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Sample records for tevatron run ii

  1. Higgs results from the Tevatron Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuchming, B.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2005-01-01

    The data taken at the Tevatron experiments have been analyzed to search for Higgs bosons. For the Standard Model Higgs searches, no excess is observed, the data are in good agreement with the expectations, so that limits are set on the production rates. For various theoretical models beyond the Standard Model, there is no excess either, which allows to derive constraints in their respective parameter spaces.

  2. First paper from Tevatron Run II submitted by CDF collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Scientists of the Collider Detector at Fermilab submitted today (March 19) the first scientific publication of Collider Run II to the science journal Physical Review D. The paper titled "Measurement of the Mass Difference m(Ds+)-m(D+) at CDF II" summarizes the results of an analysis carried out by CDF scientists Christoph Paus and Ivan Furic, MIT, describing the mass measurement of particles containing charm quarks" (1 page).

  3. Top mass measurements at the Tevatron run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velev, Gueorgui V.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    The latest top quark mass measurements by the CDF and D0 experiments are presented here. The mass has been determined in the dilepton (t{bar t} {yields} e{mu}, ee, {mu}{mu} + jets + E{sub T}) and lepton plus jets (t{bar t} {yields} e or {mu} + jets + E{sub T}) final states. The most accurate single result from lepton plus jets channel is 173.5{sub -3.6}{sup +3.7}(stat. + Jet Energy Scale Systematic) {+-} 1.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, which is better than the combined CDF and D0 Run I average. A preliminary and unofficial average of the best experimental Run II results gives M{sub top} = 172.7 {+-} 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. $B$ physics at the Tevatron: Run II and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Anikeev, K; Azfar, F.; Bailey, S.; Bauer, C.W.; Bell, W.; Bodwin, G.; Braaten, E.; Burdman, G.; Butler, J.N.; Byrum, K.; Cason, N.; Cerri, A.; Cheung, H.W.K.; Dighe, A.; Donati, S.; Ellis, R.K.; Falk, A.; Feild, G.; Fleming, S.; Furic, I.; Gardner, S.; Grossman, Y.; Gutierrez, G.; Hao, W; Harris, B.W.; Hewett, J.; Hiller, G.; Jesik, R.; Jones, M.; Kasper, P.A.; El-Khadra, A.; Kirk, M.; Kiselev, V.V.; Kroll, J.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kutschke, R.; Kuznetsov, V.E.; Laenen, E.; Lee, J.; Leibovich, A.K.; Lewis, J.D.; Ligeti, Z.; Likhoded, A.K.; Logan, H.E.; Luke, M.; Maciel, A.; Majumder, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, M.; Menary, S.; Nason, P.; Nierste, U.; Nir, Y.; Nogach, L.; Norrbin, E.; Oleari, C.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Petteni, M.; Poling, R.; Procario, M.; Punzi, G.; Quinn, H.; Rakitine, A.; Ridolfi, G.; Shestermanov, K.; Signorelli, G.; Silva, J.P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A.; Speakman, B.; Stenson, K.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stone, S.; Sumorok, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, W.; Trischuk, W.; Tseng, J.; Van Kooten, R.; Vasiliev, A.; Voloshin, M.; Wang, J.C.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wurthwein, F.; Xuan, N.; Yarba, J.; Yip, K.; Zieminski, A.

    2002-01-01

    This report provides a comprehensive overview of the prospects for B physics at the Tevatron. The work was carried out during a series of workshops starting in September 1999. There were four working groups: 1) CP Violation, 2) Rare and Semileptonic Decays, 3) Mixing and Lifetimes, 4) Production, Fragmentation and Spectroscopy. The report also includes introductory chapters on theoretical and experimental tools emphasizing aspects of B physics specific to hadron colliders, as well as overviews of the CDF, D0, and BTeV detectors, and a Summary.

  5. Direct Searches for Scalar Leptoquarks at the Run II Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Daniel Edward [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2004-08-01

    This dissertation sets new limits on the mass of the scalar leptoquark from direct searches carried out at the Run II CDF detector using data from March 2001 to October 2003. The data analyzed has a total time-integrated measured luminosity of 198 pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV. Leptoquarks are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into a lepton and a quark of the same generation. They consider two possible leptoquark decays: (1) β = BR(LQ → μq) = 1.0, and (2) β = BR(LQ → μq) = 0.5. For the β = 1 channel, they focus on the signature represented by two isolated high-pT muons and two isolated high-pT jets. For the β = 1/2 channel, they focus on the signature represented by one isolated high-pT muon, large missing transverse energy, and two isolated high-pT jets. No leptoquark signal is experimentally detected for either signature. Using the next to leading order theoretical cross section for scalar leptoquark production in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions [1], they set new mass limits on second generation scalar leptoquarks. They exclude the existence of second generation scalar leptoquarks with masses below 221(175) GeV/c2 for the β = 1(1/2) channels.

  6. Direct Searches For Scalar Leptoquarks At The Run Ii Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, D E

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation sets new limits on the mass of the scalar leptoquark from direct searches carried out at the Run II CDF detector using data from March 2001 to October 2003. The data analysed has a total time-integrated measured luminosity of 198 pb−1 of pp¯ collisions with s = 1.96 TeV. Leptoquarks are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into a lepton and a quark of the same generation. We consider two possible leptoquark decays: (1) β = BR(LQ → μq ) = 1.0, and (2) β = BR(LQ → μq ) = 0.5. For the β = 1 channel, we focus on the signature represented by two isolated high- pT muons and two isolated high-pT jets. For the β = 1/2 channel, we focus on the signature represented by one isolated high-pT muon, large missing transverse energy, and two isolated high- p T jets. No leptoquark signal is experimentally detected for either signature. Using the next to leading order theoretical cross section for s...

  7. CERN scientists take part in the Tevatron Run II performance review committee

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Tevatron Run II is under way at Fermilab, exploring the high-energy frontier with upgraded detectors that will address some of the biggest questions in particle physics.Until CERN's LHC switches on, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider is the world's only source of top quarks. It is the only place where we can search for supersymmetry, for the Higgs boson, and for signatures of additional dimensions of space-time. The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently convened a high-level international review committee to examine Fermilab experts' first-phase plans for the accelerator complex. Pictured here with a dipole magnet in CERN's LHC magnet test facility are the four CERN scientists who took part in the DOE's Tevatron review. Left to right: Francesco Ruggiero, Massimo Placidi, Flemming Pedersen, and Karlheinz Schindl. Further information: CERN Courier 43 (1)

  8. First measurement of the W boson mass in run II of the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abulencia, A.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Affolder, Anthony Allen; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Albrow, Michael G.; /Tsukuba U.; Amerio, S.; /Fermilab; Amidei, Dante E.; /Padua U.; Anastassov, A.; /Michigan U.; Anikeev, K.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Annovi, A.; /Fermilab /Frascati /Comenius U.

    2007-07-01

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass using 200 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. With a sample of 63964 W {yields} ev candidates and 51128 W W {yields} {mu}v candidates, we measure M{sub W} = (80413 {+-} 34{sub stat} {+-}34{sub syst} = 80413 {+-} 48) MeV/c{sup 2}. This is the most precise single measurement of the W boson mass to date.

  9. Study of Long-range Collisions and Wire Compensation for Tevatron Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank; Erdelyi, B; Boocha, V

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes studies of long-range collisions and their compensation by current carrying wires for the Tevatron Run-II, which were performed during a two-week stay at Fermilab, February 22 to March 8, 2004. The weak-strong code WSDIFF was significantly extended to simulate the actual long-range encounters at the Tevatron for different antiproton bunches in the train at injection and in collision. Tune footprints and diffusive apertures simulated by this code are presented for various cases, differing in the bunch position, the energy, the number of long-range and head-on collisions, the presence of additional compensating wires and the momentum deviation. It is confirmed that the solution of 4 wires for injection, previously found by B. Erdelyi, raises the dynamic aperture, by about 1.0-1.5sigma. For both injection and collision an ideal compensation of the 6 or 3 closest long-range encounters was modeled, by removing these collisions altogether. At collision, an improvement in the dynamic aperture ...

  10. Search for squarks and gluinos in the D0 experiment of the Run-II-a at the Tevatron; Recherche des squarks et des gluinos dans l'experience D0 au Run-II-a du Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdier, P

    2007-11-15

    The D0 experiment is recording pp-bar collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV since the beginning of the Run II-a of the Tevatron in 2001. The design of processor boards for the D0 level 2 trigger system is first presented. Those boards were installed in 2003, and they have been working perfectly since that date. Performances of missing transverse energy (/ ET ) reconstruction are then described. This quantity is important at hadron colliders especially for new particles searches. Finally, squarks and gluinos, supersymmetric partners of quarks and gluons, could be the most copiously produced supersymmetric particles at the Tevatron, if they are sufficiently light. Those particles were searched for in 0.96 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by D0 during the Run II-a. The final state consists of jets and missing transverse energy. The numbers of observed events are in good agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Lower mass limits at 95 % confidence level are obtained on the squark and gluino masses in the framework of the mSUGRA model. Contributions to other D0 data analyses are also shortly described. Those analyses are the search for first generation leptoquarks and the search for squarks in jets+{tau}(s)+E{sub T} events. The possibility to constrain a 'Little Higgs' model using the results of the jets+E{sub T} searches is then discussed. (author)

  11. The Physics Case for Extended Tevatron Running

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Darien R.

    2010-11-01

    Run II of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is currently scheduled to end late in 2011. Given the current performance of the collider and of the CDF and D0 detectors, it is estimated that the current data set could be approximately doubled with a run extended into 2014. A few examples are presented of the physics potential of these additional statistics. These are discussed in the context of the expected reach of the LHC 7 TeV data and the existing Tevatron data. In particular, an extraordinary opportunity is described which could probe the existence of a standard model Higgs boson with mass in the currently preferred region between 115 GeV and 150 GeV.

  12. Search for chargino and neutralino at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canepa, Anadi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2006-08-01

    In this dissertation we present a search for the associated production of charginos and neutralinos, the supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model bosons. We analyze a data sample representing 745 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the p$\\bar{p}$ Tevatron collider. We compare the Standard Model predictions with the observed data selecting events with three leptons and missing transverse energy. Finding no excess, we combine the results of our search with similar analyses carried out at CDF and set an upper limit on the chargino mass in SUSY scenarios.

  13. Measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation measures the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider with center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 ± 0.1 fb-1. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t$\\bar{t}$ events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be σt$\\bar{t}$ = 7.14 ± 0.25 (stat)-0.86+0.61(sys) pb.

  14. A Measurement of the Lifetime of the Λb Baryon with the CDF Detector at the Tevatron Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unverhau, Tatjana Alberta Hanna [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    In March 2001 the Tevatron accelerator entered its Run II phase, providing colliding proton and anti-proton beams with an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator to produce Λb baryons, which provides a unique opportunity to measure the properties of these particles. This thesis presents a measurement of the mean lifetime of the Λb baryon in the semileptonic channel Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$ μ- $\\bar{v}$μ. In total 186 pb-1 of data were used for this analysis, collected with the CDF detector between February 2002 and September 2003. To select the long-lived events from b-decays, the secondary vertex trigger was utilized. This significant addition to the trigger for Run II allows, for the first time, the selection of events with tracks displaced from the primary interaction vertex at the second trigger level. After the application of selection cuts this trigger sample contains approximately 991 Λb candidates. To extract the mean lifetime of Λb baryons from this sample, they transverse decay length of the candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit under the consideration of the missing neutrino momentum and the bias introduced by the secondary vertex trigger. The mean lifetime of the Λb is measured to be τ = 1.29 ± 0.11(stat.) ± 0.07(syst.) ps equivalent to a mean decay length of cτ = 387 ± 33(stat.) ± 21 (syst.) μm.

  15. Operation and physics potential of Tevatron Run 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2001-12-07

    The Tevatron Run 2 has begun. The Tevatron program in the next six years offers a real opportunity to significantly advance our understanding of the fundamental properties of the universe. It is an exciting, challenging program that goes straight to the highest priorities of high energy physics worldwide. The accelerator and detectors are being commissioned and seem to be performing well. We anticipate first physics results in the summer of 2002.

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass using dilepton events and a neutrino weighting algorithm with the DOe experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.

    2007-07-01

    Several measurements of the top quark mass in the dilepton final states with the DOe experiment are presented. The theoretical and experimental properties of the top quark are described together with a brief introduction of the Standard Model of particle physics and the physics of hadron collisions. An overview over the experimental setup is given. The Tevatron at Fermilab is presently the highest-energy hadron collider in the world with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. There are two main experiments called CDF and DOe, A description of the components of the multipurpose DOe detector is given. The reconstruction of simulated events and data events is explained and the criteria for the identification of electrons, muons, jets, and missing transverse energy is given. The kinematics in the dilepton final state is underconstraint. Therefore, the top quark mass is extracted by the so-called Neutrino Weighting method. This method is introduced and several different approaches are described, compared, and enhanced. Results for the international summer conferences 2006 and winter 2007 are presented. The top quark mass measurement for the combination of all three dilepton channels with a dataset of 1.05 1/fb yields: mtop=172.5{+-}5.5 (stat.) {+-} 5.8 (syst.) GeV. This result is presently the most precise top quark mass measurement of the DOe experiment in the dilepton chann el. It entered the top quark mass wold average from March 2007. (orig.)

  17. First final results from CDF RunII

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Tevatron collider was shut down at the end of September 2011, ending a period of operation lasted ten years ("Run II"). First results are now becoming available from the analysis of the full CDF Run II sample of 10fb-1. I will cover highlights of the CDF program from charm, bottom, top and Higgs sectors.

  18. Search for supersymmetric particles decaying into tri-leptons through R-parity violation, with D0 Run-II experiment at Fermilab; Recherche de particules supersymetriques se desintegrant en R-parite violee (couplage {lambda}(121)) dans un etat final a trois leptons, avec les donnees du Run-II de l'experience D0 au TeVatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnan, A.M

    2005-07-15

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the first data taken by the D0 detector during the Run II of the Tevatron. Supersymmetric particles have been search for in proton-antiproton collisions, with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. In the framework of supersymmetry with R-parity violation, I have studied the pair production of Gauginos, leading to a pair of LSP (0,{chi}{sub 1}), each one decaying into ee{nu}{sub {mu}} or e{mu}{nu}{sub e} with a {lambda}(121) coupling. The final state contains at least two electrons: I have thus paid special attention in this work to the methods concerning identification and mis-identification of electromagnetic particles, as well as reconstruction, triggering, and correction (of the reconstructed energy). In a selection of tri-leptons, with at least two electrons, and some transverse missing energy, we observed 0 event in the 350 pb{sup -1} of analyzed data, for 0.4 + 0.35 - 0.05 (sta) {+-} 0.16 (sys) expected from the Standard Model contributions. In the signal considered in this analysis, the selection efficiency is around 12 per cent. Results have been studied in two models: mSUGRA and MSSM. In mSUGRA model, limits on m(1/2) and lightest gauginos's masses have been obtained, with tan({beta}) = 5, A{sub 0} = 0, m{sub 0} = 100 and 1000 GeV.c{sup -2} and both signs of {mu}. In MSSM, with the hypothesis of massive sfermions (1000 GeV.c{sup -2}), we can exclude, at 95% Confidence Level, the region m({chi}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) < 200 GeV.c{sup -2} for all masses of {chi}{sub 1}{sup 0} LSP. (author)

  19. Higgs Searches at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, H G

    2000-01-01

    Higgs hunting is a world-wide sport and the Tevatron is set to become the next field of play when Run II starts in March 2001. To set the stage, we summarize results of searches for standard and non-standard Higgs bosons by CDF and Dzero in Run I at the Tevatron. Progress has been made in quantifying the requirements on the Tevatron Collider and on the upgraded experiments in Run II for extending the excellent work done at LEP. Armed with parameterizations of expected detector performance, the Tevatron Higgs Working group has made predictions of the sensitivity of CDF and Dzero to Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and in its Minimal Supersymmetric extension as a function of integrated luminosity. These predictions are presented to underscore the excitement being generated by Run II, and to highlight the need for the highest possible luminosity.

  20. The Muon system of the run II D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, B.S.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Anosov, V.A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bardon, O.; Bartlett, J.F.; Baturitsky, M.A.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov,; Bodyagin, V.; Butler, J.M.; Cease, H.; Chi, E.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Doulas, S.; Dugad, S.R.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Charles U. /Prague, Tech.

    2005-03-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of the upgraded D0 muon system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Significant improvements have been made to the major subsystems of the D0 muon detector: trigger scintillation counters, tracking detectors, and electronics. The Run II central muon detector has a new scintillation counter system inside the iron toroid and an improved scintillation counter system outside the iron toroid. In the forward region, new scintillation counter and tracking systems have been installed. Extensive shielding has been added in the forward region. A large fraction of the muon system electronics is also new.

  1. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  2. Recent results from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vellidis, Costas; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider was shut down in 2011, after 10 years of high performance operation at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV in Run II. The two experiments, CDF and DZero, continue to analyze the collected data, aiming to extract all possible information regarding studies of the standard model and searches for new physics. A short review of some of the recent measurements at the Tevatron, and of the impact of the Tevatron program to high energy physics, is presented.

  3. ATLAS VH(bb) Run II Search

    CERN Document Server

    Buzatu, Adrian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Higgs boson discovered at the LHC in 2012 has been observed coupling directly to W and Z bosons and to tau leptons, and indirectly to top quarks. In order to probe if it is indeed the particle predicted by the Standard Model, direct couplings of the Higgs boson to quarks must also be measured. The Higgs boson decays most often to a pair of bottom quarks (with a branching ratio of 58%). When the Higgs boson is produced alone in gluon-gluon fusion, the signal in this decay mode is overwhelmed by the regular multi-jet background. By requiring the Higgs boson to be produced in association with a vector boson V (W or Z), which is further required to decay leptonically, data events can be selected using charged-lepton or missing transverse energy triggers. The Tevatron experiments presented combined results showing evidence for the VH(H to bb) process at a significance level of about 3 standard deviations, while the combined LHC results from Run II data show a 2.6 standard deviation evidence for the H to bb dec...

  4. Searches for supersymmetry at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary R. M. Bishai

    2001-05-15

    We review current experimental results of searches for Supersymmetry (SUSY) at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using the Run I data collected during 1992-1996. New results from the CDF detector in the jets + missing E{sub t} and lepton-photon channels are presented. Recent results from model independent searches at D0 using the SLEUTH algorithm are reviewed. We discuss the prospects for supersymmetry searches at Run II of the Tevatron, scheduled to start in March, 2001.

  5. Constraining top quark effective theory in the LHC Run II era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Andy; Englert, Christoph; Ferrando, James; Miller, David J.; Moore, Liam; Russell, Michael; White, Chris D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Glasgow,Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The TopFitter collaboration

    2016-04-04

    We perform an up-to-date global fit of top quark effective theory to experimental data from the Tevatron, and from LHC Runs I and II. Experimental data includes total cross-sections up to 13 TeV, as well as differential distributions, for both single top and pair production. We also include the top quark width, charge asymmetries, and polarisation information from top decay products. We present bounds on the coefficients of dimension six operators, and examine the interplay between inclusive and differential measurements, and Tevatron/LHC data. All results are currently in good agreement with the Standard Model.

  6. Tevatron Results on Heavy Flavor Production and Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scuri, Fabrizio [INFN, Pisa

    2014-09-02

    The most recent results on heavy flavor production and decays from the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 are summarized and compared with some LHC experiment results. The collected data sample refers to the full Tevatron Run II operation and it corresponds to about 10 inverse fb of integrated luminosity per experiment.

  7. Electroweak, top and bottom physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukegawa, Fumihiko; /Tsukuba U.

    2004-10-01

    The Tevatron Run-II program has been in progress since 2001, and the CDF and D0 experiments have been operational with upgraded detectors. Coupled with recent improvements in the Tevatron accelerator performance, the experiments have started producing important physics results and measurements. They report these measurements as well as prospects in the near future.

  8. Tevatron The Cinderella story or the art of collider

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Tevatron Collider at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) is the world's highest energy particle collider at 1.8TeV c.m.e. The machine was a centerpiece of the US and world's High Energy Physics for many years. Currently, the Tevatron is in the last years of its operation in so-called Run II which started 2001 and is tentatively scheduled to end in 2010. In this lecture series, we'll try to learn from the exciting story of the Tevatron Collider Run II: the story of long preparations, great expectations, initial difficulties, years of "blood and sweat", continuous upgrades, exceeding its goals, high emotions, tune-up of accelerator organization for "combat fighting". The lectures will cover Introduction to the Tevatron, its history and Run II; "Plumbing" Issues; Beam Physics Issues; Luminosity Progress; Organization of Troops and Lessons for LHC.

  9. Hot topics from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzinski, D.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The Tevatron Run-II began in March 2001. To date, both the CDF and D0 experiments have collected 1 fb{sup -1} of data each. The results obtained from this data set were summarized at this conference in 39 parallel session presentations covering a wide range of topics. The author summarizes the most important of those results here and comments on some of the prospects for the future.

  10. B States at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulini, Manfred; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2009-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments have produced a wealth of heavy flavor physics results since the beginning of RunII of the Fermilab Tevatron. They review recent measurements of B hadron states including excited B states (B**, B{sub s}**) and the B{sub c}{sup +} meson. They also summarize the discoveries of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon states and the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon.

  11. Tevatron Alignment Issues 2003-2004

    CERN Document Server

    Volk, James T; Elementi, Luciano; Gelfand, Norman M; Gollwitzer, Keith; Greenwood, John A; Martens, Michael A; Moore, Craig D; Nobrega, Alfred; Russell, Allison D; Sager, Terry; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Stefanski, Raymond; Syphers, Michael J; Wojcik, George

    2005-01-01

    It was observed during the early part of Run II that dipole corrector currents in the Tevatron were changing over time. Measurement of the roll for dipoles and quadrupoles confirmed that there was a slow and systematic movement of the magnets from their ideal position. A simple system using a digital protractor and laptop computer was developed to allow roll measurements of all dipoles and quadrupoles. These measurements showed that many magnets in the Tevatron had rolled more than 1 milli-radian. To aid in magnet alignment a new survey network was built in the Tevatron tunnel. This network is based on the use of free centering laser tracker. During the measurement of the network coordinates for all dipole, quadrupole and corrector magnets were obtained. This paper discusses roll measurement techniques and data, the old and new Tevatron alignment network.

  12. Input data to run Landis-II

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data are input data files to run the forest simulation model Landis-II for Isle Royale National Park. Files include: a) Initial_Comm, which includes the location...

  13. ATLAS Run II Exotics Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    While Standard Model is in a good shape especially after Higgs boson discovery, there are a lot of questions beyond SM. The ATLAS detector is performing about 50 Exotics searches addressed these questions. This talk is discussing some of them with datasets collected during the 2015-2016 LHC run from 3 fb^-1 to 18 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy . Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  14. Operational Experience, Improvements, and Performance of the CDF Run II Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Calancha, C; Carron, S.; Cihangir, S.; Corbo, M.; Clark, D.; Di Ruzza, B.; Eusebi, R.; Fernandez, J.P.; Freeman, J.C.; Garcia, J.E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Grinstein, S.; Hartz, M.; Herndon, M.; Hill, C.; Hocker, A.; Husemann, U.; Incandela, J.; Issever, C.; Jindariani, S.; Junk, T.R.; Knoepfel, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.; Merkel, P; Mondragon, M.N.; Moore, R.; Mumford, J.R.; Nahn, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nelson, T.K.; Pavlicek, V.; Pursley, J.; Redondo, I.; Roser, R.; Schultz, K.; Spalding, J.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Stuart, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Tesarek, R.; Treptow, K.; Wallny, R.; Worm, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) pursues a broad physics program at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Between Run II commissioning in early 2001 and the end of operations in September 2011, the Tevatron delivered 12 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. Many physics analyses undertaken by CDF require heavy flavor tagging with large charged particle tracking acceptance. To realize these goals, in 2001 CDF installed eight layers of silicon microstrip detectors around its interaction region. These detectors were designed for 2--5 years of operation, radiation doses up to 2 Mrad (0.02 Gy), and were expected to be replaced in 2004. The sensors were not replaced, and the Tevatron run was extended for several years beyond its design, exposing the sensors and electronics to much higher radiation doses than anticipated. In this paper we describe the operational challenges encountered over the past 10 years of running the CDF silicon detectors, the preventive measures undertaken, an...

  15. Search for the Production of Gluinos and Squarks with the CDF II Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lorenzo, Gianluca [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-19

    This thesis reports on two searches for the production of squarks and gluinos, supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model (SM) quarks and gluons, using the CDF detector at the Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collider. An inclusive search for squarks and gluinos pair production is performed in events with large ET and multiple jets in the final state, based on 2 fb-1 of CDF Run II data. The analysis is performed within the framework of minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) and assumes R-parity conservation where sparticles are produced in pairs. The expected signal is characterized by the production of multiple jets of hadrons from the cascade decays of squarks and gluinos and large missing transverse energy ET from the lightest supersymmetric particles (LSP). The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% confidence level (CL) upper limits on production cross sections and squark and gluino masses in a given mSUGRA scenario. An upper limit on the production cross section is placed in the range between 1 pb and 0.1 pb, depending on the gluino and squark masses considered. The result of the search is negative for gluino and squark masses up to 392 GeV/c2 in the region where gluino and squark masses are close to each other, gluino masses up to 280 GeV/c2 regardless of the squark mass, and gluino masses up to 423 GeV=c2 for squark masses below 378 GeV/c2. These results are compatible with the latest limits on squark/gluino production obtained by the D0 Collaboration and considerably improve the previous exclusion limits from direct and indirect searches at LEP and the Tevatron. The inclusive search is then extended to a scenario where the pair production of sbottom squarks is dominant. The new search is performed in a generic MSSM scenario with R-parity conservation. A specific SUSY particle mass hierarchy is assumed such that the

  16. Search for MSSM Higgses at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Connolly, A

    2002-01-01

    We present an overview of searches for MSSM Higgs at the Tevatron, concentrating on searches probing the high tan(beta) region. We discuss the search for A/H -> tau tau which is soon to be completed in the Run I data and review the new tau triggers implemented by CDF and D0 in Run II, which will greatly impact this analysis. We also present the results of a Run I search for A/H bb -> bbbb performed by CDF and highlight expected improvements in this channel by both experiments in Run II.

  17. Supersymmetry results at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manca, Giulia; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    The Run II physics programme of the Tevatron is proceeding with more than 300 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data, collected at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles are starting to set new limits, improving over the LEP and Run I results and exploring new regions of parameter space. They present recent results in Supersymmetry with the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors and give some prospects for the future of these searches.

  18. Coupling in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1994-12-01

    The performance of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at the commencement of run Ib was far below expectations. After a frustrating period of several months, a low-{beta} quad downstream of the interaction point at B0 was found to be rolled. This rolled quadrupole coupled the horizontal and vertical motion of the Tevatron beams. It also made matching the beam from the Main Ring to the Tevatron impossible, resulting in emittance blow up on injection. The net result of the roll was a significant reduction in the Tevatron luminosity. When the roll in the quadrupole was corrected the performance of the Tevatron improved dramatically. This note will discuss the experimental data indicating the presence of coupling and subsequent calculations which show how coupling an affect the luminosity. It is not intended to exhaust a discussion of coupling, which hopefully will be understood well enough to be discussed in a subsequent note.

  19. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section at D0 Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agram, Jean-Laurent [Univ. of Upper Alsace, Mulhouse (France)

    2004-12-17

    This work describes the measurement of inclusive jets cross section in the DØ experiment. This cross section is computed as a function of jet transverse momentum, in several rapidity intervals. This quantity is sensitive to the proton structure and is crucial for the determination of parton distribution functions (PDF), essentially for the gluon at high proton momentum fraction. The measurement presented here gives the first values obtained for Tevatron Run II for the cross section in several rapidity intervals, for an integrated luminosity of 143 pb-1. The results are in agreement, within the uncertainties, with theoretical Standard Model predictions, showing no evidence for new physics.

  20. Luminosity Measurements at LHCb for Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Coombs, George

    2018-01-01

    A precise measurement of the luminosity is a necessary component of many physics analyses, especially cross-section measurements. At LHCb two different direct measurement methods are used to determine the luminosity: the “van der Meer scan” (VDM) and the “Beam Gas Imaging” (BGI) methods. A combined result from these two methods gave a precision of less than 2% for Run I and efforts are ongoing to provide a similar result for Run II. Fixed target luminosity is determined with an indirect method based on the single electron scattering cross-section.

  1. Generation and diagnostics of uncaptured beam in the Fermilab Tevatron and its control by electron lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Long Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In the collider run II, the Tevatron operates with 36 high intensity bunches of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons. Particles not captured by the Tevatron rf system pose a threat since they can quench the superconducting magnets during acceleration or at beam abort. We describe the main mechanisms for the origination of this uncaptured beam, and present measurements of its main parameters by means of a newly developed diagnostics system. The Tevatron electron lens is effectively used in the collider run II operation to remove uncaptured beam and keep its intensity in the abort gaps at a safe level.

  2. Parton distributions: HERA-Tevatron-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Watt, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    The parton distribution functions (PDFs) are a non-negotiable input to almost all theory predictions at hadron colliders. In this talk, I introduce PDF determination by global analysis and discuss selected topics concerning recent relevant data from HERA and the Tevatron, before giving some prospects for the LHC. The combination of H1 and ZEUS cross sections reduces uncertainties and will be an important input to future global PDF analyses. The theoretical description of the heavy-quark contribution to structure functions at HERA has a significant influence on predictions at the LHC. New W and Z data from the Tevatron Run II provide important PDF constraints, but there are currently problems describing the latest data on the lepton charge asymmetry from W -> l nu decays. The Tevatron Run II jet production data prefer a smaller high-x gluon than the previous Run I data, which impacts on predictions for Higgs cross sections at the Tevatron. It is now possible to consistently calculate a combined "PDF+alpha_S" u...

  3. Input data to run Landis-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.

    2017-01-01

    The data are input data files to run the forest simulation model Landis-II for Isle Royale National Park. Files include: a) Initial_Comm, which includes the location of each mapcode, b) Cohort_ages, which includes the ages for each tree species-cohort within each mapcode, c) Ecoregions, which consist of different regions of soils and climate, d) Ecoregion_codes, which define the ecoregions, and e) Species_Params, which link the potential establishment and growth rates for each species with each ecoregion.

  4. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Top Quark Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; Vellidis, Costas

    2014-09-17

    We present results on top quark physics from the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton anti-proton collider. These include legacy results from Run II that were published or submitted for publication before mid-2014, as well as a summary of Run I results. The historical perspective of the discovery of the top quark in Run I is also described.

  5. Recent QCD Studies at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Robert Craig

    2008-04-01

    Since the beginning of Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron the QCD physics groups of the CDF and D0 experiments have worked to reach unprecedented levels of precision for many QCD observables. Thanks to the large dataset--over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by each experiment--important new measurements have recently been made public and will be summarized in this paper.

  6. High pt jets and photons at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; /Illinois U., Chicago

    2005-09-01

    The authors present recent results on high p{sub T} jets and photon production in {bar p}p collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The measurements were performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations using between 150 and 300 pb{sup -1} of data taken during Run II at the Tevatron.

  7. Searches for New Phenomena at the Tevatron and at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Arnd

    2006-10-01

    Recent results on searches for new physics at Run II of the Tevatron and highlights from HERA are reported. The searches cover many different final states and a wide range of models. All analyses have at this point led to negative results, but some interesting anomalies have been found.

  8. CMS Trigger Improvements towards Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067212

    2016-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capability. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. Both systems need to provide an efficient and fast selection of events, to keep the average write-out rate below 450Hz. For Run II, the doubling of both the center of mass energy to 13 TeV and the collision rate to 40 MHz, will imply increased cross sections and out-of-time pile-up. We will present the improvements brought to both L1T and HLT strategies to meet those new challenges.

  9. QCD analysis of W- and Z-boson production at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarda, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Belov, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, 198504, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Cooper-Sarkar, A. M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Diaconu, C. [CPPM, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Mediterranee, Marseille (France); Glazov, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Guffanti, A. [Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jung, A. [FERMILAB, 60510, Batavia, IL (United States); Kolesnikov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Joliot-Curie 6, 141980, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Lohwasser, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, 15738, Zeuthen (Germany); Myronenko, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Olness, F. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX (United States); Pirumov, H.; Plačakytė, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Radescu, V. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sapronov, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Joliot-Curie 6, 141980, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Slominski, W. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Starovoitov, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Sutton, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Sussex House, BN1 9RH, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    Recent measurements of the W-boson charge asymmetry and of the Z-boson production cross sections, performed at the Tevatron collider in Run II by the D0 and CDF collaborations, are studied using the HERAFitter framework to assess their impact on the proton parton distribution functions (PDFs). The Tevatron measurements, together with deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA, are included in a QCD analysis performed at next-to-leading order, and compared to the predictions obtained using other PDF sets from different groups. Good agreement between measurements and theoretical predictions is observed. The Tevatron data provide significant constraints on the d-valence quark distribution.

  10. QCD analysis of W- and Z-boson production at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarda, S.; Glazov, A.; Myronenko, V.; Pirumov, H.; Placakyte, R.; Starovoitov, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Belov, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); St. Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Cooper-Sarkar, A.M. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Diaconu, C. [Univ. Mediterranee, CPPM, IN2P3-CNRS, Marseille (France); Guffanti, A. [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center, Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jung, A. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Kolesnikov, V.; Sapronov, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Lohwasser, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Olness, F. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX (United States); Radescu, V. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Slominski, W. [Jagiellonian University, M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Sutton, M. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Collaboration: HERAFitter developers' team

    2015-09-15

    Recent measurements of the W-boson charge asymmetry and of the Z-boson production cross sections, performed at the Tevatron collider in Run II by the D0 and CDF collaborations, are studied using the HERAFitter framework to assess their impact on the proton parton distribution functions (PDFs). The Tevatron measurements, together with deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA, are included in a QCD analysis performed at next-to-leading order, and compared to the predictions obtained using other PDF sets from different groups. Good agreement between measurements and theoretical predictions is observed. The Tevatron data provide significant constraints on the d-valence quark distribution. (orig.)

  11. Muon reconstruction and identification with the Run II D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Abbott, B. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Acharya, B.S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Adams, T. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Agnew, J.P. [The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Alexeev, G.D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Alton, A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Arthaud, M. [CEA, Irfu, SPP, Saclay (France); Askew, A. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Atkins, S. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Augsten, K. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Avila, C. [Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia); Badaud, F. [LPC, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Clermont (France); Bagby, L.; Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bandurin, D.V. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Banerjee, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Barberis, E. [Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); and others

    2014-02-11

    We present an overview of the muon reconstruction and identification methods employed by the D0 collaboration to analyze the Run II (2001–2011) pp{sup ¯} data of the Fermilab Tevatron collider at √(s)=1.96TeV. We discuss the performance of these methods, how it is measured using D0 data, and how it is properly modeled by the D0 simulation program. In its pseudorapidity acceptance, |η|<2, the muon system identifies high-p{sub T} muons (p{sub T}≳10GeV) with efficiencies ranging from 72% to 89%. Muons tracks are reconstructed in the D0 central tracking system with efficiencies ranging from 85% to 92% and with a typical relative momentum resolution of 10% for p{sub T}=40GeV. Isolation criteria reject multijet background with efficiencies of 87–99%.

  12. Search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in the ditau decay channels at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almenar, Cristobal Cuenca [Univ. of Valencia (Spain)

    2008-04-01

    This thesis presents the results on a search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs, with least one of these taus decays leptonically. The search was performed with a sample of 1.8 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron and collected by CDF Run II. No significant excess over the Standard Model prediction was found and a 95% confidence level exclusion limit have been set on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the Higgs boson mass. This limit has been translated into the MSSM Higgs sector parameter plane, tanβ vs. MA, for the four different benchmark scenarios.

  13. Muon reconstruction and identification with the Run II D0 detector

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the muon reconstruction and identification methods employed by the D0 Collaboration to analyze the Run II (2001-2011) ppbar data of the Fermilab Tevatron collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. We discuss the performance of these methods, how it is measured using D0 data, and how it is properly modeled by the D0 simulation program. In its pseudorapidity acceptance, eta10 GeV) with efficiencies ranging from 72% to 89%. Muons tracks are reconstructed in the D0 central tracking system with efficiencies ranging from 85% to 92% and with a typical relative momentum resolution of 10% for pT = 40 GeV. Isolation criteria reject multijet background with efficiencies of 87% to 99%.

  14. Rare b decays and CP violation at the Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristori, Luciano

    2012-03-01

    The experiments at the Tevatron, CDF and D0, have access to one of the world's largest samples of charm and beauty hadrons decays. These provide information competitive and complementary to that from dedicated flavor facilities. With the analysis of the full Run II data sample, this successful program has now reached its maturity. I review recent Tevatron flavor physics results, focusing on those that are specifically sensitive to departures from the Standard Model, such as searches for rare B decays, measurements of CP-violation in charm, and bottom-strange decays.

  15. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; /Fermilab; Kozub, Sergei; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Solyak, Nikolai; /Fermilab; Sytnik, Veniamin; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Tiunov, Mikhail; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Tkachenko, Leonid; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Wildman, David; Wolff, Daniel; Zhang, Xiao-Long; /Fermilab

    2011-09-12

    Fermilab's Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy accelerator in which tightly focused beams of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons collide at two dedicated interaction points (IPs). Both beams share the same beam pipe and magnet aperture and, in order to avoid multiple detrimental head-on collisions, the beams are placed on separated orbits everywhere except the main IPs by using high-voltage (HV) electrostatic separators. The electromagnetic beam-beam interaction at the main IPs together with the long-range interactions between separated beams adversely affect the collider performance, reducing the luminosity integral per store (period of continuous collisions) by 10-30%. Tuning the collider operation for optimal performance becomes more and more cumbersome as the beam intensities and luminosity increase. The long-range effects which (besides being nonlinear) vary from bunch to bunch are particularly hard to mitigate. A comprehensive review of the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron Collider Run II can be found in Ref. [1]. The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  16. Review of recent LHCb results and prospects for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Hicheur, A

    2015-01-01

    As first Run II data acquisition has begun, it is useful to expose the pending questions by reviewing some of the most recent results obtained with Run I data analyses. Early results of the current data taking and middle-term prospects are also shown to illustrate the efficiency of the acquisition and analysis chain.

  17. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Wobisch, M

    2012-01-01

    Recent QCD related results from the CDF and the D0 experiments are presented based on proton anti-proton collision data at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV, taken in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Measured observables include inclusive photon and diphoton production, vector boson plus jets production, event shape variables, and inclusive multijet production. The measurement results are compared to QCD theory calculations in different approximations. A determination of the strong coupling constant from jet data is presented.

  18. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandurin, D. [Virginia U.; Bernardi, G. [Paris U., VI-VII; Gerber, C. [Chicago U., EFI; Junk, T. [Fermilab; Juste, A. [Barcelona, IFAE; Kotwal, A. [Duke U.; Lewis, J. [Fermilab; Mesropian, C. [Rockefeller U.; Schellman, H. [Northwestern U.; Sekaric, J. [Kansas U.; Toback, D. [Texas A-M; Van Kooten, R. [Indiana U.; Vellidis, C. [Fermilab; Zivkovic, L. [Clemson U.

    2015-02-27

    We present a comprehensive review of the physics results obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations up to summer 2014, with emphasis on those achieved in the Run II of the Tevatron collider which delivered a total integrated luminosity of ~10 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96~{\\rm TeV}$. The results are presented in six main physics topics: QCD, Heavy Flavor, Electroweak, Top quark, Higgs boson and searches for New Particles and Interactions. The characteristics of the accelerator, detectors, and the techniques used to achieve these results are also briefly summarized.

  19. Charm (and Beauty) Production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacker, Jonas; /Bristol U.

    2007-11-01

    The authors present recent results on heavy flavor production at Tevatron Run II for typically {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of analyzed p{bar p} data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This includes results on single and correlated open charm and bottom cross sections, charm pair production kinematics, J/{psi}, {psi}(2S) and {chi}{sub cJ} cross sections and polarization measurements in J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), {Upsilon}(1S), and {Upsilon}(2S).

  20. Recent Tevatron Results on CP-Violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbincius, Peter H. [Fermilab

    2014-08-27

    Using their full Tevatron Run II data sets, the CDF and D0 Experiments present measurements of CP -violating asymmetries in the charmless decays of bottom baryons Λ0 → pπ-, Λ0 → pK-, and also for B0 → K-π+, B0 → K+π-, b b s Ds → φπ± , and for single muons and like-sign dimuons in pp collisions. Except for the like-sign dimuon asymmetry, these asymmetry measurements are consistent with available predictions of the standard model.

  1. Recent Tevatron Results on CP-Violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbincius, Peter H. [Fermilab

    2014-08-25

    Using their full Tevatron Run II data sets, the CDF and D0 Experiments present measurements of CP-violating asymmetries in the charmless decay of bottom baryons Lambda-b => p pi-, Lambda-b => p K-, and also for Bs0 => K- pi+, B0 => K+ pi-, Ds => phi pi, and for single muons and like-sign dimuons in p-pbar collisions. Except for the like-sign dimuon asymmetry, these asymmetry measurements are consistent with available predictions of the standard model.

  2. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: Tevatron: The Cinderella Story or The Art Of Collider Commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 01, 03, 04, 05 October 2007 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Tevatron: The Cinderella Story or The Art Of Collider Commissioning V. SHILTSEV / Fermi National Accelerator Laboraty, Batavia IL, USA The Tevatron Collider at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) is the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8TeV c.m.e. The machine was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics for many years. Currently, the Tevatron is in the last years of its operation in so-called Run II which started 2001 and is tentatively scheduled to end in 2010. In this lecture series, we’ll try to learn from the exciting story of the Tevatron Collider Run II: the story of long preparations, great expectations, initial difficulties, years of "blood and sweat", continuous upgrades, exceeding its goals, high emotions, tune-up of accelerator organization for "combat fighting". The lectures will cover Introduction to the Tevatron, its history and Run II; "Plumbing"...

  3. Search for supersymmetric neutral Higgs bosons at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanlon, Tim; /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-10-01

    Recent preliminary results obtained by the CDF and D0 Collaborations on searches for Higgs bosons beyond the Standard Model at Run II of the Tevatron are discussed. The data, corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 1 fb{sup -1}, are compared to theoretical expectations. No significant excess of signal above the expected background is observed in any of the various final states examined, and so limits at 95% Confidence Level (CL) are presented.

  4. Parton distributions for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D.; Carrazza, Stefano; Deans, Christopher S.; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Hartland, Nathan P.; Latorre, José I.; Rojo, Juan; Ubiali, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We present NNPDF3.0, the first set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) determined with a methodology validated by a closure test. NNPDF3.0 uses a global dataset including HERA-II deep-inelastic inclusive cross-sections, the combined HERA charm data, jet production from ATLAS and CMS, vector boson rapidity and transverse momentum distributions from ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, W+c data from CMS and top quark pair production total cross sections from ATLAS and CMS. Results are based on LO, NLO and NNLO QCD theory and also include electroweak corrections. To validate our methodology, we show that PDFs determined from pseudo-data generated from a known underlying law correctly reproduce the statistical distributions expected on the basis of the assumed experimental uncertainties. This closure test ensures that our methodological uncertainties are negligible in comparison to the generic theoretical and experimental uncertainties of PDF determination. This enables us to determine with confidence PDFs at different pertu...

  5. Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  6. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Roeck, Albert de; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+$\\alpha_s$ uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new

  7. QCD measurements at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Selected quantum chromodynamics (QCD) measurements performed at the Fermilab Run II Tevatron ppbar collider running at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV by CDF and D0 Collaborations are presented. The inclusive jet, dijet production and three-jet cross section measurements are used to test perturbative QCD calculations, constrain parton distribution function (PDF) determinations, and extract a precise value of the strong coupling constant, alpha_s(m_Z) = 0.1161^{+0.0041}_{-0.0048}. Inclusive photon production cross-section measurements reveal an inability of next-to-leading-order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations to describe low-energy photons arising directly in the hard scatter. The diphoton production cross-sections check the validity of the NLO pQCD predictions, soft-gluon resummation methods implemented in theoretical calculations, and contributions from the parton-to-photon fragmentation diagrams. Events with W/Z+jets productions are used to measure many kinematic distributions allowing extensive tests and tu...

  8. Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Run II Detector using the Electron P(T) Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andeen, Jr., Timothy R. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a description of the measurement of the W boson mass using the D0 Run II detector with 770 pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collision data. These collisions were produced by the Tevatron at √s = 1.96 TeV between 2002 and 2006. We use a sample of W → ev and Z → ee decays to determine the W boson mass with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and the transverse mass distribution of the boson. We measure MW = 80340 ± 37 (stat.) ± 26 (sys. theo.) ± 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = 80340 ± 68 MeV with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and MW = 80361 ± 28 (stat.) ± 17 (sys. theo.) ± 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = 80361 ± 61 MeV with the transverse mass distribution.

  9. Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators in ATLAS Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MBTS) delivered the primary triggers for selecting events from real LHC collisions with the smallest bias for the low luminosity LHC RunI fills from 2009-2013 (proton-proton, lead-lead and lead-proton collisions). Similarly, for the next RunII of LHC (2015-2018) MBTS will provide key ingredients for the first physics measurements at the new LHC proton-proton collisions energies (charge multiplicity, proton-proton cross section, rapidity gap measurements, ...) and in general for low luminosity LHC fills. After more than $25$\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions delivered during RunI of LHC, MBTS detectors have been substantially upgraded for the RunII of LHC (starting in 2015). The upgrade strategy will be presented showing the scintillator replacement, the modified read out scheme, the optical measurements on RunI scintillators assessing the degradation due to the dose received and how the new simulation is being implemented to take into accounts all the modific...

  10. Review of physics results from the Tevatron: QCD physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesropian, Christina [Rockefeller U.; Bandurin, Dmitry [Virginia U.

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results from studies of quantum chromodynamics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include Run II results for the time period up to the end of Summer 2014. A brief description of Run I results is also given. This review covers a wide spectrum of topics, and includes measurements with jet and vector boson final states in the hard (perturbative) energy regime, as well as studies of soft physics such as diffractive and elastic scatterings, underlying and minimum bias events, hadron fragmentation, and multiple parton interactions.

  11. LHCb detector and trigger performance in Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca, Dordei

    2017-12-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of b- and c- hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events into two stages, giving room to perform the alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  12. Database usage and performance for the Fermilab Run II experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonham, D.; Box, D.; Gallas, E.; Guo, Y.; Jetton, R.; Kovich, S.; Kowalkowski, J.; Kumar, A.; Litvintsev, D.; Lueking, L.; Stanfield, N.; Trumbo, J.; Vittone-Wiersma, M.; White, S.P.; Wicklund, E.; Yasuda, T.; /Fermilab; Maksimovic, P.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2004-12-01

    The Run II experiments at Fermilab, CDF and D0, have extensive database needs covering many areas of their online and offline operations. Delivering data to users and processing farms worldwide has represented major challenges to both experiments. The range of applications employing databases includes, calibration (conditions), trigger information, run configuration, run quality, luminosity, data management, and others. Oracle is the primary database product being used for these applications at Fermilab and some of its advanced features have been employed, such as table partitioning and replication. There is also experience with open source database products such as MySQL for secondary databases used, for example, in monitoring. Tools employed for monitoring the operation and diagnosing problems are also described.

  13. Higgs Boson Measurements in CMS with Run II Data

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Latest results from the CMS experiment on studies of Higgs boson production are presented. Studies involving the 125 GeV Higgs boson using various Standard Model production and decay modes have been performed using proton proton collisions from data accumulated during the LHC Run II with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Similar datasets have also been used to place constraints on physics beyond the Standard Model involving extended Higgs boson sectors.

  14. Beyond the Standard Model - Searches at HERA and the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Gruenendahl, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Searches for Physics beyond the Standard Model have entered an exciting new phase: the complete HERA data samples obtained until the end of operations in the Summer of 2007 are now available for analysis. ZEUS and H1 have each collected about 0.5 fb^{-1} of lepton proton data, distributed over electron and positron running, and over different lepton beam polarisations. At the same time the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider is accumulating data at unprecedented rates, with current analyses based on up to 3 fb^{-1}. The Tevatron experiments DZERO and CDF have each already recorded over 4 fb^{-1} (Fall 2008), and are aiming for a total of 8 fb^{-1} of antiproton-proton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy for Tevatron Run II. I am presenting recent updates (from the last 12 months) on searches, grouped loosely into three classes: well-established `traditional' searches, mostly for very specific signatures and models, more recent and/or more generalized searches for broader classes of phenomena, a...

  15. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  16. The CMS Level-1 Trigger system for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Tapper, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    During LHC Run II the centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions has increased up to 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity has progressed towards $2 \\times 10^{34} \\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under these conditions, the CMS trigger system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS Level-1 trigger is designed to improve performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing. The trigger design, implementation and commissioning are summarised and performance results are described.

  17. Improvements to ATLAS Track Reconstruction for Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Cairo, Valentina Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Run-II of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. In addition, the Insertable B-layer (IBL) is a fourth pixel layer, which has been inserted at the centre of ATLAS during the shutdown of the LHC. We will discuss improvements to track reconstruction developed during the two year shutdown of the LHC. These include novel techniques developed to improve the performance in the dense cores of jets, optimisation for the expected conditions, and a big software campaign which lead to more than a factor of three decrease in the CPU time needed to process each recorded event.

  18. VeloTT tracking for LHCb Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, Espen Eie; Tresch, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This note describes track reconstruction in the LHCb tracking system upstream of the magnet, combining VELO tracks with hits in the TT sub-detector. The implementation of the VeloTT algorithm and its performance in terms of track reconstruction efficiency, ghost rate and execution time are presented. The algorithm has been rewritten for use in the first software trigger level for LHCb Run II. The momentum and charge information obtained for the VeloTT tracks (due to a fringe magnetic field between the VELO and TT sub-detectors) can reduce the total execution time for the full tracking sequence.

  19. Top Quark Physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Andreas W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). Particle Physics Division

    2015-05-21

    An overview of recent top quark measurements using the full Run II data set of CDF or D0 at the Tevatron is presented. Results are complementary to the ones at the LHC. Recent measurements of the production cross section of top quarks in strong and electroweak production and of top quark production asymmetries are presented. The latter includes the measurement of the tt-bar production asymmetry by D0 in the dilepton decay channel. Within their uncertainties the results from all these measurements agree with their respective Standard Model expectation. Finally latest updates on measurements of the top quark mass are discussed, which at the time of the conference are the most precise determinations.

  20. Electroweak production of the top quark in the Run II of the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Benoit [Louis Pasteur Univ., Strasbourg (France)

    2006-04-28

    The work exposed in this thesis deals with the search for electroweak production of top quark (single top) in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This production mode has not been observed yet. Analyzed data have been collected during the Run II of the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb-1. In the Standard Model, the decay of a top quark always produce a high momentum bottom quark. Therefore bottom quark jets identification plays a major role in this analysis. The large lifetime of b hadrons and the subsequent large impact parameters relative to the interaction vertex of charged particle tracks are used to tag bottom quark jets. Impact parameters of tracks attached to a jet are converted into the probability for the jet to originate from the primary vertex. This algorithm has a 45% tagging efficiency for a 0.5% mistag rate. Two processes (s and t channels) dominate single top production with slightly different final states. The searched signature consists in 2 to 4 jets with at least one bottom quark jet, one charged lepton (electron or muon) and missing energy accounting for a neutrino. This final state is background dominated and multivariate techniques are needed to separate the signal from the two main backgrounds: associated production of a W boson and jets and top quarks pair production. The achieved sensitivity is not enough to reach observation and we computed upper limits at the 95% confidence level at 5 pb (s-channel) and 4.3 pb (t-channel) on single top production cross-sections.

  1. Top quark production and properties at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Frank; /Munich U.

    2005-06-01

    The precise measurement of top quark production and properties is one of the primary goals of the Tevatron during Run II. The total t{bar t} production cross-section has been measured in a large variety of decay channels and using different selection criteria. Results from differential cross-section measurements and searches for new physics in t{bar t} production and top quark decays are available. Electroweak production of single top quarks has been searched for. The results from all these analyses, using typically 200 pb{sup -1} of data, are presented.

  2. Spectroscopy and Decay of $B$ Hadrons at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulini, Manfred

    2007-02-01

    The authors review recent results on heavy quark physics focusing on Run II measurements of B hadron spectroscopy and decay at the Tevatron. A wealth of new B physics measurements from CDF and D0 has been available. These include the spectroscopy of excited B states (B**, B**{sub s}) and the observation of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon. The discussion of the decays of B hadrons and measurements of branching fractions focuses on charmless two-body decays of B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -}. They report several new B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay channels.

  3. B Lambda_b and Charm Results from the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Azfar, F

    2003-01-01

    Recent results on $B_d$, $B_u^{\\pm}$, $B_s$, $\\Lambda_b$ and Charm hadrons are reported from $\\approx$ 75pb$^{-1}$ and $\\approx$ 40 pb$^{-1}$ of data accumulated at the upgraded CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron $\\bar{p}-p$ collider, during Run-II. These include lifetime and mass measurements of $B$ and Charm hadrons, searches for rare decays in charm and $B$ hadrons and CP-violation in Charm decays. Results relevant to CP-violation in B-decays are also reported.

  4. Studies of top quark properties and search for electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Mousumi; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron during the Run I operation. Since the start of the Tevatron Run II in 2001, both experiments have collected {approx}2 fb{sup -1} data samples, which are over twenty times larger than that used in the Run 1 discovery. This larger data sample allows more precise studies of top-quark properties; differences between observed top-quark properties and the Standard Model (SM) prediction may give hints to possible physics beyond the SM. Here we present the latest results on the measurements of top-quark properties and the search for electroweak (EW) single top quark production from the CDF and D0 collaborations. The integrated luminosity used for the measurements corresponds to about 1 fb{sup -1}.

  5. Measurements of $\\sigma(V+D^{*})/\\sigma(V)$ in $9.7$ fb$^{-1}$ at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matera, Keith [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics has been remarkably successful, but the non-perturbative features of quantum chromodynamics must be tested and modeled with data. There have been many such tests, focused primarily on the use of jet-based probes of heavy flavor (bottom and charm quark) production at hadron colliders. In this thesis, we propose and test a strategy for identifying heavy flavor in events containing a W or Z vector boson (a V boson); this technique probes a much lower energy regime than can be explored by jet-based methods. In a sample of W and Z events skimmed from 9.7 fb-1 of high- pT electron and muon data from CDF Run II p p collisions at center of mass energy √s = 1:96 GeV , we identify charm by fully reconstructing D* (2010) → D0(→ Kπ )π s decays at the track level. Using a binned fit of Δm=m(Kππ s) m(Kπ ) to count reconstructed D* candidates, we then unfold these raw counts with acceptance values derived from Monte Carlo, and present measurements of σ(W + D* )/ σ(W) and σ(Z + D* )/ σ(Z) in the W/Z leptonic decay channels. All measurements are found to be in agreement with the predictions of Pythia 6.2 (PDF set CTEQ5L). These results include the first measurement of W/Z + c production in events with zero jet objects at the Tevatron, and the first measurement of W/Z +c production with pT (c) < 15 GeV at the Tevatron.

  6. New Physics at the LHC: results and Run II perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Kajomovitz, Enrique; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The talk gives an overview of selected Run-1 results on searches for New Physics from the ATLAS and CMS experiments. A short outlook of the Run-2 schedule and some prospects for Run-2 sensitivity reach for New Physics

  7. CMS detector tracking performance in Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Brondolin, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Since the start of Run-II in June 2015, LHC has delivered pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 13TeV and with a bunch time separation of 25 ns. On avarage, more than 25 inelastic collisions are superimposed on the event of interest. Under these new conditions, the CMS collaboration has re-calibrated and verified the performance of the whole detector. In particular, the CMS tracking performance has been measured both directly and indirectly. Direct measurements are, among others, the beam spot determination, the vertex resolution and the muon reconstruction efficiency with the tag and probe technique. An indirect assessment can be given by the pion reconstruction efficiency and the low-mass resonance parameters as a function of different single track kinematics.

  8. Boosted H­->bb Tagger In Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Sahinsoy, Merve; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Several searches for Higgs bosons decaying to b­quark pairs benefit from the increased Run II centre­of­mass energy by exploiting the large transvers­momentum (boosted) Higgs boson regime, where the two b­jets are merged into one large­radius jet. ATLAS uses a boosted H­>bb tagger algorithm to separate the Higgs signal from the background processes (QCD, W and Z bosons, top quarks). The tagger takes as input a large­R=1.0 jet calibrating the pseudorapidity, energy and mass scale. The tagger employs b­tagging, Higgs candidate mass, and substructure information. The performance of several operating points in Higgs boson signal and QCD and ttbar all­hadronic backgrounds are presented. Systematic uncertainties are evaluated so that this tagger can be used in analyses.

  9. Improvements to ATLAS track reconstruction for Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairo, Valentina Maria Martina, E-mail: valentina.maria.cairo@cern.ch [University of Calabria, Arcavacata di Rende (Italy); CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-07-11

    Run II of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. A major change to the Inner Detector layout during the shutdown period has been the installation of the Insertable B-Layer, a fourth pixel layer located at a radius of 33 mm. This contribution discusses improvements to track reconstruction developed during the two year shutdown of the LHC. These include novel techniques developed to improve the performance in the dense cores of jets, optimisation for the expected conditions, and a big software campaign which lead to more than a factor of three decrease in the CPU time needed to process each recorded event.

  10. LHCb-The LHCb trigger in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Michielin, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb trigger system has been upgraded to exploit the real-time alignment, calibration and analysis capabilities of LHCb in Run-II. An increase in the CPU and disk capacity of the event filter farm, combined with improvements to the reconstruction software, mean that efficient, exclusive selections can be made in the first stage of the High Level Trigger (HLT1). The output of HLT1 is buffered to the 5 PB of disk on the event filter farm, while the detector is aligned and calibrated in real time. The second stage, HLT2, performs complete, offline quality, event reconstruction. Physics analyses can be performed directly on this information, and for the majority of charm physics selections, a reduced event format can be written out, which permits higher event rates.

  11. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00444244; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor, LUCID, and its read-out electronics have been completely rebuilt for the LHC Run II in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV) and the 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive $^{207}$Bi sources that produce internal-conversion electrons with energy above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count signals with amplitude above a predefined threshold (hits) as well as the integrated pulseheight of the signals, which makes it possible to measure luminosity with complementary methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be described, together with the results of the 2015 luminosity measurement.

  12. LHCb Run II tracking performance and prospects for the Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb tracking system consists of a Vertex Locator around the interaction point, a tracking station with four layers of silicon strip detectors in front of the magnet, and three tracking stations, using either straw-tubes or silicon strip detectors, behind the magnet. This system allows to reconstruct charged particles with a high efficiency (typically > 95% for particles with momentum > 5 GeV) and an excellent momentum resolution (0.5% for particles with momentum < 20 GeV). The high momentum resolution results in very narrow mass peaks, leading to a very good signal-to-background ratio in such key channels as $B_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$. Furthermore an optimal decay time resolution is an essential element in the studies of time dependent CP violation. For Run II a novel reconstruction strategy was adopted, allowing to run the same track reconstruction in the software trigger as offline. This convergence was possible due to a staged approach in the track reconstruction and a large reduction in the processing tim...

  13. LHCb’s Real-Time Alignment in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Batozskaya, Varvara

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. The data collected at the start of the fill will be processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants will be evaluated for each run. This procedure will improve the quality of the online alignment. Critically, this new real-time alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and oine reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and oine selected events. This oers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configu...

  14. The CMS Level-1 trigger system for LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadamuro, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 105. During Run II, the LHC has increased the centre-of-mass energy of proton-proton collisions up to 13 TeV and may progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2×1034 cm-2 s-1 or higher. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS Level-1 (L1) trigger benefits from the recent μTCA technology and is designed to maintain the performance under high instantaneous luminosity conditions. More sophisticated, innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of CMS: this drastically reduces the trigger rate and improves the trigger efficiency for a wide variety of physics processes. In this document, we present the overall architecture of the upgraded Level-1 trigger system. The performance of single object triggers, measured on collision data recorded during the 2016 running period, are also summarised.

  15. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre; Cadamuro, Luca; Davignon, Olivier; Romanteau, Thierry; Strebler, Thomas; Cepeda, Maria Luisa; Sauvan, Jean-baptiste; Wardle, Nicholas; Aggleton, Robin Cameron; Ball, Fionn Amhairghen; Brooke, James John; Newbold, David; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Smith, D; Taylor, Joseph Ross; Fountas, Konstantinos; Baber, Mark David John; Bundock, Aaron; Breeze, Shane Davy; Citron, Matthew; Elwood, Adam Christopher; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory Michiel; Laner Ogilvy, Christian; Penning, Bjorn; Rose, A; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Tapper, Alexander; Durkin, Timothy John; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Williams, Thomas Stephen; Dasu, Sridhara Rao; Dodd, Laura Margaret; Klabbers, Pamela Renee; Levine, Aaron; Ojalvo, Isabel Rose; Ruggles, Tyler Henry; Smith, Nicholas Charles; Smith, Wesley; Svetek, Ales; Forbes, R; Tikalsky, Jesra Lilah; Vicente, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Results from the completed Phase 1 Upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger are presented. The upgrade was completed in two stages, with the first running in 2015 for proton and Heavy Ion collisions and the final stage for 2016 data taking. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and has been used by CMS to collect over 43 fb-1 of data since the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Run II. The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT), which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the uTCA standard. The trigger processors are instrumented with Xilinx Virtex-7 690 FPGAs and 10 Gbps optical links. The TMT architecture is flexible and the number of trigger p...

  16. Celebrating the Tevatron legacy

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Fermilab hosted an exceptional event on 11 June: the Tevatron Impact symposium. More than 800 people attended to hear how the Tevatron advanced our understanding of fundamental physics.   A version of this "Director's Corner" by Pier Oddone first appeared in Fermilab Today on 12 June.   The development of accelerator technology for the Tevatron has influenced every subsequent major hadron accelerator. We heard reviews on the detector technologies and trigger systems developed with the Tevatron that are essential today for high-luminosity machines like the LHC. There were also talks on the superconducting-wire industry that made MRI magnets ubiquitous, and we discussed the major computational systems that use large farms of Linux-based commodity processors. Researchers who worked on the Tevatron also established multivariate analysis techniques that now allow us to squeeze the maximum information from complex data sets. One focus of the symposium was the ...

  17. The Higgs and Supersymmetry at Run II of the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, David [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2016-04-14

    Prof. David Shih was supported by DOE grant DE-SC0013678 from April 2015 to April 2016. His research during this year focused on the phenomenology of super-symmetry (SUSY) and maximizing its future discovery potential at Run II of the LHC. SUSY is one of the most well-motivated frameworks for physics beyond the Standard Model. It solves the "naturalness" or "hierarchy" problem by stabilizing the Higgs mass against otherwise uncontrolled quantum corrections, predicts "grand unification" of the fundamental forces, and provides many potential candidates for dark matter. However, after decades of null results from direct and indirect searches, the viable parameter space for SUSY is increasingly constrained. Also, the discovery of a Standard Model-like Higgs with a mass at 125 GeV places a stringent constraint on SUSY models. In the work supported on this grant, Shih has worked on four different projects motivated by these issues. He has built natural SUSY models that explain the Higgs mass and provide viable dark matter; he has studied the parameter space of "gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking" (GMSB) that satisfies the Higgs mass constraint; he has developed new tools for the precision calculation of flavor and CP observables in general SUSY models; and he has studied new techniques for discovery of supersymmetric partners of the top quark.

  18. The CMS calorimeter trigger upgrade for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10e5. The first level (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its centre of mass energy up to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2e34 cm-2s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics program under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system must be consolidated. In particular the L1 calorimeter Trigger hardware and architecture will be modified. The goal is to maintain the current thresholds (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of tau leptons. This can only be achieved by designing an updated trigger architecture based on the recent microTCA technology. Racks can be equipped with fast optical links and latest...

  19. Applying EVM principles to Tevatron Beam Position Monitor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Bakul; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    At Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), the Tevatron high energy particle collider must meet the increasing scientific demand of higher beam luminosity. To achieve this higher luminosity goal, U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a major upgrade of capabilities of Fermilab's accelerator complex that spans five years and costs over fifty million dollars. Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system upgrade is a part of this project, generally called RunII upgrade project. Since the purpose of the Tevatron collider is to detect the smashing of proton and anti-protons orbiting the circular accelerator in opposite directions, capability to detect positions of both protons and antiprotons at a high resolution level is a desirable functionality of the monitoring system. The original system was installed during early 1980s, along with the original construction of the Tevatron. However, electronic technology available in 1980s did not allow for the detection of significantly smaller resolution of antiprotons. The objective of the upgrade project is to replace the existing BPM system with a new system utilizing capabilities of modern electronics enhanced by a front-end software driven by a real-time operating software. The new BPM system is designed to detect both protons and antiprotons with increased resolution of up to an order of magnitude. The new system is capable of maintaining a very high-level of data integrity and system reliability. The system consists of 27 VME crates installed at 27 service buildings around the Tevatron ring servicing 236 beam position monitors placed underground, inside the accelerator tunnel. Each crate consists of a single Timing Generator Fanout module, custom made by Fermilab staff, one MVME processor card running VxWorks 5.5, multiple Echotek Digital Receiver boards complimented by custom made Filter Board. The VxWorks based front-end software communicates with the Main Accelerator Control software via a special

  20. Measurement of B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) in Top-Quark-Pair Decays Using Dilepton Events and the Full CDF Run II Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q represents any quark flavor, in events with two charged leptons, imbalance in total transverse energy, and at least two jets. The measurement uses proton-antiproton collision data at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1 collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We measure R to be 0.87±0.07, and extract the magnitude of the top-bottom quark coupling to be |Vtb|=0.93±0.04, assuming three generations of quarks. Under these assumptions, a lower limit of |Vtb|>0.85(0.87) at 95% (90%) credibility level is set.

  1. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the t t xAF dilepton channel using the full CDF Run II data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass in events containing two leptons (electrons or muons) with a large transverse momentum, two or more energetic jets, and a transverse-momentum imbalance. We use the full proton-antiproton collision data set collected by the CDF experiment during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II at center-of-mass energy √{s }=1.96 TeV , corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb-1 . A special observable is exploited for an optimal reduction of the dominant systematic uncertainty, associated with the knowledge of the absolute energy of the hadronic jets. The distribution of this observable in the selected events is compared to simulated distributions of t t ¯ dilepton signal and background. We measure a value for the top-quark mass of 171.5 ±1.9 (stat)±2.5 (syst) GeV /c2 .

  2. Measurement of R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) in top-quark-pair decays using lepton+jets events and the full CDF run II dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-06-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q represents quarks of type b, s, or d, in the final state with a lepton and hadronic jets. The measurement uses s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collision data from 8.7fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We simultaneously measure R=0.94±0.09 (stat+syst) and the tt¯ production cross section σtt¯=7.5±1.0(stat+syst)pb. The magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, |Vtb|=0.97±0.05 (stat+syst) is extracted assuming three generations of quarks, and a lower limit of |Vtb|>0.89 at 95% credibility level is set.

  3. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: Results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Rojo, Juan; Ball, Richard D; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; de Roeck, Albert; Farry, Stephen; Ferrando, James; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Harland-Lang, Lucian; Huston, Joey; Glazov, Alexander; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Gwenlan, Claire; Lipka, Katerina; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Mangano, Michelangelo; Nadolsky, Pavel; Perrozzi, Luca; Placakyte, Ringaile; Radescu, Voica; Salam, Gavin P; Thorne, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The accurate determination of the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterisation and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarise the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided so far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. This document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritise their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.

  4. Commissioning of the nonlinear chromaticity at injection for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080608; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Carlier, Felix Simon; Langner, Andy Sven; Malina, Lukas; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, correction of nonlinear chromaticity and amplitude detuning was included in the LHC commissioning for Run II. The corrections found during the nonlinear optics commissioning have been deployed operationally at injection in the LHC. This note summarizes the relevant measurements and corrections performed during the first commissioning of the LHC in Run II

  5. Study of the signal H{sup 0}/A{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{mu} in hadron colliders and inter-calibration of the Ddiameter calorimeter with RUN 2 of Tevatron; Etude du signal H{sup 0}/A{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{mu} aux collisionneurs hadroniques et intercalibration du calorimetre de Ddiametre au RUN 2 du Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delsart, P.A

    2003-10-01

    D0 is one of the 2 detectors settled on the Tevatron at Fermilab. This thesis has been made in collaboration with the 'theory' group and the D0 group of IPNL (nuclear physics institute of Lyon). Within the D0 group we have worked on the calibration of the detector's calorimeter: intercalibration. Using the fact that the physics is phi-symmetric in D0 we have created and applied statistical methods for a relative calibration of some phi-symmetric parts of the calorimeter. Work on particle physics concerned the two Higgs doublet model. In such models leptonic number violation is possible: we have simulated the H{sup 0}/A{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{mu} signal in order to study the discovery potential and the constraints on the coupling responsible for this decay. (author)

  6. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Searches for New Particles and Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toback, David [Texas A-M; ŽIvković, Lidija [Belgrade U.

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results for searches for new particles and interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include results from Run I as well as Run II for the time period up to July 2014. We focus on searches for supersymmetry, as well as other models of new physics such as new fermions and bosons, various models of excited fermions, leptoquarks, technicolor, hidden-valley model particles, long-lived particles, extra dimensions, dark matter particles, and signature-based searches.

  7. Physics at the Tevatron

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Physics Results from the Tevatron : The Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab in the US is currently the world's highest energy collider. At the experiments CDF and D0 a broad physics programme is being pursued, ranging from flavour physics via electroweak precision measurements to searches for the Higgs boson and new particles beyond the Standard Model. In my lecture I will describe some of the highlight measurements in the flavour, electroweak and searches sectors, and the experimental techniques that are used.

  8. ATLAS Trigger Menu and Performance in Run I and Prospects for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Igonkina, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system plays a key role in the collection of data for a wide range of physics analysis. The 2012 proton run had significantly larger luminosities and pile-up than 2011, while for the proton-lead run in 2013 it was critical to select samples with low biases. To address these challenges, while maintaining or even improving performance, new algorithms have been commissioned. The trigger strategy and the main algorithms and their performance are described. For the 2015 run, the combination of a luminosity increase and an energy increase will put even larger demands on the trigger system. One new tool to address the challenges will be the addition of a topological capability in the first level of the trigger, implemented in custom electronics. The L1 topological trigger hardware and software architectures and their performance will be presented.

  9. LHCb computing in Run II and its evolution towards Run III

    CERN Document Server

    Falabella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    his contribution reports on the experience of the LHCb computing team during LHC Run 2 and its preparation for Run 3. Furthermore a brief introduction on LHCbDIRAC, i.e. the tool to interface to the experiment distributed computing resources for its data processing and data management operations, is given. Run 2, which started in 2015, has already seen several changes in the data processing workflows of the experiment. Most notably the ability to align and calibrate the detector between two different stages of the data processing in the high level trigger farm, eliminating the need for a second pass processing of the data offline. In addition a fraction of the data is immediately reconstructed to its final physics format in the high level trigger and only this format is exported from the experiment site to the physics analysis. This concept have successfully been tested and will continue to be used for the rest of Run 2. Furthermore the distributed data processing has been improved with new concepts and techn...

  10. ATLAS Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillator upgrade for LHC RunII

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MBTS) delivered the primary triggers for selecting events from real LHC collisions with the smallest bias for the low luminosity LHC RunI fills from 2009-2013 (proton-proton, lead-lead and lead-proton collisions). MBTS also will provide key ingredients for the first RunII physics measurements at the new LHC proton-proton collisions energies (charge multiplicity, proton-proton cross section, rapidity gap measurements, ...). After more than 25fb-1 of proton-proton collisions delivered during RunI of LHC, MBTS detectors have been substantially upgraded for the RunII of LHC (starting in 2015). The upgrade strategy will be presented showing the scintillator replacement, the modified read out scheme, the optical measurements on RunI scintillators assessing the degradation due to the dose received and how the new simulation is being implemented to take into accounts all the modifications foreseen for RunII.

  11. Performance of the ATLAS Tau Trigger in Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Ikai, Takashi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach instantaneous luminosities of over 10^{34}cm^{-2}s{-1}, tau trigger operation is more challenging. Hadronic tau trigger plays a important role and is used to measure Yukawa coupling constant and to search physics of Beyond Standard Model. This presents tau trigger system, operation, performance in Run2 and strategy in the future.

  12. Tevatron AC dipole system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; /Texas U.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  13. LHCb's Time-Real Alignment in RunII

    CERN Multimedia

    Batozskaya, Varvara

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run 2. Data collected at the start of the fill will be processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants will be evaluated for each run. This procedure will improve the quality of the online alignment. Critically, this new real-time alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configur...

  14. Search for techniparticles at D0 Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feligioni, Lorenzo [Univ. of Perugia (Italy)

    2006-01-01

    Technicolor theory (TC) accomplishes the necessary electroweak symmetry breaking responsible for the mass of the elementary particles. TC postulates the existence of a new SU(NTC) gauge theory. Like QCD the exchange of gauge bosons causes the existence of a non-vanishing chiral condensate which dynamically breaks the SU(NTC)L x SU(NTC)R symmetry. This gives rise to NTC2-1 Nambu-Goldstone Bosons. Three of these Goldstone Bosons become the longitudinal components of the W± and Z which therefore acquire mass; the remaining ones are new particles (technihadrons) that can be produced at the high energy colliders and detected. The Technicolor Straw Man Model (TCSM) is a version of the dynamical symmetry breaking with a large number of technifermions and a relative low value of their masses. One of the processes predicted by the TCSM is q$\\bar{q}$ → VT {yields} W{pi}T, where VT is the Technicolor equivalent of the QCD vector meson and {pi}T is the equivalent of the pion. W is the electroweak gauge boson of the Standard Model. This dissertation describes the search for WπT with the D0 detector, a multi-purpose particle detector located at one of the collision points of the Tevatron accelerator situated in Batavia, IL. The final state considered for this thesis is a W boson that decays to electron and neutrino plus a πT that decays into b$\\bar{c}$ or b$\\bar{b}$, depending on the charge of the initial technivector meson produced. In the D0 detector this process will appear as a narrow cluster of energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter with an associated track reconstructed in the tracking detector. The undetected neutrino from the decay of the W boson will be seen as missing momentum. The fragmentation of the quarks from the decay of the πT will produce two jets of collimated particles. Events

  15. Study of the heavy flavour fractions in z+jets events from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at energy √s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrandrea, Paolo [Univ. of Siena (Italy)

    2008-06-01

    to provide collisions for the experiments at the end of 2008. In the meanwhile the only running accelerator able to provide collisions suitable for the search of the Higgs boson is the Tevatron at Fermilab, a proton-antiproton collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV working at 3 • 1032cm-2s-1 peak luminosity. These features make the Tevatron able for the direct search of the Higgs boson in the 115-200 GeV mass range. Since the coupling of the Higgs boson is proportional to the masses of the particles involved, the decay in b{bar b} has the largest branching ratio for Higgs mass < 135 GeV and thus the events Z/W + $b\\bar{b}$ are the main background to the Higgs signal in the most range favored by Standard Model fits. In this thesis a new technique to identify Heavy Flavour quarks inside high - PT jets is applied to events with a reconstructed Z boson to provide a measurement of the Z+b and Z+c inclusive cross sections. The study of these channels represent also a test of QCD in high transferred momentum regime, and can provide information on proton pdf. This new Heavy Flavour identication technique (tagger) provides an increased statistical separation between b, c and light flavours, using a new vertexing algorithm and a chain of artificial Neural Networks to exploit as much information as possible in each event. For this work I collaborated with the Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' group working in the CDF II experiment at Tevatron, that has at first developed this tagger. After a brief theoretical introduction (chapter 1) and a description of the experimental apparatus (chapter 2), the tagger itself and its calibration procedure are described in chapter 3 and 4. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the event selection and the chapter 6 contains the results of the measurement and the study of the systematic errors.

  16. Tevatron physics results

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    I will summarize the physics results from the Tevatron experiments with particular emphasis on the experimental methods used in different kinds of analysis. In particular, the Tevatron is a proton-antiproton collider that has now accumulated more than 2 fb^-1 of luminosity in the two experiments, called CDF and D0. In this lecture I will review the results on inclusive productions of jets, W- and Z-bosons, the results in the flavor sector, the measurements of top production, searches for Higgs boson production and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In each case I will explain the basic experimental concepts and methods needed for making the measurement.

  17. Searches for new physics in jet final states in ATLAS at LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Amadio, Brian Thomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase of the center-of-mass energy from 8 to 13 TeV at LHC Run II offers a great discovery potential for new physics at high mass, especially for strongly produced high-mass resonances, contact interactions, and TeV-gravity phenomena with high-pT jets. This talk presents the most recent Run II results from ATLAS on new physics searches in jet final states.

  18. LHCb : LHCbVELO: Performance and Radiation Damage in LHC Run I and Preparationfor Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO). The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n+-on-n 300 um thick half-disc silicon sensors with R-measuring and Phi-measuring micro-strips. In order to allow retracting the detector, the VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each. The detectors are operated in a secondary vacuum and are cooled by a bi-phase CO2 cooling system. During data taking in LHC Run 1 the LHCb VELO has operated with an extremely high efficiency and excellent performance. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98%. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 um is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have received a large and non-uniform radiation dose of up to 1.2 x 10...

  19. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  20. Vector resonances at LHC Run II in composite 2HDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiara, Stefano Di [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Heikinheimo, Matti; Tuominen, Kimmo [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-000140, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FI-000140, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-03-02

    We consider a model where the electroweak symmetry breaking is driven by strong dynamics, resulting in an electroweak doublet scalar condensate, and transmitted to the standard model matter fields via another electroweak doublet scalar. At low energies the effective theory therefore shares features with a type-I two Higgs doublet model. However, important differences arise due to the rich composite spectrum expected to contain new vector resonances accessible at the LHC. We carry out a systematic analysis of the vector resonance signals at LHC and find that the model remains viable, but will be tightly constrained by direct searches as the projected integrated luminosity, around 200 fb{sup −1}, of the current run becomes available.

  1. The updated ATLAS Jet Trigger for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00359694; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    After the current shutdown, the LHC is about to resume operation for a new data-taking period, when it will operate with increased luminosity, event rate and center of mass energy. The new conditions will impose more demanding constraints on the ATLAS online trigger reconstruction and selection system. To cope with such increased constraints, the ATLAS High-Level Trigger, placed after a first hardware-based Level~1 trigger, has been redesigned by merging two previously separated software-based processing levels. In the new joint processing level, the algorithms run in the same computing nodes, thus sharing resources, minimizing the data transfer from the detector buffers and increasing the algorithm flexibility. The jet trigger software selects events containing high transverse momentum hadronic jets. It needs optimal jet energy resolution to help rejecting an overwhelming background while retaining good efficiency for interesting jets. In particular, this requires the CPU-intensive reconstruction of tridimen...

  2. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II.

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID and its read-out electronics has been completely rebuilt for the 2015 LHC run in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive Bi$^{207}$ sources that produces internal conversion electrons above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count particle hits above a threshold but also the integrated pulseheight of the signals from the particles which makes it possible to measure luminosity with new methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be covered by the contribution as well as the results of the luminosity measurements with the detector in 2015.

  3. ATLAS Jet Trigger Update for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Sebastien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    After the current shutdown, the LHC is about to resume operation for a new data-taking period, when it will operate with increased luminosity, event rate and centre of mass energy. The new conditions will impose more demanding constraints on the ATLAS online trigger reconstruction and selection system. To cope with such increased constraints, the ATLAS High Level Trigger, placed after a first hardware-based Level-1 trigger, has been redesigned by merging two previously separated software-based processing levels. In the new joint processing level, the algorithms run in the same computing nodes, thus sharing resources, minimizing the data transfer from the detector buffers and increasing the algorithm flexibility. The Jet trigger software selects events containing high transverse momentum hadronic jets. It needs optimal jet energy resolution to help rejecting an overwhelming background while retaining good efficiency for interesting jets. In particular, this requires the CPU-intensive reconstruction of tridimen...

  4. The updated ATLAS Jet Trigger for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Sebastien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    After the current shutdown, the LHC is about to resume operation for a new data-taking period, when it will operate with increased luminosity, event rate and center of mass energy. The new conditions will impose more demanding constraints on the ATLAS online trigger reconstruction and selection system. To cope with such increased constraints, the ATLAS High Level Trigger, placed after a first hardware-based Level-1 trigger, has been redesigned by merging two previously separated software-based processing levels. In the new joint processing level, the algorithms run in the same computing nodes, thus sharing resources, minimizing the data transfer from the detector buffers and increasing the algorithm flexibility. The jet trigger software selects events containing high transverse momentum hadronic jets. It needs optimal jet energy resolution to help rejecting an overwhelming background while retaining good efficiency for interesting jets. In particular, this requires the CPU-intensive reconstruction of tridimen...

  5. Correlations in bottom quark pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyardt, Jason Edward [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    I present an analysis of b$\\bar{b}$ pair production correlations, using dimuon-triggered data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV during Run II of the TeVatron. The leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) b quark production processes are discriminated by the angular and momentum correlations between the b{bar b} pair. Track-level jets containing a muon are classified by b quark content and used to estimate the momentum vector of the progenitor b quark. The theoretical distributions given by the MC@NLO event generator are tested against the data.

  6. Beam-beam effects at the Fermilab Tevatron: Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sen

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The Tevatron in Run II is operating with three trains of 12 bunches each. Long-range beam-beam interactions have been significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations of antiprotons. The dynamics due to the long-range beam-beam interactions depends on several beam parameters such as tunes, coupling, chromaticities, beam separations, intensities, and emittances. We have developed analytical tools to calculate, for example, amplitude dependent tune shifts and chromaticities, beam-beam induced coupling, and resonance driving terms. We report on these calculations and estimates of dynamic aperture and diffusion coefficients with long-term tracking. These theoretical results are compared with observations and used to predict performance at design values of beam parameters.

  7. ATLAS Jet Trigger Update for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares Delgado, Ademar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is the biggest and most powerful particle collider ever built. It produces up to 40 million proton-proton collisions per second at unprecedented energies to explore the fundamental laws and properties of Nature. The ATLAS experiment is one of the detectors that analyses and records these collisions. It generates dozens of GB/s of data that has to be reduced before it can be permanently stored, the event selection is made by the ATLAS trigger system, which reduces the data volume by a factor of 10^5 . The trigger system has to be highly configurable in order to adapt to changing running conditions and maximize the physics output whilst keeping the output rate under control. A particularly interesting pattern generated during collisions consists of a collimated spray of particles, known as a hadronic jet. To retain the interesting jets and efficiently reject the overwhelming background, optimal jet energy resolution is needed. Therefore the Jet trigger software requires CPU-intens...

  8. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinthuprasith, Tutanon

    2017-01-01

    The phase-1 upgrades of the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger have been completed. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and it will be used by CMS to collect data starting from the 2016 data run. The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Design, which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the uTCA standard. The architecture is flexible and the number of trigger processors can be expanded according to the physics needs of CMS. Intelligent, more complex, and innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of CMS: the upgraded trigger system implements pattern recognition and MVA (Boosted Decision Tree) regression techniques in the trigger processors for pT assignment, pile up subtraction, and isolation requirements for electrons, and taus. The performance of the TMT design and the latency measurements and the algorithm performance which has been measured using data is also presented here.

  9. First Run II Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    We describe a measurement of the W boson mass m{sub W} using 200 pb{sup -1} of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collision data taken with the CDF II detector. With a sample of 63,964 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 51,128 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates, we measure m{sub W} = [80.413 {+-} 0.034(stat.) {+-} 0.034 (sys.) = 80.413 {+-} 0.048] GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the single most precise m{sub W} measurement to date. When combined with other measured electroweak parameters, this result further constrains the properties of new unobserved particles coupling to W and Z bosons.

  10. Resonant production of sleptons in the run I of the DO experiment and identification of electrons in the run II; Recherche de production resonante de sleptons au Run I de D zero et identification et mesure des electrons au Run 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdesselam, A

    2001-10-01

    This work deals with the resonant production of supersymmetric particles smuons and muon sneutrinos. The theoretical framework of this study rests on the model mSUGRA in which 5 parameters are considered: m{sub 0}, m{sub 1/2}, tan({beta}), A{sub 0}, sign({mu}) and one parameter for the violation of the R-parity. 2 analysis methods have been used: the traditional sequential analysis and the neuron network analysis that begins to be largely used in particle physics. This work is based on the experimental data collected during the run I of the experiment DO at the Tevatron (Fermilab, Usa). The value of luminosity is 94 pb{sup -1}. The general result is that no more events were detected than predicted by the standard model, so these results can be interpreted as a mean to draw limits for the values of the parameters. For instance values up to 230 GeV and 260 GeV are excluded for m{sub 0} and m{sub 1/2} respectively if the coupling constant {lambda}{sub 211} is worth 0.09, tan({beta}) = 2, sign({mu}) =-1 and A{sub 0} = 0. The interpretation can be made in terms of mass and the study shows that relative masses for {nu}-tilde{sub {mu}} and {chi}{sup 0}{sub 1} of 280 GeV and 112 GeV respectively are excluded with a 95% probability. Another part of this work deals with the identification of electron in the run II, different tools can be used, here the author chose the covariance matrix ( H matrix). (A.C.)

  11. ATLAS jet trigger update for the LHC run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, A. T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas (LIP), Lisbon, (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is the biggest and most powerful particle collider ever built. It produces up to 40 million proton-proton collisions per second at unprecedented energies to explore the fundamental laws and properties of Nature. The ATLAS experiment is one of the detectors that analyses and records these collisions. It generates dozens of GB/s of data that has to be reduced before it can be permanently stored, the event selection is made by the ATLAS trigger system, which reduces the data volume by a factor of 105. The trigger system has to be highly configurable in order to adapt to changing running conditions and maximize the physics output whilst keeping the output rate under control. A particularly interesting pattern generated during collisions consists of a collimated spray of particles, known as a hadronic jet. To retain the interesting jets and efficiently reject the overwhelming background, optimal jet energy resolution is needed. Therefore the Jet trigger software requires CPU-intensive reconstruction algorithms. In order to reduce the resources needed for the reconstruction step, a partial detector readout scheme was developed, which effectively suppresses the low activity regions of the calorimeter. In this paper we describe the overall ATLAS trigger software, and the jet trigger in particular, along with the improvements made on the system. We then focus on detailed studies of the algorithm timing and the performance impact of the full and partial calorimeter readout schemes. We conclude with an outlook of the jet trigger plans for the next LHC data-taking period. (authors)

  12. Tevatron Beam Lifetimes at Injection Using the Shot Data Analysis System

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Aimin; Lebrun, Paul; McCrory, Elliott; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Slaughter, Anna Jean

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Shot Data Acquisition and Analysis (SDA) system is to provide summary data on the Fermilab RunII accelerator complex and provide related software for detailed analyses. In this paper, we discuss such a specific analysis on Tevatron beam lifetimes at injection. These results are based on SDA data, tools and methodology. Beam lifetime is one of our most important diagnostics. An analysis of it can give information on intra beam scattering, aperture limitations, instabilities and most importantly beam-beam effects. Such an analysis gives us a better understanding of our machine, and will lead to an improved performance in the future.

  13. Test runs of a Belle II PXD prototype readout system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getzkow, Dennis; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Soeren; Lautenbach, Klemens [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut (Germany); Gessler, Thomas [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Belle II PXD readout system (called ONSEN for Online Selection Nodes) uses ATCA (Advanced Telecommunications Architecture) boards with Xilinx Virtex-5 FX70T FPGAs and high speed optical links (6.5 Gbit/s each). The full system consists of 9 carrier boards and 33 daughter cards. The ONSEN system has several interfaces: (a) it receives PXD data from the DHH (Data Handling Hybrid) system, (b) it receives ROI (Regions-of-Interest) data for online data reduction from the HLT (High Level Trigger) system by GbE, and (c) it features data ports to two event builders: EVB1 combines data from all detectors except PXD (in order to generate the ROIs) and EVB2 combines the reduced PXD data with all other data. One of the critical issues is the matching of trigger numbers in the data (received by DHH from the timing distribution system) and trigger numbers in the ROIs (received by the HLT). In order to test the interfaces, in particular for a high HLT rate up to 30 kHz, a prototype system with 3 daughter cards was installed at KEK and tested with DHH, HLT and EVB2. Test results are presented.

  14. Supersymmetry at the Tevatron?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammel, S.

    1998-02-01

    These lectures contain an introduction to the search for supersymmetry at hadron colliders. The Tevatron is one of high-energy physics most sophisticated tools. The high center-of-mass energy of its proton-antiproton collisions makes it an ideal place to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry. Two experiments, CDF and D0, completed a long data taking period in summer of 1995, yielding over 100 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton interactions. The data recorded by the experiments are still being analyzed. The lectures outline the strategies in the search for supersymmetry at the Tevatron and examine the major analyses in detail. Results obtained by the two experiments are included where available.

  15. Preparation and commissioning of LHCb for the Run II of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070171

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has performed very well during the Run I of the LHC, producing a large number of relevant physics results on a wide range of topics. The preparation and commissioning of the LHCb experiment for Run II is discussed here, with special emphasis on the changes in the trigger strategy and the addition of a new subdetector to improve the physics reach of the experiment. An overview of the commissioning with the first collisions delivered by the LHC is also included.

  16. Technical design report for the upgrade of the ICD for D-Zero Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, L. [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); De, K. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Draper, P. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Gallas, E. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Li, J. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Sosebee, M. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Stephens, R.W. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], White, A. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Inter Cryostat Detector (ICD) used in Run I of the D0 Experiment will be inoperable in the central, high magnetic field planned for Run II. In Run I, the ICD enhanced the hermeticity and uniformity of the D0 calorimeter system, improving both missing transverse energy and jet energy resolution. The goals for the Run II ICD are the same. In this document, the physics arguments for maintaining the ICD are presented, followed by a detailed description of the planned design changes, prototype tests, construction, installation, and commissioning of the device for the Run II D0 detector. Estimates of costs and schedule can be found on //DOSERVER2/Operations/Upgrade Project/ subareas available via DZERO`s WinFrame Program Manager. This detector is not intended to provide any ``L0`` capabilities (for luminosity monitoring), or to provide any EM coverage in the intermediate region, or to provide additional coverage in the intermediate regions, unlike previous upgrades proposed in this detector region. The ICD upgrade described here maintains most of the Run I capabilities in a high magnetic field environment.

  17. Online monitoring for the CDF Run II experiment and the remote operation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Fabiani, D.; /INFN, Pisa; Hirschbuehl, D.; /Karlsruhe U.; Ikado, K.; /Waseda U.; Kubo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Kusakabe, Y.; /Waseda U.; Maeshima, K.; /UCLA; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; /Waseda U.; Plager, C.; /UCLA; Schmidt, E.; /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Karlsruhe U.

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of the CDF Run II online event monitoring framework, placed well before the physics runs start, allowed to develop coherent monitoring software across all the different subsystems which consequently made maintenance and operation simple and efficient. Only one shift person is needed to monitor the entire CDF detector, including the trigger system. High data quality check is assured in real time and well defined monitoring results are propagated coherently to offline datasets used for physics analyzes. We describe the CDF Run II online event monitoring system and operation, with emphasis on the remote monitoring shift operation started since November 2006 with Pisa-INFN as pilot Institution and exploiting the WEB based access to the data.

  18. ATLAS strategy for primary vertex reconstruction during Run-II of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Based on experience gained from run-I of the LHC, the ATLAS vertex reconstruction group has developed a refined primary vertex reconstruction strategy for run-II.  With instantaneous luminosity exceeding 10^34 cm-2 s-1, an average of 40 to 50 pp collisions per bunch crossing are expected. Together with the increase of the center-of-mass collision energy from 8 TeV to 13 TeV, this will create a challenging environment for primary vertex pattern recognition. This contribution explains the ATLAS strategy for primary vertex reconstruction in high pile-up conditions.  The new approach is based on vertex seeding with a medical-imaging algorithm, adaptive reconstruction of vertex positions, and iterative recombination of occasional split vertices. The mathematical foundation and software implementation of the method are described in detail. Monte Carlo-based estimates of vertex reconstruction performance for LHC run-II are presented.

  19. Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  20. Theory Motivation For Exotic Signatures: Prospects and Wishlist for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Stolarski, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Here I give some motivations for exotic signatures to search for at Run II of the LHC, focusing on displaced phenomena. I will discuss signatures arising from various different kinds of models including theories of dark matter and those with exotic decays of the Higgs.

  1. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the ${t\\bar{t}}$ dilepton channel using the full CDF Run II data set

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-01-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass in events containing two leptons (electrons or muons) with a large transverse momentum, two or more energetic jets, and a transverse-momentum imbalance. We use the full proton-antiproton collision data set collected by the CDF experiment during the Fermilab Tevatron Run~II at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb$^{-1}$. A special observable is exploited for an optimal reduction of the dominant systematic uncertainty, associated with the knowledge of the absolute energy of the hadronic jets. The distribution of this observable in the selected events is compared to simulated distributions of ${t\\bar{t}}$ dilepton signal and background.We measure a value for the top-quark mass of $171.5\\pm 1.9~{\\rm (stat)}\\pm 2.5~{\\rm (syst)}$ GeV/$c^2$.

  2. Measurement of \\boldmath $R = {\\mathcal{B}\\left(t \\rightarrow Wb \\right)/\\mathcal{B}\\left(t \\rightarrow Wq \\right)} $ in Top--Quark--Pair Decays using Dilepton Events and the Full CDF Run II Data Set

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; D'Errico, Maria; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Marchese, Luigi; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Ranjan, Niharika; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Song, Hao; Sorin, Maria Veronica; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2014-06-02

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions $R=\\mathcal{B}(t\\rightarrow Wb)/\\mathcal{B}(t\\rightarrow $ $q$ represents quarks of flavors $b$, $s$, or $d$, in the final state, in events with two charged leptons, missing transverse energy and at least two jets. The measurement uses $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV proton--antiproton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb$^{-1}$ and collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We measure $R=0.87 \\pm 0.07$ (stat+syst), and extract the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, $\\left|V_{tb}\\right| = 0.93 \\pm 0.04$ (stat+syst) assuming three generations of quarks. Under these assumptions, a lower limit of $|V_{tb}|>0.85$ at 95% credibility level is set.

  3. Overview of Energy Reconstruction, and Electron and Photon Performances with the CMS ECAL in Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira de Lima, Rafael; CMS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment is crucial for achieving high resolution measurements of electrons and photons. Maintaining and possibly improving the excellent performance achieved in Run I is vital for measurements of the Standard Model Higgs boson and searches for new higher mass resonances in final states with electrons and photons. Since spring 2015, the ECAL has operated with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy and at a reduced bunch spacing of 25 ns. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II is expected to exceed the levels previously attained. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) is expected to reach up to 40 interactions. In this summary we present new crystal energy reconstruction algorithms and clustering techniques that have been developed to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run II. We will show first performance results from 2015 data, achieved through energy calibrations using electrons from W and Z boson decays, photons from π 0/η decays, and the azimuthally symmetric energy distribution of minimum bias events. Lastly, we present an outlook on the expected Run II performance in the next years.

  4. CTEQ-TEA parton distribution functions and HERA Run I and II combined data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tie-Jiun; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the impact of the recent HERA Run I +II combination of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross-section data on the CT14 global analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). New PDFs at next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order, called CT14 HERA 2 , are obtained by a refit of the CT14 data ensembles, in which the HERA Run I combined measurements are replaced by the new HERA Run I +II combination. The CT14 functional parametrization of PDFs is flexible enough to allow good descriptions of different flavor combinations, so we use the same parametrization for CT14 HERA 2 but with an additional shape parameter for describing the strange quark PDF. We find that the HERA I +II data can be fit reasonably well, and both CT14 and CT14 HERA 2 PDFs can describe equally well the non-HERA data included in our global analysis. Because the CT14 and CT14 HERA 2 PDFs agree well within the PDF errors, we continue to recommend CT14 PDFs for the analysis of LHC Run 2 experiments.

  5. Race for the Higgs hots up as Tevatron seeks extension

    CERN Multimedia

    Banks, Michael

    2009-01-01

    "With researchers at Cern's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) having circulated protons for the first time since last year's accident, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is requesting $25m so that the Tevatron collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois can run for an extra year until 2011" (0.25 page)

  6. Improvement of the Jet Calibration Techniques for the ATLAS Experiment in LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097636; Di Simone, Andrea; Consorti, Valerio; Rúriková, Zuzana

    Many analyses in particle physics need jets, clustered with different parameters or even with different algorithms. But it is not feasible to provide in-situ correction factors for each case. In this thesis a new calibration method is tested which is called "R-scan calibration". This calibration uses only one fully calibrated jet collection. By building ratios between the fully calibrated jets and partially calibrated jets, it is possible to derive in-situ correction factors for the probe jet. Especially for the new run of the LHC a quick inter-calibration like the R-scan is very useful. Therefore, during this thesis the R-scan method is designed and improved with the data acquired during Run I. After a validation of this method it is applied to the new data format of Run II.

  7. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector in the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco Navarro, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS physics goals require excellent resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system and on the quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the Run II of the LHC, the system was upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). An outline of the track based alignment approach and its implementation within the ATLAS software will be presented. Special attention will be paid to integration of the IBL into the alignment framework, techniques allowing to identify and eliminate tracking systematics as well as strategies to deal with time-dependent alignment. Performance from the commissioning of Cosmic data and potentially early LHC Run II proton-proton collisions will be discussed.

  8. Performance of the LHCb RICH detectors during the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00261218; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb RICH system provides hadron identification over a wide momentum range $(2–100 ~\\text{GeV}/c)$. This detector system is key to LHCb’s precision flavour physics programme, which has unique sensitivity to physics beyond the standard model. This paper reports on the performance of the LHCb RICH in Run II, following significant changes in the detector and operating conditions. The changes include the refurbishment of significant number of photon detectors, assembled using new vacuum technologies, and the removal of the aerogel radiator. The start of Run II of the LHC saw the beam energy increase to $6.5 ~\\text{TeV}$ per beam and a new trigger strategy for LHCb with full online detector calibration. The RICH information has also been made available for all trigger streams in the High Level Trigger for the first time.

  9. Beauty and charm rare decays at the LHC: prospects for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorendi, Sara; De Sanctis, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    The main results on the searches for rare decays of B and D mesons from ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments are summarised in this report. Particular attention will be given to the measurements performed by at least two of the three experiments, where common aspects and differences are highlighted. Detector improvements and perspectives of the three experiments for Run II ongoing data campaign are also discussed.

  10. Polarization for prompt J/ψ and ψ(2s) production at the Tevatron and LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bin; Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2013-01-25

    With nonrelativistic QCD factorization, we present the first complete next-to-leading order study on the polarization of prompt J/ψ hadroproduction by including feeddown from χ(c)((3)P(J)(1),(3)S(1)(8)) and ψ(2s) which turn out to be very important parts. By using the color-octet long-distance matrix elements obtained from a combined fit of the measurements at the Tevatron and LHC for J/ψ, ψ(2s) and χ(c), the prompt J/ψ polarization predictions are presented, and the results are in agreement with the CDF run I data (except two points), but in conflict with the CDF run II data, while they are close to the ALICE data (inclusive J/ψ). The measurements at the LHC are expected to clarify the situation.

  11. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, Michael G.; Begel, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Campanelli, M.; Chlebana, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dittmann, J.R.; Ellis, S.D.; Field, B.; Field, R.; Gallinaro, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 fb{sup -1} of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focused on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  12. Combination of CDF and D0 results on the mass of the top quark using up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tevatron Electroweak Working Group, Tevatron Group

    2014-07-10

    We summarize the current top-quark mass measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments at Fermilab. We combine published Run I (1992--1996) results with the most precise published and preliminary Run II (2001--2011) measurements based on data corresponding to up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions. Taking correlations of uncertainties into account, and combining the statistical and systematic uncertainties, the resulting preliminary Tevatron average mass of the top quark is $M_{top} = 174.34 \\pm 0.64 ~GeV/c^2$, corresponding to a relative precision of 0.37%.

  13. Entwicklungsarbeit am Spurendetektor fur das CDF Experiment am Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Frank [Univ. of Karlsruhe (TH) (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Silicon, the element, which revolutionized the development of electronics, is known as an important and multiusable material, dominating todays electronic technology. It's properties are well investigated and today well known. Silicon is used in solar cells, computers and telecommunications. Since the Sixties semiconductors have been used as particle detectors. Initially they were operated in fixed- target experiments as calorimeters and as detectors with a high precision track reconstruction. Since the Eighties they are widely used in collider experiments as silicon microstrip or silicon pixel detectors near the primary vertex. Silicon sensors have a very good intrinsic energy resolution: for every 3.6 eV released by a particle crossing the medium, one electron-hole pair is produced. Compared to 30 eV required to ionize a gas molecule in a gaseous detector, one gets 10 times the number of particles. The average energy loss and high ionized particle number with 390 e V / μm ~ 108 (electron - hole pairs)/ μm is effectively high due to the high density of silicon. These detectors allow a high precision reconstruction of tracks, primary and secondary vertices, which are especially important for b flavour tagging. The Tevatron and its detectors are being upgraded for the next data taking run starting in 2001 (RUN II). The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) [2] for the upcoming Run II and its upgraded components are described in chapter 2. The main upgrade project is the design and construction of a completely new inner tracking system.

  14. $t\\bar{t}$ Production in Multijet Events at CDF (RunII)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresele, Ambra Alessia [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

    2003-03-14

    This thesis describes the all hadronic $t\\bar{t}$ analysis on the ~100 pb-1 of data collected so far by the CDF experiment (chapter 2 and chapter 3) in the $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 2 TeV of Tevatron (Fermilab).

  15. One-family walking technicolor in light of LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya

    2017-12-01

    The LHC Higgs can be identified as the technidilaton, a composite scalar, arising as a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson for the spontaneous breaking of scale symmetry in walking technicolor. One interesting candidate for the walking technicolor is the QCD with the large number of fermion flavors, involving the one-family model having the eight-fermion flavors. The smallness of the technidilaton mass can be ensured by the generic walking feature, Miransky scaling, and the presence of the “anti-Veneziano limit” characteristic to the large-flavor walking scenario. To tell the standard-model Higgs from the technidilaton, one needs to wait for the precise estimate of the Higgs couplings to the standard model particles, which is expected at the ongoing LHC Run II. In this talk the technidilaton phenomenology in comparison with the LHC Run-I data is summarized with the special emphasis placed on the presence of the anti-Veneziano limit supporting the lightness of technidilaton. Besides the technidilaton, the walking technicolor predicts the rich particle spectrum such as technipions and technirho mesons, arising as composite particles formed by technifermions. The LHC phenomenology of those technihadrons and the discovery channels are also discussed, which are smoking-guns of the walking technicolor, to be accessible at the LHC Run II.

  16. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, a...

  17. The CMS Level-1 tau lepton and Vector Boson Fusion triggers for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Amendola, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level triggering system composed of Level-1, instrumented by custom-design hardware boards, and a software High-Level-Trigger. A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance is now being used to maintain the thresholds that were used in LHC Run I for the more challenging luminosity conditions experienced during Run II. The upgrades to the calorimetry trigger will be described along with performance data. The algorithms for the selection of final states with tau leptons, both for precision measurements and for searches of new physics beyond the Standard Model, will be described in detail. The implementation of the first dedicated Vector Boson Fusion trigger algorithm will be presented as well, along with its performance on benchmark physics signals.

  18. Novel Real-time Calibration and Alignment Procedure for LHCb Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Prouve, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve optimal detector performance the LHCb experiment has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II of the LHC. For the alignment tasks, data is collected and processed at the beginning of each fill while the calibrations are performed for each run. This real time alignment and calibration allows the same constants being used in both the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. Additionally the newly computed alignment and calibration constants can be instantly used in the trigger, making it more efficient. The online alignment and calibration of the RICH detectors also enable the use of hadronic particle identification in the trigger. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the LHCb trigger. An overview of all alignment and calibration tasks is presented and their performance is shown.

  19. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for the LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabi, A.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Davignon, O.; Romanteau, T.; Strebler, T.; Cepeda, M.; Sauvan, J. B.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Taylor, J.; Foudas, C.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Breeze, S.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Shtipliyski, A.; Tapper, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Forbes, R.; Gorski, T.; Klabbers, P.; Levine, A.; Ruggles, T.; Smith, N.; Smith, W.; Svetek, A.; Tikalsky, J.; Vicente, M.

    2017-01-01

    Results from the completed Phase 1 Upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger are presented. The upgrade was performed in two stages, with the first running in 2015 for proton and heavy ion collisions and the final stage for 2016 data taking. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and has been used by CMS to collect over 43 fb-1 of data since the start of the Run II of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT), which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the μTCA standard. The trigger processors are instrumented with Xilinx Virtex-7 690 FPGAs and 10 Gbps optical links. The TMT architecture is flexible and the number of trigger processors can be expanded according to the physics needs of CMS. Sophisticated and innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of the experiment. The system has been able to adapt to the outstanding performance of the LHC, which ran with an instantaneous luminosity well above design. The performance of the system for single physics objects are presented along with the optimizations foreseen to maintain the thresholds for the harsher conditions expected during the LHC Run II and Run III periods.

  20. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the midpoint algorithm in Run II at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Robert Craig [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint jet clustering algorithm in five different rapidity regions. This is the first analysis which measures the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint algorithm in the forward region of the detector. The measurement is based on more than 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of Run II data taken by the CDF experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The results are consistent with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  1. Dark Matter Search Results from the Commissioning Run of PandaX-II

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Andi; Cui, Xiangyi; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Fu, Changbo; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gong, Haowei; Hu, Shouyang; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xinglong; Liang, Hao; Lin, Qing; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ni, Kaixuan; Pushkin, Kirill; Ren, Xiangxiang; Schubnell, Michael; Shen, Manbin; Shi, Fang; Stephenson, Scott; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiming; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Mengjiao; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zeng, Xionghui; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Huanqiao; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Xiaopeng

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a search for WIMPs from the commissioning run of the PandaX-II experiment located at the China Jinping underground Laboratory. A WIMP search data set with an exposure of 306$\\times$19.1 kg-day was taken, while its dominant $^{85}$Kr background was used as the electron recoil calibration. No WIMP candidates are identified, and a 90\\% upper limit is set on the spin-independent elastic WIMP-nucleon cross section with a lowest excluded cross section of 2.97$\\times$10$^{-45}$~cm$^2$ at a WIMP mass of 44.7~GeV/c$^2$.

  2. Polishing optical fibers for the D0 ICD in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth Gallas and Jia Li

    1998-12-01

    The active element in the Run II D0 Inter Cryostat Detector (ICD) is an array of scintil- lator tiles. Charged and neutral particles produce light in the tiles which is transported to the photodetection system along optical fiber pathways. In general, building a tile/fiber detector requires very conscientious technical support and a high degree of quality control. Polishing fibers is one of the most delicate of tasks involved. This note describes methods used by the ICD group to polish the ends of fibers. These methods may be used in the ICD production as well as in prototype development.

  3. Entdeckung elektroschwacher Produktion einzelner Top-Quarks mit dem CDF II Experiment; Discovery electroweak production of single top quarks with the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, Jan [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a neural network search for combined as well as separate s- and t-channel single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron using 3.2 fb-1 of collision data. It is the twelfth thesis dealing with single top-quark production performed within the CDF Collaboration, whereas three have been done in Run I [53–55] and eight in Run II [23, 25, 28, 39, 56–59].

  4. Performance of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter in Run II and its role in the measurement of the Higgs boson properties

    CERN Document Server

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The characterisation of the Higgs boson discovered in 2012 around 125 GeV, and confirmed with the data collected in Run II, requires the precise determination of its mass, width and couplings. The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) is crucial for measurements in the highest resolution channels, $H\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $H\\to 4$ leptons. In particular the energy resolution, the scale uncertainty and the position resolution for electrons and photons are required to be as good as possible.During Run II the LHC is continuously operating with 25 ns bunch spacing and increasing instantaneous luminosity. The calorimeter reconstruction algorithm has been adapted to cope with increasing levels of pile-up and the calibration and monitoring strategy have been optimised to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run II. We show first performance results from the Run II data taking periods, achieved through energy calibrations using physics events, with...

  5. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass using Dilepton Events and a Neutrino Weighting Algorithm with the D0 Experiment at the Tevatron (Run II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Joerg [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    2007-01-01

    Elementary particle physics raises questions that are several thousand years old. What are the fundamental components of matter and how do they interact? These questions are linked to the question of what happened in the very first moments after the creation of the universe. Modern physics systematically tests nature to find answers to these and other fundamental questions. Precise theories are developed that describe various phenomena and at the same time are reduced to a few basic principals of nature. Simplification and reduction have always been guiding concepts of physics. The interplay between experimental data and theoretical descriptions led to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. It summarizes the laws of nature and is one of most precise descriptions of nature achieved by mankind. Despite the great success of the Standard Model it is not the ultimate theory of everything. Models beyond the Standard Model try to unify all interactions in one grand unified theory. The number of free parameters is attempted to be reduced. Gravity is attempted to be incorporated. Extensions to the Standard Model like supersymmetry address the so-called hierarchy problem. Precision measurements are the key for searches of new particles and new physics. A powerful tool of experimental particle physics are particle accelerators. They provide tests of the Standard Model at smallest scales. New particles are produced and their properties are investigated. In 1995 the heaviest known elementary particle, called top quark, has been discovered at Fermilab. It differs from all other lighter quarks due to the high mass and very short lifetime. This makes the top quark special and an interesting object to be studied. A rich program of top physics at Fermilab investigates whether the top quark is really the particle as described by the Standard Model. The top quark mass is a free parameter of the theory that has been measured precisely. This thesis presents a precise measurement of the top quark mass by the D0 experiment at Fermilab in the dilepton final states. The comparison of the measured top quark masses in different final states allows an important consistency check of the Standard Model. Inconsistent results would be a clear hint of a misinterpretation of the analyzed data set. With the exception of the Higgs boson, all particles predicted by the Standard Model have been found. The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main focuses in high energy physics. The theory section will discuss the close relationship between the physics of the Higgs boson and the top quark.

  6. Study of the $H^0/A^0 \\to \\tau \\mu$ signal at the hadronic colliders and intercalibration of the D0 calorimeter at Tevatron Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delsart, Pierre Antoine [Claude Bernard Univ. Lyon (France)

    2003-10-13

    This thesis was realized in collaboration with the "theory'' group and the "D0" group of IPNL. Within D0 we have worked on a component of the calibration of the detector's calorimeter : the intercalibration. Using the fact the physics is $\\phi$-symmetric in D0, we created and applied statistical methods for a relative calibration of the $\\phi$-symmetric parts of the calorimeter. Work on particle physics concerned the two Higgs doublet model. In such models leptonic number violation is possible : we have simulated the $H^0/A^0 \\to \\tau \\mu$ signal in order to study the discovery potential and the constraints on the coupling responsible for this decay.

  7. Search for The Standard Model Higgs Boson in the four lepton final state by the D0 experiment at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Diego [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents a measurement of Z boson pair production in p¯p collisions at 1.96 TeV with 9.6 fb-1 to 9.8 fb-1 of D0 data. We examine the final states eeee, eeμμ, and μμμμ. Based on selected data, the measured cross section in the mass region M(Z/γ*) > 30 GeV is σ(p¯p → Z/γ* Z/γ*) = 1.26+0.44 -0.36 (stat)+0.17 -0.15 (syst) ± 0.08 (lumi) pb.

  8. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of top-quark and antiquark pairs using the full CDF Run II data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We measure the forward-backward asymmetry of the production of top-quark and antiquark pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √{s }=1.96 TeV using the full data set collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Tevatron Run II corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb-1 . The asymmetry is characterized by the rapidity difference between top quarks and antiquarks (Δ y ) and measured in the final state with two charged leptons (electrons and muons). The inclusive asymmetry, corrected to the entire phase space at parton level, is measured to be AFBt t ¯=0.12 ±0.13 , consistent with the expectations from the standard model (SM) and previous CDF results in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combination of the CDF measurements of the inclusive AFBt t ¯ in both final states yields AFBt t ¯=0.160 ±0.045 , which is consistent with the SM predictions. We also measure the differential asymmetry as a function of Δ y . A linear fit to AFBt t ¯(|Δ y |), assuming zero asymmetry at Δ y =0 , yields a slope of α =0.14 ±0.15 , consistent with the SM prediction and the previous CDF determination in the final state with a single charged lepton. The combined slope of AFBt t ¯(|Δ y |) in the two final states is α =0.227 ±0.057 , which is 2.0 σ larger than the SM prediction.

  9. A precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of D{Ø} Run II data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huanzhao [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-05-16

    The top quark is a very special fundamental particle in the Standard Model (SM) mainly due to its heavy mass. The top quark has extremely short lifetime and decays before hadronization. This reduces the complexity for the measurement of its mass. The top quark couples very strongly to the Higgs boson since the fermion-Higgs Yukawa coupling linearly depends on the fermion’s mass. Therefore, the top quark is also heavily involved in Higgs production and related study. A precise measurement of the top quark mass is very important, as it allows for self-consistency check of the SM, and also gives a insight about the stability of our universe in the SM context. This dissertation presents my work on the measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton final states of t$\\bar{t}$ events in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, using the full DØ Run II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron. I extracted the top quark mass by reconstructing event kinematics, and integrating over expected neutrino rapidity distributions to obtain solutions over a scanned range of top quark mass hypotheses. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization that I made to minimize the expected statistical uncertainty. I also improve the calibration of jets in dilepton events by using the calibration determined in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton+jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. The measured mass is 173.11 ± 1.34(stat)+0.83 -0.72(sys) GeV .

  10. Run II performance of luminosity and beam condition monitors at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The BRIL (Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity) system of CMS consists of instrumentation to measure the luminosity online and offline, and to monitor the LHC beam conditions inside CMS. An accurate luminosity measurement is essential to the CMS physics program, and measurement of the beam background is necessary to ensure safe operation of CMS. Many of the BRIL subsystems have been upgraded and others have been added for LHC Run II to complement the existing measurements. The beam condition monitor (BCM) consists of several sets of diamond sensors used to measure online luminosity and beam background with a single-bunch-crossing resolution. The BCM also detects when beam conditions become unfavorable for CMS running and may trigger a beam abort to protect the detector. The beam halo monitor (BHM) uses quartz bars to measure the background of the incoming beams at larger radii. The pixel luminosity telescope (PLT) consists of telescopes of silicon sensors designed to provide a CMS online and offline luminosity measurement. In addition, the forward hadronic calorimeter (HF) delivers an independent luminosity measurement, making the whole system robust and allowing for cross-checks of the systematics. An overview of the performance during 2015 LHC running for the new/updated BRIL subsystems will be given, including the uncertainties of the luminosity measurements.

  11. Identifying a light charged Higgs boson at the LHC Run II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdesslam Arhrib

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the phenomenological implications of a light Higgs boson, h, within the CP-conserving 2-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM Type-I, for the detection prospects of the charged H± state at Run II of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, assuming s=13 TeV as energy and O(100 fb−1 as luminosity. When sufficiently light, this h state can open up the bosonic decay channel H±→W±(⁎h, which may have a branching ratio significantly exceeding those of the H±→τν and H±→cs channels. We perform a broad scan of the 2HDM Type-I parameter space, assuming the heavier of the two CP-even Higgs bosons, H, to be the observed SM-like state with a mass near 125 GeV. Through these scans we highlight regions in which mH±Run II.

  12. Identifying a light charged Higgs boson at the LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Enberg, Rikard; Klemm, William; Moretti, Stefano; Munir, Shoaib

    2017-11-01

    We analyse the phenomenological implications of a light Higgs boson, h, within the CP-conserving 2-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) Type-I, for the detection prospects of the charged H± state at Run II of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), assuming √{ s } = 13 TeV as energy and O (100 fb-1) as luminosity. When sufficiently light, this h state can open up the bosonic decay channel H± →W ± (*) h, which may have a branching ratio significantly exceeding those of the H± → τν and H± → cs channels. We perform a broad scan of the 2HDM Type-I parameter space, assuming the heavier of the two CP-even Higgs bosons, H, to be the observed SM-like state with a mass near 125 GeV. Through these scans we highlight regions in which mH± Run II.

  13. Global searches at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renkel, Peter; /Southern Methodist U.

    2009-01-01

    We present a review of global searches at the Tevatron with D0 and CDF detectors. The strategy involves splitting the data from the Tevatron into many final states and looking for signs of new physics in the high p{sub T} tails of various distributions using SLEUTH algorithm. CDF also utilizes Bump Hunter to search for narrow resonances in mass distributions. We analyzed 180 D0 final states, 9335 D0 distributions; 399 CDF final states and 19650 CDF distributions. No evidence of new physics is found.

  14. Top Quark Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabalina, E.; /Chicago U.

    2006-05-01

    An overview of the preliminary results of the top quark pair production cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV carried out by the CDF and D0 collaborations is presented. The data samples used for the analyses are collected in the current Tevatron run and correspond to an integrated luminosity from 360 pb{sup -1} up to 760 pb{sup -1}.

  15. Achievements and Lessons from Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centerpiece of the world's high energy physics program - beginning operation in December of 1985 until it was overtaken by LHC in 2011. The aim of the this unique scientific instrument was to explore the elementary particle physics reactions with center of mass collision energies of up to 1.96 TeV. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, however as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430 times higher luminosities to each of two high luminosity experiments, CDF and D0. Tevatron will be shut off September 30, 2011. The collider was arguably one of the most complex research instruments ever to reach the operation stage and is widely recognized for many technological breakthroughs and numerous physics discoveries. Below we briefly present the history of the Tevatron, major advances in accelerator physics, and technology implemented during the long quest for better and better performance. We also discuss some lessons learned from our experience.

  16. Single top quarks at the Tevatron and observation of the s-channel production mode

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The presentation gives an overview of single-top-quark production at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The talk covers measurements of the total s+t channel production cross section and the extraction of the CKM matrix element |V_tb|. Furthermore, separate analyses of the s-channel and t-channel production modes are discussed. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment and represent in most cases the full Run-II dataset. Through a combination of the CDF and D0 measurements the first observation of single-top-quark production in the s-channel is claimed. This is particularly highlighted in the seminar.

  17. A Final Review of the Performance of the CDF Run II Data Acquisition System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The CDF Collider Detector at Fermilab ceased data collection on September 30, 2011 after over twenty five years of operation. We review the performance of the CDF Run II data acquisition systems over the last ten of these years while recording nearly 10 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions with a high degree of efficiency. Technology choices in the online control and configuration systems and front-end embedded processing have impacted the efficiency and quality of the data accumulated by CDF, and have had to perform over a large range of instantaneous luminosity values and trigger rates. We identify significant sources of problems and successes. In particular, we present our experience computing and acquiring data in a radiation environment, and attempt to correlate system technical faults with radiation dose rate and technology choices.

  18. Operation and performance of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers during LHC run II

    CERN Document Server

    Eysermans, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The Resitive Plate Chambers (RPC) at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provide redundancy to the Drift Tubes in the barrel and Cathode Strip Chambers in the endcap regions. Consisting of 1056 double gap RPC chambers, the main detector parameters and environmental conditions are carefully monitored during the data taking period. At a center of mass energy of 13 TeV, the luminosity reached record levels which was challenging from the operational and performance point of view. In this work, the main operational parameters are discussed and the overall performance of the RPC system is reported for the LHC run II data taking period. With a low amount of inactive chambers, a good and stable detector performance was achieved with high efficiency.

  19. B-Physics at CMS with LHC Run-II and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The LHC is entering into operation with an increased centre-of-mass energy of 13~TeV, and within the next 3 years of operations (Run-II) the foreseen integrated luminosity delivered to CMS will be about 100 fb$^{-1}$. The B hadron production cross section is expected to nearly double at this energy, thus potentially increasing by almost one order of magnitude the collected statistics relative to the previous operation period. This will enable CMS to perform enhanced measurements in the B-physics sector. A further increase in integrated luminosity is expected to occur in two more steps after the second LHC long shutdown (LS) in 2018 and the third LS in 2021, thus enabling to significantly improve the precision of several B-physics measurements, including $B_s(B_d)\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$, and search for rarer decays. This proceeding reports on the prospects for B-physics measurements with high statistics data at CMS.

  20. CMS operations for Run II preparation and commissioning of the offline infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Cerminara, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    The restart of the LHC coincided with an intense activity for the CMS experiment. Both at the beginning of Run II in 2015 and the restart of operations in 2016, the collaboration was engaged in an extensive re-commissioning of the CMS data-taking operations. After the long stop, the detector was fully aligned and calibrated. Data streams were redesigned, to fit the priorities dictated by the physics program for 2015 and 2016. A new reconstruction software (both online and offline) was commissioned with early collisions and further developed during the year. A massive campaign of Monte Carlo production was launched, to assist physics analyses. This presentation reviews the main event of this commissioning journey and describes the status of CMS physics performances for 2016.

  1. Novel methods and expected run II performance of ATLAS track reconstruction in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, Roland Wolfgang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding and optimal track reconstruction performance of ATLAS in the core of high pT objects is paramount for a number of techniques such as jet energy and mass calibration, jet flavour tagging, and hadronic tau identification as well as measurements of physics quantities like jet fragmentation functions. These dense environments are characterized by charged particle separations on the order of the granularity of ATLAS’s inner detector. With the insertion of a new innermost layer in this tracking detector, which allows measurements closer to the interaction point, and an increase in the centre of mass energy, these difficult environments will become even more relevant in Run II, such as in searches for heavy resonances. Novel algorithmic developments to the ATLAS track reconstruction software targeting these topologies as well as the expected improved performance will be presented.

  2. Electron and Photon High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084857

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system. The first level is implemented on custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to contain the HLT rate within the available bandwidth while keeping thresholds low enough to cover the requirements of the physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the improvements that have been applied to the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. We present such changes in the definitions of HLT electrons and photons, focusing in particular on the deployment of a new clustering algorithm allowing pileup mitigation, a new Particle-Flow based isolation replacing th...

  3. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector Upgraded for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez Pena, Javier

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable Barrel Layer (IBL). An outline of the track based alignment approach and its implementation within the ATLAS software will be presented. Special attention will be paid to integration to the alignment framework of the IBL, which plays the key role in precise reconstruction of the collider luminous region, interaction vertices and identification of long-lived heavy flavour states. In order to detect as soon as possible deformations and misalignments of the tracking system that may affect the data taking, a fast alignment chain was implemented at CERN’s Tier-0. Last upgrades and tests of this fast chain will be covered. Performance from Cosmic Ray commissioning run will be discussed.

  4. Measurement of the W W and W Z production cross section using final states with a charged lepton and heavy-flavor jets in the full CDF Run II data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the total W W and W Z production cross sections in p p ¯ collision at √{s }=1.96 TeV , in a final state consistent with leptonic W boson decay and jets originating from heavy-flavor quarks from either a W or a Z boson decay. This analysis uses the full data set collected with the CDF II detector during Run II of the Tevatron collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1 . An analysis of the dijet mass spectrum provides 3.7 σ evidence of the summed production processes of either W W or W Z bosons with a measured total cross section of σW W +W Z=13.7 ±3.9 pb . Independent measurements of the W W and W Z production cross sections are allowed by the different heavy-flavor decay patterns of the W and Z bosons and by the analysis of secondary-decay vertices reconstructed within heavy-flavor jets. The productions of W W and of W Z dibosons are independently seen with significances of 2.9 σ and 2.1 σ , respectively, with total cross sections of σW W=9.4 ±4.2 pb and σW Z=3. 7-2.2+2.5 pb . The measurements are consistent with standard-model predictions.

  5. Measurement of the $WW$ and $WZ$ production cross section using final states with a charged lepton and heavy-flavor jets in the full CDF Run II data set

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2016-08-23

    We present a measurement of the $WW$ and $WZ$ diboson production cross-sections in a final state consistent with leptonic $W$ boson decay and jets originating from heavy-flavor quarks from either a $W$ or a $Z$ boson decay. This analysis uses the full data set collected with the CDF II detector during Run II of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. An analysis of the dijet mass spectrum provides $3.7\\sigma$ evidence of the summed production processes of either $WW$ or $WZ$ bosons with a measured cross section of $\\sigma_{WW+WZ} = 13.7\\pm 3.9$ pb. Independent measurements of the $WW$ and $WZ$ production cross-sections are allowed by the different heavy-flavor decay-patterns of the $W$ and $Z$ bosons and by the analysis of secondary-decay vertices reconstructed within heavy-flavor jets. The productions of $WW$ and of $WZ$ dibosons are independently seen with significances of $2.9\\sigma$ and $2.1\\sigma$, respectively, with cros...

  6. Search for the single top quarks produced in s-channel via electroweak interactions at √s = 1.96 at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabeen, Shabnam [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a search for single top quarks produced in the s-channel electroweak production mode. The search is performed in the electron+jets decay channels, with one or more secondary-vertex tagged jets to indicate the presence of a b-jet and hence improving the signal:background ratio. Separation between signal and background is further enhanced by the use of Feed Forward Neural networks. 360 pb-1 of Run II data used for this analysis was delivered by the Tevatron, and collected by D0 between August 2002 and August 2004. The resulting 95% confidence level upper limit is 4 pb.

  7. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Matthew [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high š. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  8. Alignment of the CMS Tracker: Latest results from LHC Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Mittag, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    The all-silicon design of the tracking system of the CMS experiment provides excellent measurements of charged-particle tracks and an efficient tagging of jets. Conditions of the CMS tracker changed repeatedly during the 2015/2016 shutdown and the 2016 data-taking period. Still the true position and orientation of each of the 15 148 silicon strip and 1440 silicon pixel modules need to be known with high precision for all intervals. The alignment constants also need to be promptly re-adjusted each time the state of the CMS magnet is changed between 0T and 3.8 T. Latest Run-II results of the CMS tracker alignment and resolution performance are presented, which are obtained using several millions of reconstructed tracks from collision and cosmic-ray data of 2016. The geometries and the resulting performance of physics observables are carefully validated. In addition to the offline alignment, an online procedure has been put in place which continuously monitors movements of the pixel high-level structures and tri...

  9. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector Upgraded for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butti, Pierfrancesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An o...

  10. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butti, Pierfrancesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An outl...

  11. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector upgraded for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00386283; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An o...

  12. The CMS Level-1 electron and photon trigger: for Run II of LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, N.; Jessop, C.; Meng, F.; Marinelli, N.; Taroni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Davignon, O.; Romanteau, T.; Strebler, T.; Zabi, A.; Sauvan, J. B.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Taylor, J.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Shtipliyski, A.; Tapper, A.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Xia, F.

    2017-02-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) employs a sophisticated two-level online triggering system that has a rejection factor of up to 105. Since the beginning of Run II of LHC, the conditions that CMS operates in have become increasingly challenging. The centre-of-mass energy is now 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity currently peaks at 1.5 ×1034 cm-2s-1. In order to keep low physics thresholds and to trigger efficiently in such conditions, the CMS trigger system has been upgraded. A new trigger architecture, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT) has been introduced which allows the full granularity of the calorimeters to be exploited at the first level of the online trigger. The new trigger has also benefited immensely from technological improvements in hardware. Sophisticated algorithms, developed to fully exploit the advantages provided by the new hardware architecture, have been implemented. The new trigger system started taking physics data in 2016 following a commissioning period in 2015, and since then has performed extremely well. The hardware and firmware developments, electron and photon algorithms together with their performance in challenging 2016 conditions is presented.

  13. Level-1 trigger selection of electrons and photons with CMS for LHC Run-II.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088114

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment has a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly $10^5$. The first, hardware-level trigger (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all subdetectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its center of mass energy to 13 or 14 TeV, and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme in this intense environment, the CMS trigger and data acquisition system must be upgraded. The L1 calorimeter trigger hardware and architecture in particular has been redesigned to maintain the current thresholds even in presence of more demanding conditions (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of $\\tau$ leptons. This design benefits from recent $\\mu$TCA technology, allowing sophisticated algorit...

  14. The CMS Level-1 Tau identification algorithm for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083962

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10e5. The first level (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. During Run II, the centre of mass energy of the LHC collisions will be increased up to 13/14 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity will eventually reach 2e34 cm-2s-1. To guarantee a successful and ambitious physics program under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system must be consolidated. In particular, the L1 calorimeter Trigger hardware and architecture will be upgraded, benefiting from the recent microTCA technology allowing sophisticated algorithms to be deployed, better exploiting the calorimeter granularity and opening the possibility of making correlations between different parts of the detector. Given the enhanced granularity provided by the new system, an opt...

  15. Bounds on universal extra dimension from LHC run I and II data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajyoti Choudhury

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the collider bounds on minimal Universal Extra Dimension (mUED model from LHC Run-I and II data. The phenomenology of mUED is determined by only two parameters namely, the compactification scale (R−1 of the extra dimension and cutoff scale (Λ of the theory. The characteristic feature of mUED is the occurrence of nearly degenerate mass spectrum for the Kaluza–Klein (KK particles and hence, soft leptons, soft jets at the collider experiments. The degree of degeneracy of KK-mass spectrum crucially depends on Λ. The strongest direct bound on R−1 (∼950GeV for large Λ arises from a search for a pair of soft dimuons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC experiment with 8 TeV center-of-mass energy and 20 fb−1 integrated luminosity. However, for small Λ and hence, small splitting within the first KK-level, the bounds from the dimuon channel are rather weak. On the other hand, the discovery of 126 GeV Higgs boson demands small Λ to prevent the scalar potential form being unbounded from below. We discuss LHC monojet searches as a probe of low Λ region of mUED parameter space. We also compute bounds on the mUED parameter space from 13 TeV multijets results.

  16. Performances of the ATLAS Level-1 Muon barrel trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Sessa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range $|\\eta|<1.05$ for a total surface of more than $4000\\ m^2$ and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 $\\mu s$. The detailed measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and of the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking is here presented.

  17. Invited talk at SM@LHC2016 titled "Higgs Prospects for Run-II and HL-LHC"

    CERN Document Server

    Neubauer, Mark; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Summary of the expectations for Higgs precision measurements of couplings and properties at Run II and the HL-LHC phase. The talk should also cover the increased potential for new searches and measurements with limited sensitivity until now, including BSM Higgs boson searches.

  18. Measurement of R = \\boldmath${\\mathcal{B}(t \\rightarrow Wb)/\\mathcal{B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)} $ in Top--quark--pair Decays using Lepton+jets Events and the Full CDF Run II Data set

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-06-03

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions $R=\\mathcal{B}(t\\rightarrow Wb)/\\mathcal{B}(t\\rightarrow Wq)$, where $q$ represents quarks of type $b$, $s$, or $d$, in the final state with a lepton and hadronic jets. The measurement uses $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV proton--antiproton collision data from 8.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We simultaneously measure $R=0.94 \\pm 0.09$ (stat+syst), the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section $\\sigma_{t \\bar t} = 7.5 \\pm 1.0$ (stat+syst) pb. The magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, $|V_{tb}| = 0.97 \\pm 0.05$ (stat+syst) is extracted assuming three generations of quarks, and a lower limit of $|V_{tb}|>0.89$ at 95% credibility level is set.

  19. Diffractively produced Z bosons in the muon decay channel in p-pbar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV, and the measurement of the efficiency of the D0 Run II luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Tamsin L

    2006-04-01

    The first analysis of diffractively produced Z bosons in the muon decay channel is presented, using data taken by the D0 detector at the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 109 pb{sup -1}. The diffractive sample is defined using the fractional momentum loss {zeta} of the intact proton or antiproton measured using the calorimeter and muon detector systems. In a sample of 10791 (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} events, 24 diffractive candidate events are found with {zeta} < 0.02. The first work towards measuring the cross section times branching ratio for diffractive production of (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} is presented for the kinematic region {zeta} < 0.02. The first work towards measuring the cross section times branching ratio for diffractive production of (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} is presented for the kinematic region {zeta} < 0.02. The systematic uncertainties are not yet sufficiently understood to present the cross section result. In addition, the first measurement of the efficiency of the Run II D0 Luminosity Monitor is presented, which is used in all cross section measurements. The efficiency is: {var_epsilon}{sub LM} = (90.9 {+-} 1.8)%.

  20. Observation of Central Exclusive Diphoton Production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brucken, Jens Erik [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Inst. of Physics (Finland)

    2013-01-01

    We have observed exclusive γγ production in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron at √ s = 1.96 TeV. We use data corresponding to 1.11 ± 0.07 fb-1 integrated luminosity taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, with a trigger requiring two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2 GeV, and vetoing on hits in the forward beam shower counters. We select events with two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| < 1.0, with no other particles detected in -7.4 < η < +7.4. The two showers have similar ET and an azimuthal angle separation Δφ ~ π; we find 34 events with exactly two matching charged particle tracks, agreeing with expectations for the QED process p¯p → p+e+e- + ¯p by two photon exchange; and we find 43 events with no tracks. The latter are candidates for the exclusive process p¯p → p + γγ + ¯p by double pomeron exchange. We use the strip and wire chambers at the longitudinal shower maximum position within the calorimeter to measure a possible exclusive background from IP + IP → π0π0, and conclude that it is consistent with zero and is < 15 events at 95% C.L. The measured cross section is σγγ,excl(|η| < 1, ET (γ) > 2.5 GeV) = 2.48 +0.40 -0.35(stat) +0.40 -0.51(syst) pb and in agreement with the theoretical predictions. This process is closely related to exclusive Higgs boson production pp → p + H + p at the Large Hadron Collider. The observation of the exclusive production of diphotons shows that exclusive Higgs production can happen and could be observed with a proper experimental setup.

  1. SUSY searches at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffre, Michel; /Orsay, LAL

    2012-02-01

    The Tevatron collider has provided the CDF and D0 collaborations with large datasets as input to a rich program of physics beyond the standard model. The results presented here are from recent searches for SUSY particles using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of data. Supersymmetry (SUSY) [1] is one of the most favored theories beyond the standard model (SM). Each SM particle is associated to a sparticle whose spin differs by one half unit. This boson-fermion symmetry is obviously broken by some unknown mechanism. Even in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM (MSSM [2]) there are a large number of free parameters. To reduce this number one can introduce new assumptions on the symmetry breaking mechanism and build models based on minimal supergravity (as mSUGRA [3]) or on a Gauge Mediated Symmetry Breaking scenario (GMSB [4]), a top-down approach. Another possibility is to make phenomenological assumptions to reduce the number of particles accessible to the experiment while keeping some of the properties of the above models (bottom-up approach). As the sparticles are heavy, to produce them one has to make collisions at the highest center of mass energy. The Tevatron was the best place for discovery until the start of LHC. In the near term, Tevatron experiments and their large datasets remain competitive in areas like production of third generation squarks and of non-coloured sparticles. I will report on recent results from the CDF and D0 collaborations, assuming R-parity is conserved, i.e the sparticles are produced in pairs, and the lightest of them (LSP) is stable, neutral, weakly interacting, and detected as missing transverse energy, E{sub T}.

  2. Jet physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Seidel

    2002-05-29

    Recent analyses by the CDF and D0 Collaborations of jet data produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are presented. These include new studies of the inclusive jet production cross section, a measurement of the strong coupling constant, the first measurement of subjet multiplicity of quark and gluon jets, examination of ratios of multijet cross sections and their implications for choice of renormalization scale, and a study of charged jet evolution and energy flow in the underlying event. The results are compared to theoretical predictions.

  3. Jet Physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, Anwar; Lincoln, Don

    2010-02-01

    Jets have been used to verify the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), measure the structure of the proton and to search for the physics beyond the Standard Model. In this article, we review the current status of jet physics at the Tevatron, a {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. We report on recent measurements of the inclusive jet production cross section and the results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model using jets. Dijet production measurements are also reported.

  4. Parton distribution functions, αs, and heavy-quark masses for LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Moch, S.; PlačakytÄ--, R.

    2017-07-01

    We determine a new set of parton distribution functions (ABMP16), the strong coupling constant αs and the quark masses mc, mb and mt in a global fit to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD. The analysis uses the MS ¯ scheme for αs and all quark masses and is performed in the fixed-flavor number scheme for nf=3 , 4, 5. Essential new elements of the fit are the combined data from HERA for inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), data from the fixed-target experiments NOMAD and CHORUS for neutrino-induced DIS, data from Tevatron and the LHC for the Drell-Yan process and the hadro-production of single-top and top-quark pairs. The theory predictions include new improved approximations at NNLO for the production of heavy quarks in DIS and for the hadro-production of single-top quarks. The description of higher twist effects relevant beyond the leading twist collinear factorization approximation is refined. At NNLO, we obtain the value αs(nf=5 )(MZ)=0.1147 ±0.0008 .

  5. Parton distribution functions, α{sub s} and heavy-quark masses for LHC run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, S. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bluemlein, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Moch, S.; Placakyte, R. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2017-01-15

    We determine a new set of parton distribution functions (ABMP16), the strong coupling constant α{sub s} and the quark masses m{sub c}, m{sub b} and m{sub t} in a global fit to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD. The analysis uses the MS scheme for α{sub s} and all quark masses and is performed in the fixed-flavor number scheme for n{sub f}=3,4,5. Essential new elements of the fit are the combined data from HERA for inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), data from the fixed-target experiments NOMAD and CHORUS for neutrino-induced DIS, and data from Tevatron and the LHC for the Drell-Yan process and the hadro-production of single-top and top-quark pairs. The theory predictions include new improved approximations at NNLO for the production of heavy quarks in DIS and for the hadro-production of single-top quarks. The description of higher twist effects relevant beyond the leading twist collinear factorization approximation is refined. At NNLO we obtain the value α{sub s}{sup (n{sub f}=5)} (M{sub Z})=0.1147±0:0008.

  6. Search for supersymmetric particles in the dimuon channels with the D-Zero experiment at the Tevatron; Recherche de particules supersymetriques dans les canaux dimuons avec le detecteur D-Zero au TeVatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu Anh, T

    2004-07-01

    Supersymmetry is a possible way for physics beyond the standard model. This work is dedicated to the search of supersymmetric particles such as squarks and gluinos at the Tevatron collider. The analysis has been made on experimental data from the run-II. The first chapter is dedicated to a brief presentation of the standard model. In the second chapter the author reviews the recent work on this issue in CERN (Lep) and in Fermilab (Tevatron). The experimental properties of the search for squarks and gluinos such as the signature with leptons in the final state are detailed in this chapter. The third chapter is devoted to the D0 detector and to the reconstruction of particles with it. The fourth chapter describes the specificity of this work : the detection of squarks and gluinos through the simplest signature possible: 2 muons, 2 jets and with the adequate missing energy in the final state. It appears that for an integrated luminosity of 170 pb{sup -1} no events in excess with respect to the standard model has been detected. As a consequence it is shown that squarks and gluinos must have a mass greater than 200-250 GeV. (A.C.)

  7. B_s oscillation and prospects for delta m_s at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzemer, Stephanie; /MIT

    2005-07-01

    Till the start of the LHC, the Tevatron is the only running accelerator which produces enough B{sub s} mesons to perform {Delta}m{sub s} measurements. The status--as it was at the time of the conference--of two different {Delta}m{sub s} analysis performed both by the CDF and D0 collaboration will be presented.

  8. Differential satellite cell density of type I and II fibres with lifelong endurance running in old men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Karlsen, A; Couppé, C

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of lifelong endurance running on the satellite cell pool of type I and type II fibres in healthy human skeletal muscle. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were collected from 15 healthy old trained men (O-Tr) who had been running 43 ± 16 (mean ± SD) kilometres a week for 28...... ± 9 years. Twelve age-matched untrained men (O-Un) and a group of young trained and young untrained men were recruited for comparison. Frozen sections were immunohistochemically stained for Pax7, type I myosin and laminin, from which fibre area, the number of satellite cells, and the relationship...... between these variables were determined. RESULTS: In O-Un and O-Tr, type II fibres were smaller and contained fewer satellite cells than type I fibres. However, when expressed relative to fibre area, the difference in satellite cell content between fibre types was eliminated in O-Tr, but not O...

  9. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb-1 of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H → γγ, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb-1. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low pTγ region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower pTγ ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high xT. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons

  10. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of LHCb detector for Run II and tracking for the upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091576

    2016-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. Data collected at the start of the fill is processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. The procedure aims to improve the quality of the online selection and performance stability. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. A similar scheme is planned to be used for Run III foreseen to start in 2020. At that time LHCb will run at an instantaneous luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{33}$ cm$^2$ s$^1$ and a fully software based trigger strategy will be used. The new running conditions and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger (only 13 ms per event are available) represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. The new software based trigger strategy implies a full detector read-out at the collision rate of 40 MHz. High performance ...

  11. TEVATRON Phase 1, February, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1980-02-01

    This report describes the "Tevatron Phase 1 project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The project follows research and development efforts and the earlier Energy Saver project. The Research and Development work has led to the development and fabrication of superconducting· accelerator magnets and installation of a test string of magnets in A sector of the Main-Ring tunnel. The Energy Saver project, authorized in FY79 and now in progress, includes construction of a complete ring of superconducting magnets and their installation in the Main-Ring tunnel. The project includes refrigeration and rf equipment adequate for sustained operation of the ring at a peak energy of 500 GeV, making use of the existing experimental areas....

  12. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; /Fermilab; Kozub, Sergei; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab /SLAC /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  13. Combination of CDF and D0 results on the mass of the top quark using up $9.7\\:{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tevatron Electroweak Working Group, Tevatron Group [Fermilab; Aaltonen, T. [Fermilab

    2016-08-05

    We summarize the current top quark mass (mt) measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments at Fermilab. We combine published results from Run I (1992–1996) with the most precise published and preliminary Run II (2001–2011) measurements based on $p\\bar{p}$ data corresponding to up to 9.7 fb$-$1 of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions. Taking correlations of uncertainties into account, and combining the statistical and systematic contributions in quadrature, the preliminary Tevatron average mass value for the top quark is mt = 174.30 ± 0.65 GeV/c2, corresponding to a relative precision of 0.37%.

  14. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  15. Measurement of W-Boson Polarization in Top-quark Decay using the Full CDF Run II Data Set

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M..; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, Y.J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Walsh, K.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-02-21

    We measure the polarization of W bosons from top-quark (t) decays into final states with a charged lepton and jets, tt --> WbWb --> lvbqqb, using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector. A model-independent method simultaneously determines the fraction of longitudinal (f_0) and right-handed (f_+) W bosons to yield f_0 = 0.726 +/- 0.066 (stat) +/- 0.067 (syst) and f_+ = -0.045 +/- 0.044 (stat) +/- 0.058 (syst) with a correlation coefficient of -0.69. Additional results are presented under various standard model assumptions. No significant discrepencies with the standard model are observed.

  16. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at LHC Run II and prospects for High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhicai

    2017-01-01

    Many physics analyses using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the LHC require accurate, high-resolution electron and photon energy measurements. Following the excellent performance achieved during LHC Run I at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is operating at the LHC with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II has achieved unprecedented levels. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) has reached up to 40 interactions in 2016 and may increase further in 2017. These high pileup levels necessitate a retuning of the ECAL readout and trigger thresholds and reconstruction algorithms. In addition, the energy response of the detector must be precisely calibrated and monitored. We present new reconstruction algorithms and calibration strategies that were implemented to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run...

  17. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddick, Thomas [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.

  18. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  19. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb has a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  20. Performance of the CASTOR calorimeter at CMS during Run II of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Van De Klundert, Merijn H F

    2016-01-01

    The detector has pseudorapidity borders at -5.2 and -6.6. An overview is presented on the various aspects of CASTOR's performance and their relations during LHC Run 2. The equalisation of CASTOR's channels is performed using beam-halo muons. Thereafter, CASTOR's pedestal spectrum is studied. It is shown that noise estimates which are extracted using a fit, give on average a 10\\% lower threshold than statistical estimates. Gain correction factors, which are needed for the intercalibration, are obtained using a statistical, in-situ applicable method. The results of this method are shown to be reasonably consistent with laboratory measurements. Penultimately the absolute calibration is discussed, with emphasis on the relation between the scale uncertainty and CASTOR's alignment. It is shown that the alignment's contribution to the systematic uncerta...

  1. From the Tevatron to Project X

    CERN Multimedia

    Pier Oddone, Fermilab director (from CERN Courier)

    2011-01-01

    In the October issue of the CERN Courier, Fermilab Director Pier Oddone will present the past, present and future of the US laboratory after the Tevatron. The Bulletin presents some early extracts from his article…   Fermilab Director, Pier Oddone. The end of September marks the end of an era at Fermilab, with the shutdown of the Tevatron after 28 years of operation at the frontiers of particle physics. The Tevatron’s far-reaching legacy spans particle physics, accelerator science and industry. The collider established Fermilab as a world leader in particle physics research, a role that will be strengthened with a new set of facilities, programmes and projects in neutrino and rare-process physics, astroparticle physics, and accelerator and detector technologies. The Tevatron exceeded every expectation ever set for it. This remarkable machine achieved luminosities with antiprotons once considered impossible, reaching more than 4x1032 cm-2s-1 instantaneous luminosity and...

  2. Pulser for the Tevatron electron lens gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iouri Terechkine et al.

    2004-05-18

    To compensate for beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, an ''electron lens'' is considered to be an effective instrument. When a bunch of electrons with energy in the range (10-16) kV is overlapping with a bunch of antiprotons, the resulting focusing force for antiprotons can be adjusted by changing the electron beam current and by profiling its radial distribution. There exist several scenarios of how the system must function. According to one of them, an electron gun that supplies electrons must be fed by voltage pulses that follow with the frequency of antiproton bunches circulating in the Tevatron, which is about 2.5 MHz. To provide focusing tailored for each individual antiproton bunch, a modulator of the gun (pulser) must allow pulse-to-pulse voltage change. This report will cover main approaches to a design of a pulser for use with the gun of the Tevatron Electron Lens.

  3. Search for Supersymmetry in the Dilepton Final State with Taus at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Robert David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the results a search for chargino and neutralino supersymmetric particles yielding same signed dilepton final states including one hadronically decaying tau lepton using 6.0 fb-1 of data collected by the the CDF II detector. This signature is important in SUSY models where, at high tan β, the branching ratio of charginos and neutralinos to tau leptons becomes dominant. We study event acceptance, lepton identification cuts, and efficiencies. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of SUSY particle mass for certain generic models.

  4. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  5. Jet reclustering and close-by effects in ATLAS run II

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The reconstruction of hadronically-decaying, high-$p_{T}$ $W$, $Z$ and Higgs bosons and top quarks is instrumental to exploit the physics potential of the ATLAS detector in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The jet reclustering procedure reconstructs such objects by using calibrated anti-$k_{t}$ jets as inputs to the anti-$k_{t}$ algorithm with a larger distance parameter. The performance of these reclustered large-radius jets during LHC Run 2 is studied, and compared with that of trimmed anti-$k_{t}$ large-radius jets directly constructed from locally calibrated topological clusters. The propagation of calibrations to reclustered jets is found to be sufficient to restore their average energy and mass scales to particle level. The modelling of small-radius anti-$k_{t}$ jets in each other's vicinity is studied using methods which combine tracking and calorimeter information. Systematic uncertainties resulting from the propagation of the uncertainties on th...

  6. The ATLAS Pixel Detector for Run II at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Marx, Marilyn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. An overview of the refurbishing of the Pixel Detector and of the IBL project as ...

  7. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, P. [Comenius U.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  8. Fitting the Luminosity Decay in the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    McCrory, Elliott; Slaughter, Anna Jean; Xiao, Aimin

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the various ways in which the decay of the luminosity in the Tevatron have been fit. The standard assumptions of a fixed-lifetime exponential decay are only appropriate for very short time intervals. A "1/time" funcional form fits rather well, and is supported by analytical derivations. A more complex form, assuming a time-varying lifetime, produces excellent results. Changes in the luminosity can be factored into two phenomena: The luminosity burn-off rate, and the burn-off rate from non-luminosity effects. The luminous and the non-luminous burn rate are shown for stores in the Tevatron.

  9. The Tevatron bunch by bunch longitudinal dampers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng-Yang Tan and James Steimel

    2002-09-25

    We describe in this paper the Tevatron bunch by bunch dampers. The goal of the dampers is to stop the spontaneous longitudinal beam size blowup of the protons during a store. We will go through the theory and also show the measured results during the commissioning of this system. The system is currently operational and have stopped the beam blowups during a store.

  10. WW and WZ production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipeles, Elliot; /UC, San Diego

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes recent measurements of the production properties of WW and WZ pairs of bosons at the Tevatron. This includes measurements of the cross-section and triple gauge couplings in the WW process and the first evidence for WZ production.

  11. Photon final states at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanelli, Mario; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The authors present here several recent measurements involving associate production of photons and jets at the Tevatron. In particular, inclusive photon + met from D0, and photon + b-jets and photon + b-jet + leptons + MET from CDF are described in some detail. These measurements offer a good test of QCD predictions in rather complex final states.

  12. Tevatron sees light at end of tunnel?

    CERN Multimedia

    Seife, C

    2002-01-01

    Physicists at Fermilab are finally starting to get on top of problems with the beam luminosity of the Tevatron. After a million dollar refit last year, every single luminosity target has been missed since it went operational six months ago (1 page).

  13. Are PDFs still consistent with Tevatron data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Zack

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As active data taking has moved to the LHC at CERN, more and more LHC data have been included into fits of parton distribution functions. An anomaly has arisen where formerly excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and experiment in single-top-quark production at the Tevatron is no longer quite as good. Is this indicative of a deeper issue?

  14. Searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Wade C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Junk, Thomas R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    During Run II of the Tevatron collider, which took place from 2001 until 2011, the CDF and D0 detectors each collected approximately 10 fb -1 of collision data at a center-of-mass energy of . This dataset allowed for tests for the presence of the SM Higgs boson in the mass range 90-200 GeV in the production modes gg → H, W/ZH, vector-boson fusion, and H, with H decay modes H → , H → W+W-, H →

  15. Forward-Backward Asymmetry of Top Quark Pair Productionn at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ziqing [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This dissertation presents the final measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (AFB) of top quark-antiquark pair events (t t-) at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t t- events are produced in proton{anti-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1:96 TeV during the Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements are performed with the full CDF Run II data (9.1 fb-1) in the final state that contain two charged leptons (electrons or muons, the dilepton final state), and are designed to con rm or deny the evidence-level excess in the AFB measurements in the final state with a single lepton and hadronic jets (lepton+jets final state) as well as the excess in the preliminary measurements in the dilepton final state with the first half of the CDF Run II data. New measurements include the leptonic AFB (AlFB), the lepton-pair AFB (All FB) and the reconstructed top AFB (At t FB). Each are combined with the previous results from the lepton+jets final state measured at the CDF experiment. The inclusive Al FB, All FB, and At t FB measured in the dilepton final state are 0.072 ± 0.060, 0.076 ± 0.081, and 0.12 ± 0.13, to be compared with the Standard Model (SM) predictions of 0.038 ± 0.003, 0.048 ± 0.004, and 0.010 ± 0.006, respectively. The CDF combination of AlFB and At t FB are 0.090+0:028 -0.026, and 0.160 ± 0.045, respectively. The overall results are consistent with the SM predictions.

  16. Search for WH Associated Production in the l upsilon b-bbar Final State Using the DØ Detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jonathan [Paris Diderot Univ. (France)

    2011-09-15

    The Standard Model is the framework which allows to describe interactions between particles and their dynamics. The Higgs mechanism is a solution to naturally introduce a mass term in the theoretical description of this model. After electroweak spontaneous symmetry breaking, a new massive scalar particle is introduced, the Higgs boson. Since it hasn’t been discovered yet, the search for the Higgs boson is carried at the Tevatron, which is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider at a center-of-mass of 1.96 TeV. For MH <115 GeV, the dominant decay mode is H → b$\\bar{b}$ . The analysis presented in this document is focused on the 100< MH <150 GeV mass range, in the channel where the Higgs boson is produced in assocation with a W boson which decays either to an electron or muon and a neutrino. The study of this final state relies on informations collected from all parts of the DØ detector. A result based on 5.3 fb-1 of RunII Tevatron collisions is presented here. In order to increase the sensitivity to the signal, the analysis is separated in different sub-channels according to the lepton flavour, number of jets in the final state, number of jets identified as originated from b quarks and data taking periods. After selecting events, a multivariate analysis technique is used to separate signal-like events from the expected physics and instrumental backgrounds. A good agreement between data and simulation is observed. As no signal excess is observed in data, an observed (expected) upper limit of 4.5 (4.8) for MH = 115 GeV is set on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the H → b$\\bar{b}$ branching fraction to its standard model prediction, at 95% confidence level. Since the final Tevatron dataset is soon to be analyzed, an effort is brought to achieve the maximum sensitivity. A preliminary analysis updated in Summer 2011 is presented as well as future improvements to be considered in the final publication for the search in

  17. Search for Supersymmetry using rare B$0\\atop{s(d)}$ → μ+μ- decays at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutelyov, Vyacheslav E. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2005-12-01

    A search for rare B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+μ- and B$0\\atop{d}$ → μ+μ- decays has been performed in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using 364 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The rate of each decay is sensitive to contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). No events pass the optimized selection requirements, consistent with the SM expectation. The resulting upper limits on the branching ratios are B(B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+μ-) < 1.5 × 10-7 and B(B$0\\atop{d}$ → μ+μ-) < 3.8 × 10-8 at the 90% confidence level. The limits are used to exclude some parameter space for several supersymmetric models.

  18. Combined search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to bb using the D0 run II data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; Devaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; García-Guerra, G A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Wang, R-J; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2012-09-21

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV ≤ M(H) ≤ 150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV ≤ M(H) ≤145 GeV, the data exhibit an excess above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.

  19. Search for Third Generation Squarks in the Missing Transverse Energy plus Jet Sample at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marono, Miguel Vidal [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain)

    2010-03-01

    lightest SUSY particle (LSP) which would provide a candidate for cold dark matter, that account for 23% of the universe content, as strongly suggested by recent astrophysical data [1]. The Tevatron is a hadron collider operating at Fermilab, USA. This accelerator provides proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions with a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. CDF and D0 are the detectors built to analyse the products of the collisions provided by the Tevatron. Both experiments have produced a very significant scientific output in the last few years, like the discovery of the top quark or the measurement of the Bs mixing. The Tevatron experiments are also reaching sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson. The scientific program of CDF includes a broad spectrum on searches for physics signatures beyond the Standard Model. Tevatron is still the energy frontier, what means an unique opportunity to produce a discovery in physic beyond the Standard Model. The analyses presented in this thesis focus on the search for third generation squarks in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state. The production of sbottom ($\\tilde{b}$) and stop ($\\tilde{t}$) quarks could be highly enhanced at the Tevatron, giving the possibility of discovering new physics or limiting the parameter space available in the theory. No signal is found over the predicted Standard Model background in both searches. Instead, 95% confidence level limits are set on the production cross section, and then translated into the mass plane of the hypothetical particles. This thesis sketches the basic theory concepts of the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Extension in Chapter 2. Chapter 3, describes the Tevatron and CDF. Based on the CDF subsystems information, Chapter 4 and 5 describe the analysis objet reconstruction and the heavy flavor tagging tools. The development of the analyses is shown in Chapter 6 and Chapter 7. Finally, Chapter 8 is devoted to discuss the results and conclusions

  20. Triggering on electrons, jets and tau leptons with the CMS upgraded calorimeter trigger for the LHC RUN II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068461; Cadamuro, L.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Romanteau, T.; Sauvan, J.B.; Strebler, T.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Tapper, A.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment has implemented a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10e5. During Run II, the LHC will increase its centre-of-mass energy up to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2e34cm-2s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition (DAQ) system has been upgraded. A novel concept for the L1 calorimeter trigger is introduced the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT). In this design, nine main receive each all of the calorimeter data from an entire event provided by 18 preprocessors. This design is not different from that of the CMS DAQ and HLT systems. The advantage of the TMT architecture is that a global view and full granularity of the calorimeters can be exploited by sophisticated algortihms. The goal is to maintain the current thresholds for calorimeter objects and improve the performance for their selection. T...

  1. Heavy Flavor Baryons at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhr, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 have filled many empty spots in the spectrum of heavy baryons over the last few years. The most recent results are described in this article: The first direct observation of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0}, improved measurements of {Sigma}{sub b} properties, a new measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} branching ratio, and a high-statistics study of charm baryons.

  2. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  3. $B$ mixing and lifetimes at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Piedra, J.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. Both the D0 and CDF experiments have collected a sample of about 1 fb{sup -1}. they report results on three topics: b-hadron lifetimes, polarization amplitudes and the decay width difference in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  4. Di-boson production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lentdecker, Gilles; /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present some precision measurements on electroweak physics performed at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Namely they report on the boson-pair production cross sections and on triple gauge boson couplings using proton anti-proton collisions collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 324 pb{sup -1}.

  5. Summary of the half-day internal review of LHC performance limitations (linked to transverse collective effects) during run II (CERN, 29/11/2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, Elias; Biancacci, Nicolo; Buffat, Xavier; Carver, Lee Robert; Iadarola, Giovanni; Li, Kevin Shing Bruce; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Romano, Annalisa; Schenk, Michael; Tambasco, Claudia; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    In this note the half-day internal review of LHC performance limitations (linked to transverse collective effects) during run II (2015-2016), which took place at CERN on 29/11/2016 (https://indico.cern.ch/event/589625/), is summarised and the next steps are discussed.

  6. Search for Resonant Second Generation Slepton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Anzelc, M. S.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Jesus, A. C. S. Assis; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Ay, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Berntzon, L.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Bloom, K.; Blumenschein, U.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Calfayan, P.; Calvet, S.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevallier, F.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christofek, L.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; da Motta, H.; Das, A.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doidge, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dong, H.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fatakia, S. N.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoeth, H.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jakobs, K.; Jarvis, C.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Käfer, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J. M.; Kalk, J. R.; Kappler, S.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kasper, P.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Khatidze, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirby, M. H.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Kryemadhi, A.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuhl, T.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Lager, S.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Bihan, A.-C. Le; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lesne, V.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Z.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martens, M.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; Meder, D.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.

    2006-09-01

    We present a search for supersymmetry in the R-parity violating resonant production and decay of smuons and muon sneutrinos in the channels μ˜→χ˜10μ, μ˜→χ˜2,3,40μ, and ν˜μ→χ˜1,2±μ. We analyzed 0.38fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected between April 2002 and August 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of events is in agreement with the standard model expectation, and we calculate 95% C.L. limits on the slepton production cross section times branching fraction to gaugino plus muon, as a function of slepton and gaugino masses. In the framework of minimal supergravity, we set limits on the coupling parameter λ211', extending significantly previous results obtained in Run I of the Tevatron and at the CERN LEP collider.

  7. Search for resonant second generation slepton production at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Bihan, A-C Le; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Kooten, R Van; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Toerne, E Von; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-09-15

    We present a search for supersymmetry in the R-parity violating resonant production and decay of smuons and muon sneutrinos in the channels mu-->chi(1)(0)mu, mu-->chi(2,3,4)(0)mu, and nu(mu)-->chi(1,2)(+/-)mu. We analyzed 0.38 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected between April 2002 and August 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of events is in agreement with the standard model expectation, and we calculate 95% C.L. limits on the slepton production cross section times branching fraction to gaugino plus muon, as a function of slepton and gaugino masses. In the framework of minimal supergravity, we set limits on the coupling parameter lambda(211)('), extending significantly previous results obtained in Run I of the Tevatron and at the CERN LEP collider.

  8. Fixed target issues for the Tevatron Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanski, R.

    1988-08-29

    The Tevatron Upgrade poses some interesting prospects for the Fixed-Target program if an option to extract the high energy proton beam is preserved. This paper presents a summary of the advantages of increased energy for fixed target experiments, and evaluates some of the more challenging technical issues. In particular, Bottom production, muon and neutrino interactions, and polarized /bar p/ experiments would benefit substantially from a higher energy primary beam. The new Main Injector will also be important for fixed target experiments as a source for test beams and intense kaon and neutrino beams. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Baryon spectroscopy results at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kooten, R.; /Indiana U.

    2010-01-01

    The Tevatron at Fermilab continues to collect data at high luminosity resulting in datasets in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The high collision energies allow for the observation of new heavy quark baryon states not currently accessible at any other facility. In addition to the ground state {Lambda}{sub b}, the spectroscopy and properties of the new heavy baryon states {Omega}{sub b}, {Xi}{sub b}, and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} as measured by the CDF and D0 Collaborations are presented.

  10. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  11. Hard Colour Singlet Exchange at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian; Lonnblad, Leif; Cox, Brian; Forshaw, Jeff; Lonnblad, Leif

    1999-01-01

    We have performed a detailed phenomenological investigation of the hard colour singlet exchange process which is observed at the Tevatron in events which have a large rapidity gap between outgoing jets. We include the effects of multiple interactions to obtain a prediction for the gap survival factor. Comparing the data on the fraction of gap events with the prediction from BFKL pomeron exchange we find agreement provided that a constant value of alpha_s is used in the BFKL calculation. Moreover, the value of alpha_s is in line with that extracted from measurements made at HERA.

  12. Single Top Quarks at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinson, Ann P.; /UC, Riverside

    2008-09-01

    After many years searching for electroweak production of top quarks, the Tevatron collider experiments have now moved from obtaining first evidence for single top quark production to an impressive array of measurements that test the standard model in several directions. This paper describes measurements of the single top quark cross sections, limits set on the CKM matrix element |Vtb|, searches for production of single top quarks produced via flavor-changing neutral currents and from heavy W-prime and H+ boson resonances, and studies of anomalous Wtb couplings. It concludes with projections for future expected significance as the analyzed datasets grow.

  13. New diffractive results from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results in diffractive processes are summarized and a few notable characteristics described in terms of Quantum Chromodynamics. Exclusive dijet production is used to establish a benchmark for future experiments in the quest for diffractive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Stringent upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented. The quark/gluon composition of dijet final states is used to provide additional hints on exclusive dijet production.

  14. Longitudinal dynamics and tomography in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stogin, J. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States); Sen, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Moore, R. S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-01-10

    Motivated by the desire to understand the longitudinal effects of beam-beam forces, we study the longitudinal dynamics of protons and anti-protons at injection and top energy in the Tevatron. Multi-turn data of the longitudinal profiles are captured to reveal information about frequencies of oscillation, and changes in the bunch distributions. Tomographic reconstruction is used to create phase space maps which are subsequently used to find the momentum distributions. Changes in these distributions for both proton and anti-proton beams are also followed through the operational cycle. We report too on the details of interesting dynamics and some unexpected findings.

  15. Forward Tracking with the silicon vertex detector at the CDF experiment in RUN II. Spurrekonstruktion in Vorwärtsrichtung mit dem Silizium-Vertexdetektor des CDF-Experiments in RUN II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidle, Thorsten [Univ. of Karlsruhe (TH) (Germany)

    2007-02-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes the fundamental particles of matter and their interactions. In order to test the Standard Model, determine free parameters and search for new particles beyond the Standard Model, large accelerator complexes produce particle collisions which are recorded by large detectors. Until the start of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab provides particle collisions with the highest center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. The two multipurpose detector systems CDF and DØ record the collisions. A multipurpose detector system is built of several specialized sub-detectors to measure different particle properties. A particle which passes the detector deposits energy by interacting with the detector material. A silicon strip detector and a wire drift chamber detect charged particles close to the collision point. The energy loss in these systems is relatively small, instead many different small energy depositions are produced by one passing particle. These so-called hits can be combined to a track, indicating the path of the particle. A homogeneous magnetic field surrounding the tracking system forces a charged particle to a helix path which allows a momentum measurement by measuring the curvature. The reconstruction of particle tracks is a non-trivial task. First all position measurements belonging to a particle along a hypothetical helix have to be found and then all position information has to be combined to a reconstructed track and its parameters. I focused my work on the track reconstruction in the silicon detector which provides a good position resolution of the measurements.

  16. A Study of The Standard Model Higgs, WW and ZZ Production in Dilepton Plus Missing Transverse Energy Final State at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shih-Chieh [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    We report on a search for Standard Model (SM) production of Higgs to WW* in the two charged lepton (e, μ) and two neutrino final state in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb-1. The Matrix Element method is developed to calculate the event probability and to construct a likelihood ratio discriminator. There are 522 candidates observed with an expectation of 513 ± 41 background events and 7.8 ± 0.6 signal events for Higgs mass 160GeV/c2 at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level calculation. The observed 95% C.L. upper limit is 0.8 pb which is 2.0 times the SM prediction while the median expected limit is 3.1$+1.3\\atop{-0.9}$ with systematics included. Results for 9 other Higgs mass hypotheses ranging from 110GeV/c2 to 200GeV/c2 are also presented. The same dilepton plus large transverse energy imbalance (ET) final state is used in the SM ZZ production search and the WW production study. The observed significance of ZZ → llvv channel is 1.2σ. It adds extra significance to the ZZ → 4l channel and leads to a strong evidence of ZZ production with 4.4 σ significance. The potential improvement of the anomalous triple gauge coupling measurement by using the Matrix Element method in WW production is also studied.

  17. Di-boson production and SM SUSY Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvira, V.Daniel; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson would be a major success for the Standard Model (SM) and would provide further insights into the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. This report contains the latest results from the D0 and CDF Tevatron experiments on searches for the SM Higgs produced from gluon fusion with H {yields} WW, and in association with a W boson. It also includes searches for a supersymmetric Higgs in the b{bar b} and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decay channels. The study of di-boson production at the Tevatron is important to understand backgrounds in high mass Higgs searches. It also provides a test of the SM through the measurement of the production cross section and the gauge boson self couplings. This paper includes measurements of the WW, W{gamma}, and WZ production cross sections, as well as limits on the anomalous couplings associated with the WW{gamma} and WWZ interactions. The results are based on sets of up to 320 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 and CDF experiments at the {bar p}p Tevatron collider, running at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  18. Running Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dieting OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs Running Away KidsHealth > For Kids > Running Away Print A ... life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running away, you ...

  19. QCD, Tevatron results and LHC prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvira, V.Daniel; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    We present a summary of the most recent measurements relevant to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) delivered by the D0 and CDF Tevatron experiments by May 2008. CDF and D0 are moving toward precision measurements of QCD based on data samples in excess of 1 fb-1. The inclusive jet cross sections have been extended to forward rapidity regions and measured with unprecedented precision following improvements in the jet energy calibration. Results on dijet mass distributions, bbbar dijet production using tracker based triggers, underlying event in dijet and Drell-Yan samples, inclusive photon and diphoton cross sections complete the list of measurements included in this paper. Good agreement with pQCD within errors is observed for jet production measurements. An improved and consistent theoretical description is needed for photon+jets processes. Collisions at the LHC are scheduled for early fall 2008, opening an era of discoveries at the new energy frontier, 5-7 times higher than that of the Tevatron.

  20. Bucket shaking stops bunch dancing in Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burov, A.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Bunches in Tevatron are known to be longitudinally unstable: their collective oscillations, also called dancing bunches, persist without any signs of decay. Typically, a damper is used to stop these oscillations, but recently, it was theoretically predicted that the oscillations can be stabilized by means of small bucket shaking. Dedicated measurements in Tevatron have shown that this method does stop the dancing. According to predictions of Refs. [2,3], the flattening of the bunch distribution at low amplitudes should make the bunch more stable against LLD. An experiment has been devised to flatten the distribution by modulating the RF phase at the low-amplitude synchrotron frequency for a few degrees of amplitude. These beam studies show that stabilisation really happens. After several consecutive shakings, the dancing disappears and the resulting bunch profile becomes smoother at the top. Although not shown in this report, sometimes a little divot forms at the centre of the distribution. These experiments confirm that resonant RF shaking flattens the bunch distribution at low amplitudes, and the dancing stops.

  1. Measuring the running top-quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenfeld, U.; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Uwer, P. [Berlin Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2009-06-15

    We present the first direct determination of the running top-quark mass based on the total cross section of top-quark pair-production as measured at the Tevatron. Our theory prediction for the cross section includes various next-to-next-to-leading order QCD contributions, in particular all logarithmically enhanced terms near threshold, the Coulomb corrections at two loops and all explicitly scale dependent terms at NNLO accuracy. The result allows for an exact and independent variation of the renormalization and factorization scales. For Tevatron and LHC we study its dependence on all scales, on the parton luminosity and on the top-quark mass using both the conventional pole mass definition as well as the running mass in the MS scheme. We extract for the top-quark an MS mass of m({mu}=m) =160.0{sup +3.3}{sub -3.2} GeV. (orig.)

  2. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  3. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC Run II and prospects for high-luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Negro, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is a high-performance calorimeter wich will operate also at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This talk will describe the strategies that have been employed to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run 2. Performance results from the 2015-2016 data taking periods will be shown and an outlook on the expected Run 2 performance in the years to come will be provided. The status and plans for the upgraded ECAL barrel electronics for the HL-LHC will be presented, based on recent results from simulations, laboratory tests, and test beam measurements of prototype devices.

  4. Search for V H and Technicolor Producion in the qqbb Final State Using the RunII DØ Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clutter, Justace R. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    2010-04-01

    A search for dijet resonance production in a four-jet all-hadronic final state from the DØ detector at Fermilab’s Tevatron is presented. The data set, acquired at a p$\\bar{p}$ center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, contains primarily multijet events and represents approximately 1 fb-1 of data. The cross section limits for associated Higgs production and Technicolor pro- cesses are determined through a background subtraction method using data to estimate the background. This four-jet channel is potentially very powerful, but is extremely challenging due to the large multijet background from QCD processes. Background rejection is performed by utilizing b-tagging, pre-selection cuts, a multi-variate boosted decision tree discriminant, and the correlated information contained in the M(bb) and M(jj) dijet invariant masses. The search for V H (WH+ZH) processes yields a 95% confidence level observed upper limit of 20.4 pb on the VH cross section for a Higgs mass of 115 GeV/c2. Additionally, a 95% confidence level observed upper limit of 16.7 pb was set for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c2 and 24.6 pb was set for a Higgs boson mass of 135 GeV/c2. The same data set was used to place limits on the Technicolor process ρTC → WπTC where the technirho mass was fixed to 240 GeV/c2. For a technipion mass of 115 GeV/c2 we find a 95% confidence level observed upper limit on the cross section of 49 pb. The technipion masses of 125 GeV/c2 and 140 GeV/c2, the 95% confidence level observed upper limits are 57 pb and 71 pb, respectively.

  5. Accelerator physics at the Tevatron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the developments in accelerator physics and technology implemented at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the world’s most powerful accelerator for almost twenty years prior to the completion of the Large Hadron Collider. The book covers the history of collider operation and upgrades, novel arrangements of beam optics and methods of orbit control, antiproton production and cooling, beam instabilities and feedback systems, halo collimation, and advanced beam instrumentation. The topics discussed show the complexity and breadth of the issues associated with modern hadron accelerators, while providing a systematic approach needed in the design and construction of next generation colliders. This book is a valuable resource for researchers in high energy physics and can serve as an introduction for students studying the beam physics of colliders.

  6. QCD at the Tevatron: Jets and fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Daniel Elvira

    2001-09-27

    At the Fermilab Tevatron energies, ({radical} s=1800 GeV and {radical} s = 630 GeV), jet production is the dominant process. During the period 1992-1996, the D0 and CDF experiments accumulated almost 100 pb{sup -1} of data and performed the most accurate jet production measurements up to this date. These measurements and the NLO-QCD theoretical predictions calculated during the last decade, have improved our understanding of QCD, our knowledge of the proton structure, and pushed the limit to the scale associated with quark compositeness to 2.4-2.7 TeV. In this paper, we present the most recent published and preliminary measurements on jet production and fragmentation by the D0 and CDF collaborations.

  7. The TEVATRON Phase 1 Project, December, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the "Tevatron Phase I" project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The project follows research and development efforts and the earlier Energy Saver project. The R & D work has led to the development and fabrication of superconducting accelerator magnets and installation of a test string of magnets in A sector of the MainRing tunnel. The Energy Saver project, authorized in FY79 and now in progress, includes construction of a complete ring of superconducting magnets and their installation in the Main-Ring tunnel. The project includes refrigeration and rf equipment adequate for sustained operation of the ring at a peak energy of 500 GeV, making use of the existing experimental areas....

  8. Scientific Opportunity: the Tevatron and the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The press makes much of the competition between CERN’s LHC and Fermilab’s Tevatron in the search for the Higgs boson. This competitive aspect is real, and probably adds spice to the scientific exploration, but for us such reporting often feels like spilling the entire pepper shaker over a fine meal. The media’s emphasis on competition obscures the more important substance of our long-standing collaboration in scientific discovery.   Our laboratories and our communities have worked together for decades. Europeans have contributed greatly to the Tevatron’s many successes, including the discovery of the top quark, the discovery of fast oscillations in the decay of strange B mesons and the many searches for new phenomena. Americans have contributed to many programs at CERN, notably the extraordinary precision measurements of LEP, and more recently construction of the LHC accelerator and detectors. Fermilab scientists played a vital role throughout 2009 in...

  9. Search for electroweak top quark production in the electron + jets channel in the D0 experiment at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busato, Emmanuel [Paris Univ. (France)

    2005-04-01

    The top quark, whose mass approaches the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, is by far the heaviest known elementary particle. New physics is therefore expected to have its most important effect in the top sector. The Tevatron is, currently, the only collider able to produce the top quark. Among all possible production processes in the standard model, the top-antitop pair production via strong interaction, first observed in 1995, is the one with the largest cross section. The production via electroweak interaction (known as single top production), more difficult to extract from the background because of a lower cross section and of a lower signal to background ratio, has never been observed. In this thesis, we have searched for these processes by studying proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =1.96 TeV produced by the Tevatron and detected with the DØ detector. The experimental study of the top quark is very sensitive to the quality of the data taken by the calorimeter. This detector showed, at the beginning of the Run II, rather important noise problems. Having identified the origin of the noise, new treatments at the offline level were implemented and their effects studied. It has been shown that these treatments reduce very significantly the effect of the noise in the reconstruction of physical quantities without notable degradation of the signal. Within the standard model, the top quark decays into W b with a branching ratio close to 100%. Leptonic decays of the into electron + neutrino have been used to identify the from the top decay. The main backgrounds to the single top signal ( +jets and QCD) are made essentially of light quark jets in the final state. Two ..-tagging algorithms have therefore been applied in order to improve the signal to background ratio. No evidence for electroweak top quark production has been found. Upper limits at the 95 % confidence level on the observed (expected) cross sections have be computed. They are found to be 14

  10. Beyond the Standard Model at the Tevatron and the LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Perelstein, Maxim

    2008-01-01

    This contribution contains a brief review of several scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model at the energy scales accessible to experiments at the Tevatron and the LHC, focusing on their experimental signatures.

  11. Optical Isolation of Scintillating Tiles Using TiO{subscript 2} Doped Epoxy for the D-Zero ICD in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth Gallas

    1999-02-16

    A Run II D0 Inter Cryostat Detector tile array will be composed of 16 identical modules. Each module contains 12 optically isolated scintillating tile elements, each with dimension of 0.1 x 0.1 in {eta} and {phi} in the pseudora-pidity region from 1.1 to 1.4. The 12 tiles in a module are formed by routing grooves in a single piece of scintillator - optical isolation is achieved by fill-ing the grooves with a white re ective epoxy. The procedure for filling these isolation grooves is described here.

  12. Design Report Tevatron 1 Project (Second Printing November 1982)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1982-10-01

    This report describes the design of the Tevatron I Project, which will enable Fermilab to produce proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron accelerator. Center-of-mass energies near 2 TeV, by far the highest available anywhere in the world for high-energy physics research until at least the decade of the 1990's, will provide enormous opportunities for exciting new physics.

  13. Determination of the effective inelastic p anti-p cross-section for the D0 Run II luminosity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.; /Manchester U.; Yacoob, S.; Andeen, T.; /Northwestern U.; Begel, M.; /Rochester U.; Casey, B.C.K.; Partridge, R.; /Brown U.; Schellman, H.; /Northwestern U.; Sznajder, A.; /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2004-11-01

    The authors determine the effective inelastic p{bar p} cross-section into the D0 Luminosity Monitor for all run periods prior to September 2004. This number is used to relate the measured inelastic collision rate to the delivered luminosity. The key ingredients are the inelastic p{bar p} cross-section, the Luminosity Monitor efficiency, and the modeling of kinematic distributions for various inelastic processes used to determine the detector acceptance. The resulting value is {sigma}{sub p{bar p},eff} = 46 {+-} 3 mb.

  14. Search for gluino and squark production in multi-jets plus missing transverse energy final states at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portell i Bueso, Xavier [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain). Inst. for High Energy Physics

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of the search for squarks and gluinos in multiple jets plus missing transverse energy final states have been presented. No evidence of these new particles have been found in 371 pb-1 of CDF Run II data. New limits have been set which exclude gluino masses below 220 GeV and, in the region where M$\\tilde{g}$ ~ M$\\tilde{q}$, masses below 380 GeV/c2 are excluded. These limits are valid in a mSUGRA scenario with tan β = 5, A = 0 and μ < 0 assuming the lightest four squark flavours degenerate in mass. To obtain these results a careful study of the beam conditions and their contribution to events with ET final states has been performed. Special attention has been taken in studying the different SM backgrounds and their normalizations at NLO. Dedicated cuts have been introduced to remove the background processes and main discriminating variables have been optimized for different signal regions. The different systematic uncertainties have also been considered. This is the first time that this search is performed at CDF Run II and the results presented here show significant improvements with respect to the constraints from previous experiments. Thus, this analysis has established the procedure to continue searching for squarks and gluinos with the new data samples that CDF is collecting from Tevatron. Some improvements may also be implemented by considering other hadron final states with different jet multiplicities. This could help extending the sensitivity of the analysis to regions where gluino and squark masses are not similar. At the forthcoming LHC, the search for squarks and gluinos in this inclusive channel constitutes one of the first analyses to be performed. The ET and multiple jets final states are present in multiple decay modes of many models beyond the SM. The experience from Tevatron in working on an hadron collider environment will be useful for these kind of

  15. On extracting design principles from biology: II. Case study-the effect of knee direction on bipedal robot running efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, M; Kim, S

    2015-02-02

    Comparing the leg of an ostrich to that of a human suggests an important question to legged robot designers: should a robot's leg joint bend in the direction of running ('forwards') or opposite ('backwards')? Biological studies cannot answer this question for engineers due to significant differences between the biological and engineering domains. Instead, we investigated the inherent effect of joint bending direction on bipedal robot running efficiency by comparing energetically optimal gaits of a wide variety of robot designs sampled at random from a design space. We found that the great majority of robot designs have several locally optimal gaits with the knee bending backwards that are more efficient than the most efficient gait with the knee bending forwards. The most efficient backwards gaits do not exhibit lower touchdown losses than the most efficient forward gaits; rather, the improved efficiency of backwards gaits stems from lower torque and reduced motion at the hip. The reduced hip use of backwards gaits is enabled by the ability of the backwards knee, acting alone, to (1) propel the robot upwards and forwards simultaneously and (2) lift and protract the foot simultaneously. In the absence of other information, designers interested in building efficient bipedal robots with two-segment legs driven by electric motors should design the knee to bend backwards rather than forwards. Compared to common practices for choosing robot knee direction, application of this principle would have a strong tendency to improve robot efficiency and save design resources.

  16. Higgs boson studies at the Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Bu, X. B.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; De Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stark, J.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, R.-J.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-09-01

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for the standard model Higgs boson with mass in the range 90-200GeV/c2 produced in the gluon-gluon fusion, WH, ZH, tt¯H, and vector boson fusion processes, and decaying in the H→bb¯, H→W+W-, H→ZZ, H→τ+τ-, and H→γγ modes. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 10fb-1 and were collected at the Fermilab Tevatron in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV. The searches are also interpreted in the context of fermiophobic and fourth generation models. We observe a significant excess of events in the mass range between 115 and 140GeV/c2. The local significance corresponds to 3.0 standard deviations at mH=125GeV/c2, consistent with the mass of the Higgs boson observed at the LHC, and we expect a local significance of 1.9 standard deviations. We separately combine searches for H→bb¯, H→W+W-, H→τ+τ-, and H→γγ. The observed signal strengths in all channels are consistent with the presence of a standard model Higgs boson with a mass of 125GeV/c2.

  17. Higgs Boson Studies at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S.B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Bu, X.B.; Budd, H.S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B.C.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S.J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.F.; Dittmann, J.R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Faure, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J.A.; Garcia-Guerra, G.A.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P.D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Grunendahl, S.; Grunewald, M.W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S.R.; Haley, J.; Han, J.Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A.P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A.S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jeong, M.S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K.K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S.Y.; Jung, A.W.; Junk, T.R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J.M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Lee, W.M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Li, D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.Z.; Lim, J.K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A.L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A.K.A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M.M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N.K.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.A.; Negret, J.P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Petroff, P.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.A.; Podesta-Lerma, P.L.M.; Podstavkov, V.M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A.V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M.S.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P.N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Salcido, P.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Sanders, M.P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A.S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, K.J.; Snider, F.D.; Snow, G.R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stark, J.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D.A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; Van Leeuwen, W.M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.W.; Vasilyev, I.A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A.Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H.D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Wang, R.J.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W.C., III; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Williams, M.R.J.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D.R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T.R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y.A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S.W.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J.M.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-09-17

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for the standard model Higgs boson with mass in the range 90--200 GeV/c^2 produced in the gluon-gluon fusion, WH, ZH, ttbarH, and vector boson fusion processes, and decaying in the H->bbbar, H->W^+W^-, H->ZZ, H->\\tau^+\\tau^-, and H->\\gamma \\gamma\\ modes. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 10 fb^-1 and were collected at the Fermilab Tevatron in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The searches are also interpreted in the context of fermiophobic and fourth generation models. We observe a significant excess of events in the mass range between 115 and 140 GeV/c^2. The local significance corresponds to 3.1 standard deviations at m_H=125 GeV/c^2, consistent with the mass of the Higgs boson observed at the LHC. Furthermore, we separately combine searches for H->bbbar, H->W^+W^-, H->\\tau^+\\tau^-, and H->\\gamma \\gamma. The observed signal strengths in all channels are consistent with the presence of a standard model Higgs boson with a mass of 1...

  18. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run-II at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00407702

    2016-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of the LHC. Taking advantage of the detector development period 2013 – 2014, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface to equip it with new service panels and to repair modules furthermore this helped with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), fourth layer of pixel, installed in between the existing Pixel Detector and a new beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been used. A new readout chip has been designed with CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical perfor...

  19. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at D0 Run II with the Matrix Element Method in the Lepton+Jets Final State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieferdecker, Philipp [Ludwig Maximilian Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2005-08-05

    The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model. Its precise knowledge yields valuable insights into unresolved phenomena in and beyond the Standard Model. A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton+jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events are selected requiring an isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), significant missing transverse energy, and exactly four calorimeter jets. For each event, the probabilities to originate from the signal and background processes are calculated based on the measured kinematics, the object resolutions and the respective matrix elements. The jet energy scale is known to be the dominant source of systematic uncertainty. The reference scale for the mass measurement is derived from Monte Carlo events. The matrix element likelihood is defined as a function of both, m{sub top} and jet energy scale JES, where the latter represents a scale factor with respect to the reference scale. The top mass is obtained from a two-dimensional correlated fit, and the likelihood yields both the statistical and jet energy scale uncertainty. Using a dataset of 320 pb-1 of D0 Run II data, the mass of the top quark is measured to be: m$ℓ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 169.5 ± 4.4(stat. + JES)$+1.7\\atop{-1.6}$(syst.) GeV; m$e+jets\\atop{top}$ = 168.8 ± 6.0(stat. + JES)$+1.9\\atop{-1.9}$(syst.) GeV; m$μ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 172.3 ± 9.6(stat.+JES)$+3.4\\atop{-3.3}$(syst.) GeV. The jet energy scale measurement in the ℓ+jets sample yields JES = 1.034 ± 0.034, suggesting good consistency of the data with the simulation. The measurement forecasts significant improvements to the total top mass uncertainty during Run II before the startup of the LHC, as the data sample will grow by a factor of ten and D0's tracking capabilities will be employed in jet energy reconstruction and flavor identification.

  20. Motivation and detectability of an invisibly-decaying Higgs boson at the Fermilab Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, S P; Martin, Stephen P.; Wells, James D.

    1999-01-01

    A Higgs boson with mass below 150 GeV has a total decay width of less than 20 MeV into accessible Standard Model states. This narrow width means that the usual branching fractions for such a light Higgs boson are highly susceptible to any new particles to which it has unsuppressed couplings. In particular, there are many reasonable and interesting theoretical ideas that naturally imply an invisibly-decaying Higgs boson. The motivations include models with light supersymmetric neutralinos, spontaneously broken lepton number, radiatively generated neutrino masses, additional singlet scalar(s), or right-handed neutrinos in the extra dimensions of TeV gravity. We discuss these approaches to model building and their implications for Higgs boson phenomenology in future Tevatron runs. We find, for example, that the Tevatron with 30 fb^{-1} integrated luminosity can make a 3\\sigma observation in the l+ l- plus missing transverse energy channel for a 125 GeV Higgs boson that is produced with the same strength as the S...

  1. The Reach of the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC for Gaugino Mediated SUSY Breaking Models

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Howard W; Krupovnickas, T; Tata, Xerxes; Baer, Howard; Belyaev, Alexander; Krupovnickas, Tadas; Tata, Xerxes

    2002-01-01

    In supersymmetric models with gaugino mediated SUSY breaking (inoMSB), it is assumed that SUSY breaking on a hidden brane is communicated to the visible brane via gauge superfields which propagate in the bulk. This leads to GUT models where the common gaugino mass $m_{1/2}$ is the only soft SUSY breaking term to receive contributions at tree level. To obtain a viable phenomenology, it is assumed that the gaugino mass is induced at some scale $M_c$ beyond the GUT scale, and that additional renormalization group running takes place between $M_c$ and $M_{GUT}$ as in a SUSY GUT. We assume an SU(5) SUSY GUT above the GUT scale, and compute the SUSY particle spectrum expected in models with inoMSB. We use the Monte Carlo program ISAJET to simulate signals within the inoMSB model, and compute the SUSY reach including cuts and triggers approriate to Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC experiments. We find no reach for SUSY by the Tevatron collider in the trilepton channel. %either with or without %identified tau leptons. ...

  2. Reach of the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC for gaugino mediated SUSY breaking models

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Howard W; Krupovnickas, T; Tata, Xerxes; 10.1103/PhysRevD.65.075024

    2002-01-01

    In supersymmetric models with gaugino mediated SUSY breaking (gMSB), it is assumed that SUSY breaking on a hidden brane is communicated to the visible brane via gauge superfields which propagate in the bulk. This leads to GUT models where the common gaugino mass m/sub 1/2/ is the only soft SUSY breaking term to receive contributions at the tree level. To obtain a viable phenomenology, it is assumed that the gaugino mass is induced at some scale M/sub c/ beyond the GUT scale, and that additional renormalization group running takes place between M/sub c/ and M/sub GUT/ as in a SUSY GUT. We assume an SU(5) SUSY GUT above the GUT scale, and compute the SUSY particle spectrum expected in models with gMSB. We use the Monte Carlo program ISAJET to simulate signals within the gMSB model, and compute the SUSY reach including cuts and triggers appropriate to Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC experiments. We find no reach for SUSY by the Tevatron collider in the trilepton channel. At the CERN LHC, values of m/sub 1/2/=1000...

  3. Measuring the CP asymmetry in the decay $D^0 \\rightarrow K^0_SK^0_S$ using Run II data at LHCb.

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Kamil Leszek

    2017-01-01

    A sensitivity study for the measurement of $CP$ asymmetry in the decay $D^0 \\rightarrow K^0_{S}K^0_{S}$ has been performed using $pp$ collision data collected by the LHCb experiment during Run II at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} =13 \\ TeV$. The results indicate that an improvement of a factor of at least three in efficiency is necessary to achieve a world's best precision on $\\mathcal{A}_{CP}$. A proposed set of changes to the trigger selection for this channel is presented. If implemented these changes would increase the signal yield per unit of integrated luminosity by a factor of six, and therefore place LHCb in the position to perform the world's most precise measurement of $\\mathcal{A}_{CP}$($D^0 \\rightarrow K^0_{S}K^0_{S}$).

  4. Physics performance and fast turn around: the challenge of calibration and alignment at the CMS experiment during the LHC Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Di Guida, Salvatore; Franzoni, Giovanni; Govi, Giacomo; Musich, Marco; Pfeiffer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a very complex apparatus with more than 70 million acquisition channels. To exploit its full physics potential, a very careful calibra- tion of the various components, together with an optimal knowledge of their position in space, is essential. The CMS Collaboration has set up a powerful infrastructure to allow for the best knowledge of these conditions at any given moment. The quick turnaround of these workflows was proven crucial both for the algorithms performing the online event selection and for the ul- timate resolution of the offline reconstruction of the physics objects. The contribution will report about the design and performance of these workflows during the operations of the 13TeV LHC RunII.

  5. Search for singly-produced vector-like quarks in lepton and jets final state with the ATLAS detector in Run-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Dustin; Dietrich, Janet; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Lacker, Heiko; Sperlich, Dennis [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Vector-like quarks are predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. They provide the possibility to solve some long-standing problems such as the hierarchy problem and also might help to explain the b-quark forward-backward asymmetry in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions measured at LEP. Candidates for these vector-like quarks are the top-like T and the Y quark. The Y quarks decay exclusively into a W-boson and a b-quark, which appears also to be the dominant decay channel of the T quarks. We present the search strategy for singly-produced T/Y quarks and the expected sensitivity using the first LHC run-II data recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2015.

  6. Overview of Beam-Beam Effects in the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V.

    2014-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centrepiece of the world's high-energy physics program, from the start of operation in December 1985 until it was overtaken by the LHC in 2011. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 1030 cm-2 s-1; however, as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430-times higher luminosities to each of two high-luminosity experiments, Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D0. On the way to record high luminosities, many issues related to the electromagnetic beam-beam interaction of colliding beams have been addressed. Below we present a short overview of the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron.

  7. An Electromagnetic Sensor for the Autonomous Running of Visually Impaired and Blind Athletes (Part II: The Wearable Device).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieralisi, Marco; Di Mattia, Valentina; Petrini, Valerio; De Leo, Alfredo; Manfredi, Giovanni; Russo, Paola; Scalise, Lorenzo; Cerri, Graziano

    2017-02-16

    Currently, the availability of technology developed to increase the autonomy of visually impaired athletes during sports is limited. The research proposed in this paper (Part I and Part II) focuses on the realization of an electromagnetic system that can guide a blind runner along a race track without the need for a sighted guide. In general, the system is composed of a transmitting unit (widely described in Part I) and a receiving unit, whose components and main features are described in this paper. Special attention is paid to the definition of an electromagnetic model able to faithfully represent the physical mechanisms of interaction between the two units, as well as between the receiving magnetic sensor and the body of the user wearing the device. This theoretical approach allows for an estimation of the signals to be detected, and guides the design of a suitable signal processing board. This technology has been realized, patented, and tested with a blind volunteer with successful results and this paper presents interesting suggestions for further improvements.

  8. Critical Speed Measurements in the Tevatron Cold Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraff, B.; Bossert, R.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W. M.

    2006-04-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high energy operations. Nominal operating range for these compressors is 43,000 to 85,000 rpm. Past foil bearing failures prompted investigation to determine if critical speeds for operating compressors fall within operating range. Data acquisition hardware and software settings will be discussed for measuring liftoff, first critical and second critical speeds. Several tests provided comparisons between an optical displacement probe and accelerometer measurements. Vibration data and analysis of the 20 Tevatron ring cold compressors will be presented.

  9. Searches for the standard model Higgs boson at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorigo, Tommaso; /Padua U.

    2005-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron have searched for the Standard Model Higgs boson in data collected between 2001 and 2004. Upper limits have been placed on the production cross section times branching ratio to b{bar b} pairs or W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs as a function of the Higgs boson mass. projections indicate that the Tevatron experiments have a chance of discovering a M{sub H} = 115 GeV Higgs with the total dataset foreseen by 2009, or excluding it at 95% C.L. up to a mass of 135 GeV.

  10. Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolas, Ludovic Y. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the Bc → J/Ψπ decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb-1 of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

  11. Searches for standard model Higgs at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; /Cantabria U., Santander

    2007-04-01

    A summary of the latest results of Standard Model Higgs boson searches from CDF and D0 presented at the DIS 2007 conference is reported in this paper. All analyses presented use 1 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron data. The strategy of the different analyses is determined by the Higgs production mechanism and decay channel.

  12. Searches for Beyond SM Higgs Boson at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonov, A.; /Texas A-M

    2006-05-01

    In the following, the authors describe preliminary results of searches for non-SM higgs bosons at the CDF and D0 experiments. Both experiments use data obtained in p{bar p} collisions at the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV.

  13. Explaining Tevatron leptons photons missing- T events with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    model prediction, our model is in good agreement with these data because their signal to background efficiency is low at the best-fit point. However, they help to constrain the model away from the best fit point. Keywords. Gauge mediated; Tevatron. 1. Introduction. The CDF experiment has recently discovered an anomaly in ...

  14. Bs data at Tevatron and possible new physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-15

    Nov 15, 2012 ... Although most of the data from the Tevatron experiments of CDF and DØ, and to a smaller extent, the B factories Belle and BABAR are consistent with the Standard Model (SM), there are some measurements, which show a significant deviation from the SM expecta- tions, and hence point towards new ...

  15. Surge Recovery Techniques for the Tevatron Cold Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A. L.; Makara, J. N.; Theilacker, J. C.

    2006-04-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, made by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/s of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/s and operating speeds between 40 and 95 krpm. Since initial commissioning in 1993, Tevatron transient conditions such as quench recovery have led to multiple-location machine trips as a result of the cold compressors entering the surge regime. Historically, compressors operating at lower inlet pressures and higher speeds have been especially susceptible to these machine trips and it was not uncommon to have multiple compressor trips during large multiple-house quenches. In order to cope with these events and limit accelerator down time, surge recovery techniques have been implemented in an attempt to prevent the compressors from tripping once the machine entered this surge regime. This paper discusses the different methods of surge recovery that have been employed. Data from tests performed at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab as well as actual Tevatron operational data were utilized. In order to aid in the determination of the surge region, a full mapping study was undertaken to characterize the entire pressure field of the cold compressor. These techniques were then implemented and tested at several locations in the Tevatron with some success.

  16. Searches for Standard Model Higgs at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortavitarte, Rocio Vilar; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-11-01

    A summary of the latest results of Standard Model Higgs boson searches from CDF and D0 presented at the DIS 2007 conference is reported in this paper. All analyses presented use 1 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron data. The strategy of the different analyses is determined by the Higgs production mechanism and decay channel.

  17. Probing top anomalous couplings at the Tevatron and the Large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Limits are set on the scale of new physics that might lead to such contributions using latest Tevatron measurements of the t t ¯ cross-section. It is demonstrated that the invariant mass distribution is a sensitive probe. Prospects at the LHC are examined. It is shown that, for unitarized amplitudes, an increase in the LHC energy ...

  18. The CDF-II silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Palmonari et al.

    2002-01-18

    The CDFII silicon tracking system, SVX, for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron has up to 8 cylindrical layers with average radii spanning from {approx} (1.5 to 28.7) cm, and lengths ranging from {approx} (90 to 200) cm for a total active-area of {approx} 6 m{sup 2} and {approx} 7.2 x 10{sup 5} readout channels. SVX will improve the CDFII acceptance and efficiency for both B and high-Pt physics dependent upon b-tagging. Along with the description of the SVX we report some alignment survey data from the SVX assembly phase and the actual status of the alignment as it results from the offline data analysis. The problems encountered are also reviewed.

  19. Search for the scalar partner of the top quark and contribution to the improvement of the calorimetry of the experiment D zero for the phase 2 of Tevatron; Recherche du partenaire supersymetrique du quark top et contribution a l'amelioration de la calorimetrie de l'experience D zero pour la phase 2 du tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, B

    2001-04-01

    Supersymmetry could be the most natural extension of the Standard Model. In this thesis we present a new search for the sTop, the hypothetical scalar partner of the Top quark, that we performed in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), using the Run I data of the DO experiment, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 108 pb{sup -1}. We selected events with one electron, one muon and missing transverse energy in the final state, which can be the decay product of pair of sTop quarks in 3 (t-tilde {yields} bl{nu}-tilde), or 4-body (t-tilde {yields} b{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup 0}l{nu}{sub l}). No signal is seen and the results are interpreted in terms of limits on the sTop production cross-section and exclusion regions in the parameter space (m{sub t}-tilde,m{sub {chi}}-tilde{sub 1{sup 0}}) or (m{sub t}-tilde,m{sub {nu}}-tilde). This new type of selection at the Tevatron for the search of the sTop allowed us to put stronger constraints than those previously published at LEP or at the Tevatron in the t-tilde {yields} bl{nu}-tilde channel, and the first limits ever set in the 4-body decay channel. For the 3-body channel, assuming that the sneutrino is the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), the excluded region at 95% confidence level extends up to a sTop mass of 142 (130) GeV if the sneutrino mass (m{sub {nu}}-tilde) is 43 (86) GeV. If the 4-body decay channel dominates, assuming that the neutralino is the LSP, the limit depends on the sneutrino mass. If it is light enough (m{sub {nu}}-tilde {approx}< 100 GeV) this limit reaches a sTop mass of 132 GeV for a neutralino mass of 60 GeV. In all searches for new particles, the calorimetry plays a crucial role from the experimental point of view. The expected increase in integrated luminosity in the Run II which started on the 1. of March 2001, and the detector upgrade which has been achieved over the last three years will allow to extend these exclusion domains or to discover the sTop. We

  20. The search for the Higgs at the Tevatron; La recherche du Higgs au Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, A

    2004-07-01

    The Tevatron has undergone an impressive technical renovation program whose final aim is to reach an integrated luminosity of 15 fb{sup -1} per experiment. Both CDF and DO detectors have been upgraded in the fields of detection, triggering, track reconstruction and particle identification. In the framework of the standard model, theoretical studies show that for a luminosity of only 2 fb{sup -1} (that is the first step of the renovation program) CDF and DO could barely extend the domain already excluded by LEP for the existence of the Higgs boson. On the other hand for a luminosity of 15 fb{sup -1}, a standard Higgs boson could be excluded up to 180 GeV/c{sup 2} and discovered up to 125 GeV/c{sup 2}. Moreover, a 3*{sigma} result could be obtained in the decay channels H {yields} bb-bar and H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} up to 180 GeV/c{sup 2}. In the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), at least 20 fb{sup -1} are required for the discovery of the Higgs boson in the energy range: 80 {<=} m{sub A} {<=} 380 GeV/c{sup 2}. (A.C.)

  1. CASY: a dynamic simulation of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor core auxiliary cooling system. Volume II. Example computer run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    A listing of a CASY computer run is presented. It was initiated from a demand terminal and, therefore, contains the identification ST0952. This run also contains an INDEX listing of the subroutine UPDATE. The run includes a simulated scram transient at 30 seconds.

  2. Search for electroweak production of supersymmetric particles with photonic final states using the first LHC Run II data recorded with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A search for supersymmetry in final states with photons is presented in this thesis. Datacollected in Run II of the Large Hadron Collider at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV isused. The proton-proton collision dataset recorded with the CMS experiment in 2015corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 fb−1 .The analysis is designed to be sensitive to electroweak production of supersymmetric particles and compressed mass spectra. All considered models are motivated bygauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. A cut-and-count experiment is performedusing three exclusive search bins. No sign for physics beyond the standard model isobserved.Exclusion limits are set for a general gauge mediation scenario and a simplifiedmodel assuming electroweak gaugino production. A similar sensitivity is reached as inthe search performed at s = 8 TeV.Additionally, two simplified models of gluino pair production are considered. Thecurrently best limits set by CMS can be improved for these scenarios at large neutralinoand cha...

  3. A Study for Doubly-Charged Higgs Boson at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroiant, Sasha [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We search for the pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles followed by the lepton-flavor violating decay of each Higgs into electron-and-tau and muonand- tau pairs using 350 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Separate searches investigate cases where three or four finalstate leptons are detected, and the limits for each exclusive decay mode reflect the combined results of both searches. Assuming the H$±±\\atop{L}$ decays exclusively into likesign electron-and-tau pairs, we set a lower limit on its mass of 114 GeV/c2 at the 95 % confidence level. In the case of exclusive muon-and-tau decays, we set a lower mass limit of 112 GeV/c2 also at the 95% confidence level.

  4. A search for double-charged Higgs bosons at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraoiant, Sasha [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We search for the pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles followed by the lepton-flavor violating decay of each Higgs into electron-and-tau and muon-and-tau pairs using 350 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Separate searches investigate cases where three or four final state leptons are detected, and the limits for each exclusive decay mode reflect the combined results of both searches. Assuming the H$±±\\atop{L}$ decays exclusively into like sign electron-and-tau pairs, we set a lower limit on its mass of 114 GeV/c2 at the 95 % confidence level. In the case of exclusive muon-and-tau decays, we set a lower mass limit of 112 GeV/c2 also at the 95% confidence level.

  5. The Tevatron tune tracker pll - theory, implementation and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The Tevatron tune tracker is based on the idea that the transverse phase response of the beam can be measured quickly and accurately enough to allow us to track the betatron tune with a phase locked loop (PLL). The goal of this paper is to show the progress of the PLL project at Fermilab. We will divide this paper into three parts: theory, implementation and measurements. In the theory section, we will use a simple linear model to show that our design will track the betatron tune under conditions that occur in the Tevatron. In the implementation section we will break down and examine each part of the PLL and in some cases calculate the actual PLL parameters used in our system from beam measurements. And finally in the measurements section we will show the results of the PLL performance.

  6. Top quark pair production cross section at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortiana, Giorgio; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.

    2008-04-01

    Top quark pair production cross section has been measured at the Tevatron by CDF and D0 collaborations using different channels and methods, in order to test standard model predictions, and to search for new physics hints affecting the t{bar t} production mechanism or decay. Measurements are carried out with an integrated luminosity of 1.0 to 2.0 fb{sup -1}, and are found to be consistent with standard model expectations.

  7. Selected Topics from Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard [Michigan State U.

    2016-12-07

    The most recent results of the top-quark mass measurements at the Tevatron at Fermilab are presented. Data were collected in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV by the CDF and D0 experiments. Top quark mass measurements in the lepton+jets, dilepton and alljet final states as well as their combination and the extraction of the mass from the cross-section measurement are presented.

  8. Tevatron-for-LHC Report: Preparations for Discoveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buescher, V.; Carena, Marcela S.; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Mrenna, S.; Rainwater, D.; Schmitt, M.

    2006-08-01

    This is the ''TeV4LHC'' report of the ''Physics Landscapes'' Working Group, focused on facilitating the start-up of physics explorations at the LHC by using the experience gained at the Tevatron. We present experimental and theoretical results that can be employed to probe various scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  9. Exclusive Photoproduction of ϒ:. from Hera to Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybarska, Anna; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Szczurek, Antoni

    The amplitude for photoproduction γp → ϒp is calculated in a pQCD k⊥-factorization approach. The total cross section for diffractive ϒs is compared to recent HERA data. The amplitude is used to predict the cross section for exclusive pbar p-> pΥ (1S, 2S)bar p proces in hadronic reactions at Tevatron energies. We also included absorption effects.

  10. Search for Electroweak Single-Top Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehler, Matthias; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-08-01

    The CDF II experiment and the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are parts of the Fermi National Laboratories (Fermilab). The Fermilab is located in the vicinity of Chicago, USA. Today, the Tevatron is the only collider which is able to produce the heaviest known elementary particle, the top quark. The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron by the CDF and the D0 collaborations in 1995 [1]. So far, all the top quarks found are produced via the strong interaction as top-antitop pairs. The Standard Model of elementary particle physics also predicts single-top quark production via the electroweak interaction. This production mode has not yet been observed. The CDF and the D0 collaborations have set upper limits on the cross section for that process in Run I [2, 3] and improved those results in Run II [4, 5]. Single-top quark production is one of the major interests in Run II of the Tevatron as it offers several ways to test the Standard Model and to search for potential physics beyond the Standard Model. The measurement of the cross section of singly produced top quarks via the electroweak interaction offers the possibility to determine the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element V{sub tb} directly. The CKM matrix defines the transformation from the eigenstates of the electroweak interactions to the mass eigenstates of the quarks. V{sub tb} gives the strength of the coupling at the Wtb vertex. The single-top quark is produced at this vertex and therefore the cross section of the single-top quark production is directly proportional to |V{sub tb}|{sup 2}. In the Standard Model, three generations of quarks and the unitarity of the CKM matrix are predicted. This leads to V{sub tb} {approx} 1. Up to now, there is no possibility to measure V{sub tb} without using the assumption that there are a certain number of quark generations. Since the measurement of the cross section of single-top quark production is independent of this assumption it could verify another

  11. Running Linux

    CERN Document Server

    Dalheimer, Matthias Kalle

    2006-01-01

    The fifth edition of Running Linux is greatly expanded, reflecting the maturity of the operating system and the teeming wealth of software available for it. Hot consumer topics such as audio and video playback applications, groupware functionality, and spam filtering are covered, along with the basics in configuration and management that always made the book popular.

  12. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  13. Academic Training - Tevatron: studying pp collisions at the highest energy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 15, 16, 17, 18 May Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 15, 16, 17 May - Council Chamber on 18 May Physics at the Tevatron B. HEINEMANN, Univ. of Liverpool, FERMILAB Physics Results from the Tevatron The Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab in the US is currently the world's highest energy collider. At the experiments CDF and D0 a broad physics programme is being pursued, ranging from flavour physics via electroweak precision measurements to searches for the Higgs boson and new particles beyond the Standard Model. In my lecture I will describe some of the highlight measurements in the flavour, electroweak and searches sectors, and the experimental techniques that are used. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/...

  14. Review of charged Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Phillip; /Oklahoma U.

    2010-12-01

    Although the standard model of particle physics (SM) is remarkably successful at describing the fundamental particles and their interactions, the mechanism for the breaking of elecroweak symmetry (EWSB) has yet to be confirmed. In the SM, the EWSB sector consists of four scalar fields represented by a single SU(2) complex doublet. Following EWSB, three of the fields are responsible for the generation of the W{sup {+-}} and Z masses, while the fourth is the neutral Higgs boson. At the present time, the Tevatron experiments have set 95% CL exclusion limits on the mass of the SM Higgs boson for the ranges 100 to 109 GeV and 158 to 175 GeV. In addition to these constraints on the SM Higgs boson, the Tevatron experiments have also set limits on neutral and charged Higgs bosons (H{sup {+-}}) in the context of several models beyond the SM. In this review, we discuss searches for charged Higgs bosons performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron in the mass range of 80 to 300 GeV.

  15. Pressure field study of the Tevatron cold compressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebaner, A.L.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2003-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations [1]. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/sec of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/sec. Operating speeds are between 40 and 95 krpm, with a speed of 80 krpm at the design point. Different heat loads and magnet quench performance of each of the twenty-four satellite refrigerators dictates different process pressure and flow rates of the cold compressors. Reducing the process flow rate can cause the centrifugal cold compressor to stop pumping and subsequently surge. Tests have been conducted at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab to map the pressure field and appropriate efficiency of the IHI hydrodynamic cold compressor. The information allows tuning of each of the twenty-four Tevatron satellite refrigerators to avoid cold compressor operation near the surge and choke lines. A new impeller has also been tested. The Tevatron cold compressor pressure field and efficiency data with the new impeller are presented in this paper.

  16. Pressure Field Study of the Tevatron Cold Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebaner, A. L.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W. M.; Theilacker, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/sec of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/sec. Operating speeds are between 40,000 and 95,000 rpm, with a speed of 80,000 rpm at the design point. Different heat loads and magnet quench performance of each of the twenty-four satellite refrigerators dictates different process pressure and flow rates of the cold compressors. Reducing the process flow rate can cause the centrifugal cold compressor to stop pumping and subsequently surge. Tests have been conducted at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab to map the pressure field and appropriate efficiency of the IHI hydrodynamic cold compressor. The information allows tuning of each of the twenty-four Tevatron satellite refrigerators to avoid cold compressor operation near the surge and choke lines. A new impeller has also been tested. The Tevatron cold compressor pressure field and efficiency data with the new impeller are presented in this paper.

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson associated with a W Boson using Matrix Element Technique in the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez [Univ. of Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    In this thesis a direct search for the Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson at the CDF detector in the Tevatron is presented. This search contributes predominantly in the region of low mass Higgs region, when the mass of Higgs boson is less than about 135 GeV. The search is performed in a final state where the Higgs boson decays into two b quarks, and the W boson decays leptonically, to a charged lepton (it can be an electron or a muon) and a neutrino. This work is organized as follows. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the Standard Model theory of particle physics and presents the SM Higgs boson search results at LEP, and the Tevatron colliders, as well as the prospects for the SM Higgs boson searches at the LHC. The dataset used in this analysis corresponds to 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. That is the luminosity acquired between the beginning of the CDF Run II experiment, February 2002, and May 2009. The relevant aspects, for this analysis, of the Tevatron accelerator and the CDF detector are shown in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4 the particles and observables that make up the WH final state, electrons, muons, ET, and jets are presented. The CDF standard b-tagging algorithms to identify b jets, and the neural network flavor separator to distinguish them from other flavor jets are also described in Chapter 4. The main background contributions are those coming from heavy flavor production processes, such as those coming from Wbb, Wcc or Wc and tt. The signal and background signatures are discussed in Chapter 5 together with the Monte CArlo generators that have been used to simulate almost all the events used in this thesis. WH candidate events have a high-pT lepton (electron or muon), high missing transverse energy, and two or more than two jets in the final state. Chapter 6 describes the event selection applied in this analysis and the

  18. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Chamizo

    2012-01-01

      On 17th January, as soon as the services were restored after the technical stop, sub-systems started powering on. Since then, we have been running 24/7 with reduced shift crew — Shift Leader and DCS shifter — to allow sub-detectors to perform calibration, noise studies, test software upgrades, etc. On 15th and 16th February, we had the first Mid-Week Global Run (MWGR) with the participation of most sub-systems. The aim was to bring CMS back to operation and to ensure that we could run after the winter shutdown. All sub-systems participated in the readout and the trigger was provided by a fraction of the muon systems (CSC and the central RPC wheel). The calorimeter triggers were not available due to work on the optical link system. Initial checks of different distributions from Pixels, Strips, and CSC confirmed things look all right (signal/noise, number of tracks, phi distribution…). High-rate tests were done to test the new CSC firmware to cure the low efficiency ...

  19. Running Club

    CERN Document Server

    Running Club

    2011-01-01

    The cross country running season has started well this autumn with two events: the traditional CERN Road Race organized by the Running Club, which took place on Tuesday 5th October, followed by the ‘Cross Interentreprises’, a team event at the Evaux Sports Center, which took place on Saturday 8th October. The participation at the CERN Road Race was slightly down on last year, with 65 runners, however the participants maintained the tradition of a competitive yet friendly atmosphere. An ample supply of refreshments before the prize giving was appreciated by all after the race. Many thanks to all the runners and volunteers who ensured another successful race. The results can be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/default.aspx CERN participated successfully at the cross interentreprises with very good results. The teams succeeded in obtaining 2nd and 6th place in the Mens category, and 2nd place in the Mixed category. Congratulations to all. See results here: http://www.c...

  20. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  1. Search for $B_s \\rightarrow \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ and $B_d \\rightarrow \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decays with the full CDF Run II data set

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, Y.J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Sperka, D.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-04-04

    We report on a search for \\bsmm\\ and \\bdmm\\ decays using proton-antiproton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$~TeV corresponding to $10~\\fb$ of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The observed number of \\bd\\ candidates is consistent with background-only expectations and yields an upper limit on the branching fraction of $\\brbdmm < 4.6\\times 10^{-9}$ at 95\\% confidence level. We observe an excess of \\bs\\ candidates. The probability that the background processes alone could produce such an excess or larger is $0.94\\%$. The probability that the combination of background and the expected standard model rate of \\bsmm\\ could produce such an excess or larger is $6.8\\%$. These data are used to determine a branching fraction $\\brbsmm = (1.3^{+0.9}_{-0.7}) \\times 10^{-8} $ and provide an upper limit of $\\brbsmm < 3.1\\times 10^{-8}$ at 95\\% confidence level.

  2. Searches for New Physics Using High Mass Dimuons at the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagoz Unel, Muge [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2004-12-01

    This work describes the measurement of inclusive jets cross section in the D0 experiment. This cross section is computed as a function of jet transverse momentum, in several rapidity intervals. This quantity is sensitive to the proton structure and is crucial for the determination of parton distribution functions (PDF), essentially for the gluon at high proton momentum fraction. The measurement presented here gives the first values obtained for Tevatron Run II for the cross section in several rapidity intervals, for an integrated luminosity of 143 pb-1. The results are in agreement, within the uncertainties, with theoretical Standard Model predictions, showing no evidence for new physics. This work points out the aspects of the detector which need better understanding to reach Run I precision and to constrain the PDFs.

  3. The Higgs boson in the Standard Model theoretical constraints and a direct search in the wh channel at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huske, Nils Kristian [Pierre and Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France); Bielefeld Univ. (Germany)

    2010-09-10

    H < 175 GeV based on the observed final limits at 95% C.L. In the most interesting low mass region between 115 and 135 GeV, even the full Tevatron combination is not yet sensitive enough to exclude a Higgs boson, or to even prove its existence with a meaningful significance. Fig. 112 shows a projection plot for sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson at the Tevatron as a measure of increasing luminosity. The 10 fb-1 projection is a rather conservative outlook for the coming year of data taking as the Tevatron runs smoothly and the run till the end of 2011 is assured. By now, already 9 fb-1 have been recorded by the two experiments. As the extrapolation plot shows, this amount of luminosity will allow to exclude the Higgs boson over a wide mass range at a 95% C.L. With the LHC at CERN now running and successfully collecting first data, it is worth looking at projections of Higgs boson sensitivity at the current center of mass energy of 7 TeV of the LHC accelerator. Fig. 113 shows a projection of a possible SM Higgs boson exclusion using 1 fb-1 of LHC data collected by the ATLAS experiment. An exclusion is expected between 135 and 188 GeV at 95% C.L., combining the three decay channels H → WW, H → ZZ and H → γγ. A combination between LHC experiments would possibly yield an even broader range of excluded Higgs boson mass points. Therefore, whether at the Tevatron or the LHC, exciting times in the exclusion or possible discovery of the SM Higgs boson lie ahead.

  4. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueck, Jan [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (Germany)

    2009-07-24

    The standard model of elementary particle physics (SM) predicts, besides the top-quark pair production via the strong interaction, also the electroweak production of single top-quarks [19]. Up to now, the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton-collider is the only place to produce and study top quarks emerging from hadron-hadron-collisions. Top quarks were directly observed in 1995 during the Tevatron Run I at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.8 TeV simultaneously by the CDF and D0 Collaborations via the strong production of top-quark pairs. Run II of the Tevatron data taking period started 2001 at √s = 1.96 TeV after a five year upgrade of the Tevatron accelerator complex and of both experiments. One main component of its physics program is the determination of the properties of the top quark including its electroweak production. Even though Run II is still ongoing, the study of the top quark is already a successful endeavor, confirmed by dozens of publications from both Tevatron experiments. A comprehensive review of top-quark physics can be found in reference. The reasons for searching for single top-quark production are compelling. As the electroweak top-quark production proceeds via a Wtb vertex, it provides the unique opportunity of the direct measurement of the CKM matrix element |Vtb|, which is expected to be |Vtb| ~ 1 in the SM. Significant deviations from unity could be an indication of a fourth quark generation, a production mode via flavor-changing neutral currents, and other new phenomena, respectively. There are two dominating electroweak top-quark production modes at the Fermilab Tevatron: the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson striking a b quark and the s-channel production of a timelike W boson via the fusion of two quarks. In proton-antiproton-collisions the third electroweak production mode, the associated Wt production of an on-shell W boson in conjunction with a top quark has a comparatively negligible small

  5. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Rakness.

    2013-01-01

    After three years of running, in February 2013 the era of sub-10-TeV LHC collisions drew to an end. Recall, the 2012 run had been extended by about three months to achieve the full complement of high-energy and heavy-ion physics goals prior to the start of Long Shutdown 1 (LS1), which is now underway. The LHC performance during these exciting years was excellent, delivering a total of 23.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, 6.2 fb–1 at 7 TeV, and 5.5 pb–1 at 2.76 TeV. They also delivered 170 μb–1 lead-lead collisions at 2.76 TeV/nucleon and 32 nb–1 proton-lead collisions at 5 TeV/nucleon. During these years the CMS operations teams and shift crews made tremendous strides to commission the detector, repeatedly stepping up to meet the challenges at every increase of instantaneous luminosity and energy. Although it does not fully cover the achievements of the teams, a way to quantify their success is the fact that that...

  6. Low-Energy Run of Fermilab Electron Cooler's Beam Generation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab; Fedotov, A.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2011-03-14

    In the context of the evaluation of possibly using the Fermilab Electron Cooler for the proposed low-energy RHIC run at BNL, operating the cooler at 1.6 MeV electron beam energy was tested in a short beam line configuration. The main conclusion of this feasibility study is that the cooler's beam generation system is suitable for BNL needs. The beam recirculation was stable for all tested parameters. In particular, a beam current of 0.38 A was achieved with the cathode magnetic field up to the maximum value presently available of 250 G. The energy ripple was measured to be 40 eV. A striking difference with running the 4.3 MeV beam (nominal for operation at FNAL) is that no unprovoked beam recirculation interruptions were observed. Electron cooling proposed to increase the luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon [1] needs a good quality, 0.9-5 MeV electron beam. Preliminary design studies indicate that the scheme of the Recycler's electron cooler at FNAL is suitable for low-energy RHIC cooling and most parts of the cooler can be re-used after the end of the Tevatron Run II. To analyze issues related to the generation of the electron beam in the energy recovery mode and to gain experience with the beam transport at lower beam energy, a dedicated study was performed at FNAL with a beam run through a short beam line (so called U-bend). This report summarizes our findings and observations in the course of the measurements.

  7. Measurements of top quark production and properties at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, P. [Comenius U.

    2014-09-15

    In this letter, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark production and properties at the Tevatron. We do not include results of the top-quark mass and single top-quark production as they were presented in separate talks. The results of the measurements are mostly consistent with the standard-model predictions. However, by looking at the production asymmetry measured by CDF, one can see a discrepancy in both, $t\\bar{t}$ inclusive and lepton-based measurements. D\\O\\ results of production asymmetry are compatible with the standard-model predictions as well as with the CDF results.

  8. Top Production at the Tevatron: The Antiproton Awakens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Kenneth [Nebraska U.

    2017-07-01

    A long time ago, at a laboratory far, far away, the Fermilab Tevatron collided protons and antiprotons at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. The CDF and D0 experiments each recorded datasets of about 10 fb$^{-1}$. As such experiments may never be repeated, these are unique datasets that allow for unique measurements. This presentation describes recent results from the two experiments on top-quark production rates, spin orientations, and production asymmetries, which are all probes of the $p\\bar{p}$ initial state.

  9. Electroweak and B physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, K.T.

    2001-01-30

    This writeup is an introduction to some of the experimental issues involved in performing electroweak and b physics measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the electroweak sector, we discuss W and Z boson cross section measurements as well as the measurement of the mass of the W boson. For b physics, we discuss measurements of B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} mixing and CP violation. This paper is geared towards nonexperts who are interested in understanding some of the issues and motivations for these measurements and how the measurements are carried out.

  10. Studies of top quark properties at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shary, Viatcheslav

    2012-05-01

    An overview of the recent measurements of the top quark properties in proton antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. These measurements are based on 5.4-8.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 and CDF experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The top quark mass and width measurements, studies of the spin correlation in top quark pair production, W boson helicity measurement, searches for anomalous top quark couplings and Lorentz invariance violation are discussed.

  11. SUSY + Beyond Standard Model Higgs Searches at the Tevatron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Patwa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent results by the CDF and DØ Collaborations for non-Standard Model Higgs boson searches in pp¯ $par p$ collisions at center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV using up to 8.2 fb−1 of Fermilab Tevatron data are discussed. Searches for neutral Higgs bosons predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM, doubly-charged Higgs bosons predicted in extended models, as well as Higgs bosons within Hidden Valley and Fermiophobic models are described.

  12. B0(s) mixing studies at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, M.D.; /Delhi U.

    2006-05-01

    Measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency via B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis provides a powerful constraint on CKM matrix elements. This note briefly reviews the motivation behind these analyses and describes the various steps that go into a mixing measurement. Recent results on B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations using the data samples collected at Tevatron Collider in the period 2002-2005 are presented.

  13. High Mass Standard Model Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petridis Konstantinos A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying predominantly to W+W− pairs, at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, using up to 8.2 fb−1 of data collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis techniques and the various channels considered are discussed. These searches result in exclusions across the Higgs mass range of 156.5< mH <173.7 GeV for CDF and 161< mH <170 GeV for D0.

  14. Studies of single top quark production at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, Breese

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present several measurements of single top quark production from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron. The various analyses utilize integrated luminosity ranging from 2.1 to 4.8 fb -1. The results include the observation of single top production with a combined cross section of 2.76 +0.58 -0.47 pb for a top quark mass of 170 GeV/c2, as well as measurements of top quark polarization and first evidence for t-channel production.

  15. Search for higgs, leptoquarks, and exotics at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Ming Wang

    2004-06-22

    This paper reviews some of the most recent results from the CDF and D0 experiments on the searches for Standard Model and Non-Standard Model Higgs bosons, and other new phenomena at the Tevatron. Both experiments examine data from proton anti-proton collision at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, of integrated luminosity {approx} 200 pb{sup -1} (per experiment), to search for Higgs predicted in the Standard Model and beyond Standard Model, supersymmetric particles in the Gauge Mediated Symmetry Breaking scenario, leptoquarks, and excited electrons. No signal was observed, and limits on the signatures and models are derived.

  16. Resonant second generation slepton production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autermann, Christian Tobias [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany)

    2006-12-01

    A search for R-parity violating supersymmetry with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$-collider is presented. Assuming a non-zero LQ$\\bar{d}$ coupling λ$'\\atop{2jk}$ leads to final state with two muons and jets. A total integrated luminosity of 375 pb-1 collected between April 2002 and August 2004 is utilized. The observed number of events is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation, and limits on Rp supersymmetry are derived.

  17. Record-breaking luminosity boosts discovery potential at Fermilab's Tevatron collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Batavia

    2006-01-01

    The record-breaking performance of the Tevatron colklider at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is pushing tje search fpr dark matter, supersymmetric particles and extra dimensions to new limits. Repeatedly smashing peak luminosity records, the Tevatron has created record numbers of proton-antiproton collisions that provide the means to unveil the secrets of the universe

  18. Is there really an eccentric action of the hamstrings during the swing phase of high-speed running? Part II: Implications for exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooren, Bas; Bosch, Frans

    2017-12-01

    We have previously argued that there may actually be no significant eccentric, but rather predominantly an isometric action of the hamstring muscle fibres during the swing phase of high-speed running when the attachment points of the hamstrings are moving apart. Based on this we suggested that isometric rather than eccentric exercises are a more specific way of conditioning the hamstrings for high-speed running. In this review we argue that some of the presumed beneficial adaptations following eccentric training may actually not be related to the eccentric muscle fibre action, but to other factors such as exercise intensity. Furthermore, we discuss several disadvantages associated with commonly used eccentric hamstring exercises. Subsequently, we argue that high-intensity isometric exercises in which the series elastic element stretches and recoils may be equally or even more effective at conditioning the hamstrings for high-speed running, since they also avoid some of the negative side effects associated with eccentric training. We provide several criteria that exercises should fulfil to effectively condition the hamstrings for high-speed running. Adherence to these criteria will guarantee specificity with regards to hamstrings functioning during running. Practical examples of isometric exercises that likely meet several criteria are provided.

  19. A measurement of the t anti t production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV with the DOe detector at the Tevatron using final states with a muon and jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klute, M.

    2004-02-01

    A preliminary measurement of the t anti t production cross section at {radical}s=1.96 TeV is presented. The {mu}-plus-jets final state is analyzed in a data sample of 94 pb{sup -1} and a total of 14 events are selected with a background expectation of 11.7{+-}1.9 events. The measurement yields: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X}=2.4{sub -3.5}{sup +4.2}(stat.){sub -2.6}{sup +2.5}(syst.){+-}0.3(lumi.) pb. The analysis, being part of a larger effort to re-observe the top quark in Tevatron Run II data and to measure the production cross section, is combined with results from the available analysis channels. The combined result yields: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X}=8.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(syst.){+-}0.8(lumi.) pb.

  20. Review of Heavy Flavor Physics at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giurgiu, Gavril; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2011-10-01

    The D0 and CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron have each accumulated more that 9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The corresponding large datasets enable the two experiments to perform unprecedented studies of heavy flavor hadron properties. We present recent D0 and CDF measurements, focusing on rare decays and CP violation in B-meson decays. Flavor Physics probes new phenomena by either searching for small deviations from the Standard Model (SM) based theoretical predictions or by measuring quantities which are highly suppressed within the SM. Searching for small deviations from the SM are performed using large strange, charm or bottom hadron samples, mostly by kaon experiments of B factories. Measurements of highly suppressed quantities, such as CP violation phases and asymmetries in the neutral B{sub s}-meson system or searches for rare B decays, are performed with the hope that new physics effects would be large enough to significantly affect the measured quantities and so, lead to observations of deviations from the SM expectations. The D0 and CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron have each accumulated more that 9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The corresponding large datasets enable the two experiments to perform unprecedented studies of heavy flavor hadron properties. We present recent D0 and CDF measurements, focusing on rare decays and CP violation in B-meson decays.

  1. In celebration of the fixed target program with the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey A. Appel et al.

    2001-12-28

    The Tevatron is the world's first large superconducting accelerator. With its construction, we gained the dual opportunities to advance the state of the art in accelerator technology with the machine itself and in particle physics with the experiments that became possible in a higher energy regime. There have been 43 experiments in the Tevatron fixed target program. Many of these are better described as experimental programs, each with a broad range of physics goals and results, and more than 100 collaborating physicists and engineers. The results of this program are three-fold: (1) new technologies in accelerators, beams and detectors which advanced the state of the art; (2) new experimental results published in the refereed physics journals; and (3) newly trained scientists who are both the next generation of particle physicists and an important part of the scientific, technical and educational backbone of the country as a whole. In this book they compile these results. There are sections from each experiment including what their physics goals and results were, what papers were published, and which students have received degrees. Summaries of these results from the program as a whole are quite interesting, but the physics results from this program are too broad to summarize globally. The most important of the results appear in later sections of this booklet.

  2. Running Club

    CERN Document Server

    Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 29th September at 18h. The 5.5km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found at http://cern.ch/club...

  3. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2012-01-01

      With the analysis of the first 5 fb–1 culminating in the announcement of the observation of a new particle with mass of around 126 GeV/c2, the CERN directorate decided to extend the LHC run until February 2013. This adds three months to the original schedule. Since then the LHC has continued to perform extremely well, and the total luminosity delivered so far this year is 22 fb–1. CMS also continues to perform excellently, recording data with efficiency higher than 95% for fills with the magnetic field at nominal value. The highest instantaneous luminosity achieved by LHC to date is 7.6x1033 cm–2s–1, which translates into 35 interactions per crossing. On the CMS side there has been a lot of work to handle these extreme conditions, such as a new DAQ computer farm and trigger menus to handle the pile-up, automation of recovery procedures to minimise the lost luminosity, better training for the shift crews, etc. We did suffer from a couple of infrastructure ...

  4. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2012-01-01

      On Wednesday 14 March, the machine group successfully injected beams into LHC for the first time this year. Within 48 hours they managed to ramp the beams to 4 TeV and proceeded to squeeze to β*=0.6m, settings that are used routinely since then. This brought to an end the CMS Cosmic Run at ~Four Tesla (CRAFT), during which we collected 800k cosmic ray events with a track crossing the central Tracker. That sample has been since then topped up to two million, allowing further refinements of the Tracker Alignment. The LHC started delivering the first collisions on 5 April with two bunches colliding in CMS, giving a pile-up of ~27 interactions per crossing at the beginning of the fill. Since then the machine has increased the number of colliding bunches to reach 1380 bunches and peak instantaneous luminosities around 6.5E33 at the beginning of fills. The average bunch charges reached ~1.5E11 protons per bunch which results in an initial pile-up of ~30 interactions per crossing. During the ...

  5. A Next-to-Leading Order QCD Analysis of Neutrino - Iron Structure Functions at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, William Glenn [Nevis Labs, Columbia U.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleon structure functions measured in neutrino-iron and antineutrinoiron charged-current interactions are presented. The data were taken in two high-energy high-statistics runs by the LAB-E detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Structure functions are extracted from a sample of 950,000 neutrino and 170,000 antineutrino events with neutrino energies from 30 to 360 Ge V. The structure functions $F_2$ and $xF_3$ are compared with the the predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD). The combined non-singlet and singlet evolution in the context of PQCD gives NL0(4) . 2 value of $\\Lambda^{NLO,(4)}_{\\overline MS}$ = 337 ± 28 (exp.) MeV, which corresponds to $\\alpha_s$ ($M^2_z$) = 0.119 ± 0.002 (exp.) ± 0.004 (theory), and with a gluon distribution given by $xG(x,Q^2_0 = 5 GeV^2$ ) = (2.22±0.34) x ($1-x)^{4.65 \\pm 0.68}$

  6. SVX4: A New Deep-Submicron Readout IC for the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, B.; Alfonsi, S.; Bacchetta, N.; Centro, S.; Christofek, L.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Haber, C.; Hanagaki, K.; Hoff, J.; Johnson, M.; vonderLippe, H.; Lujan, P.; Mandelli, E.; Meng, G.; Nomerotski, A.; Pellet, D.; Rapidis, P.; Utes, M.; Walder, J.-P.; Weber, M.; Wester, W.; /LBL, Berkeley /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Kansas U. /Fermilab /UC,

    2003-10-01

    SVX4 is the new silicon strip readout IC designed to meet the increased radiation tolerance requirements for Run IIb at the Tevatron collider. Devices have been fabricated, tested, and approved for production. The SVX4 design is a technology migration of the SVX3D design currently in use by CDF. Whereas SVX3D was fabricated in a 0.8 {micro}m radiation-hard process, SVX4 was fabricated in a standard 0.25 {micro}m mixed-signal CMOS technology using the ''radiation tolerant by design'' transistor topologies devised by the RD-49 collaboration. The specific cell layouts include digital cells developed by the ATLAS Pixel group, and full-custom analog blocks. Unlike its predecessors, the new design also includes the necessary features required for generic use by both the CDF and D0 experiments at Fermilab. Performance of the IC includes >20 MRad total dose tolerance, and {approx}2000 e-rms equivalent input noise charge with 40 pF input capacitance, when sampled at 132 ns period with an 80 ns preamp risetime. At the nominal digitize/readout rate of 106/53 MHz, the 9 mm x 6.3 mm die dissipates {approx}2 mW/channel average at 2.5 V. A review of typical operation, details of the design conversion process, and performance measurements are covered.

  7. SVX4 a new deep submicron readout IC for the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, B; Bacchetta, N; Centro, Sandro; Christofek, L; García-Sciveres, M; Haber, C; Hanagaki, K; Hoff, J; Johnson, M; Von der Lippe, H; Mandelli, E; Meng, G; Nomerotski, A; Pellet, D; Rapidis, P; Utes, M; Walder, J P; Weber, M; Wester, W; Wilkes, T; Yarema, R J; Yao, W; Zimmerman, T

    2004-01-01

    SVX4 is the new silicon strip readout IC designed to meet the increased radiation tolerance requirements for Run IIb at the Tevatron collider. Devices have been fabricated, tested, and approved for production. The SVX4 design is a technology migration of the SVX3D design currently in use by CDF. Whereas SVX3D was fabricated in a 0.8 mu m radiation-hard process, SVX4 was fabricated in a standard 0.25 mu m mixed-signal CMOS technology using the "radiation tolerant by design" transistor topologies devised by the RD-49 collaboration. The specific cell layouts include digital cells developed by the ATLAS Pixel group, and full-custom analog blocks. Unlike its predecessors, the new design also includes the necessary features required for generic use by both the CDF and DO experiments at Fermilab. Performance of the IC includes >20 Mrad total dose tolerance, and ~2000 e- rms equivalent input noise charge with 40 pF input capacitance, when sampled at 132 ns period with an 80 ns preamp risetime. At the nominal digitize...

  8. Search for gluinos decaying into b-jets and transverse missing energy with the detector D0 at the Tevatron; Recherche de gluinos dans la topologie a jets de quarks b et energie transverse manquante avec le detecteur D0 au TeVatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, Th

    2007-05-15

    The standard model of particle physics is the model of reference to explain the subatomic phenomena. This theoretical model has been successful for about 35 years. Although it has never been directly refuted, it has some theoretical and experimental limitations at high energy. That is why several new theories are trying to propose some extensions for this model. The supersymmetry is a possible extension, which is appreciated for its theoretical neatness. The work, which is presented in this manuscript, is dedicated to the search for a supersymmetric signal. The main feature of this signal are the presence of 4 b-jets and the high transverse missing energy. This search have been performed with the Run II data collected with the D0 detector from April 2003 to March 2006 (1 fb{sup -1}). The signature of such a topology needs a good energy resolution for the jets and a precise measure of the transverse missing energy. Consequently, it is essential to understand the information given by the calorimeter which is one of the crucial parts of the detector for such a search. The presence of the b-jets in the final state implies a efficient b-tagging. The b-tagging is a discriminant variable for the signal with respect to the standard model background. The hadronic colliders like the Tevatron are characterized by a QCD cross section which is many orders of magnitude larger than the supersymmetric signal cross section. Therefore, it is important to find fast and efficient selection cuts based on the calorimeter at the trigger level. The most important part of my work before the signal search has been dedicated on the study and the design of the trigger conditions for the jets and transverse missing energy signals. (author)

  9. Measurement of the T quark mass in the electron-muon channel with the D0 detector at the Tevatron; Mesure de la masse du quark top dans le canal electron-muon aupres du detecteur D0 au TeVatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthaud, M

    2008-06-15

    The standard model of particle physics is a theory that describes the elementary components of matter and their interactions. The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle described by this model and its mass is one of its free parameters. The measurement of this mass constrains the Higgs boson mass. At the moment of this study, it can be observed only with the 2 detectors located around the Tevatron which collides protons and antiprotons at a centre of mass energy of {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV. In this thesis, the Run-II b data collected by the D0 detector between June 2006 and August 2007 (around 1 fb{sup -1}) have been analysed. The top quark is mainly produced by pairs and it decays in almost 100% of the time into a W boson and a bottom quark. In the final state studied here, one of the W bosons decays into an electron and a neutrino and the second one into a muon and a neutrino. Such a final state requires to control tightly the muon transverse momentum precision measurement. Events containing Z and J/{psi} decaying into 2 muons have been studied to adjust the momentum precision in simulated events to one observed in data. During the analysis, 77 top-anti-top events have been selected in the electron-muon channel to determine the top quark mass with a method based on the Monte-Carlo integration of the matrix element describing the production of a top-anti-top pair decaying into an electron and a muon. This yields a top quark mass value of m(top) equals (172 {+-} 4.2 (sta) {+-} 2.5 (syst)) GeV. (author)

  10. A group exercise programme for people at risk from type II diabetes run as a physiotherapy student clinical placement is beneficial: a qualitative study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Bysterveldt, Erin; Davey, Simon; Douglas, Naomi; Liu, Robert; Robertson, Linda; Conroy, Jenny; Higgs, Chris; Hale, Leigh

    2014-01-01

    ... for undergraduate physiotherapy students. Class participants included 10 adults with, or at high risk of developing, type II diabetes and 3 family members attending a 12-week group exercise programme and 20 supervised undergraduate physio...

  11. Searches for New Physics in Top Events at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, A.W.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    Recent results of searches for new physics in top events at the Tevatron are presented. In case of CDF three searches are discussed using 6 to 8.7 fb{sup -1} of data, with the latter being the final CDF data sample available for this kind of analysis. CDF carried out a search for Top + jet resonance production, dark matter production in association with single top and boosted tops. No signs of new physics are observed and instead upper limits are derived. D0 used 5.3 fb{sup -1} of data and searched for a narrow resonance in t{bar t} production and a time dependent t{bar t} cross section, which would reveal a violation of Lorentz invariance. However, no signs for deviations from standard model are seen and instead upper limits for non-standard model contributions are calculated.

  12. Search for quirks at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Michigan U.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, G.A.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /NIKHEF, Amsterdam

    2010-08-01

    We report results of a search for particles with anomalously high ionization in events with a high transverse energy jet and large missing transverse energy in 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Production of such particles (quirks) is expected in scenarios with extra QCD-like SU(N) sectors, and this study is the first dedicated search for such signatures. We find no evidence of a signal and set a lower mass limit of 107 GeV for the mass of a charged quirk with strong dynamics scale {Lambda} in the range from 10 keV to 1 MeV.

  13. The PAX Toolkit and its Applications at Tevatron and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kappler, S; Felzmann, U; Hirschbuehl, D; Kirsch, M; Quast, G; Schmidt, A; Weng, J; Kappler, Steffen; Erdmann, Martin; Felzmann, Ulrich; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Kirsch, Matthias; Quast, Guenter; Schmidt, Alexander; Weng, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    At the CHEP03 conference we launched the Physics Analysis eXpert (PAX), a C++ toolkit released for the use in advanced high energy physics (HEP) analyses. This toolkit allows to define a level of abstraction beyond detector reconstruction by providing a general, persistent container model for HEP events. Physics objects such as particles, vertices and collisions can easily be stored, accessed and manipulated. Bookkeeping of relations between these objects (like decay trees, vertex and collision separation, etc.) including deep copies is fully provided by the relation management. Event container and associated objects represent a uniform interface for algorithms and facilitate the parallel development and evaluation of different physics interpretations of individual events. So-called analysis factories, which actively identify and distinguish different physics processes and study systematic uncertainties, can easily be realized with the PAX toolkit. PAX is officially released to experiments at Tevatron and LHC...

  14. Review of top quark production at LHC and Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00419409; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A summary of recent results on top quark production at LHC and Tevatron are presented in this paper. The measurements of top quark production were performed in various energies ($\\sqrt s$ = 1.96, 7, 8, 13 TeV) and initial states ($p \\bar{p}$ and $p p$) by the ATLAS, CDF, CMS, DØ and LHCb ex- periments. The measured top quark pair production cross-section is in good agreement with the standard model predictions in each energy region. Differential cross-sections were also measured and compared with several theoretical predictions. Most of the higher order QCD models reproduce the experimental data well, while a slight discrepancy in a certain phase space such as higher top quark $p_{T}$ region is observed. Electroweak single top quark production was also measured and the results are consistent with theoretical predictions at the various energies.

  15. Initial tests of an AC dipole for the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, R.; /Texas U.; Jansson, A.; /Fermilab; Kopp, S.; /Texas U.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  16. Measurement of \\boldmath $R = {\\mathcal{B}\\left(t \\rightarrow Wb \\right)/\\mathcal{B}\\left(t \\rightarrow Wq \\right)} $ in Top--Quark--Pair Decays using Dilepton Events and the Full CDF Run II Data Set

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions $R=\\mathcal{B}(t\\rightarrow Wb)/\\mathcal{B}(t\\rightarrow $ $q$ represents quarks of flavors $b$, $s$, or $d$, in the final state, in events with two charged leptons, missing transverse energy and at least two jets. The measurement uses $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV proton--antiproton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb$^{-1}$ and collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of t...

  17. Phase modulation of the bucket stops bunch oscillations at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.Y.; Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-02

    Bunches in the Tevatron are known to exhibit longitudinal oscillations which persist indefinitely. These oscillations are colloquially called 'dancing bunches.' Although the dancing proton bunches do not cause single bunch emittance growth or beam loss at injection, they lead to bunch lengthening at collisions. In Tevatron operations, a longitudinal damper has been built which stops this dance and damps out coupled bunch modes. Recent theoretical work predicts that the dance can also be stopped by an appropriate change in the bunch distribution. This paper describes the Tevatron experiments which support this theory.

  18. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogburn, IV, Reuben Walter [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have

  19. Measurement of the top quark properties at the Tevatron and the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00040958

    2014-01-01

    Almost two decades after its discovery at Fermilab's Tevatron collider experiments, the top quark is still under the spotlight due to its connections to some of the most interesting puzzles in the Standard Model. The Tevatron has been shut down two years ago, yet some interesting results are coming out of the CDF and D0 collaborations. The LHC collider at CERN produced two orders of magnitude more top quarks than Tevatron's, thus giving birth to a new era for top quark physics. While the LHC is also down at the time of this writing, many top quark physics results are being extracted out of the 7\\,TeV and 8\\,TeV proton proton collisions by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, and many more are expected to appear before the LHC will be turned on again sometime in 2015. These proceedings cover a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  20. Design Report Tevatron 1 Project, Second Printing November 1982 (Revised April 1983)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1982-10-01

    This report describes the design of the Tevatron I Project, which will enable Fermilab to produce proton-antiproton collsions in the Tevatron accelerator. Center-of-mass energies near 2 TeV, by far the highest available anywhere in the world for high-energy physics research until at least the decade of the 1990's, will provide enormous opportunities for exciting new physics.

  1. J/ψ polarization at the Tevatron and the LHC: nonrelativistic-QCD factorization at the crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butenschoen, Mathias; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2012-04-27

    We study the polarization observables of J/ψ hadroproduction at next-to-leading order within the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics. We complete the present knowledge of the relativistic corrections by also providing the contribution due to the intermediate (3)P(J)([8]) color-octet states at this order, which turns out to be quite significant. Exploiting the color-octet long-distance matrix elements previously extracted through a global fit to experimental data of unpolarized J/ψ production, we provide theoretical predictions in the helicity and Collins-Soper frames and compare them with data taken by CDF at Fermilab Tevatron I and II and by ALICE at CERN LHC. The notorious CDF J/ψ polarization anomaly familiar from leading-order analyses persists at the quantum level, while the situation looks promising for the LHC, which is bound to bring final clarification.

  2. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets topology at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U.; Affolder, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Tsukuba U.

    2007-03-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. They analyze events from the single lepton plus jets final state (t{bar t} {yields} W{sup +}bW{sup -}{bar b} {yields} lvbq{bar q}{bar b}). The top quark mass is extracted using a direct calculation of the probability density that each event corresponds to the t{bar t} final state. The probability is a function of both the mass of the top quark and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, they achieve the single most precise measurement of the top quark mass, 170.8 {+-} 2.2(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  3. Characterising the Decays of High-pt Top Quarks and Addressing Naturalness with Jet Substructure in ATLAS Runs I and II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00397460

    The coupling of the Standard Model top quark to the Higgs boson is O(1), which leads to large quantum corrections in the perturbative expansion of the Higgs boson mass. Possible solutions to this so-called naturalness problem include supersymmetric models with gluinos and stop squarks whose masses are at the electroweak scale, O(1 TeV). If supersymmetry is realised in nature at this scale, these particles are expected to be accessible with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A search for gluino pair production with decays mediated by stop- and sbottom-squark loops in the initial 14.8 ifb of the ATLAS run 2 dataset is presented in terms of a pair of simplified models, which targets extreme regions of phase space using jet substructure techniques. No excess is observed and limits are set which greatly extend the previous exclusion region of this search, up to 1.9 TeV (1.95 TeV) for gluinos decaying through light stop (sbottom) squarks to the lightest neutralinos. A performance study of top tagging algorithms in ...

  4. Measurements of top-quark properties at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Andreas Werner [Fermilab

    2013-07-30

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the Tevatron are presented. CDF uses data corresponding up to 9.0 fb-1 to measure the ratio R of the branching fractions , the branching fraction for top-quarks decaying into τ leptons and the cross section for the production of an additional γ in t production. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation. DØ uses 5.3 fb-1 of data to measure the t cross section as a function of the time. A time dependency would imply Lorentz invariance violation as implemented by the Standard Model extension. No time dependency is observed and DØ sets first limits in the top-quark sector for Lorentz invariance violation. DØ also determines indirectly the top quark width using the results of earlier measurements at DØ. The measured top quark width is in agreement with the SM expectation and does not show any hints for new physics contributions.

  5. Charmed meson and onium production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Nakaya

    2000-12-20

    The authors report recent results of D*{sup {+-}} meson, J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production at the Fermilab Tevatron. They observe about 8,000 D*{sup {+-}} mesons reconstructed in the decay chain of D* {r_arrow} D{sub {pi}}{sup 0}, D{sup 0} {r_arrow} K{mu}+X. They measure the integrated D*{sup +} production cross section to be 347 {+-} 65(stat.) {+-} 58(sys.) nb for the rapidity range {vert_bar}{eta}(D*{sup +}){vert_bar} < 1.0 and the transverse momentum range p{sub T} (D*{sup +}) > 10 GeV/c. The measurement is slightly higher than the theoretical prediction, especially at lower pT range. We also measure the polarization of J/{psi} at production and find that the measured transverse polarization is not well explained by the color-octet model proposed to explain the anomalously high J/{psi} production cross section. We also present a new result on {Upsilon} production and polarization. Production of the {Upsilon} is consistent with being unpolarized.

  6. W mass and Triple Gauge Couplings at Tevatron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pétroff Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The W mass is a crucial parameter in the Standard Model (SM of particle physics, providing constraints on the mass of the Higgs boson as well as on new physics models via quantum loop corrections. On the other hand, any deviation of the triple gauge boson couplings (TGC from their values predicted by the SM would be also an indication for new physics. We present recent measurements on W boson mass and searches for anomalous TGC (aTGC in Wγ, Zγ, WW, WZ and ZZ at Fermilab Tevatron both by CDF and DØ Collaborations. The CDF Collaboration has measured the W boson mass using data corresponding to 2.2 fb−1 of integrated luminosity. The measurement, performed using electron and muon decays of W boson, yields a mass of MW = 80387 ± 19 MeV. The DØ Collaboration has measured MW = 80367 ± 26 MeV with data corresponding to 4.3 fb−1 of integrated luminosity in the channel W → ev. The combination with an earlier DØ result, using independant data sample at 1 fb−1 of integrated luminosity, yields MW = 80375 ± 23 MeV. The limits on anomalous TGCs parameters are consistent with the SM expectations.

  7. Neutrino Production of Same Sign Dimuons at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandler, Pamela Helen [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The rate of neutrino and antineutrino induced same-sign dimuon production was measured using a sample of 220 μ-μ- events and 15 μ+μ+ events, normalized to 1.5 million neutrino-induced charged-current events and 0.3 million antineutrino-induced events with energies between 30 GeV and 600 GeV. The data was obtained with the Chicago-Columbia- Fermilab-Rochester neutrino detector at the Fermilab Tevatron during two experiments, E744 and E770. The CCFR detector is a combined steel target and calorimeter which is followed by a muon-momentum spectrometer. After background subtraction, the prompt rate of same-sign dimuon production is (0.53±0.24)x$10^{-4}$ per charged-current event for neutrinos and (0.52±0.33)x $10^{-4}$ per charged-current events for antineutrinos. These rates are consistent with Standard Model predictions for cc gluon bremsstrahlung and with zero. The kinematic distributions of the same-sign dimuon signal are consistent with those of the nonprompt background due to meson decays in the hadron shower of a charged-current events and cc gluon bremsstrahlung.

  8. The Effects of combined HERA and recent Tevatron W - > l $\

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, R.S.; Stirling, W.J.; Watt, G.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the effect of including the `combined' HERA structure function data in the MSTW global fit for parton distribution functions (PDFs). The combined neutral-current HERA data have a significant, if not dramatic, effect, of up to 2--3% at NLO for Z boson and Higgs production at the Tevatron and LHC, and a generally slightly smaller effect, particularly on LHC processes, at NNLO. This is an amount comparable, or less than, the typical PDF uncertainties, and hence we do not intend to release an imminent update to the MSTW 2008 fit. We also investigate the consistency with the recent D0 data on electron and muon charge asymmetry from W decays and the direct CDF measurement of the W charge asymmetry. The D0 lepton charge asymmetry data imply a fairly large change to the down-quark distribution and/or large nuclear corrections to be applied when fitting to deuterium structure function data, while the CDF W charge asymmetry data are more consistent with the existing PDFs. However, it is difficult to reconcil...

  9. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfyrla, Anna [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-03-10

    In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb-1 of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is σWW/WZtheory x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 2.09 ± 0.14 pb. They measured NSignal = 410 ± 212(stat) ± 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section σWW/WZ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 1.47 ± 0.77(stat) ± 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be σ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels

  10. Effect of Gu Tong Xian capsule on expression level of type I, II collagen and BMP-2 mRNA in rabbits with fracture during long-distance running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to analyze and investigate the effects of Gu Tong Xian Capsule on the expression level of type I, II collagen and BMP-2 mRNA in rabbits with fracture during long-distance running. 60 adult healthy rabbits were selected as research objects, and then randomly divided into three groups including model group, positive control group and treatment group, each containing 20 rabbits. The three groups were treated with saline gastric lavage, powder for fracture and trauma, and Gu Tong Xian capsule, respectively. The rabbits of the three groups were respectively sacrificed at 1st week, 2nd weeks and 4th week after operation for sample collection. After that, the expression levels of bone collagen type I, II and BMP-2 of three groups were measured and compared with each other. At all stages, the transcriptional level of type I collagen mRNA in the treatment group were significantly higher than that in the positive control group and model group (p < 0.05; Transcriptional level of type II collagen mRNA in the treatment group increased significantly in the first week, then gradually declined in the 2nd and 4th week, with significantly difference to the model group and the positive control group (p < 0.05. In addition, the transcriptional level of bone morphogenetic protein BMP-2 mRNA at fracture site of the treatment group was higher than that of model group and positive control group (p < 0.05. Gu Tong Xian Capsule can significantly promote fracture healing of experiment rabbits and reduce fracture healing time. Moreover, it can well regulate the expression levels of type I, II collagen and transcriptional level ofBMP-2 mRNA in experiment rabbits with fracture.

  11. Dr. Sheehan on Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, George A.

    This book is both a personal and technical account of the experience of running by a heart specialist who began a running program at the age of 45. In its seventeen chapters, there is information presented on the spiritual, psychological, and physiological results of running; treatment of athletic injuries resulting from running; effects of diet…

  12. Studies of the Chromaticity, Tune, and Coupling Drift in the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Martens, Michael A; Bauer, Pierre; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Velev, Gueorgui

    2005-01-01

    Chromaticity drift is a well-known and more or less well-understood phenomenon in superconducting colliders such as the Tevatron. Less known is the effect of tune and coupling drift, also observed in the Tevatron during injection. These effects are caused by field drifts in the superconducting magnets. Understanding of the behavior of the tune, coupling, and chromaticity at the start of the ramp is an important part of understanding the observed 5-10% loss in beam intensity at the start of the Tevatron ramp. In addition modifications in the Tevatron shot set-up procedure are being implemented to allow for a gain in integrated luminosity. In this context we conducted several beam-studies, during the period of April to August 2004, in which we measured the drift in the Tevatron chromaticity, tune and coupling during the injection porch. In some case we also measured the snapback at the start of the ramp. We will present the results of these studies data and put them into context of the results of off-line magne...

  13. HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Weiren [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Mourou, Gerard [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Solyak, Nikolay [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tajima, Toshiki [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Velasco, Mayda [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-05-20

    Among various options for a Higgs factory [1], a photon collider has the distinct advantage of the lowest energy requirement for an electron beam. This advantage is especially important for a circular Higgs factory, in which the synchrotron radiation power increases to the fourth power of the electron energy. For an e+e- collider, the minimum required energy per beam is 120 GeV, while for a photon collider it is 80 GeV. The corresponding ratio of synchrotron radiation power is 5 to 1. This makes it possible to consider building a photon collider at Fermilab, which will be named HFiTT, or Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel. The layout is shown in Figure 1. A photon collider is based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) by shooting a low energy (~3.5 eV) laser beam into a high energy (10s of GeV) electron beam to generate a back-scattered high energy (10s of GeV) photon beam for collision. The cross section for γγ → H is large and comparable to e+e- → ZH (~200 fb). Since this is an s-channel resonance, the required photon energy is low (63 GeV), corresponding to 80 GeV for an electron beam. Our design goal is 10,000 Higgs per year. If we look to the far future of electron collider technology, very high gradient acceleration techniques such as plasma wakefield acceleration are asymmetric between electrons and positrons. It is therefore important to develop a technology that will allow physicists to accelerate electrons only and still access annihilation reactions with precisely understood point-like interactions. The photon collider fills this need. This project will not only carry out important measurements of the Higgs boson properties but will also demonstrate the unique technologies needed to construct photon collider experiments at higher energies.

  14. Search for a Standard Model Higgs boson in the $\\tau\\tau$ decay channel produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totaro, Pierluigi [INFN, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to tau lepton pairs, in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV. The search is based on approximately 2.3 fb$^{-1}$ of CDF Run II data and is performed by considering the following signal processes: WH($\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$), ZH($\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$), qHq'$\\rightarrow$q$\\tau\\tau$q' and gg$\\rightarrow$H$\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$. Events are selected by requiring an hadronic tau and one isolated electron or muon, coming from the leptonic decay of one of the two taus. In addition, at least one calorimeter jet must be present in the final state. We expect 921.8$\\pm$48.9 background events in the 1 jet channel and 159.4$\\pm$11.6 in the $\\ge$ 2 jets channel, while in data we observe 965 and 166 events, respectively. In order to improve the search sensitivity we employ a multivariate technique, based on a set of Boosted Decision Trees trained to get the best sep aration between signal and the dominant sources of background. We observe no evidence for a Higgs boson signal and therefore we set a 95\\% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the cross section relative to the SM predictions ($\\sigma/\\sigma_{\\mathrm{SM}}$). Results are presented for the Higgs boson mass varying from M$_\\mathrm{H}$ = 100 GeV/$c^2$ to M$_\\mathrm{H}$ = 150 GeV/$c^2$. For the mass hypothesis of 120 GeV/c$^2$ the observed limit is 27.2, while the corresponding expected value is 23.4$^{+9.8}_{-6.4}$.

  15. Placing Limits on the Higgs Production Cross Section at the Tevatron using the H → W +W- → ℓ+- Decay Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Toby [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-01

    Limits on the Higgs production cross section at the Tevatron were placed using data with an integrated luminosity of 2.4 fb-1 from CDF. Limits over a Higgs mass range between 110 GeV and 200 GeV were determined, by calculating a limit at ten mass points distributed over this region. The analysis exclusively searches for Higgs produced by top-quark mediated gluon fusion and then decaying into two W bosons. Only leptonic decay channels of the W are considered, such that the final event signature consists of ee, eµ, or µµ with missing energy from undetected neutrinos. After an evaluation of alternative techniques, a neural net was selected as the best method for increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The BFGS neural net training technique was selected as the most efficient method. A Bayesian Likelihood technique was used to place limits on the observed Higgs production cross section, and an expected limit was calculated by running 10,000 pseudo experiments. The 160 GeV mass point was the most most sensitive, achieving an expected limit 4.1 times the Standard Model prediction cross section at a 95% Confidence Level. Observed limits are within 1 σ of the expected limit below a mass point of ii 160 GeV. Above this, observed limits are higher than the expected limits, within 2 σ. The lowest observed limit was also at MH =160 GeV with a limit of 6.85 times the Standard Model prediction at a 95% Confidence Level. A new method for increasing the sensitivity of the measurement was proposed and investigated, but unused in the analysis.

  16. Simulation of Hollow Electron Beam Collimation in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, I.A.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    The concept of augmenting the conventional collimation system of high-energy storage rings with a hollow electron beam was successfully demonstrated in experiments at the Tevatron. A reliable numerical model is required for understanding particle dynamics in the presence of a hollow beam collimator. Several models were developed to describe imperfections of the electron beam profile and alignment. The features of the imperfections are estimated from electron beam profile measurements. Numerical simulations of halo removal rates are compared with experimental data taken at the Tevatron.

  17. Contributions to the mini-workshop on beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of the Workshop was to assay the current understanding of compensation of the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron with use of low-energy high-current electron beam, relevant accelerator technology, along with other novel techniques of the compensation and previous attempts. About 30 scientists representing seven institutions from four countries--FNAL, SLAC, BNL, Novosibirsk, CERN, and Dubna were in attendance. Twenty one talks were presented. The event gave firm ground for wider collaboration on experimental test of the compensation at the Tevatron collider. This report consists of vugraphs of talks given at the meeting.

  18. A measurement of the t anti-t production cross-section in proton anti-proton collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV with the D0 detector at the Tevatron using final states with a muon and jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klute, Markus [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    A preliminary measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section at √s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The μ-plus-jets final state is analyzed in a data sample of 94 pb-1 and a total of 14 events are selected with a background expectation of 11.7 ± 1.9 events. The measurement yields: σp$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ + X} = 2.4$+4.2\\atop{-3.5}$(stat.)$+2.5\\atop{-2.6}$(syst.) ± 0.3(lumi.) pb. The analysis, being part of a larger effort to re-observe the top quark in Tevatron Run II data and to measure the production cross section, is combined with results from all available analyses channels. The combined result yields: σ p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ + X = 8.1$+2.2\\atop{-2.0}$(stat.)$+1.6\\atop{-1.4}$(syst.) ± 0.8(lumi.) pb.

  19. Using Time Separation of Signals to Obtain Independent Proton and Antiproton Beam Position Measurements Around the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Independent position measurement of the counter-circulating proton and antiproton beams in the Tevatron presents a challenge to upgrading the Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system. The inherent directionality of the Tevatron BPM pickup design provides 26dB isolation between signals from the two beams. At the present typical 10:1 proton-to-antiproton bunch intensity ratio, this isolation alone is insufficient to support millimeter accuracy antiproton beam position measurements due to interfering proton signals. An accurate and manageable solution to the interfering signal problem is required for antiproton measurements now and, as machine improvements lead to increased antiproton intensity, will facilitate future elimination of antiproton bias on proton beam position measurements. This paper discusses the possibilities and complications of using time separation of the two beam signals at the numerous Tevatron BPM locations and given the dynamic longitudinal conditions of Tevatron operation. Results of me...

  20. Using MAX/MIN Transverse Regions to Study the Underlying Event in Run 2 at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, L. Alberto [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Elementary particle physics attempts to answer very fundamental questions of how the Universe was created and how it works. One approach to unlocking these mysteries is by «»Hiding very fast moving protons and antiprotons and studying the outcome. Most of the time these particles ooze through each other, but occasionally we get a collision that is characterized by a large amount of transverse momentum. This signals a special kind of collision that can be calculated by the theorist. The problem lies in the fact that only a portion of the collisions can he calculated, The majority of the collision is mes..~y and must be modeled. The data presented here helps to improve the current models and allows for a better understanding of the dynamics of nuclear forces.

  1. A next-to-leading-order QCD analysis of neutrino-iron structure functions at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, William Glenn [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleon structure functions measured in neutrino-iron and antineutrino-iron charged-current interactions are presented. The data were taken in two high-energy high-statistics runs by the LAB-E detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Structure functions are extracted from a sample of 950,000 neutrino and 170,000 antineutrino events with neutrino energies from 30 to 360 GeV. The structure functions F2 and xF3 are compared with the predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD). The combined non-singlet and singlet evolution in the context of PQCD gives value of ΛNLO,(4)/MS = 337 ± 28 (exp.) MeV, which corresponds to αS(MZ2) = 0.119 ± 0.002 (exp.) ± 0.004 (theory), and with a gluon distribution given by xG(x,Q02 = 5GeV2) = (2.22 ± 0.34) x (1 - x)4.65±0.68.

  2. Invariant-mass distribution of jet pairs produced in association with a W boson in pp ¯ collisions at √s =1.96 TeV using the full CDF Run II data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Vázquez, F.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We report on a study of the dijet invariant-mass distribution in events with one identified lepton, a significant imbalance in the total event transverse momentum, and two jets. This distribution is sensitive to the possible production of a new particle in association with a W boson, where the boson decays leptonically. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy collected by the Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.9 fb-1. The data are found to be consistent with standard model expectations, and a 95% confidence level upper limit is set on the production cross section of a W boson in association with a new particle decaying into two jets.

  3. Measurement of the Inclusive $b$-jet cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF RunII and Development of silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS silicon tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Onofrio, Monica [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2005-01-01

    In the past twenty years, the study of events with bottom quark has led to many important Tevatron results- as the discovery of the top quark- and it will be as well crucial at the LHC for the search of new physics phenomena. This analysis exploits the good tracking capabilities of the detector and relies on b-jet identification made by secondary vertex reconstruction. The study of the Inner Tracker system performance and in particular the Semi conductor Tracker (SCT), can be considered one of the fundamental issues in the construction of the apparatus. The second part of this thesis work reports some of the crucial tests performed during the development of the silicon microstrip detectors composing the SCT.

  4. Invariant-mass distribution of jet pairs produced in association with a $W$ boson in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV using the full CDF Run II data set

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Luca, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a study of the dijet invariant-mass distribution in events with one identified lepton, a significant imbalance in the total event transverse momentum, and two jets. This distribution is sensitive to the possible production of a new particle in association with a $W$ boson, where the boson decays leptonically. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy collected by the Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.9 fb$^{-1}$. The data are found to be consistent with standard-model expectations, and a 95$\\%$ confidence level upper limit is set on the cross section for a $W$ boson produced in association with a new particle decaying into two jets.

  5. Vertex Reconstruction in ATLAS Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Matt; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Vertex reconstruction is the process of taking reconstructed tracks and using them to determine the locations of proton collisions. In this poster we present the performance of our current vertex reconstruction algorithm, and look at investigations into potential improvements from a new seed finding method.

  6. The LHCb trigger in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Michielin, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb trigger system has been upgraded to allow alignment, calibration and physics analysis to be performed in real time. An increased CPU capacity and improvements in the software have allowed lifetime unbiased selections of beauty and charm decays in the high level trigger. Thanks to offline quality event reconstruction already available online, physics analyses can be performed directly on this information and for the majority of charm physics selections a reduced event format can be written out. Beauty hadron decays are more efficiently triggered by re-optimised inclusive selections, and the HLT2 output event rate is increased by a factor of three.

  7. Tau Identification at CMS in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Ojalvo, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    During LHC Long Shutdown 1 necessary upgrades to the CMS detector were made. CMS also took the opportunity to improve further particle reconstruction. A number of improvements were made to the Hadronic Tau reconstruction and Identification algorithms. In particular, electromag- netic strip reconstruction of the Hadron plus Strips (HPS) algorithm was improved to better model signal of pi0 from tau decays. This modification improves energy response and removes the tau footprint from isolation area. In addition to this, improvement to discriminators combining iso- lation and tau life time variables, and anti-electron in MultiVariate Analysis technique was also developed. The results of these improvements are presented and validation of Tau Identification using a variety of techniques is shown.

  8. Measurement of the leptonic angular distribution in $W$ boson decay as a function of the $W$ transverse momentum using the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerrito, Lucio [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2002-04-01

    A measurement of the angular distribution of leptons from the analysis of W-boson decay data is presented. Although the properties of the leptonic angular distribution from W decays have been studied extensively in the past decades, the amount of data collected at the Tevatron is sufficient to observe Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) corrections. When QCD is included, the lepton polar-angle distribution is best described by two parameters, $\\alpha_1$ and $\\alpha_2$, functions of $p^W_T$: $\\frac{{\\rm d}\\sigma}{{\\rm d}\\cos\\theta^*} \\propto (1\\pm\\alpha_1 \\cos\\theta^* +\\alpha_2 \\cos^2\\theta^*),$ where $\\theta^*$ is measured in the W rest-frame with respect to the proton beam. Both the W asymmetry measurement and the W mass precision measurement at CDF rely on the accurate understanding and simulation of the leptonic angular distribution. The data analysed in this thesis, which include both the electron and the muon channels, were collected with the CDF detector at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider during Run Ib (1994$-$1996). The coefficient $\\alpha_2$ of the polar-angle distribution is measured as a function of the W-boson transverse-momentum up to 100 GeV. The measurement strategy consists of fitting the transverse-mass distribution to a set of templates from a Monte Carlo event and detector simulation. A log-likelihood method is used to determine $\\alpha_2$. The measured values of $\\alpha_2$ confirm the Standard Model expectation for the W-polarisation at high transverse-momentum. A study for a measurement of $\\alpha_1$ is also presented. However, there is insufficient sensitivity for the measurement of $\\alpha_1$ with the CDF Run I detector.

  9. Observation and studies of double J/psi production at the Tevatron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 11 (2014), "111101-1"-"111101-8" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Batavia TEVATRON Coll * parton * density * nucleon * model * anti-p p * inclusive reaction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  10. Combination of measurements of the top-quark pair production cross section from the Tevatron Collider

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 7 (2014), "072001-1"-"072001-16" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Batavia TEVATRON Coll * quantum chromodynamics * perturbation theory * statistical analysis * CDF * DZERO Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  11. Search for fourth generation quarks and leptons at the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, I F; Schiller, A

    1999-01-01

    If the next generations of heavy quarks and leptons exist within the standard model (SM), they can manifest themselves in Higgs boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC, before being actually observed. This generation leads to an increase of the Higgs boson production cross section via gluon fusion at hadron colliders by a factor 6-9. So, the study of this process at the Tevatron and LHC can finally fix the number of generations in the SM. Using the WW* Higgs boson decay channel, the studies at the upgraded Tevatron will answer the question about the next generation for mass values 135 GeV Tevatron, studies in this channel could explore the mass range 110-140 GeV. (15 refs).

  12. Exclusive e+e-, di-photon and di-jet production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

    2007-05-01

    Results from studies on exclusive production of electron-position pair, di-photon, and dijet production at CDF in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. THe first observation and cross section measurements of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and di-jet production in hadron-hadron collisions are emphasized.

  13. Accelerator Science and Technology Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centerpiece of the world's high energy physics program - beginning operation in December of 1985 until it was overtaken by LHC in 2011. The aim of this unique scientific instrument was to explore the elementary particle physics reactions with center of mass collision energies of up to 1.96 TeV. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 1030cm-2s-1, however as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430 times higher luminosities to each of two high luminosity experiments, CDF and D0. The Tevatron will be shut off September 30, 2011. The collider was arguably one of the most complex research instruments ever to reach the operation stage and is widely recognized for many technological breakthroughs and numerous physics discoveries. In this John Adams lecture, I briefly present the history of the Tevatron, major advances in accelerator physics, and technology implemented during the long...

  14. Electroweak radiative effects in the single $W$-production at Tevatron and LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Akushevich, I.; Ilyichev, A.; Shumeiko, N.; Zykunov, V.

    2003-01-01

    An alternative calculation of the lowest order electroweak radiative corrections to the single W-boson production in hadron-hadron collision in the framework of the quark parton model without any absorption of the collinear quark singularity into the parton distributions is carried out. Numerical analysis under Tevatron and LHC kinematic conditions is performed.

  15. 'Outrunning' the running ear

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    Children in day-care centres are at a higher risk. • Breast-feeding less than 3 months. Other conditions which may mimic acute purulent otitis media should be considered when evaluating a patient with a running ear.These are listed in Table I. To outrun the running ear all these facts should be kept in mind when evaluating ...

  16. RUNNING INJURY DEVELOPMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karen Krogh; Hulme, Adam; Damsted, Camma

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioral science methods have rarely been used in running injury research. Therefore, the attitudes amongst runners and their coaches regarding factors leading to running injuries warrants formal investigation. PURPOSE: To investigate the attitudes of middle- and long-distance runne...

  17. Running Injury Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh Johansen, Karen; Hulme, Adam; Damsted, Camma

    2017-01-01

    Background: Behavioral science methods have rarely been used in running injury research. Therefore, the attitudes amongst runners and their coaches regarding factors leading to running injuries warrants formal investigation. Purpose: To investigate the attitudes of middle- and long-distance runne...

  18. Overuse injuries in running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Jørgensen, Jens Erik

    2016-01-01

    What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence.......What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence....

  19. Implications of direct dark matter constraints for minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carena, Marcela; Hooper, Dan; Skands, Peter

    2006-08-04

    In regions of large tanbeta and small mAlpha, searches for heavy neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) Higgs bosons at the Tevatron are promising. At the same time, rates in direct dark matter experiments, such as CDMS, are enhanced in the case of large tanbeta and small mAlpha. As a result, there is a natural interplay between the heavy, neutral Higgs searches at the Tevatron and the region of parameter space explored by CDMS. We show that if the lightest neutralino makes up the dark matter of our universe, current limits from CDMS strongly constrain the prospects of heavy, neutral MSSM Higgs discovery at the Tevatron unless |mu| greater or approximately 400 GeV. The limits of CDMS projected for 2007 will increase this constraint to |mu| greater or approximately 800 GeV. If CDMS does observe neutralinos in the near future, however, it will make the discovery of Higgs bosons at the Tevatron far more likely.

  20. W boson production and mass at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; /Toronto U.

    2005-06-01

    The CDF and D0 collaborations have analyzed up to {approx} 200 pb{sup -1} of Run 2 physics data to measure W production properties such as the W cross section, the W width, lepton universality and the W charge asymmetry. From the cross section measurements, CDF obtains a lepton universality of g{sub {mu}}/g{sub e} = 0.998 {+-} 0.012 and g{sub {tau}}/g{sub e} = 0.99 {+-} 0.04 and an indirect W width of {Lambda}{sub W} = 2079 {+-} 41 MeV. D0 measured the W width directly and finds {Lambda}{sub W} = 2011 {+-} 142 MeV. CDF has estimated the uncertainties on the W boson mass measurements in the electron and muon decay channels and obtains an overall uncertainty of 76 MeV.

  1. First results from the 2010 pp Run and performance of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Leonidopoulos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at LHC recorded over 45 pb^-1 of pp collision data at sqrt(s)=7 TeV. The large collected datasets are of very high quality and have been used to commission and calibrate the CMS detector, with the achieved performance close to the TDR specifications. CMS has reestablished all the major Standard Model processes in the 2010 Run and is entering new territory in searches for New Physics, with sensitivity already exceeding that at LEP and TeVatron.

  2. Measurement of Beam Tunes in the Tevatron Using the BBQ System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edstrom, Dean R.; /Indiana U.

    2009-04-01

    Measuring the betatron tunes in any synchrotron is of critical importance to ensuring the stability of beam in the synchrotron. The Base Band Tune, or BBQ, measurement system was developed by Marek Gasior of CERN and has been installed at Brookhaven and Fermilab as a part of the LHC Accelerator Research Program, or LARP. The BBQ was installed in the Tevatron to evaluate its effectiveness at reading proton and antiproton tunes at its flattop energy of 980 GeV. The primary objectives of this thesis are to examine the methods used to measure the tune using the BBQ tune measurement system, to incorporate the system into the Fermilab accelerator controls system, ACNET, and to compare the BBQ to existing tune measurement systems in the Tevatron.

  3. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  4. Experimental studies of compensation of beam-beam effects with Tevatron electron lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V; Alexahin, Y; Kamerdzhiev, V; Solyak, N; Wildman, D; Zhang, X-L [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bishofberger, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Parkhomchuk, V; Reva, V [Budker INP, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Zimmermann, F [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland)], E-mail: shiltsev@fnal.gov

    2008-04-15

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider. In this paper, we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980 GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron electron lenses.

  5. The like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry at the Tevatron: corrections from B meson fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Mitov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The existing predictions for the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry at the Tevatron are expressed in terms of parameters related to B mesons' mixing and inclusive production fractions. We show that in the realistic case when phase-space cuts are applied, the asymmetry depends also on the details of the production mechanism for the B mesons. In particular, it is sensitive to the difference in the fragmentation functions of B^0_d and B^0_s mesons. We estimate these fragmentation effects and find that they shift the theory prediction for this observable by approximately 10%. We also point out the approximately 20% sensitivity of the asymmetry depending on which set of values for the B meson production fractions is used: as measured at the Z pole or at the Tevatron. The impact of these effects on the extraction of A^s_{SL} from the D\\O measurement is presented.

  6. Search for vector-like quark production in the lepton+jets and dilepton+jets final states using 5.4 fb-1 of Run II data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughron, Seth [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics provides an excellent description of particle interactions at energies up to ~1 TeV, but it is expected to fail above that scale. Multiple models developed to describe phenomena above the TeV scale predict the existence of very massive, vector-like quarks. A search for single electroweak production of such particles in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is performed in the W+jets and Z+jets channels. The data were collected by the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1. Events consistent with a heavy object decaying to a vector boson and a jet are selected. We observe no significant excess in comparison to the background prediction and set 95% confidence level upper limits on production cross sections for vector-like quarks decaying to W+jet and Z+jet. Assuming a vector-like quark -- standard model quark coupling parameter $\\tilde{κ}$qQ of unity, we exclude vector-like quarks with mass below 693 GeV for decays to W+jet and mass below 449 GeV for decays to Z+jet. These represent the most sensitive limits to date.

  7. LHC and Tevatron results on the $t\\bar{t}$ differential cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00213443; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This note describes a review of the most recent $t\\bar{t}$ differential cross sections measurement per- formed by LHC and Tevatron experiments. I will describe the measurements of fiducial and full phase-space differential cross sections based on events with exactly two, one or zero charged leptons in the final state. These results are compared to predictions made with next-to-leading order or next-to-next-to leading order numerical calculations.

  8. Long-Term Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Tevatron at Collision Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabel, A.C.; Cai, Y.; /SLAC; Sen, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-02-10

    The beam-beam effect is a significant source of nonlinearities in the Tevatron. We have developed a code which allows us to estimate its contribution to the finite lifetime of the anti-proton beam, both at collision and injection energy, by tracking realistic particle distribution for a high number of terms and extrapolating from the particle loss rate. We describe the physical modeling underlying the code and give benchmarking results.

  9. Limits on Z' production at the Tevatron using CDF and D0 data

    CERN Document Server

    Pillai, M K

    1996-01-01

    A search for a neutral heavy vector gauge boson, $\\zp$, was conducted in CDF and $\\approx$ 90pb$^{-1}$ dielectron data obtained at D0 using the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab. We obtain the 95\\% Confidence Limits on the cross-section $\\times$ branching ratio for a $\\zp$ decaying to dileptons based on the combined data from CDF and D0. Of interest is the excluded mass region from E$_6$ based models.

  10. Tevatron Beam Halo Collimation System: Design, Operational Experience and New Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhov, Nikolai; Annala, Jerry; Carrigan, Richard; Church, Michael; Drozhdin, Alexander; Johnson, Todd; Robert, Reilly; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Stancari, Guilio; Still, Dean; Valishev, Alexander; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zvoda, Viktoriya

    2012-01-01

    Collimation of proton and antiproton beams in the Tevatron collider is required to protect CDF and D0 detectors and minimize their background rates, to keep irradiation of superconducting magnets under control, to maintain long-term operational reliability, and to reduce the impact of beam-induced radiation on the environment. In this article we briefly describe the design, practical implementation and performance of the collider collimation system, methods to control transverse and longitudi...

  11. Phenomenological study of the atypical heavy flavor production observed at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, G.; Barone, M.; Fiori, I.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Parri, A.; Ptohos, F.; /Frascati /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Cyprus U.

    2005-11-01

    The authors address known discrepancies between the heavy flavor properties of jets produced at the Tevatron collider and the prediction of conventional-QCD simulations. In this study, they entertain the possibility that these effects are real and due to new physics. They show that all anomalies can be simultaneously fitted by postulating the additional pair production of light bottom squarks with a 100% semileptonic branching fraction.

  12. Consequences of the extra SM families on the Higgs boson production at Fermilab Tevatron and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Arik, E; Cetin, S A; Sultansoy, S F

    2002-01-01

    The latest electroweak precission data allow the existence of additional chiral generations in the standard model. We study the influence of extra generations on the production of SM Higgs boson at hadron colliders. Due to the enhancement of the gluon fusion channel, the ``golden mode'' becomes more promising even at upgraded Tevatron. Furthermore, the formation of the fourth family quarkonia with the subsequent $\\eta_{4}\\to ZH$ decay introduces additional tool for the investigation of the Higgs boson properties.

  13. Di-J/psi production at the Tevatron and the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review recent results which we have obtained in the study of J/psi-pair production at the Tevatron and the LHC. We claim that the existing data set from CMS and D0 point at a significant double-parton-scattering contribution with an effective cross section smaller than that for jet-related observables. We have also derived simple relations involving feed-down fractions from excited states which can help in disentangling the single from the double scatterings.

  14. Development of 3D beam-beam simulation for the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-06-01

    We present status of development of a 3D Beam-Beam simulation code for simulating the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The essential features of the code are 3D particle-in-cell Poisson solver for calculating the Beam-Beam electromagnetic interactions with additional modules for linear optics, machine impedance and chromaticity, and multiple bunch tracking. The simulations match synchrobetatron oscillations measured at the VEPP-2M collider. The impedance calculations show beam instability development consistent with analytic expressions.

  15. PDF dependence of Higgs cross sections at the Tevatron and LHC: response to recent criticism

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, R S

    2011-01-01

    We respond to some criticism questioning the validity of the current Standard Model Higgs exclusion limits at the Tevatron, due to the significant dependence of the dominant production cross section from gluon-gluon fusion on the choice of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the strong coupling (alpha_S). We demonstrate the ability of the Tevatron jet data to discriminate between different high-x gluon distributions, performing a detailed quantitative comparison to show that fits not explicitly including these data fail to give a good description. In this context we emphasise the importance of the consistent treatment of luminosity uncertainties. We comment on the values of alpha_S obtained from fitting deep-inelastic scattering data, particularly the fixed-target NMC data, and we show that jet data are needed for stability. We conclude that the Higgs cross-section uncertainties due to PDFs and alpha_S currently used by the Tevatron and LHC experiments are not significantly underestimated, contrary to so...

  16. Can Unshod Running Reduce Running Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    left foot, I decided to have a doctor look at it. The doctor determined the pain was due to Plantar Fasciitis, where the Plantar Tendon pulls away...much of the same activities from the post World War II version. The new fitness program added flexibility, nutrition , circuit drills and other...

  17. The relationship between negative addiction to running and running ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between negative addiction to running and running enjoyment amongst black Zulu-speaking South African runners: an exploratory study. ... running history and the importance placed by the participant on the running activity were shown to play a role in both running dependence and enjoyment processes.

  18. Measurement of the $B_{s} \\to K^{+}K^{-}$ lifetime and extraction of the $\\Delta\\Gamma_{CP}/\\Gamma_{CP}$ at CDF Run II and Development of the ATLAS-SCT endcap modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donega, Mauro [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of the present work we present the first measurement of the Bd and Bs meson lifetimes in charmless decays (Bd → K+π-, Bd → π+π-, Bs → K+K-) based on 360pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collision taken at the CDF Run II detector and the extraction $\\frac{ΔΓCP}{ΓCP}$ for the Bs-meson. We find the Bd-meson lifetime (in the Bd → K+π- and Bd → π+π- decay modes) to be: cτ (Bd) = 452 ± 24 (stat) ± 6 (syst) µm τ (Bd) = 1.51 ± 0.08 (stat) ± 0.02 (syst) ps and the Bs-meson lifetime (in the Bs → K+K- decay mode) to be: cτ (Bs → K+K-) = 458 ± 53 (stat) ± 6 (syst) µm τ (Bs → K+K-) = 1.53 ± 0.18 (stat) ± 0.02 (syst) ps Both measurements are consistent with the world averages. We calculate the ΔΓCP CP for the Bs meson combining the measured lifetime in the Bs → K+K- decay with the world average value of the Bs-meson lifetime in the flavour specific decays: We find: cτfs = 441 ± 13 µm τfs = 1.472 ± 0.045 ps ΔΓCP /ΓCP = -0.08 ± 0.23 (stat.) ± 0.03 (syst.) that is compatible with the theoretical expectation of (7.2 ± 2.4) × 10-2. In the second part of the present work, a few steps of the final R&D of the ATLAS-SCT endcaps modules will be reported. Two module layouts have been developed on two different electrical hybrids de- signs. Both layouts have been produced in small prototype series and tested before and after exposing them to a particle fluence equivalent to that expected at the end of the ATLAS data taking.

  19. Running Boot Camp

    CERN Document Server

    Toporek, Chuck

    2008-01-01

    When Steve Jobs jumped on stage at Macworld San Francisco 2006 and announced the new Intel-based Macs, the question wasn't if, but when someone would figure out a hack to get Windows XP running on these new "Mactels." Enter Boot Camp, a new system utility that helps you partition and install Windows XP on your Intel Mac. Boot Camp does all the heavy lifting for you. You won't need to open the Terminal and hack on system files or wave a chicken bone over your iMac to get XP running. This free program makes it easy for anyone to turn their Mac into a dual-boot Windows/OS X machine. Running Bo

  20. Resonant second generation slepton production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autermann, C.T.

    2006-12-21

    }{yields}{chi}{sup 0}{sub 2,(3,4)}{mu} and {nu}{sub m}u{yields} {chi}{sup {+-}}{sub 1,(2)}{mu} are combined within the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model to the world's best limit on the relevant coupling {lambda}{sup '}{sub 211} in dependence of the neutralino and the slepton masses. A lower bound on the slepton mass depending only on {lambda}{sup '}{sub 211} is derived. If any LQ anti d coupling {lambda}{sup '}{sub 2ij} with j=1,2 and k=1,2,3 is larger than 0.01, then neutralino masses below 41.5 GeV and gluino masses below 285 GeV can be excluded within mSUGRA. This result is a significant extension of the D0 Run I bounds. (orig.)

  1. Electroweak production of the top quark in the Run 2 of the D0 experiment; Production electrofaible du quark top au Run 2 de l'experience D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, B

    2006-04-15

    The work exposed in this thesis deals with the search for electroweak production of top quark (single top) in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This production mode has not been observed yet. Analyzed data have been collected during the Run II of the D diameter experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb{sup -1}. In the Standard Model, the decay of a top quark always produce a high momentum bottom quark. Therefore bottom quark jets identification plays a major role in this analysis. The large lifetime of b hadrons and the subsequent large impact parameters relative to the interaction vertex of charged particle tracks are used to tag bottom quark jets. Impact parameters of tracks attached to a jet are converted into the probability for the jet to originate from the primary vertex. This algorithm has a 45% tagging efficiency for a 0.5% mistag rate. Two processes (s and t channels) dominate single top production with slightly different final states. The searched signature consists in 2 to 4 jets with at least one bottom quark jet, one charged lepton (electron or muon) and missing energy accounting for a neutrino. This final state is background dominated and multivariate techniques are needed to separate the signal from the two main backgrounds: associated production of a W boson and jets and top quarks pair production. The achieved sensitivity is not enough to reach observation and we computed upper limits at the 95% confidence level at 5 pb (s-channel) and 4.3 pb (t-channel) on single top production cross-sections. (author)

  2. Running Like Crazy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rushin, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-seven years and four wives later, [Jerry Dunn] is still running. On Jan. 8,1995, Dunn paused near the nine-mile mark of the Walt Disney World Marathon in Orlando to marry, in front of Cinderella's Castle, fellow runner Elaine Doll...

  3. Running the rat race

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SASA Refresher Course Texts: Running the rat race. 74. 2014;20(1) ... and feelings of existential despair which characterise the human condition, to emerge as they are today: whole, satisfied, well .... Pure efficiency only exists on paper. In the ...

  4. Optimizing Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widule, Carol J.

    1989-01-01

    The optimization of step length and step rate (frequency) is essential for sprinters. This article analyzes data that compare step rate and step length to height, as a function of running speed, for ten elite runners. How results of such analyses can be used in training runners is also discussed. (IAH)

  5. ATLAS inner detector: the Run 1 to Run 2 transition, and first experience from Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Dobos, Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is equipped with a tracking system, the Inner Detector, built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded; taking advantage of the long showdown, the Pixel Detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), a fourth layer of pixel detectors, installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm from the beam axis. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point and the increase of Luminosity that LHC will face in Run-2, a new read-out chip within CMOS 130nm and two different silicon sensor pixel technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. SCT and TRT systems consolidation was also carri...

  6. Electroweak corrections to monojet production at the Tevatron and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denner, Ansgar [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dittmaier, Stefan [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Kasprzik, Tobias [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Mueck, Alexander [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, Aachen (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Single-jet production with missing transverse momentum is one of the most promising discovery channels for new physics at the LHC. In the Standard Model, Z+jet production with a Z-boson decay into neutrinos leads to this monojet signature. To improve the corresponding Standard Model predictions, we present the calculation of the full next-to-leading-order (NLO) electroweak corrections and a recalculation of the NLO QCD corrections to monojet production at the Tevatron and the LHC. We discuss the phenomenological impact on the total cross sections as well as on relevant differential distributions. (orig.)

  7. From Tevatron's top and lepton-based asymmetries to the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona, Adrian; Falkowski, Adam; Khatibi, Sara; Najafabadi, Mojtaba Mohammadi; Perez, Gilad; Santiago, Jose

    2014-01-01

    We define a lepton-based asymmetry in semi-leptonic ttbar production at the LHC. We show that the ratio of this lepton-based asymmetry and the ttbar charge asymmetry, measured as a function of the lepton transverse momentum or the ttbar invariant mass is a robust observable in the Standard Model. It is stable against higher order corrections and mis-modeling effects. We show that this ratio can also be a powerful discriminant among different new physics models and between them and the Standard Model. Finally, we show that a related ratio defined at the Tevatron is also robust as a function of the ttbar invariant mass.

  8. QCD corrections to W boson plus heavy quark production at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Giele, W T; Laenen, Eric; Giele, Walter T; Keller, Stephane; Laenen, Eric

    1996-01-01

    The next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of a W-boson in association with a jet containing a heavy quark are presented. The calculation is fully differential in the final state particle momenta and includes the mass of the heavy quark. We study for the case of the Tevatron the sensitivity of the cross section to the strange quark distribution function, the dependence of the cross section on the heavy quark mass, the transverse momentum distribution of the jet containing the heavy quark, and the momentum distribution of the heavy quark in the jet.

  9. B(s) Mixing, Delta Gamma(s) and CP Violation at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2008-05-01

    The authors discuss the results from the Tevatron experiments on mixing and CP violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system, with particular emphasis to the updated measurements of the decay-width difference {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} and the first measurement of the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub s} using flavor tagging information. They also briefly review the charge asymmetry measurements in semileptonic B{sub s}{sup 0} decays and in B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} decays.

  10. Microwave Schottky diagnostic systems for the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler, and CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J

    2011-01-01

    A means for non-invasive measurement of transverse and longitudinal characteristics of bunched beams in synchrotrons has been developed based on high sensitivity slotted waveguide pickups. The pickups allow for bandwidths exceeding hundreds of MHz while maintaining good beam sensitivity characteristics. Wide bandwidth is essential to allow bunch-by-bunch measurements by means of a fast gate. The Schottky detector system is installed and successfully commissioned in the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler and CERN LHC synchrotrons. Measurement capabilities include tune, chromaticity, and momentum spread of single or multiple beam bunches in any combination. With appropriate calibrations, emittance can also be measured by integrating the area under the incoherent tune sidebands.

  11. Model Independent Searches for New Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, Joel

    2009-06-01

    The standard model is a successful but limited theory. There is significant theoretical motivation to believe that new physics may appear at the energy scale of a few TeV, the lower end of which is currently probed by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The methods used to search for physics beyond the standard model in a model independent way and the results of theses searches based on 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector and 2.0 fb{sup -1} at the CDF detector are presented.

  12. J/{sub psi} production: Tevatron and fixed-target collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrelli, A.

    2000-06-01

    In this talk the author shows the results of a fit of the NRQCD matrix elements to the CDF data for direct J/{psi} production, by including the radiative corrections to the g g {r_arrow} {sup 3} S {sub 1}{sup [1]} channel and the effect of the k{sub T}-smearing. Furthermore he performs the NLO NRQCD analysis of J/{psi} production in fixed-target proton-nucleon collisions and he fits the colour-octet matrix elements to the available experimental data. The results are compared to the Tevatron ones.

  13. E710, $p\\bar{p}$ Elastic Scattering at Tevatron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadr, Sasan [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Experiment E710, located at site EO of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab, was conceived in order to measure $p\\bar{p}$ elastic scattering. The measured parameters were: the total cross section $\\sigma_t$, the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward scattering amplitude $p$, the nuclear slope parameter B, the nuclear curvature parameter C, the total elastic cross section $\\sigma_{el}$, and the single diffractive cross section $\\sigma_{sd}$. These measurements were taken at center-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$= 1.02 and 1.8 TeV.

  14. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and decay modes of hadrons at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2010-05-01

    The Tevatron provides 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions and allows for collection of rich b-hadron samples to the two experiments CDF and D0. The study of heavy flavor properties represents a fruitful opportunity to investigate the flavor sector of the Standard Model (SM) and to look for hints of New Physics (NP). Here we report the first measurement of polarization amplitudes in B{sub s}{sup 0} charmless decays, world leading results on b-hadron lifetimes, and measurements of several other properties of b-hadrons.

  15. Fragmentation contributions to J/ψ production at the Tevatron and the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T; Chung, Hee Sok; Kim, U-Rae; Lee, Jungil

    2014-07-11

    We compute leading-power fragmentation corrections to J/ψ production at the Tevatron and the LHC. We find that, when these corrections are combined with perturbative corrections through next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant α(s), we obtain a good fit to high-p(T) cross section data from the CDF and CMS Collaborations. The fitted long-distance matrix elements lead to predictions of near-zero J/ψ polarization in the helicity frame at large p(T).

  16. Factorization breaking in high-transverse-momentum charged-hadron production at the Tevatron?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, S; Kniehl, B A; Kramer, G

    2010-06-18

    We compare the transverse-momentum (pT) distribution of inclusive light-charged-particle production measured by the CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron with the theoretical prediction evaluated at next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics using fragmentation functions recently determined through a global data fit. While in the lower pT range the data agree with the prediction within the theoretical error or slightly undershoot it, they significantly exceed it in the upper pT range, by several orders of magnitude at the largest values of pT, potentially challenging the factorization theorem.

  17. Jet Substructure at the Tevatron and LHC: New results, new tools, new benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    Altheimer, A; Asquith, L; Brooijmans, G; Butterworth, J; Campanelli, M; Chapleau, B; Cholakian, A E; Chou, J P; Dasgupta, M; Davison, A; Dolen, J; Ellis, S D; Essig, R; Fan, J J; Field, R; Fregoso, A; Gallicchio, J; Gershtein, Y; Gomes, A; Haas, A; Halkiadakis, E; Halyo, V; Hoeche, S; Hook, A; Hornig, A; Huang, P; Izaguirre, E; Jankowiak, M; Kribs, G; Krohn, D; Larkoski, A J; Lath, A; Lee, C; Lee, S J; Loch, P; Maksimovic, P; Martinez, M; Miller, D W; Plehn, T; Prokofiev, K; Rahmat, R; Rappoccio, S; Safonov, A; Salam, G P; Schumann, S; Schwartz, M D; Schwartzman, A; Seymour, M; Shao, J; Sinervo, P; Son, M; Soper, D E; Spannowsky, M; Stewart, I W; Strassler, M; Strauss, E; Takeuchi, M; Thaler, J; Thomas, S; Tweedie, B; Vasquez Sierra, R; Vermilion, C K; Villaplana, M; Vos, M; Wacker, J; Walker, D; Walsh, J R; Wang, L-T; Wilbur, S; Yavin, I; Zhu, W

    2012-01-01

    In this report we review recent theoretical progress and the latest experimental results in jet substructure from the Tevatron and the LHC. We review the status of and outlook for calculation and simulation tools for studying jet substructure. Following up on the report of the Boost 2010 workshop, we present a new set of benchmark comparisons of substructure techniques, focusing on the set of variables and grooming methods that are collectively known as "top taggers". To facilitate further exploration, we have attempted to collect, harmonise, and publish software implementations of these techniques.

  18. Microwave Schottky diagnostic systems for the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler, and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph J. Pasquinelli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A means for noninvasive measurement of transverse and longitudinal characteristics of bunched beams in synchrotrons has been developed based on high sensitivity slotted waveguide pickups. The pickups allow for bandwidths exceeding hundreds of MHz while maintaining good beam sensitivity characteristics. Wide bandwidth is essential to allow bunch-by-bunch measurements by means of a fast gate. The Schottky detector system is installed and successfully commissioned in the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler and CERN LHC synchrotrons. Measurement capabilities include tune, chromaticity, and momentum spread of single or multiple beam bunches in any combination. With appropriate calibrations, emittance can also be measured by integrating the area under the incoherent tune sidebands.

  19. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Addiction? » Does Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen PDF: EasyToRead_WhatIsAddiction_Final_ ... English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." ©istock.com/ Antonio_Diaz Matt's ...

  20. CDF Run I B physics results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, S.

    2001-03-08

    The CDF Run I B physics program has been very successful, making numerous measurements over a wide variety of B physics topics. Measurements have included masses and lifetimes; discovery of the B{sub c}; B{sub s} {r_arrow} J/{psi}{phi} polarization; B{sup 0} {leftrightarrow} {bar B}{sup 0} mixing; sin (2{beta}); and rare decay limits. Recent results include a search for {Lambda}{sub b} {r_arrow} {Lambda}{gamma} and a study of B{sup 0} {r_arrow} J/{psi}K(*){sup 0} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} decays. The tools and experience developed during Run I are quite valuable as CDF enters Run II.

  1. Multiple Parton Interactions in p$bar{p}$ Collisions in D0 Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanov, Georgy [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russia)

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is devoted to the study of processes with multiple parton interactions (MPI) in a ppbar collision collected by D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. The study includes measurements of MPI event fraction and effective cross section, a process-independent parameter related to the effective interaction region inside the nucleon. The measurements are done using events with a photon and three hadronic jets in the final state. The measured effective cross section is used to estimate background from MPI for WH production at the Tevatron energy

  2. Running Training, Instruction on Running Technique, and Running Economy in 10-year-old Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petray, Clayre K.; Krahenbuhl, Gary S.

    1985-01-01

    This study attempted to determine the effects of running training, instruction on running techniques, or a combination of instruction and training on the running economy of 10-year-old children. No significant alterations in running economy or technique were produced as a result of the various regimens. (Author/MT)

  3. MSTW PDFs and impact of PDFs on cross sections at Tevatron and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Watt, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    We briefly summarise the "MSTW 2008" determination of parton distribution functions (PDFs), and subsequent follow-up studies, before reviewing some topical issues concerning the PDF dependence of cross sections at the Tevatron and LHC. We update a recently published study of benchmark Standard Model total cross sections (W, Z, gg->H and t-tbar production) at the 7 TeV LHC, where we account for all publicly available PDF sets and we compare to LHC data for W, Z, and t-tbar production. We show the sensitivity of the Higgs cross sections to the gluon distribution, then we demonstrate the ability of the Tevatron jet data, and also the LHC t-tbar data, to discriminate between PDF sets with different high-x gluon distributions. We discuss the related problem of attempts to extract the strong coupling alpha_S from only deep-inelastic scattering data, and we conclude that a direct data constraint on the high-x gluon distribution is required to obtain a meaningful result. We therefore discourage the use of PDF sets ob...

  4. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in final states with $b$ quarks at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-11-01

    We present the result of searches for a low mass Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or a Z boson at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The search is performed in events containing one or two b tagged jets in association with either two leptons, or one lepton and an imbalance in transverse energy, or simply a large imbalance in transverse energy. Datasets corresponding to up to 8.5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are considered in the analyses. These are the most powerful channels in the search for a low mass Higgs boson at the Tevatron. Recent sensitivity improvements are discussed. For a Higgs mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, the expected sensitivity for the most sensitive individual analyses reaches 2.3 times the SM prediction at 95% confidence level (C.L.), with all limits below 5 times the SM. Additionally, a WZ/ZZ cross-section measurement is performed to validate the analysis techniques deployed for searching for the Higgs.

  5. Channeling and Volume Reflection Based Crystal Collimation of Tevatron Circulating Beam Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V.; Drozhdin, A.; Johnson, T.; Legan, A.; Mokhov, N.; Reilly, R.; Still, D.; Tesarek, R.; Zagel, J.; Peggs, S.; Assmann, R.; Previtali, V.; Scandale, W.; Chesnokov, Y.; Yazynin, I.; Guidi, V.; Ivanov, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The T980 crystal collimation experiment is underway at the Tevatron to determine if this technique could increase 980 GeV beam-halo collimation efficiency at high-energy hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the LHC. T980 also studies various crystal types and parameters. The setup has been substantially enhanced during the Summer 2009 shutdown by installing a new O-shaped crystal in the horizontal goniometer, as well as adding a vertical goniometer with two alternating crystals (O-shaped and multi-strip) and additional beam diagnostics. First measurements with the new system are quite encouraging, with channeled and volume-reflected beams observed on the secondary collimators as predicted. Investigation of crystal collimation efficiencies with crystals in volume reflection and channeling modes are described in comparison with an amorphous primary collimator. Results on the system performance are presented for the end-of-store studies and for entire collider stores. The first investigation of colliding be...

  6. Non-perturbative QCD Effects and the Top Mass at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Wicke, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The modelling of non-perturbative effects is an important part of modern collider physics simulations. In hadron collisions there is some indication that the modelling of the interactions of the beam remnants, the underlying event, may require non-trivial colour reconnection effects to be present. We recently introduced a universally applicable toy model of such reconnections, based on hadronising strings. This model, which has one free parameter, has been implemented in the Pythia event generator. We then considered several parameter sets (`tunes'), constrained by fits to Tevatron minimum-bias data, and determined the sensitivity of a simplified top mass analysis to these effects, in exclusive semi-leptonic top events at the Tevatron. A first attempt at isolating the genuine non-perturbative effects gave an estimate of order +-0.5GeV from non-perturbative uncertainties. The results presented here are an update to the original study and include recent bug fixes of Pythia that influenced the tunings investigat...

  7. Determination of W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF Run II and production of endcap modules for the ATLAS Silicon Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moed, Shulamit [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2007-01-01

    . The production monitoring and summary using this package is shown in this thesis. The second part of the thesis reports a measurement of the fraction of longitudinal and right-handed helicity states of W bosons in top quark decays. This measurement was done using 955 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF detector at the TEvatron, where protons and anti-protons are collided with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. the helicity fraction measurements take advantage of the fact that the angular distribution of the W boson decay products depends on the helicity state of the W which they originate from. They analyze t$\\bar{t}$ events in the 'lepton+jets' channel and look at the leptonic side of decay. They construct templates for the distribution of cosθ*, the angle between the charged lepton and the W flight direction in the rest frame of the top quark. Using Monte Carlo techniques, they construct probability distributions ('templates') for cosθ* in the case of left-handed, longitudinal and right-handed Ws and a template for the background model. They extract the W helicity fractions using an unbinned likelihood fitter based on the information of these templates. The Standard Model predicts the W helicity fractions to be about 70% longitudinal and 30% left-handed, while the fraction of right-handed W bosons in top decays is highly suppressed and vanishes when neglecting the mass of the b quark.

  8. A Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass with 1 Inverse Femtobarn of DZero Run IIa Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osta, Jyotsna [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This thesis is a detailed presentation of a precision measurement of the mass of the W boson. It has been obtained by analyzing W → ev decays. The data used for this analysis was collected from 2002 to 2006 with the D0 detector, during Run IIa of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1. With a sample of 499,830 W → ev candidate events, we obtain a mass measurement of MW = 80.401 ± 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment to date.

  9. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-04

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ubuntu Up and Running

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Ubuntu for everyone! This popular Linux-based operating system is perfect for people with little technical background. It's simple to install, and easy to use -- with a strong focus on security. Ubuntu: Up and Running shows you the ins and outs of this system with a complete hands-on tour. You'll learn how Ubuntu works, how to quickly configure and maintain Ubuntu 10.04, and how to use this unique operating system for networking, business, and home entertainment. This book includes a DVD with the complete Ubuntu system and several specialized editions -- including the Mythbuntu multimedia re

  11. One-step competitive lateral flow biosensor running on an independent quantification system for smart phones based in-situ detection of trace Hg(II) in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nan; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Chen, Yuting; Yang, Zhansen; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a one-step lateral flow biosensor (LFB) has been developed, optimized and validated for quantitative detection of Hg(II) in water. In the measurement principle, just one T-rich ssDNA probe (TSP) for the specific binding process was successfully employed in the competitive LFB based methods. The concept of an independent quantification system was realized using a cresol red dot as an external standard, which effectively eliminates false negative results. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection for Hg(II) was 4nM; high selectivity towards Hg(II) and extraordinary device-to-device repeatability of the LFB were achieved. Furthermore, Hg(II) from tap water samples was analyzed, and the results were confirmed by ICP-MS. The interference from other components in the real samples could be neglected during the analysis. The approach provides a simple, sensitive, and practical tool for the detection of trace Hg(II) in tap water, showing great promise for in-situ applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. PDU Run 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    PDU Run 10, a 46-day H-Coal syncrude mode operation using Wyodak coal, successfully met all targeted objectives, and was the longest PDU operation to date in this program. Targeted coal conversion of 90 W % was exceeded with a C/sub 4/-975/sup 0/F distillate yield of 43 to 48 W %. Amocat 1A catalyst was qualified for Pilot Plant operation based on improved operation and superior performance. PDU 10 achieved improved yields and lower hydrogen consumption compared to PDU 6, a similar operation. High hydroclone efficiency and high solids content in the vacuum still were maintained throughout the run. Steady operations at lower oil/solids ratios were demonstrated. Microautoclave testing was introduced as an operational aid. Four additional studies were successfully completed during PDU 10. These included a catalyst tracer study in conjunction with Sandia Laboratories; tests on letdown valve trims for Battelle; a fluid dynamics study with Amoco; and special high-pressure liquid sampling.

  13. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  14. Search for supersymmetric Higgs bosons in the D0 experiment at the Tevatron; Recherche de bosons de Higgs supersymetriques au Tevatron dans l'experience D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaut, M

    2006-09-15

    A search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model is performed in the 3 or 4 jets channels, pp-bar {yields} {phi}({yields} bb-bar)b(b-bar) with {phi} = h, H or A. For this purpose, the data collected with the D0 detector from 2002 to 2006 at the Tevatron hadronic collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV are analyzed. A complete study of the triggering is first done. The triggering conditions are optimized in order to keep the more signal fraction possible. Furthermore, a method is developed to predict the triggering efficiencies on our signal and backgrounds using only the data. Then an analysis method that allows the prediction of our background without the help of simulations is studied. No excess in events is observed in the data sample analyzed, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.9 fb{sup -1}, so limits are set in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. At 95% confidence level, the following limits are found: tan({beta}) < 46 - 121 for m{sub {phi}} equals 100 - 170 GeV. (author)

  15. Dummy run for a phase II study of stereotactic body radiotherapy of T1-T2      N0M0 medical inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djärv, Emma; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia

    2006-01-01

    In forthcoming multicentre studies on stereotactic body radiotherapy       (SBRT) compliance with volume and dose prescriptions will be mandatory to       avoid unnecessary heterogeneity bias. To evaluate compliance in a       multicentre setting we used two cases from an ongoing phase II study...

  16. Combination of measurements of the top-quark pair production cross section from the Tevatron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurisano, Adam J; Avila, Carlos A; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badaud, Frederique; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bartos, Pavol; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bauce, Matteo; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Bedeschi, Franco; Begalli, Marcia; Behari, Satyajit; Bellantoni, Leo; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brigliadori, Luca; Brock, Raymond L; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Brucken, Erik; Bu, Xue-Bing; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Buszello, Claus Peter; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Chokheli, Davit; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Clutter, Justace Randall; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corbo, Matteo; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Cordelli, Marco; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; Davies, Gavin John; de Barbaro, Pawel; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; D'Errico, Maria; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Dominguez, D. Aaron M.; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edmunds, Daniel L; Elagin, Andrey L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Fiedler, Frank; Field, Richard D; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Fuess, Stuart C; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Gershtein, Yuri S; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Ginther, George E; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Hahn, Stephen R; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Ji-Yeon; Han, Liang; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harder, Kristian; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harel, Amnon; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Christopher Paul; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinrich, Joel G; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ito, Albert S; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jones, Matthew T; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Joshi, Jyoti; Jun, Soon Yung; Jung, Andreas Werner; Junk, Thomas R; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Limosani, Antonio; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lipton, Ronald J; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansour, Jason; Marchese, Luigi; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Mesropian, Christina; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miao, Ting; Miconi, Florian; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Mondal, Naba K; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Mulhearn, Michael James; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nagy, Elemer; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Pal, Arnab; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Parker, William Chesluk; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Pondrom, Lee G; Popov, Alexey V; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Breese; Ranjan, Niharika; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Ristori, Luciano; Rizatdinova, Flera; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sajot, Gerard; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santi, Lorenzo; Santos, Angelo Souza; Sato, Koji; Savage, David G; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwarz, Thomas A; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Sekaric, Jadranka; Semenov, Alexei; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simak, Vladislav J; Simonenko, Alexander V; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Song, Hao; Sonnenschein, Lars; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Soustruznik, Karel; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stark, Jan; Stentz, Dale James; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Titov, Maxim; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vernieri, Caterina; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilanova, Didier; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wahl, Horst D; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Michael HLS; Wang, Song-Ming; Warchol, Jadwiga; Waters, David S; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wobisch, Markus; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wood, Darien Robert; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Siqi; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Yu, Jiaming; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    We combine six measurements of the inclusive top-quark pair (ttbar) production cross section (sigma_ttbar) from data collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron with proton anti-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 8.8 fb^{-1}. We obtain a value of sigma_ttbar = 7.60 \\pm 0.41 pb for a top-quark mass of m_t=172.5 GeV. The contributions to the uncertainty are 0.20 pb from statistical sources, 0.29 pb from systematic sources, and 0.21 pb from the uncertainty on the integrated luminosity. The result is in good agreement with the standard model expectation of 7.35^{+0.28}_{-0.33} pb at NNLO+NNLL in pertubative QCD.

  17. NNLO QCD predictions for fully-differential top-quark pair production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czakon, Michał; Fiedler, Paul [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie,RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Heymes, David; Mitov, Alexander [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge,Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-05

    We present a comprehensive study of differential distributions for Tevatron top-pair events at the level of stable top quarks. All calculations are performed in NNLO QCD with the help of a fully differential partonic Monte-Carlo and are exact at this order in perturbation theory. We present predictions for all kinematic distributions for which data exists. Particular attention is paid on the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry which we study in detail. We compare the NNLO results with existing approximate NNLO predictions as well as differential distributions computed with different parton distribution sets. Theory errors are significantly smaller than current experimental ones with overall agreement between theory and data.

  18. Status of the observed and predicted b anti-b production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happacher, F.; Giromini, P.; /Frascati; Ptohos, F.; /Cyprus U.

    2005-09-01

    The authors review the experimental status of the b-quark production at the Fermilab Tevatron. They compare all available measurements to perturbative QCD predictions (NLO and FONLL) and also to the parton-level cross section evaluated with parton-shower Monte Carlo generators. They examine both the single b cross section and the so called b{bar b} correlations. The review shows that the experimental situation is quite complicated because the measurements appear to be inconsistent among themselves. In this situation, there is no solid basis to either claim that perturbative QCD is challenged by these measurements or, in contrast, that long-standing discrepancies between data and theory have been resolved by incrementally improving the measurements and the theoretical prediction.

  19. Next-to-Leading Order {QCD} Predictions for $Z, \\gamma^*$ + 3-Jet Distributions at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, C.F.; Dixon, Lance J.; Febres Cordero, F.; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2010-01-01

    Using BlackHat in conjunction with SHERPA, we have computed next-to-leading order QCD predictions for a variety of distributions in Z,gamma*+1,2,3-jet production at the Tevatron, where the Z boson or off-shell photon decays into an electron-positron pair. We find good agreement between the NLO results for jet p_T distributions and measurements by CDF and D0. We also present jet-production ratios, or probabilities of finding one additional jet. As a function of vector-boson p_T, the ratios have distinctive features which we describe in terms of a simple model capturing leading logarithms and phase-space and parton-distribution-function suppression.

  20. Search for Neutral Higgs Bosons in Events with Multiple Bottom Quarks at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alverson, G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S.B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K.R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bose, T.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Bu, X.B.; Budd, H.S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B.C.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, D.K.; Cho, K.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Croc, A.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S.J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.F.; Dittmann, J.R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Enari, Y.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez, J.P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia, J.E.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J.A.; Garcia-Guerra, G.A.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C.E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P.D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Grunendahl, S.; Grunewald, M.W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Hahn, S.R.; Haley, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J.Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R.F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, M.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A.P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hewamanage, S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A.S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jeong, M.S.; Jesik, R.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K.K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S.Y.; Jung, A.W.; Junk, T.R.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kasper, P.A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.N.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J.M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Landsberg, G.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Lee, S.W.; Lee, W.M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.Z.; Lim, J.K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Lin, C.J.; Lindgren, M.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H.J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A.L.; Lysak, R.; Lys, J.; Maciel, A.K.A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martinez, M.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McFarland, K.S.; McGivern, C.L.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M.M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N.K.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.A.; Negret, J.P.; Nett, J.; Neubauer, M.S.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A.A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patrick, J.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.E.; Penning, B.; Penzo, A.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Petroff, P.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.A.; Podesta-Lerma, P.L.M.; Podstavkov, V.M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A.V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rangel, M.S.; Ranjan, K.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P.N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo, I.; Renkel, P.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Salcido, P.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Sanders, M.P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A.S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schlobohm, S.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, K.J.; Snider, F.D.; Snow, G.R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soha, A.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Squillacioti, P.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stelzer, B.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D.A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G.L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G.A.; Thomson, E.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; W.van Leeuwen, M.; Varelas, N.; Varganov, A.; Varnes, E.W.; Vasilyev, I.A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A.Y.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R.L.; Wahl, H.D.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W.C., III; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wick, F.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Williams, M.R.J.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D.R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T.R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, W.C.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y.A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S.W.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J.M.; Yu, S.S.; Yun, J.C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T.G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-01-01

    The combination of searches performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks is reported. The data, corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity at CDF and 5.2 fb-1 at D0, have been collected in final states containing three or more b jets. Upper limits are set on the cross section multiplied by the branching ratio varying between 44 pb and 0.7 pb in the Higgs boson mass range 90 to 300 GeV, assuming production of a narrow scalar boson. Significant enhancements to the production of Higgs bosons can be found in theories beyond the standard model, for example in supersymmetry. The results are interpreted as upper limits in the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model in a benchmark scenario favoring this decay mode.

  1. Search for the Higgs-Boson with the CDF experiment at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennecke, Martin [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-06-10

    A search for a low-mass SM Higgs-Boson in the channel WH → lvb$\\bar{b}$ has been performed using neural networks. The data were taken by the CDF experiment at the p-$\\bar{p}$ collider Tevatron from 2000-2003, corresponding to in integrated luminosity of Lint = 162 pb-1 at a CMS-energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. 95% confidence level upper limits are set on σ × BR, the product of the production cross section times the Branching ratio, as a function of the Higgs boson mass. Cross sections above 8 pb are excluded for six different Higgs masses between 110 GeV/c2 and 150 GeV/c2. The required integrated luminosities for a 95% C.L. exclusion, 3σ evidence and 5σ discovery are calculated.

  2. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, A.V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  3. Combined Forward-Backward Asymmetry Measurements in Top-Antitop Quark Production at the Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Borysova, M.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapelain, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Drutskoy, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Farrington, S.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gogota, O.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savitskyi, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shkola, O.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfmeister, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron have measured the asymmetry between yields of forward- and backward-produced top and antitop quarks based on their rapidity difference and the asymmetry between their decay leptons. These measurements use the full data sets collected in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV . We report the results of combinations of the inclusive asymmetries and their differential dependencies on relevant kinematic quantities. The combined inclusive asymmetry is AFBt t ¯=0.128 ±0.025 . The combined inclusive and differential asymmetries are consistent with recent standard model predictions.

  4. Combined Forward-Backward Asymmetry Measurements in Top-Antitop Quark Production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al.

    2017-09-14

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron have measured the asymmetry between yields of forward- and backward-produced top and antitop quarks based on their rapidity difference and the asymmetry between their decay leptons. These measurements use the full data sets collected in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt s =1.96$ TeV. We report the results of combinations of the inclusive asymmetries and their differential dependencies on relevant kinematic quantities. The combined inclusive asymmetry is $A_{\\mathrm{FB}}^{t\\bar{t}} = 0.128 \\pm 0.025$. The combined inclusive and differential asymmetries are consistent with recent standard model predictions.

  5. Top anti-top Asymmetries at the Tevatron and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Yvonne Reinhild [DESY

    2012-11-01

    The heaviest known elementary particle today, the top quark, has been discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab. Recently, the CDF and D0 collaborations have studied the forward-backward asymmetry in ttbar events, resulting in measured values larger than the standard model prediction. With the start of the LHC at CERN in 2010, a new top quark factory has opened and asymmetry measurements in ttbar have also been performed in a proton proton environment with higher collision energy. No deviations from the standard model have been noticed so far in the measurements of ATLAS and CMS. This article discusses recent results of asymmetry measurements in ttbar events of the ATLAS, CDF, CMS and D0 collaborations.

  6. Ambient beam motion and its excitation by ghost lines in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Transverse betatron motion of the Tevatron proton beam is measured and analyzed. It is shown that the motion is coherent and excited by external sources of unknown origins. Observations of the time-varying 'ghost lines' in the betatron spectrum are reported. The direct measurement of the rms betatron oscillations amplitude estimates it at about 110 nm at {beta}{sub y} {approx} 900 m. Correspondingly, at the amplitudes at the average beta function location with {beta}{sub y} {approx} 50 m is about 25 nm. Given that such direct measurements with clearly observable betatron peak were not repeatedly reproducible, one can conclude that well know 'ghost lines' are the reason for that - as they are come and go without any obvious regularity. Our analysis of these 'ghost lines' shows that (a) besides slow motion across frequencies, they also exhibit oscillatory movements with period varying from 15-20 min to few hours; (b) for the stores analysed, the lines add about factor of 2 to average - over colliding store duration - Schottky power in the betatron bands. The latter allows to estimate that they contribute about half to the previously determined the rms normalized emittance growth rate of some 0.06 {pi} mm mrad/hr. The Tevatron 'ghost lines' look very similar to infamous 'humps' recently observed in the LHC. Those 'humps' are unwanted oscillations seen repeatedly in the LHC beams (mostly in the vertical plane) and also believed to be caused by external excitations.

  7. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Gonzalez, B.Alvarez; /Cantabria U., Santander; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The authors present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in {bar p}p interactions, {bar p}p {yields} {bar p} + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb{sup -1} collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E{sub T}{sup jet} {ge} 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E{sub T}{sup jet}. The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb{sup -1} of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J{sub z} = 0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at {radical}s = 14 TeV are discussed.

  8. The CDF calorimeter upgrade for RunIIb

    CERN Document Server

    Huston, J; Kuhlmann, S; Lami, S; Miller, R; Paoletti, R; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F

    2004-01-01

    The physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider will continue to explore the high energy elementary particle physics until the LHC commissioning. The upgrade of the CDF calorimeter opens a new window for improving the jet energy resolution, important in finding various signals such as Higgs by correcting the energy loss in the dead material and adding information in the jet algorithms using charged particles. It plays an important role in soft electron tagging of b- jets and photon identification in SUSY. The upgrade of the CDF calorimeter includes: a) the replacement of slow gas detector on the front face of the Central Calorimeter with Preshower (CPR) based on 2cm thick scintillator tiles segmented in eta and Phi and read out by WLS fibers running into a groove on the surface of each tiles. The WLS fibers are placed to clear fibers after leaving the tiles; b) the replacement of the Central Crack Chamber (CCR) with 5mm thick scintillator tiles read with the same technique: To finalize the design parame...

  9. Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren

    2015-12-02

    Voluntary wheel running in the mouse is used to assess physical performance and endurance and to model exercise training as a way to enhance health. Wheel running is a voluntary activity in contrast to other experimental exercise models in mice, which rely on aversive stimuli to force active movement. This protocol consists of allowing mice to run freely on the open surface of a slanted, plastic saucer-shaped wheel placed inside a standard mouse cage. Rotations are electronically transmitted to a USB hub so that frequency and rate of running can be captured via a software program for data storage and analysis for variable time periods. Mice are individually housed so that accurate recordings can be made for each animal. Factors such as mouse strain, gender, age, and individual motivation, which affect running activity, must be considered in the design of experiments using voluntary wheel running. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Comparing Running Specific and Traditional Prostheses During Running: Assessing Performance and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    with unilateral transtibial amputations who are able to run. Data collection has not begun due to delays in both the HRPO approval process and the...TERMS Kinetics, biomechanics, amputation , prosthesis, transtibial 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...multiple levels. II. KEYWORDS Kinetics, biomechanics, amputation , prosthesis, transtibial III. ACCOMPLISHMENTS A. What were the major goals of the

  11. Search for Kaluza-Klein gravitons of the Randall-Sundrum model in the dimuon channel with the D0 detector at Tevatron; Etude de la production de graviton de Kaluza-Klein dans ses desintegrations en paires de muons dans le modele de Randall-Sundrum aupres de l'experience D0 au Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahrichi, N

    2004-07-01

    In this thesis we have put the first constraints on the fundamental parameters of the Randall-Sundrum model of extra dimensions, k/M{sub Pl} which is proportional to the coupling of the graviton to the standard model fields and M{sub G} which is the mass of the first excited state of the Kaluza-Klein graviton. The analysis performed on Monte Carlo sample of the signal allowed to find an error in the PYTHIA generator. The elaboration of an independent generator dedicated for this special analysis helped to find out and correct the error. The data sample used for the analysis covers the period running from november 2002 up to july 2003 taken by the D0 collaboration at Tevatron, which corresponds to an accumulated luminosity of 107,8 pb{sup -1}. The search for the graviton in the dimuon channel allowed to measure the Z production cross-section multiplied by the branching ratio in dimuons. (author)

  12. Study of the production of the Σ b with the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calancha Paredes, Constantino [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-01

    understanding of the Standard Model and its limitations. In particular, it is very important the measurement of those observables which they are not able to be calculated from theory by perturbation theory. Particle accelerators have played and play nowadays a major role for past and new physics discoverements and has been for many years the source of many precision measurements. Unprecedent discoveries have been made and are yet to come. These measurements allow to select the models that best fit the results and also they can be used as input for those models to get further predictions. Tevatron has been for many years the highest energy particle collider operational in the world. It is located in the high energy physics laboratory Fermilab in Batavia, in the State of Illinois (USA). Tevatron produce proton-antiproton collisions with an energy of 1.96 TeV at the center of the mass. This thesis is based on the data taken by the CDF II detector, one of the two multipurpose detectors located in the two interaction points at Tevatron. In this thesis a precise measurement of the mass and width of four heavy baryon states are performed. These states are described together by the symbol Σ b. They are built by two light quarks and one heavy b quark as it is shown in Fig. 1.2. Baryons containing one bottom quark and two light quarks are described by Heavy Quark Effective Theories (HQET).

  13. Toward standardization of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) measurements: II. Performance of a laboratory network running the HPLC candidate reference measurement procedure and evaluation of a candidate reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helander, Anders; Wielders, Jos P M; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Weykamp, Cas; Siebelder, Carla; Anton, Raymond F; Schellenberg, François; Whitfield, John B

    2010-11-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a descriptive term used for a temporary change in the transferrin glycosylation profile caused by alcohol, and used as a biomarker of chronic high alcohol consumption. The use of an array of methods for measurement of CDT in various absolute or relative amounts, and sometimes covering different transferrin glycoforms, has complicated the comparability of results and caused confusion among medical staff. This situation prompted initiation of an IFCC Working Group on CDT standardization. This second publication of the WG-CDT covers the establishment of a network of reference laboratories running a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) candidate reference measurement procedure, and evaluation of candidate secondary reference materials. The network laboratories demonstrated good and reproducible performance and thus can be used to assign target values for calibrators and controls. A candidate secondary reference material based on native human serum lyophilized with a cryo-/lyoprotectant to prevent protein denaturation was found to be commutable and stable during storage. A proposed strategy for calibration of different CDT methods is also presented. In an external quality assurance study involving 66 laboratories and covering the current routine CDT assays (HPLC, capillary electrophoresis and immunoassay), recalculation of observed results based on the nominal values for the candidate calibrator reduced the overall coefficient of variation from 18.9% to 5.5%. The logistics for distribution of reference materials and review of results were found to be functional, indicating that a full reference system for CDT may soon be available.

  14. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders: part II, advanced sleep phase disorder, delayed sleep phase disorder, free-running disorder, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm. An American Academy of Sleep Medicine review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Robert L; Auckley, Dennis; Auger, R Robert; Carskadon, Mary A; Wright, Kenneth P; Vitiello, Michael V; Zhdanova, Irina V

    2007-11-01

    This the second of two articles reviewing the scientific literature on the evaluation and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs), employing the methodology of evidence-based medicine. We herein report on the accumulated evidence regarding the evaluation and treatment of Advamced Sleep Phase Disorder (ASPD), Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder (DSPD), Free-Running Disorder (FRD) and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm ISWR). A set of specific questions relevant to clinical practice were formulated, a systematic literature search was performed, and relevant articles were abstracted and graded. A substantial body of literature has accumulated that provides a rational basis the evaluation and treatment of CRSDs. Physiological assessment has involved determination of circadian phase using core body temperature and the timing of melatonin secretion. Behavioral assessment has involved sleep logs, actigraphy and the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). Treatment interventions fall into three broad categories: 1) prescribed sleep scheduling, 2) circadian phase shifting ("resetting the clock"), and 3) symptomatic treatment using hypnotic and stimulant medications. Circadian rhythm science has also pointed the way to rational interventions for CRSDs and these treatments have been introduced into the practice of sleep medicine with varying degrees of success. More translational research is needed using subjects who meet current diagnostic criteria.

  15. Effects of marathon running on running economy and kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyröläinen, H; Pullinen, T; Candau, R; Avela, J; Huttunen, P; Komi, P V

    2000-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate interactions between running economy and mechanics before, during, and after an individually run marathon. Seven experienced triathletes performed a 5-min submaximal running test on a treadmill at an individual constant marathon speed. Heart rate was monitored and the expired respiratory gas was analyzed. Blood samples were drawn to analyze serum creatine kinase activity (S-CK), skeletal troponin I (sTnI), and blood lactate (B-La). A video analysis was performed (200 frames x s(-1)) to investigate running mechanics. A kinematic arm was used to determine the external work of each subject. The results of the present study demonstrate that after the marathon, a standardized 5-min submaximal running test resulted in an increase in oxygen consumption, ventilation, and heart rate (P marathon, while sTnI and S-CK values increased (P marathon, respectively. With regard to the running kinematics, a minor increase in stride frequency and a similar decrease in stride length were observed (P running economy cannot be explained by changes in running mechanics. Therefore, it is suggested that the increased physiological loading is due to several mechanisms: increased utilization of fat as an energy substrate, increased demands of body temperature regulation, and possible muscle damage.

  16. Changes in Running Mechanics During a 6-Hour Running Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanelli, Nicola; Taboga, Paolo; Lazzer, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    To investigate changes in running mechanics during a 6-h running race. Twelve ultraendurance runners (age 41.9 ± 5.8 y, body mass 68.3 ± 12.6 kg, height 1.72 ± 0.09 m) were asked to run as many 874-m flat loops as possible in 6 h. Running speed, contact time (t c ), and aerial time (t a ) were measured in the first lap and every 30 ± 2 min during the race. Peak vertical ground-reaction force (F max ), stride length (SL), vertical downward displacement of the center of mass (Δz), leg-length change (ΔL), vertical stiffness (k vert ), and leg stiffness (k leg ) were then estimated. Mean distance covered by the athletes during the race was 62.9 ± 7.9 km. Compared with the 1st lap, running speed decreased significantly from 4 h 30 min onward (mean -5.6% ± 0.3%, P running, reaching the maximum difference after 5 h 30 min (+6.1%, P = .015). Conversely, k vert decreased after 4 h, reaching the lowest value after 5 h 30 min (-6.5%, P = .008); t a and F max decreased after 4 h 30 min through to the end of the race (mean -29.2% and -5.1%, respectively, P running, suggesting a possible time threshold that could affect performance regardless of absolute running speed.

  17. A Running Start: Resource Guide for Youth Running Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Seth; Becker, Andrew; Armstrong, Tess

    2016-01-01

    The lack of physical activity is an epidemic problem among American youth today. In order to combat this, many schools are incorporating youth running programs as a part of their comprehensive school physical activity programs. These youth running programs are being implemented before or after school, at school during recess at the elementary…

  18. Measurements of beam halo diffusion and population density in the Tevatron and in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio

    Halo dynamics influences global accelerator performance: beam lifetimes, emittance growth, dynamic aperture, and collimation efficiency. Halo monitoring and control are also critical for the operation of high-power machines. For instance, in the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the energy stored in the beam tails may reach several megajoules. Fast losses can result in superconducting magnet quenches, magnet damage, or even collimator deformation. The need arises to measure the beam halo and to remove it at controllable rates. In the Tevatron and in the LHC, halo population densities and diffusivities were measured with collimator scans by observing the time evolution of losses following small inward or outward collimator steps, under different experimental conditions: with single beams and in collision, and, in the case of the Tevatron, with a hollow electron lens acting on a subset of bunches. After the LHC resumes operations, it is planned to compare measured diffusivities with the known strength of tran...

  19. Measurement of cross-section σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → Z0) x BF (Z0 → τ$\\bar{τ}$ ) at √s = 1.96-TeV using the D0 detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duensing, Silke [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2004-04-08

    In this thesis the first measurement of σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → Z0 → τ$\\bar{τ}$ with the D0 detector at the Tevatron is presented. The tau pair candidates are recorded by the D0 detector using p$\\bar{p}$ interactions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Events in which one tau decays into a muon and the other tau final state is hadronic with one charged particle are selected for this analysis. The selection criteria for the hadronic tau decay are based on the tau final state, hence for two channels of one-prong taus: single charged pion (τπ) and rho decays (τρ). The selection is based on simple cuts on a number of discriminating variables and the cut values have been optimized for the best cross section measurement. Of hadronic tau candidates that have been reconstructed as τπ candidates, 0.801 ± 0.017 ± 0.066 pass the selection cut; in the case of τρ taus, the selection efficiency is 0.676 ± 0.009 ± 0.009. Of all QCD jets that are reconstructed as hadronic tau candidates, 0.0093 ± 0.0002 pass the τπ selection cuts and 0.0122 ± 0.0002 the τρ cuts. The cross section has been measured to be 274 ± 121 ± 40 ± 27 pb in the μτπ channel and 273 ± 40$+18\\atop{-23}$ ± 27 pb in the μτρ channel, resulting in a combined measurement of σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → Z0 → τ$\\bar{τ}$) = 273 ± 38$+19\\atop{-23}$ ± 27 pb which agrees with the SM prediction within errors. The errors are dominated by the statistical error as only the first data taken with the D0 detector in Run II was used. Due to the small set of tau candidates, the calorimeter energy scale could not yet be determined using data and this uncertainty is the largest systematic effect on the measurement. Another large contribution arises from the uncertainty of 10% on the luminosity measurement. This is expected to decrease significantly in the future. It was demonstrated that the

  20. Kenyan dominance in distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Henrik B

    2003-09-01

    Critical physiological factors for performance in running are maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), fractional VO(2max) utilization and running economy. While Kenyan and Caucasian elite runners are able to reach very high, but similar maximal oxygen uptake levels, the VO(2max) of black South African elite runners seems to be slightly lower. Moreover, the studies of black and white South African runners indicate that the former are able to sustain the highest fraction of VO(2max) during long distance running. Results on adolescent Kenyan and Caucasian boys show that these boys are running at a similar percentage of VO(2max) during competition. Kenyan elite runners, however, appear to be able to run at a high % of VO(2max) which must then have been achieved by training. A lower energy cost of running has been demonstrated in Kenyan elite runners and in untrained adolescent Kenyan boys compared to their Caucasian counterparts. In agreement with this are the results from studies on black South African elite runners who have shown similar low energy costs during running as the Kenyan elite runners. The good running economy cannot be explained by differences in muscle fibre type as they are the same in Kenyan and Caucasian runners. The same is true when comparing untrained adolescent Kenyan boys with their Caucasian counterparts. A difference exists in BMI and body shape, and the Kenyans long, slender legs could be advantageous when running as the energy cost when running is a function of leg mass. Studies comparing the response to training of Kenyans and Caucasians have shown similar trainability with respect to VO(2max), running economy and oxidative enzymes. Taken all these data together it appears that running at a high fractional VO(2max) and having a good running economy may be the primary factors favouring the good performance of endurance athletes rather than them having a higher VO(2max) than other elite runners. In addition to having the proper genes to shape

  1. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker.

    CERN Document Server

    Sfyrla, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Ce travail de thèse est composé de deux parties. La première présente un travail de recherche sur la production de paires de bosons $WW$ et $WZ$ dans les états finaux de lepton, neutrino et jets, menée à l'expérience CDF II. Un réseau neuronal artificiel est utilisé pour la sélection des données, qui correspondent à une luminosité intégrée de 1.2 fb$^{-1}$. Le résultat fixe une limite supérieure à la section efficace (95% CL) de $\\sigma \\times Br(W\\rightarrow \\ell \

  2. Like-Sign Dileptons at the Fermilab Tevatron Revisited in the Light of the HERA High-$Q^2$ Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, D; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup

    1997-01-01

    We re-examine like-sign dilepton signals at the Fermilab Tevatron assuming that the excess high-$Q^2$ events recently seen at HERA are due to the production and decay of squarks of $R$-parity-violating supersymmetry. For gluinos in the mass range of 200--350 GeV, the like-sign dilepton signal can help to make the crucial distinction between the most favoured squark explanation and other proposed solutions.

  3. Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaltonen, T.; et al., [Unknown; Ancu, L.S.; de Jong, S.J.; Filthaut, F.; Galea, C.F.; Hegeman, J.G.; Houben, P.; Meijer, M.M.; Svoisky, P.; van den Berg, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W+W-. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb(-1) of p (p) over bar collisions at root s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background

  4. Coherent Production of Pions and Rho Mesons in Neutrino Charged Current Interactions on Neon Nuclei at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willocq, Stéphane [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1992-04-30

    The coherent production of single pions and $\\rho$ mesons in charged current interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon nuclei has been studied. The data were obtained using the Fermilab 15-foot Bubble Chamber, filled with a heavy Ne- $H_2$ mixture and exposed to the Quadrupole Triplet neutrino beam produced by 800 Ge V protons from the Tevatron. The average beam energy was 86 Ge V. In a sample of 330 000 frames, 1032 two-prong $\

  5. Myocardial perfusion after marathon running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Laaksonen, Marko S; Luotolahti, Matti; Laine, Hanna; Takala, Teemu O; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the effects of acute prolonged exercise (marathon running) on cardiac function and myocardial perfusion. Cardiac dimensions and function were measured in seven endurance-trained men using echocardiography before and repeatedly after marathon (42.2 km) running (at 10 min, 150 min, and 20 h). Myocardial perfusion and perfusion resistance were measured using positron emission tomography and 15O-H2O before and 85-115 min after running. Echocardiographic indices showed only mild and clinically non-significant changes in cardiac function after running. Rate-pressure-corrected basal myocardial perfusion (0.89+/-0.13 vs. 1.20+/-0.32 mL min(-1) g(-1), P=0.04) was increased after running. Also, adenosine-stimulated perfusion tended to be higher (3.67+/-0.81 vs. 4.47+/-0.52 mL min(-1) g(-1), P=0.12) and perfusion resistance during adenosine stimulation was significantly lower after running (26+/-6 vs. 18+/-3 mmHg min g mL(-1), P=0.03). Plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration was significantly increased after running. These results show that marathon running does not cause marked changes in cardiac function in healthy men. Basal perfusion was increased after exercise, probably reflecting changes in fuel preferences to increased use of FFAs. Strenuous exercise also seems to enhance coronary reactivity, which could thereby serve as a protective mechanism to vascular events after exercise.

  6. Design of ProjectRun21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Camma; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Sørensen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    the exposure to running is pre-fixed in the running schedules and thereby conditioned by design. Time-to-event models will be used for analytical purposes. DISCUSSION: ProjectRun21 will examine if particular subgroups of runners with certain running experiences and running paces seem to sustain more running...

  7. Combination of measurements of the top-quark pair production cross section from the Tevatron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Farrington, S.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We combine six measurements of the inclusive top-quark pair (tt ¯) production cross section (σtt ¯) from data collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron with proton-antiproton collisions at √s =1.96 TeV. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 8.8 fb-1. We obtain a value of σtt ¯=7.60±0.41 pb for a top-quark mass of mt=172.5 GeV. The contributions to the uncertainty are 0.20 pb from statistical sources, 0.29 pb from systematic sources, and 0.21 pb from the uncertainty on the integrated luminosity. The result is in good agreement with the standard model expectation of 7.35-0.33+0.28 pb at next-to-next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to leading logarithms in perturbative QCD.

  8. Search for super symmetry at the Tevatron using the trilepton signature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dube, Sourabh Shishir [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This dissertation describes a search for the associated production of the supersymmetric particles, the chargino and the neutralino, through their R-parity conserving decays to three leptons and missing energy. This search is carried out using the data collected at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collider at Fermilab. The results are obtained by combining five independent channels with varying signal to background ratio. Overall, a total of 6.4 ± 1.1 background events from standard model processes and 11.4 ± 1.1 signal events for a particular choice of mSUGRA model parameters are expected. The observation of 7 events in data is consistent with the standard model background expectation, and the mSUGRA model is constrained. Limits are set on the cross section of Chargino-Neutralino pair production, and a limit on the mass of the chargino is extracted. A method of obtaining model-independent results is also discussed.

  9. New results on the b^-+c meson at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, M.A.; /Pittsburgh U.

    2006-09-01

    The authors present recent results on B{sub c}{sup -} meson from the Tevatron. The B{sub c}{sup -} meson has been observed in semileptonic decays, B{sub c}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{ell}{sup -} {nu}X, both by CDF and D0 experiments at a significance larger than 5{sigma}. The D0 experiment has used the candidates in B{sub c}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{mu}{sup -} {nu}X decay to extract the mass and lifetime of B{sub c}{sup -} meson. The CDF experiment has used both electron and muon channel candidates in B{sub c}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{ell}{sup -} {nu}X decays to measure the relative production times branching ratio with respect to B{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup -} decay and also measured the lifetime of B{sub c}{sup -} meson in electron channel as {tau}(B{sub c}{sup -}) = 0.463{sub -0.055}{sup +0.073} {+-} 0.036 ps. The CDF experiment has also observed B{sub c}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup -} decay with a significance exceeding 6.5{sigma} and has measured the mass of B{sub c}{sup -} meson as M(B{sub c}{sup -}) = 6276.5 {+-} 4.0 {+-} 2.7 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Combination of the top-quark mass measurements from the Tevatron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alverson, G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S.B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K.R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bose, T.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X.B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B.C.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, D.K.; Cho, K.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Croc, A.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Dagenhart, D.; Das, A.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S.J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.F.; Dittmann, J.R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Enari, Y.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez, J.P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J.E.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J.A.; Garcia-Guerra, G.A.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C.E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P.D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Grunendahl, S.; Grunewald, M.W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Hahn, S.R.; Haley, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J.Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R.F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, M.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A.P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hewamanage, S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A.S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jeong, M.S.; Jesik, R.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K.K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S.Y.; Jung, A.W.; Junk, T.R.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kasper, P.A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.N.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J.M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Landsberg, G.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Lee, W.M.; Lee, S.W.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.Z.; Lim, J.K.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.J.; Lincoln, D.; Lindgren, M.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H.J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A.L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A.K.A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martinez, M.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McFarland, K.S.; McGivern, C.L.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M.M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N.K.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.A.; Negret, J.P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M.S.; Neustroev, P.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A.A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patrick, J.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.E.; Penning, B.; Penzo, A.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Petroff, P.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.A.; Podesta-Lerma, P.L.M.; Podstavkov, V.M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A.V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rangel, M.S.; Ranjan, K.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P.N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo, I.; Renkel, P.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Salcido, P.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Sanders, M.P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A.S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schlobohm, S.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, K.J.; Snider, F.D.; Snow, G.R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soha, A.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Squillacioti, P.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D.A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G.L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G.A.; Thomson, E.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; W.van Leeuwen, M.; Varelas, N.; Varganov, A.; Varnes, E.W.; Vasilyev, I.A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A.Y.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R.L.; Wahl, H.D.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W.C., III; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wick, F.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Williams, M.R.J.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D.R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T.R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, W.C.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y.A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G.P.; Yin, H.; Yi, K.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S.W.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J.M.; Yu, S.S.; Yun, J.C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T.G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle, with a mass about twice the mass of the $W$ and $Z$ bosons of the weak interaction, and about 40 times larger than the mass of its isospin partner, the bottom quark. It decays almost 100% of the time to a $W$ boson and a bottom quark, and the $W$ boson then decays to a lepton and a neutrino or to a quark-antiquark pair. Using top-antitop pairs at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the CDF and {\\dzero} collaborations have measured the top quark's mass in different decay channels for integrated luminosities of up to 5.8 fb$^{-1}$. This paper reports on a combination of these measurements that results in a more precise value of the mass than any individual decay channel can provide. It describes the treatment of the systematic uncertainties and their correlations. The mass value determined is $173.18 \\pm 0.56({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.75({\\rm syst})$ GeV or $173.18 \\pm 0.94$ GeV, which has a precision of $\\pm 0.54%$, making the mass of the top quark the most...

  11. Precise measurements of the $W$ mass at the Tevatron and indirect constraints on the Higgs mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes de Sa, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    I describe the latest D0 and CDF W boson mass measurements. The D0 measurement is performed with 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in the electron decay channel with a data set of 1.68 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by D0 is M{sub W} = 80.375 {+-} 0.023 GeV when combined with the previously analyzed 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The CDF measurement uses 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in both electron and muon decay channels with a total of 1.1 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by CDF is M{sub W} = 80.387 {+-} 0.019 GeV. I report the combination of these two measurements with previous Tevatron measurements and with the LEP measurements of the W boson mass. The new world average is M{sub W} = 80.385 {+-} 0.015GeV. I discuss the implications of the new measurement to the indirect measurement of the Standard Model Higgs boson mass.

  12. A search for z boson pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Chad Ryan [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation describes a search for Z/γ* boson pair production decaying into μμμμ, μμee, and eeee final states with approximately 1 fb-1 of data at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The small cross section times branching ratio for each channel mandated a thorough study of the acceptance and efficiencies. After optimization, 1.7 ± 0.1 events are expected for Standard Model production with a background of 0.13 ± 0.03 events. One event was found in the μμee channel. A cross section limit of 4.4 pb is determined at a 95% confidence level for Standard Model production. Additionally, one parameter and two parameter 95% C.L. limits are found for the anomalous neutral trilinear gauge couplings ZZZ* and ZZγ*. The one parameter 95% C.L. coupling limits with a form factor scale of 1.2 TeV are: -0.28 < f$Z\\atop{40}$ < 0.28, -0.31 < f$Z\\atop{50}$ < 0.29, -0.26 < f$γ\\atop{40}$ < 0.26, and -0.30 < f$γ\\atop{50}$ < 0.28.

  13. Impact of the A48 collimator on the Tevatron B0 dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolas, L Y

    2003-01-01

    To protect the CDF detector components in an event of an abort kicker prefire (AKP) in the Tevatron, a new collimator is to be installed at the A48 location during the summer 2003 shutdown. Detailed calculations have shown that this 0.5-m long ''single L-shape'' steel collimator will intercept a bunch of protons when such an incident occurs, providing reliable protection of the CDF main detector at an AKP. It will also mitigate the backgrounds induced by elastic beam-gas interactions upstream of B0. Although the Roman Pot detectors downstream of the A48 collimator will see an increased background, the amount of radiation they will receive either resulting from beam halo interactions in the collimator or during an AKP will not damage their sensitive parts. Secondaries resulting from beam halo interactions with the A48 collimator do not noticeably affect the downstream dipoles. The case of an AKP is quite different. As opposed to halo hits in the ''single-L shape'' unit (around 10 sup 5 p/s), a bunch lost on A4...

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in associated production with w boson at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Xu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-11-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron is presented in this dissertation. The process of interest is the associated production of W boson and Higgs boson, with the W boson decaying leptonically and the Higgs boson decaying into a pair of bottom quarks. The dataset in the analysis is accumulated by the D0 detector from April 2002 to April 2008 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1. The events are reconstructed and selected following the criteria of an isolated lepton, missing transverse energy and two jets. The D0 Neural Network b-jet identification algorithm is further used to discriminate b jets from light jets. A multivariate analysis combining Matrix Element and Neural Network methods is explored to improve the Higgs boson signal significance. No evidence of the Higgs boson is observed in this analysis. In consequence, an observed (expected) limit on the ratio of σ (p$\\bar{p}$ → WH) x Br (H → b$\\bar{b}$) to the Standard Model prediction is set to be 6.7 (6.4) at 95% C.L. for the Higgs boson with a mass of 115 GeV.

  15. Wheel running in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Johanna H; Robbers, Yuri

    2014-07-07

    The importance of exercise for health and neurogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Wheel running is often used in the laboratory for triggering enhanced activity levels, despite the common objection that this behaviour is an artefact of captivity and merely signifies neurosis or stereotypy. If wheel running is indeed caused by captive housing, wild mice are not expected to use a running wheel in nature. This however, to our knowledge, has never been tested. Here, we show that when running wheels are placed in nature, they are frequently used by wild mice, also when no extrinsic reward is provided. Bout lengths of running wheel behaviour in the wild match those for captive mice. This finding falsifies one criterion for stereotypic behaviour, and suggests that running wheel activity is an elective behaviour. In a time when lifestyle in general and lack of exercise in particular are a major cause of disease in the modern world, research into physical activity is of utmost importance. Our findings may help alleviate the main concern regarding the use of running wheels in research on exercise.

  16. Phthalate SHEDS-HT runs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Inputs and outputs for SHEDS-HT runs of DiNP, DEHP, DBP. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Moreau, M., J. Leonard, K. Phillips, J. Campbell,...

  17. Turkey Run Landfill Emissions Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — landfill emissions measurements for the Turkey run landfill in Georgia. This dataset is associated with the following publication: De la Cruz, F., R. Green, G....

  18. How to run 100 meters?

    CERN Document Server

    Aftalion, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to bring a mathematical justification to the optimal way of organizing one's effort when running. It is well known from physiologists that all running exercises of duration less than 3mn are run with a strong initial acceleration and a decelerating end; on the contrary, long races are run with a final sprint. This can be explained using a mathematical model describing the evolution of the velocity, the anaerobic energy, and the propulsive force: a system of ordinary differential equations, based on Newton's second law and energy conservation, is coupled to the condition of optimizing the time to run a fixed distance. We show that the monotony of the velocity curve vs time is the opposite of that of the oxygen uptake (V O2) vs time. Since the oxygen uptake is monotone increasing for a short run, we prove that the velocity is exponentially increasing to its maximum and then decreasing. For longer races, the oxygen uptake has an increasing start and a decreasing end and this accounts for...

  19. Effect Of Running Shoes on Foot Impact During Running

    CERN Document Server

    Nassif, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Running is part of almost every sport, and requires a great amount of stamina, endurance, mental toughness and overall strength. At every step, the foot experiences ground reaction forces necessary to support the motion of the body. With the advancements in shoe technology, running shoes have grown in popularity among runners, as well as non-runners, because they reduce the risk of injuries from the impact felt by the foot. The purpose of this report is to analyze the effect of running shoes on impact forces on the foot. This is achieved through the use of three force pads fixed at different locations on the foot The force measured by each sensor is then used to estimate the vertical ground reaction force, using the sensors' calibrations equations . Based on the ground reaction force, the effective mass corresponding to the momentum change occurring during the transient phase of the impact is estimated. The results show that running at 9 miles per hour without running shoes generates an effective mass of (14....

  20. HiggsSignals. Confronting arbitrary Higgs sectors with measurements at the Tevatron and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtle, Philip [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Heinemeyer, Sven [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Staal, Oscar [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). The Oskar Klein Centre; Stefaniak, Tim [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics; Weiglein, Georg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    HiggsSignals is a Fortran90 computer code that allows to test the compatibility of Higgs sector predictions against Higgs rates and masses measured at the LHC or the Tevatron. Arbitrary models with any number of Higgs bosons can be investigated using a model-independent input scheme based on HiggsBounds. The test is based on the calculation of a {chi}{sup 2} measure from the predictions and the measured Higgs rates and masses, with the ability of fully taking into account systematics and correlations for the signal rate predictions, luminosity and Higgs mass predictions. It features two complementary methods for the test. First, the peak-centered method, in which each observable is defined by a Higgs signal rate measured at a specific hypothetical Higgs mass, corresponding to a tentative Higgs signal. Second, the mass-centered method, where the test is evaluated by comparing the signal rate measurement to the theory prediction at the Higgs mass predicted by the model. The program allows for the simultaneous use of both methods, which is useful in testing models with multiple Higgs bosons. The code automatically combines the signal rates of multiple Higgs bosons if their signals cannot be resolved by the experimental analysis. We compare results obtained with HiggsSignals to official ATLAS and CMS results for various examples of Higgs property determinations and find very good agreement. A few examples of HiggsSignals applications are provided, going beyond the scenarios investigated by the LHC collaborations. For models with more than one Higgs boson we recommend to use HiggsSignals and HiggsBounds in parallel to exploit the full constraining power of Higgs search exclusion limits and the measurements of the signal seen at m{sub H} {approx} 125.5 GeV.