination, decommissioning, and reclamation of uranium recovery facilities in Texas. Uranium recovery licensees are required to post financial security with the Agency for that purpose. Texas uranium facilities include (1) conventional surface mining and milling plants, including tailings ponds, and (2) in situ solution mining plants, each with somewhat different cost elements for decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and closure. Cost estimates for decontamination, decommissioning, and reclamation, along with a facility closure plan, are initially submitted to the Agency by the licensees. These are verified and compared with detailed independent cost estimates prepared by Agency staff. Significant differences between the two estimates are examined and resolved by negotiation and/or recalculation to the satisfaction of the state. The Texas philosophy for maintaining financial security permits flexibility in the closure plan without jeopardizing or compromising the ultimate long-term objectives of closure. Review of closure plans incorporates new technological developments In contrast, financial security is established expeditiously by applying the best available cost data to necessarily conservative estimates of the work involved. Financial security cost estimates are subject to annual review and adjustment

  16. Design and performance evaluation of very thin overlays in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Very thin overlays 1-inch thick or less were placed as surface layers on five major highways in Texas. : These mixes were designed in the laboratory to have a balance of good rut resistance as measured by : TxDOTs Hamburg Wheel Tracking test and g...

  17. Equity evaluation of vehicle miles traveled fees in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The Texas state gas tax has been 20.0 cents per gallon since 1991, and the federal gas tax has been 18.4 : cents per gallon since 1993. The gas tax is not only stagnant, but depreciating in value due to inflation. : One proposed alternative to the ga...

  18. Texas perpetual pavements : experience overview and the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Since 2001, the State of Texas has been designing and constructing perpetual pavements on some of its heavily : trafficked highways where the expected 20-year truck-traffic estimate of 18 kip ESALs is in excess of 30 million. To : date, there are 10 ...

  19. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2014-15. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  20. State of Student Aid and Higher Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creusere, Marlena; Fletcher, Carla; Klepfer, Kasey; Norman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    TG provides critical support to schools, students, and borrowers at every stage of the federal student aid process--from providing information on how to pay for a higher education including financial aid options, to facilitating successful loan repayment after graduation. This issue of "State of Student Aid and Higher Education in Texas"…

  1. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  2. The rise of neglected tropical diseases in the "new Texas"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Within the last five years, the State of Texas has experienced either transmission or outbreaks of Ebola, chikungunya, West Nile, and Zika virus infections. Autochthonous transmission of neglected parasitic and bacterial diseases has also become increasingly reported. The rise of such emerging and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) has not occurred by accident but instead reflects rapidly evolving changes and shifts in a “new” Texas beset by modern and globalizing forces that include rapid expansions in population together with urbanization and human migrations, altered transportation patterns, climate change, steeply declining vaccination rates, and a new paradigm of poverty known as “blue marble health.” Summarized here are the major NTDs now affecting Texas. In addition to the vector-borne viral diseases highlighted above, there also is a high level of parasitic infections, including Chagas disease, trichomoniasis, and possibly leishmaniasis and toxocariasis, as well as typhus-group rickettsiosis, a vector-borne bacterial infection. I also highlight some of the key shifts in emerging and neglected disease patterns, partly due to an altered and evolving economic and ecological landscape in the new Texas, and provide some preliminary disease burden estimates for the major prevalent and incident NTDs. PMID:29346369

  3. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2015-16. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix; Hinojosa, David

    2016-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  4. State of Student Aid and Higher Education in Texas, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Chris; Fletcher, Carla; Klepfer, Kasey

    2016-01-01

    Texas Guaranteed Student Loan Corporation (TG) provides critical support to schools, students, and borrowers at every stage of the federal student aid process--from providing information on how to pay for a higher education including financial aid options, to facilitating successful loan repayment after graduation. This 2016 issue of "State…

  5. Texas Superintendents' Role in Student Fourth Amendment Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, Stacey

    This study analyzed the current student drug testing policies of Texas public school districts in the context of the Fourth Amendment rights of students. Court decisions on this issue conflict, and school administrators, attorneys, and other concerned parties may be interested in knowing school districts policies. Responses were received from 827…

  6. Tight Focus on Instruction Wins Texas District Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    It took a while for four-time finalist Aldine, Texas, to win the Broad Prize for Urban Education. But it took even longer to craft the system that ultimately put the district over the top. Educators in Aldine district have been working for more than a decade to refine their "managed instruction" system. Reviewers examined how the school…

  7. Feeding habits of songbirds in East Texas clearcuts during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald W. Worthington; R. Montague Jr. Whiting; James G. Dickson

    2004-01-01

    This east Texas study was undertaken to determine the importance of seeds of forbs, grasses, and woody shrubs to songbirds wintering in young pine plantations which had been established utilizing the clearcut regeneration system. The feeding habits and preferences of four species of songbirds, northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), song sparrows...

  8. Environmental Assessment: Installation Development at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    America—Division of Saint -Gobain Fiberglass Reinforcements 888 Cryovac Division—Sealed Air Corporation Flexible Packaging 750 Cingular Wireless...Affected Environment Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas 3-55 May 31, 2007 Archer County, Baylor County, Brown County, Callahan County, Clay County

  9. Biscalitheca suzanneana, N. Sp., from the uppermost Pennsylvanian of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamay, S.H.

    1972-01-01

    Biscalitheca suzanneana, n. sp., is described from specimens found in an uppermost Pennsylvanian deposit in north-central Texas. The genus was identified primarily on the basis of impressions of the unique sporangial annuli. The occurrence establishes for Biscalitheca a stratigraphic range equivalent to nearly the entire Upper Pennsylvanian Series. ?? 1972.

  10. The rise of neglected tropical diseases in the "new Texas".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotez, Peter J

    2018-01-01

    Within the last five years, the State of Texas has experienced either transmission or outbreaks of Ebola, chikungunya, West Nile, and Zika virus infections. Autochthonous transmission of neglected parasitic and bacterial diseases has also become increasingly reported. The rise of such emerging and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) has not occurred by accident but instead reflects rapidly evolving changes and shifts in a "new" Texas beset by modern and globalizing forces that include rapid expansions in population together with urbanization and human migrations, altered transportation patterns, climate change, steeply declining vaccination rates, and a new paradigm of poverty known as "blue marble health." Summarized here are the major NTDs now affecting Texas. In addition to the vector-borne viral diseases highlighted above, there also is a high level of parasitic infections, including Chagas disease, trichomoniasis, and possibly leishmaniasis and toxocariasis, as well as typhus-group rickettsiosis, a vector-borne bacterial infection. I also highlight some of the key shifts in emerging and neglected disease patterns, partly due to an altered and evolving economic and ecological landscape in the new Texas, and provide some preliminary disease burden estimates for the major prevalent and incident NTDs.

  11. The rise of neglected tropical diseases in the "new Texas".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Hotez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the last five years, the State of Texas has experienced either transmission or outbreaks of Ebola, chikungunya, West Nile, and Zika virus infections. Autochthonous transmission of neglected parasitic and bacterial diseases has also become increasingly reported. The rise of such emerging and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs has not occurred by accident but instead reflects rapidly evolving changes and shifts in a "new" Texas beset by modern and globalizing forces that include rapid expansions in population together with urbanization and human migrations, altered transportation patterns, climate change, steeply declining vaccination rates, and a new paradigm of poverty known as "blue marble health." Summarized here are the major NTDs now affecting Texas. In addition to the vector-borne viral diseases highlighted above, there also is a high level of parasitic infections, including Chagas disease, trichomoniasis, and possibly leishmaniasis and toxocariasis, as well as typhus-group rickettsiosis, a vector-borne bacterial infection. I also highlight some of the key shifts in emerging and neglected disease patterns, partly due to an altered and evolving economic and ecological landscape in the new Texas, and provide some preliminary disease burden estimates for the major prevalent and incident NTDs.

  12. High energy physics program at Texas A ampersand M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The Texas A ampersand M high energy physics program has achieved significant mile-stones in each of its research initiatives. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO; the development of two new detector technologies, liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry and knife-edge chambers; and two SSC detector proposals, SDC and TEXAS/EMPACT. We have developed prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry in TEXAS/EMPACT. A new element in this program is the inclusion of a theoretical high energy physics research program being carried out by D. Nanopoulos and C. Pope. D. Nanopoulos has succeeded in building a string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. The impact of this work on string phenomenology certainly has far reaching consequences. C. Pope is currently working on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two- dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity, and W-string theory. The following report presents details of the accomplishments of the Texas A ampersand M program over the past year and the proposed plan of research for the coming year

  13. Degrees of Separation: Latino Students' Transitions to a Texas HBCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Taryn Ozuna; Stone, Ashley N.

    2016-01-01

    A successful transition to college is the foundation for future academic success, and this process is particularly important for a quickly growing Latino population. This qualitative study explored the transitional experiences of eight Latino students who enrolled in a historically Black university in Texas. Focusing specifically on their…

  14. Carbon monoxide exposures after hurricane Ike - Texas, September 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-14

    During power outages after hurricanes, survivors can be at risk for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning if they use portable generators improperly. On September 13, 2008, Hurricane Ike struck the coast of Texas, leaving approximately 2.3 million households in the southeastern portion of the state without electricity. Six days later, 1.3 million homes were still without electrical power. To assess the impact of storm-related CO exposures and to enhance prevention efforts, CDC analyzed data from five disparate surveillance sources on CO exposures reported during September 13--26 in counties of southeast Texas that were declared disaster areas by the federal government. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that one data source, Texas poison centers, received reports of 54 persons with storm-related CO exposures during the surveillance period. Another data source, the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) hyperbaric oxygen treatment database, reported that 15 persons received hyperbaric oxygen treatment for storm-related CO poisoning. Medical examiners, public health officials, and hospitals in Texas reported that seven persons died from storm-related CO poisoning. Among the data sources, the percentage of reported storm-related CO exposures caused by improper generator use ranged from 82% to 87%. These findings underscore the need for effective prevention messages during storm preparation, warnings, and response periods regarding the correct use of generators and the installation and maintenance of battery-powered CO detectors.

  15. How Community Colleges in Texas Prioritize Resources for Latino Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Sarah L.; Garbee, Kelty T.; Miller, Ryan A.; Saenz, Victor B.

    2018-01-01

    This study explored how administrators at community colleges conceptualized change related to resource allocation and managing competing priorities to support targeted programming for Latino men. The study included the perspectives of 39 administrators from seven community colleges across Texas using concepts associated with institutional change…

  16. Closing the Gaps: 2015. The Texas Higher Education Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Texas is profiting from a diverse, vibrant and growing economy. Yet this prosperity could turn to crisis if steps are not taken quickly to ensure an educated population and workforce for the future. At present, the proportion of Texans enrolled in higher education is declining. Too few higher education programs are noted for excellence and too few…

  17. Land-surface subsidence in the Texas coastal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzlaff, Karl W.

    1980-01-01

    Land-surface subsidence has been mapped in the Houston-Galveston area and is known to have occurred in other areas within the Texas coastal region. Most of the subsidence has been caused by both the withdrawal of ground water and by the production of oil, gas, and associated ground water.

  18. Economic analysis of water conservation policies in the Texas Panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to declining water availability from the Ogallala Aquifer, management policy alternatives for extending the life of the aquifer to sustain rural economies in the Texas Panhandle are evaluated. The study concludes that water conservation policies for the region significantly impact crop mix, reso...

  19. Texas School Law: A Practical Guide. 1999 Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreca, Christopher P.; Gregory, Raymond L.; Horner, Jeffrey J.; Muzzy, Gray H.

    This guide is a supplement to the 1996 edition of "Texas School Law: A Practical Guide." It addresses four topics: real-estate issues relating to school districts and colleges, student-discipline law, education of children with disabilities, and sexual abuse or harassment of students. The first section examines legal changes in the realm…

  20. Racial Threat and White Opposition to Bilingual Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Lynn M.; Dowling, Julie A.; Boardman, Jason D.; Ellison, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines local contextual conditions that influence opposition to bilingual education among non-Hispanic Whites, net of individual-level characteristics. Data from the Texas Poll (N = 615) are used in conjunction with U.S. Census data to test five competing hypotheses using binomial and multinomial logistic regression models. Our…

  1. Synthesis study of Texas signal control systems : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, several versions of traffic control systems have been established across the United States and within the state of Texas. There is a growing need to identify the various versions of these systems that exist, including the system hard...

  2. A Critical Policy Analysis of Texas' "Closing the Gaps 2015"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Katherine Cumings; Thackik, Stefani Leigh

    2016-01-01

    This critical policy analysis uses critical race theory to provide a counter narrative to the P-16 initiative in Texas known as "Closing the Gaps 2015". Findings indicate that while these reforms aim to increase educational access and achievement for people of color, they fall short of addressing systemic inequities such as enduring…

  3. Bullied Status and Physical Activity in Texas Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Kathleen R.; Pérez, Adriana; Saxton, Debra L.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Springer, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the association between having been bullied at school during the past 6 months ("bullied status") and not meeting physical activity (PA) recommendations of 60 minutes of daily PA during the past week among 8th- and 11th-grade Texas adolescents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine this…

  4. Texas Agricultural Science Teachers' Attitudes toward Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ryan; Williams, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The researchers sought to find the Agricultural Science teachers' attitude toward five innovations (Computer-Aided Design, Record Books, E-Mail Career Development Event Registration, and World Wide Web) of information technology. The population for this study consisted of all 333 secondary Agricultural science teachers from Texas FFA Areas V and…

  5. Installation Restoration Program. Phase I. Records Search, Reese, AFB, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Reese AFB is located within the Brazos iver Basin. The Brazoes River drains approximately 45,000 square miles Li Texas and New Mexico. Dralnage is... robotics . He me the certified industrial hygienist and consultant for A.T. K oaney lanagemeat Consultants. In addition to the routine oecupational safety

  6. Research to develop an ITS strategic plan for Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    TxDOTs mission is to provide safe and reliable transportation solutions for the citizens of Texas. Intelligent : transportation systems (ITS) can play a pivotal role in meeting that mission. TxDOT can take advantage of : advanced and emerging tech...

  7. Market, Legislation Make Wind an Attractive Investment in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2001-06-01

    This brochure, part of the SEP Stellar Projects series, covers development of wind energy in Texas due to favorable legislation and public policy and favorable market forces. Those odd shaped structures popping up out in West Texas aren't funny looking oil rigs and they're not genetically altered cotton plants. They're wind turbines, an old technology with a 21st century update. Once too expensive for commercial production, the addition of computers to wind turbines and the rise in fossil fuel prices has brought the cost of wind-generated electricity in line with other power sources. A push by the 1999 Legislature to restructure the retail electric power market put in place rules that encourage wind generation. One rule requires Texas utilities to get an additional 2,000 megawatts of their power from renewable resources such as wind and solar power by 2009. Rules easing the cost of transmitting electricity from remote areas also aid the development of wind farms in West Texas.

  8. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercultural Development Research Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This infographic shows how Texas public schools are losing one out of four students. The statistics show that schools are twice as likely to lose Hispanic students and Black students before they graduate, and universal high school education is at least a quarter of a century away. The flyer also provides information on getting informed, getting…

  9. Texas Teacher Evaluation & Support System (T-TESS) Appraiser Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Texas Education Agency's (TEA) approved instrument for evaluating teachers, the Professional Development and Appraisal System (PDAS), was the primary instrument used by 86 percent of local education agencies (LEAs) in the state and has been in place since 1997. In acknowledging the vital roles teachers play in student achievement, and based on…

  10. Rural Teacher's Perceptions of Safety on Texas High School Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ronald J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study used narrative inquiry to explore the perceptions of safety of rural Texas high school teachers as it related to a campus intruder or active shooter. The investigator utilized Creswell's (2012) six steps in analyzing and interpreting the qualitative data. The results of the study showed that…

  11. Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

  12. Wildlife Contact Rates at Artificial Feeding Sites in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Tyler A.; Long, David B.; Shriner, Susan A.

    2013-06-01

    Given the popularity of feeding white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) in Texas and the increasing amount of corn that is distributed, more information is needed on the impacts of this activity on non-target wildlife. Our objectives were to report visitation, intra- and interspecific contact, and contact rates of wildlife at artificial feeding sites in Texas. Our study was conducted at three sites in Kleberg and Nueces counties, Texas. We trapped animals from February to April and August to September, 2009 and marked animals with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. At each site and season, we placed one feeder system containing a PIT tag reader within 600 m of trap locations. Readers detected PIT tags from a distance of 25 cm. We determined a contact event to occur when two different PIT tags were detected by feeder systems within 5 s. We recorded 62,719 passes by raccoons ( Procyon lotor), 103,512 passes by collared peccaries ( Pecari tajacu), 2,923 passes by feral swine ( Sus scrofa), 1,336 passes by fox squirrels ( Sciurus niger), and no passes by opossums ( Didelphis virginiana) at feeder systems. For site-season combinations in which contact events occurred, we found intraspecific contact rates (contacts per day) for raccoons, collared peccaries, and feral swine to be 0.81-124.77, 0.69-38.08, and 0.0-0.66, respectively. Throughout our study we distributed ~2,625 kg of whole kernel corn, which resulted in 6,351 contact events between marked wildlife (2.4 contacts per kg of corn). If 136 million kg of corn is distributed in Texas annually, we would expect >5.2 billion unnatural contact events between wildlife would result from this activity each year in Texas. Consequently, we do not believe that it is wise for natural resource managers to maintain artificial feeding sites for white-tailed deer or other wildlife due to pathogen transmission risks.

  13. Manpower Planning for the Wastewater Treatment Workforce of Texas: An Emerging Function. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Texas Water Utilities Association (58th, College Station, Texas, March, 1976).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tom

    This paper, presented at the 58th annual meeting of the Texas Water Utilities Association, attempts to point out the need for manpower planning for the wastewater treatment workforce of Texas. As reasons for manpower planning, this document discloses estimates of 1400-1500 new jobs, 1300 of which will be in wastewater treatment facilities of 1 MGD…

  14. Archaeological Investigations at the San Gabriel Reservoir Districts, Central Texas. Volume 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    89. Burial P17 oblique occlusal view of mandible showing supernumerary teeth behind first premolars .. ......... ... 351 90. Burial #17 skull and...and it projects just slightly into the nasal cavity. The third individual (#17), a male, has very distinct, fully formed supernumerary teeth bilaterally...corresponding pair are normal. 350 SI I I Fig. 89. Burial #17 oblique occlusal view of mandible showing supernumerary teeth behind first premolars. 351

  15. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 2. Confirmation/Quantification Stage 1. Bergstrom AFB, Texas. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    tm 4 ɜ#v<- **»«*? A**fH i/**-»*’ • F 7t/£ «^ r*W 5*r**%r<cJ ~Z.on< \\i A’i. 3 IC UMM 5S J.S J **»*- f6 J. .« 27 sir 3*» £rM/tLLV...Rick A. Belan Project Director RAB:sg Attachment H-120 ^«P^—iw^^,«--^-^*wg ATTACHMENT 1 H-121 mTS 6-: 1 I As -oi ^ acca - -03

  16. Environmental and Cultural Impact Proposed Tennessee Colony Reservoir, Trinity River, Texas. Volume V. Appendix G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of the Lithosphere The secondary short range (within five years) ef- fects on the lithosphere will be: ... water in or on the soil intefering ...130 .. .water in or on the soil intefering with plant qrowth or cul tivation. a medium risk of erosion unless close-growing plant cover is maintained

  17. Archaeological Investigations at the San Gabriel Reservoir Districts, Central Texas. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    m~ LO ~) . Lc LA 0; +-)4 0 -W4 -4 cmJ cn -4 (𔃾 1- 00 (cn 4D r, cn a,- cm 4--) 0 0 0-C 3C I *CD S- 1 > aA %a 0 0% 0 0% 00 0NoC oM cn SLA C’. 0 ’J 1 LA...Admittedly, culture-historical models include explanatory concepts such as acculturation , diffusion and population integration; however, no attempt is

  18. Archaeological Investigations at the San Gabriel Reservoir Districts, Central Texas. Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    prairie three-awn) I P Aristida purpurea Nutt. ( Purple three-awn T Arundo donx L. (glantreed) It (ponds, Sothriochloa ischaeewe (L.) Kang. vat...whom he had been having an affair. How he came to Hoxie and what happened to the 1woman, Mrs. Redwood did not know but Woods drank a lot and slept in...decorated with purple Iflowers, a dresser which originally went with a bedroom sutie, a l chair, a leather backed probably Master’s Host chair of a set of

  19. Archaeological Investigations at the San Gabriel Reservoir Districts Central Texas. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    Danna Allison, who wanted money per acre for rent rather than the "thirds and fourths" arrangement Mr. David preferred. Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Bryan and son...the gaping hole of the old basement which had been used as a dump through the years. It was about 1953 that Mrs. Danna Allison hired "Shorty" Renicanek...Allison states there are 6-8 pieces of furniture in his and Mr. Carradine’s possession. Mrs. Danna Allison stated that Agnes Allison Whatley and her sister

  20. Oak bark allometry and fire survival strategies in the Chihuahuan desert Sky Islands, Texas, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan W Schwilk

    Full Text Available Trees may survive fire through persistence of above or below ground structures. Investment in bark aids in above-ground survival while investment in carbohydrate storage aids in recovery through resprouting and is especially important following above-ground tissue loss. We investigated bark allocation and carbohydrate investment in eight common oak (Quercus species of Sky Island mountain ranges in west Texas. We hypothesized that relative investment in bark and carbohydrates changes with tree age and with fire regime: We predicted delayed investment in bark (positive allometry and early investment in carbohydrates (negative allometry under lower frequency, high severity fire regimes found in wetter microclimates. Common oaks of the Texas Trans-Pecos region (Quercus emoryi, Q. gambelii, Q. gravesii, Q. grisea, Q. hypoleucoides, Q. muehlenbergii, and Q. pungens were sampled in three mountain ranges with historically mixed fire regimes: the Chisos Mountains, the Davis Mountains and the Guadalupe Mountains. Bark thickness was measured on individuals representing the full span of sizes found. Carbohydrate concentration in taproots was measured after initial leaf flush. Bark thickness was compared to bole diameter and allometries were analyzed using major axis regression on log-transformed measurements. We found that bark allocation strategies varied among species that can co-occur but have different habitat preferences. Investment patterns in bark were related to soil moisture preference and drought tolerance and, by proxy, to expected fire regime. Dry site species had shallower allometries with allometric coefficients ranging from less than one (negative allometry to near one (isometric investment. Wet site species, on the other hand, had larger allometric coefficients, indicating delayed investment to defense. Contrary to our expectation, root carbohydrate concentrations were similar across all species and sizes, suggesting that any differences in

  1. Oak bark allometry and fire survival strategies in the Chihuahuan desert Sky Islands, Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwilk, Dylan W; Gaetani, Maria S; Poulos, Helen M

    2013-01-01

    Trees may survive fire through persistence of above or below ground structures. Investment in bark aids in above-ground survival while investment in carbohydrate storage aids in recovery through resprouting and is especially important following above-ground tissue loss. We investigated bark allocation and carbohydrate investment in eight common oak (Quercus) species of Sky Island mountain ranges in west Texas. We hypothesized that relative investment in bark and carbohydrates changes with tree age and with fire regime: We predicted delayed investment in bark (positive allometry) and early investment in carbohydrates (negative allometry) under lower frequency, high severity fire regimes found in wetter microclimates. Common oaks of the Texas Trans-Pecos region (Quercus emoryi, Q. gambelii, Q. gravesii, Q. grisea, Q. hypoleucoides, Q. muehlenbergii, and Q. pungens) were sampled in three mountain ranges with historically mixed fire regimes: the Chisos Mountains, the Davis Mountains and the Guadalupe Mountains. Bark thickness was measured on individuals representing the full span of sizes found. Carbohydrate concentration in taproots was measured after initial leaf flush. Bark thickness was compared to bole diameter and allometries were analyzed using major axis regression on log-transformed measurements. We found that bark allocation strategies varied among species that can co-occur but have different habitat preferences. Investment patterns in bark were related to soil moisture preference and drought tolerance and, by proxy, to expected fire regime. Dry site species had shallower allometries with allometric coefficients ranging from less than one (negative allometry) to near one (isometric investment). Wet site species, on the other hand, had larger allometric coefficients, indicating delayed investment to defense. Contrary to our expectation, root carbohydrate concentrations were similar across all species and sizes, suggesting that any differences in below ground

  2. 2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izatt, R. D.; Lerch, R. E.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

  3. Addiction treatment outcomes, process and change: Texas Institute of Behavioral Research at Texas Christian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D Dwayne; Joe, George W; Dansereau, Donald F; Flynn, Patrick M

    2011-10-01

    For more than 40 years the Texas Institute of Behavioral Research (IBR) has given special attention to assessment and evaluation of drug user populations, addiction treatment services and various cognitive and behavioral interventions. Emphasis has been on studies in real-world settings and the use of multivariate methodologies to address evaluation issues within the context of longitudinal natural designs. Historically, its program of addiction treatment research may be divided into three sequential epochs-the first era dealt mainly with client assessment and its role in treatment outcome and evaluation (1969-89), the second focused upon modeling the treatment process and the importance of conceptual frameworks (1989-2009) in explaining the relationships among treatment environment, client attributes, treatment process and outcome, and the third (and current) era has expanded into studying tactical deployment of innovations and implementation. Recent projects focus upon adapting and implementing innovations for improving early engagement in adolescent residential treatment settings and drug-dependent criminal justice populations. Related issues include the spread of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other infectious diseases, organizational and systems functioning, treatment costs and process related to implementation of evidence-based practices. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs

  5. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  6. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor

  7. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

  8. Fluids in subsurface environments : A symposium : Transactions of the 6th annual meeting of the Southwestern Federation of Geological Societies, at Midland, Texas, January 30, 31 and February 1, 1964. A. Young and J.E. Galley (editors). Am. Assoc. Petrol. Geologists, Tulsa, Okla., 1965, 414 pp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manten, A.A.

    1966-01-01

    The volume under review - the proceedings of the annual meeting of the Southwestern (U.S.) Federation of Geological Societies - has a very strong regional accent in its array of reports, which largely concentrate on the subsurface fluids in the Texas-New Mexico area. Because of, or despite this

  9. Texas Instruments Technical Seminar: Power Management and Wireless

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Monday 6 November TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR 14:00 to 17:30 - Training Centre Auditorium (bldg. 593) Texas Instruments Technical Seminar: Power Management and Wireless Michael Scholtholt, Field Application Engineer / TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (US, D, CH) The range of power management products available today offers the possibility to find the best solution for each application. To select the right product it is therefore necessary to understand system requirements, how power supply products work, and where they differentiate. This Technical Training Seminar will also present an overview of how to choose the right RF platform based on markets and applications: nowadays almost everbody has at least one wireless product in use, and this tendency seems to increase significantly. Power Management Voltage mode vs. current mode control Differentiating DC/DC converters by analyzing control and compensation schemes: line / load regulation, transient response, BOM, board space, ease-of-use Introduction to evalu...

  10. Texas Instruments Technical Seminar: Power Management and Wireless

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Monday 6 November TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR 14:00 to 17:30 - Training Centre Auditorium (bldg. 593) Texas Instruments Technical Seminar: Power Management and Wireless Michael Scholtholt, Field Application Engineer / TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (US, D, CH) The range of power management products available today offers the possibility to find the best solution for each application. To select the right product it is therefore necessary to understand system requirements, how power supply products work, and where they differentiate. This Technical Training Seminar will also present an overview of how to choose the right RF platform based on markets and applications: nowadays almost everbody has at least one wireless product in use, and this tendency seems to increase significantly. Power Management Voltage mode vs. current mode control Differentiating DC/DC converters by analyzing control and compensation schemes: line / load regulation, transient response, BOM, board space, ease-of-use Introduction to evaluati...

  11. THE RELIGIOUS ECONOMY OF TEXAS: AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTWE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Lile

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the changing market shares of major Texas religious groups during this century. Market shares are computed by dividing membership by Texas population. Results show that certain religious groups (firms have performed much better in terms of market share than others. The better performers are the more conservative Protestant denominations along with the Roman Catholic Church. Groups losing market share tendto be the more liberal Protestant denominations. This finding would appear to be consistent with Niebuhr’s church-sect theory which, among other things, predicts that religious groups (sects characterized by a high degree of tension with society grow whereas groups (churches characterized by alow degree of tension with society tend to decline.

  12. Operational reactivity considerations of Texas A and M TRIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, John D.; Schad, Douglas R.

    1970-01-01

    The Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor was converted from a 100 kW MTR type core to a modified 1 MW TRIGA Mark III core in August, 1968. The TRIGA core has solved many of the low neutron flux problems without requiring a forced cooled reactor. However, the TRIGA core has presented some operational problems as the results of its reactivity requirements. Several solutions have been proposed to eliminate the problem of burnup. The use of fueled followers is presently being implemented at Texas A and M, but this is only a temporary solution. A final solution is the use of FLIP fuel which is presently under development. It incorporates a burnable poison in the fuel matrix, which results in a predicted lifetime of 9 MW-years. A decision to use this fuel will depend on the results of the PRNC conversion

  13. Potential of sustainable biomass production systems in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, M.A.; Hussey, M.A.; Wiselogel, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Biomass production for liquid fuels feedstock from systems based on warm-season perennial grasses (WSPG) offers a sustainable alternative for forage-livestock producers in Texas. Such systems also would enhance diversity and flexibility in current production systems. Research is needed to incorporate biomass production for liquid fuels, chemicals, and electrical power into current forage-livestock management systems. Our research objectives were to (i) document the potential of several WSPG in diverse Texas environments for biomass feedstock production, (ii) conduct fundamental research on morphological development of WSPG to enhance management for biomass feedstock production, (iii) examine current on-farm production systems for opportunities to incorporate biomass production, and (iv) determine feedstock quality and stability during storage

  14. 2014 Texas Military Value Task Force: Preparing for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    important issue that is never completely solved, but can be the “poison pill ” for mission growth or even result in an installation closure. The official...vary from $30M-$150M. Community’s targeted smart investment would improve military value. Historic renovation of facilities significantly...increases cost to DoD. Action & Desired Outcome: Communities fund smart investment candidates that meet 4A & 4B funding criteria. Texas legislature

  15. Phytoremediation of Groundwater at Air Force Plant 4, Carswell, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    ability of trees to act as pumps was noted in the late 19th century when Eucalyptus trees were planted in Italy and Algeria to dry up marshes. The...development of short rotation crops such as cottonwoods, hybrid poplar, willow, eucalyptus , or other energy crops, requires consideration of operational...from Mississippi, Arkansas, and Texas suffered significant dieback during the winter. Ying et. al. concluded that trees from southern latitudes were

  16. Steven Hawking to visit Texas A&M in spring

    CERN Multimedia

    Xavier, D

    2002-01-01

    Stephen Hawking will visit Texas A&M University from Feb. 24 to March 21 2003 to participate in the inaugural meeting of the George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics. This institute will bring several of the world's top physicists to A&M for a month-long exploration of the latest ideas on topics ranging from superstrings to M-theory and supergravity (1/2 page).

  17. 2014 Fort Hood, Texas, mass casualty incident: reviews and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Strommen, Joshua J.; Waterman, Scott M.; Mitchell, Christopher A.; Grogan, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    On April 2, 2014, in Fort Hood, Texas, an active shooter incident occurred where four active duty soldiers were tragically killed. Active shooter incidents are becoming alarmingly more frequent over the last decade in the USA. The authors provide a detailed account of the events that occurred within the hospital and an evaluation of the triage decisions made on that day. A detailed review of mass casualty preparedness and the general approach to triage processes are also described.

  18. Reaching the Texas dental goals of healthy people 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Bill

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has promoted Healthy People 2010, which is a set of national health objectives for the nation to achieve over the first decade of the new century (1). Texas has not yet met its target of 50 percent of 8-year-old children with dental sealants having been placed on their 6-year molars, which is one of the Healthy People 2010 goals. An assessment of the dental needs of children in Tarrant County, Texas, was initiated by the JPS Health Network (named after John Peter Smith). The JPS Health Network established the Healthy Smiles program to address the dental needs of the students in this county because a school based dental sealant program would be effective in reducing dental decay. Approved Title One elementary schools in Tarrant County were scheduled for dental screenings, education, and fluoride and dental sealant applications. Students were given visual dental screenings and classified as to future dental needs. First grade students received fluoride varnish and second and third grade students received fluoride and dental sealants. For the 2010-2011 school year: A total of 28,322 students were seen by dental professionals from the JPS Health Network; 8,348 dental sealants were placed; and 11,825 fluoride applications were given by dental staff. The JPS Health Network Healthy Smiles Program proved to be an effective way to deliver oral preventive care and dental education to a large number of low-income students. Dental caries prevention programs such as Healthy Smiles could help Texas reach its goals for improved oral health for the children of Texas.

  19. Bilateral adrenal histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent man from Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J. Rog

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated histoplasmosis affecting the adrenal gland(s of immunocompetent adults is a very rare infection. Here, we present a case of bilateral adrenal histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent, 62-year-old gentleman from Texas along with a brief review of the published literature. Given the risk of patient decompensation secondary to adrenal insufficiency and the wide availability of effective treatments, adrenal histoplasmosis must be considered even in immunocompetent adults who acquire adrenal masses.

  20. Bilateral adrenal histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent man from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rog, Colin J; Rosen, Daniel G; Gannon, Francis H

    2016-12-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis affecting the adrenal gland(s) of immunocompetent adults is a very rare infection. Here, we present a case of bilateral adrenal histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent, 62-year-old gentleman from Texas along with a brief review of the published literature. Given the risk of patient decompensation secondary to adrenal insufficiency and the wide availability of effective treatments, adrenal histoplasmosis must be considered even in immunocompetent adults who acquire adrenal masses.

  1. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering. Dept. of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences

    2016-10-28

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostics and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015, allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing, and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn-62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using a) a subcritical aqueous target system and b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator-generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011 and, due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory, it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  2. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostic and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015, allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing, and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn- 62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using (a) a subcritical aqueous target system and (b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator-generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011; due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory, it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  3. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, Gamal

    2016-01-01

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostic and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015, allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing, and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn- 62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using (a) a subcritical aqueous target system and (b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator-generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011; due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory, it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  4. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, Gamal; M Univ., College Station, TX

    2016-01-01

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostics and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015, allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing, and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn-62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using a) a subcritical aqueous target system and b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator-generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011 and, due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory, it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  5. Potential impact of neonicotinoid use on Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in Texas: A historical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Hannah M H; Mora, Miguel A; Brightsmith, Donald J; Navarro-Alberto, Jorge A

    2018-01-01

    The widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides in recent years has led to increasing environmental concern, including impacts to avian populations. In Texas and across their range, Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) habitat frequently overlaps cultivated cropland protected by neonicotinoids. To address the effects of neonicotinoid use on bobwhites in Texas, we conducted a historical analysis from 1978-2012 in Texas' ecological regions using quail count data collected from North American Breeding Bird Survey and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and neonicotinoid use data from the U.S. Geological Survey. We considered bobwhite abundance, neonicotinoid use, climate, and land-use variables in our analysis. Neonicotinoid use was significantly (pTexas Plains ecological regions in the time periods following neonicotinoid introduction (1994-2003) or after their widespread use (2004-2012). Our analyses suggest that the use of neonicotinoid insecticides may negatively affect bobwhite populations in crop-producing regions of Texas.

  6. Texas Teacher at Sea on the BOLIVAR Project Geophysical Cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, M.; Sullivan, S.; Ellins, K.

    2004-12-01

    UTIG provides K-12 teachers with research experiences in field programs that involve UTIG scientists. I am a 6th-9th grade science teacher in Van Vleck, Texas and in April 2004 I sailed to the southeastern Caribbean aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing as a member of the BOLIVAR Project alongside scientists from the U.S. and Venezuela. Our goal was collect seismic data to image the crust and mantle beneath the Caribbean as part of a study of the tectonic processes accompanying different stages of the Caribbean arc/South America continental collision process. Throughout the 52-day cruise I worked as a watch stander, interpreted newly collected seismic reflection data, helped deploy the streamer, maintained a cruise blog (a chronological journal weblog documenting personal thoughts about my experience), spoke with students in Texas with the telephone on loan from Iridium Satellite Solutions, and responded to email inquiries from shore-based students. It was hard work, but most importantly, a voyage of discovery. With guidance from scientists and GK-12 Fellows at UTIG, I am using my experience and the data collected as the basis for K-12 curriculum resources, including learning activities and a video documentary. Support for my participation and post-cruise activities was provided by the NSF and the Trull Foundation in Texas. If given the opportunity to do this again, I would, without reservation!

  7. Texas market profile: soil and groundwater decontamination sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The soil and groundwater decontamination market in Texas generated $7 billion in earnings in 1997 and should reach almost $9 billion in 2002. While Texas has introduced voluntary clean-up programs, decontamination is required at more than 200,000 sites. Pollution has arisen from such industrial sectors as chemicals, crude oil and natural gas. In Texas, government agency decontamination activities provide major business opportunities. As in the base of the environmental sector as a whole, economic factors are gradually taking over from regulation as the prime demand drivers. Cost and risk are major concerns for clients. Because the incentive to reduce costs and the trend toward contracting out and privatization are becoming stronger, companies with specialized technologies have opportunities in this market. The government is the main client for environmental restoration services, but the private sector is accounting for an increased share of the market. Aspects of market access discussed include: implications of NAFTA and 'Buy America', ATA carnets, the Environmental Technology Verification Program, centralized database, federal government contracting announcements, partnerships, and payment conditions

  8. The prevalence of academic dishonesty in Texas dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhney, Kelly A; Gutmann, Marylou E; Schneiderman, Emet; DeWald, Janice P; McCann, Ann; Campbell, Patricia R

    2008-11-01

    The media has given much attention to the academic cheating crisis in America. A majority of college students believe that, in today's global environment, it is necessary to cheat in order to get ahead and to compete with their peers. The prevalence and attitudes concerning academic dishonesty of health professions students, including those in medical, dental, and nursing schools, have been extensively researched. No such studies exist in the discipline of dental hygiene. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cheating in Texas dental hygiene programs. Four hundred surveys were mailed to twenty Texas dental hygiene schools for graduating students to complete. A total of 289 usable surveys was returned for a response rate of 72.25 percent. Data were analyzed using SPSS with frequencies and chi-square tests. Findings from this study reveal that 86.5 percent of graduating Texas dental hygiene students have cheated a minimum of one time during matriculation. Students identified the demands of what they considered academic overload as the primary justification for cheating behavior.

  9. Phosphine Exposure Among Emergency Responders - Amarillo, Texas, January 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emily M; Patel, Ketki; Victory, Kerton R; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Nogueira, Leticia M; Bojes, Heidi K

    2018-04-06

    Phosphine is a highly toxic gas that forms when aluminum phosphide, a restricted-use pesticide* typically used in agricultural settings, reacts with water. Acute exposure can lead to a wide range of respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal symptoms, and can be fatal (1). On January 2, 2017, the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) was notified by the Texas Panhandle Poison Center of an acute phosphine exposure incident in Amarillo, Texas. DSHS investigated potential occupational phosphine exposures among the 51 on-scene emergency responders; 40 (78.4%) did not use respiratory protection during response operations. Fifteen (37.5%) of these 40 responders received medical care for symptoms or as a precaution after the incident, and seven (17.5%) reported new or worsening symptoms consistent with phosphine exposure within 24 hours of the incident. Emergency response organizations should ensure that appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is used during all incidents when an unknown hazardous substance is suspected. Additional evaluation is needed to identify targeted interventions that increase emergency responder PPE use during this type of incident.

  10. Interim status of the Texas uranium survey experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupiter, C.; Wollenberg, H.

    1974-01-01

    The objective of the Texas uranium survey experiment is to evaluate an improved method for prospecting for uranium by determining correlations among (a) geologic analysis, (b) soil sample radiochemical analysis, (c) aerial radiometric data, (d) aerial infrared scans, and (e) aerophotographic data. Although aerial radiometric measurements have been used previously in mineral prospecting, the development of useful correlative techniques based on analysis of data from large terrestrial areas employing the five parameters (a through e, above) remains to be evaluated, and could be of significant value to the need for establishing uranium resource pools to meet the nation's energy crisis. The Texas uranium survey field experiment began on June 13, 1973, employing a Martin-404 aircraft to fly gamma-ray recording equipment at a 500-ft altitude over two areas in southeast Texas. The areas surveyed are referred to as the Dubose area (approximately 120 sq. miles) and the Clay West area (approximately 24 sq. miles). This document briefly summarizes the work which has been done, describes the kind and quality of calibrations and data analysis carried out thus far and outlines recommended additional work which would bring the experiment to some degree of completion, providing a basis for evaluating the techniques

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Ray Point Site, Ray Point, Texas. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Results are reported from an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Ray Point, Texas. The Phase II--Title I services generally include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of soil sampling and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. About 490,000 tons of ore were processed at this mill with all of the uranium sold on the commercial market. None was sold to the AEC; therefore, this report focuses on a physical description of the site and the identification of radiation pathways. No remedial action options were formulated for the site, inasmuch as none of the uranium was sold to the AEC and Exxon Corporation has agreed to perform all actions required by the State of Texas. Radon gas release from the tailings at the Ray Point site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. Exxon is also studying the feasibility of reprocessing the tailings

  12. Impact of evaporite dissolution and collapse on highways and other cultural features in the Texas Panhandle and Eastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, W.W.; Gustavson, T.C.; Alhades, A.B.; Hoadley, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Geological investigations in the Texas Panhandle and eastern New Mexico indicate that regional subsurface dissolution of Permian evaporites has occurred and is an ongoing process. Evidence of removal of large volumes of evaporites (mainly halite) and collapse of overlying beds is demonstrated by cross sections constructed from gamma-ray logs. Surface manifestation of subsurface dissolution and collapse is clearly shown in Hall County, Texas, where over 400 sinkholes and undrained depressions have been identified from aerial photographs. Sinkhole diameters up to approximately 100 m (300 ft) and depths to 15 m (50 ft) have been observed. Eleven active northeast- and southwest-trending fractures and faults have been recognizd, some of which are demonstrated as patched sections of highways. Formation of collapse features and faults that damage highways is a recognized problem in the region. Stock tanks and large reservors are also affected to a lesser degree. Dissolution and collapse pose difficult problems for geologists, highway engineers, and maintenance crews. Areas of active subsurface dissolution have been identified, but development of collapse features and faults at the surface generally follows no predictable pattern. The history of, and potential for, evaporite dissolution sould be investigated in each area before construction of highways, reservoirs, and stock tanks. Areas with high densities of collapse features, fractures, and faults should be avoided when possible

  13. Potential impact of neonicotinoid use on Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in Texas: A historical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ertl, Hannah M. H.; Mora, Miguel A.; Brightsmith, Donald J.; Navarro-Alberto, Jorge A.

    2018-01-01

    The widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides in recent years has led to increasing environmental concern, including impacts to avian populations. In Texas and across their range, Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) habitat frequently overlaps cultivated cropland protected by neonicotinoids. To address the effects of neonicotinoid use on bobwhites in Texas, we conducted a historical analysis from 1978-2012 in Texas' ecological regions using quail count data collected from North America...

  14. Assessing aquifer storage and recovery feasibility in the Gulf Coastal Plains of Texas

    OpenAIRE

    W. Benjamin Smith; Gretchen R. Miller; Zhuping Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Study region: The Gulf Coast and Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer systems in the Gulf Coastal Plains of Texas. Study focus: Aquifer storage and recovery is a water storage alternative that is underutilized in Texas, a state with both long periods of drought and high intensity storms. Future water storage plans in Texas almost exclusively rely on surface reservoirs, subject to high evaporative losses. This study seeks to identify sites where aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) may be successful, especial...

  15. Political constraints on government cartelization: the case of oil production regulation in Texas and Saudi Arabia.

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Libecap; James L. Smith

    2001-01-01

    We examine government cartelization efforts in crude oil production. Texas and Saudi Arabia are alleged to act as swing producers to maintain the interstate (1933-1972) and OPEC (1973 on) oil cartels respectively. We analyze the political constraints that affected the ability of Texas and Saudi Arabia to act as residual producers within their respective cartels. In the case of Texas, political factors molded individual firm production quotas, advantaging high-cost producers and hence, reducin...

  16. Predicting Student Success on the Texas Chemistry STAAR Test: A Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Johnson, Jared

    2012-01-01

    Background: The context is the new Texas STAAR end-of-course testing program. Purpose: The authors developed a logistic regression model to predict who would pass-or-fail the new Texas chemistry STAAR end-of-course exam. Setting: Robert E. Lee High School (5A) with an enrollment of 2700 students, Tyler, Texas. Date of the study was the 2011-2012…

  17. Incidence and risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in Texas Latinos: implications for prevention research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie G Ramirez

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is increasing in the U.S. despite a decline in cancer overall. Latinos have higher rates of HCC than the general population according to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER Program. Not included in SEER, Texas Latinos make up one-fifth of the U.S. Latino population. To determine whether HCC incidence differs among U.S. and Texas Latinos, this descriptive study compares HCC incidence from 1995 through 2006 among three Latino populations: U.S. SEER, Texas overall and a South Texas subset. To identify lines of prevention research, we compare prevalence of known HCC risk factors among these Latino groups.Data were collected from the U.S. SEER Program, Texas Cancer Registry and Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS. Annual age-specific and age-adjusted HCC incidence rates, annual percent changes (APCs and 95% confidence intervals were calculated as well as prevalence of obesity, diabetes, heavy alcohol use and cigarette smoking.Of the three Latino groups compared, South Texas Latinos had the highest age-adjusted HCC incidence rates and SEER Latinos had the lowest (10.6/100,000 (10.1-11.1 and 7.5/100,000 (7.2-7.7, respectively. HCC incidence significantly increased over time (APCs>0 among Latinos in all three geographic groups. Between 1995 and 2006, there was an increase in obesity among all three populations, and obesity was highest among South Texas Latinos. Diabetes increased among U.S. Latinos, and Latino women in South Texas had significantly higher diabetes prevalence than U.S. Latino women. Cigarette smoking and heavy alcohol use were similar among groups.The incidence of HCC among Latinos in South Texas is higher than elsewhere in the United States. Higher rates of HCC among Texas and South Texas Latinos may be associated with greater prevalence of obesity and diabetes, risk factors for HCC that are amenable to intervention.

  18. An aerial radiological survey of the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station and surrounding area, Bay City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.M.

    1988-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS) near Bay City, Texas, during the period 25 March to 4 April 1988. The purpose of the 259-square-kilometer (100-square-mile) survey was to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the plant and surrounding area. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. Exposure rates were observed up to 10μR/h over land. No areas of enhanced exposure rates were observed. Ground-based exposure rate measurements and soil samples were obtained to support the aerial data. Oblique aerial photographs of the plant were also acquired during the survey. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. The impact of the Texas public school nutrition policy on student food selection and sales in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Karen W; Watson, Kathleen B

    2009-04-01

    We assessed the statewide impact of the 2004 Texas Public School Nutrition Policy on foods and beverages served or sold in schools. We collected lunch food production records from 47 schools in 11 Texas school districts for the school years before (2003-2004) and after (2004-2005) policy implementation. Cafeteria servings of fruit, vegetables (regular and fried), and milk served each day were calculated. Twenty-three schools from 5 districts provided records of à la carte sales of candy, chips, desserts, drinks, ice cream, and water. We examined aggregated school-level differences in total items served or sold per day per student between study years. School demographics were similar to state data. Regardless of district and school size, cafeterias served significantly fewer high-fat vegetable items per student postpolicy (P School food policy changes have improved foods served or sold to students. It is not known whether improved lunch choices influence consumption for the whole day.

  20. Distribution of indoor radon concentrations and uranium-bearing rocks in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudak, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare regional patterns of indoor radon concentration with uranium-bearing rock zones and county populations in Texas. Zones yielding radon concentrations that are relatively high for Texas include shale and sandstone in northwest Texas; red beds in north-central Texas; felsic volcanic rocks in west Texas; and sandstone, limestone, and igneous rocks in central Texas. Located in northwest Tecas, only five of the 202 counties evaluated have mean indoor radon concentrations above 4.0 pCi l -1 . Two of those counties have populations above the state median of 20115. The highest county mean concentration is 8.8 pCi l -1 . Results of the study suggest that (1) regional geology influences indoor radon concentrations in Texas, (2) statewide, the radon concentrations are relatively low, (3) highly populated counties do not coincide with regions of high indoor radon concentration, and (4) regions that may warrant further monitoring include northwest Texas and, to a lesser degree, west and central Texas. (orig.)

  1. USGS Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Christopher J.; Baldys, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas provides early detection and monitoring of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) by using a holistic suite of detection methods. The program is designed to assess zebra mussel occurrence, distribution, and densities in north Texas waters by using four approaches: (1) SCUBA diving, (2) water-sample collection with plankton tow nets (followed by laboratory analyses), (3) artificial substrates, and (4) water-quality sampling. Data collected during this type of monitoring can assist rapid response efforts and can be used to quantify the economic and ecological effects of zebra mussels in the north Texas area. Monitoring under this program began in April 2010. The presence of large zebra mussel populations often causes undesirable economic and ecological effects, including damage to water-processing infrastructure and hydroelectric powerplants (with an estimated 10-year cost of $3.1 billion), displacement of native mussels, increases in concentrations of certain species of cyanobacteria, and increases in concentrations of geosmin (an organic compound that results in taste and odor issues in water). Since no large-scale, environmentally safe eradication method has been developed for zebra mussels, it is difficult to remove established populations. Broad physicochemical adaptability, prolific reproductive capacity, and rapid dispersal methods have enabled zebra mussels, within a period of about 20 years, to establish populations under differing environmental conditions across much of the eastern part of the United States. In Texas, the presence of zebra mussels was first confirmed in April 2009 in Lake Texoma in the Red River Basin along the Texas-Oklahoma border. They were most likely introduced into Lake Texoma through overland transport from an infested water body. Since then, the presence of zebra mussels has been reported in both the Red River and Washita River arms of Lake Texoma, in

  2. Revitalizing a mature oil play: Strategies for finding and producing unrecovered oil in frio fluvial-deltaic sandstone reservoirs at South Texas. Annual report, October 1994--October 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtz, M.; Knox, P.; McRae, L. [and others

    1996-02-01

    The Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone oil play of South Texas has produced nearly 1 billion barrels of oil, yet it still contains about 1.6 billion barrels of unrecovered mobile oil and nearly the same amount of residual oil resources. Interwell-scale geologic facise models of Frio Fluvial-deltaic reservoirs are being combined with engineering assessments and geophysical evaluations in order to determine the controls that these characteristics exert on the location and volume or unrecovered mobile and residual oil. Progress in the third year centered on technology transfer. An overview of project tasks is presented.

  3. Summary of the Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Falls City Site, Falls City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. Services included taking soil samples, the performance of radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The two alternative remedial action options presented include on-site and off-site cleanup, fencing, and hydrological monitoring and, in addition, stabilization of pile 2 with 2 ft of cover material. The costs are $1.84 million and $2.45 million

  4. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Falls City Site, Falls City, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. Services included taking soil samples, the performance of radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The two alternative remedial action options presented include on-site and off-site cleanup, fencing, and hydrological monitoring, and in addition, stabilization of pile 2 with 2 ft of cover material. The costs are $1.84 million for Option I and $2.45 million for Option II.

  5. In-situ leaching of South Texas uranium ores - 2. Oxidative removal of adsorbed ammonium ions with sodium hypochlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Johnson, W.F.; Fletcher, A.; Venuto, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports a laboratory study of the oxidative destruction, by sodium hypochlorite, of ammonium ions adsorbed on relatively reduced South Texas uranium ore. Included are an assessment of reaction stoichiometry, determination of some major reaction pathways and side reactions, and identification of several intermediates. Adsorbed ammonium ions were completely removed by 0.5% sodium hypochlorite with the concentration of ammonia in the effluent falling to a very low value after 10-15 pore volumes of the oxidant. Substantial quantities of sulfate, reflecting oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite, were formed. Large amounts of uranium were leached out, and substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium ions were also produced during the pre-saturation with ammonium bicarbonate during the oxidation stage. 28 refs

  6. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Falls City Site, Falls City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. Services included taking soil samples, the performance of radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The two alternative remedial action options presented include on-site and off-site cleanup, fencing, and hydrological monitoring, and in addition, stabilization of pile 2 with 2 ft of cover material. The costs are $1.84 million for Option I and $2.45 million for Option II

  7. Eleventh annual Department of Energy low-level waste management conference. Volume 2: Low-level waste strategy and planning, decontamination and decommissioning, compliance monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-11-01

    Nineteen papers are presented in volume 2. The 11 papers in the LLW Strategy and Planning section discuss plans for disposal facilities in Texas, Pennsylvania, Hanford, the Southwest and Southeast Compacts, and others. Three papers discuss decontamination technology and activities. Environmental monitoring requirements and recommendations at LLW facilities are discussed in 5 papers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. 78 FR 40427 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 183-Austin, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Samsung...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ..., Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC (Semiconductors); Austin, Texas Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC (Samsung), operator of Subzone 183B, submitted a... June 26, 2013. Samsung currently has authority to produce semiconductor memory devices for export...

  9. Hurricane Rita Aerial Photography: High-Resolution Imagery of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast after Hurricane Rita made landfall. The regions photographed range from San Luis Pass, Texas...

  10. Multivariate volume rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  11. Ovarian volume throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham

    2013-01-01

    cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from...... to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis...

  12. Flash flood swift water rescues, Texas, 2005–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidehi Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rainfall patterns are complex and difficult to predict, climate models suggest precipitation in Texas will occur less frequently and with greater intensity in the future. In combination with rapid population growth and development, extreme rainfall events are likely to lead to flash floods and necessitate swift water rescues. Swift water rescues are used to retrieve person(s from swift water flowing at a rate of 1 knot or greater. Data were obtained from the Texas Fire Marshal’s Office and analyzed to describe spatial and temporal characteristics of rescues. Between 2005 and 2014, 3256 swift water rescues were reported from 136 of 254 (54% counties. Over half (54.6%, n = 1777 occurred in counties known as Flash Flood Alley, which includes Texas’ largest and fastest growing cities. Less than 1.0% (n = 18 were reported from 49 counties designated as completely rural, or with an urban population less than 2500. Increases in swift water rescues were seen between March and September and during major weather events such as tropical storms. Because county-level data was utilized and demographic data was missing in all but 2% (n = 47 of the incidents, our ability to identify populations at risk or target interventions in the future using this data is limited. Despite the frequency of flash flood events and swift water rescues in Texas, knowledge gaps persist that should be addressed through the conduct of interdisciplinary research by epidemiologists and climatologists and by disseminating evidence-based health education and safety programs, particularly in rapidly growing counties that make up Texas’ Flash Flood Alley.

  13. Quantifying changes and influences on mottled duck density in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Beth; Haukos, David A.; Walther, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the relative influence of environmental and intrinsic effects on populations is important for managing and conserving harvested species, especially those species inhabiting changing environments. Additionally, climate change can increase the uncertainty associated with management of species in these changing environments, making understanding factors affecting their populations even more important. Coastal ecosystems are particularly threatened by climate change; the combined effects of increasing severe weather events, sea level rise, and drought will likely have non-linear effects on coastal marsh wildlife species and their associated habitats. A species of conservation concern that persists in these coastal areas is the mottled duck (Anas fulvigula). Mottled ducks in the western Gulf Coast are approximately 50% below target abundance numbers established by the Gulf Coast Joint Venture for Texas and Louisiana, USA. Although evidence for declines in mottled duck abundance is apparent, specific causes of the decrease remain unknown. Our goals were to determine where the largest declines in mottled duck population were occurring along the system of Texas Gulf Coast National Wildlife Refuges and quantify the relative contribution of environmental and intrinsic effects on changes to relative population density. We modeled aerial survey data of mottled duck density along the Texas Gulf Coast from 1986–2015 to quantify effects of extreme weather events on an index to mottled duck density using the United States Climate Extremes Index and Palmer Drought Severity Index. Our results indicate that decreases in abundance are best described by an increase in days with extreme 1-day precipitation from June to November (hurricane season) and an increase in drought severity. Better understanding those portions of the life cycle affected by environmental conditions, and how to manage mottled duck habitat in conjunction with these events will likely be key to

  14. Dietary patterns and depressive mood in a multiethnic representative sample of Texas eighth graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relation between dietary patterns and depressive mood among 8th grade students in Texas. Data were from the 2004–2005 School Physical Activity and Nutrition study, a multistage probability-based sample of Texas 8th graders. Participants (n=8827; 14.7% Afri...

  15. Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, B.C.; Walter, P.L.; Baird, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation

  16. 78 FR 53426 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 84; Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... 84; Houston, Texas Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as..., the Port of Houston Authority, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 84, submitted an application to the Board for authority to expand FTZ 84 to include a site in Brazos County, Texas, adjacent to the Houston...

  17. 78 FR 49254 - Foreign-Trade Zone 84-Houston, Texas; Application for Subzone; Toshiba International Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-77-2013] Foreign-Trade Zone 84--Houston, Texas; Application for Subzone; Toshiba International Corporation; Houston, Texas An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board by the Port of Houston Authority, grantee of FTZ 84...

  18. Harvest timing and techniques to optimize fiber quality in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production conditions typical to the Texas High Plains region can produce cotton crops with high short fiber and nep content, both of which have a detrimental impact on ring spinning performance. Since Texas now produces nearly 50% of the US cotton crop annually, it is critical that research focuses...

  19. Called to Teach: Percy and Anna Pennybacker's Contributions to Education in Texas, 1880-1899

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kelley M.

    2012-01-01

    In 1879, with aid from the Peabody fund, Texas's first tax-supported teacher training institution, Sam Houston State Normal Institute (SHNI), opened on the site of the old Austin College in Huntsville (Richmond 1941, 37). The need for qualified educators in Texas was growing as the state struggled to make up for decades of neglect of and antipathy…

  20. Education on the Installment Plan: The Rise of Student Loan Indebtedness in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Matt

    During academic year (AY) 1996-97, 83,000 students left Texas postsecondary institutions with $882 million in federally guaranteed loans. This study attempts to analyze the cumulative Texas Guaranteed Student Loan Corporation loan indebtedness of student borrowers who left postsecondary educational institutions from AY 1991 through 1997. The major…

  1. 75 FR 17691 - Foreign-Trade Zone 196 - Fort Worth, Texas, Application for Manufacturing Authority, ATC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Worth, Texas, Application for Manufacturing Authority, ATC Logistics & Electronics (Cell Phone Kitting... Board (the Board) by ATC Logistics & Electronics (ATCLE), operator of Site 2, FTZ 196, Fort Worth, Texas.... Executive Secretary. [FR Doc. 2010-7886 Filed 4-6-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510-DS-S ...

  2. Texas Educator Excellence Grant (TEEG) Program: Year Three Evaluation Report. Policy Evaluation Report. [Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Matthew G.; Lewis, Jessica L.; Podgursky, Michael J.; Ehlert, Mark W.; Gronberg, Timothy J.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Jansen, Dennis W.; Stecher, Brian M.; Taylor, Lori L.; Lopez, Omar S.; Peng, Art

    2009-01-01

    The Texas Educator Excellence Grant (TEEG) program was state-funded and provided annual grants to schools to design and implement performance pay plans during the 2006-07 to 2009-10 school year. TEEG was implemented each year (i.e., Cycle) in approximately 1,000 high poverty, high performing Texas public schools. Performance pay for teachers…

  3. 78 FR 6316 - Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR13-23-000] Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing Take notice that on January 17, 2013, Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions to comply with a Commission order issued in...

  4. 75 FR 70732 - Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-92-001] Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing November 10, 2010. Take notice that on November 9, 2010, Enterprise Texas Pipeline LLC submitted a revised baseline filing of its Statement of Operating Conditions...

  5. Assessing the Potential to Expand Community College Baccalaureate Programs in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Goldman, Charles A.; Butterfield, Lindsay; Miller, Trey

    2014-01-01

    Many workforce-development needs, particularly those requiring baccalaureate degrees, remain unmet in some areas of Texas. Employers and students are calling for additional programs to develop workplace skills and to provide opportunities for career advancement. On May 22, 2013, the Texas Legislature approved a bill mandating a study on whether…

  6. Financial Statement Opinion Audit Guide for Texas Public Community Colleges, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Auditor's Office, Austin.

    This document, prepared by the Texas State Auditor's Office, offers detailed guidelines for conducting a financial audit of community colleges in Texas. Its purpose is to assist governing boards and college management in ensuring that their colleges are receiving high-quality opinion audits on annual financial statements. The guide includes the…

  7. Relationship between Leadership Behaviors of High School Principals and Teacher Retention in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Debra L.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between leadership behaviors of high school principals and teacher retention in Texas. A total of 88 Texas high school principals participated in the survey. Leadership behaviors were measured using the Culturally Adapted Leadership for Inspired Business Excellence and Results (CALIBER) Leadership Assessment…

  8. Development of a low level radioactive waste disposal site in Texas - 1994 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, L.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The Texas Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, an agency of the State of Texas, has been trying to develop a site for the disposal of low level radioactive waste in Texas for over ten years. Since 1991, the agency has been evaluating a site near Sierra Blanca, in far west Texas. Site characterization has been completed and a license application has been filed with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. Construction plans were completed in 1993, and the agency is prepared to begin construction and operations as soon as a license can be issued. Development costs for the site are borne by the utility companies and other major generators in Texas through the assessment of a planning and implementation fee. Total costs to date are approximately $26 million. As the project moves toward completion, state and national anti-nuclear activist groups have become more involved in attempts to thwart the Texas government's effort to solve the radioactive waste problem. To counter this increased opposition, the Texas utility companies and medical radioactive waste generators have also become more active in responding to these groups. This has been very helpful and is in keeping with the elements of building block 12 of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee's Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Power Plants. This paper and poster session look at the schedule, design, and long term prospects for ultimate success of the project

  9. Texas Student Success Council: Finding Common Ground to Increase Community College Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, a prominent Texas business group erected provocative billboards condemning low completion rates at the state's community colleges and questioning the value of tax dollars spent there. The Texas Association of Business put up the signs to prod community colleges to do more to increase student success and help create a better educated…

  10. Muleshoe Virus and Other Hantaviruses Associated with Neotomine or Sigmodontine Rodents in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Cajimat, Maria N B; Richter, Martin H; Bradley, Robert D; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2017-10-01

    The broad objective of this study was to increase our knowledge of Muleshoe virus and other hantaviruses associated with cricetid rodents in Texas. Anti-hantavirus antibody was found in 38 (3.2%) of 1171 neotomine rodents and 6 (1.8%) of 332 sigmodontine rodents from 10 Texas counties; hantaviral RNA was detected in 23 (71.9%) of 32 antibody-positive rodents. Analyses of nucleocapsid protein gene sequences indicated Muleshoe virus infection in four hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) from northern Texas; Bayou virus, three Texas marsh oryzomys (Oryzomys texensis) from the Gulf Coast; Limestone Canyon virus, five brush mice (Peromyscus boylii) from western Texas; and Sin Nombre virus-five Texas mice (P. attwateri), one Lacey's white-ankled deer mouse (P. laceianus), four white-footed mice (P. leucopus), and one fulvous harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys fulvescens) from northern, central, or southern Texas. The results of this study together with the results of a previous study revealed that Muleshoe virus, perhaps in association with S. hispidus, is distributed across northern Texas. Finally, the results of Bayesian analyses of glycoprotein precursor (GPC) gene sequences and pairwise comparisons of complete GPC (amino acid) sequences strengthened support for the notion that Muleshoe virus is distinct from Black Creek Canal virus, Bayou virus, and all other species included in the Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus.

  11. Square Pegs in Round Holes: Montessori Principals' Perceptions of Science Education in Texas Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the perceptions of Texas public Montessori school principals as instructional leaders in science. Twelve public Montessori school principals were interviewed for this study. Two research questions were used: How do public Montessori principals perceive Texas science standards in public…

  12. TELPAS: Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System. Rater Manual, Grades K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System (TELPAS) fulfills federal requirements for assessing the English language proficiency of English language learners (ELLs) in kindergarten through grade 12 in four language domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. TELPAS assesses students in alignment with the Texas English…

  13. Project Texas: A Nontraditional Teacher Professional Development Model for Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjean-Perrotta, Blanche; Buehler, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Project Texas is a professional development program for K-8 teachers from districts serving underrepresented populations in order to develop teacher knowledge of Texas' eco-regions. The program provides a meaningful context modeling integration of field experiences, investigative activities, problem-solving strategies, and cooperative learning…

  14. Texas Chiropractic College Practice Management Education: The Patient's Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waigandt, Alex; And Others

    A survey was conducted to determine the patient's perception of treatment received from clinicians at the Texas Chiropractic College Clinic in Pasadena, Texas. A questionnaire designed to assess various aspects of the school's clinical and dispensary services was administered to 79 patients who had completed their treatment prescriptions. The…

  15. The First State Dream Act: In-State Resident Tuition and Immigration in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Stella M.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, Texas became the first state to pass an in-state resident tuition policy that benefits undocumented immigrant students, a majority of whom are of Latino/a origin. This analysis estimates the effect of the Texas in-state resident tuition policy on students likely to be undocumented. Using a differences-in-differences strategy and two…

  16. Understanding the Impact of a Ninth-Grade Transition Program in Texas. Vignette

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Ninth grade often is considered a make-or-break year in determining whether students will be successful in high school and beyond. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) created the Texas Ninth Grade Transition and Intervention Program to ease the transition of at-risk students into high school and increase the likelihood that they graduate on time and…

  17. The Northeast Texas Adult Education Rural Workplace Literacy Program. Annual Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Sue; Burns, Kathryn; Bowers, Jana; Pruitt, Jeanni; Pate, Sally

    The Northeast Texas Adult Education Rural Education Workplace Literacy Program, which is a partnership between Northeast Texas Community College and area businesses, offers workplace literacy instruction designed around job-specific basic skills. Training is offered in the following: applied workplace technology; applied math skills; measurements…

  18. Index of stations; surface-water data-collections network of Texas, September 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Jones, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's investigations of the water resources of Texas are conducted in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, river authorities, cities, counties, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation, International Boundary and Water Commission, and others.

  19. Comparative Demonstration and Evaluation of Classification Technologies: Closed Castner Range, Fort Bliss, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    DEMONSTRATION REPORT Comparative Demonstration and Evaluation of Classification Technologies: Closed Castner Range Fort Bliss , Texas ESTCP...54  Appendix A: Points of Contact...Detection System 2x2 (TEMTADS) data that was collected by URS Group, Inc. (URS) at the Castner Range (CR) at Fort Bliss , Texas. 1.1 BACKGROUND ESTCP

  20. Balancing Liberty and Equality: Justice Kennedy's Decisive Vote in "Fisher v. University of Texas," Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Liliana M.

    2015-01-01

    For the second time in three years, the Supreme Court is reviewing the constitutionality of a race-conscious admissions policy at the University of Texas, Austin. While the case, "Fisher v. University of Texas," raises questions specific to UT Austin, the Court's second review could change the ways higher education institutions across…

  1. Implementation and effectiveness of sound mitigation measures on Texas highways (HB 790) : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The 84th Texas Legislature passed House Bill (HB) 790 directing the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) to perform a study on the implementation and effectiveness of sound mitigation measures on the state highway system and certain toll roads an...

  2. 75 FR 27119 - ViewPoint Financial Group, Inc., Plano, Texas; Approval of Conversion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision [AC-37: OTS No. H-47111] ViewPoint Financial Group, Inc., Plano, Texas; Approval of Conversion Application Notice is hereby given that on May 6..., Plano, Texas, to convert to the stock form of organization. Copies of the application are available for...

  3. Stream and Aquifer Biology of South-Central Texas - A Literature Review, 1973-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    helminth parasites of Gambusia affinis and Gambusia geiseri ( Osteichthyes : Poecillidae) in the area of San Marcos, Texas: Guadalupe-Blanco River...fountain darter, Etheostoma fonticola, ( Osteichthyes : Percidae): San Marcos, Tex., Southwest Texas State University, M.S. thesis, 100 p. Schenck...J.R., and Whiteside, B.G., 1976, Distribution, habitat preference, and population size estimate of Etheostoma fonticola ( Osteichthyes : Percidae

  4. Spatial interpolation of daily evapotranspiration data in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Texas High Plains Evapotranspiration (ET) Network collects meteorological data from grass-referenced weather stations at hourly intervals and estimates hourly and daily reference ET using the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standardized Reference ET equation. Producers in the Texas Hi...

  5. Spatial interpolation of daily reference evapotranspiration in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Texas High Plains Evapotranspiration (ET) Network collects meteorological data from 18 grass reference weather stations at hourly intervals and estimates hourly and daily reference ET using the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standardized Reference ET equation. Producers in the Texas ...

  6. 75 FR 69909 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Emissions Banking and Trading of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R06-OAR-2005-TX-0012; FRL-9226-3] Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Emissions Banking and Trading of Allowances Program AGENCY... four revisions to the Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP) that create and amend the Emissions Banking...

  7. Missing Pages from the Human Story: World History According to Texas Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noboa, Julio

    2012-01-01

    For more than a decade, the world history course taught in the public high schools of Texas has provided the only comprehensive overview of the story of humanity to millions of students, most of whom are of Mexican descent. The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills curriculum standard for world history has been foundational for textbook selection,…

  8. 75 FR 13261 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 260 under Alternative Site Framework, Lubbock, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1668] Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 260 under Alternative Site Framework, Lubbock, Texas Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign... reorganization of general-purpose zones; Whereas, the City of Lubbock, Texas, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 260...

  9. 76 FR 67600 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Regulations for Control of Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Luminant Big Brown Mine and Power Plant in Freestone County, Texas. The effects would be disastrous to the community of Fairfield, Texas, where the commenter lives and works. The closure of this facility would cause... the potential to result in the plant closures and the local community's economic decline outlined in...

  10. Aerial remote sensing survey of Fusarium wilt of cotton in New Mexico and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium wilt of cotton, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV), is a widespread cotton disease, but the more virulent FOV race 4 (FOV4) has recently been identified in the New Mexico-Texas border area near El Paso, Texas. A preliminary aerial remote sensing survey was cond...

  11. 76 FR 18391 - Safety Zone; Texas International Boat Show Power Boat Races; Corpus Christi Marina, Corpus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Texas International Boat Show Power Boat Races; Corpus Christi Marina, Corpus Christi... temporary safety zone in the Corpus Christi, Texas for North American Tri-Hull Championship scheduled to...-mail LT Wes Geyer, Sector Corpus Christi Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard; telephone 361-888...

  12. 76 FR 65935 - Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis-Free States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    .... APHIS-2011-0005] Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis- Free States AGENCY.... SUMMARY: We are adopting as a final rule, without change, an interim rule that amended the brucellosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of swine by adding Texas to the list of validated brucellosis...

  13. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 3: EVA/Manned Systems/Fluid Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution 16-19 Jan. 1990 in Dallas, Texas. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 3 consists of the technology discipline sections for Extravehicular Activity/Manned Systems and the Fluid Management System. For each technology discipline, there is a Level 3 subsystem description, along with the papers.

  14. Gulf Coast Programmatic Environmental Assessment Geothermal Well Testing: The Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    In accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 711, environmental assessments are being prepared for significant activities and individual projects of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). This environmental assessment of geopressure well testing addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environments, and possible impacts in a broad sense. The specific part of the program addressed by this environmental assessment is geothermal well testing by the take-over of one or more unsuccessful oil wells before the drilling rig is removed and completion of drilling into the geopressured zone. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. In the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource. The project addressed by this environmental assessment is the performance of a geothermal well test in high potential geothermal areas. Well tests involve four major actions each of which may or may not be required for each of the well tests. The four major actions are: site preparation, drilling a salt-water disposal well, actual flow testing, and abandonment of the well.

  15. Texas urban triangle : creating a spatial decision support system for mobility policy and investments that shape the sustainable growth of Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    This project developed a GIS-based Spatial Decision Support System to help local, metropolitan, and state : jurisdictions and authorities in Texas understand the implications of transportation planning and : investment decisions, and plan appropriate...

  16. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response

  17. Shallow ground-water conditions, Tom Green County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Most of the water needs of Tom Green County, Texas, are supplied by ground water; however, the city of San Angelo is supplied by surface water. Groundwater withdrawals during 1980 (latest year for which data are available) in Tom Green County totaled about 15,300 acre-feet, all derived from shallow aquifers. Shallow aquifers in this report refer to the ground-water system generally less than 400 feet deep that contains water with less than a 10,000 milligrams per liter concentration of dissolved solids; aquifers comprising this system include: The Leona, Comanche Peak, Trinity, Blaine, San Angelo, Choza, Bullwagon, Vale, Standpipe, and Arroyo aquifers.

  18. University of Texas Safeguards by Design Problem Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Eric Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruggiero, Christy E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-22

    This document describes the problem statement that students at the University of Texas will use for their senior level capstone design class. The purpose of this project is to introduce students to Safeguards by Design concepts as part of their capstone design course at the culmination of their degree program. This work is supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory with FY17 and FY18 programmatic funding from the U. S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (INS), Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Human Resource Development Program, Safeguards by Design Project.

  19. Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

    2007-02-24

    This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtu—site basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping

  20. Systematic status of wild Canis in North-central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Nowak, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Skulls of wild Canis collected 2003–2004 in north-central Texas are morphometrically similar to a series taken there and in nearby areas in 1964–1971, which was considered to represent a population of Coyotes (C. latrans) modified through introgression from Red Wolves (C. rufus). A few of the new specimens closely resemble small examples of Red Wolves. Such affinity is supported by authoritative examination of living and videotaped animals. The persistence of influence of Red Wolves, long after presumed extirpation through hybridization and human persecution, may be relevant to wolf conservation.

  1. Reliability generalization of the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief (TRIG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Samuel A; Lewey, Jennifer H; O'Toole, Siobhan K; Graves, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    While grief is a universal experience, this phenomenon is experienced in a variety of ways largely dependent upon one's cultural schema. To consider the potential problems inherent in generalizing the results of an assessment tool across cultures, this study explores the notion of generalizability in assessment by evaluating the reliability of the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief (TRIG) using a meta-analytic technique called reliability generalization. The TRIG demonstrated strong reliability with mean Cronbach's alphas of .90 and .82 for the present and past subscales, respectively. Overall, the TRIG, especially the present subscale, appears to produce reliable scores even across cultures.

  2. Hydraulic Fracking Water Treatment in Texas and North Dakota.

    OpenAIRE

    Abordo , Genel; Patel , Cameron; Duncan , Cody; McAlpine , Caitlin; Thomas, Trevor; Libby, James; Ryan , Kerrick

    2013-01-01

    Project Definition: Flo-tech Engineering is developing a mobile treatment system for flowback and produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations.  The water will be treated for fracking reuse.  The system will be implemented in Bakken Shale in North Dakota and/or Eagle Ford Shale in southern Texas.  Design Constraints and Parameters:  Extensive research was required to determine which site areas to develop and the current technologies used to treat the water involved in hydraulic fractur...

  3. Geology and ground-water resources of Winkler County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Sergio; Wesselman, John B.

    1963-01-01

    Winkler County, in west Texas, is adjacent to the southeast corner of New Mexico. Most of the county lies in the Pecos Valley; the remainder, in the northeastern part of the county, is part of the Llano Estacado, or the High Plains. Its principal industries are those related to the production and refining of oil, but ranching also is an important occupation. The county has an arid to semiarid climate, an area of about 887 square miles, and a population of about 12,000 in 1957.

  4. 78 FR 48467 - CompuCom Systems, Inc., Tewksbury, Massachusetts; CompuCom Systems, Inc. Houston, Texas; Amended...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Systems, Inc., Tewksbury, Massachusetts; CompuCom Systems, Inc. Houston, Texas; Amended Certification... workers of the subject firm. New information shows that the Houston, Texas and Tewksbury, Massachusetts... workers of the Houston, Texas location of CompuCom Systems, Inc. The amended notice applicable to TA-W-82...

  5. 77 FR 70174 - Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Houston and Texas City, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Houston and Texas City, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Assessment to the Coast Guard Captain of the Port, Sector Houston-Galveston regarding the company's proposed expansion of its Liquefied Hazardous Gas (LHG) facilities in Houston and Texas City, Texas, and increased...

  6. 40 CFR 409.50 - Applicability; description of the Florida and Texas raw cane sugar processing subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Florida and Texas raw cane sugar processing subcategory. 409.50 Section 409.50 Protection of Environment... CATEGORY Florida and Texas Raw Cane Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.50 Applicability; description of the Florida and Texas raw cane sugar processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  7. 78 FR 21399 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Texas at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Inventory Completion: Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Texas at... Archaeological Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio has completed an inventory of human remains, in... Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe...

  8. 75 FR 55978 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions to the New Source...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... Chemical Council (TCC); Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ); Members of the Texas House of..., ERCC, GCLC and TCC commented that Texas submitted a revision to 30 TAC 116.160(a) and a new section 116... corrected the deficiencies identified in the proposal. Comment 7: BCCA, TIP, ERCC, and TCC commented that...

  9. Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mines, South Texas Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This talk was presented by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geologist Susan Hall on May 11, 2009, at the Uranium 2009 conference in Keystone, Colorado, and on May 12, 2009, as part of an underground injection control track presentation at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Environmental Trade Fair and Conference in Austin, Texas. Texas has been the location of the greatest number of uranium in-situ recovery (ISR) mines in the United States and was the incubator for the development of alkaline leach technology in this country. For that reason, the author chose to focus on the effectiveness of restoration at ISR mines by examining legacy mines developed in Texas. The best source for accurate information about restoration at Texas ISR mines is housed at the TCEQ offices in Austin. The bulk of this research is an analysis of those records.

  10. Status of the Texas low-level radioactive waste disposal site - construction sequencing and staffing patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, L.R. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, an agency of the State of Texas, has been attempting to develop a site for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in Texas for more than fourteen years. Since 1991, the agency has been evaluating a site near Sierra Blanca, in far west Texas. Site characterization was completed in 1992, and a license application was filed that year. Construction plans were completed in 1993. In April 1996, the licensing agency, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, completed its review and proposed to issue a license. The administrative hearings on the proposed license should be completed by July 1997. The Authority is prepared to begin construction and operations as soon as a final license can be issued

  11. A new species of Elasmia Möschler from New Mexico and Texas, and a new subspecies of Elasmia mandela (Druce from Texas and Oklahoma (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae, Nystaleinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Metzler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hippia packardii (Morrison and Hippia insularis (Grote are moved to the genus Elasmia Möschler as comb. n. Elasmia cave Metzler, sp. n. is described from New Mexico and Texas, and Elasmia mandela santaana Metzler & Knudson, ssp. n. is described from Texas and Oklahoma. A key to the species of Elasmia of southwestern U.S. is provided. Adult male and female moths of Elasmia from southwestern U.S. and their genitalia are illustrated.

  12. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  13. Petroleum geology of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.R.

    1986-03-01

    The Palo Duro Basin, Permian Basin, Texas is an asymmetric, relatively shallow, intracratonic basin in the southern Texas Panhandle filled mostly by Mississippian, Pennsylvanian, and Permian sedimentary rocks. Although deeper and prolific prolific petroleum-producing basins adjoin it on the north (Anadarko Basin), south (Midland Basin), and east (Hardeman Basin), the Palo Duro Basin has produced remarkably small amounts of oil and gas to date. This is all the more noteworthy because the sedimentary sequence and rock types of the basin are similar to those of the adjacent basins. Analyses of the stratigraphic succession and structural configuration of the Palo Duro Basin suggest that adequate reservoir rocks, top-seals, and geologic structures are present. Most of the structures formed early enough to have trapped hydrocarbons if they were migrating in the rock column. Although additional work is under way to properly address the question of the petroleum source rocks, generation, and migration, the general absence of production in the basin may relate to an overall deficiency in hydrocarbon generation within the basin. Geologic information in this report will form part of the basis for further analysis and conclusions on hydrocarbon potential in the Palo Duro Basin

  14. Ground-water resources of Limestone County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettman, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    Limestone County, located in east-central Texas, has small to plentiful ground-water supplies available, depending upon the location within the county. The Wilcox Group in the eastern part of the county has adequate supplies to meet the expected water demands in the foreseeable future. The thicker zones of the Wilcox Group can supply yields in excess of 500 gallons per minute. The Midway Group can supply yields in excess of 100 gallons per minute from the Tehuacana Member of the Kincaid Formation. This represents the largest well yields from the Midway Group in Texas. The Midway Group elsewhere in the State is mostly a poor water producer and is not considered an aquifer. The Taylor Marl and Navarro Group furnish only small quantities of ground water to wells in the western part of the county where these units crop out. The Hosston and Travis Peak Formations are present at depths in excess of 2,000 feet. These formations, which contain slightly saline water in the western part of the county, could be expected to produce water with a temperature of about 150°F that might be used for heating purposes.

  15. Wastewater Disposal Wells, Fracking, and Environmental Injustice in Southern Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jill E; Werder, Emily; Sebastian, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    To investigate race and poverty in areas where oil and gas wastewater disposal wells, which are used to permanently inject wastewater from hydraulic fracturing (fracking) operations, are permitted. With location data of oil and gas disposal wells permitted between 2007 and 2014 in the Eagle Ford area, a region of intensive fracking in southern Texas, we analyzed the racial composition of residents living less than 5 kilometers from a disposal well and those farther away, adjusting for rurality and poverty, using a Poisson regression. The proportion of people of color living less than 5 kilometers from a disposal well was 1.3 times higher than was the proportion of non-Hispanic Whites. Adjusting for rurality, disposal wells were 2.04 times (95% confidence interval = 2.02, 2.06) as common in areas with 80% people of color or more than in majority White areas. Disposal wells are also disproportionately sited in high-poverty areas. Wastewater disposal wells in southern Texas are disproportionately permitted in areas with higher proportions of people of color and residents living in poverty, a pattern known as "environmental injustice."

  16. Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium) exposures in Texas, 1998-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2006-10-01

    For centuries, jimsonweed, Datura stramonium, was known to produce hallucinogenic effects. Jimsonweed is easily obtained and may be abused by adolescents. This investigation examined the patterns of jimsonweed exposures reported to Texas poison control centers during 1998-2004. A total of 188 reported human exposures were identified. Seventy-six percent of the exposures occurred in June-October. For those cases where the information was known, the majority were male (82%) and age 13-19 yr (72%). Intentional abuse or misuse accounted for 78% of reported exposures. Eighty-two percent of the reported exposures were at, en route to, or referred to health care facilities, and 89% of those cases with a known medical outcome had moderate or major effects. The most frequently reported clinical effects were hallucination, tachycardia, agitation, mydriasis, and confusion; the most frequently reported treatments were intravenous fluids replacement, activated charcoal, cathartic, and benzodiazepines. The pattern of reported jimsonweed exposures in Texas was consistent with previously published literature.

  17. Red-shouldered hawk nesting habitat preference in south Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Bradley N.; Boal, Clint W.

    2010-01-01

    We examined nesting habitat preference by red-shouldered hawks Buteo lineatus using conditional logistic regression on characteristics measured at 27 occupied nest sites and 68 unused sites in 2005–2009 in south Texas. We measured vegetation characteristics of individual trees (nest trees and unused trees) and corresponding 0.04-ha plots. We evaluated the importance of tree and plot characteristics to nesting habitat selection by comparing a priori tree-specific and plot-specific models using Akaike's information criterion. Models with only plot variables carried 14% more weight than models with only center tree variables. The model-averaged odds ratios indicated red-shouldered hawks selected to nest in taller trees and in areas with higher average diameter at breast height than randomly available within the forest stand. Relative to randomly selected areas, each 1-m increase in nest tree height and 1-cm increase in the plot average diameter at breast height increased the probability of selection by 85% and 10%, respectively. Our results indicate that red-shouldered hawks select nesting habitat based on vegetation characteristics of individual trees as well as the 0.04-ha area surrounding the tree. Our results indicate forest management practices resulting in tall forest stands with large average diameter at breast height would benefit red-shouldered hawks in south Texas.

  18. Trace metal seasonal variations in Texas marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Trace elements in coastal environments are derived from three major sources: (1) the bordering watershed; (2) the offshore marine environment; and (3) industrial and/or urban effluent. The site of deposition, however, is controlled by physical and chemical processes in the coastal zone. In many cases, these processes are controlled by climate and can vary seasonally. In the harbor at Corpus Christi, Texas, the summer climate creates an oxygen-poor environment in the water column near the sediment-water interface. This causes chalcophilic metals to precipitate from the water, resulting in high concentrations in the sediments near the source. During the winter, turbulence created by strong winds causes the entire water mass to become aerated and oxidizing, and remobilization of some metals results. In addition, this turbulence accelerates circulation which transports the metal-enriched waters from the harbor. On the outer continental shelf of south Texas, the infaunal activity varies seasonally with bottom water temperatures. As this infaunal activity has an effect on the chemical environment within the sediment near the sediment-water interface, the observed trace metal content at the interface also appears to change with the seasons. ?? 1986.

  19. Faecal Campylobacter shedding among dogs in animal shelters across Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, A M; Cummings, K J; Rodriguez-Rivera, L D; Hamer, S A; Lawhon, S D

    2017-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies on faecal Campylobacter shedding among dogs in the United States have been limited, despite evidence that the incidence of human campylobacteriosis has increased over the last decade. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of faecal Campylobacter shedding among shelter dogs in Texas, to estimate the specific prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli shedding, and to identify risk factors for Campylobacter-positive status. Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected faecal samples from dogs in six animal shelters across Texas between May and December, 2014. Quantitative PCR protocols were used to detect Campylobacter in samples and to specifically identify C. jejuni and C. coli. The prevalence of faecal Campylobacter shedding among sampled dogs was 75.7% (140/185). Prevalence varied significantly by shelter (p = .03), ranging from 57% to 93%. There was a marginal association (p = .06) between abnormal faecal consistency and positive Campylobacter status, after controlling for shelter as a random effect. However, approximately 70% of Campylobacter-positive dogs had grossly normal faeces. Campylobacter prevalence did not vary significantly by age group or sex. The prevalence of C. jejuni-positive samples was 5.4% (10/185), but C. coli was not detected in any samples. Dogs are a potential source of zoonotic Campylobacter transmission. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shaieb, Z.; Thomas, R.G.; Stewart, G.F.

    1982-04-01

    Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, eolian and marginal-marine sandstones of the Permian Rush Springs Formation overlying the Cement Anticline are favorable for joint-controlled deposits in sandstone, non-channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits, and Texas roll-front deposits. Three areas contain lithologies favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits: arkosic sandstones and granule conglomerates of the Permian Post Oak Conglomerate south of the Wichita Mountains; subarkosic and sublithic Lower Permian fluvio-deltaic and coastal-plain sandstones of the eastern Red River Valley; and subsurface arkosic, subarkosic, and sublithic alluvial-fan and fan-delta sandstones of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian sequence in the eastern Hollis Basin. The coarse-grained facies of the Cambrian Quanah Granite and genetically related aplite and pegmatite dikes in the Wichita Mountains are favorable for orthomagmatic and autometasomatic deposits, respectively

  1. Von Braun Rocket Team at Fort Bliss, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1940-01-01

    The German Rocket Team, also known as the Von Braun Rocket Team, poses for a group photograph at Fort Bliss, Texas. After World War II ended in 1945, Dr. Wernher von Braun led some 120 of his Peenemuende Colleagues, who developed the V-2 rocket for the German military during the War, to the United Sttes under a contract to the U.S. Army Corps as part of Operation Paperclip. During the following five years the team worked on high altitude firings of the captured V-2 rockets at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, and a guided missile development unit at Fort Bliss, Texas. In April 1950, the group was transferred to the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, and continued to work on the development of the guided missiles for the U.S. Army until transferring to a newly established field center of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF URBAN RAINWATER HARVESTING FOR THREE TEXAS CITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to inform decision makers at state and local levels, as well as property owners about the amount of water that can be supplied by rainwater harvesting systems in Texas so that it may be included in any future planning. Reliability of a rainwater tank is important because people want to know that a source of water can be depended on. Performance analyses were conducted on rainwater harvesting tanks for three Texas cities under different rainfall conditions and multiple scenarios to demonstrate the importance of optimizing rainwater tank design. Reliability curves were produced and reflect the percentage of days in a year that water can be supplied by a tank. Operational thresholds were reached in all scenarios and mark the point at which reliability increases by only 2% or less with an increase in tank size. A payback period analysis was conducted on tank sizes to estimate the amount of time it would take to recoup the cost of installing a rainwater harvesting system.

  3. Cardiac surgery for inmates in the Texas Department of Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilfinger, T V; Conti, V R

    1990-10-01

    All Texas prison inmates requiring hospitalization since 1983 have been transferred to a separate prison hospital adjacent to a tertiary care university hospital. We reviewed and analyzed the data regarding one major tertiary care service, namely cardiac surgery, to describe the rate of utilization of this service and its results. From January 1, 1984, to June 30, 1988, 73 inmates underwent 74 cardiac operations, 50 of which were coronary revascularizations. The age-adjusted rates of utilization for coronary artery bypass grafting were substantially higher for inmates over age 45 than for that described for the general population, whereas the utilization rates for valve surgery were comparable. There were no perioperative or late deaths, and 86% of the inmate patients are currently employed within the Texas Department of Corrections system or were employed at the time of their release. The utilization rates and the results of this representative tertiary medical care service for the state's prison population are comparable to those achieved in the private sector, and may have a substantial beneficial effect on inmate rehabilitation.

  4. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  5. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, L.M.

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables

  6. Assessment of the economic implications of 10CFR61 on the south Texas project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniazewyez, B.G.; Turner, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The State of Texas, as an Agreement State, is developing Texas Part 45, ''Licensing Requirements fo Near-Surface Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste'' to implement the intent of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Title 10 to the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61 (10CFR61) ''Licensing Requirement for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste.'' This paper addresses the potential economic impact of the proposed Texas Part 45 and 10CFR61 on the South Texas Project (STP). The Texas Department of Health is developing the proposed rule making Texas Part 45 pertaining to land disposal of radioactive waste, which together with proposed amendments to related portions of Texas Parts 11 and 21, provide the licensing procedures, performance objectives, and technical criteria for licensing disposal facilities. These regulations establish requirements concerning allowable waste forms, classification, packaging, and labeling of waste, as well as acceptable shipping records and manifests. Thus, the regulations' impact upon a nuclear power plant such as STP include not only shipping and disposal costs, but also the costs of proper preparation, classification, and labeling of waste, and the cost of associated record keeping and paperwork required for compliance with the regulations

  7. Petrographic Composition of Lignite from the Lake Somerville Spillway (East-central Texas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, Sandra; Bielowicz, Barbara

    2017-12-01

    In the presented paper, the macroscopic and microscopic composition of lignite from Lake Somerville Spillway has been examined. The study area is the upper part of the Manning Formation, located north-west of Somerville in the central-eastern part of Texas. There are three exposures: NE, SW and MC (Main Central) with visible parts of late-Eocene lignite seams belonging to the Jackson Group. The Manning section is divided into four marine dominated parasequences (P1 through P4). Lignite samples outlining the P1 parasequence from the MC and NE outcrops and the argillate sample from the lower part of the P2 parasequence, NE outcrop. Macroscopic characterization was carried out based on lithological classifications of humic coal. On this basis, it has been shown that the main lithotype occurring in the deposit is detritic (matrix) coal with a high share of mineral matter. The maceral composition of coal was determined according to the ICCP guidelines. The macerals from liptinite group were determined under fluorescent light. The maceral group content analysis was performed with use of 500-600 equally spaced points on the surface of the polished sections. It has been found that the examined coal is dominated by macerals from the huminite group, with a share ranging from 20.8 to 65.3% volume, including atrinite (9.8-22.8% volume, 17.5% volume on average). In the examined coal, macerals from the inertinite group (10.1 to 44.8%), especially semifusinite (max. 13.9%), fusinite (max. 9.3%) and funginite (max. 6.3 %) are of particularly large share. In the liptinite group, particular attention was paid to the content of alginite (max. 4.5%) and bituminite (max. 1.3 %), which indicate the paralic sedimentation environment of the examined coal. Additionally, the variability of macerals and maceral groups within the exposures and levels of the P1 parasequence was examined. The last step was to compare lignite from Lake Somerville Spillway with other lignites belonging to the

  8. Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S. C.; Ball, D. E.

    1981-06-01

    The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

  9. Geothermal resource assessment for the state of Texas: status of progress, November 1980. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, C.M. Jr.; Caran, S.C.; Gever, C.; Henry, C.D.; Macpherson, G.L.; McBride, M.W.

    1982-03-01

    Data pertaining to wells and thermal aquifers and data interpretation methods are presented. Findings from a program of field measurements of water temperatures (mainly in South-Central Texas) and an assessment of hydrologic properties of three Cretaceous aquifers (in North-Central Texas) are included. Landsat lineaments and their pertinance to the localization of low-temperature geothermal resources are emphasized. Lineament data were compared to structural and stratigraphic features along the Balcones/Ouachita trend in Central Texas to test for correlations. (MHR)

  10. New library buildings: the Houston Academy of Medicine--Texas Medical Center Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, S; Lyders, R A

    1977-04-01

    A historical account is given of the Houston Academy of Medicine--Texas Medical Center Library within its Texas Medical Center setting in Houston, Texas. Outlined are planning, financing, and construction of the new library, which consists in part of new building and in part of renovated interiors of an old building originally completed in 1954. A concise picture is given of the new library's interiors, showing its functional success for users and employees alike. An architectural summary is appended showing gross and net footages, source of funds, costs and capacities.

  11. Unconventional plants for biomass feedstocks in semi-arid West Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodin, J.R.; Newton, R.J.

    1981-08-01

    The objectives of the reported project are: to evaluate the establishment and productivity potential of four plant species in West Texas as influenced by rainfall, temperature, and minimum cultural practices; to accurately assess the present distribution and acreages inhabited by the four candidates in West Texas as well as the soil, geographical, and climatic factors which govern their adaptation; and to provide productivity data in order to make adequate economic and sociological assessments of biomass production in West Texas. The four species selected are HONEY MESQUITE (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.), JOHNSONGRASS (Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers), KOCHIA (Kochia scoparia (L.) Roth), and SALTBUSH (Atriplex canescens (Pursh.) (Nutt.). (LEW)

  12. Essays on the industrial composition of Texas oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Genevieve Lynn

    This dissertation examines the changes in Texas oil and gas production from 1970--1996. Chapter II applies the survivor technique to the 300 largest oil producing firms in Texas for the years 1970--1996. The survivor technique is a powerful method to determine the efficient scale of production in a competitive industry. While previous applications of the survivor technique did not yield conclusive findings, Texas oil production is a competitive industry for which the technique provides clear results. Specifically, the technique shows that firms producing more than 100,000 barrels of oil per day in Texas have higher opportunity costs of production. Chapter III describes the size distribution of firms in Texas oil production. The Pareto distribution is found to correctly describe the size distribution of the 300 largest firms producing oil in Texas from 1970--1996, while the lognormal distribution is conclusively rejected. The k-firm concentration ratio reveals that Texas oil production became relatively less concentrated over this period. A simple relationship between the concentration ratio and the parameters of the Pareto distribution is defined and estimates of the Pareto distribution parameters are used to show that the size distribution of firms did not change significantly over the period 1970--1996. The fourth chapter analyses the impact of the changes in the regulatory environment of the Texas natural gas industry. In 1970, natural gas producers faced a quagmire of regulations governing the sale and price of their gas. Today, natural gas is a commodity traded freely in spot and futures markets. This chapter examines the pattern of production that resulted from this changing regulatory environment by examining the behavior of nine natural gas producing firms in Texas over the period 1970--1996. Each of these firms appeared on the list of the Texas top four natural gas producers at least once over this period. The analysis reveals that the majors have

  13. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

  14. Air Force Health Study. An Epidemiologic Investigation of Health Effects in Air Force Personnel Following Exposure to Herbicides. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    LABORATORY HU" MAN SYSTEMS DIVISION (AFSC) Brooks Air Forcc Ba.se, Texas 7,235 I n TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME III PAGE 8. NEUROLOGICAL ASSESSMENT...at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation (SCRF). To enhance the comparability, the longitudinal assessment contrasted differences between the... libido in many of the workers with chloracne. Most of these symptoms resolved over a 4-year period (3, 4). Two fodowup szudies of expanded plant

  15. High energy physics program at Texas A ampersand M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The Texas A ampersand M experimental high energy physics program has been supported since its inception by DOE Contract DE-AS05-81ER40039. During that period we established a viable experimental program at a university which before this time had no program in high energy physics. In 1990, the experimental program was augmented with a program in particle theory. In the accompanying final report, we outline the research work accomplished during the final year of this contract and the program being proposed for consideration by the Department of Energy for future grant support. Some of the particular areas covered are: Collider detector at Fermilab program; the TAMU MACRO program; SSC R ampersand D program; SSC experimental program; and theoretical physics program

  16. Air quality permits in Texas and New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusselman, D.K.; Hofmann, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Permitting gas processing equipment ranges from fairly simple procedures under the Texas Air Control Board (TACB) Standard Exemption List and the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Division (NMEID) Registration Regulations to an extremely complicated procedure requiring a federal Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and/or non-attainment review. The following topics relating to obtaining air permits for gas plants will be addressed in this paper: Type of permit/exemption necessary for construction, Specific permit/exemption requirements, New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Subparts KKK, LLL, GG, K, Ka and Kb, Potential effects of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments (FCAA). This paper only addresses specific permitting concerns and requirements that apply to the natural gas production industry. The same requirements apply to other industries, with possible additional requirements of National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), NSPS other than Subparts KKK, LLL, GG, K, Ka and Kb, and non-attainment review for pollutants other than ozone

  17. Job Creation and Petroleum Independence with E85 in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walk, Steve [Protec Fuel Management LLC, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Protec Fuel Management project objectives are to help design, build, provide, promote and supply biofuels for the greater energy independence, national security and domestic economic growth through job creations, infrastructure projects and supply chain business stimulants. Protec Fuel has teamed up with station owners to convert 5 existing retail fueling stations to include E85 fuel to service existing large number of fleet FFVs and general public FFVs. The stations are located in high flex fuel vehicle locations in the state of TX. Under the project name, “Job Creation and Petroleum Independence with E85 in Texas,” Protec Fuel identified and successfully opened stations strategically located to maximize e85 fueling success for fleets and public. Protec Fuel and industry affiliates and FFV manufacturers are excited about these stations and the opportunities as they will help reduce emissions, increase jobs, economic stimulus benefits, energy independence and petroleum displacement.

  18. Antecedents of children's adult outcomes in the Texas Adoption Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehlin, John C; Horn, Joseph M; Ernst, Jody L

    2009-02-01

    Four composite variables concerning life outcomes were derived from a brief mail questionnaire describing 478 adults, now in their 30s and 40s, who had participated as children in the Texas Adoption Project. Responses were obtained from the participants themselves, their parents, and their siblings. MMPI scores of the parental generation were correlated with the adult outcomes of their biologically related and unrelated children. The obtained correlations were low, but for the biological relationships positive parent adjustment went with positive life outcomes of their children, whereas for adoptive relationships the reverse was the case. Favorable MMPI scores from late adolescence were favorably related to adult outcomes, as were favorable personality ratings from childhood.

  19. Fuel fragmentation model advances using TEXAS-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M.L.; El-Beshbeeshy, M.; Nilsuwankowsit, S.; Tang, J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Because an energetic fuel-coolant interaction may be a safety hazard, experiments are being conducted to investigate the fuel-coolant mixing/quenching process (FARO) as well as the energetics of vapor explosion propagation for high temperature fuel melt simulants (KROTOS, WFCI, ZrEX). In both types of experiments, the dynamic breakup of the fuel is one of the key aspects that must be fundamentally understood to better estimate the magnitude of the mixing/quenching process or the explosion energetics. To aid our understanding the TEXAS fuel-coolant interaction computer model has been developed and is being used to analyze these experiments. Recently, the models for dynamic fuel fragmentation during the mixing and explosion phases of the FCI have been improved by further insights into these processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe these enhancements and to demonstrate their improvements by analysis of particular JRC FCI data. (author)

  20. Environmental assessment overview, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs

  1. Prevalence of Salmonella among waterfowl along the Texas Gulf coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigar, M K; Cummings, K J; Rankin, S C

    2017-12-01

    Migratory waterfowl may play a role in the ecology and transmission of zoonotic pathogens, given their ability to travel long distances and their use of varied habitats. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of Salmonella among waterfowl along the Texas Gulf coast and to characterize the isolates. Faecal samples were collected from hunter-harvested waterfowl at four wildlife management areas from September through November, 2016. Standard bacteriologic culture methods were used to isolate Salmonella from samples, and isolates were characterized by serotyping and anti-microbial susceptibility testing. The apparent prevalence of faecal Salmonella shedding was 0.5% (2/375). Serotypes identified were Thompson and Braenderup, and both isolates were susceptible to all anti-microbial agents tested. Although faecal contamination of agricultural fields or surface waters could serve as a potential source of zoonotic Salmonella transmission, waterfowl along the Gulf coast during the fall hunting season appear to pose minimal risk. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. What now for shallow water. [Off Louisiana and Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosby, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Improved prices and technological advances in well productivity prompt a fresh appraisal of bypassed reserves in some 20,000 sq miles of tidelands lying under 20--80 ft of water off the coasts of Louisiana and Texas. The resulting shallow-water drilling could bring new life to the ''obsolete'' submersible rig. The 25 existing drill rigs could drill an average of 175 exploratory wells per year if they were all available. Furthermore, well-designed submersible rigs and jackups can be built economically and are economical to operate and maintain. The new tradeoffs available with shallow-water operations should encourage operators to reevaluate the worked areas and explore the areas still open in water depths to 80 ft.

  3. Organophosphate insecticide poisoning of Canada geese in the Texas panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Wynn, L.D.; Flickinger, Edward L.; Kolbe, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen hundred waterfowl, mostly Canada Geese, died near Etter, Texas, in late January 1981 from anticholinesterase poisoning. Winter wheat in the area of the die-off had been treated with organophosphate insecticides to control greenbugs. Cholinesterase (ChE) levels in brains of a sample of geese found dead were 75% below normal, enough to account for death (Ludke et al. 1975). The gastrointestinal (G I) tracts of geese found dead were packed with winter wheat; gas chromatography techniques identified parathion and methyl parathion in the GI tract contents. Residues of both chemicals were confirmed by mass spectrometry. We recommend that less toxic materials, such as malathion, be used on grain crops when waterfowl are in the vicinity of treatment.

  4. Biogenic hydrocarbon emission estimates for North Central Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Wade Strange, I.; Allen, D.T. [University of Texas at Austin (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Estes, M. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States); Yarwood, G. [ENVIRON International Corporation, Novato, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were estimated for a 37 county region in North Central Texas. The estimates were based on several sources of land use/land cover data that were combined using geographical information systems. Field studies were performed to collect species and tree diameter distribution data. These data were used to estimate biomass densities and species distributions for each of the land use and cover classifications. VOC emissions estimates for the domain were produced using the new land use/land cover data and a biogenic emissions model. These emissions were more spatially resolved and a factor of 2 greater in magnitude than those calculated based on the biogenic emissions landuse database (BELD) commonly used in biogenic emissions models. (author)

  5. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Texas A ampersand M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A ampersand M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory

  6. Effects of prescribed fire in the coastal prairies of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, James B.; Allain, Larry K.; Baldwin, Heather Q.; Billock, Arlene G.; Eddleman, William R.; Given, Aaron M.; Jeske, Clint W.; Moss, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    Prescribed fire is widely applied for habitat management in coastal ecosystems. Fire management plans typically list a variety of objectives for prescribed burning, including succession management, promotion of native flora and fauna, providing habitat for species of importance, wildfire risk reduction (fuels management), as well as reduction and/or prevention of invasive species. In most cases, the information needed to determine the degree to which management objectives are met is not available. This study sought to provide an assessment of key objectives of fire management at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Texas Mid-coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex. The main purpose of this work was to provide information and recommendations that will support Region 2 of the USFWS in the conduct of their fire and habitat management activities in the Western Gulf coast region. There were four main components of this project: (1) a historical analysis of the role of fire in this ecosystem, (2) the development of standard methodology for assessing and monitoring fire effects in this system, (3) an evaluation of the effects of prescribed burning on the habitat being managed, and (4) an evaluation of the effects of burning on select fauna of special concern. A team of researchers, including some from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Southeast Missouri State University, and Louisiana State University were involved in the various components of this project. Extensive support by USFWS personnel, both at the Texas Mid-coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex and in the Regional Office (Region 2, USFWS), was a key component in this work. Data from the three years of this study were combined with the results of previous USGS studies performed at the site to strengthen our conclusions.

  7. Aflatoxin contamination in corn sold for wildlife feed in texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Nicholas R; Peper, Steven T; Downing, Carson D; Kendall, Ronald J

    2017-05-01

    Supplemental feeding with corn to attract and manage deer is a common practice throughout Texas. Other species, including northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), are commonly seen feeding around supplemental deer feeders. In many cases, supplemental feeding continues year-round so feed supply stores always have supplemental corn in stock. Fluctuating weather and improper storage of corn can lead to and/or amplify aflatoxin contamination. Due to the recent decline of bobwhites throughout the Rolling Plains ecoregion of Texas, there has been interest in finding factors such as toxins that could be linked to their decline. In this study, we purchased and sampled supplemental corn from 19 locations throughout this ecoregion to determine if aflatoxin contamination was present in individual bags prior to being dispersed to wildlife. Of the 57 bags sampled, 33 bags (approximately 58%) contained aflatoxin with a bag range between 0.0-19.91 parts per billion (ppb). Additionally, three metal and three polypropylene supplemental feeders were each filled with 45.4 kg of triple cleaned corn and placed in an open field to study long-term aflatoxin buildup. Feeders were sampled every 3 months from November 2013-November 2014. Average concentration of aflatoxin over the year was 4.08 ± 2.53 ppb (±SE) in metal feeders, and 1.43 ± 0.89 ppb (±SE) in polypropylene feeders. The concentration of aflatoxins is not affected by the type of feeder (metal vs polypropylene), the season corn was sampled, and the location in the feeder (top, middle, bottom) where corn is sampled. It is unlikely that corn used in supplemental feeders is contributing to the bobwhite decline due to the low levels of aflatoxin found in purchased corn and long-term storage of corn used in supplemental feeders.

  8. Epidemiology of falls in older adults in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Hasanat; Wong, Nicole J; Hu, Yueha; Yu, Mo; Marshall, Amanda; Yu, Shicheng

    2015-02-01

    The expected increase in the US older adult population implies an increased risk of fall-related injury among these individuals. We describe the epidemiology of fall morbidity among older adults in Texas, a large US state with a diverse population base. Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2010 data were analyzed. The falls outcome was defined as falling: any fall in the past 3 months and a serious fall: a fall resulting in limited activities for at least 1 day or requiring medical attention. A total of 5996 subjects were included in this analysis; 17.6% (n = 1055) reported falling 1 to 5 times in the previous 3 months, and 361 (6%) experienced serious falls. Risk of falling had a significant positive association among respondents who rated their general health as fair to poor (relative risk [RR] 2.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.55-3.68) and a negative association for those who reported regular physical activity (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42-0.82). A similar model examined the risk of serious falls and found statistically positive associations in respondents who reported fair or poor general health (RR 3.29, 95% CI 2.00-5.43). Negative associations were found for those who reported regular physical activity (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.38-0.83) and for men (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39-0.98). No statistically significant correlations for either of the fall outcomes were found with residence, obesity, education, income, age, ethnicity, employment, marital status, diabetes mellitus, or cardiovascular disease. Interventions aimed at the prevention of falls should focus on maintaining and improving general health and promoting physical activity among older adults.

  9. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Texas A M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  10. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Falls City site, Falls City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Falls City site in order to update the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranum mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrolgy and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,700,000 for stabilization in place, to about $35,100,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Falls City tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The tailings piles are presently being rewashed for uranium recovery by Solution Engineering, Inc. The cost for further reprocessing would be about $250/lb of U 3 O 8 . The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive for the foreseeable future

  11. Urinary fluoride excretion by children 4-6 years old in a south Texas community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baez Ramon J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated urinary fluoride excretion by school children 4-6 years old who were living in a south Texas rural community that had concentrations of fluoride in drinking water supplies generally around the optimal level. We took supervised collections of urine samples in the morning and afternoon at school, and parents of the participating students collected nocturnal samples. We recorded the beginning and end times of the three collection periods and then determined the urinary volume and urinary flow for each of the periods. We measured urinary fluoride concentrations and calculated the urinary excretion rate per hour. The children had breakfast and lunch provided at the school, where the drinking water contained 1.0-1.3 milligrams/liter (mg/L fluoride. Fluoride concentrations in the tested household water supplies, from wells, ranged from 0.1 to 3.2 mg/L fluoride. The children's average urinary fluoride concentrations found for the day were similar to those for the night, with means ranging from 1.26 mg/L to 1.42 mg/L. Average excretion was 36.4 µg/h in the morning, 45.6 µg/h in the afternoon, and 17.5 µg/h at night. The lower nocturnal excretion rates are easily explained by low urinary flow at night. Based on the 15 hours of urine collected, the extrapolated 24-hour fluoride excretion was 749 µg. In conjunction with similar studies, the data from this study will help in developing upper limits for urinary fluoride excretion that are appropriate for avoiding unsightly fluorosis while providing optimal protection against dental decay.

  12. Urinary fluoride excretion by children 4-6 years old in a south Texas community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon J. Baez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated urinary fluoride excretion by school children 4-6 years old who were living in a south Texas rural community that had concentrations of fluoride in drinking water supplies generally around the optimal level. We took supervised collections of urine samples in the morning and afternoon at school, and parents of the participating students collected nocturnal samples. We recorded the beginning and end times of the three collection periods and then determined the urinary volume and urinary flow for each of the periods. We measured urinary fluoride concentrations and calculated the urinary excretion rate per hour. The children had breakfast and lunch provided at the school, where the drinking water contained 1.0-1.3 milligrams/liter (mg/L fluoride. Fluoride concentrations in the tested household water supplies, from wells, ranged from 0.1 to 3.2 mg/L fluoride. The children's average urinary fluoride concentrations found for the day were similar to those for the night, with means ranging from 1.26 mg/L to 1.42 mg/L. Average excretion was 36.4 µg/h in the morning, 45.6 µg/h in the afternoon, and 17.5 µg/h at night. The lower nocturnal excretion rates are easily explained by low urinary flow at night. Based on the 15 hours of urine collected, the extrapolated 24-hour fluoride excretion was 749 µg. In conjunction with similar studies, the data from this study will help in developing upper limits for urinary fluoride excretion that are appropriate for avoiding unsightly fluorosis while providing optimal protection against dental decay.

  13. Evaluation of Four Water Management Policies for Ogallala Aquifer Sustainability in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, J. E.; Gowda, P. H.; Howell, T. A.; Marek, T. H.; Ha, W.; Almas, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    Diminishing groundwater supply in the Ogallala Aquifer will severely reduce regional crop and animal production in the absence of a sustainable water management policy. It is essential to mitigate adverse impacts on the regional economy due to future withdrawals of the limited groundwater resource. Currently, approximately ten alternative water management policies are being debated by policy makers in the Central and Southern High Plains of the Ogallala Aquifer region. Before implementing any new policy or modifying current policies, newer alternative policies should be evaluated for their impact on groundwater levels with eventual extension to regional economic impacts. The main objective of this study was to evaluate four water management policies, from the debated ones, on future groundwater levels in the Ogallala Aquifer beneath four heavily irrigated counties (Dallam, Sherman, Hartley, and Moore) located in the northwest corner of the Texas High Plains using a calibrated ModFlow model. The four water management policies were (1) voluntary permanent conversion to dry land production up to 10% of the total irrigated area, (2) adoption of advances in biotechnology that allow water use reductions at a rate of 1% per year up to 10% of current use, (3) mandatory water use reduction to decrease the total water pumped by 10% (volume per unit land area per year), and (4) voluntary temporary conversion to dry land production during 15 years for a maximum area of 10% of the total irrigated area. The water management policies were converted into water demand rates for ModFlow model inputs. Simulations were conducted for a 50-year (2010-2060) period. Preliminary results indicate that a combination of more than one policy will be required to produce a significant reduction in the current groundwater depletion rates.

  14. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett; Laura C. Zahm

    2005-04-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the 2003-2004 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently houses over 500,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 400,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has continued to increase during this third year of operation; over the past twelve months the HRC has averaged approximately 200 patrons per month. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and/or cash during this operating period. All of these funds went directly into the endowment. Outreach during 2004 and 2005 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing more donations of rock material and cash in order to fully fund the HRC endowment. BEG will also continue to increase the number of patrons using the facility, and we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library.

  15. Air pollutant concentrations near three Texas roadways, Part I: Ultrafine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yifang; Pudota, Jayanth; Collins, Donald; Allen, David; Clements, Andrea; DenBleyker, Allison; Fraser, Matt; Jia, Yuling; McDonald-Buller, Elena; Michel, Edward

    Vehicular emitted air pollutant concentrations were studied near three types of roadways in Austin, Texas: (1) State Highway 71 (SH-71), a heavily traveled arterial highway dominated by passenger vehicles; (2) Interstate 35 (I-35), a limited access highway north of Austin in Georgetown; and (3) Farm to Market Road 973 (FM-973), a heavily traveled surface roadway dominated by truck traffic. Air pollutants examined include carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO x), and carbonyl species in the gas-phase. In the particle phase, ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations (diameter road were found to be the most important factors determining UFP concentrations near the roadways. Since wind directions were not consistent during the sampling periods, distances along wind trajectories from the roadway to the sampling points were used to study the decay characteristics of UFPs. Under perpendicular wind conditions, for all studied roadway types, particle number concentrations increased dramatically moving from the upwind side to the downwind side. The elevated particle number concentrations decay exponentially with increasing distances from the roadway with sharp concentration gradients observed within 100-150 m, similar to previously reported studies. A single exponential decay curve was found to fit the data collected from all three roadways very well under perpendicular wind conditions. No consistent pattern was observed for UFPs under parallel wind conditions. However, regardless of wind conditions, particle concentrations returned to background levels within a few hundred meters of the roadway. Within measured UFP size ranges, smaller particles (6-25 nm) decayed faster than larger ones (100-300 nm). Similar decay rates were observed among UFP number, surface, and volume.

  16. Patterns of Infant Mortality in Texas' Triethnic Population During 1993 Through 1995

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerra, Horacio

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated the patterns of infant mortality in relation to birth weight, gestational and maternal age, parity, and prenatal care in Texas' triethnic population from 1993 through 1995 using...

  17. Air Pollutant Source Attribution for Southeast Texas Using 14C/12C Ratios

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lemire, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    ... ozone and particulate matter through the use of radiocarbon measurements. This effort was just a small portion of the many experiments conducted as a part of the Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS) 2000...

  18. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Texas based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Texas census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  19. Texas M-E flexible pavement design system: literature review and proposed framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Recent developments over last several decades have offered an opportunity for more rational and rigorous pavement design procedures. Substantial work has already been completed in Texas, nationally, and internationally, in all aspects of modeling, ma...

  20. The Legal Status of Low Speed, Electric, Automated Vehicles in Texas : Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This report explores whether vehicles that are both Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs) and Automated Vehicles (AVs) may operate legally on public roads in Texas. First is an examination of Neighborhood Electric Vehicles and how they are governed i...